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Sample records for all-atom md simulation

  1. From Aβ Filament to Fibril: Molecular Mechanism of Surface-Activated Secondary Nucleation from All-Atom MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, Nadine; Frost, Christina V; Geissler, Phillip L; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-02-02

    Secondary nucleation pathways in which existing amyloid fibrils catalyze the formation of new aggregates and neurotoxic oligomers are of immediate importance for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we apply extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water to study surface-activated secondary nucleation pathways at the extended lateral β-sheet surface of a preformed Aβ9-40 filament. Calculation of free-energy profiles allows us to determine binding free energies and conformational intermediates for nucleation complexes consisting of 1-4 Aβ peptides. In addition, we combine the free-energy profiles with position-dependent diffusion profiles to extract complementary kinetic information and macroscopic growth rates. Single monomers bind to the β-sheet surface in a disordered, hydrophobically collapsed conformation, whereas dimers and larger oligomers can retain a cross-β conformation resembling a more ordered fibril structure. The association processes during secondary nucleation follow a dock/lock mechanism consisting of a fast initial encounter phase (docking) and a slow structural rearrangement phase (locking). The major driving forces for surface-activated secondary nucleation are the release of a large number of hydration water molecules and the formation of hydrophobic interface contacts, the latter being in contrast to the elongation process at filament tips, which is dominated by the formation of stable and highly specific interface hydrogen bonds. The calculated binding free energies and the association rates for the attachment of Aβ monomers and oligomers to the extended lateral β-sheet surface of the filament seed are higher compared to those for elongation at the filament tips, indicating that secondary nucleation pathways can become important once a critical concentration of filaments has formed.

  2. Refinement of protein structure homology models via long, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Raval, Alpan; Piana, Stefano; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2012-08-01

    Accurate computational prediction of protein structure represents a longstanding challenge in molecular biology and structure-based drug design. Although homology modeling techniques are widely used to produce low-resolution models, refining these models to high resolution has proven difficult. With long enough simulations and sufficiently accurate force fields, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations should in principle allow such refinement, but efforts to refine homology models using MD have for the most part yielded disappointing results. It has thus far been unclear whether MD-based refinement is limited primarily by accessible simulation timescales, force field accuracy, or both. Here, we examine MD as a technique for homology model refinement using all-atom simulations, each at least 100 μs long-more than 100 times longer than previous refinement simulations-and a physics-based force field that was recently shown to successfully fold a structurally diverse set of fast-folding proteins. In MD simulations of 24 proteins chosen from the refinement category of recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiments, we find that in most cases, simulations initiated from homology models drift away from the native structure. Comparison with simulations initiated from the native structure suggests that force field accuracy is the primary factor limiting MD-based refinement. This problem can be mitigated to some extent by restricting sampling to the neighborhood of the initial model, leading to structural improvement that, while limited, is roughly comparable to the leading alternative methods.

  3. Benchmarking all-atom simulations using hydrogen exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, John J.; Yu, Wookyung; Gichana, Elizabeth K.; Baxa, Michael C.; Hinshaw, James R.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-10-27

    We are now able to fold small proteins reversibly to their native structures [Lindorff-Larsen K, Piana S, Dror RO, Shaw DE (2011) Science 334(6055):517–520] using long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that modern force fields can reproduce the energy surface near the native structure. In this paper, to test how well the force fields recapitulate the other regions of the energy surface, MD trajectories for a variant of protein G are compared with data from site-resolved hydrogen exchange (HX) and other biophysical measurements. Because HX monitors the breaking of individual H-bonds, this experimental technique identifies the stability and H-bond content of excited states, thus enabling quantitative comparison with the simulations. Contrary to experimental findings of a cooperative, all-or-none unfolding process, the simulated denatured state ensemble, on average, is highly collapsed with some transient or persistent native 2° structure. The MD trajectories of this protein G variant and other small proteins exhibit excessive intramolecular H-bonding even for the most expanded conformations, suggesting that the force fields require improvements in describing H-bonding and backbone hydration. Finally and moreover, these comparisons provide a general protocol for validating the ability of simulations to accurately capture rare structural fluctuations.

  4. Benchmarking all-atom simulations using hydrogen exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, John J.; Yu, Wookyung; Gichana, Elizabeth K.; ...

    2014-10-27

    We are now able to fold small proteins reversibly to their native structures [Lindorff-Larsen K, Piana S, Dror RO, Shaw DE (2011) Science 334(6055):517–520] using long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that modern force fields can reproduce the energy surface near the native structure. In this paper, to test how well the force fields recapitulate the other regions of the energy surface, MD trajectories for a variant of protein G are compared with data from site-resolved hydrogen exchange (HX) and other biophysical measurements. Because HX monitors the breaking of individual H-bonds, this experimental technique identifies the stability andmore » H-bond content of excited states, thus enabling quantitative comparison with the simulations. Contrary to experimental findings of a cooperative, all-or-none unfolding process, the simulated denatured state ensemble, on average, is highly collapsed with some transient or persistent native 2° structure. The MD trajectories of this protein G variant and other small proteins exhibit excessive intramolecular H-bonding even for the most expanded conformations, suggesting that the force fields require improvements in describing H-bonding and backbone hydration. Finally and moreover, these comparisons provide a general protocol for validating the ability of simulations to accurately capture rare structural fluctuations.« less

  5. Benchmarking all-atom simulations using hydrogen exchange

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J.; Yu, Wookyung; Gichana, Elizabeth K.; Baxa, Michael C.; Hinshaw, James R.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are now able to fold small proteins reversibly to their native structures [Lindorff-Larsen K, Piana S, Dror RO, Shaw DE (2011) Science 334(6055):517–520]. These results indicate that modern force fields can reproduce the energy surface near the native structure. To test how well the force fields recapitulate the other regions of the energy surface, MD trajectories for a variant of protein G are compared with data from site-resolved hydrogen exchange (HX) and other biophysical measurements. Because HX monitors the breaking of individual H-bonds, this experimental technique identifies the stability and H-bond content of excited states, thus enabling quantitative comparison with the simulations. Contrary to experimental findings of a cooperative, all-or-none unfolding process, the simulated denatured state ensemble, on average, is highly collapsed with some transient or persistent native 2° structure. The MD trajectories of this protein G variant and other small proteins exhibit excessive intramolecular H-bonding even for the most expanded conformations, suggesting that the force fields require improvements in describing H-bonding and backbone hydration. Moreover, these comparisons provide a general protocol for validating the ability of simulations to accurately capture rare structural fluctuations. PMID:25349413

  6. All-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of a membrane protein stabilizing polymer.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Drasler, William J; Xie, Wangshen; Gao, Jiali; Popot, Jean-Luc; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2011-09-06

    Amphipathic polymers called amphipols (APols) have been developed as an alternative to detergents for stabilizing membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions. APols provide MPs with a particularly mild environment and, as a rule, keep them in a native functional state for longer periods than do detergents. Amphipol A8-35, a derivative of polyacrylate, is widely used and has been particularly well studied experimentally. In aqueous solutions, A8-35 molecules self-assemble into well-defined globular particles with a mass of ∼40 kDa and a R(g) of ∼2.4 nm. As a first step towards describing MP/A8-35 complexes by molecular dynamics (MD), we present three sets of simulations of the pure APol particle. First, we performed a series of all-atom MD (AAMD) simulations of the particle in solution, starting from an arbitrary initial configuration. Although AAMD simulations result in stable cohesive particles over a 45 ns simulation, the equilibration of the particle organization is limited. This motivated the use of coarse-grained MD (CGMD), allowing us to investigate processes on the microsecond time scale, including de novo particle assembly. We present a detailed description of the parametrization of the CGMD model from the AAMD simulations and a characterization of the resulting CGMD particles. Our third set of simulations utilizes reverse coarse-graining (rCG), through which we obtain all-atom coordinates from a CGMD simulation. This allows a higher-resolution characterization of a configuration determined by a long-timescale simulation. Excellent agreement is observed between MD models and experimental, small-angle neutron scattering data. The MD data provides new insight into the structure and dynamics of A8-35 particles, which is possibly relevant to the stabilizing effects of APols on MPs, as well as a starting point for modeling MP/A8-35 complexes.

  7. All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Membrane Protein Stabilizing Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Drasler, William J.; Xie, Wangshen; Gao, Jiali; Popot, Jean-Luc; Sachs, Jonathan N.

    2011-01-01

    Amphipathic polymers called amphipols (APols) have been developed as an alternative to detergents for stabilizing membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions. APols provide MPs with a particularly mild environment and, as a rule, keep them in a native and functional state for longer periods than detergents do. Amphipol A8-35, a derivative of polyacrylate, is widely used and has been particularly well studied experimentally. In aqueous solutions, A8-35 molecules self-assemble into well-defined globular particles, with a mass of ~40 kDa and a Rg of ~2.4 nm. As a first step towards describing MP/A8-35 complexes by molecular dynamics (MD), we present three sets of simulations of the pure APol particle. First, we performed a series of all-atom MD (AAMD) simulations of the particle in solution, starting from an arbitrary initial configuration. While AAMD simulations result in cohesive and stable particles over a 45-ns simulation, the equilibration of the particle organization is limited. This motivated the use of coarse-grained MD (CGMD), allowing us to investigate processes on the microsecond timescale, including de novo particle assembly. We present a detailed description of the parametrization of the CGMD model from the AAMD simulations, and a characterization of the resulting CGMD particles. Our third set of simulations utilizes reverse coarse-graining (rCG), through which we obtain all-atom coordinates from a CGMD simulation. This allows higher-resolution characterization of a configuration determined by a long-timescale simulation. An excellent agreement is observed between MD models and experimental, small angle neutron scattering data. The MD data provides new insights into the structure and dynamics of A8-35 particles, possibly relevant to the stabilizing effects of APols on MPs, as well as a starting point for modeling MP/A8-35 complexes. PMID:21806035

  8. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  9. Beyond modeling: all-atom olfactory receptor model simulations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peter C; Crasto, Chiquito J

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are a type of GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). These receptors are responsible for mediating the sense of smell through their interaction with odor ligands. OR-odorant interactions marks the first step in the process that leads to olfaction. Computational studies on model OR structures can generate focused and novel hypotheses for further bench investigation by providing a view of these interactions at the molecular level beyond inferences that are drawn merely from static docking. Here we have shown the specific advantages of simulating the dynamic environment associated with OR-odorant interactions. We present a rigorous protocol which ranges from the creation of a computationally derived model of an olfactory receptor to simulating the interactions between an OR and an odorant molecule. Given the ubiquitous occurrence of GPCRs in the membranes of cells, we anticipate that our OR-developed methodology will serve as a model for the computational structural biology of all GPCRs.

  10. Beyond Modeling: All-Atom Olfactory Receptor Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peter C.; Crasto, Chiquito J.

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are a type of GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). These receptors are responsible for mediating the sense of smell through their interaction with odor ligands. OR-odorant interactions marks the first step in the process that leads to olfaction. Computational studies on model OR structures can generate focused and novel hypotheses for further bench investigation by providing a view of these interactions at the molecular level beyond inferences that are drawn merely from static docking. Here we have shown the specific advantages of simulating the dynamic environment associated with OR-odorant interactions. We present a rigorous protocol which ranges from the creation of a computationally derived model of an olfactory receptor to simulating the interactions between an OR and an odorant molecule. Given the ubiquitous occurrence of GPCRs in the membranes of cells, we anticipate that our OR-developed methodology will serve as a model for the computational structural biology of all GPCRs. PMID:22563330

  11. All-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of the SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-07-01

    The SNARE complex, consisting of three proteins (VAMP2, syntaxin, and SNAP-25), is thought to drive membrane fusion by assembling into a four-helix bundle through a zippering process. In support of the above zippering model, a recent single-molecule optical tweezers experiment by Gao et al. revealed a sequential unzipping of SNARE along VAMP2 in the order of the linker domain → the C-terminal domain → the N-terminal domain. To offer detailed structural insights to this unzipping process, we have performed all-atom and coarse-grained steered molecular dynamics (sMD) simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of SNARE using different models and force fields. Our findings are summarized as follows: First, the sMD simulations based on either an all-atom force field (with an implicit solvent model) or a coarse-grained Go model were unable to capture the forced unfolding pathway of SNARE as observed by Gao et al., which may be attributed to insufficient simulation time and inaccurate force fields. Second, the sMD simulations based on a reparameterized coarse-grained model (i.e., modified elastic network model) were able to predict a sequential unzipping of SNARE in good agreement with the findings by Gao et al. The key to this success is to reparameterize the intrahelix and interhelix nonbonded force constants against the pair-wise residue-residue distance fluctuations collected from all-atom MD simulations of SNARE. Therefore, our finding supports the importance of accurately describing the inherent dynamics/flexibility of SNARE (in the absence of force), in order to correctly simulate its unfolding behaviors under force. This study has established a useful computational framework for future studies of the zippering function of SNARE and its perturbations by point mutations with amino-acid level of details, and more generally the forced unfolding pathways of other helix bundle proteins.

  12. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a photosystem i/detergent complex.

    PubMed

    Harris, Bradley J; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2014-10-09

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to investigate the solution structure and dynamics of the photosynthetic pigment-protein complex photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus embedded in a toroidal belt of n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) detergent. Evaluation of root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) relative to the known crystal structure show that the protein complex surrounded by DDM molecules is stable during the 200 ns simulation time, and root-mean-square fluctuation (RMSF) analysis indicates that regions of high local mobility correspond to solvent-exposed regions such as turns in the transmembrane α-helices and flexible loops on the stromal and lumenal faces. Comparing the protein-detergent complex to a pure detergent micelle, the detergent surrounding the PSI trimer is found to be less densely packed but with more ordered detergent tails, contrary to what is seen in most lipid bilayer models. We also investigated any functional implications for the observed conformational dynamics and protein-detergent interactions, discovering interesting structural changes in the psaL subunits associated with maintaining the trimeric structure of the protein. Importantly, we find that the docking of soluble electron mediators such as cytochrome c6 and ferredoxin to PSI is not significantly impacted by the solubilization of PSI in detergent.

  13. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  14. Resolution-Adapted All-Atomic and Coarse-Grained Model for Biomolecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Hu, Hao

    2014-06-10

    We develop here an adaptive multiresolution method for the simulation of complex heterogeneous systems such as the protein molecules. The target molecular system is described with the atomistic structure while maintaining concurrently a mapping to the coarse-grained models. The theoretical model, or force field, used to describe the interactions between two sites is automatically adjusted in the simulation processes according to the interaction distance/strength. Therefore, all-atomic, coarse-grained, or mixed all-atomic and coarse-grained models would be used together to describe the interactions between a group of atoms and its surroundings. Because the choice of theory is made on the force field level while the sampling is always carried out in the atomic space, the new adaptive method preserves naturally the atomic structure and thermodynamic properties of the entire system throughout the simulation processes. The new method will be very useful in many biomolecular simulations where atomistic details are critically needed.

  15. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles: from coarse-grained to all-atom resolution.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Guillaume; Michaux, Catherine; Perpète, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is a well-known anionic detergent widely used in both experimental and theoretical investigations. Many molecular dynamics (MD) simulation have been performed on the SDS molecule at coarse-grained (CG), united-atom (UA), and all-atom (AA) resolutions. However, these simulations are usually based on general parameters determined from large sets of molecules, and as a result, peculiar molecular specificities are often poorly represented. In addition, the parameters (ideal bond lengths, angles, dihedrals and charge distribution) differ according to the resolution, highlighting a lack of coherence. We therefore propose a new set of parameters for CG, UA, and AA resolutions based on a high quantum mechanics (QM) level optimization of the detergent structure and the charge distribution. For the first time, QM-optimized parameters were directly applied to build the AA, UA, and CG model of the SDS molecule, leading to a more coherent description. As a test case, MD simulations were then performed on SDS preformed micelles as previous experimental and theoretical investigations allow direct comparison with our new sets of parameters. While all three models yield similar macromolecular properties (size, shape, and accessible surface) perfectly matching previous results, the attribution of more coherent parameters to SDS enables the description of the specific interactions inside and outside the micelle. These more consistent parameters can now be used to accurately describe new multi-scale systems involving the SDS molecule.

  16. An all-atom simulation study of the ordering of liquid squalane near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Mesfin; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2008-05-01

    An all-atom molecular dynamics study using the OPLS force field has been carried out to obtain new insights in to the orientation and ordering of liquid squalane near a solid surface. As observed in previous experiments, the squalane molecules closest to a SiO 2 substrate are found to be tightly bound with their molecular axis preferentially parallel to the interface. Unlike linear alkanes, the squalane molecules are also found to lie preferentially parallel to the liquid/vapor interface. The simulation results predict that the molecular plane orientation of the squalane molecules changes from mainly parallel to perpendicular to the substrate in going further away from the substrate.

  17. All-atomic simulations on human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA binding with thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Luo, Di; Mu, Yuguang

    2015-04-16

    Ligand-stabilized human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA is believed to be an anticancer agent, as it can impede the continuous elongation of telomeres by telomerase in cancer cells. In this study, five well-established human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA models were probed on their binding behaviors with thioflavin T (ThT) via both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and well-tempered metadynamics (WT-MetaD) simulations. Novel dynamics and characteristic binding patterns were disclosed by the MD simulations. It was observed that the K(+) promoted parallel and hybridized human telomeric G-quadruplex conformations pose higher binding affinities to ThT than the Na(+) and K(+) promoted basket conformations. It is the end, sandwich, and base stacking driven by π-π interactions that are identified as the major binding mechanisms. As the most energy favorable binding mode, the sandwich stacking observed in (3 + 1) hybridized form 1 G-quadruplex conformation is triggered by reversible conformational change of the G-quadruplex. To further examine the free energy landscapes, WT-MetaD simulations were utilized on G-quadruplex-ThT systems. It is found that all of the major binding modes predicted by the MD simulations are confirmed by the WT-MetaD simulations. The results in this work not only accord with existing experimental findings, but also reinforce our understanding on the dynamics of G-quadruplexes and aid future drug developments for G-quadruplex stabilization ligands.

  18. Application of principal component analysis in protein unfolding: an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Das, Atanu; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2007-10-28

    We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the thermal denaturation of one protein and one peptide-ubiquitin and melittin. To identify the correlation in dynamics among various secondary structural fragments and also the individual contribution of different residues towards thermal unfolding, principal component analysis method was applied in order to give a new insight to protein dynamics by analyzing the contribution of coefficients of principal components. The cross-correlation matrix obtained from MD simulation trajectory provided important information regarding the anisotropy of backbone dynamics that leads to unfolding. Unfolding of ubiquitin was found to be a three-state process, while that of melittin, though smaller and mostly helical, is more complicated.

  19. Comparing a simple theoretical model for protein folding with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Henry, Eric R; Best, Robert B; Eaton, William A

    2013-10-29

    Advances in computing have enabled microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories of protein folding that can be used to compare with and test critical assumptions of theoretical models. We show that recent simulations by the Shaw group (10, 11, 14, 15) are consistent with a key assumption of an Ising-like theoretical model that native structure grows in only a few regions of the amino acid sequence as folding progresses. The distribution of mechanisms predicted by simulating the master equation of this native-centric model for the benchmark villin subdomain, with only two adjustable thermodynamic parameters and one temperature-dependent kinetic parameter, is remarkably similar to the distribution in the molecular dynamics trajectories.

  20. Reparameterization of all-atom dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lipid parameters enables simulation of fluid bilayers at zero tension.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jacob; Jensen, Morten Ø; Hansen, Flemming Y; Hemmingsen, Lars; Peters, Günther H

    2007-06-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers using the CHARMM27 force field in the tensionless isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble give highly ordered, gel-like bilayers with an area per lipid of approximately 48 A(2). To obtain fluid (L(alpha)) phase properties of DPPC bilayers represented by the CHARMM energy function in this ensemble, we reparameterized the atomic partial charges in the lipid headgroup and upper parts of the acyl chains. The new charges were determined from the electron structure using both the Mulliken method and the restricted electrostatic potential fitting method. We tested the derived charges in molecular dynamics simulations of a fully hydrated DPPC bilayer. Only the simulation with the new restricted electrostatic potential charges shows significant improvements compared with simulations using the original CHARMM27 force field resulting in an area per lipid of 60.4 +/- 0.1 A(2). Compared to the 48 A(2), the new value of 60.4 A(2) is in fair agreement with the experimental value of 64 A(2). In addition, the simulated order parameter profile and electron density profile are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Thus, the biologically more interesting fluid phase of DPPC bilayers can now be simulated in all-atom simulations in the NPT ensemble by employing our modified CHARMM27 force field.

  1. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases.

  2. Membrane binding and insertion of a pHLIP peptide studied by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yonghua; Qian, Zhenyu; Luo, Yin; Zhang, Yun; Mu, Yuguang; Wei, Guanghong

    2013-07-12

    Recent experiments in function mechanism study reported that a pH low-insertion peptide (pHLIP) can insert into a zwitterionic palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid bilayer at acidic pH while binding to the bilayer surface at basic pH. However, the atomic details of the pH-dependent interaction of pHLIP with a POPC bilayer are not well understood. In this study, we investigate the detailed interactions of pHLIP with a POPC bilayer at acidic and basic pH conditions as those used in function mechanism study, using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations have been performed by employing the initial configurations, where pHLIP is placed in aqueous solution, parallel to bilayer surface (system S), partially-inserted (system P), or fully-inserted (system F) in POPC bilayers. On the basis of multiple 200-ns MD simulations, we found (1) pHLIP in system S can spontaneously insert into a POPC bilayer at acidic pH, while binding to the membrane surface at basic pH; (2) pHLIP in system P can insert deep into a POPC bilayer at acidic pH, while it has a tendency to exit, and stays at bilayer surface at basic pH; (3) pHLIP in system F keeps in an α-helical structure at acidic pH while partially unfolding at basic pH. This study provides at atomic-level the pH-induced insertion of pHLIP into POPC bilayer.

  3. A hybrid all-atom/coarse grain model for multiscale simulations of DNA.

    PubMed

    Machado, Matías Rodrigo; Dans, Pablo Daniel; Pantano, Sergio

    2011-10-28

    Hybrid simulations of molecular systems, which combine all-atom (AA) with simplified (or coarse grain, CG) representations, propose an advantageous alternative to gain atomistic details on relevant regions while getting profit from the speedup of treating a bigger part of the system at the CG level. Here we present a reduced set of parameters derived to treat a hybrid interface in DNA simulations. Our method allows us to forthrightly link a state-of-the-art force field for AA simulations of DNA with a CG representation developed by our group. We show that no modification is needed for any of the existing residues (neither AA nor CG). Only the bonding parameters at the hybrid interface are enough to produce a smooth transition of electrostatic, mechanic and dynamic features in different AA/CG systems, which are studied by molecular dynamics simulations using an implicit solvent. The simplicity of the approach potentially permits us to study the effect of mutations/modifications as well as DNA binding molecules at the atomistic level within a significantly larger DNA scaffold considered at the CG level. Since all the interactions are computed within the same classical Hamiltonian, the extension to a quantum/classical/coarse-grain multilayer approach using QM/MM modules implemented in widely used simulation packages is straightforward.

  4. The folding thermodynamics and kinetics of crambin using an all-atom Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Shimada, J; Kussell, E L; Shakhnovich, E I

    2001-04-20

    We present a novel Monte Carlo simulation of protein folding, in which all heavy atoms are represented as interacting hard spheres. This model includes all degrees of freedom relevant to folding, all side-chain and backbone torsions, and uses a Go potential. In this study, we focus on the 46 residue alpha/beta protein crambin and two of its structural components, the helix and helix hairpin. For a wide range of temperatures, we recorded multiple folding events of these three structures from random coils to native conformations that differ by less than 1 A C(alpha) dRMS from their crystal structure coordinates. The thermodynamics and kinetic mechanism of the helix-coil transition obtained from our simulation shows excellent agreement with currently available experimental and molecular dynamics data. Based on insights obtained from folding its smaller structural components, a possible folding mechanism for crambin is proposed. We observed that the folding occurs via a cooperative, first order-like process, and that many folding pathways to the native state exist. One particular sequence of events constitutes a "fast-folding" pathway where kinetic traps are avoided. At very low temperatures, a kinetic trap arising from the incorrect packing of side-chains was observed. These results demonstrate that folding to the native state can be observed in a reasonable amount of time on desktop computers even when an all-atom representation is used, provided the energetics sufficiently stabilize the native state.

  5. High-throughput all-atom molecular dynamics simulations using distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Buch, I; Harvey, M J; Giorgino, T; Anderson, D P; De Fabritiis, G

    2010-03-22

    Although molecular dynamics simulation methods are useful in the modeling of macromolecular systems, they remain computationally expensive, with production work requiring costly high-performance computing (HPC) resources. We review recent innovations in accelerating molecular dynamics on graphics processing units (GPUs), and we describe GPUGRID, a volunteer computing project that uses the GPU resources of nondedicated desktop and workstation computers. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of simulating thousands of all-atom molecular trajectories generated at an average of 20 ns/day each (for systems of approximately 30 000-80 000 atoms). In conjunction with a potential of mean force (PMF) protocol for computing binding free energies, we demonstrate the use of GPUGRID in the computation of accurate binding affinities of the Src SH2 domain/pYEEI ligand complex by reconstructing the PMF over 373 umbrella sampling windows of 55 ns each (20.5 mus of total data). We obtain a standard free energy of binding of -8.7 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol within 0.7 kcal/mol from experimental results. This infrastructure will provide the basis for a robust system for high-throughput accurate binding affinity prediction.

  6. Molecular jamming--the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp in all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Pepłowski, Lukasz; Sikora, Mateusz; Nowak, Wiesław; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-02-28

    A recent survey of 17 134 proteins has identified a new class of proteins which are expected to yield stretching induced force peaks in the range of 1 nN. Such high force peaks should be due to forcing of a slip-loop through a cystine ring, i.e., by generating a cystine slipknot. The survey has been performed in a simple coarse grained model. Here, we perform all-atom steered molecular dynamics simulations on 15 cystine knot proteins and determine their resistance to stretching. In agreement with previous studies within a coarse grained structure based model, the level of resistance is found to be substantially higher than in proteins in which the mechanical clamp operates through shear. The large stretching forces arise through formation of the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp and the resulting steric jamming. We elucidate the workings of such a clamp in an atomic detail. We also study the behavior of five top strength proteins with the shear-based mechanostability in which no jamming is involved. We show that in the atomic model, the jamming state is relieved by moving one amino acid at a time and there is a choice in the selection of the amino acid that advances the first. In contrast, the coarse grained model also allows for a simultaneous passage of two amino acids.

  7. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost.

  8. Effect of Calcium and Magnesium on Phosphatidylserine Membranes: Experiments and All-Atomic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS−) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ induces very different aggregation behavior for PS− liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS− lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS− membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca2+ cations present a peak at a distance ∼2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg2+ cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca2+ peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. PMID:22824273

  9. Effect of calcium and magnesium on phosphatidylserine membranes: experiments and all-atomic simulations.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-05-02

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS(-)) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) induces very different aggregation behavior for PS(-) liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS(-) lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS(-) membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca(2+) cations present a peak at a distance ~2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg(2+) cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca(2+) peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca(2+) and Mg(2

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of protein adsorption at fluid interfaces: a comparison of all-atom and coarse-grained models.

    PubMed

    Euston, Stephen R

    2010-10-11

    The adsorption of LTP at the decane-water interface was modeled using all-atom and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations. The CG model (300 ns simulation, 1200 ns scaled time) generates equilibrium adsorbed conformations in about 12 h, whereas the equivalent 1200 ns simulation would take about 300 days for the all-atom model. In both models the LTP molecule adsorbs with α-helical regions parallel to the interface with an average tilt angle normal to the interface of 73° for the all-atom model and 62° for the CG model. In the all-atom model, the secondary structure of the LTP is conserved upon adsorption. A considerable proportion of the N-terminal loop of LTP can be found in the decane phase for the all-atom model, whereas in the CG model the protein only penetrates as far as the mixed water-decane interfacial region. This difference may arise due to the different schemes used to parametrize force field parameters in the two models.

  11. Insight into the Properties of Cardiolipin Containing Bilayers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Using a Hybrid All-Atom/United-Atom Force Field.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Chipot, Christophe

    2012-05-08

    Simulation of three models of cardiolipin (CL) containing membranes using a new set of parameters for tetramyristoyl and tetraoleoyl CLs has been developed in the framework of the united-atom CHARMM27-UA and the all-atom CHARMM36 force fields with the aim of performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cardiolipin-containing mixed-lipid membranes. The new parameters use a hybrid representation of all-atom head groups in conjunction with implicit-hydrogen united-atom (UA) to describe the oleoyl and myristoyl chains of the CLs, in lieu of the fully atomistic description, thereby allowing longer simulations to be undertaken. The physicochemical properties of the bilayers were determined and compared with previously reported data. Furthermore, using tetramyristoyl CL mixed with POPG and POPE lipids, a mitochondrial membrane was simulated. The results presented here show the different behavior of the bilayers as a result of the lipid composition, where the length of the acyl chain and the conformation of the headgroup can be associated with the mitochondrial membrane properties. The new hybrid CL parameters prove to be well suited for the simulation of the molecular structure of CL-containing bilayers and can be extended to other lipid bilayers composed of CLs with different acyl chains or alternate head groups.

  12. All-atom simulation study of protein PTH(1-34) by using the Wang-Landau sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon; Kwak, Wooseop

    2014-12-01

    We perform simulations of the N-terminal 34-residue protein fragment PTH(1-34), consisting of 581 atoms, of the 84-residue human parathyroid hormone by using the all-atom ECEPP/3 force field and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Through a massive high-performance computation, the density of states and the partition function Z( T), as a continuous function of T, are obtained for PTH(1-34). From the continuous partition function Z( T), the partition function zeros of PTH(1-34) are evaluated for the first time. From both the specific heat and the partition function zeros, two characteristic transition temperatures are obtained for the all-atom protein PTH(1-34). The higher transition temperature T 1 and the lower transition temperature T 2 of PTH(1-34) can be interpreted as the collapse temperature T θ and the folding temperature T f , respectively.

  13. Dual folding pathways of an α /β protein from all-atom ab initio folding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Wu, Chun; Duan, Yong

    2009-10-01

    Successful ab initio folding of proteins with both α-helix and β-sheet requires a delicate balance among a variety of forces in the simulation model, which may explain that the successful folding of any α /β proteins to within experimental error has yet to be reported. Here we demonstrate that it is an achievable goal to fold α /β proteins with a force field emphasizing the balance between the two major secondary structures. Using our newly developed force field, we conducted extensive ab initio folding simulations on an α /β protein full sequence design (FSD) employing both conventional molecular dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics in combination with a generalized-Born solvation model. In these simulations, the folding of FSD to the native state with high population (>64.2%) and high fidelity (Cα-Root Mean Square Deviation of 1.29 Å for the most sampled conformation when compared to the experimental structure) was achieved. The folding of FSD was found to follow two pathways. In the major pathway, the folding started from the formation of the helix. In the minor pathway, however, folding of the β-hairpin started first. Further examination revealed that the helix initiated from the C-terminus and propagated toward the N-terminus. The formation of the hydrophobic contacts coincided with the global folding. Therefore the hydrophobic force does not appear to be the driving force of the folding of this protein.

  14. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results.

  15. Analysis of Ligand-Receptor Association and Intermediate Transfer Rates in Multienzyme Nanostructures with All-Atom Brownian Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-25

    We present the second-generation GeomBD Brownian dynamics software for determining interenzyme intermediate transfer rates and substrate association rates in biomolecular complexes. Substrate and intermediate association rates for a series of enzymes or biomolecules can be compared between the freely diffusing disorganized configuration and various colocalized or complexed arrangements for kinetic investigation of enhanced intermediate transfer. In addition, enzyme engineering techniques, such as synthetic protein conjugation, can be computationally modeled and analyzed to better understand changes in substrate association relative to native enzymes. Tools are provided to determine nonspecific ligand-receptor association residence times, and to visualize common sites of nonspecific association of substrates on receptor surfaces. To demonstrate features of the software, interenzyme intermediate substrate transfer rate constants are calculated and compared for all-atom models of DNA origami scaffold-bound bienzyme systems of glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Also, a DNA conjugated horseradish peroxidase enzyme was analyzed for its propensity to increase substrate association rates and substrate local residence times relative to the unmodified enzyme. We also demonstrate the rapid determination and visualization of common sites of nonspecific ligand-receptor association by using HIV-1 protease and an inhibitor, XK263. GeomBD2 accelerates simulations by precomputing van der Waals potential energy grids and electrostatic potential grid maps, and has a flexible and extensible support for all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Simulation software is written in C++ and utilizes modern parallelization techniques for potential grid preparation and Brownian dynamics simulation processes. Analysis scripts, written in the Python scripting language, are provided for quantitative simulation analysis. GeomBD2 is applicable to the fields of biophysics, bioengineering

  16. Generation of Well-Relaxed All-Atom Models of Large Molecular Weight Polymer Melts: A Hybrid Particle-Continuum Approach Based on Particle-Field Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Antonio; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Milano, Giuseppe

    2014-12-09

    A procedure based on Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations employing soft potentials derived from self-consistent field (SCF) theory (named MD-SCF) able to generate well-relaxed all-atom structures of polymer melts is proposed. All-atom structures having structural correlations indistinguishable from ones obtained by long MD relaxations have been obtained for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) melts. The proposed procedure leads to computational costs mainly related on system size rather than to the chain length. Several advantages of the proposed procedure over current coarse-graining/reverse mapping strategies are apparent. No parametrization is needed to generate relaxed structures of different polymers at different scales or resolutions. There is no need for special algorithms or back-mapping schemes to change the resolution of the models. This characteristic makes the procedure general and its extension to other polymer architectures straightforward. A similar procedure can be easily extended to the generation of all-atom structures of block copolymer melts and polymer nanocomposites.

  17. Modeling Nanocomposites for Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Maximum 200 Words) The minimum energy configuration for Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is found for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer...Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs), Molecular Dynamics Simulations 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT...fiber composites have shown success in improving mechanical properties. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites have been studied for

  18. Mechanism of Nucleation and Growth of Aβ40 Fibrils from All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Sukanya; Schwierz, Nadine; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we characterize the nucleation and elongation mechanisms of the "diseased" polymorph of the amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) fibril using an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) protein model. After determining the nucleation size and subsequent stable protofibrillar structure from the CG model, validated with all-atom simulations, we consider the "lock and dock" and "activated monomer" fibril elongation mechanisms for the protofibril by statistical additions of a monomer drawn from four different ensembles of the free Aβ40 peptide to grow the fibril. Our CG model shows that the dominant mechanism for fibril elongation is the lock and dock mechanism across all monomer ensembles, even when the monomer is in the activated form. Although our CG model finds no thermodynamic difference between the two fibril elongation mechanisms, the activated monomer is found to be kinetically faster by a factor of 2 for the "locking" step compared with all other structured or unstructured monomer ensembles.

  19. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Surjit B; Mezei, Mihaly; Beveridge, David L

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute-solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interact more strongly with water molecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning's counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 A from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general, the

  20. Nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the bubble cavitation and application to dissociate amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2016-11-01

    The cavitation of gas bubbles in liquids has been applied to different disciplines in life and natural sciences, and in technologies. To obtain an appropriate theoretical description of effects induced by the bubble cavitation, we develop an all-atom nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation method to simulate bubbles undergoing harmonic oscillation in size. This allows us to understand the mechanism of the bubble cavitation-induced liquid shear stress on surrounding objects. The method is then employed to simulate an Aβ fibril model in the presence of bubbles, and the results show that the bubble expansion and contraction exert water pressure on the fibril. This yields to the deceleration and acceleration of the fibril kinetic energy, facilitating the conformational transition between local free energy minima, and leading to the dissociation of the fibril. Our work, which is a proof-of-concept, may open a new, efficient way to dissociate amyloid fibrils using the bubble cavitation technique, and new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  1. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  2. Dynamic performance of duolayers at the air/water interface. 2. Mechanistic insights from all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Christofferson, Andrew J; Yiapanis, George; Leung, Andy H M; Prime, Emma L; Tran, Diana N H; Qiao, Greg G; Solomon, David H; Yarovsky, Irene

    2014-09-18

    The novel duolayer system, comprising a monolayer of ethylene glycol monooctadecyl ether (C18E1) and the water-soluble polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), has been shown to resist forces such as wind stress to a greater degree than the C18E1 monolayer alone. This paper reports all-atom molecular dynamics simulations comparing the monolayer (C18E1 alone) and duolayer systems under an applied force parallel to the air/water interface. The simulations show that, due to the presence of PVP at the interface, the duolayer film exhibits an increase in chain tilt, ordering, and density, as well as a lower lateral velocity compared to the monolayer. These results provide a molecular rationale for the improved performance of the duolayer system under wind conditions, as well as an atomic-level explanation for the observed efficacy of the duolayer system as an evaporation suppressant, which may serve as a useful guide for future development for thin films where resistance to external perturbation is desirable.

  3. Multi-step formation of a hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion revealed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chang, Che-Ming; Lee, Jian-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular trafficking and virus infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the fusion process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the membrane fusion mechanism using vesicle models which were pre-bound by inter-vesicle Ca(2+)-lipid clusters to approximate Ca(2+)-catalyzed fusion. Our results show that the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion is a multi-step event. This result contrasts with the assumptions made in most continuum models. The neighboring hemifused states are separated by an energy barrier on the energy landscape. The hemifusion diaphragm is much thinner than the planar lipid bilayers. The thinning of the hemifusion diaphragm during its formation results in the opening of a fusion pore for vesicle fusion. This work provides new insights into the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm and thus increases understanding of the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  4. Gordon Fullerton in PCA (MD-11) Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA research pilot Gordon Fullerton 'flying' in the MD-11 simulator during the Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) project. This investigation grew out of the crash of a DC-10 airliner on July 19, 1989, following an explosion in the rear engine which caused the loss of all manual flight controls. The flight crew attempted to control the airliner using only the thrust from the two remaining engines. Although the DC-10 crashed during the landing attempt, 184 of the 296 passengers and crew aboard survived. The PCA effort at the Dryden Flight Research Center grew out of the crash, and attempted to develop a means to successfully land an aircraft using only engine thrust. After more than five years of work, on August 29, 1995, Gordon Fullerton made the first PCA touchdown aboard an MD-11 airliner (a later version of the DC-10). The concept was further refined over the years that followed this first landing. Simulators were essential ingredients of the PCA development process. The feasibility of the concept was first tested with an F-15 simulator, then the results of actual flight tests in an F-15 were incorporated back into the simulator. Additional simulations were run on the Boeing 720 airliner simulator used in the Controlled Impact Demonstration project. After the MD-11 test landings, Boeing 747 and 757 simulators tested a wide range of possible situations. Simulations even helped develop a method of landing an airliner if it lost its complete hydraulic system as well as a wing engine, by transferring fuel to shift the center of gravity toward the working engine. The most extreme procedure was undertaken in a 747 simulator. The aircraft simulated the loss of the hydraulic system at 35,000 feet and rolled upside down. Then, the PCA mode was engaged, the airliner righted itself, leveled its wings, and made an approach nearly identical to that of a normal auto landing.

  5. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 membrane anchor on a phospholipid bilayer by using all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-03-10

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington's disease. Its first exon-more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)-is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin's activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties-order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid-of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions.

  6. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  7. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  8. All-atom Molecular-level Computational Simulations of Planar Longitudinal Shockwave Interactions with Polyurea, Soda-lime Glass and Polyurea/Glass Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    All-atom molecular-level computational simulations of planar longitudinal shockwave interactions with polyurea, soda-lime glass and polyurea/glass...sandwich structures under dynamic-loading conditions involving propagation of planar longitudinal shockwaves . Design/methodology/approach – The problem...of shockwave generation, propagation and interaction with material boundaries is investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. The results

  9. Parametrization of Backbone Flexibility in a Coarse-Grained Force Field for Proteins (COFFDROP) Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of All Possible Two-Residue Peptides.

    PubMed

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni J; Weishaar, Mitch R; Elcock, Adrian H

    2015-05-12

    Recently, we reported the parametrization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral, and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral, and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downward in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multidomain proteins connected by flexible linkers.

  10. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  11. Probing the global and local dynamics of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases using all-atom and coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Strom, Alexander M; Fehling, Samuel C; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep; Hati, Sanchita

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained simulations have emerged as invaluable tools for studying conformational changes in biomolecules. To evaluate the effectiveness of computationally inexpensive coarse-grained models in studying global and local dynamics of large protein systems like aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, we have performed coarse-grained normal mode analysis, as well as principle component analysis on trajectories of all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations for three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases--Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase, Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase, and Enterococcus faecium prolyl-tRNA synthetase. In the present study, comparison of predicted dynamics based on B-factor and overlap calculations revealed that coarse-grained methods are comparable to the all-atom simulations in depicting the intrinsic global dynamics of the three enzymes. However, the principal component analyses of the motions obtained from the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations provide a superior description of the local fluctuations of these enzymes. In particular, the all-atom model was able to capture the functionally relevant substrate-induced dynamical changes in prolyl-tRNA synthetase. The alteration in the coupled dynamics between the catalytically important proline-binding loop and its neighboring structural elements due to substrate binding has been characterized and reported for the first time. Taken together, the study portrays comparable and contrasting situations in studying the functional dynamics of large multi-domain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases using coarse-grained and all-atom simulation methods.

  12. Cholesterol Flip-Flop Dynamics in a Phospholipid Bilayer: A 10 Microsecond All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Cholesterol (CHOL) molecules play a key role in modulating the rigidity of cell membranes, and controlling intracellular transport and signal transduction. Using all-atom molecular dynamics and the parallel replica approach, we study the effect of CHOL molecules on mechanical stresses across a dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC)-CHOL bilayer, and the mechanism by which CHOL molecules migrate from one bilayer leaflet to the other (flip-flop events). On average, we observe a CHOL flip-flop event in half-a-microsecond. Once a CHOL flip-flop event is triggered, the inter-leaflet migration occurs in about 62 nanoseconds. The energy barrier associated with flip-flop events is found to be 73 kJ/mol. Results for membrane rigidity as a function of CHOL concentration will also be presented.

  13. MD simulation of cluster formation during sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramoto, T.; Okai, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Yorizane, K.; Yamamura, Y.

    2001-06-01

    The cluster ejection due to cluster impact on a solid surface is studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations are performed for Cu cluster impacts on the Cu(1 1 1) surface for cluster energy 100 eV/atom, and for clusters of 6, 13, 28 and 55 atoms. Interatomic interactions are described by the AMLJ-EAM potential. The vibration energy spectrum is independent of the incident cluster size and energy. This comes from the fact that sputtered clusters become stable through the successive fragmentation of nascent large sputtered clusters. The vibration energy spectra for large sputtered clusters have a peak, whose energy corresponds to the melting temperature of Cu. The exponent of the power-law fit of the abundance distribution and the total sputtering yield for the cluster impacts are higher than that for the monatomic ion impacts with the same total energy, where the exponent δ is given by Yn∝ nδ and Yn is the yield of sputtered n-atom cluster. The exponent δ follows a unified function of the total sputtering yield, which is a monotonic increase function, and it is nearly equal to δ ˜ -3 for larger yield.

  14. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant--while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  15. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  16. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  17. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states – as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  18. Conformational landscape of the HIV-V3 hairpin loop from all-atom free-energy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Abhinav; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    Small beta hairpins have many distinct biological functions, including their involvement in chemokine and viral receptor recognition. The relevance of structural similarities between different hairpin loops with near homologous sequences is not yet understood, calling for the development of methods for de novo hairpin structure prediction and simulation. De novo folding of beta strands is more difficult than that of helical proteins because of nonlocal hydrogen bonding patterns that connect amino acids that are distant in the amino acid sequence and there is a large variety of possible hydrogen bond patterns. Here we use a greedy version of the basin hopping technique with our free-energy forcefield PFF02 to reproducibly and predictively fold the hairpin structure of a HIV-V3 loop. We performed 20 independent basin hopping runs for 500cycles corresponding to 7.4×107 energy evaluations each. The lowest energy structure found in the simulation has a backbone root mean square deviation (bRMSD) of only 2.04Å to the native conformation. The lowest 9 out of the 20 simulations converged to conformations deviating less than 2.5Å bRMSD from native.

  19. Evaluation of protein-protein docking model structures using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solution theory in the energy representation.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Guo, Hao; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2012-12-07

    We propose a method to evaluate binding free energy differences among distinct protein-protein complex model structures through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water using the solution theory in the energy representation. Complex model structures are generated from a pair of monomeric structures using the rigid-body docking program ZDOCK. After structure refinement by side chain optimization and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, complex models are evaluated based on the sum of their conformational and solvation free energies, the latter calculated from the energy distribution functions obtained from relatively short molecular dynamics simulations of the complex in water and of pure water based on the solution theory in the energy representation. We examined protein-protein complex model structures of two protein-protein complex systems, bovine trypsin/CMTI-1 squash inhibitor (PDB ID: 1PPE) and RNase SA/barstar (PDB ID: 1AY7), for which both complex and monomer structures were determined experimentally. For each system, we calculated the energies for the crystal complex structure and twelve generated model structures including the model most similar to the crystal structure and very different from it. In both systems, the sum of the conformational and solvation free energies tended to be lower for the structure similar to the crystal. We concluded that our energy calculation method is useful for selecting low energy complex models similar to the crystal structure from among a set of generated models.

  20. All-atom effective models for first-principles simulations of the temperature-dependent behavior of complex ferroelectric oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iniguez, Jorge; Wojdel, Jacek C.; Hermet, Patrick; Ghosez, Philippe; Zanolli, Zeila

    2011-03-01

    Since its introduction in the 90's, the first-principles effective-Hamiltonian method has been successfully used to simulate temperature-driven phenomena in increasingly complex ferroelectrics, from classic compound BaTi O3 to multiferroic BiFe O3 . Currently, the emergence of nano-structured materials -- e.g., in the form of ultra-thin films or short-period superlattices -- poses new challenges to the simulations, and the development of predictive models seems to require a reconsideration of the traditional approach. Of particular interest are cases in which novel interfacial effects determine the behavior, as in the PbTi O3 - SrTi O3 superlattices of Bousquet et al. [Nature 452, 7188 (2008)]. In such situations a large number of structural distortions may become active, and it may be difficult to decide which ones need to be included in the model. In order to tackle these difficulties, we are extending the first-principles effective-Hamiltonian method so as to retain a full atomistic description of the material, thus removing the so-called local mode approximation. I will describe our new approach and show preliminary results for PbTi O3 . Work funded by the Spanish DGI and the FP7 program of the EU.

  1. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  2. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  3. Relationship between population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state and oligomer formation times of peptides: insights from all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hoang Bao; Kouza, Maksim; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2010-04-28

    Despite much progress in understanding the aggregation process of biomolecules, the factors that govern its rates have not been fully understood. This problem is of particular importance since many conformational diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, and type-II diabetes are associated with the protein oligomerization. Having performed all-atom simulations with explicit water and various force fields for two short peptides KFFE and NNQQ, we show that their oligomer formation times are strongly correlated with the population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state. The larger the population the faster the aggregation process. Our result not only suggests that this quantity plays a key role in the self-assembly of polypeptide chains but also opens a new way to understand the fibrillogenesis of biomolecules at the monomeric level. The nature of oligomer ordering of NNQQ is studied in detail.

  4. The tilt-dependent potential of mean force of a pair of DNA oligomers from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2017-03-01

    Electrostatic interactions between DNA molecules have been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically, but several aspects (e.g. its role in determining the pitch of the cholesteric DNA phase) still remain unclear. Here, we performed large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water and 150 mM sodium chloride, to reconstruct the potential of mean force (PMF) of two DNA oligomers 24 base pairs long as a function of their interaxial angle and intermolecular distance. We find that the potential of mean force is dominated by total DNA charge, and not by the helical geometry of its charged groups. The theory of homogeneously charged cylinders fits well all our simulation data, and the fit yields the optimal value of the total compensated charge on DNA to  ≈65% of its total fixed charge (arising from the phosphorous atoms), close to the value expected from Manning’s theory of ion condensation. The PMF calculated from our simulations does not show a significant dependence on the handedness of the angle between the two DNA molecules, or its size is on the order of 1{{k}\\text{B}}T . Thermal noise for molecules of the studied length seems to mask the effect of detailed helical charge patterns of DNA. The fact that in monovalent salt the effective interaction between two DNA molecules is independent on the handedness of the tilt may suggest that alternative mechanisms are required to understand the cholesteric phase of DNA.

  5. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  6. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  7. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  8. Uncovering the microscopic mechanism of strand exchange during RecA mediated homologous recombination using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankla, Manish; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-02-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key step during the repair process of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breakage. RecA is a protein that mediates HR in bacteria. RecA monomers polymerize on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) separated from the broken dsDNA to form a helical filament, thus allowing strand exchange to occur. Recent crystal structures depict each RecA monomer in contact with three contiguous nucleotides called DNA triplets. Surprisingly, the conformation of each triplet is similar to that of a triplet in B-form DNA. However, in the filament the neighboring triplets are separated by loops of the RecA proteins. Single molecule experiments demonstrated that strand exchange propagation occurs in 3 base-pair increments. However, the temporal resolution of the experiments was insufficient to determine the exact molecular mechanism of the triplet propagation. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effect of both the RecA protein and the conformation of the bound ssDNA fragment on the stability of the duplex DNA intermediate formed during the strand-exchange process. Specifically, we report simulations of force-induced unzipping of duplex DNA in the presence and absence of the RecA filament that explored the effect of the triplet ladder conformation.

  9. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  10. Membrane protein simulations with a united-atom lipid and all-atom protein model: lipid protein interactions, side chain transfer free energies and model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieleman, D. Peter; MacCallum, Justin L.; Ash, Walter L.; Kandt, Christian; Xu, Zhitao; Monticelli, Luca

    2006-07-01

    We have reparameterized the dihedral parameters in a commonly used united-atom lipid force field so that they can be used with the all-atom OPLS force field for proteins implemented in the molecular dynamics simulation software GROMACS. Simulations with this new combination give stable trajectories and sensible behaviour of both lipids and protein. We have calculated the free energy of transfer of amino acid side chains between water and 'lipid-cyclohexane', made of lipid force field methylene groups, as a hydrophobic mimic of the membrane interior, for both the OPLS-AA and a modified OPLS-AA force field which gives better hydration free energies under simulation conditions close to those preferred for the lipid force field. The average error is 4.3 kJ mol-1 for water-'lipid-cyclohexane' compared to 3.2 kJ mol-1 for OPLS-AA cyclohexane and 2.4 kJ mol-1 for the modified OPLS-AA water-'lipid-cyclohexane'. We have also investigated the effect of different methods to combine parameters between the united-atom lipid force field and the united-atom protein force field ffgmx. In a widely used combination, the strength of interactions between hydrocarbon lipid tails and proteins is significantly overestimated, causing a decrease in the area per lipid and an increase in lipid ordering. Using straight combination rules improves the results. Combined, we suggest that using OPLS-AA together with the united-atom lipid force field implemented in GROMACS is a reasonable approach to membrane protein simulations. We also suggest that using partial volume information and free energies of transfer may help to improve the parameterization of lipid-protein interactions and point out the need for accurate experimental data to validate and improve force field descriptions of such interactions.

  11. Membrane protein simulations with a united-atom lipid and all-atom protein model: lipid-protein interactions, side chain transfer free energies and model proteins.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D Peter; Maccallum, Justin L; Ash, Walter L; Kandt, Christian; Xu, Zhitao; Monticelli, Luca

    2006-07-19

    We have reparameterized the dihedral parameters in a commonly used united-atom lipid force field so that they can be used with the all-atom OPLS force field for proteins implemented in the molecular dynamics simulation software GROMACS. Simulations with this new combination give stable trajectories and sensible behaviour of both lipids and protein. We have calculated the free energy of transfer of amino acid side chains between water and 'lipid-cyclohexane', made of lipid force field methylene groups, as a hydrophobic mimic of the membrane interior, for both the OPLS-AA and a modified OPLS-AA force field which gives better hydration free energies under simulation conditions close to those preferred for the lipid force field. The average error is 4.3 kJ mol(-1) for water-'lipid-cyclohexane' compared to 3.2 kJ mol(-1) for OPLS-AA cyclohexane and 2.4 kJ mol(-1) for the modified OPLS-AA water-'lipid-cyclohexane'. We have also investigated the effect of different methods to combine parameters between the united-atom lipid force field and the united-atom protein force field ffgmx. In a widely used combination, the strength of interactions between hydrocarbon lipid tails and proteins is significantly overestimated, causing a decrease in the area per lipid and an increase in lipid ordering. Using straight combination rules improves the results. Combined, we suggest that using OPLS-AA together with the united-atom lipid force field implemented in GROMACS is a reasonable approach to membrane protein simulations. We also suggest that using partial volume information and free energies of transfer may help to improve the parameterization of lipid-protein interactions and point out the need for accurate experimental data to validate and improve force field descriptions of such interactions.

  12. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  13. Effects of water models on binding affinity: evidence from all-atom simulation of binding of tamiflu to A/H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔG(bind) of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔG(bind) is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔG(bind) decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM.

  14. Folding processes of the B domain of protein A to the native state observed in all-atom ab initio folding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Wu, Chun; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Zhou, Yaoqi; Duan, Yong

    2008-06-01

    Reaching the native states of small proteins, a necessary step towards a comprehensive understanding of the folding mechanisms, has remained a tremendous challenge to ab initio protein folding simulations despite the extensive effort. In this work, the folding process of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) has been simulated by both conventional and replica exchange molecular dynamics using AMBER FF03 all-atom force field. Started from an extended chain, a total of 40 conventional (each to 1.0 μs) and two sets of replica exchange (each to 200.0 ns per replica) molecular dynamics simulations were performed with different generalized-Born solvation models and temperature control schemes. The improvements in both the force field and solvent model allowed successful simulations of the folding process to the native state as demonstrated by the 0.80 A˚ Cα root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the best folded structure. The most populated conformation was the native folded structure with a high population. This was a significant improvement over the 2.8 A˚ Cα RMSD of the best nativelike structures from previous ab initio folding studies on BdpA. To the best of our knowledge, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that ab initio simulations can reach the native state of BdpA. Consistent with experimental observations, including Φ-value analyses, formation of helix II/III hairpin was a crucial step that provides a template upon which helix I could form and the folding process could complete. Early formation of helix III was observed which is consistent with the experimental results of higher residual helical content of isolated helix III among the three helices. The calculated temperature-dependent profile and the melting temperature were in close agreement with the experimental results. The simulations further revealed that phenylalanine 31 may play critical to achieve the correct packing of the three helices which is consistent with the experimental observation

  15. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  16. Structure and Properties of HELICAL CARBON NANOTUBES through MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Akshay; Verma, Deepti; Gupta, Shakti S.

    Helical Carbon Nanotubes (HCNTs) are coiled 3-valent carbon networks which represent pure carbon helix. Here we study the geometries of two classes: hexagonal helix containing purely polyhex networks and the second class with 5-and 7-membered rings besides hexagons. We followed a model of hexagonal, single wall HCNTs, and determined their relaxed configuration using MD simulations based on Tersoff potential. A race-track like structure is observed in the cross-section of HCNTs upon minimization. For generating class two helix, the adjacency matrix eigenvector's (AME) method is applied which utilizes 3-coordinated tiling of the plane by 5-,6-,and 7-membered ring for the construction of helical structures. The application of the AME method to torusenes is crucial for class two helix generation as it is based on an appropriate choice of bi-lobial eigenvectors triplet which can be selected on the basis of their nodal properties as verified here. After 3-D transformations the final structure was obtained with the help of MM3-potential based MD simulations on Tinker commercial code. The spring constants of HCNTs are computed through MD simulations.

  17. A virtual-system coupled multicanonical molecular dynamics simulation: principles and applications to free-energy landscape of protein-protein interaction with an all-atom model in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Higo, Junichi; Umezawa, Koji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-05-14

    We propose a novel generalized ensemble method, a virtual-system coupled multicanonical molecular dynamics (V-McMD), to enhance conformational sampling of biomolecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. In this method, a virtual system, of which physical quantities can be set arbitrarily, is coupled with the biomolecular system, which is the target to be studied. This method was applied to a system of an Endothelin-1 derivative, KR-CSH-ET1, known to form an antisymmetric homodimer at room temperature. V-McMD was performed starting from a configuration in which two KR-CSH-ET1 molecules were mutually distant in an explicit solvent. The lowest free-energy state (the most thermally stable state) at room temperature coincides with the experimentally determined native complex structure. This state was separated to other non-native minor clusters by a free-energy barrier, although the barrier disappeared with elevated temperature. V-McMD produced a canonical ensemble faster than a conventional McMD method.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with Zn(2+) and acetazolamide on the basis of all-atom force field simulations.

    PubMed

    Wambo, Thierry O; Chen, Liao Y; McHardy, Stanton F; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) represents an ultimate example of the perfectly efficient metalloenzymes, which is capable of catalyzing the hydration of carbon dioxide with a rate approaching the diffusion controlled limit. Extensive experimental studies of this physiologically important metalloprotein have been done to elucidate the fundamentals of its enzymatic actions: what residues anchor the Zn(2+) (or another divalent cation) at the bottom of the binding pocket; how the relevant residues work concertedly with the divalent cation in the reversible conversions between CO2 and HCO3(-); what are the protonation states of the relevant residues and acetazolamide, an inhibitor complexed with hCAII, etc. In this article, we present a detailed computational study on the basis of the all-atom CHARMM force field where Zn(2+) is represented with a simple model of divalent cation using the transferrable parameters available from the current literature. We compute the hydration free energy of Zn(2+), the characteristics of hCAII-Zn(2+) complexation, and the absolute free energy of binding acetazolamide to the hCAII-Zn(2+) complex. In each of these three problems, our computed results agree with the experimental data within the known margin of error without making any case-by-case adjustments to the parameters. The quantitatively accurate insights we gain in this all-atom molecular dynamics study should be helpful in the search and design of more specific inhibitors of this and other carbonic anhydrases.

  19. MD-simulations of Beta-Amyloid Protein Insertion Efficiency and Kinetics into Neuronal Membrane Mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (A β) peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used all-atom MD simulations to study the protein insertion efficiency and kinetics of monomeric A β40 and A β42 into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers (PC) with and without 40 mole% cholesterol (CHOL) that mimic the cholesterol-enriched and depleted lipid nanodomains of the neuronal plasma membranes. Independent replicates of 200-ns simulations of each protein pre-inserted in the upper lipid layer were generated. In PC bilayers, only 25% of A β40 and 50% of A β42 in the replicates showed complete insertion into the lower lipid layer, whereas the percentages increased to 50% and 100%, respectively, in PC/CHOL bilayers, providing evidence that cholesterol improves the protein insertion efficiency into the bilayers. The rate of protein insertion was proportional to the hydrophobic, transmembrane helix length of the inserted peptide and depended on the cholesterol content. We propose that the lysine snorkeling and C-terminus anchoring of A β to the PC headgroups at the upper and lower lipid/water interfaces represent the dual-transmembrane stabilization mechanisms of A β in the neuronal membrane domains.

  20. Free-energy landscape of intrinsically disordered proteins investigated by all-atom multicanonical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Higo, Junichi; Umezawa, Koji

    2014-01-01

    We introduce computational studies on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Especially, we present our multicanonical molecular dynamics (McMD) simulations of two IDP-partner systems: NRSF-mSin3 and pKID-KIX. McMD is one of enhanced conformational sampling methods useful for conformational sampling of biomolecular systems. IDP adopts a specific tertiary structure upon binding to its partner molecule, although it is unstructured in the unbound state (i.e. the free state). This IDP-specific property is called "coupled folding and binding". The McMD simulation treats the biomolecules with an all-atom model immersed in an explicit solvent. In the initial configuration of simulation, IDP and its partner molecules are set to be distant from each other, and the IDP conformation is disordered. The computationally obtained free-energy landscape for coupled folding and binding has shown that native- and non-native-complex clusters distribute complicatedly in the conformational space. The all-atom simulation suggests that both of induced-folding and population-selection are coupled complicatedly in the coupled folding and binding. Further analyses have exemplified that the conformational fluctuations (dynamical flexibility) in the bound and unbound states are essentially important to characterize IDP functioning.

  1. MD simulations of chain molecules in the Surface Force Apparatus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Adriano A.; Carlson, Jean M.

    1998-03-01

    We performed MD simulations of chain molecules confined between two smooth flat crystalline plates in which we drove the top plate in two ways. In a constant shear rate in which we saw that the chains tend to align along the shear flow. We also measured the time scale associated with this alignment. In the second way we dragged the top confining plate with an elastic spring which was pulled at a constant speed. The stick-slip oscillations were overdamped. We studied the transition from stick-slip to steady-sliding and noticed that unlike the underdamped regime, this transition depends also on the elastic constant of the pulling spring. Finally we also perfomed stop-start like experiments and observed a sharp time scale for the onset of the stiction spikes in the spring force as in the experiments performed by J. Israelachvili et al.

  2. The MD simulation of thermal properties of plutonium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingjie, Wan; Li, Zhang; Jiguang, Du; Duohui, Huang; Lili, Wang; Gang, Jiang

    2012-12-01

    The thermodynamic properties of PuO2 have been investigated between 300 and 3000 K by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with empirical interaction potential. The properties include melting point, lattice parameter variation, enthalpy and heat capacity. The melting point of two-phase simulation (TPS) is in agreement with the experimental value, and it gives a much lower value than one-phase simulation (OPS). The lattice parameter and heat capacity at high temperatures are expressed as a(T)=5.38178+4.38×10-5T+6.5525×10-9T+0.9362×10-12T and CP(KJṡmol-1ṡK-1)=18648.8e/(T(-1)2)+9.337×10-6T, respectively. True linear thermal expansion coefficient (TLTEC) α is about 8.89×10-6 K-1 at 300 K. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical data.

  3. ab initio MD simulations of geomaterials with ~1000 atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. B.; Kirtman, B.; Spera, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    In the last two decades, ab initio studies of materials using Density Functional Theory (DFT) have increased exponentially in popularity. DFT codes are now used routinely to simulate properties of geomaterials--mainly silicates and geochemically important metals such as Fe. These materials are ubiquitous in the Earth’s mantle and core and in terrestrial exoplanets. Because of computational limitations, most First Principles Molecular Dynamics (FPMD) calculations are done on systems of only ~100 atoms for a few picoseconds. While this approach can be useful for calculating physical quantities related to crystal structure, vibrational frequency, and other lattice-scale properties (especially in crystals), it is statistically marginal for duplicating physical properties of the liquid state like transport and structure. In MD simulations in the NEV ensemble, temperature (T), and pressure (P) fluctuations scale as N-1/2; small particle number (N) systems are therefore characterized by greater statistical state point location uncertainty than large N systems. Previous studies have used codes such as VASP where CPU time increases with N2, making calculations with N much greater than 100 impractical. SIESTA (Soler, et al. 2002) is a DFT code that enables electronic structure and MD computations on larger systems (N~103) by making some approximations, such as localized numerical orbitals, that would be useful in modeling some properties of geomaterials. Here we test the applicability of SIESTA to simulate geosilicates, both hydrous and anhydrous, in the solid and liquid state. We have used SIESTA for lattice calculations of brucite, Mg(OH)2, that compare very well to experiment and calculations using CRYSTAL, another DFT code. Good agreement between more classical DFT calculations and SIESTA is needed to justify study of geosilicates using SIESTA across a range of pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth’s interior. Thus, it is useful to adjust parameters in

  4. Using MD Simulations To Calculate How Solvents Modulate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Cao, Shannon; Hoang, Kevin; Young, Kayla L; Paluch, Andrew S; Mobley, David L

    2016-04-12

    Here, our interest is in predicting solubility in general, and we focus particularly on predicting how the solubility of particular solutes is modulated by the solvent environment. Solubility in general is extremely important, both for theoretical reasons - it provides an important probe of the balance between solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions - and for more practical reasons, such as how to control the solubility of a given solute via modulation of its environment, as in process chemistry and separations. Here, we study how the change of solvent affects the solubility of a given compound. That is, we calculate relative solubilities. We use MD simulations to calculate relative solubility and compare our calculated values with experiment as well as with results from several other methods, SMD and UNIFAC, the latter of which is commonly used in chemical engineering design. We find that straightforward solubility calculations based on molecular simulations using a general small-molecule force field outperform SMD and UNIFAC both in terms of accuracy and coverage of the relevant chemical space.

  5. Electroporation of archaeal lipid membranes using MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the electroporation of archaeal lipid bilayers when subjected to high transmembrane voltages induced by a charge imbalance, mimicking therefore millisecond electric pulse experiments. The structural characteristics of the bilayer, a 9:91 mol% 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) were compared to small angle X-ray scattering data. A rather good agreement of the electron density profiles at temperatures of 298 and 343 K was found assessing therefore the validity of the protocols and force fields used in simulations. Compared to dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the electroporation threshold for the bilayer was found to increase from ~2 V to 4.3 V at 323 K, and to 5.2 V at 298 K. Comparing the electroporation thresholds of the archaeal lipids to those of simple diphytanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers (2.5 V at 323 K) allowed one to trace back the stability of the membranes to the structure of their lipid head groups. Addition of DPPC in amounts of 50 mol% to the archaeal lipid bilayers decreases their stability and lowers the electroporation thresholds to 3.8 V and 4.1 V at respectively 323 and 298 K. The present study therefore shows how membrane compositions can be selected to cover a wide range of responses to electric stimuli. This provides new routes for the design of liposomes that can be efficiently used as drug delivery carriers, as the selection of their composition allows one to tune in their electroporation threshold for subsequent release of their load.

  6. Quantum and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of protonation and divalent ion binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2).

    PubMed

    Slochower, David R; Huwe, Peter J; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A

    2013-07-18

    Molecular dynamics calculations have been used to determine the structure of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) at the quantum level and to quantify the propensity for PIP2 to bind two physiologically relevant divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). We performed a geometry optimization at the Hartree-Fock 6-31+G(d) level of theory in vacuum and with a polarized continuum dielectric to determine the conformation of the phospholipid headgroup in the presence of water and its partial charge distribution. The angle between the headgroup and the acyl chains is nearly perpendicular, suggesting that in the absence of other interactions the inositol ring would lie flat along the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane. Next, we employed hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the protonation state of PIP2 and its interactions with magnesium or calcium. We test the hypothesis suggested by prior experiments that binding of magnesium to PIP2 is mediated by a water molecule that is absent when calcium binds. These results may explain the selective ability of calcium to induce the formation of PIP2 clusters and phase separation from other lipids.

  7. Structural and fluctuational difference between two ends of Aβ amyloid fibril: MD simulations predict only one end has open conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G.

    2016-12-01

    Aβ amyloid fibrils, which are related to Alzheimer’s disease, have a cross-β structure consisting of two β-sheets: β1 and β2. The Aβ peptides are thought to be serially arranged in the same molecular conformation along the fibril axis. However, to understand the amyloid extension mechanism, we must understand the amyloid fibril structure and fluctuation at the fibril end, which has not been revealed to date. Here, we reveal these features by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Aβ42 and Aβ40 fibrils in explicit water. The structure and fluctuation were observed to differ between the two ends. At the even end, the Aβ peptide always took a closed form wherein β1 and β2 were closely spaced. The Aβ peptide fluctuated more at the odd end and took an open form wherein the two β-sheets were well separated. The differences are attributed to the stronger β-sheet formation by the β1 exposed at the even end than the β2 exposed at the odd end. Along with the small fluctuations at the even end, these results explain why the fibril extends from one end only, as observed in experiments. Our MD results agree well with recent observations by high-speed atomic force microscopy.

  8. Structural and fluctuational difference between two ends of Aβ amyloid fibril: MD simulations predict only one end has open conformations

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G.

    2016-01-01

    Aβ amyloid fibrils, which are related to Alzheimer’s disease, have a cross-β structure consisting of two β-sheets: β1 and β2. The Aβ peptides are thought to be serially arranged in the same molecular conformation along the fibril axis. However, to understand the amyloid extension mechanism, we must understand the amyloid fibril structure and fluctuation at the fibril end, which has not been revealed to date. Here, we reveal these features by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Aβ42 and Aβ40 fibrils in explicit water. The structure and fluctuation were observed to differ between the two ends. At the even end, the Aβ peptide always took a closed form wherein β1 and β2 were closely spaced. The Aβ peptide fluctuated more at the odd end and took an open form wherein the two β-sheets were well separated. The differences are attributed to the stronger β-sheet formation by the β1 exposed at the even end than the β2 exposed at the odd end. Along with the small fluctuations at the even end, these results explain why the fibril extends from one end only, as observed in experiments. Our MD results agree well with recent observations by high-speed atomic force microscopy. PMID:27934893

  9. Solute and solvent dynamics in confined equal-sized aqueous environments of charged and neutral reverse micelles: a combined dynamic fluorescence and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Biswas, Ranjit; Ghorai, Pradip K

    2013-03-28

    Here a combined dynamic fluorescence and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study of aqueous pool-size dependent solvation energy and rotational relaxations of a neutral dipolar solute, C153, trapped in AOT (charged) and IGPAL (neutral) reverse micelles (RMs) at 298 K, is described. RMs in simulations have been represented by a reduced model where SPC/E water molecules interact with a trapped C153 that possesses realistic charge distributions for both ground and excited states. In large aqueous pools, measured average solvation and rotation rates are smaller for the neutral RMs than those in charged ones. Interestingly, while the measured average solvation and rotation rates increase with pool size for the charged RMs, the average rotation rates for the neutral RMs exhibit a reverse dependence. Simulations have qualitatively reproduced this experimental trend and suggested interfacial location for the solute for all cases. The origin for the subnanosecond Stokes shift dynamics has been investigated and solute-interface interaction contribution quantified. Simulated layer-wise translational and rotational diffusions of water molecules re-examine the validity of the core-shell model and provide a resolution to a debate regarding the origin of the subnanosecond solvation component in dynamic Stokes shift measurements with aqueous RMs but not detected in ultrafast IR measurements.

  10. Current Tools and Methods in Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations for Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C; Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica E; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Basurto, José Correa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is a computational method that employs Newton's laws to evaluate the motions of water, ions, small molecules, and macromolecules or more complex systems, for example, whole viruses, to reproduce the behavior of the biological environment, including water molecules and lipid membranes. Specifically, structural motions, such as those that are dependent of the temperature and solute/ solvent are very important to study the recognition pattern of ligandprotein or protein-protein complexes, in that sense, MD simulations are very useful because these motions can be modeled using this methodology. Furthermore, MD simulations for drug design provide insights into the structural cavities required to design novel structures with higher affinity to the target. Also, the employment of MD simulations to drug design can help to refine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of targets in order to obtain a better sampling of the binding poses and more reliable affinity values with better structural advantages, because they incorporate some biological conditions that include structural motions compared to traditional docking procedures. This work analyzes the concepts and applicability of MD simulations for drug design because molecular structural motions are considered, and these help to identify hot spots, decipher structural details in the reported protein sites, as well as to eliminate sites that could be structural artifacts which could be originated from the structural characterization conditions from MD. Moreover, better free energy values for protein ligand recognition can also be obtained, and these can be validated under experimental procedures due to the robustness of the MD simulation methods.

  11. FATSLiM: a fast and robust software to analyze MD simulations of membranes.

    PubMed

    Buchoux, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    When studying biological membranes, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations reveal to be quite complementary to experimental techniques. Because the simulated systems keep increasing both in size and complexity, the analysis of MD trajectories need to be computationally efficient while being robust enough to perform analysis on membranes that may be curved or deformed due to their size and/or protein-lipid interactions. This work presents a new software named FATSLiM ('Fast Analysis Toolbox for Simulations of Lipid Membranes') that can extract physical properties from MD simulations of membranes (with or without interacting proteins). Because it relies on the calculation of local normals, FATSLiM does not depend of the bilayer morphology and thus can handle with the same accuracy vesicles for instance. Thanks to an efficiency-driven development, it is also fast and consumes a rather low amount of memory.

  12. Simulating picosecond X-ray diffraction from crystals using FFT methods on MD output

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, Giles; Nagler, Bob; Higginbotham, Andrew; Murphy, William; Wark, Justin; Park, Nigel; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce

    2007-12-12

    Multi-million atom non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give significant insight into the transient processes that occur under shock compression. Picosecond X-ray diffraction enables the probing of materials on a timescale fast enough to test such effects. In order to simulate diffraction patterns, Fourier methods are required to gain a picture of reciprocal lattice space. We present here results of fast Fourier transforms of atomic coordinates of shocked crystals simulated by MD, and comment on the computing power required as a function of problem size. The relationship between reciprocal space and particular experimental geometries is discussed.

  13. PuReMD-GPU: A reactive molecular dynamics simulation package for GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Kylasa, S.B.; Aktulga, H.M.; Grama, A.Y.

    2014-09-01

    We present an efficient and highly accurate GP-GPU implementation of our community code, PuReMD, for reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. PuReMD and its incorporation into LAMMPS (Reax/C) is used by a large number of research groups worldwide for simulating diverse systems ranging from biomembranes to explosives (RDX) at atomistic level of detail. The sub-femtosecond time-steps associated with ReaxFF strongly motivate significant improvements to per-timestep simulation time through effective use of GPUs. This paper presents, in detail, the design and implementation of PuReMD-GPU, which enables ReaxFF simulations on GPUs, as well as various performance optimization techniques we developed to obtain high performance on state-of-the-art hardware. Comprehensive experiments on model systems (bulk water and amorphous silica) are presented to quantify the performance improvements achieved by PuReMD-GPU and to verify its accuracy. In particular, our experiments show up to 16× improvement in runtime compared to our highly optimized CPU-only single-core ReaxFF implementation. PuReMD-GPU is a unique production code, and is currently available on request from the authors.

  14. Refined OPLS all-atom force field parameters for n-pentadecane, methyl acetate, and dimethyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Murzyn, Krzysztof; Bratek, Maciej; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta

    2013-12-27

    OPLS All-Atom (OPLS/AA) is a generic all-atom force field which was fine-tuned to accurately reproduce condensed phase properties of organic liquids. Its application in modeling of lipid membranes is, however, limited mainly due to the inability to correctly describe phase behavior and organization of the hydrophobic core of the model lipid bilayers. Here we report new OPLS/AA parameters for n-pentadecane, methyl acetate, and dimethyl phosphate anion. For the new force field parameters, we show very good agreement between calculated and numerous reference data, including liquid density, enthalpy of vaporization, free energy of hydration, and selected transport properties. The new OPLS/AA parameters have been used in successful submicrosecond MD simulations of bilayers made of bacterial glycolipids whose results will be published elsewhere shortly.

  15. An MD Simulation of Concentrated Aqueous Solutions of Caesium Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Ohtaki, H.; Okada, I.

    1991-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of concentrated aqueous Csl solutions have been performed for Csl: H2O = 1:20 (2.78 molal) at 298 K and 341 K and 1:10 (5.56 molal) at 349 K. Effects of temperature and concentration on the structures of the hydrated ions, the ion pairs, and ionic aggregates are discussed by comparing the results with X-ray diffraction data obtained under similar conditions [1

  16. Structure of overheated metal clusters: MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    The structure of overheated metal clusters appeared in condensation process was studied by computer simulation techniques. It was found that clusters with size larger than several tens of atoms have three layers: core part, intermediate dense packing layer and a gas- like shell with low density. The change of the size and structure of these layers with the variation of internal energy and the size of cluster is discussed.

  17. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package. PMID:23703210

  18. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)–glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898–915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}N–H⋯O{sup −} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup −1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}N–H⋯O{sup −} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000–2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is

  19. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Vener, M V; Odinokov, A V; Wehmeyer, C; Sebastiani, D

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)-glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898-915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short (+)N-H⋯O(-) bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm(-1). It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the (+)N-H⋯O(-) fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000-2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic

  20. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)-glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898-915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short +N-H⋯O- bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm-1. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the +N-H⋯O- fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000-2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic

  1. Structure of Anion-Conducting Polymers from Waxs and MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisken, Barbara; Tahmasebi, Sepehr; Schibli, Eric; Holdcroft, Steven

    The structure of novel polymers for anion exchange membranes (AEMs) is investigated using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a united-atom force field model based on the DREIDING force field. The polymers being studied are poly(benzimidazole) (PBI) derivatives including poly(dimethylbenzimidazole) (PDMBI), mesitylene poly(benzimidazole) (mes-PBI), and mesitylene poly(dimethylbenzimidazole) (mes-PDMBI). WAXS reveals an amorphous structure with two main length scales. By comparing simulation results to WAXS data, we attribute features observed in the scattering data to side-to-side spacing between polymer chains and to the parallel-ring stacking of the benzimidazole rings. Overall, we are able to validate the interpretation of scattering data by combining MD simulations and scattering experiments.

  2. PIMC Validation of Effective Quantum Potentials for MD Simulations of Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather D.; Castor, John I.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Khairallah, Saad A.; Surh, Michael P.; Dubois, Jonathan L.; Alder, Berni J.; Draeger, Erik W.; Schwegler, Eric; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dense plasmas, such as those found in non-equilibrium laser fusion experiments, are challenging due to the importance of several quantum mechanical effects. We currently employ approximate statistical potentials, obtained exactly in the pair approximation from a numerical solution of the Bloch equation for the Coulomb density matrix. The fermionic character of the electrons is handled via an effective Pauli potential. We first study the accuracy of existing pair potentials and their extension to lower temperature and high Z ions by examining the exact pair density matrix. We then perform classical hypernetted chain and MD simulations using those effective potentials to study equilibrium thermodynamics of dense plasmas. Fully quantum path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations are used to gauge the accuracy of the classical calculations for dense hydrogen. Using feedback from the PIMC, we can further refine the effective Coulomb and Pauli potentials. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Novel 3D/VR interactive environment for MD simulations, visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Doblack, Benjamin N; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P

    2014-12-18

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced.

  4. Novel 3D/VR Interactive Environment for MD Simulations, Visualization and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doblack, Benjamin N.; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced. PMID:25549300

  5. Morphology and Dynamics of Tapered Diblock Copolymers from fDFT-initialized MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lisa M.; Seo, Youngmi; Brown, Jonathan R.

    2015-03-01

    Tapered block copolymers are similar to AB diblock copolymers, but with a statistical A-to-B (normal) or B-to-A (inverse) gradient ``taper'' between the A and B blocks. Depending on the sequence of monomers along the chain and the segregation strength, the A and B monomers are known to microphase separate into various ordered morphologies. Tapering introduces an additional parameter, independent of molecular weight or polymer choice, to tune morphology, and has been shown previously to widen the gyroid region of the phase diagram.In this study, we use classical, fluids density functional theory (fDFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the morphology and dynamics of tapered systems. Using fDFT allows us to accurately compare free energies between different potential microphases as a function of interaction parameter and fraction of A. Because of the similarity of the fDFT and MD models, the fDFT results map very closely with the corresponding MD model. We use the fDFT density profiles to generate the initial state of the chains for the simulations. Lamellae, cylinders, and other phases can be generated in this way with approximately correct spacing and density. We apply the streamlined simulation setup to analyze the effect of tapering on conformations and dynamics.

  6. Analytical model and MD simulation of nonlinear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Katsunobu; Abe, Motomi; Fukuda, Yuko; Zhakhovskii, Vasilii; Matsuoka, Chihiro

    2001-10-01

    We present two topics, an analytical model and moelrcular dynamic (MD) simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshokov instability (RMI). We have developled a selfconsistent analytical model that describes a nonlinear evolution of a vortex sheet in the two-dimensional RMI. The model consists of two kinematic boundary conditions, a modified Birkhoff-Rott equation and an equation for time evolution of circulation at the interface with a finite Atwood number. It is shown that the created vortcity on the interface has strong inhomogeneity, that causes locally streching and compression of the sheet. We discuss the dependence of the Atwood number on the nonlinear dynamics of the sheet. MD approache has been applied for converging shocks and RMI in a dense Lennard-Jones fluid in cylindrical geometry. MD method has fundamental advantages over hydrodymanic simulations such as no limitation of resolution in turbulent state. The appearance of Mach stems in the rippled shocks and turbulent mixing in RMI have been observed when the reflected shock passes through the unstable surface again. We discuss the mode number and Mach number dependence on the mixing.

  7. Kinetics of CH4 and CO2 hydrate dissociation and gas bubble evolution via MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M; Coombe, D

    2014-03-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of gas hydrate dissociation comparing the behavior of CH4 and CO2 hydrates are presented. These simulations were based on a structurally correct theoretical gas hydrate crystal, coexisting with water. The MD system was first initialized and stabilized via a thorough energy minimization, constant volume-temperature ensemble and constant volume-energy ensemble simulations before proceeding to constant pressure-temperature simulations for targeted dissociation pressure and temperature responses. Gas bubble evolution mechanisms are demonstrated as well as key investigative properties such as system volume, density, energy, mean square displacements of the guest molecules, radial distribution functions, H2O order parameter, and statistics of hydrogen bonds. These simulations have established the essential similarities between CH4 and CO2 hydrate dissociation. The limiting behaviors at lower temperature (no dissociation) and higher temperature (complete melting and formation of a gas bubble) have been illustrated for both hydrates. Due to the shift in the known hydrate stability curves between guest molecules caused by the choice of water model as noted by other authors, the intermediate behavior (e.g., 260 K) showed distinct differences however. Also, because of the more hydrogen-bonding capability of CO2 in water, as reflected in its molecular parameters, higher solubility of dissociated CO2 in water was observed with a consequence of a smaller size of gas bubble formation. Additionally, a novel method for analyzing hydrate dissociation based on H-bond breakage has been proposed and used to quantify the dissociation behaviors of both CH4 and CO2 hydrates. Activation energies Ea values from our MD studies were obtained and evaluated against several other published laboratory and MD values. Intrinsic rate constants were estimated and upscaled. A kinetic reaction model consistent with macroscale fitted kinetic models has been proposed to

  8. MD simulations suggest important surface differences between reconstituted and circulating spherical HDL1[S

    PubMed Central

    Segrest, Jere P.; Jones, Martin K.; Catte, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Since spheroidal HDL particles (sHDL) are highly dynamic, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are useful for obtaining structural models. Here we use MD to simulate sHDL with stoichiometries of reconstituted and circulating particles. The hydrophobic effect during simulations rapidly remodels discoidal HDL containing mixed lipids to sHDL containing a cholesteryl ester/triglyceride (CE/TG) core. We compare the results of simulations of previously characterized reconstituted sHDL particles containing two or three apoA-I created in the absence of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) with simulations of circulating human HDL containing two or three apoA-I without apoA-II. We find that circulating sHDL compared with reconstituted sHDL with the same number of apoA-I per particle contain approximately equal volumes of core lipid but significantly less surface lipid monolayers. We conclude that in vitro reconstituted sHDL particles contain kinetically trapped excess phospholipid and are less than ideal models for circulating sHDL particles. In the circulation, phospholipid transfer via PLTP decreases the ratio of phospholipid to apolipoprotein for all sHDL particles. Further, sHDL containing two or three apoA-I adapt to changes in surface area by condensation of common conformational motifs. These results represent an important step toward resolving the complicated issue of the protein and lipid stoichiometry of circulating HDL. PMID:23856070

  9. Multiple Simulated Annealing-Molecular Dynamics (MSA-MD) for Conformational Space Search of Peptide and Miniprotein.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Xu, Wei-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-10-23

    Protein and peptide structure predictions are of paramount importance for understanding their functions, as well as the interactions with other molecules. However, the use of molecular simulation techniques to directly predict the peptide structure from the primary amino acid sequence is always hindered by the rough topology of the conformational space and the limited simulation time scale. We developed here a new strategy, named Multiple Simulated Annealing-Molecular Dynamics (MSA-MD) to identify the native states of a peptide and miniprotein. A cluster of near native structures could be obtained by using the MSA-MD method, which turned out to be significantly more efficient in reaching the native structure compared to continuous MD and conventional SA-MD simulation.

  10. Sub-Terrahertz Spectroscopy of E.COLI Dna: Experiment, Statistical Model, and MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizov, I.; Dorofeeva, T.; Khromova, T.; Gelmont, B.; Globus, T.

    2012-06-01

    We will present result of combined experimental and computational study of sub-THz absorption spectra from Escherichia coli (E.coli) DNA. Measurements were conducted using a Bruker FTIR spectrometer with a liquid helium cooled bolometer and a recently developed frequency domain sensor operating at room temperature, with spectral resolution of 0.25 cm-1 and 0.03 cm-1, correspondingly. We have earlier demonstrated that molecular dynamics (MD) simulation can be effectively applied for characterizing relatively small biological molecules, such as transfer RNA or small protein thioredoxin from E. coli , and help to understand and predict their absorption spectra. Large size of DNA macromolecules ( 5 million base pairs for E. coli DNA) prevents, however, direct application of MD simulation at the current level of computational capabilities. Therefore, by applying a second order Markov chain approach and Monte-Carlo technique, we have developed a new statistical model to construct DNA sequences from biological cells. These short representative sequences (20-60 base pairs) are built upon the most frequently repeated fragments (2-10 base pairs) in the original DNA. Using this new approach, we constructed DNA sequences for several non-pathogenic strains of E.coli, including a well-known strain BL21, uro-pathogenic strain, CFT073, and deadly EDL933 strain (O157:H7), and used MD simulations to calculate vibrational absorption spectra of these strains. Significant differences are clearly present in spectra of strains in averaged spectra and in all components for particular orientations. The mechanism of interaction of THz radiation with a biological molecule is studied by analyzing dynamics of atoms and correlation of local vibrations in the modeled molecule. Simulated THz vibrational spectra of DNA are compared with experimental results. With the spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1 or better, which is now available in experiments, the very easy discrimination between different

  11. Subnanosecond Dynamics of Proteins in Solution: MD Simulations and Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarek, M.; Tobias, D. J.

    In summary, while classical MD simulations using current generation force fields have allowed us to reproduce quite well the dynamics of proteins in a variety of environments, as probed by neutron scattering data, the full potential of such calculations has not yet been fully exploited. We have illustrated some examples where simulations can be used to provide support for the models used by experimentalists, and others where it is clear that further work is needed to extract the maximum information from QENS spectra. At any rate, it is crucial that simulations and experiments on such complex systems go hand in hand, so that "raw data" may be compared side-by-side, and all the pitfalls, both in the simulation protocols and the experimental data analysis, may be identified and overcome.

  12. Dynamics of biopolymers on nanomaterials studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.

    Neutron scattering has been proved to be a powerful tool to study the dynamics of biological systems under various conditions. This thesis intends to utilize neutron scattering techniques, combining with MD simulations, to develop fundamental understanding of several biologically interesting systems. Our systems include a drug delivery system containing Nanodiamonds with nucleic acid (RNA), and two specific model proteins, beta-Casein and Inorganic Pyrophosphatase (IPPase). RNA and nanodiamond (ND) both are suitable for drug-delivery applications in nano-biotechnology. The architecturally flexible RNA with catalytic functionality forms nanocomposites that can treat life-threatening diseases. The non-toxic ND has excellent mechanical and optical properties and functionalizable high surface area, and thus actively considered for biomedical applications. In this thesis, we utilized two tools, quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations to probe the effect of ND on RNA dynamics. Our work provides fundamental understanding of how hydrated RNA motions are affected in the RNA-ND nanocomposites. From the experimental and Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MD), we found that hydrated RNA motion is faster on ND surface than a freestanding one. MD Simulation results showed that the failure of Stokes Einstein relation results the presence of dynamic heterogeneities in the biomacromolecules. Radial pair distribution function from MD Simulation confirmed that the hydrophilic nature of ND attracts more water than RNA results the de-confinement of RNA on ND. Therefore, RNA exhibits faster motion in the presence of ND than freestanding RNA. In the second project, we studied the dynamics of a natively disordered protein beta-Casein which lacks secondary structures. In this study, the temperature and hydration effects on the dynamics of beta-Casein are explored by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS). We investigated the mean square displacement (MSD) of

  13. Shock induced alpha-epsilon phase transition in iron: Analysis of MD simulations and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawreliak, James; Belak, J. F.; Davies, H. M.; Germann, T. C.; Meyers, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    Multi-million atom non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for shock compressed iron are analyzed using Fourier methods to determine the long scale ordering of the crystal. By analyzing the location of the maxima in k-space we can determine the crystal structure and compression due to the shock. This poster will present results from different shock pressures and compare them to recent experiments of shock compressed iron where the crystal structure was determined using in-situ wide angle x-ray diffraction.

  14. A gold cyano complex in nitromethane: MD simulation and X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Michael; Injan, Natcha; Megyes, Tünde; Bako, Imre; Balint, Szabolcz; Limtrakul, Jumras; Nazmutdinov, Renat; Mitev, Pavlin D.; Hermansson, Kersti

    2012-01-01

    The solvation structure around the dicyanoaurate(I) anion (Au(CN)2−) in a dilute nitromethane (CH3NO2) solution is presented from X-ray diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics simulation (NVT ensemble, 460 nitromethane molecules at room temperature). The simulations are based on a new solute–solvent force-field fitted to a training set of quantum-chemically derived interaction energies. Radial distribution functions from experiment and simulation are in good agreement. The solvation structure has been further elucidated from MD data. Several shells can be identified. We obtain a solvation number of 13–17 nitromethane molecules with a strong preference to be oriented with their methyl groups towards the solute. PMID:25540462

  15. Mimicking titration experiments with MD simulations: A protocol for the investigation of pH-dependent effects on proteins

    PubMed Central

    Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure and function are highly dependent on the environmental pH. However, the temporal or spatial resolution of experimental approaches hampers direct observation of pH-induced conformational changes at the atomic level. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation strategies (e.g. constant pH MD) have been developed to bridge this gap. However, one frequent problem is the sampling of unrealistic conformations, which may also lead to poor pKa predictions. To address this problem, we have developed and benchmarked the pH-titration MD (pHtMD) approach, which is inspired by wet-lab titration experiments. We give several examples how the pHtMD protocol can be applied for pKa calculation including peptide systems, Staphylococcus nuclease (SNase), and the chaperone HdeA. For HdeA, pHtMD is also capable of monitoring pH-dependent dimer dissociation in accordance with experiments. We conclude that pHtMD represents a versatile tool for pKa value calculation and simulation of pH-dependent effects in proteins. PMID:26936826

  16. Mimicking titration experiments with MD simulations: A protocol for the investigation of pH-dependent effects on proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich

    2016-03-01

    Protein structure and function are highly dependent on the environmental pH. However, the temporal or spatial resolution of experimental approaches hampers direct observation of pH-induced conformational changes at the atomic level. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation strategies (e.g. constant pH MD) have been developed to bridge this gap. However, one frequent problem is the sampling of unrealistic conformations, which may also lead to poor pKa predictions. To address this problem, we have developed and benchmarked the pH-titration MD (pHtMD) approach, which is inspired by wet-lab titration experiments. We give several examples how the pHtMD protocol can be applied for pKa calculation including peptide systems, Staphylococcus nuclease (SNase), and the chaperone HdeA. For HdeA, pHtMD is also capable of monitoring pH-dependent dimer dissociation in accordance with experiments. We conclude that pHtMD represents a versatile tool for pKa value calculation and simulation of pH-dependent effects in proteins.

  17. Desorption of water from hydrophilic MCM-41 mesopores: positron annihilation, FTIR and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Priya; Dutta, D; Muthulakshmi, T; Chakraborty, B; Raje, N; Pujari, P K

    2017-02-08

    The desorption mechanism of water from the hydrophilic mesopores of MCM-41 was studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. PALS results indicated that water molecules do not undergo sequential evaporation in a simple layer-by-layer manner during desorption from MCM-41 mesopores. The results suggested that the water column inside the uniform cylindrical mesopore become stretched during desorption and induces cavitation (as seen in the case of ink-bottle type pores) inside it, keeping a dense water layer at the hydrophilic pore wall, as well as a water plug at both the open ends of the cylindrical pore, until the water was reduced to a certain volume fraction where the pore catastrophically empties. Before being emptied, the water molecules formed clusters inside the mesopores. The formation of molecular clusters below a certain level of hydration was corroborated by the MD simulation study. The results are discussed.

  18. MD Simulations and Multivariate Studies for Modeling the Anti-Leishmanial Activity of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Mirian Elisa Rodrigues; Fadel, Valmir; Maltarollo, Vinícius Gonçalves; Baldissera, Gisele; Honorio, Kathia Maria; Ruggiero, José Roberto; Dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez

    2017-03-07

    Leishmaniasis, a protozoan-caused disease, requires alternative treatments with minimized side effects and less prone to resistance development. Antimicrobial peptides represent a possible choice to be developed. We report on the prospection of structural parameters of 23 helical antimicrobial and leishmanicidal peptides as a tool for modeling and predicting the activity of new peptides. This investigation is based on molecular dynamic simulations (MD) in mimetic membrane environment, since most of these peptides share the feature of interacting with phospholipid bilayers. To overcome the lack of experimental data on peptides' structures, we started simulations from designed 100% α-helices. This procedure was validated through comparisons with NMR data and the determination of the structure of Decoralin-amide. From physicochemical features and MD results, descriptors were raised and statistically related to the minimum inhibitory concentration against Leishmania by the multivariate data analysis technique. This statistical procedure confirmed five descriptors combined by different loadings in five principal components. The leishmanicidal activity depends on peptides' charge, backbone solvation, volume and solvent accessible surface area. The generated model possesses good predictability (q(2) =0.715, r(2) =0.898) and is indicative for the most and the least active peptides. This is a novel theoretical path for structure-activity studies combining computational methods that identify and prioritize the promising peptide candidates. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Desorption of water from hydrophilic MCM-41 mesopores: positron annihilation, FTIR and MD simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Priya; Dutta, D.; Muthulakshmi, T.; Chakraborty, B.; Raje, N.; Pujari, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    The desorption mechanism of water from the hydrophilic mesopores of MCM-41 was studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. PALS results indicated that water molecules do not undergo sequential evaporation in a simple layer-by-layer manner during desorption from MCM-41 mesopores. The results suggested that the water column inside the uniform cylindrical mesopore become stretched during desorption and induces cavitation (as seen in the case of ink-bottle type pores) inside it, keeping a dense water layer at the hydrophilic pore wall, as well as a water plug at both the open ends of the cylindrical pore, until the water was reduced to a certain volume fraction where the pore catastrophically empties. Before being emptied, the water molecules formed clusters inside the mesopores. The formation of molecular clusters below a certain level of hydration was corroborated by the MD simulation study. The results are discussed.

  20. Solvation structure and dynamics of K+ in aqueous ammonia solution: Insights from an ONIOM-XS MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbalee, Pilailuk; Sripa, Pattrawan; Tongraar, Anan; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-07-01

    An ONIOM-XS MD simulation has been performed to investigate the solvation structure and dynamics of K+ in aqueous ammonia solution. Detailed analyses on the ONIOM-XS MD trajectories clearly reveal that the K+ solvation is rather flexible, forming numerous possible K+-ligand species, ranging from 4- to 10-fold coordinated complexes. The average coordination number of K+ in such a solvent mixture is predicted to be 7.0, consisting of 4.8 water and 2.2 ammonia molecules. The results obtained by the ONIOM-XS MD simulation have provided more insights into the characteristics of this solvated ion, i.e., when compared to the previous QM/MM MD study.

  1. Prediction of drug-packaging interactions via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Peter; Brunsteiner, Michael; Khinast, Johannes

    2012-07-15

    The interaction between packaging materials and drug products is an important issue for the pharmaceutical industry, since during manufacturing, processing and storage a drug product is continuously exposed to various packaging materials. The experimental investigation of a great variety of different packaging material-drug product combinations in terms of efficacy and safety can be a costly and time-consuming task. In our work we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to evaluate the applicability of such methods to pre-screening of the packaging material-solute compatibility. The solvation free energy and the free energy of adsorption of diverse solute/solvent/solid systems were estimated. The results of our simulations agree with experimental values previously published in the literature, which indicates that the methods in question can be used to semi-quantitatively reproduce the solid-liquid interactions of the investigated systems.

  2. A study of QM/Langevin-MD simulation for oxygen-evolving center of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Waka; Kimura, Yoshiro; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Ogata, Koji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Yokojima, Satoshi

    2013-12-10

    We have performed three QM/Langevin-MD simulations for oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) and surrounding residues, which are different configurations of the oxidation numbers on Mn atoms in the Mn{sub 4}O{sub 5}Ca cluster. By analyzing these trajectories, we have observed sensitivity of the change to the configuration of Mn oxidation state on O atoms of carboxyl on three amino acids, Glu354, Ala344, and Glu333. The distances from Mn to O atoms in residues contacting with the Mn{sub 4}O{sub 5}Ca cluster were analyzed for the three trajectories. We found the good correlation of the distances among the simulations. However, the distances with Glu354, Ala344, and Glu333 have not shown the correlation. These residues can be sensitive index of the changes of Mn oxidation numbers.

  3. Segregation formation, thermal and electronic properties of ternary cubic CdZnTe clusters: MD simulations and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurban, Mustafa; Erkoç, Şakir

    2017-04-01

    Surface and core formation, thermal and electronic properties of ternary cubic CdZnTe clusters are investigated by using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In this work, MD simulations of the CdZnTe clusters are performed by means of LAMMPS by using bond order potential (BOP). MD simulations are carried out at different temperatures to study the segregation phenomena of Cd, Zn and Te atoms, and deviation of clusters and heat capacity. After that, using optimized geometries obtained, excess charge on atoms, dipole moments, highest occupied molecular orbitals, lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, HOMO-LUMO gaps (Eg) , total energies, spin density and the density of states (DOS) have been calculated with DFT. Simulation results such as heat capacity and segregation formation are compared with experimental bulk and theoretical results.

  4. Structural and dynamical aspects of Streptococcus gordonii FabH through molecular docking and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Amen; Abbasi, Sumra Wajid; Azam, Syed Sikander

    2015-07-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP-synthase III (FabH or KAS III) has become an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents which can overcome the multidrug resistance. Unraveling the fatty acid biosynthesis (FAB) metabolic pathway and understanding structural coordinates of FabH will provide valuable insights to target Streptococcus gordonii for curing oral infection. In this study, we designed inhibitors against therapeutic target FabH, in order to block the FAB pathway. As compared to other targets, FabH has more interactions with other proteins, located on the leading strand with higher codon adaptation index value and associated with lipid metabolism category of COG. Current study aims to gain in silico insights into the structural and dynamical aspect of S. gordonii FabH via molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The FabH protein is catalytically active in dimerization while it can lock in monomeric state. Current study highlights two residues Pro88 and Leu315 that are close to each other by dimerization. The active site of FabH is composed of the catalytic triad formed by residues Cys112, His249, and Asn279 in which Cys112 is involved in acetyl transfer, while His249 and Asn279 play an active role in decarboxylation. Docking analysis revealed that among the studied compounds, methyl-CoA disulfide has highest GOLD score (82.75), binding affinity (-11 kcal/mol) and exhibited consistently better interactions. During MD simulations, the FabH structure remained stable with the average RMSD value of 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å for undocked protein and docked complex, respectively. Further, crucial hydrogen bonding of the conserved catalytic triad for exhibiting high affinity between the FabH protein and ligand is observed by RDF analysis. The MD simulation results clearly demonstrated that binding of the inhibitor with S. gordonii FabH enhanced the structure and stabilized the dimeric FabH protein. Therefore, the inhibitor has the potential to become

  5. Insights into proton translocation in cbb3 oxidase from MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Carvalheda, Catarina A; Pisliakov, Andrei V

    2017-03-01

    Heme-copper oxidases are membrane protein complexes that catalyse the final step of the aerobic respiration, namely the reduction of oxygen to water. The energy released during catalysis is coupled to the active translocation of protons across the membrane, which contributes to the establishment of an electrochemical gradient that is used for ATP synthesis. The distinctive C-type (or cbb3) cytochrome c oxidases, which are mostly present in proteobacteria, exhibit a number of unique structural and functional features, including high catalytic activity at low oxygen concentrations. At the moment, the functioning mechanism of C-type oxidases, in particular the proton transfer/pumping mechanism presumably via a single proton channel, is still poorly understood. In this work we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and continuum electrostatics calculations to obtain atomic-level insights into the hydration and dynamics of a cbb3 oxidase. We provide the details of the water dynamics and proton transfer pathways for both the "chemical" and "pumped" protons, and show that formation of protonic connections is strongly affected by the protonation state of key residues, namely H243, E323 and H337.

  6. MD simulation of steady shock-wave fronts with phase transition in single-crystal iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakhovsky, V. V.; Migdal, K. P.; Inogamov, N. A.; Anisimov, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    Overdriven shock waves propagating in main crystallographic directions of single-crystal bcc iron were studied with moving-window molecular dynamics (MD) technique. To simulate correctly the shock-induced bcc-to-hcp phase transition in iron a new EAM potential fitted to the cold pressure curves and pressure transition at 13 GPa was developed with the stress matching method. We demonstrate that structure of shock fronts depends on orientation of crystal. A peculiar structure of steady shock-wave front in [100] direction is observed. While the ultra-fast α → ɛ transition initiated in uniaxially compressed crystal along [100] in elastic zone transforms bcc completely to hcp phase, transformation in other directions is performed only partially with production of metastable composition of nanometer-sized bcc-hcp-fcc grains.

  7. Molecular design and MD simulations of epitaxial superlattice of self-assembling ternary lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Multicomponent lipid bilayers represent an important model system for studying cell membranes. At present, an ordered multicomponent phospholipid/cholesterol bilayer system involving charged lipid is still not available. Using a lipid superlattice (SL) model, a 13 x 15 x 15 nm^3 ternary phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine/cholesterol bilayer system in water with simultaneous headgroup SL and acyl chain SL at different depths, or epitaxial SL, of the bilayer has been designed with atomistic detail. The arrangements of this epitaxial SL system were optimized by only two molecular parameters, lattice space and rotational angle of the lipids. Using atomistic MD simulations, we demonstrated the stability of the ordered structures for more than 100 ns. A positional restrained system was also used as a control. This system will provide new insights into understanding the nanodomain structures of cell membranes at the molecular level.

  8. Dynamics of Molecules Adsorbed in Zeolitic Systems: Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2011-07-01

    Zeolites represent a class of technologically important materials because of their characteristic properties of molecular sieving and catalysis, which makes them indispensable in the petroleum industries. While the catalytic properties depend upon many factors, a major role is played by the dynamics of hydrocarbon gases. In order to be able to tailor make these materials for use in industry for catalytic and sieving purposes, it is important to understand the dynamical properties of the guest molecules adsorbed in the zeolitic materials. It is of interest to study the effects of size and shape of guest molecules and also the host zeolitic structure, governing the diffusion mechanism of the adsorbed species. Here we report the results of Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of two hydrocarbons namely acetylene and propylene adsorbed in two structurally different zeolites Na-Y and ZSM-5.

  9. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigatingmore » protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.« less

  10. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigating protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.

  11. Collision-induced light scattering spectra of krypton layer confined between graphite slabs - MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawid, A.; Wojcieszyk, D.; Gburski, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We have used the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method to obtain the collision-induced light scattering spectra of the thin krypton layer confined between two parallel graphite slabs. The simulations have been made under constant density, pressure and temperature condition. We have investigated four thin krypton layers of the thickness ranging from 13 to 24 Å. The 2-, 3- and 4-body correlation functions of collision-induced polarizability anisotropy were calculated. The spectra of colliding krypton atoms were simulated as cosine Fourier transform of the total polarizability anisotropy correlation function. The calculated correlation functions and their spectra show substantial dependence on the distance between graphite slabs. The collision-induced light scattering spectrum of krypton bulk sample was also simulated and compared with the krypton layer between graphite walls. The striking differences between these two systems are observed. We have further extended our analysis of krypton movement between graphite slabs by calculating the mean square displacement functions and diffusion coefficients. The decrease of the diffusion of krypton atoms with the increasing distance between graphite walls has been found. The structure of krypton layer has been also investigated by calculating the density profile and pressure tension across the rift. The distance between graphite slabs, for which the highest mobility of krypton's atoms occurred, has been found.

  12. Coupling MD Simulations and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to Study Ions in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, E. Sanchez; Beret, E. C.; Martinez, J. M.; Pappalardo, R. R.; Ayala, R.; Munoz-Paez, A.

    2007-11-29

    The structure of ionic solutions is a key-point in understanding physicochemical properties of electrolyte solutions. Among the reduced number of experimental techniques which can supply direct information on the ion environment, X-ray Absorption techniques (XAS) have gained importance during the last decades although they are not free of difficulties associated to the data analysis leading to provide reliable structures. Computer simulations of ions in solution is a theoretical alternative to provide information on the solvation structure. Thus, the use of computational chemistry can increase the understanding of these systems although an accurate description of ionic solvation phenomena represents nowadays a significant challenge to theoretical chemistry. We present: (a) the assignment of features in the XANES spectrum to well defined structural motif in the ion environment, (b) MD-based evaluation of EXAFS parameters used in the fitting procedure to make easier the structural resolution, and (c) the use of the agreement between experimental and simulated XANES spectra to help in the choice of a given intermolecular potential for Computer Simulations. Chemical problems examined are: (a) the identification of the second hydration shell in dilute aqueous solutions of highly-charged cations, such as Cr{sup 3+}, Rh{sup 3+}, Ir{sup 3+}, (b) the invisibility by XAS of certain structures characterized by Computer Simulations but exhibiting high dynamical behavior and (c) the solvation of Br{sup -} in acetonitrile.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes in Water: MD Simulations of Internal and External Flow, Self Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Halicioglu, Timur; Werder, Thomas; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have developed computational tools, based on particle codes, for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in aqueous environments. The interaction of CNTs with water is envisioned as a prototype for the design of engineering nano-devices, such as artificial sterocillia and molecular biosensors. Large scale simulations involving thousands of water molecules are possible due to our efficient parallel MD code that takes long range electrostatic interactions into account. Since CNTs can be considered as rolled up sheets of graphite, we expect the CNT-water interaction to be similar to the interaction of graphite with water. However, there are fundamental differences between considering graphite and CNTs, since the curvature of CNTs affects their chemical activity and also since capillary effects play an important role for both dynamic and static behaviour of materials inside CNTs. In recent studies Gordillo and Marti described the hydrogen bond structure as well as time dependent properties of water confined in CNTs. We are presenting results from the development of force fields describing the interaction of CNTs and water based on ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations. Furthermore, our results include both water flows external to CNTs and the behaviour of water nanodroplets inside heated CNTs. In the first case (external flows) the hydrophobic behaviour of CNTs is quantified and we analyze structural properties of water in the vicinity of CNTs with diagnostics such as hydrogen bond distribution, water dipole orientation and radial distribution functions. The presence of water leads to attractive forces between CNTs as a result of their hydrophobicity. Through extensive simulations we quantify these attractive forces in terms of the number and separation of the CNT. Results of our simulations involving arrays of CNTs indicate that these exhibit a hydrophobic behaviour that leads to self-organising structures capable of trapping water clusters

  14. A combined EPR and MD simulation study of a nitroxyl spin label with restricted internal mobility sensitive to protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganesyan, Vasily S.; Chami, Fatima; White, Gaye F.; Thomson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    EPR studies combined with fully atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and an MD-EPR simulation method provide evidence for intrinsic low rotameric mobility of a nitroxyl spin label, Rn, compared to the more widely employed label MTSL (R1). Both experimental and modelling results using two structurally different sites of attachment to Myoglobin show that the EPR spectra of Rn are more sensitive to the local protein environment than that of MTSL. This study reveals the potential of using the Rn spin label as a reporter of protein motions.

  15. Particle Size Effect on Wetting Kinetics of a Nanosuspension Drop: MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Baiou; Webb, Edmund

    The behavior of nano-fluids, or fluid suspensions containing nanoparticles, has garnered tremendous attention recently for applications in advanced manufacturing. In our previous results from MD simulations, for a wetting system with different advancing contact angles, cases where self-pinning was observed were compared to cases where it was not and relevant forces on particles at the contact line were computed. To advance this work, the roles of particle size and particle loading are examined. Results presented illustrate how particle size affects spreading kinetics and how this connects to dynamic droplet morphology and relevant forces that exist nearby the contact line region. Furthermore, increased particle size in simulations permits a more detailed investigation of particle/substrate interfacial contributions to behavior observed at the advancing contact line. Based on changes in spreading kinetics with particle size, forces between the particle and liquid front are predicted and compared to those computed from simulations. At high loading, particle/particle interactions become relevant and forces computed between particles entrained to an advancing contact line will be presented.

  16. Estimation of Hydrogen-Exchange Protection Factors from MD Simulation Based on Amide Hydrogen Bonding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hee; Venable, John D; Steckler, Caitlin; Cellitti, Susan E; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-09-28

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) studies have provided critical insight into our understanding of protein folding, structure, and dynamics. More recently, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) has become a widely applicable tool for HX studies. The interpretation of the wealth of data generated by HX-MS experiments as well as other HX methods would greatly benefit from the availability of exchange predictions derived from structures or models for comparison with experiment. Most reported computational HX modeling studies have employed solvent-accessible-surface-area based metrics in attempts to interpret HX data on the basis of structures or models. In this study, a computational HX-MS prediction method based on classification of the amide hydrogen bonding modes mimicking the local unfolding model is demonstrated. Analysis of the NH bonding configurations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation snapshots is used to determine partitioning over bonded and nonbonded NH states and is directly mapped into a protection factor (PF) using a logistics growth function. Predicted PFs are then used for calculating deuteration values of peptides and compared with experimental data. Hydrogen exchange MS data for fatty acid synthase thioesterase (FAS-TE) collected for a range of pHs and temperatures was used for detailed evaluation of the approach. High correlation between prediction and experiment for observable fragment peptides is observed in the FAS-TE and additional benchmarking systems that included various apo/holo proteins for which literature data were available. In addition, it is shown that HX modeling can improve experimental resolution through decomposition of in-exchange curves into rate classes, which correlate with prediction from MD. Successful rate class decompositions provide further evidence that the presented approach captures the underlying physical processes correctly at the single residue level. This assessment is further strengthened in a comparison of

  17. Methodologies for the Analysis of Instantaneous Lipid Diffusion in MD Simulations of Large Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chavent, Matthieu; Reddy, Tyler; Goose, Joseph; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Stone, John E.; Jobard, Bruno; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between lipids and membrane proteins play a key role in determining the nanoscale dynamic and structural properties of biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a valuable tool for studying membrane models, complementing experimental approaches. It is now possible to simulate large membrane systems, such as simplified models of bacterial and viral envelope membranes. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop tools to visualize and quantify the dynamics of these immense systems, which typically are comprised of millions of particles. To tackle this issue, we have developed visual and quantitative analyses of molecular positions and their velocity field using path line, vector field and streamline techniques. This allows us to highlight large, transient flow-like movements of lipids and to better understand crowding within the lipid bilayer. The current study focuses on visualization and analysis of lipid dynamics. However, the methods are flexible and can be readily applied to e.g. proteins and nanoparticles within large complex membranes. The protocols developed here are readily accessible both as a plugin for the molecular visualization program VMD and as a module for the MDAnalysis library. PMID:25341001

  18. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  19. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  20. Atomic level insights into realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes through MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Maiti, Prabal K.; Bharatam, Prasad V.

    2016-09-01

    Computational studies performed on dendrimer-drug complexes usually consider 1:1 stoichiometry, which is far from reality, since in experiments more number of drug molecules get encapsulated inside a dendrimer. In the present study, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were implemented to characterize the more realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes (1:n stoichiometry) in order to understand the effect of high drug loading on the structural properties and also to unveil the atomistic level details. For this purpose, possible inclusion complexes of model drug Nateglinide (Ntg) (antidiabetic, belongs to Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II) with amine- and acetyl-terminated G4 poly(amidoamine) (G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac)) dendrimers at neutral and low pH conditions are explored in this work. MD simulation analysis on dendrimer-drug complexes revealed that the drug encapsulation efficiency of G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac) dendrimers at neutral pH was 6 and 5, respectively, while at low pH it was 12 and 13, respectively. Center-of-mass distance analysis showed that most of the drug molecules are located in the interior hydrophobic pockets of G4 PAMAM(NH2) at both the pH; while in the case of G4 PAMAM(Ac), most of them are distributed near to the surface at neutral pH and in the interior hydrophobic pockets at low pH. Structural properties such as radius of gyration, shape, radial density distribution, and solvent accessible surface area of dendrimer-drug complexes were also assessed and compared with that of the drug unloaded dendrimers. Further, binding energy calculations using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach revealed that the location of drug molecules in the dendrimer is not the decisive factor for the higher and lower binding affinity of the complex, but the charged state of dendrimer and drug, intermolecular interactions, pH-induced conformational changes, and surface groups of dendrimer do play an

  1. Influence of mold and substrate material combinations on nanoimprint lithography process: MD simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seunghwa; Yu, Suyoung; Cho, Maenghyo

    2014-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) study was performed to examine the effect of mold-substrate material composition on the pattern transferring and defects of the resist polymer in a thermal Nano Imprint Lithography (NIL) process. As candidate materials, single crystalline nickel (Ni), silicon (Si) and silica (SiO2, α-quartz) for the rigid mold substrate, and amorphous poly-(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) thin film for the resist were considered for common applications in NIL processes. Three different material compositions of Si mold-Ni substrate, Ni mold-Si substrate, and quartz mold-Ni substrate were considered. In accordance with a real NIL process, a sequence of indentation-relaxation-release processes was quasi-statically simulated using isothermal ensemble simulation on tri-layer molecular structures consisting of a mold, resist, and substrate. To correlate the deformed shape and delamination of PMMA resist from the substrate in indentation and release processes, non-bond interaction energy between a rigid mold and resist was calculated for each combination of mold and substrate materials. The Si mold-Ni substrate combination shows successful pattern transfer to the resist polymer even without an anti-sticking layer as a result of the desirable balance of surface free energy for mold and substrate materials. However, Ni mold-Si substrate combination shows a critical delamination of the resist in the release process due to strong van der Waals adhesion between the resist and Ni mold. Similarly, the quartz mold-Ni substrate combination shows the same delamination in pattern transfer, but the adhesion of the resist to the quartz mold is attributed to electrostatic interaction. In order to provide guidelines for material selection in imprint-like processes where surface adsorption and wetting characteristics are critical design parameters, a simple PMMA-rigid plate model is proposed, with which consistent surface interaction characteristics in the full model NIL process

  2. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C-H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: 1H-13C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C-H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of 13C or 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R1, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C-H bond effective reorientational correlation time τe, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of 13C R1 and R1ρ relaxation rates, as well as 1H-13C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τe from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g1 methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τe-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τe-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C-H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C-H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD simulations of amphiphilic bilayers such as lipid membranes.

  3. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C–H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C–H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of {sup 13}C or {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R{sub 1}, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C–H bond effective reorientational correlation time τ{sub e}, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of {sup 13}C R{sub 1} and R{sub 1ρ} relaxation rates, as well as {sup 1}H−{sup 13}C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τ{sub e} from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g{sub 1} methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τ{sub e}-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τ{sub e}-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C–H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C–H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD

  4. Distribution of Drug Molecules in Lipid Membranes: Neutron Diffraction and MD Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Mihailescu, Ella; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. In this study, using neutron diffraction, the DOPC lipid bilayer structure (with and without drug) as well as the distribution of a model NSAID (Ibuprofen) as a function of its position along the membrane normal was obtained at sub-nanometer resolution. It was found that the bilayer thickness reduces as the drug is added. Further, the results are successfully compared with atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. Based on this successful comparison and motivated by atomic details from MD, quasi-molecular modeling of the lipid membrane is being carried out and will be presented. The above study is expected to provide an effective methodology to design drug delivery nanoparticles based on a variety of soft condensed matter such as lipids or polymers.

  5. Investigation of Oxygen Diffusion in Irradiated UO2 with MD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, Seçkin D.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, irradiated UO2 is analyzed by atomistic simulation method to obtain diffusion coefficient of oxygen ions. For this purpose, a couple of molecular dynamics (MD) supercells containing Frenkel, Schottky, vacancy and interstitial types for both anion and cation defects is constructed individually. Each of their contribution is used to calculate the total oxygen diffusion for both intrinsic and extrinsic ranges. The results display that irradiation-induced defects contribute the most to the overall oxygen diffusion at temperatures below 800-1,200 K. This result is quite sensible because experimental data shows that, from room temperature to about 1,500 K, irradiation-induced swelling decreases and irradiated UO2 lattice parameter is gradually recovered because defects annihilate each other. Another point is that, concentration of defects enhances the irradiation-induced oxygen diffusion. Irradiation type also has the similar effect, namely oxygen diffusion in crystals irradiated with α-particles is more than the crystals irradiated with neutrons. Dynamic Frenkel defects dominate the oxygen diffusion data above 1,500—1,800 K. In all these temperature ranges, thermally induced Frenkel defects make no significant contribution to overall oxygen diffusion.

  6. Kinetic Cooperativity, Loop Dynamics, and Allostery from NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschweiler, Rafael

    The hallmark of glucokinase (GCK), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose during glycolysis, is its kinetic cooperativity whose understanding at atomic detail has remained open since its discovery over 40 years ago. I will discuss how the origin of kinetic cooperativity is rooted in intramolecular protein dynamics using NMR relaxation data of 17 isoleucines distributed over all parts of GCK. Residues of glucose-free GCK located in the small domain display a distinct exchange behavior involving multiple conformers that are substantially populated, whereas in the glucose-bound form these dynamic processes are quenched. The conformational exchange process directly competes with the enzymatic turnover at physiological glucose concentrations, thereby generating the sigmoidal rate dependence that defines kinetic cooperativity. The flexible nature of protein loops and the timescales of their dynamics are critical for many biologically important events at the molecular level, such as protein interaction and recognition processes. Based on a library of proteins, rules about loop dynamics in terms of amplitude and timescales can be derived using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and NMR data. These rules have been implemented in the new web server ToeLoop (for Timescales Of Every Loop) that permits the prediction of loop dynamics based on an average 3D protein structure (http://spin.ccic.ohio-state.edu/index.php/loop/index).

  7. From force-fields to photons: MD simulations of dye-labeled nucleic acids and Monte Carlo modeling of FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldner, Lori

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful technique for understanding the structural fluctuations and transformations of RNA, DNA and proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a window into the nature of these fluctuations on a different, faster, time scale. We use Monte Carlo methods to model and compare FRET data from dye-labeled RNA with what might be predicted from the MD simulation. With a few notable exceptions, the contribution of fluorophore and linker dynamics to these FRET measurements has not been investigated. We include the dynamics of the ground state dyes and linkers in our study of a 16mer double-stranded RNA. Water is included explicitly in the simulation. Cyanine dyes are attached at either the 3' or 5' ends with a 3 carbon linker, and differences in labeling schemes are discussed.[4pt] Work done in collaboration with Peker Milas, Benjamin D. Gamari, and Louis Parrot.

  8. Folding of proteins with an all-atom Go-model.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, J; Qin, M; Liu, F; Wang, W

    2008-06-21

    The Go-like potential at a residual level has been successfully applied to the folding of proteins in many previous works. However, taking into consideration more detailed structural information in the atomic level, the definition of contacts used in these traditional Go-models may not be suitable for all-atom simulations. Here, in this work, we develop a rational definition of contacts considering the screening effect in the crowded intramolecular environment. In such a scheme, a large amount of screened atom pairs are excluded and the number of contacts is decreased compared to the case of the traditional definition. These contacts defined by such a new definition are compatible with the all-atom representation of protein structures. To verify the rationality of the new definition of contacts, the folding of proteins CI2 and SH3 is simulated by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. A high folding cooperativity and good correlation of the simulated Phi-values with those obtained experimentally, especially for CI2, are found. This suggests that the all-atom Go-model is improved compared to the traditional Go-model. Based on the comparison of the Phi-values, the roles of side chains in the folding are discussed, and it is concluded that the side-chain structures are more important for local contacts in determining the transition state structures. Moreover, the relations between side chain and backbone orderings are also discussed.

  9. Preferential solvation and dynamics of Li+ in aqueous ammonia solution: An ONIOM-XS MD simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbalee, Pilailuk; Tongraar, Anan; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-01-01

    A more sophisticated quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) technique based on the ONIOM-XS method, called the ONIOM-XS MD, has been applied for studying the characteristics of Li+ in an aqueous ammonia solution. As compared to the conventional QM/MM MD study, which predicts a clear water preference with the arrangement of the Li+[(H2O)4][(H2O)4] type, the ONIOM-XS MD simulation clearly reveals that this ion can order both water and ammonia molecules to form the preferred Li+[(H2O)3NH3][(H2O)11(NH3)3] complex. Of particular interest, it is observed that the "structure-making" ability of Li+ is not too strong and that the first solvation shell of Li+ is somewhat flexible, in which other different 4-fold coordinated species, such as Li+(H2O)4 and Li+(H2O)2(NH3)2, can frequently be formed. In addition, it is found that the second solvation shell of Li+ is less structured, implying a small influence of Li+ in ordering the solvent molecules in this shell.

  10. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  11. Combining coarse-grained protein models with replica-exchange all-atom molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wabik, Jacek; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Gront, Dominik; Kouza, Maksim; Koliński, Andrzej

    2013-05-10

    We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  12. Dynamics of a globular protein and its hydration water studied by neutron scattering and MD simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Lagi, Marco; Chu, Xiang-qiang; ...

    2010-01-01

    This review article describes our neutron scattering experiments made in the past four years for the understanding of the single-particle (hydrogen atom) dynamics of a protein and its hydration water and the strong coupling between them. We found that the key to this strong coupling is the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon occurring at around T L = 225±5 K in the hydration water. On lowering of the temperature toward FSC, the structure of hydration water makes a transition from predominantly the high density form (HDL), a more fluid state, to predominantly the low density formmore » (LDL), a less fluid state, derived from the existence of a liquid–liquid critical point at an elevated pressure. We show experimentally that this sudden switch in the mobility of hydration water on Lysozyme, B-DNA and RNA triggers the dynamic transition, at a temperature T D = 220 K, for these biopolymers. In the glassy state, below T D , the biopolymers lose their vital conformational flexibility resulting in a substantial diminishing of their biological functions. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a realistic model of hydrated lysozyme powder, which confirms the existence of the FSC and the hydration level dependence of the FSC temperature. Furthermore, we show a striking feature in the short time relaxation ( β -relaxation) of protein dynamics, which is the logarithmic decay spanning 3 decades (from ps to ns). The long time α -relaxation shows instead a diffusive behavior, which supports the liquid-like motions of protein constituents. We then discuss our recent high-resolution X-ray inelastic scattering studies of globular proteins, Lysozyme and Bovine Serum Albumin. We were able to measure the dispersion relations of collective, intra-protein phonon-like excitations in these proteins for the first time. We found that the phonon energies show a marked softening and at the same time their population increases

  13. An all-atom structure-based potential for proteins: bridging minimal models with all-atom empirical forcefields.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Noel, Jeffrey K; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Onuchic, José N

    2009-05-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Go) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase, and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a C(alpha) structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include: (1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature, (2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters, (3) protein folding free-energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications, (4) the global folding mechanisms in a C(alpha) model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model, and (5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Because this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function.

  14. An All-atom Structure-Based Potential for Proteins: Bridging Minimal Models with All-atom Empirical Forcefields

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Paul C.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y.; Onuchic, José N.

    2012-01-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Gō) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a Cα structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include 1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature 2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters 3) protein folding free energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications 4) the global folding mechanisms in a Cα model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model 5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Since this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function. PMID:18837035

  15. Solvation structure and dynamics of Na+ in liquid ammonia studied by ONIOM-XS MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripradite, Jarukorn; Tongraar, Anan; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-12-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) technique based on the ONIOM-XS method, known as the ONIOM-XS MD, has been applied to investigate the solvation structure and dynamics of Na+ in liquid ammonia. Regarding the ONIOM-XS MD results, it is observed that Na+ is able to order the surrounding ammonia molecules to form its specific first and second solvation shells with the average coordination numbers of 5.1 and 11.2, respectively. The first solvation shell of Na+ is rather well-defined, forming a preferred 5-fold coordinated complex with a distorted square pyramidal geometry. In this respect, the most preferential Na+(NH3)5 species could convert back and forth to the lower probability Na+(NH3)6 and Na+(NH3)4 configurations. The second solvation shell of Na+ is detectable, in which a number of ammonia molecules, ranging from 7 to 14, are involved in this layer and they are arranged according to recognizable influence of the ion.

  16. In silico characterization of binding mode of CCR8 inhibitor: homology modeling, docking and membrane based MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Gadhe, Changdev G; Balupuri, Anand; Cho, Seung Joo

    2015-01-01

    Human CC-chemokine receptor 8 (CCR8) is a crucial drug target in asthma that belongs to G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which is characterized by seven transmembrane helices. To date, there is no X-ray crystal structure available for CCR8; this hampers active research on the target. Molecular basis of interaction mechanism of antagonist with CCR8 remains unclear. In order to provide binding site information and stable binding mode, we performed modeling, docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of CCR8. Docking study of biaryl-ether-piperidine derivative (13C) was performed inside predefined CCR8 binding site to get the representative conformation of 13C. Further, MD simulations of receptor and complex (13C-CCR8) inside dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers were performed to explore the effect of lipids. Results analyses showed that the Gln91, Tyr94, Cys106, Val109, Tyr113, Cys183, Tyr184, Ser185, Lys195, Thr198, Asn199, Met202, Phe254, and Glu286 were conserved in both docking and MD simulations. This indicated possible role of these residues in CCR8 antagonism. However, experimental mutational studies on these identified residues could be effective to confirm their importance in CCR8 antagonism. Furthermore, calculated Coulombic interactions represented the crucial roles of Glu286, Lys195, and Tyr113 in CCR8 antagonism. Important residues identified in this study overlap with the previous non-peptide agonist (LMD-009) binding site. Though, the non-peptide agonist and currently studied inhibitor (13C) share common substructure, but they differ in their effects on CCR8. So, to get more insight into their agonist and antagonist effects, further side-by-side experimental studies on both agonist (LMD-009) and antagonist (13C) are suggested.

  17. All-Atom Continuous Constant pH Molecular Dynamics With Particle Mesh Ewald and Titratable Water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yandong; Chen, Wei; Wallace, Jason A; Shen, Jana

    2016-11-08

    Development of a pH stat to properly control solution pH in biomolecular simulations has been a long-standing goal in the community. Toward this goal recent years have witnessed the emergence of the so-called constant pH molecular dynamics methods. However, the accuracy and generality of these methods have been hampered by the use of implicit-solvent models or truncation-based electrostatic schemes. Here we report the implementation of the particle mesh Ewald (PME) scheme into the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method, enabling CpHMD to be performed with a standard MD engine at a fractional added computational cost. We demonstrate the performance using pH replica-exchange CpHMD simulations with titratable water for a stringent test set of proteins, HP36, BBL, HEWL, and SNase. With the sampling time of 10 ns per replica, most pKa's are converged, yielding the average absolute and root-mean-square deviations of 0.61 and 0.77, respectively, from experiment. Linear regression of the calculated vs experimental pKa shifts gives a correlation coefficient of 0.79, a slope of 1, and an intercept near 0. Analysis reveals inadequate sampling of structure relaxation accompanying a protonation-state switch as a major source of the remaining errors, which are reduced as simulation prolongs. These data suggest PME-based CpHMD can be used as a general tool for pH-controlled simulations of macromolecular systems in various environments, enabling atomic insights into pH-dependent phenomena involving not only soluble proteins but also transmembrane proteins, nucleic acids, surfactants, and polysaccharides.

  18. Pressure-induced structural transition of mature HIV-1 Protease from a combined NMR/MD simulation approach

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Bax, Ad; Best, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the pressure-induced structural changes in the mature human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease dimer (HIV-1 PR), using residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements in a weakly oriented solution. 1DNH RDCs were measured under high-pressure conditions for an inhibitor-free PR and an inhibitor-bound complex, as well as for an inhibitor-free multidrug resistant protease bearing 20 mutations (PR20). While PR20 and the inhibitor-bound PR were little affected by pressure, inhibitor-free PR showed significant differences in the RDCs measured at 600 bar compared to 1 bar. The structural basis of such changes was investigated by MD simulations using the experimental RDC restraints, revealing substantial conformational perturbations, specifically a partial opening of the flaps and the penetration of water molecules into the hydrophobic core of the subunits at high-pressure. This study highlights the exquisite sensitivity of RDCs to pressure-induced conformational changes and illustrates how RDCs combined with MD simulations can be used to determine the structural properties of metastable intermediate states on the folding energy landscape. PMID:26385843

  19. Molecular structure of poly(methyl methacrylate) surface II: Effect of stereoregularity examined through all-atom molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jha, Kshitij C; Zhu, He; Dhinojwala, Ali; Tsige, Mesfin

    2014-11-04

    Utilizing all-atom molecular dynamics (MD), we have analyzed the effect of tacticity and temperature on the surface structure of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) at the polymer-vacuum interface. We quantify these effects primarily through orientation, measured as the tilt with respect to the surface normal, and the surface number densities of the α-methyl, ester-methyl, carbonyl, and backbone methylene groups. Molecular structure on the surface is a complex interplay between orientation and number densities and is challenging to capture through sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy alone. Independent quantification of the number density and orientation of chemical groups through all-atom MD presents a comprehensive model of stereoregular PMMA on the surface. SFG analysis presented in part I of this joint publication measures the orientation of molecules that are in agreement with MD results. We observe the ester-methyl groups as preferentially oriented, irrespective of tacticity, followed by the α-methyl and carbonyl groups. SFG spectroscopy also points to ester-methyl being dominant on the surface. The backbone methylene groups show a very broad angular distribution, centered along the surface plane. The surface number density ratios of ester-methyl to α-methyl groups show syndiotactic PMMA having the lowest value. Isotactic PMMA has the highest ratios of ester- to α-methyl. These subtle trends in the relative angular orientation and number densities that influence the variation of surface structure with tacticity are highlighted in this article. A more planar conformation of the syndiotactic PMMA along the surface (x-y plane) can be visualized through the trajectories from all-atom MD. Results from conformation tensor calculations for chains with any of their segments contributing to the surface validate the visual observation.

  20. ATP Hydrolysis Induced Conformational Changes in the Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD Revealed by MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chao; Weng, Jingwei; Wang, Wenning

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to uni-directionally transport substrates across cell membrane. ATP hydrolysis occurs at the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) dimer interface of ABC transporters, whereas substrate translocation takes place at the translocation pathway between the transmembrane domains (TMDs), which is more than 30 angstroms away from the NBD dimer interface. This raises the question of how the hydrolysis energy released at NBDs is “transmitted” to trigger the conformational changes at TMDs. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the post-hydrolysis state of the vitamin B12 importer BtuCD. Totally 3-μs MD trajectories demonstrate a predominantly asymmetric arrangement of the NBD dimer interface, with the ADP-bound site disrupted and the ATP-bound site preserved in most of the trajectories. TMDs response to ATP hydrolysis by separation of the L-loops and opening of the cytoplasmic gate II, indicating that hydrolysis of one ATP could facilitate substrate translocation by opening the cytoplasmic end of translocation pathway. It was also found that motions of the L-loops and the cytoplasmic gate II are coupled with each other through a contiguous interaction network involving a conserved Asn83 on the extended stretch preceding TM3 helix plus the cytoplasmic end of TM2/6/7 helix bundle. These findings entail a TMD-NBD communication mechanism for type II ABC importers. PMID:27870912

  1. Monomerization alters the dynamics of the lid region in Campylobacter jejuni CstII: an MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Pradeep Kumar; Srivastava, Alka; Rao, K Krishnamurthy; Balaji, Petety V

    2016-01-01

    CstII, a bifunctional (α2,3/8) sialyltransferase from Campylobacter jejuni, is a homotetramer. It has been reported that mutation of the interface residues Phe121 (F121D) or Tyr125 (Y125Q) leads to monomerization and partial loss of enzyme activity, without any change in the secondary or tertiary structures. MD simulations of both tetramer and monomer, with and without bound donor substrate, were performed for the two mutants and WT to understand the reasons for partial loss of activity due to monomerization since the active site is located within each monomer. RMSF values were found to correlate with the crystallographic B-factor values indicating that the simulations are able to capture the flexibility of the molecule effectively. There were no gross changes in either the secondary or tertiary structure of the proteins during MD simulations. However, interface is destabilized by the mutations, and more importantly the flexibility of the lid region (Gly152-Lys190) is affected. The lid region accesses three major conformations named as open, intermediate, and closed conformations. In both Y121Q and F121D mutants, the closed conformation is accessed predominantly. In this conformation, the catalytic base His188 is also displaced. Normal mode analysis also revealed differences in the lid movement in tetramer and monomer. This provides a possible explanation for the partial loss of enzyme activity in both interface mutants. The lid region controls the traffic of substrates and products in and out of the active site, and the dynamics of this region is regulated by tetramerization. Thus, this study provides valuable insights into the role of loop dynamics in enzyme activity of CstII.

  2. QM/MD simulation of SWNT nucleation on transition-metal carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Yamane, Honami; Ohta, Yasuhito; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-11-10

    The mechanism and kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation from Fe- and Ni-carbide nanoparticle precursors have been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. The dependence of the nucleation mechanism and its kinetics on environmental factors, including temperature and metal-carbide carbon concentration, has also been elucidated. It was observed that SWNT nucleation occurred via three distinct stages, viz. the precipitation of the carbon from the metal-carbide, the formation of a "surface/subsurface" carbide intermediate species, and finally the formation of a nascent sp(2)-hybidrized carbon structure supported by the metal catalyst. The SWNT cap nucleation mechanism itself was unaffected by carbon concentration and/or temperature. However, the kinetics of SWNT nucleation exhibited distinct dependences on these same factors. In particular, SWNT nucleation from Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticles proceeded more favorably compared to nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) nanoparticles. Although SWNT nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) and Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticle precursors occurred via an identical route, the ultimate outcomes of these processes also differed substantially. Explicitly, the Ni(x)-supported sp(2)-hybridized carbon structures tended to encapsulate the catalyst particle itself, whereas the Fe(x)-supported structures tended to form isolated SWNT cap structures on the catalyst surface. These differences in SWNT nucleation kinetics were attributed directly to the relative strengths of the metal-carbon interaction, which also dictates the precipitation of carbon from the nanoparticle bulk and the longevity of the resultant surface/subsurface carbide species. The stability of the surface/subsurface carbide was also influenced by the phase of the nanoparticle itself. The observations agree well with experimentally available data for SWNT growth on iron and nickel catalyst particles.

  3. Explicit all-atom modeling of realistically sized ligand-capped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ananth P; Clancy, Paulette

    2012-03-21

    We present a study of an explicit all-atom representation of nanocrystals of experimentally relevant sizes (up to 6 nm), "capped" with alkyl chain ligands, in vacuum. We employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulation methods in concert with a well-tested intermolecular potential model, MM3 (molecular mechanics 3), for the studies presented here. These studies include determining the preferred conformation of an isolated single nanocrystal (NC), pairs of isolated NCs, and (presaging studies of superlattice arrays) unit cells of NC superlattices. We observe that very small NCs (3 nm) behave differently in a superlattice as compared to larger NCs (6 nm and above) due to the conformations adopted by the capping ligands on the NC surface. Short ligands adopt a uniform distribution of orientational preferences, including some that lie against the face of the nanocrystal. In contrast, longer ligands prefer to interdigitate. We also study the effect of changing ligand length and ligand coverage on the NCs on the preferred ligand configurations. Since explicit all-atom modeling constrains the maximum system size that can be studied, we discuss issues related to coarse-graining the representation of the ligands, including a comparison of two commonly used coarse-grained models. We find that care has to be exercised in the choice of coarse-grained model. The data provided by these realistically sized ligand-capped NCs, determined using explicit all-atom models, should serve as a reference standard for future models of coarse-graining ligands using united atom models, especially for self-assembly processes.

  4. MD simulations of loading rate dependence of detwinning deformation in nanocrystalline Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao; Tang, QiHeng

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline Ni with pre-twin atom structure. The simulation sample is composed of four grains with average size 12 nm. The simulation technique of isobaric-isothermal ensemble (NPT) with high pressure is applied to obtain a sample with two circle twins. Under uniaxial tensile and shear loading, as well as different detwinning deformation behaviors are observed. Under uniaxial tension the detwinning deformation is induced by the event of grain growth, and it is supported by local energy analysis. Under the shear loading the detwinning deformation is related to the loading rate. The results show that there may be a critical shear rate. As the shear rate is sufficiently high the circle twin is found to be failed; as the shear rate is less than that rate, the size of circle twin become smaller and gradually approach a constant value. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experiment observation.

  5. Exploring Beta-Amyloid Protein Transmembrane Insertion Behavior and Residue-Specific Lipid Interactions in Lipid Bilayers Using Multiscale MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) interactions with neurons are linked to Alzheimer's. Using a multiscale MD simulation strategy that combines the high efficiency of phase space sampling of coarse-grained MD (CGD) and the high spatial resolution of Atomistic MD (AMD) simulations, we studied the Abeta insertion dynamics in cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid bilayers that mimic the neuronal membranes domains. Forward (AMD-CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) mappings were used. At the atomistic level, cholesterol promoted insertion of Abeta with high (folded) or low (unfolded) helical contents of the lipid insertion domain (Lys28-Ala42), and the insertions were stabilized by the Lys28 snorkeling and Ala42-anchoring to the polar lipid groups of the bilayer up to 200ns. After the forward mapping, the folded inserted state switched to a new extended inserted state with the Lys28 descended to the middle of the bilayer while the unfolded inserted state migrated to the membrane surface up to 4000ns. The two new states remained stable for 200ns at the atomistic scale after the reverse mapping. Our results suggested that different Abeta membrane-orientation states separated by free energy barriers can be explored by the multiscale MD more effectively than by Atomistic MD simulations alone. NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  6. All-atom structural models for complexes of insulin-like growth factors IGF1 and IGF2 with their cognate receptor.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Harish; Abrams, Cameron F

    2010-07-16

    Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) is a membrane-spanning glycoprotein of the insulin receptor family that has been implicated in a variety of cancers. The key questions related to molecular mechanisms governing ligand recognition by IGF1R remain unanswered, partly due to the lack of testable structural models of apo or ligand-bound receptor complexes. Using a homology model of the IGF1R ectodomain IGF1RDeltabeta, we present the first experimentally consistent all-atom structural models of IGF1/IGF1RDeltabeta and IGF2/IGF1RDeltabeta complexes. Our explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of apo-IGF1RDeltabeta shows that it displays asymmetric flexibility mechanisms that result in one of two binding pockets accessible to growth factors IGF1 and IGF2, as demonstrated via an MD-assisted Monte Carlo docking procedure. Our MD-generated ensemble of structures of apo and IGF1-bound IGF1RDeltabeta agrees reasonably well with published small-angle X-ray scattering data. We observe simultaneous contacts of each growth factor with sites 1 and 2 of IGF1R, suggesting cross-linking of receptor subunits. Our models provide direct evidence in favor of suggested electrostatic complementarity between the C-domain (IGF1) and the cysteine-rich domain (IGF1R). Our IGF1/IGF1RDeltabeta model provides structural bases for the observation that a single IGF1 molecule binds to IGF1RDeltabeta at low concentrations in small-angle X-ray scattering studies. We also suggest new possible structural bases for differences in the affinities of insulin, IGF1, and IGF2 for their noncognate receptors.

  7. Shock Induced (Alpha)-(Epsilon) Phase Change in Iron: Analysis of MD Simulations and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Rosolankova, K; Belak, J F; Collins, G; Colvin, J; Davies, H M; Eggert, J H; Germann, T C; Holian, B; Kalantar, D H; Kadau, K; Lomdahl, P; Lorenzana, H E; Sheppard, J; Stolken, J S; Wark, J S

    2005-08-25

    Multimillion atom non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for shock compressed iron are analyzed using Fourier methods to determine the long scale ordering of the crystal. By analyzing the location of the maxima in k-space we can determine the crystal structure and compression due to the shock. This report presents results from a 19.6 GPa simulated shock in single crystal iron and compare them to recent experimental results of shock compressed iron where the crystal structure was determined using in-situ wide angle x-ray diffraction.

  8. Shock Induced α-ɛ Phase Change in Iron: Analysis of MD Simulations and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawreliak, J.; Rosolankova, K.; Belak, J. F.; Collins, G.; Colvin, J.; Davies, H. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Germann, T. C.; Holian, B.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kadau, K.; Lomdahl, P.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Sheppard, J.; Stölken, J. S.; Wark, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Multimillion atom non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for shock compressed iron are analyzed using Fourier methods to determine the long scale ordering of the crystal. By analyzing the location of the maxima in k-space we can determine the crystal structure and compression due to the shock. This report presents results from a 19.6GPa simulated shock in single crystal iron and compare them to recent experimental results of shock compressed iron where the crystal structure was determined using in-situ wide angle x-ray diffraction.

  9. Detonation initiation in solid explosive: MD simulation using AB interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzov, Semen; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    The classical molecular dynamics method is used for atomistic simulation of detonation initiation in AB model of condensed phase explosive, in which the simplified REBO potential defines reactive interatomic interactions between atoms period A and B. The simulated ultra-short (picoseconds) shock wave (SW) compression of an explosive corresponds to indirect detonation initiation produced by femtosecond laser pulses. We study shock to detonation transition (SDT) including the evolution of pressure profiles in an AB explosive film. It is demonstrated that the pressure profile of detonation wave (DW) can be calculated from a time-dependent rear-surface velocity measured in experiments. The role of a single cylindrical pore in detonation initiation is investigated. The thresholds for long-term (tens of picosecond) and sustained loading initiating regimes are determined.

  10. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Krepl, Miroslav; Cléry, Antoine; Blatter, Markus; Allain, Frederic H.T.; Sponer, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins represent an abundant class of proteins playing key roles in RNA biology. We present a joint atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and experimental study of two RRM-containing proteins bound with their single-stranded target RNAs, namely the Fox-1 and SRSF1 complexes. The simulations are used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to interpret and expand the available structural data. We accumulate more than 50 μs of simulations and show that the MD method is robust enough to reliably describe the structural dynamics of the RRM–RNA complexes. The simulations predict unanticipated specific participation of Arg142 at the protein–RNA interface of the SRFS1 complex, which is subsequently confirmed by NMR and ITC measurements. Several segments of the protein–RNA interface may involve competition between dynamical local substates rather than firmly formed interactions, which is indirectly consistent with the primary NMR data. We demonstrate that the simulations can be used to interpret the NMR atomistic models and can provide qualified predictions. Finally, we propose a protocol for ‘MD-adapted structure ensemble’ as a way to integrate the simulation predictions and expand upon the deposited NMR structures. Unbiased μs-scale atomistic MD could become a technique routinely complementing the NMR measurements of protein–RNA complexes. PMID:27193998

  11. Evaluation of GEOS-5 Sulfur Dioxide Simulations During the Frostburg, MD 2010 Field Campaign.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchard, V.; Da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P.; Krotkov, N.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stehr, J. W.; Mount, G.; Spenei, E.; Arkinson, H. L.; He, H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a major atmospheric pollutant with a strong anthropogenic component mostly produced by the combustion of fossil fuel and other industrial activities. As a precursor of sulfate aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and human health, this gas needs to be monitored on a global scale. Global climate and chemistry models including aerosol processes along with their radiative effects are important tools for climate and air quality research. Validation of these models against in-situ and satellite measurements is essential to ascertain the credibility of these models and to guide model improvements. In this study the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running on-line inside the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model is used to simulate aerosol and SO2 concentrations. Data taken in November 2010 over Frostburg, Maryland during an SO2 field campaign involving ground instrumentation and aircraft are used to evaluate GEOS-5 simulated SO2 concentrations. Preliminary data analysis indicated the model overestimated surface SO2 concentration, which motivated the examination of mixing processes in the model and the specification of SO2 anthropogenic emission rates. As a result of this analysis, a revision of anthropogenic emission inventories in GEOS-5 was implemented, and the vertical placement of SO2 sources was updated. Results show that these revisions improve the model agreement with observations locally and in regions outside the area of this field campaign. In particular, we use the ground-based measurements collected by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for the year 2010 to evaluate the revised model simulations over North America.

  12. Specific DNA recognition by the Antp homeodomain: MD simulations of specific and nonspecific complexes.

    PubMed

    Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Billeter, Martin

    2004-12-01

    Four molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of complexes between the wild-type or a mutant Antennapedia homeodomain and 2 DNA sequences were generated in order to probe the mechanisms governing the specificity of DNA recognition. The starting point was published affinity measurements showing that a single protein mutation combined with a replacement of 2 base pairs yields a new high-affinity complex, whereas the other combinations, with changes on only 1 macromolecule, exhibited lower affinity. The simulations of the 4 complexes yielded fluctuating networks of interaction. On average, these networks differ significantly, explaining the switch of affinity caused by the alterations in the macromolecules. The network of mostly hydrogen-bonding interactions involving several water molecules, which was suggested both by X-ray and NMR structures of the wild-type homeodomain and its DNA operator sequence, could be reproduced in the trajectory. More interestingly, the high-affinity complex with alterations in both the protein and the DNA yielded again a dynamic but very tight network of intermolecular interactions, however, attributing a significantly stronger role to direct hydrophobic interactions at the expense of water bridges. The other 2 homeodomain-DNA complexes, with only 1 molecule altered, show on average over the trajectories a clearly reduced number of protein-DNA interactions. The observations from these simulations suggest specific experiments and thus close the circle formed by biochemical, structural, and computational studies. The shift from a water-dominated to a more "dry" interface may prove important in the design of proteins binding DNA in a specific manner.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of triangle-well fluids in two dimensions: MC and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Yuri; Bárcenas, Mariana; Odriozola, Gerardo; Orea, Pedro

    2016-11-07

    With the aim of providing complementary data of the thermodynamics properties of the triangular well potential, the vapor/liquid phase diagrams for such potential with different interaction ranges were calculated in two dimensions by Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations; also, the vapor/liquid interfacial tension was calculated. As reported for other interaction potentials, it was observed that the reduction of the dimensionality makes the phase diagram to shrink. Finally, with the aid of reported data for the same potential in three dimensions, it was observed that this potential does not follow the principle of corresponding states.

  14. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  15. MD simulations of the formation of stable clusters in mixtures of alkaline salts and imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Bouzón-Capelo, Silvia; Pérez-Rodríguez, Martín; Cabeza, Óscar; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2013-03-21

    Structural and dynamical properties of room-temperature ionic liquids containing the cation 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([BMIM](+)) and three different anions (hexafluorophosphate, [PF6](-), tetrafluoroborate, [BF4](-), and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [NTf2](-)) doped with several molar fractions of lithium salts with a common anion at 298.15 K and 1 atm were investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of the size of the salt cation was also analyzed by comparing these results with those for mixtures of [BMIM][PF6] with NaPF6. Lithium/sodium solvation and ionic mobilities were analyzed via the study of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, cage autocorrelation functions, mean-square displacements (including the analysis of both ballistic and diffusive regimes), self-diffusion coefficients of all the ionic species, velocity and current autocorrelation functions, and ionic conductivity in all the ionic liquid/salt systems. We found that lithium and sodium cations are strongly coordinated in two different positions with the anion present in the mixture. Moreover, [Li](+) and [Na](+) cations were found to form bonded-like, long-lived aggregates with the anions in their first solvation shell, which act as very stable kinetic entities within which a marked rattling motion of salt ions takes place. With very long MD simulation runs, this phenomenon is proved to be on the basis of the decrease of self-diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities previously reported in experimental and computational results.

  16. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in cooling to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.

  17. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; ...

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  18. MD Simulations and FRET Reveal an Environment-Sensitive Conformational Plasticity of Importin-β

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Kangkan; Dölker, Nicole; Van, Qui; Gregor, Ingo; Dickmanns, Achim; Baade, Imke; Kehlenbach, Ralph H.; Ficner, Ralf; Enderlein, Jörg; Grubmüller, Helmut; Neumann, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport of macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. Transport through the pore is restricted by a hydrophobic selectivity filter comprising disordered phenylalanine-glycine-rich repeats of nuclear pore proteins. Exchange through the pore requires specialized transport receptors, called exportins and importins, that interact with cargo proteins in a RanGTP-dependent manner. These receptors are highly flexible superhelical structures composed of HEAT-repeat motifs that adopt various degrees of extension in crystal structures. Here, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations using crystal structures of Importin-β in its free form or in complex with nuclear localization signal peptides as the starting conformation. Our simulations predicted that initially compact structures would adopt extended conformations in hydrophilic buffers, while contracted conformations would dominate in more hydrophobic solutions, mimicking the environment of the nuclear pore. We confirmed this experimentally by Förster resonance energy transfer experiments using dual-fluorophore-labeled Importin-β. These observations explain seemingly contradictory crystal structures and suggest a possible mechanism for cargo protection during passage of the nuclear pore. Such hydrophobic switching may be a general principle for environmental control of protein function. PMID:26200863

  19. Properties of ultrathin cholesterol and phospholipid layers surrounding silicon-carbide nanotube: MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Raczyński, Przemysław; Raczyńska, Violetta; Górny, Krzysztof; Gburski, Zygmunt

    2015-08-15

    Computer simulation technique was used to study the dynamics of cholesterol and POPC phospholipid molecules forming a thin layer on the surface of the carbon and silicon-carbide nanotubes. Each nanotube was surrounded by an ultra-thin film formed by n lipid molecules, where n varies from 15 to 50. All studies were done for five temperatures, including physiological one (T=260, 285, 310, 335 and 360K). The influence of a nanotube on the dynamics of cholesterol or phospholipid molecules in a layer is presented and discussed. The water is ubiquitous in all biological milieus, where the cholesterol or lipids occur. Thus, simulations were performed in a water environment. Moreover, to show different behavior of lipids in systems with water the results were compared with the samples without it. The dynamical and structural observables, such as the mean square displacement, diffusion coefficient, radial distribution function, and activation energy were calculated to qualitatively investigate the behavior of cholesterol and phospholipid molecules in the layers. We observed remarkable differences between the cholesterol dynamics depending whether the ultrathin film surrounds carbon or silicon-carbide nanotube and whether the water environment appeared.

  20. Detonation initiation in solid explosive: MD simulation using AB interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzov, Semen; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of impact detonation initiation in an AB model of condensed-phase explosive is performed with using a simplified reactive empirical bond order potential. Simulation of ultra-short piston-driven compression of AB explosive for the duration of a few picoseconds represents the indirect initiation of detonation by an ultra-short shock wave (SW) generated in a thin metal foil irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. Impact conditions required for transition of SW to detonation wave (DW) are studied. Variation of loading time and piston velocity, which controls piston pressure and input energy, is used to plot 2D regions of transition from SW to DW in pressure-time and energy-time planes. We demonstrate that the input energy required for initiation has a global minimum. Analysis of evolution of calculated pressure profiles gives a critical thickness of such AB explosive film in which transition from SW to DW can be completed. The effect of porosity and roughness of AB sample on impact detonation initiation is discussed.

  1. α-Tocopherol Is Well Designed to Protect Polyunsaturated Phospholipids: MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xiaoling; Kinnun, Jacob J.; Marquardt, Drew; Ghefli, Mikel; Kučerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Harroun, Thad A.; Feller, Scott E.; Wassall, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The presumptive function for alpha-tocopherol (αtoc) in membranes is to protect polyunsaturated lipids against oxidation. Although the chemistry of the process is well established, the role played by molecular structure that we address here with atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations remains controversial. The simulations were run in the constant particle NPT ensemble on hydrated lipid bilayers composed of SDPC (1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-22:6PC) and SOPC (1-stearoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-18:1PC) in the presence of 20 mol % αtoc at 37°C. SDPC with SA (stearic acid) for the sn-1 chain and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) for the sn-2 chain is representative of polyunsaturated phospholipids, while SOPC with OA (oleic acid) substituted for the sn-2 chain serves as a monounsaturated control. Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction experiments provide validation. The simulations demonstrate that high disorder enhances the probability that DHA chains at the sn-2 position in SDPC rise up to the bilayer surface, whereby they encounter the chromanol group on αtoc molecules. This behavior is reflected in the van der Waals energy of interaction between αtoc and acyl chains, and illustrated by density maps of distribution for acyl chains around αtoc molecules that were constructed. An ability to more easily penetrate deep into the bilayer is another attribute conferred upon the chromanol group in αtoc by the high disorder possessed by DHA. By examining the trajectory of single molecules, we found that αtoc flip-flops across the SDPC bilayer on a submicrosecond timescale that is an order-of-magnitude greater than in SOPC. Our results reveal mechanisms by which the sacrificial hydroxyl group on the chromanol group can trap lipid peroxyl radicals within the interior and near the surface of a polyunsaturated membrane. At the same time, water-soluble reducing agents that regenerate αtoc can access the chromanol

  2. Structure and diffusion of furans and other cellulose-derived compounds in solvents via MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabideau, Brooks; Ismail, Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    There is now a large push towards the development of energy sources that are both environmentally friendly and sustainable; with the conversion of cellulose derived from biomass into biofuels being one promising route. In this conversion, a variety of intermediary compounds have been identified, which appear critical to successful expansion of the process to an industrial scale. Here we examine the structure and diffusion of these furans and acids derived from cellulose within ionic liquids via molecular dynamic simulation. Ionic liquids have shown the ability to dissolve cellulose with certain `green' benefits over existing, conventional solvents. Specifically, we study the solvation properties of these chemicals by examining the pair correlation functions of solute with solvent, and by exploring the agglomeration and separation of these chemicals from the solvent as well as the hydrogen bonding between species. Additionally, we determine the diffusion constant of these compounds in ionic liquid and aqueous solvents.

  3. Mixed brush made of 4-arm stars and linear chains: MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chan-Fei; Merlitz, Holger; Wu, Chen-Xu; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the structural properties of binary polymer brushes, composed of functional 4-armed star polymers and chemically identical linear polymers of different molecular weights. The molecular dynamics simulations confirm recent self-consistent field studies, in which a considerable potential of these systems for the design of switchable surfaces has been claimed. The length of the linear chains serves as a control parameter, which, while passing over a critical value, induces a sharp transition of the molecular conformation. We investigate these transitions at different grafting densities and summarize our findings in a phase diagram. The temperature dependence of the brush structure is investigated in a non-selective solvent, and non-trivial variations of the surface composition are observed. The quantity of these latter effects would be insufficient to build switchable systems, and we argue that a minor quantity of solvent selectivity would suffice to enable the desired feature of an environment-responsive coating.

  4. MD simulation of plastic deformation nucleation in stressed crystallites under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, A. V.; Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Chernov, V. M.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    The investigation of plastic deformation nucleation in metals and alloys under irradiation and mechanical loading is one of the topical issues of materials science. Specific features of nucleation and evolution of the defect system in stressed and irradiated iron, vanadium, and copper crystallites were studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Mechanical loading was performed in such a way that the modeled crystallite volume remained unchanged. The energy of the primary knock-on atom initiating a cascade of atomic displacements in a stressed crystallite was varied from 0.05 to 50 keV. It was found that atomic displacement cascades might cause global structural transformations in a region far larger than the radiation-damaged area. These changes are similar to the ones occurring in the process of mechanical loading of samples. They are implemented by twinning (in iron and vanadium) or through the formation of partial dislocation loops (in copper).

  5. X-ray structure, thermodynamics, elastic properties and MD simulations of cardiolipin/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine mixed membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boscia, Alexander L.; Treece, Bradley W.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Braun, Anthony R.; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Klösgen, Beate; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipins (CLs) are important biologically for their unique role in biomembranes that couple phosphorylation and electron transport like bacterial plasma membranes, chromatophores, chloroplasts and mitochondria. CLs are often tightly coupled to proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. The first step in understanding the interaction of CL with proteins is to obtain the pure CL structure, and the structure of mixtures of CL with other lipids. In this work we use a variety of techniques to characterize the fluid phase structure, material properties and thermodynamics of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with tetramyristoylcardiolipin (TMCL), both with 14-carbon chains, at several mole percentages. X-ray diffuse scattering was used to determine structure, including bilayer thickness and area/lipid, the bending modulus, KC, and Sxray, a measure of chain orientational order. Our results reveal that TMCL thickens DMPC bilayers at all mole percentages, with a total increase of ~6 Å in pure TMCL, and increases AL from 64 Å2 (DMPC at 35°C) to 109 Å2 (TMCL at 50°C). KC increases by ~50%, indicating that TMCL stiffens DMPC membranes. TMCL also orders DMPC chains by a factor of ~2 for pure TMCL. Coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations confirm the experimental thickening of 2 Å for 20 mol% TMCL and locate the TMCL headgroups near the glycerol-carbonyl region of DMPC; i.e., they are sequestered below the DMPC phosphocholine headgroup. Our results suggest that TMCL plays a role similar to cholesterol in that it thickens and stiffens DMPC membranes, orders chains, and is positioned under the umbrella of the PC headgroup. CL may be necessary for hydrophobic matching to inner mitochondrial membrane proteins. Differential scanning calorimetry, Sxray and CGMD simulations all suggest that TMCL does not form domains within the DMPC bilayers. We also determined the gel phase structure of TMCL, which surprisingly displays diffuse X-ray scattering, like a

  6. Integrating mass spectrometry with MD simulations reveals the role of lipids in Na+/H+ antiporters

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Marklund, Erik G.; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Coincon, Mathieu; Gault, Joseph; Gupta, Kallol; Liko, Idlir; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Drew, David; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Na+/H+ antiporters are found in all kingdoms of life and exhibit catalysis rates that are among the fastest of all known secondary-active transporters. Here we combine ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational stability and lipid-binding properties of the Na+/H+ exchanger NapA from Thermus thermophilus and compare this to the prototypical antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli and the human homologue NHA2. We find that NapA and NHA2, but not NhaA, form stable dimers and do not selectively retain membrane lipids. By comparing wild-type NapA with engineered variants, we show that the unfolding of the protein in the gas phase involves the disruption of inter-domain contacts. Lipids around the domain interface protect the native fold in the gas phase by mediating contacts between the mobile protein segments. We speculate that elevator-type antiporters such as NapA, and likely NHA2, use a subset of annular lipids as structural support to facilitate large-scale conformational changes within the membrane. PMID:28071645

  7. MD simulation of cluster-surface impacts for metallic phases: soft landing, droplet spreading and implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo; Puzynin, Igor; Smith, William; Yasuoka, Kenji; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2001-11-01

    An optimized version of the DL_POLY molecular dynamics simulation code [K. Kholmurodov, W. Smith, K. Yasuoka, T. Ebisuzaki, Comput. Phys. Commun. 125 (2000) 167-192] has been used to study the cluster-surface impact processes for metallic phases. The interaction of an energetic cluster of atoms with a solid surface has been investigated using the Finnis-Sinclair many-body potential. The characteristics of the cluster-surface collisions were studied in a wide range of the cluster impact energies ( Einc=0.035-3.5 eV/atom). Modification of the surface, exposed to the cluster-beams, was studied by monitoring the molecular dynamics configurations of the system in real time. The density and temperature distributions in the system under the energetic irradiations has been investigated in detail. The three major channels of the impact yield (viz., soft landing, droplet spreading and implantation) were distinguished and estimated. Based on the density and temperature distributions data the low energy cluster-surface impact has been analyzed and a novel interpretation of droplet spreading process is given.

  8. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies.

  9. Self-assembly of polyelectrolyte surfactant complexes using large scale MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby

    2014-03-01

    Polyelectrolytes (PE) and surfactants are known to form interesting structures with varied properties in aqueous solutions. The morphological details of the PE-surfactant complexes depend on a combination of polymer backbone, electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions. We study the self-assembly of cationic PE and anionic surfactants complexes in dilute condition. The importance of such complexes of PE with oppositely charged surfactants can be found in biological systems, such as immobilization of enzymes in polyelectrolyte complexes or nonspecific association of DNA with protein. Many useful properties of PE surfactant complexes come from the highly ordered structures of surfactant self-assembly inside the PE aggregate which has applications in industry. We do large scale molecular dynamics simulation using LAMMPS to understand the structure and dynamics of PE-surfactant systems. Our investigation shows highly ordered pearl-necklace structures that have been observed experimentally in biological systems. We investigate many different properties of PE-surfactant complexation for different parameter ranges that are useful for pharmaceutical, engineering and biological applications.

  10. Integrating mass spectrometry with MD simulations reveals the role of lipids in Na(+)/H(+) antiporters.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Marklund, Erik G; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Coincon, Mathieu; Gault, Joseph; Gupta, Kallol; Liko, Idlir; Benesch, Justin L P; Drew, David; Robinson, Carol V

    2017-01-10

    Na(+)/H(+) antiporters are found in all kingdoms of life and exhibit catalysis rates that are among the fastest of all known secondary-active transporters. Here we combine ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational stability and lipid-binding properties of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NapA from Thermus thermophilus and compare this to the prototypical antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli and the human homologue NHA2. We find that NapA and NHA2, but not NhaA, form stable dimers and do not selectively retain membrane lipids. By comparing wild-type NapA with engineered variants, we show that the unfolding of the protein in the gas phase involves the disruption of inter-domain contacts. Lipids around the domain interface protect the native fold in the gas phase by mediating contacts between the mobile protein segments. We speculate that elevator-type antiporters such as NapA, and likely NHA2, use a subset of annular lipids as structural support to facilitate large-scale conformational changes within the membrane.

  11. Integrating mass spectrometry with MD simulations reveals the role of lipids in Na+/H+ antiporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landreh, Michael; Marklund, Erik G.; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Coincon, Mathieu; Gault, Joseph; Gupta, Kallol; Liko, Idlir; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Drew, David; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Na+/H+ antiporters are found in all kingdoms of life and exhibit catalysis rates that are among the fastest of all known secondary-active transporters. Here we combine ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational stability and lipid-binding properties of the Na+/H+ exchanger NapA from Thermus thermophilus and compare this to the prototypical antiporter NhaA from Escherichia coli and the human homologue NHA2. We find that NapA and NHA2, but not NhaA, form stable dimers and do not selectively retain membrane lipids. By comparing wild-type NapA with engineered variants, we show that the unfolding of the protein in the gas phase involves the disruption of inter-domain contacts. Lipids around the domain interface protect the native fold in the gas phase by mediating contacts between the mobile protein segments. We speculate that elevator-type antiporters such as NapA, and likely NHA2, use a subset of annular lipids as structural support to facilitate large-scale conformational changes within the membrane.

  12. Molecular-Dynamics (MD) Simulations of Copper Diffusion in Copper Chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    It was recently discovered that copper chalcogenides Cu2S and Cu2Se are viable candidates for thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit (ZT) values at temperatures around 1,000 K. And the possible reason for the high ZT is the low thermal conductivity arising from liquid-like Cu atoms in those phases. In this work, we perform first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to study the motion of Cu atoms in the high-temperature phases of Cu2S and Cu2Se and confirm the liquid nature of Cu atoms. To get a better understanding of the diffusion patterns of the systems, we have examined all the three phases of Cu2S (monoclinic, hexagonal and cubic phases with increasing temperature). Starting from the hexagonal phase the Cu atoms show a disordered/liquid-like feature with a jump diffusion pattern. We find that the diffusion is faster in x-y directions than in the z direction. A more isotropic diffusion pattern is found for high-temperature cubic phase with a much larger diffusion coefficient.

  13. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  14. Dynamic phase change and local structures in IL-containing mixtures: classical MD simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Xia; Liu, Qiaozhen; Ma, Xiaoxue; Fang, Dawei; Jiang, Xuefei; Guan, Wei

    2017-01-25

    The dynamic phase change between a homogeneous mixture and a liquid-liquid biphase and separation of phases are explored in three-component mixtures composed of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF4]), and water through a classical simulation method and experiment. Different experimental and theoretical tools, including density measurement, dynamic light scattering study, radial distribution, mean square displacement, an interstice model, and statistical function, are used to describe the structural modifications of the ions as a function of solution concentration. An analysis of the relation between the phase and the state of the component ions indicates that the phase separation pattern is governed by the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of anions. We proposed the existence of a critical point, that is, 1 : 3 : 8 for [Bmim][PF6]/[Bmim][BF4]/H2O (mole fraction). Before this critical point, obvious phase separation was seen in the mixtures. The separation phase became homogeneous with the addition of [Bmim][BF4] after this critical point. However, this homogeneous mixed solution was phase separated again upon the addition of [Bmim][PF6] or water. The existing nanostructures were present in the [Bmim][PF6]/[Bmim][BF4]/H2O mixtures, and their size abruptly decreased close to the critical point. We provided evidence of the formation of double salt ionic liquids of [Bmim][PF6]0.25[BF4]0.75·2H2O and discussed the interactions involved in these systems by examining their physicochemical properties. The ionic phase response of such three-component mixtures could be useful in various applications, especially in the dynamic control of extraction/separation processing.

  15. All-atom/coarse-grained hybrid predictions of distribution coefficients in SAMPL5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genheden, Samuel; Essex, Jonathan W.

    2016-11-01

    We present blind predictions submitted to the SAMPL5 challenge on calculating distribution coefficients. The predictions were based on estimating the solvation free energies in water and cyclohexane of the 53 compounds in the challenge. These free energies were computed using alchemical free energy simulations based on a hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained model. The compounds were treated with the general Amber force field, whereas the solvent molecules were treated with the Elba coarse-grained model. Considering the simplicity of the solvent model and that we approximate the distribution coefficient with the partition coefficient of the neutral species, the predictions are of good accuracy. The correlation coefficient, R is 0.64, 82 % of the predictions have the correct sign and the mean absolute deviation is 1.8 log units. This is on a par with or better than the other simulation-based predictions in the challenge. We present an analysis of the deviations to experiments and compare the predictions to another submission that used all-atom solvent.

  16. All-atom/coarse-grained hybrid predictions of distribution coefficients in SAMPL5.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Essex, Jonathan W

    2016-11-01

    We present blind predictions submitted to the SAMPL5 challenge on calculating distribution coefficients. The predictions were based on estimating the solvation free energies in water and cyclohexane of the 53 compounds in the challenge. These free energies were computed using alchemical free energy simulations based on a hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained model. The compounds were treated with the general Amber force field, whereas the solvent molecules were treated with the Elba coarse-grained model. Considering the simplicity of the solvent model and that we approximate the distribution coefficient with the partition coefficient of the neutral species, the predictions are of good accuracy. The correlation coefficient, R is 0.64, 82 % of the predictions have the correct sign and the mean absolute deviation is 1.8 log units. This is on a par with or better than the other simulation-based predictions in the challenge. We present an analysis of the deviations to experiments and compare the predictions to another submission that used all-atom solvent.

  17. MD simulations of the binding of alcohols and diols by a calixarene in water: connections between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, A; Morel, J P; Morel-Desrosiers, N; Malfreyt, P

    2005-12-15

    We report results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the complexes of p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene with linear alcohols from ethanol to heptanol in water at 25 degrees C. We show that these complexes are of the inclusion type and are governed by van der Waals interactions between the calixarene cavity and the inserted alkyl chain of the alcohol. We establish a correlation between the experimental Delta(r)H degrees values and the number of atoms inserted into the calixarene cavity. We also focus on the desolvation of the host and guest to establish the importance, at the enthalpic level, of the formation of hydrogen bond bridges between the calixarene and the alcohol molecule. The fact that methanol is not complexed by p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene is explained by calculating the cost of the desolvation of the guest upon complexation. We complete this study by modeling the complexes formed with 1,4-butanediol and 1,5-pentanediol. To explain the difference between the thermodynamic properties for the binding of 1,4-butanediol and butanol, we examine the insertion rate and the solvation of each hydroxy group. We show a specific behavior of one of the two hydroxy groups at the structural and energetic levels.

  18. Targeting domain-III hinging of dengue envelope (DENV-2) protein by MD simulations, docking and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kshatresh Dutta; Tiwari, Gargi; Ojha, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-04-01

    The entry of the dengue virus is mediated by the conformational change in the envelope protein due to change in the endosomal pH. The structural study reveals that domain-III of the dengue envelope protein (DENV) shows the largest shift in its position during the entry of the virus. Therefore, targeting the hinge region of the domain-III may block the conformational changes in the DENV. In the present work, we have targeted the domain I/III hinge region using four known ligands used for the dengue envelope protein (serotype-2) and have intended to explore the specificity of one ligand R1 (5-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-(2-phenyl-2H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-6-yl)furan-2-carboxamide) that succeeded the dengue inhibition by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction of the molecular docking and the binding free energy calculations. The residue interactions map shows Lys 296 of domain-III of the DENV-2, which might be responsible for binding small molecules between domain I/III interface, as an important residue conserved in all the dengue serotypes.

  19. Degradation of the Adhesive Properties of MD-944 Diode Tape by Simulated Low Earth Orbit Environmental Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albyn, K.; Finckenor, M.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays utilize MD-944 diode tape with silicone pressure-sensitive adhesive to protect the underlying diodes and also provide a high-emittance surface. On-orbit, the silicone adhesive will be exposed and ultimately convert to a glass-like silicate due to atomic oxygen (AO). The current operational plan is to retract ISS solar array P6 and leave it stored under load for a long duration (6 mo or more). The exposed silicone adhesive must not cause the solar array to stick to itself or cause the solar array to fail during redeployment. The Environmental Effects Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, under direction from the ISS Program Office Environments Team, performed simulated space environment exposures with 5-eV AO, near ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation. The exposed diode tape samples were put under preload and then the resulting blocking force was measured using a tensile test machine. Test results indicate that high-energy AO, ultraviolet radiation, and electron ionizing radiation exposure all reduce the blocking force for a silicone-to-silicone bond. AO exposure produces the most significant reduction in blocking force

  20. Understanding self-assembly of charged-neutral block copolymer (BCP) and surfactant complexes using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby; Kilbey, Michael

    Here we report the formation of phase separated BCP-surfactant complexes resulting from the electrostatic self-assembly of charge-neutral block copolymers with oppositely charged surfactants. Complexation behaviors of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes has gained considerable attention in the field of soft condensed matter physics due to their potential application as functional nanomaterials for batteries, wastewater treatment and drug delivery systems. Numerous experiments have examined the self-assembled structures resulting from complexation of charge-neutral BCP and surfactants, however, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding at the fundamental level. To help bridge this gap, we use, MD simulations to study self-assembly and dynamics of the BCP-surfactant complex at the molecular level. Our results show an overcharging effect in BCPs with hydrophobic neutral blocks and a formation of core-shell colloidal structure. Hydrophilic neutral blocks, on the other hand, show stable, hairy colloidal structures with neutral blocks forming a loosely-bound, fuzzy outer layer. Our results qualitatively agree with previous SANS and SAXS experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  1. The influence of cations on lithium ion coordination and transport in ionic liquid electrolytes: a MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Volker; Li, Zhe; Bedrov, Dmitry; Borodin, Oleg; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-01-07

    The dynamical and structural properties in two ionic liquid electrolytes (ILEs) based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide ([emim][TFSI]) and N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide([pyr13][TFSI]) were compared as a function of lithium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (LiTFSI) salt concentrations using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The many-body polarizable APPLE&P force field has been utilized. The influence of anion polarization on the structure of the first coordination shell of Li(+) was examined. In particular, the reduction of the oxygen of the TFSI anion (OTFSI) polarizability from 1.36 Å(3) to 1.00 Å(3) resulted in an increased fraction of the TFSI anion bidentate coordination to the Li(+). While the overall dynamics in [pyr13][TFSI]-based ILEs was slower than in [emim][TFSI]-based ILEs, the exchange of TFSI anions in and out of the first coordination shell of Li(+) was found to be faster in pyr13-based systems. The Li(+) ion transference number is higher for these systems as well. These trends can be related to the difference in interaction of TFSI with the IL cation which is stronger for pyr13 than for emim.

  2. An Evolutionary Strategy for All-Atom Folding of the 60-Amino-Acid Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L20

    PubMed Central

    Schug, A.; Wenzel, W.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated an evolutionary algorithm for de novo all-atom folding of the bacterial ribosomal protein L20. We report results of two simulations that converge to near-native conformations of this 60-amino-acid, four-helix protein. We observe a steady increase of “native content” in both simulated ensembles and a large number of near-native conformations in their final populations. We argue that these structures represent a significant fraction of the low-energy metastable conformations, which characterize the folding funnel of this protein. These data validate our all-atom free-energy force field PFF01 for tertiary structure prediction of a previously inaccessible structural family of proteins. We also compare folding simulations of the evolutionary algorithm with the basin-hopping technique for the Trp-cage protein. We find that the evolutionary algorithm generates a dynamic memory in the simulated population, which leads to faster overall convergence. PMID:16565067

  3. A simple and transferable all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model to study membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Essex, Jonathan W

    2015-10-13

    We present an efficient all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model and apply it to membrane processes. This model is an extension of the all-atom/ELBA model applied previously to processes in water. Here, we improve the efficiency of the model by implementing a multiple-time step integrator that allows the atoms and the coarse-grained beads to be propagated at different timesteps. Furthermore, we fine-tune the interaction between the atoms and the coarse-grained beads by computing the potential of mean force of amino acid side chain analogs along the membrane normal and comparing to atomistic simulations. The model was independently validated on the calculation of small-molecule partition coefficients. Finally, we apply the model to membrane peptides. We studied the tilt angle of the Walp23 and Kalp23 helices in two different model membranes and the stability of the glycophorin A dimer. The model is efficient, accurate, and straightforward to use, as it does not require any extra interaction particles, layers of atomistic solvent molecules or tabulated potentials, thus offering a novel, simple approach to study membrane processes.

  4. All-atom contact model for understanding protein dynamics from crystallographic B-factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2009-04-22

    An all-atom local contact model is described that can be used to predict protein motions underlying isotropic crystallographic B-factors. It uses a mean-field approximation to represent the motion of an atom in a harmonic potential generated by the surrounding atoms resting at their equilibrium positions. Based on a 400-ns molecular dynamics simulation of ubiquitin in explicit water, it is found that each surrounding atom stiffens the spring constant by a term that on average scales exponentially with the interatomic distance. This model combines features of the local density model by Halle and the local contact model by Zhang and Brüschweiler. When applied to a nonredundant set of 98 ultra-high resolution protein structures, an average correlation coefficient of 0.75 is obtained for all atoms. The systematic inclusion of crystal contact contributions and fraying effects is found to enhance the performance substantially. Because the computational cost of the local contact model scales linearly with the number of protein atoms, it is applicable to proteins of any size for the prediction of B-factors of both backbone and side-chain atoms. The model performs as well as or better than several other models tested, such as rigid-body motional models, the local density model, and various forms of the elastic network model. It is concluded that at the currently achievable level of accuracy, collective intramolecular motions are not essential for the interpretation of B-factors.

  5. An all-atom model of the structure of human copper transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Sharikov, Yuriy; Greenberg, Jerry P; Miller, Mark A; Kouznetsova, Valentina L; Larson, Christopher A; Howell, Stephen B

    2012-07-01

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is the major high affinity copper influx transporter in mammalian cells that also mediates uptake of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. A low resolution structure of hCTR1 determined by cryoelectron microscopy was recently published. Several protein structure simulation techniques were used to create an all-atom model of this important transporter using the low resolution structure as a starting point. The all-atom model provides new insights into the roles of specific residues of the N-terminal extracellular domain, the intracellular loop, and C-terminal region in metal ion transport. In particular, the model demonstrates that the central region of the pore contains four sets of methionine triads in the intramembranous region. The structure confirms that two triads of methionine residues delineate the intramembranous region of the transporter, and further identifies two additional methionine triads that are located in the extracellular N-terminal part of the transporter. Together, the four triads create a structure that promotes stepwise transport of metal ions into and then through the intramembranous channel of the transporter via transient thioether bonds to methionine residues. Putative copper-binding sites in the hCTR1 trimer were identified by a program developed by us for prediction of metal-binding sites. These sites correspond well with the known effects of mutations on the ability of the protein to transport copper and cisplatin.

  6. An All-Atom Model of the Structure of Human Copper Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharikov, Yuriy; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Miller, Mark A.; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Larson, Christopher A.; Howell, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is the major high affinity copper influx transporter in mammalian cells that also mediates uptake of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. A low resolution structure of hCTR1 determined by cryoelectron microscopy was recently published. Several protein structure simulation techniques were used to create an all-atom model of this important transporter using the low resolution structure as a starting point. The all-atom model provides new insights into the roles of specific residues of the N-terminal extracellular domain, the intracellular loop, and C-terminal region in metal ion transport. In particular, the model demonstrates that the central region of the pore contains four sets of methionine triads in the intramembranous region. The structure confirms that two triads of methionine residues delineate the intramembranous region of the transporter, and further identifies two additional methionine triads that are located in the extracellular N-terminal part of the transporter. Together, the four triads create a structure that promotes stepwise transport of metal ions into and then through the intramembranous channel of the transporter via transient thioether bonds to methionine residues. Putative copper-binding sites in the hCTR1 trimer were identified by a program developed by us for prediction of metal-binding sites. These sites correspond well with the known effects of mutations on the ability of the protein to transport copper and cisplatin. PMID:22569840

  7. Conformational Ensemble of the Poliovirus 3CD Precursor Observed by MD Simulations and Confirmed by SAXS: A Strategy to Expand the Viral Proteome?

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Gohara, David W; Uchida, Akira; Yennawar, Neela; Cameron, Craig E

    2015-11-23

    The genomes of RNA viruses are relatively small. To overcome the small-size limitation, RNA viruses assign distinct functions to the processed viral proteins and their precursors. This is exemplified by poliovirus 3CD protein. 3C protein is a protease and RNA-binding protein. 3D protein is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). 3CD exhibits unique protease and RNA-binding activities relative to 3C and is devoid of RdRp activity. The origin of these differences is unclear, since crystal structure of 3CD revealed "beads-on-a-string" structure with no significant structural differences compared to the fully processed proteins. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on 3CD to investigate its conformational dynamics. A compact conformation of 3CD was observed that was substantially different from that shown crystallographically. This new conformation explained the unique properties of 3CD relative to the individual proteins. Interestingly, simulations of mutant 3CD showed altered interface. Additionally, accelerated MD simulations uncovered a conformational ensemble of 3CD. When we elucidated the 3CD conformations in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments a range of conformations from extended to compact was revealed, validating the MD simulations. The existence of conformational ensemble of 3CD could be viewed as a way to expand the poliovirus proteome, an observation that may extend to other viruses.

  8. Conformational Ensemble of the Poliovirus 3CD Precursor Observed by MD Simulations and Confirmed by SAXS: A Strategy to Expand the Viral Proteome?

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Gohara, David W.; Uchida, Akira; Yennawar, Neela; Cameron, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of RNA viruses are relatively small. To overcome the small-size limitation, RNA viruses assign distinct functions to the processed viral proteins and their precursors. This is exemplified by poliovirus 3CD protein. 3C protein is a protease and RNA-binding protein. 3D protein is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). 3CD exhibits unique protease and RNA-binding activities relative to 3C and is devoid of RdRp activity. The origin of these differences is unclear, since crystal structure of 3CD revealed “beads-on-a-string” structure with no significant structural differences compared to the fully processed proteins. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on 3CD to investigate its conformational dynamics. A compact conformation of 3CD was observed that was substantially different from that shown crystallographically. This new conformation explained the unique properties of 3CD relative to the individual proteins. Interestingly, simulations of mutant 3CD showed altered interface. Additionally, accelerated MD simulations uncovered a conformational ensemble of 3CD. When we elucidated the 3CD conformations in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments a range of conformations from extended to compact was revealed, validating the MD simulations. The existence of conformational ensemble of 3CD could be viewed as a way to expand the poliovirus proteome, an observation that may extend to other viruses. PMID:26610545

  9. Local order parameters for use in driving homogeneous ice nucleation with all-atom models of water.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    We present a local order parameter based on the standard Steinhardt-Ten Wolde approach that is capable both of tracking and of driving homogeneous ice nucleation in simulations of all-atom models of water. We demonstrate that it is capable of forcing the growth of ice nuclei in supercooled liquid water simulated using the TIP4P/2005 model using over-biassed umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations. However, even with such an order parameter, the dynamics of ice growth in deeply supercooled liquid water in all-atom models of water are shown to be very slow, and so the computation of free energy landscapes and nucleation rates remains extremely challenging.

  10. Non-monotonic dynamics of water in its binary mixture with 1,2-dimethoxy ethane: A combined THz spectroscopic and MD simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Mahanta, Debasish; Patra, Animesh; Samanta, Nirnay; Luong, Trung Quan; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Mitra, Rajib Kumar

    2016-10-01

    A combined experimental (mid- and far-infrared FTIR spectroscopy and THz time domain spectroscopy (TTDS) (0.3-1.6 THz)) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique are used to understand the evolution of the structure and dynamics of water in its binary mixture with 1,2-dimethoxy ethane (DME) over the entire concentration range. The cooperative hydrogen bond dynamics of water obtained from Debye relaxation of TTDS data reveals a non-monotonous behaviour in which the collective dynamics is much faster in the low Xw region (where Xw is the mole fraction of water in the mixture), whereas in Xw ˜ 0.8 region, the dynamics gets slower than that of pure water. The concentration dependence of the reorientation times of water, calculated from the MD simulations, also captures this non-monotonous character. The MD simulation trajectories reveal presence of large amplitude angular jumps, which dominate the orientational relaxation. We rationalize the non-monotonous, concentration dependent orientational dynamics by identifying two different physical mechanisms which operate at high and low water concentration regimes.

  11. Solvation Structure of Imidazolium Cation in Mixtures of [C4mim][TFSA] Ionic Liquid and Diglyme by NMR Measurements and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takuya; Kodama, Daisuke; Kanakubo, Mitsuhiro; Tsuzuki, Seiji

    2017-04-06

    Interactions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([C4mim](+)) with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide anion ([TFSA](-)) and diethyleneglycol dimethyl ether (diglyme) in mixtures of [C4mim][TFSA] ionic liquid and diglyme have been investigated using (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of NMR chemical shift measurements and MD simulations showed that the diglyme oxygen atoms have contact with the imidazolium hydrogen atoms of [C4mim](+) in the mixtures. The contact between the hydrogen atoms of imidazolium and the oxygen atoms of [TFSA](-) remains even when the diglyme mole fraction (xdiglyme) increases up to 0.9. However, the coordination numbers of the hydrogen atoms of [C4mim](+) with oxygen atoms of diglyme increase with xdiglyme. The [TFSA](-) anions around [C4mim](+) are not completely replaced by diglyme even at xdiglyme > 0.9. The MD simulations revealed that the diglymes also have contact with the butyl group of [C4mim](+). The methyl groups of diglyme prefer to have contact with the terminal methyl group of the butyl group, whereas the diglyme oxygen atoms prefer to have contact with the methylene group connected to the imidazolium ring of [C4mim](+).

  12. Energy landscape of all-atom protein-protein interactions revealed by multiscale enhanced sampling.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape.

  13. Capturing the multiscale dynamics of membrane protein complexes with all-atom, mixed-resolution, and coarse-grained models.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhao, Xiaochuan; Liu, Jiyuan; Schneebeli, Severin T; Shelley, John C; Li, Jianing

    2017-03-20

    The structures and dynamics of protein complexes are often challenging to model in heterogeneous environments such as biological membranes. Herein, we meet this fundamental challenge at attainable cost with all-atom, mixed-resolution, and coarse-grained models of vital membrane proteins. We systematically simulated five complex models formed by two distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the lipid-bilayer membrane on the ns-to-μs timescales. These models, which suggest the swinging motion of an intracellular loop, for the first time, provide the molecular details for the regulatory role of such a loop. For the models at different resolutions, we observed consistent structural stability but various levels of speed-ups in protein dynamics. The mixed-resolution and coarse-grained models show two and four times faster protein diffusion than the all-atom models, in addition to a 4- and 400-fold speed-up in the simulation performance. Furthermore, by elucidating the strengths and challenges of combining all-atom models with reduced resolution models, this study can serve as a guide to simulating other complex systems in heterogeneous environments efficiently.

  14. All-atom model for stabilization of alpha-helical structure in peptides by hydrocarbon staples.

    PubMed

    Kutchukian, Peter S; Yang, Jae Shick; Verdine, Gregory L; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2009-04-08

    Recent work has shown that the incorporation of an all-hydrocarbon "staple" into peptides can greatly increase their alpha-helix propensity, leading to an improvement in pharmaceutical properties such as proteolytic stability, receptor affinity, and cell permeability. Stapled peptides thus show promise as a new class of drugs capable of accessing intractable targets such as those that engage in intracellular protein-protein interactions. The extent of alpha-helix stabilization provided by stapling has proven to be substantially context dependent, requiring cumbersome screening to identify the optimal site for staple incorporation. In certain cases, a staple encompassing one turn of the helix (attached at residues i and i+4) furnishes greater helix stabilization than one encompassing two turns (i,i+7 staple), which runs counter to expectation based on polymer theory. These findings highlight the need for a more thorough understanding of the forces that underlie helix stabilization by hydrocarbon staples. Here we report all-atom Monte Carlo folding simulations comparing unmodified peptides derived from RNase A and BID BH3 with various i,i+4 and i,i+7 stapled versions thereof. The results of these simulations were found to be in quantitative agreement with experimentally determined helix propensities. We also discovered that staples can stabilize quasi-stable decoy conformations, and that the removal of these states plays a major role in determining the helix stability of stapled peptides. Finally, we critically investigate why our method works, exposing the underlying physical forces that stabilize stapled peptides.

  15. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L; Latour, Robert A

    2016-06-24

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications.

  16. Structural dynamics and cation interactions of DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed guanine/cytosine quartets revealed by large-scale MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Spacková, N; Berger, I; Sponer, J

    2001-04-11

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study G-DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed GCGC and all-guanine GGGG quartet layers. Incorporation of mixed GCGC quartets into G-DNA stems substantially enhances their sequence variability. The mixed quadruplexes form rigid assemblies that require integral monovalent cations for their stabilization. The interaction of cations with the all-guanine quartets is the leading contribution for the stability of the four-stranded assemblies, while the mixed quartets are rather tolerated within the structure. The simulations predict that two cations are preferred to stabilize a four-layer quadruplex stem composed of two GCGC and two all-guanine quartets. The distribution of cations in the structure is influenced by the position of the GCGC quartets within the quadruplex, the presence and arrangement of thymidine loops connecting the guanine/cytosine stretches forming the stems, and the cation type present (Na(+) or K(+)). The simulations identify multiple nanosecond-scale stable arrangements of the thymidine loops present in the molecules investigated. In these thymidine loops, several structured pockets are identified capable of temporarily coordinating cations. However, no stable association of cations to a loop has been observed. The simulations reveal several paths through the thymidine loop regions that can be followed by the cations when exchanging between the central ion channel in the quadruplex stem and the surrounding solvent. We have carried out 20 independent simulations while the length of simulations reaches a total of 90 ns, rendering this study one of the most extensive MD investigations carried out on nucleic acids so far. The trajectories provide a largely converged characterization of the structural dynamics of these four-stranded G-DNA molecules.

  17. Modeling alkane+perfluoroalkane interactions using all-atom potentials: Failure of the usual combining rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Rossky, P. J.; Maroncelli, M.

    2003-11-01

    We have tested the ability of the OPLS-AA models (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) of alkanes and perfluoroalkanes recently developed by Jorgensen and co-workers to represent the unusual mixing behavior of alkane+perfluoroalkane systems. We find that these all-atom Lennard-Jones (6-12)+Coulomb representations, together with the usual Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules, fail to reproduce the weaker-than-anticipated interactions between these two classes of molecules. Systematic disagreements with experiment are found in the case of second pressure virial coefficients, gas solubilities, and liquid-liquid mixing properties. These discrepancies are not specific to the choice of OPLS-AA potentials, but are rather linked to the failure of the geometric mean combining rule for relating unlike atom interactions. In all cases examined, a reduction in the strength of cross H+F interactions by ˜25% relative to the geometric mean is required in order to achieve reasonable agreement with experiment. Several less commonly used combining rules were also examined. Although some of these rules are able to provide a reasonable description of the interactions among perfluoroalkane and alkane species, they fail to provide a consistent treatment when atoms other than C, H, and F are considered, as is necessary for modeling the interaction of the former molecules with rare-gas atoms.

  18. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  19. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  20. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM).

  1. Predicting Partition Coefficients with a Simple All-Atom/Coarse-Grained Hybrid Model.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel

    2016-01-12

    The solvation free energy is an essential quantity in force field development and in numerous applications. Here, we present the estimation of solvation free energies in polar (water, hexanol, octanol, and nonanol) and in apolar (hexane, octane, and nonane) media. The estimates are produced using molecular dynamics simulations employing a simple all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model (AA/ELBA) and are therefore very efficient. More than 150 solutes were taken from the Minnesota solvation database and represent small, organic molecules. The mean absolute deviation for the different solvents ranges between 2.0 and 4.1 kJ/mol, and the correlation coefficient ranges between 0.78 and 0.99, indicating that the predictions are accurate. Outliers are identified, and potential avenues for improvements are discussed. Furthermore, partition coefficients between water and the organic solvents were estimated, and the percentage of the predictions that has the correct sign ranges between 74% (for octane) and 92% (for octanol and hexanol). Finally, membrane/water partition coefficients are replaced with hexane/water and octanol/water partition coefficients, and the latter is found to be as accurate as the expensive membrane calculations, indicating a wider application area.

  2. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  3. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  4. MD simulation of the Tat/Cyclin T1/CDK9 complex revealing the hidden catalytic cavity within the CDK9 molecule upon Tat binding

    PubMed Central

    Asamitsu, Kaori; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Okamoto, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the dynamic behavior of the Tat/CycT1/CDK9 tri-molecular complex and revealed the structural changes of P-TEFb upon Tat binding. We found that Tat could deliberately change the local flexibility of CycT1. Although the structural coordinates of the H1 and H2 helices did not substantially change, H1ʹ, H2ʹ, and H3ʹ exhibited significant changes en masse. Consequently, the CycT1 residues involved in Tat binding, namely Tat-recognition residues (TRRs), lost their flexibility with the addition of Tat to P-TEFb. In addition, we clarified the structural variation of CDK9 in complex with CycT1 in the presence or absence of Tat. Interestingly, Tat addition significantly reduced the structural variability of the T-loop, thus consolidating the structural integrity of P-TEFb. Finally, we deciphered the formation of the hidden catalytic cavity of CDK9 upon Tat binding. MD simulation revealed that the PITALRE signature sequence of CDK9 flips the inactive kinase cavity of CDK9 into the active form by connecting with Thr186, which is crucial for its activity, thus presumably recruiting the substrate peptide such as the C-terminal domain of RNA pol II. These findings provide vital information for the development of effective novel anti-HIV drugs with CDK9 catalytic activity as the target. PMID:28178316

  5. How Y357F, Y276F mutants affect the methylation activity of PRDM9: QM/MM MD and free energy simulations.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yuzhuo; Sun, Lu; Zhong, Shijun

    2015-05-01

    Histone methyltransferase PRDM9 catalyzes the methylation of H3K4me2 (histone 3 dimethylated lysine 4) to H3K4me3 (histone 3 trimethylated lysine 4) by transferring the methyl group from S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet). PRDM9 is the major determinant of the meiotic recombination hotspot and the enrichment of H3K4me3 at the hotspot defines the initiation site of meiotic recombination. In PRDM9, two conserved tyrosine residues Tyr357 and Tyr276 surrounding the amino group of the substrate lysine may influence the methylation activity through hydrogen bond interactions with AdoMet or the substrate lysine. In this study, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations were performed to reveal the methylation processes catalyzed by wild type PRDM9, its Y357F, and Y276F mutants, respectively. The different roles of Tyr357 and Tyr276 in the methylation activity of PRDM9 were also investigated and compared. The calculated free energy barriers of the methyl transfers suggest that the Y276F mutation decreases the catalytic activity of the methyl transfer, while the Y357F mutation does not change the catalytic activity of the methyl transfer. The reactant complex conformations generated in the QM/MM MD simulations show that the reactive configuration can be formed in the Y357F mutant but not in the Y276F mutant.

  6. LDRD Final Report (08-ERD-037): Important Modes to Drive Protein MD Simulations to the Next Conformational Level

    SciTech Connect

    Sadigh, B

    2011-04-07

    Every action in biology is performed by dynamic proteins that convert between multiple states in order to engage their functions. Often binding to various ligands is essential for the rates of desired transitions to be enhanced. The goal of computational biology is to study these transitions and discover the different states to fully understand the protein's normal and diseased function, design drugs to target/bias specific states, and understand all of the interactions in between. We have developed a new methodology that is capable of calculating the absolute free energy of proteins while taking into account all the interactions with the solvent molecules. The efficiency of the new scheme is an order of magnitude greater than any existing technique. This method is now implemented in the massively parallel popular MD program package NAMD. This now makes it possible to calculate the relative stability of different conformational states of biological macromolecules as well as their binding free energies to various ligands.

  7. All-atom molecular dynamics studies of the full-length β-amyloid peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttmann, Edgar; Fels, Gregor

    2006-03-01

    β-Amyloid peptides are believed to play an essential role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), due to their sedimentation in the form of β-amyloid aggregates in the brain of AD-patients, and the in vitro neurotoxicity of oligomeric aggregates. The monomeric peptides come in different lengths of 39-43 residues, of which the 42 alloform seems to be most strongly associated with AD-symptoms. Structural information on these peptides to date comes from NMR studies in acidic solutions, organic solvents, or on shorter fragments of the peptide. In addition X-ray and solid-state NMR investigations of amyloid fibrils yield insight into the structure of the final aggregate and therefore define the endpoint of any conformational change of an Aβ-monomer along the aggregation process. The conformational changes necessary to connect the experimentally known conformations are not yet understood and this process is an active field of research. In this paper, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on experimental data from four different peptides of 40 amino acids and two peptides consisting of 42 amino acids. The simulations allow for the analysis of intramolecular interactions and the role of structural features. In particular, they show the appearance of β-turn in the region between amino acid 21 and 33, forming a hook-like shape as it is known to exist in the fibrillar Aβ-structures. This folding does not depend on the formation of a salt bridge between Asp-23 and Lys-28 but requires the Aβ(1-42) as such structure was not observed in the shorter system Aβ(1-40).

  8. Ab initio MD simulations of Mg2SiO4 liquid at high pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. B.; Kirtman, B.; Spera, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Computational studies implementing Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have become very popular in the Materials Sciences in recent years. DFT codes are now used routinely to simulate properties of geomaterials—mainly silicates and geochemically important metals such as Fe. These materials are ubiquitous in the Earth’s mantle and core and in terrestrial exoplanets. Because of computational limitations, most First Principles Molecular Dynamics (FPMD) calculations are done on systems of only 100 atoms for a few picoseconds. While this approach can be useful for calculating physical quantities related to crystal structure, vibrational frequency, and other lattice-scale properties (especially in crystals), it would be useful to be able to compute larger systems especially for extracting transport properties and coordination statistics. Previous studies have used codes such as VASP where CPU time increases as N2, making calculations on systems of more than 100 atoms computationally very taxing. SIESTA (Soler, et al. 2002) is a an order-N (linear-scaling) DFT code that enables electronic structure and MD computations on larger systems (N 1000) by making approximations such as localized numerical orbitals. Here we test the applicability of SIESTA to simulate geosilicates in the liquid and glass state. We have used SIESTA for MD simulations of liquid Mg2SiO4 at various state points pertinent to the Earth’s mantle and congruous with those calculated in a previous DFT study using the VASP code (DeKoker, et al. 2008). The core electronic wave functions of Mg, Si, and O were approximated using pseudopotentials with a core cutoff radius of 1.38, 1.0, and 0.61 Angstroms respectively. The Ceperly-Alder parameterization of the Local Density Approximation (LDA) was used as the exchange-correlation functional. Known systematic overbinding of LDA was corrected with the addition of a pressure term, P 1.6 GPa, which is the pressure calculated by SIESTA at the experimental

  9. Structural heterogeneity and unique distorted hydrogen bonding in primary ammonium nitrate ionic liquids studied by high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuedan; Hamano, Hiroshi; Minofar, Babak; Kanzaki, Ryo; Fujii, Kenta; Kameda, Yasuo; Kohara, Shinji; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Ishiguro, Shin-ichi; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-08

    Liquid structure and the closest ion-ion interactions in a series of primary alkylammonium nitrate ionic liquids [C(n)Am(+)][NO(3)(-)] (n = 2, 3, and 4) were studied by means of high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) experiments with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Experimental density and X-ray structure factors are in good accordance with those evaluated with MD simulations. With regard to liquid structure, characteristic peaks appeared in the low Q (Q: a scattering vector) region of X-ray structure factors S(Q)'s for all ionic liquids studied here, and they increased in intensity with a peak position shift toward the lower Q side by increasing the alkyl chain length. Experimentally evaluated S(Q(peak))(r(max)) functions, which represent the S(Q) intensity at a peak position of maximum intensity Q(peak) as a function of distance (actually a integration range r(max)), revealed that characteristic peaks in the low Q region are related to the intermolecular anion-anion correlation decrease in the r range of 10-12 Å. Appearance of the peak in the low Q region is probably related to the exclusion of the correlations among ions of the same sign in this r range by the alkyl chain aggregation. From MD simulations, we found unique and rather distorted NH···O hydrogen bonding between C(n)Am(+) (n = 2, 3, and 4) and NO(3)(-) in these ionic liquids regardless of the alkyl chain length. Subsequent ab initio calculations for both a molecular complex C(2)H(5)NH(2)···HONO(2) and an ion pair C(2)H(5)NH(3)(+)···ONO(2)(-) revealed that such distorted hydrogen bonding is specific in a liquid state of this family of ionic liquids, though the linear orientation is preferred for both the N···HO hydrogen bonding in a molecular complex and the NH···O one in an ion pair. Finally, we propose our interpretation of structural heterogeneity in PILs and also in APILs.

  10. Mature HIV-1 capsid structure by cryo-electron microscopy and all-atom molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gongpu; Perilla, Juan R; Yufenyuy, Ernest L; Meng, Xin; Chen, Bo; Ning, Jiying; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M; Schulten, Klaus; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-05-30

    Retroviral capsid proteins are conserved structurally but assemble into different morphologies. The mature human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) capsid is best described by a 'fullerene cone' model, in which hexamers of the capsid protein are linked to form a hexagonal surface lattice that is closed by incorporating 12 capsid-protein pentamers. HIV-1 capsid protein contains an amino-terminal domain (NTD) comprising seven α-helices and a β-hairpin, a carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) comprising four α-helices, and a flexible linker with a 310-helix connecting the two structural domains. Structures of the capsid-protein assembly units have been determined by X-ray crystallography; however, structural information regarding the assembled capsid and the contacts between the assembly units is incomplete. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of a tubular HIV-1 capsid-protein assembly at 8 Å resolution and the three-dimensional structure of a native HIV-1 core by cryo-electron tomography. The structure of the tubular assembly shows, at the three-fold interface, a three-helix bundle with critical hydrophobic interactions. Mutagenesis studies confirm that hydrophobic residues in the centre of the three-helix bundle are crucial for capsid assembly and stability, and for viral infectivity. The cryo-electron-microscopy structures enable modelling by large-scale molecular dynamics simulation, resulting in all-atom models for the hexamer-of-hexamer and pentamer-of-hexamer elements as well as for the entire capsid. Incorporation of pentamers results in closer trimer contacts and induces acute surface curvature. The complete atomic HIV-1 capsid model provides a platform for further studies of capsid function and for targeted pharmacological intervention.

  11. Deriving Coarse-Grained Charges from All-Atom Systems: An Analytic Solution.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Peter; Lake, Peter T; McCullagh, Martin

    2016-09-13

    An analytic method to assign optimal coarse-grained charges based on electrostatic potential matching is presented. This solution is the infinite size and density limit of grid-integration charge-fitting and is computationally more efficient by several orders of magnitude. The solution is also minimized with respect to coarse-grained positions which proves to be an extremely important step in reproducing the all-atom electrostatic potential. The joint optimal-charge optimal-position coarse-graining procedure is applied to a number of aggregating proteins using single-site per amino acid resolution. These models provide a good estimate of both the vacuum and Debye-Hückel screened all-atom electrostatic potentials in the vicinity and in the far-field of the protein. Additionally, these coarse-grained models are shown to approximate the all-atom dimerization electrostatic potential energy of 10 aggregating proteins with good accuracy.

  12. Homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation studies to investigate role of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris in degradation of Aβ peptide.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease is known to degrade amyloid beta peptide which is a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. This cleavage mechanism has not been studied in detail at the atomic level. Hence, a three-dimensional structure of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris was constructed by homology modeling using Geno3D, SWISS-MODEL, and MODELLER 9v7. All the predicted models were analyzed by PROCHECK and PROSA. Three-dimensional model of cysteine protease built by MODELLER 9v7 shows similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure. This model was then used further for docking and simulation studies. The molecular docking study revealed that Cys17, His87, and Gln88 residues of cysteine protease form an active site pocket similar to human cathepsin B. Then the docked complex was refined by molecular dynamic simulation to confirm its stable behavior over the entire simulation period. The molecular docking and MD simulation studies showed that the sulfhydryl hydrogen atom of Cys17 of cysteine protease interacts with carboxylic oxygen of Lys16 of Aβ peptide indicating the cleavage site. Thus, the cysteine protease model from X. campestris having similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure may be used as an alternate approach to cleave Aβ peptide a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Computational Study of Symmetric Methylation on Histone Arginine Catalyzed by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT5 through QM/MM MD and Free Energy Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Yufei; CHu, Yuzhuo; Guo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to arginine residues. There are three types of PRMTs (I, II and III) that produce different methylation products, including asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) and monomethylarginine (MMA). Since these different methylations can lead to different biological consequences, understanding the origin of product specificity of PRMTs is of considerable interest. In this article, the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations are performed to study SDMA catalyzed by the Type II PRMT5 on the basis of experimental observation that the dimethylated productmore » is generated through a distributive fashion. The simulations have identified some important interactions and proton transfers during the catalysis. Similar to the cases involving Type I PRMTs, a conserved Glu residue (Glu435) in PRMT5 is suggested to function as general base catalyst based on the result of the simulations. Moreover, our results show that PRMT5 has an energetic preference for the first methylation on N-1 followed by the second methylation on a different -guanidino nitrogen of arginine (N-2).The first and second methyl transfers are estimated to have free energy barriers of 19-20 and 18-19 kcal/mol respectively. The computer simulations suggest a distinctive catalytic mechanism of symmetric dimethylation that seems to be different from asymmetric dimethylation.« less

  14. Computational Study of Symmetric Methylation on Histone Arginine Catalyzed by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT5 through QM/MM MD and Free Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yufei; CHu, Yuzhuo; Guo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to arginine residues. There are three types of PRMTs (I, II and III) that produce different methylation products, including asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) and monomethylarginine (MMA). Since these different methylations can lead to different biological consequences, understanding the origin of product specificity of PRMTs is of considerable interest. In this article, the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations are performed to study SDMA catalyzed by the Type II PRMT5 on the basis of experimental observation that the dimethylated product is generated through a distributive fashion. The simulations have identified some important interactions and proton transfers during the catalysis. Similar to the cases involving Type I PRMTs, a conserved Glu residue (Glu435) in PRMT5 is suggested to function as general base catalyst based on the result of the simulations. Moreover, our results show that PRMT5 has an energetic preference for the first methylation on N-1 followed by the second methylation on a different -guanidino nitrogen of arginine (N-2).The first and second methyl transfers are estimated to have free energy barriers of 19-20 and 18-19 kcal/mol respectively. The computer simulations suggest a distinctive catalytic mechanism of symmetric dimethylation that seems to be different from asymmetric dimethylation.

  15. In silico thermodynamics stability change analysis involved in BH4 responsive mutations in phenylalanine hydroxylase: QM/MM and MD simulations analysis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Nidhi; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kumar, Vikas; Milton, Marilyn D; Mishra, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-dependent phenylalanine hydroxylases (PAH), involved in important metabolic pathways of phenylalanine, belong to non-heme iron-containing aromatic acid hydroxylases' enzyme (AAH) family. AAHs utilize BH4 as protein co-factor and thus promote hydroxylation reactions of their substrates. Any alterations in BH4 -mediated AAH's pathway or mutations in these enzymes are responsible for various disorders, and thus highlights the importance of mutational analysis to assess the effect on their biosynthetic pathways. Our present studies are aimed at single-site mutations in PAH that lead to thermodynamic stability change upon folding and further validation of designed non-reduced BH2 designed co-factors. We have presented single-site mutational analysis of PAH where single-site mutations have been identified from known literature. Further, in silico studies with the PAH, in silico mutant PAH, and crystallized known mutant A313T forms, involved QM/MM and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations analysis. The modified co-factor A showed high affinity with PAH and all mutant PAH with high G-score of -14.851. The best pose high affinity co-factor A subjected to QM/MM optimization which leads to square-pyramidal coordination of non-heme active site. The structural and energetic information obtained from the production phase of 20 ns MD simulation of co-factor-metalloprotein complex results helped to understand the binding mode and involvement of three molecules throughout the reaction pathways' catalysis of PAH. The free energies of binding (dG) of A were found to be -68.181 kcal/mol and -72.249 for 1DMW and 1TDW for A313T mutant. Binding of Co-factor A do not perturb the coordination environment of iron at the active site which resides in 2-Histdine and 1-Glutamate triad, and may enhance the percentage response towards co-factor-mediated therapy.

  16. Reduced Cβ statistical potentials can outperform all-atom potentials in decoy identification

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, James E.; Jha, Abhishek K.; Colubri, Andres; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Freed, Karl F.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a series of statistical potentials to recognize the native protein from decoys, particularly when using only a reduced representation in which each side chain is treated as a single Cβ atom. Beginning with a highly successful all-atom statistical potential, the Discrete Optimized Protein Energy function (DOPE), we considered the implications of including additional information in the all-atom statistical potential and subsequently reducing to the Cβ representation. One of the potentials includes interaction energies conditional on backbone geometries. A second potential separates sequence local from sequence nonlocal interactions and introduces a novel reference state for the sequence local interactions. The resultant potentials perform better than the original DOPE statistical potential in decoy identification. Moreover, even upon passing to a reduced Cβ representation, these statistical potentials outscore the original (all-atom) DOPE potential in identifying native states for sets of decoys. Interestingly, the backbone-dependent statistical potential is shown to retain nearly all of the information content of the all-atom representation in the Cβ representation. In addition, these new statistical potentials are combined with existing potentials to model hydrogen bonding, torsion energies, and solvation energies to produce even better performing potentials. The ability of the Cβ statistical potentials to accurately represent protein interactions bodes well for computational efficiency in protein folding calculations using reduced backbone representations, while the extensions to DOPE illustrate general principles for improving knowledge-based potentials. PMID:17893359

  17. Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and ab initio MD-simulations on single ion motions in molten NaF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    The ionic stochastic motions in the molten alkali halide NaF are investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering and first principles molecular dynamics simulation. Quasielastic neutron scattering was employed to extract the diffusion behavior of the sodium ions in the melt. An extensive first principles based simulation on a box of up to 512 particles has been performed to complement the experimental data. From that large box, a smaller 64-particle box has then been simulated over a runtime of 60 ps. A good agreement between calculated and neutron data on the level of spectral shape has been obtained. The obtained sodium diffusion coefficients agree very well. The simulation predicts a fluorine diffusion coefficient similar to the sodium one. Applying the Nernst-Einstein equation, a remarkable large cross correlation between both ions can be deduced. The velocity cross correlations demonstrate a positive correlation between the ions over a period of 0.1 ps. That strong correlation is evidence that the unlike ions do not move completely statistically independent and have a strong association over a short period of time.

  18. Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and ab initio MD-simulations on single ion motions in molten NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-07

    The ionic stochastic motions in the molten alkali halide NaF are investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering and first principles molecular dynamics simulation. Quasielastic neutron scattering was employed to extract the diffusion behavior of the sodium ions in the melt. An extensive first principles based simulation on a box of up to 512 particles has been performed to complement the experimental data. From that large box, a smaller 64-particle box has then been simulated over a runtime of 60 ps. A good agreement between calculated and neutron data on the level of spectral shape has been obtained. The obtained sodium diffusion coefficients agree very well. The simulation predicts a fluorine diffusion coefficient similar to the sodium one. Applying the Nernst-Einstein equation, a remarkable large cross correlation between both ions can be deduced. The velocity cross correlations demonstrate a positive correlation between the ions over a period of 0.1 ps. That strong correlation is evidence that the unlike ions do not move completely statistically independent and have a strong association over a short period of time.

  19. All-atom polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-15

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field (FF) for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages, and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting quantum mechanical (QM) data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude FF yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100-ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduce (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII substates of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive FF, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA.

  20. Peptide Aggregation and Pore Formation in a Lipid Bilayer: A Combined Coarse-Grained and All Atom Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, Lea; Schiøtt, Birgit; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation study where different resolutions, namely coarse-grained (CG) and all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics simulations, are used sequentially to combine the long timescale reachable by CG simulations with the high resolution of AA simulations, to describe the complete processes of peptide aggregation and pore formation by alamethicin peptides in a hydrated lipid bilayer. In the 1-μs CG simulations the peptides spontaneously aggregate in the lipid bilayer and exhibit occasional transitions between the membrane-spanning and the surface-bound configurations. One of the CG systems at t = 1 μs is reverted to an AA representation and subjected to AA simulation for 50 ns, during which water molecules penetrate the lipid bilayer through interactions with the peptide aggregates, and the membrane starts leaking water. During the AA simulation significant deviations from the α-helical structure of the peptides are observed, however, the size and arrangement of the clusters are not affected within the studied time frame. Solid-state NMR experiments designed to match closely the setup used in the molecular dynamics simulations provide strong support for our finding that alamethicin peptides adopt a diverse set of configurations in a lipid bilayer, which is in sharp contrast to the prevailing view of alamethicin oligomers formed by perfectly aligned helical alamethicin peptides in a lipid bilayer. PMID:18676652

  1. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  2. Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2007-05-16

    The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

  3. Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Kritz, A.; Keyes, D.

    2007-05-18

    The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

  4. Elucidation of Enzymatic Mechanism of Phenazine Biosynthetic Protein PhzF Using QM/MM and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    The phenazine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the pharmaceutical industry. The pathway produces two products: phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. PhzF is an isomerase that catalyzes trans-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxyanthranilic acid isomerization and plays an essential role in the phenazine biosynthetic pathway. Although the PhzF crystal structure has been determined recently, an understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and the roles of key catalytic residues are still lacking. In this study, a computational strategy using a combination of molecular modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations was used to elucidate these important issues. The Apo enzyme, enzyme–substrate complexes with negatively charged Glu45, enzyme–transition state analog inhibitor complexes with neutral Glu45, and enzyme–product complexes with negatively charged Glu45 structures were optimized and modeled using a 200 ns molecular dynamics simulation. Residues such as Gly73, His74, Asp208, Gly212, Ser213, and water, which play important roles in ligand binding and the isomerization reaction, were comprehensively investigated. Our results suggest that the Glu45 residue at the active site of PhzF acts as a general base/acid catalyst during proton transfer. This study provides new insights into the detailed catalytic mechanism of PhzF and the results have important implications for PhzF modification. PMID:26414009

  5. Reconciling structural and thermodynamic predictions using all-atom and coarse-grain force fields: the case of charged oligo-arginine translocation into DMPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-10-16

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide-water and peptide-membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer-water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are -2.51, -4.28, and -5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are -0.83, -3.33, and -3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of the ensemble of

  6. Reconciling Structural and Thermodynamic Predictions Using All-Atom and Coarse-Grain Force Fields: The Case of Charged Oligo-Arginine Translocation into DMPC Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide–water and peptide–membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer–water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are −2.51, −4.28, and −5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are −0.83, −3.33, and −3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of

  7. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Method Combined with Hybrid All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Model: Theory and Application on Redox Potential Calculations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2016-04-12

    We developed a new multiresolution method that spans three levels of resolution with quantum mechanical, atomistic molecular mechanical, and coarse-grained models. The resolution-adapted all-atom and coarse-grained water model, in which an all-atom structural description of the entire system is maintained during the simulations, is combined with the ab initio quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. We apply this model to calculate the redox potentials of the aqueous ruthenium and iron complexes by using the fractional number of electrons approach and thermodynamic integration simulations. The redox potentials are recovered in excellent accordance with the experimental data. The speed-up of the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model renders it computationally more attractive. The accuracy depends on the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model used in the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. We have used another multiresolution model, in which an atomic-level layer of water molecules around redox center is solvated in supramolecular coarse-grained waters for the redox potential calculations. Compared with the experimental data, this alternative multilayer model leads to less accurate results when used with the coarse-grained polarizable MARTINI water or big multipole water model for the coarse-grained layer.

  8. Assembling a xylanase-lichenase chimera through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Oliveira, Leandro C; Damásio, André R L; Citadini, Ana P; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Alvarez, Thabata M; Codima, Carla A; Leite, Vitor B P; Pastore, Glaucia; de Oliveira-Neto, Mario; Murakami, Mario T; Ruller, Roberto; Squina, Fabio M

    2013-08-01

    Multifunctional enzyme engineering can improve enzyme cocktails for emerging biofuel technology. Molecular dynamics through structure-based models (SB) is an effective tool for assessing the tridimensional arrangement of chimeric enzymes as well as for inferring the functional practicability before experimental validation. This study describes the computational design of a bifunctional xylanase-lichenase chimera (XylLich) using the xynA and bglS genes from Bacillus subtilis. In silico analysis of the average solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and the root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) predicted a fully functional chimera, with minor fluctuations and variations along the polypeptide chains. Afterwards, the chimeric enzyme was built by fusing the xynA and bglS genes. XylLich was evaluated through small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, resulting in scattering curves with a very accurate fit to the theoretical protein model. The chimera preserved the biochemical characteristics of the parental enzymes, with the exception of a slight variation in the temperature of operation and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The absence of substantial shifts in the catalytic mode of operation was also verified. Furthermore, the production of chimeric enzymes could be more profitable than producing a single enzyme separately, based on comparing the recombinant protein production yield and the hydrolytic activity achieved for XylLich with that of the parental enzymes.

  9. Liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by an amide ligand: interfacial features studied by MD and PMF simulations.

    PubMed

    Benay, G; Wipff, G

    2013-06-20

    We report a molecular dynamics study of biphasic systems involved in the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl nitrate by a monoamide ligand (L = N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide, DEHiBA) to hexane, from pH neutral or acidic (3 M nitric acid) aqueous solutions. We first describe the neat interfaces simulated with three electrostatic models, one of which including atomic polarizabilities. The free energy profiles for crossing the water/hexane interface by L or its UO2(NO3)2L2 complex are then investigated by PMF (potential of mean force) calculations. They indicate that the free ligand and its complex are surface active. With the polarizable force field, however, the complexes have a lower affinity for the interface than without polarization. When DEHiBA gets more concentrated and in acidic conditions, their surface activity diminishes. Surface activity of UO2(NO3)2L2 complexes is further demonstrated by demixing simulations of randomly mixed DEHiBA, hexane, and neutral or acidic water. Furthermore, demixing of randomly mixed solvents, L molecules, UO2(NO3)2 salts, and nitric acid shows in some cases complexation of L to form UO2(NO3)2L2 and UO2(NO3)2L complexes that adsorb at the aqueous interfaces. These features suggest that uranyl complexation by amide ligands occurs "right at the interface", displaying marked analogies with the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate). Regarding the positive effect of nitric acid on extraction, the simulations point to several facets involving enhanced ion pairing of uranyl nitrate, decreased affinity of the complex for the interface, and finally, stabilization of the complex in the organic phase.

  10. Folding peptides and proteins with all-atom physics: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, M. Scott

    2008-03-01

    Computational methods offer powerful tools for investigating proteins and peptides at the molecular-level; however, it has proven challenging to reproduce the long time scale folding processes of these molecules at a level that is both faithful to the atomic driving forces and attainable with modern commodity cluster computing. Alternatively, the past decade has seen significant progress in using bioinformatics-based approaches to infer the three dimensional native structures of proteins, drawing upon extensive knowledge databases of known protein structures [1]. These methods work remarkably well when a homologous protein can be found to provide a structural template for a candidate sequence. However, in cases where homology to database proteins is low, where the folding pathway is of interest, or where conformational flexibility is substantial---as in many emerging protein and peptide technologies---bioinformatics methods perform poorly. There is therefore great interest in seeing purely physics-based approaches succeed. We discuss a purely physics-based, database-free folding method, relying on proper thermal sampling (replica exchange molecular dynamics) and molecular potential energy functions. In order to surmount the tremendous computational demands of all-atom folding simulations, our approach implements a conformational search strategy based on a putative protein folding mechanism called zipping and assembly [2-4]. That is, we explicitly seek out potential folding pathways inferred from short simulations, and iteratively pursue all such routes by coaxing a polypeptide chain along them. The method is called the Zipping and Assembly Method (ZAM) and it works in two parts: (1) the full polypeptide chain is broken into small fragments that are first simulated independently and then successively re-assembled into larger segments with further sampling, and (2) consistently stable structure in fragments is detected and locked into place, in order to avoid re

  11. pH-controlled doxorubicin anticancer loading and release from carbon nanotube noncovalently modified by chitosan: MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Poo-Arporn, Rungtiva P

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, we describe here the pH condition activating doxorubicin (DOX) anticancer drugs loading and release over single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) non-covalently wrapped with chitosan (CS). The possibility of drug displacement on DOX/CS/SWNT nanocarrier was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The drug loading and release were monitored via displacement analysis and binding energy calculations. The simulated results clearly showed that the drugs well interacted with the CS/SWNT at physiological pH (pH 7.4), where CS was in the deprotonated form. Contrastingly, in weakly acidic environments (pH 5.0-6.5) which is a pH characteristics of certain cancer environments, the protonated CS became loosen wrapped around the SWNT and triggered drugs release as a result of charge-charge repulsion between CS and drug molecules. The obtained data fulfil the understanding at atomic level of drug loading and release controlled by pH-sensitive polymer, which might be useful for further cancer therapy researches.

  12. Estimation of Liposome Penetration Barriers of Drug Molecules with All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Models.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A

    2016-09-13

    Liposomes are common carriers of drug molecules, providing enhanced delivery and accumulation of hydrophilic agents or larger biomolecules. Molecular simulations can be used to estimate key features of the drug molecules upon interaction with the liposomes, such as penetration barriers and localization. Herein, we investigate several aspects of the computational estimation of penetration barriers, viz. the potential of mean force (PMFs) along a vector spanning the membrane. First, we provide an evaluation of the all-atom (AA) and coarse-grained (CG) parametrization of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and two of its alkyl esters by computing n-octanol/water partition coefficients. We find that the CG parametrization of the esters performs significantly better than the CG model of 5-ALA, highlighting the difficulty to coarse-grain small, polar molecules. However, the expected trend in partition coefficients is reproduced also with the CG models. Second, we compare PMFs in a small membrane slab described with either the AA or CG models. Here, we are able to reproduce the all-atom PMF of 5-ALA with CG. However, for the alkyl esters it is unfortunately not possible to correctly reproduce both the depth and the penetration barrier of the PMF seen in the AA simulations with any of the tested CG models. We argue that it is more important to choose a CG parametrization that reproduces the depth of the PMF. Third, we compare, using the CG model, PMFs in the membrane slab with PMFs in a large, realistic liposome. We find similar depths but slightly different penetration barriers most likely due to differences in the lipid density along the membrane axis. Finally, we compute PMFs in liposomes with three different lipid compositions. Unfortunately, differences in the PMFs could not be quantified, and it remains to be investigated to what extent liposome simulations can fully reproduce experimental findings.

  13. Enhanced dynamics of hydrated tRNA on nanodiamond surfaces: A combined neutron scattering and MD simulation study

    DOE PAGES

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; ...

    2016-09-01

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on NDmore » surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. As a result, our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.« less

  14. Enhanced dynamics of hydrated tRNA on nanodiamond surfaces: A combined neutron scattering and MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O’Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang -qiang

    2016-09-01

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on ND surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. As a result, our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.

  15. Conformational Properties of α- or β-(1→6)-Linked Oligosaccharides: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange MD Simulations and NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational sampling for a set of 10 α- or β-(1→6)-linked oligosaccharides has been studied using explicit solvent Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) simulations and NMR spectroscopy techniques. Validation of the force field and simulation methodology is done by comparing calculated transglycosidic J coupling constants and proton–proton distances with the corresponding NMR data. Initial calculations showed poor agreement, for example, with >3 Hz deviation of the calculated 3J(H5,H6R) values from the experimental data, prompting optimization of the ω torsion angle parameters associated with (1→6)-linkages. The resulting force field is in overall good agreement (i.e., within ∼0.5 Hz deviation) from experimental 3J(H5,H6R) values, although some small limitations are evident. Detailed hydrogen bonding analysis indicates that most of the compounds lack direct intramolecular H-bonds between the two monosaccharides; however, minor sampling of the O6···HO2′ hydrogen bond is present in three compounds. The results verify the role of the gauche effect between O5 and O6 atoms in gluco- and manno-configured pyranosides causing the ω torsion angle to sample an equilibrium between the gt and gg rotamers. Conversely, galacto-configured pyranosides sample a population distribution in equilibrium between gt and tg rotamers, while the gg rotamer populations are minor. Water radial distribution functions suggest decreased accessibility to the O6 atom in the (1→6)-linkage as compared to the O6′ atom in the nonreducing sugar. The role of bridging water molecules between two sugar moieties on the distributions of ω torsion angles in oligosaccharides is also explored. PMID:24552401

  16. All-Atom Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM) Force Field for Hexopyranoses and Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Arnautova, Yelena A; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2015-05-12

    We present an extension of the all-atom internal-coordinate force field, ICMFF, that allows for simulation of heterogeneous systems including hexopyranose saccharides and glycan chains in addition to proteins. A library of standard glycan geometries containing α- and β-anomers of the most common hexapyranoses, i.e., d-galactose, d-glucose, d-mannose, d-xylose, l-fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, sialic, and glucuronic acids, is created based on the analysis of the saccharide structures reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. The new force field parameters include molecular electrostatic potential-derived partial atomic charges and the torsional parameters derived from quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related molecules. The ϕ/ψ torsional parameters for different types of glycosidic linkages are developed using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates, i.e., glycosidic-linked tetrahydropyran-cyclohexane dimers. Target data for parameter optimization include two-dimensional energy surfaces corresponding to the ϕ/ψ glycosidic dihedral angles in the disaccharide analogues, as determined by quantum mechanical MP2/6-31G** single-point energies on HF/6-31G** optimized structures. To achieve better agreement with the observed geometries of glycosidic linkages, the bond angles at the O-linkage atoms are added to the internal variable set and the corresponding bond bending energy term is parametrized using quantum mechanical data. The resulting force field is validated on glycan chains of 1-12 residues from a set of high-resolution X-ray glycoprotein structures based on heavy atom root-mean-square deviations of the lowest-energy glycan conformations generated by the biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) molecular mechanics simulations from the native structures. The appropriate BPMC distributions for monosaccharide-monosaccharide and protein-glycan linkages are derived from the

  17. Structure prediction for CASP7 targets using extensive all-atom refinement with Rosetta@home.

    PubMed

    Das, Rhiju; Qian, Bin; Raman, Srivatsan; Vernon, Robert; Thompson, James; Bradley, Philip; Khare, Sagar; Tyka, Michael D; Bhat, Divya; Chivian, Dylan; Kim, David E; Sheffler, William H; Malmström, Lars; Wollacott, Andrew M; Wang, Chu; Andre, Ingemar; Baker, David

    2007-01-01

    We describe predictions made using the Rosetta structure prediction methodology for both template-based modeling and free modeling categories in the Seventh Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction. For the first time, aggressive sampling and all-atom refinement could be carried out for the majority of targets, an advance enabled by the Rosetta@home distributed computing network. Template-based modeling predictions using an iterative refinement algorithm improved over the best existing templates for the majority of proteins with less than 200 residues. Free modeling methods gave near-atomic accuracy predictions for several targets under 100 residues from all secondary structure classes. These results indicate that refinement with an all-atom energy function, although computationally expensive, is a powerful method for obtaining accurate structure predictions.

  18. Energies and 2'-Hydroxyl Group Orientations of RNA Backbone Conformations. Benchmark CCSD(T)/CBS Database, Electronic Analysis, and Assessment of DFT Methods and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mládek, Arnošt; Banáš, Pavel; Jurečka, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Zgarbová, Marie; Šponer, Jiří

    2014-01-14

    Sugar-phosphate backbone is an electronically complex molecular segment imparting RNA molecules high flexibility and architectonic heterogeneity necessary for their biological functions. The structural variability of RNA molecules is amplified by the presence of the 2'-hydroxyl group, capable of forming multitude of intra- and intermolecular interactions. Bioinformatics studies based on X-ray structure database revealed that RNA backbone samples at least 46 substates known as rotameric families. The present study provides a comprehensive analysis of RNA backbone conformational preferences and 2'-hydroxyl group orientations. First, we create a benchmark database of estimated CCSD(T)/CBS relative energies of all rotameric families and test performance of dispersion-corrected DFT-D3 methods and molecular mechanics in vacuum and in continuum solvent. The performance of the DFT-D3 methods is in general quite satisfactory. The B-LYP-D3 method provides the best trade-off between accuracy and computational demands. B3-LYP-D3 slightly outperforms the new PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 and is the second most accurate density functional of the study. The best agreement with CCSD(T)/CBS is provided by DSD-B-LYP-D3 double-hybrid functional, although its large-scale applications may be limited by high computational costs. Molecular mechanics does not reproduce the fine energy differences between the RNA backbone substates. We also demonstrate that the differences in the magnitude of the hyperconjugation effect do not correlate with the energy ranking of the backbone conformations. Further, we investigated the 2'-hydroxyl group orientation preferences. For all families, we conducted a QM and MM hydroxyl group rigid scan in gas phase and solvent. We then carried out set of explicit solvent MD simulations of folded RNAs and analyze 2'-hydroxyl group orientations of different backbone families in MD. The solvent energy profiles determined primarily by the sugar pucker match well with the

  19. Characterization of Zebrafish Cardiac and Slow Skeletal Troponin C Paralogs by MD Simulation and ITC.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Charles M; Rayani, Kaveh; Genge, Christine E; Singh, Gurpreet; Liang, Bo; Roller, Janine M; Li, Cindy; Li, Alison Yueh; Tieleman, D Peter; van Petegem, Filip; Tibbits, Glen F

    2016-07-12

    Zebrafish, as a model for teleost fish, have two paralogous troponin C (TnC) genes that are expressed in the heart differentially in response to temperature acclimation. Upon Ca(2+) binding, TnC changes conformation and exposes a hydrophobic patch that interacts with troponin I and initiates cardiac muscle contraction. Teleost-specific TnC paralogs have not yet been functionally characterized. In this study we have modeled the structures of the paralogs using molecular dynamics simulations at 18°C and 28°C and calculated the different Ca(2+)-binding properties between the teleost cardiac (cTnC or TnC1a) and slow-skeletal (ssTnC or TnC1b) paralogs through potential-of-mean-force calculations. These values are compared with thermodynamic binding properties obtained through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The modeled structures of each of the paralogs are similar at each temperature, with the exception of helix C, which flanks the Ca(2+) binding site; this region is also home to paralog-specific sequence substitutions that we predict have an influence on protein function. The short timescale of the potential-of-mean-force calculation precludes the inclusion of the conformational change on the ΔG of Ca(2+) interaction, whereas the ITC analysis includes the Ca(2+) binding and conformational change of the TnC molecule. ITC analysis has revealed that ssTnC has higher Ca(2+) affinity than cTnC for Ca(2+) overall, whereas each of the paralogs has increased affinity at 28°C compared to 18°C. Microsecond-timescale simulations have calculated that the cTnC paralog transitions from the closed to the open state more readily than the ssTnC paralog, an unfavorable transition that would decrease the ITC-derived Ca(2+) affinity while simultaneously increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilament. We propose that the preferential expression of cTnC at lower temperatures increases myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by this mechanism, despite the lower Ca(2+) affinity

  20. SERS and MD simulation studies of a kinase inhibitor demonstrate the emergence of a potential drug discovery tool.

    PubMed

    Karthigeyan, Dhanasekaran; Siddhanta, Soumik; Kishore, Annavarapu Hari; Perumal, Sathya S R R; Ågren, Hans; Sudevan, Surabhi; Bhat, Akshay V; Balasubramanyam, Karanam; Subbegowda, Rangappa Kanchugarakoppal; Kundu, Tapas K; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2014-07-22

    We demonstrate the use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as an excellent tool for identifying the binding site of small molecules on a therapeutically important protein. As an example, we show the specific binding of the common antihypertension drug felodipine to the oncogenic Aurora A kinase protein via hydrogen bonding interactions with Tyr-212 residue to specifically inhibit its activity. Based on SERS studies, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, biochemical assays, and point mutation-based validation, we demonstrate the surface-binding mode of this molecule in two similar hydrophobic pockets in the Aurora A kinase. These binding pockets comprise the same unique hydrophobic patches that may aid in distinguishing human Aurora A versus human Aurora B kinase in vivo. The application of SERS to identify the specific interactions between small molecules and therapeutically important proteins by differentiating competitive and noncompetitive inhibition demonstrates its ability as a complementary technique. We also present felodipine as a specific inhibitor for oncogenic Aurora A kinase. Felodipine retards the rate of tumor progression in a xenografted nude mice model. This study reveals a potential surface pocket that may be useful for developing small molecules by selectively targeting the Aurora family kinases.

  1. SERS and MD simulation studies of a kinase inhibitor demonstrate the emergence of a potential drug discovery tool

    PubMed Central

    Karthigeyan, Dhanasekaran; Siddhanta, Soumik; Kishore, Annavarapu Hari; Perumal, Sathya S. R. R.; Ågren, Hans; Sudevan, Surabhi; Bhat, Akshay V.; Balasubramanyam, Karanam; Subbegowda, Rangappa Kanchugarakoppal; Kundu, Tapas K.; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as an excellent tool for identifying the binding site of small molecules on a therapeutically important protein. As an example, we show the specific binding of the common antihypertension drug felodipine to the oncogenic Aurora A kinase protein via hydrogen bonding interactions with Tyr-212 residue to specifically inhibit its activity. Based on SERS studies, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, biochemical assays, and point mutation-based validation, we demonstrate the surface-binding mode of this molecule in two similar hydrophobic pockets in the Aurora A kinase. These binding pockets comprise the same unique hydrophobic patches that may aid in distinguishing human Aurora A versus human Aurora B kinase in vivo. The application of SERS to identify the specific interactions between small molecules and therapeutically important proteins by differentiating competitive and noncompetitive inhibition demonstrates its ability as a complementary technique. We also present felodipine as a specific inhibitor for oncogenic Aurora A kinase. Felodipine retards the rate of tumor progression in a xenografted nude mice model. This study reveals a potential surface pocket that may be useful for developing small molecules by selectively targeting the Aurora family kinases. PMID:24972791

  2. Crystal structure and MD simulation of mouse EndoV reveal wedge motif plasticity in this inosine-specific endonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Ronander, Mia Elise; Solvoll, Anne Marthe; Blicher, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Endonuclease V (EndoV) is an enzyme with specificity for deaminated adenosine (inosine) in nucleic acids. EndoV from Escherichia coli (EcEndoV) acts both on inosines in DNA and RNA, whereas the human homolog cleaves only at inosines in RNA. Inosines in DNA are mutagenic and the role of EndoV in DNA repair is well established. In contrast, the biological function of EndoV in RNA processing is largely unexplored. Here we have characterized a second mammalian EndoV homolog, mouse EndoV (mEndoV), and show that mEndoV shares the same RNA selectivity as human EndoV (hEndoV). Mouse EndoV cleaves the same inosine-containing substrates as hEndoV, but with reduced efficiencies. The crystal structure of mEndoV reveals a conformation different from the hEndoV and prokaryotic EndoV structures, particularly for the conserved tyrosine in the wedge motif, suggesting that this strand separating element has some flexibility. Molecular dynamics simulations of mouse and human EndoV reveal alternative conformations for the invariant tyrosine. The configuration of the active site, on the other hand, is very similar between the prokaryotic and mammalian versions of EndoV.

  3. Urea-induced denaturation of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: a combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Haque, Md Anzarul; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-02-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a multifunctional enzyme which belongs to the Ser/Thr kinase family. CaMKIV plays important role in varieties of biological processes such as gene expression regulation, memory consolidation, bone growth, T-cell maturation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis. To measure stability parameters, urea-induced denaturation of CaMKIV was carried out at pH 7.4 and 25°C, using three different probes, namely far-UV CD, near-UV absorption, and tryptophan fluorescence. A coincidence of normalized denaturation curves of these optical properties suggests that urea-induced denaturation is a two-state process. Analysis of these denaturation curves gave values of 4.20 ± 0.12 kcal mol(-1), 2.95 ± 0.15 M, and 1.42 ± 0.06 kcal mol(-1) M(-1) for [Formula: see text] (Gibbs free energy change (ΔGD) in the absence of urea), Cm (molar urea concentration ([urea]) at the midpoint of the denaturation curve), and m (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]), respectively. All these experimental observations have been fully supported by 30 ns molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  4. Comparative MD Simulations Indicate a Dual Role for Arg1323.50 in Dopamine-Dependent D2R Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Ralf C.; Clark, Timothy; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Residue Arg3.50 belongs to the highly conserved DRY-motif of class A GPCRs, which is located at the bottom of TM3. On the one hand, Arg3.50 has been reported to help stabilize the inactive state of GPCRs, but on the other hand has also been shown to be crucial for stabilizing active receptor conformations and mediating receptor-G protein coupling. The combined results of these studies suggest that the exact function of Arg3.50 is likely to be receptor-dependent and must be characterized independently for every GPCR. Consequently, we now present comparative molecular-dynamics simulations that use our recently described inactive-state and Gα-bound active-state homology models of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), which are either bound to dopamine or ligand-free, performed to identify the function of Arg1323.50 in D2R. Our results are consistent with a dynamic model of D2R activation in which Arg1323.50 adopts a dual role, both by stabilizing the inactive-state receptor conformation and enhancing dopamine-dependent D2R-G protein coupling. PMID:26741139

  5. Structure prediction for CASP8 with all-atom refinement using Rosetta.

    PubMed

    Raman, Srivatsan; Vernon, Robert; Thompson, James; Tyka, Michael; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Pei, Jimin; Kim, David; Kellogg, Elizabeth; DiMaio, Frank; Lange, Oliver; Kinch, Lisa; Sheffler, Will; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Das, Rhiju; Grishin, Nick V; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    We describe predictions made using the Rosetta structure prediction methodology for the Eighth Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction. Aggressive sampling and all-atom refinement were carried out for nearly all targets. A combination of alignment methodologies was used to generate starting models from a range of templates, and the models were then subjected to Rosetta all atom refinement. For the 64 domains with readily identified templates, the best submitted model was better than the best alignment to the best template in the Protein Data Bank for 24 cases, and improved over the best starting model for 43 cases. For 13 targets where only very distant sequence relationships to proteins of known structure were detected, models were generated using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction methodology followed by all-atom refinement; in several cases the submitted models were better than those based on the available templates. Of the 12 refinement challenges, the best submitted model improved on the starting model in seven cases. These improvements over the starting template-based models and refinement tests demonstrate the power of Rosetta structure refinement in improving model accuracy.

  6. MD simulation study of direct permeation of a nanoparticle across the cell membrane under an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenta; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been attracting much attention for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In most of the applications, NPs are required to translocate across the cell membrane and to reach the cell cytosol. Experimental studies have reported that by applying an electric field NPs can directly permeate across the cell membrane without the confinement of NPs by endocytic vesicles. However, damage to the cell can often be a concern. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the direct permeation of NPs under an external electric field can greatly contribute to the realization of a technology for the direct delivery of NPs. Here we investigated the permeation of a cationic gold NP across a phospholipid bilayer under an external electric field using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. When an external electric field that is equal to the membrane breakdown intensity was applied, a typical NP delivery by electroporation was shown: the cationic gold NP directly permeated across a lipid bilayer without membrane wrapping of the NP, while a persistent transmembrane pore was formed. However, when a specific range of the electric field that is lower than the membrane breakdown intensity was applied, a unique permeation pathway was exhibited: the generated transmembrane pore immediately resealed after the direct permeation of NP. Furthermore, we found that the affinity of the NP for the membrane surface is a key for the self-resealing of the pore. Our finding suggests that by applying an electric field in a suitable range NPs can be directly delivered into the cell with less cellular damage.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been attracting much attention for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In most of the applications, NPs are required to translocate across the cell membrane and to reach the cell cytosol. Experimental studies have reported that by applying an electric field NPs can directly permeate across the cell membrane without the confinement of

  7. QM/MM MD and free energy simulations of G9α-like protein (GLP) and its mutants: Understanding the factors that determine the product specificity

    DOE PAGES

    Chu, Yuzhuo; Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Hong

    2012-05-18

    Certain lysine residues on histone tails could be methylated by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) using S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Since the methylation states of the target lysines play a fundamental role in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression, it is important to study the property of PKMTs that allows a specific number of methyl groups (one, two or three) to be added (termed as product specificity). It has been shown that the product specificity of PKMTs may be controlled in part by the existence of specific residues at the active site. One of the best examplesmore » is a Phe/Tyr switch found in many PKMTs. Here quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations are performed on wild type G9a-like protein (GLP) and its F1209Y and Y1124F mutants for understanding the energetic origin of the product specificity and the reasons for the change of product specificity as a result of single-residue mutations at the Phe/Tyr switch as well as other positions. The free energy barriers of the methyl transfer processes calculated from our simulations are consistent with experimental data, supporting the suggestion that the relative free energy barriers may determine, at least in part, the product specificity of PKMTs. The changes of the free energy barriers as a result of the mutations are also discussed based on the structural information obtained from the simulations. Furthermore, the results suggest that the space and active-site interactions around the -amino group of the target lysine available for methyl addition appear to among the key structural factors in controlling the product specificity and activity of PKMTs.« less

  8. QM/MM MD and free energy simulations of G9α-like protein (GLP) and its mutants: Understanding the factors that determine the product specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Yuzhuo; Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Hong

    2012-05-18

    Certain lysine residues on histone tails could be methylated by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) using S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Since the methylation states of the target lysines play a fundamental role in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression, it is important to study the property of PKMTs that allows a specific number of methyl groups (one, two or three) to be added (termed as product specificity). It has been shown that the product specificity of PKMTs may be controlled in part by the existence of specific residues at the active site. One of the best examples is a Phe/Tyr switch found in many PKMTs. Here quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations are performed on wild type G9a-like protein (GLP) and its F1209Y and Y1124F mutants for understanding the energetic origin of the product specificity and the reasons for the change of product specificity as a result of single-residue mutations at the Phe/Tyr switch as well as other positions. The free energy barriers of the methyl transfer processes calculated from our simulations are consistent with experimental data, supporting the suggestion that the relative free energy barriers may determine, at least in part, the product specificity of PKMTs. The changes of the free energy barriers as a result of the mutations are also discussed based on the structural information obtained from the simulations. Furthermore, the results suggest that the space and active-site interactions around the -amino group of the target lysine available for methyl addition appear to among the key structural factors in controlling the product specificity and activity of PKMTs.

  9. Conformations of phenylalanine in the tripeptides AFA and GFG probed by combining MD simulations with NMR, FTIR, polarized Raman, and VCD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pizzanelli, Silvia; Forte, Claudia; Monti, Susanna; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Hagarman, Andrew; Measey, Thomas J; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2010-03-25

    Conformational properties of small, flexible peptides are a matter of ongoing interest since they can be considered as models for unfolded proteins. However, the investigation of the conformations of small peptides is challenging as they are ensembles of rapidly interconverting conformers; moreover, the different methods used are prone to different approximations and errors. In order to obtain more reliable results, it is prudent to combine different techniques; here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), polarized Raman, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) measurements were used to study the conformational propensity of phenylalanine in the tripeptides AFA and GFG, motivated by the relevance of phenylalanine for the self-aggregation of peptides. The results of this analysis indicate that the F residue predominantly populates the beta-strand (beta) and polyproline II (PPII) conformations in both AFA and GFG. However, while phenylalanine exhibits a propensity for beta-strand conformations in GFG (0.40 < or = beta population < or = 0.69 and 0.29 < or = PPII population < or = 0.42), the substitution of terminal glycines with alanine residues induces a higher population of PPII (0.31 < or = beta population < or = 0.50 and 0.37 < or = PPII population < or = 0.57).

  10. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    DOE PAGES

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.; Persson, Ingmar

    2014-11-26

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2–, chlorate, ClO3–, and perchlorate, ClO4–. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO–, bromate, BrO3–, iodate, IO3– and metaperiodate, IO4–, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63–, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearlymore » that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl–O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. Here, the water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5 = 1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5 = 2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it

  11. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-01-28

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2(-), chlorate, ClO3(-), and perchlorate, ClO4(-). In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO(-), bromate, BrO3(-), iodate, IO3(-) and metaperiodate, IO4(-), ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO6(3-), ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01-0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5 = 1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5 = 2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  12. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.; Persson, Ingmar

    2014-11-26

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2, chlorate, ClO3, and perchlorate, ClO4. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO, bromate, BrO3, iodate, IO3 and metaperiodate, IO4, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63–, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl–O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. Here, the water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5 = 1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5 = 2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism

  13. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2−, chlorate, ClO3−, and perchlorate, ClO4−. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO−, bromate, BrO3−, iodate, IO3− and metaperiodate, IO4−, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63−, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5=1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5=2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  14. Hybrid MD-Nernst Planck Model of Alpha-hemolysin Conductance Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozmuta, Ioana; O'Keefer, James T.; Bose, Deepak; Stolc, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by experiments in which an applied electric field translocates polynucleotides through an alpha-hemolysin protein channel causing ionic current transient blockade, a hybrid simulation model is proposed to predict the conductance properties of the open channel. Time scales corresponding to ion permeation processes are reached using the Poisson-Nemst-Planck (PNP) electro-diffusion model in which both solvent and local ion concentrations are represented as a continuum. The diffusion coefficients of the ions (K(+) and Cl(-)) input in the PNP model are, however, calculated from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD). In the MD simulations, a reduced representation of the channel is used. The channel is solvated in a 1 M KCI solution, and an external electric field is applied. The pore specific diffusion coefficients for both ionic species are reduced 5-7 times in comparison to bulk values. Significant statistical variations (17-45%) of the pore-ions diffusivities are observed. Within the statistics, the ionic diffusivities remain invariable for a range of external applied voltages between 30 and 240mV. In the 2D-PNP calculations, the pore stem is approximated by a smooth cylinder of radius approx. 9A with two constriction blocks where the radius is reduced to approx. 6A. The electrostatic potential includes the contribution from the atomistic charges. The MD-PNP model shows that the atomic charges are responsible for the rectifying behaviour and for the slight anion selectivity of the a-hemolysin pore. Independent of the hierarchy between the anion and cation diffusivities, the anionic contribution to the total ionic current will dominate. The predictions of the MD-PNP model are in good agreement with experimental data and give confidence in the present approach of bridging time scales by combining a microscopic and macroscopic model.

  15. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Electrosprayed Protein Complexes: An All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Model with Mobile Protons.

    PubMed

    Popa, Vlad; Trecroce, Danielle A; McAllister, Robert G; Konermann, Lars

    2016-06-16

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an indispensable technique for examining noncovalent protein complexes. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of these multiply protonated gaseous ions usually culminates in ejection of a single subunit with a disproportionately large amount of charge. Experiments suggest that this process involves subunit unfolding prior to separation from the residual complex, as well as H(+) migration onto the unravelling chain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are a promising avenue for gaining detailed insights into these CID events. Unfortunately, typical MD algorithms do not allow for mobile protons. Here we address this limitation by implementing a strategy that combines atomistic force fields (such as OPLS/AA and CHARMM36) with a proton hopping algorithm, focusing on the tetrameric complexes transthyretin and streptavidin. Protons are redistributed over all acidic and basic sites in 20 ps intervals, subject to an energy function that reflects electrostatic interactions and proton affinities. Our simulations predict that nativelike conformers at the onset of collisional heating contain multiple salt bridges. Collisional heating initially causes subtle structural changes that lead to a gradual decline of these zwitterionic patterns. Many of the MD runs show gradual unfolding of a single subunit in conjunction with H(+) migration, culminating in subunit separation from the complex. However, there are also instances where two or more chains start to unfold simultaneously, giving rise to charge competition. The scission point where the "winning" subunit separates from the complex can be attained for different degrees of unfolding, giving rise to product ions in various charge states. The simulated product ion distributions are in close agreement with experimental CID data. Proton enrichment in the departing subunit is driven by charge-charge repulsion, but the combination of salt bridge depletion, charge migration

  16. Mechanism of PhosphoThreonine/Serine Recognition and Specificity for Modular Domains from All-atom Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phosphopeptide-binding domains mediate many vital cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein recognition. We studied three well-known domains important for signal transduction: BRCT repeats, WW domain and forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. The first two recognize both phosphothreonine (pThr) and phosphoserine (pSer) residues, but FHA has high specificity for pThr residues. Here we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how FHA exclusively chooses pThr and how BRCT and WW recognize both pThr/pSer. The work also investigated the energies and thermodynamic information of intermolecular interactions. Results Simulations carried out included wide-type and mutated systems. Through analysis of MD simulations, we found that the conserved His residue defines dual loops feature of the FHA domain, which creates a small cavity reserved for only the methyl group of pThr. These well-organized loop interactions directly response to the pThr binding selectivity, while single loop (the 2nd phosphobinding site of FHA) or in combination with α-helix (BRCT repeats) or β-sheet (WW domain) fail to differentiate pThr/pSer. Conclusions Understanding the domain pre-organizations constructed by conserved residues and the driving force of domain-phosphopeptide recognition provides structural insight into pThr specific binding, which also helps in engineering proteins and designing peptide inhibitors. PMID:21612598

  17. ProtoMD: A prototyping toolkit for multiscale molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, Endre; Mansour, Andrew Abi; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    ProtoMD is a toolkit that facilitates the development of algorithms for multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is designed for multiscale methods which capture the dynamic transfer of information across multiple spatial scales, such as the atomic to the mesoscopic scale, via coevolving microscopic and coarse-grained (CG) variables. ProtoMD can be also be used to calibrate parameters needed in traditional CG-MD methods. The toolkit integrates 'GROMACS wrapper' to initiate MD simulations, and 'MDAnalysis' to analyze and manipulate trajectory files. It facilitates experimentation with a spectrum of coarse-grained variables, prototyping rare events (such as chemical reactions), or simulating nanocharacterization experiments such as terahertz spectroscopy, AFM, nanopore, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. ProtoMD is written in python and is freely available under the GNU General Public License from github.com/CTCNano/proto_md.

  18. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K

    2014-10-15

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here, we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: (1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? (2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force-shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK(a) values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via cotitrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma.

  19. Binding Analysis of Some Classical Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Insights for a Rational Design Using Free Energy Perturbation Method Calculations with QM/MM MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Érica C M; Oliva, Mónica; Świderek, Katarzyna; Martins, João B L; Andrés, Juan

    2017-04-13

    In the present study, the binding free energy of some classical inhibitors (DMT, DNP, GNT, HUP, THA) with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation (FEP) method based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials. The results highlight the key role of the van der Waals interaction for the inhibition process, since the contribution of this term to the binding free energy is almost as decisive as the electrostatic one. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and the interaction energy per residue along the QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD) simulations highlights the most relevant interactions in the different AChE-ligand systems, showing that the charged residues with a more prominent contribution to the interaction energy are Asp72 and Glu199, although the relative importance depends on the molecular size of the ligand. A correlation between the binding free energy and the number of cation-π interactions present in the systems has been established, DMT being the most potent inhibitor, capable of forming four cation-π interactions. A layer of water molecules surrounding the inhibitors has been observed, which act as bridges along a network formed by the ligands and the residues of the gorge and also between different residues. Although several hydrogen bonds between ligands and AChE do appear, no significant values of BIEs have been recorded. This behavior can be accounted for by the special features of AChE, such as the presence of several subsites of different natures in the gorge or the existence of several water molecules that act as bridges in the electrostatic interactions.

  20. Toward a Rational Design of Bioactive Glasses with Optimal Structural Features: Composition–Structure Correlations Unveiled by Solid-State NMR and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The physiological responses of silicate-based bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to depend critically on both the P content (nP) of the glass and its silicate network connectivity (N̅BOSi). However, while the bioactivity generally displays a nonmonotonic dependence on nP itself, recent work suggest that it is merely the net orthophosphate content that directly links to the bioactivity. We exploit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with 31P and 29Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to explore the quantitative relationships between N̅BOSi, nP, and the silicate and phosphate speciations in a series of Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses spanning 2.1 ≤ N̅BOSi ≤ 2.9 and variable P2O5 contents up to 6.0 mol %. The fractional population of the orthophosphate groups remains independent of nP at a fixed N̅BOSi-value, but is reduced slightly as N̅BOSi increases. Nevertheless, P remains predominantly as readily released orthophosphate ions, whose content may be altered essentially independently of the network connectivity, thereby offering a route to optimize the glass bioactivity. We discuss the observed composition-structure links in relation to known composition-bioactivity correlations, and define how Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 compositions exhibiting an optimal bioactivity can be designed by simultaneously altering three key parameters: the silicate network connectivity, the (ortho)phosphate content, and the nNa/nCa molar ratio. PMID:24364818

  1. Toward a rational design of bioactive glasses with optimal structural features: composition-structure correlations unveiled by solid-state NMR and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Renny; Stevensson, Baltzar; Tilocca, Antonio; Edén, Mattias

    2014-01-23

    The physiological responses of silicate-based bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to depend critically on both the P content (n(P)) of the glass and its silicate network connectivity (N(BO)(Si)). However, while the bioactivity generally displays a nonmonotonic dependence on nP itself, recent work suggest that it is merely the net orthophosphate content that directly links to the bioactivity. We exploit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with ³¹P and ²⁹Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to explore the quantitative relationships between N(BO)(Si), n(P), and the silicate and phosphate speciations in a series of Na₂O-CaO-SiO₂-P₂O₅ glasses spanning 2.1 ≤ N(BO)(Si) ≤ 2.9 and variable P₂O₅ contents up to 6.0 mol %. The fractional population of the orthophosphate groups remains independent of n(P) at a fixed N(BO)(Si)-value, but is reduced slightly as N(BO)(Si) increases. Nevertheless, P remains predominantly as readily released orthophosphate ions, whose content may be altered essentially independently of the network connectivity, thereby offering a route to optimize the glass bioactivity. We discuss the observed composition-structure links in relation to known composition-bioactivity correlations, and define how Na₂O-CaO-SiO₂-P₂O₅ compositions exhibiting an optimal bioactivity can be designed by simultaneously altering three key parameters: the silicate network connectivity, the (ortho)phosphate content, and the n(Na)/n(Ca) molar ratio.

  2. Microsecond simulations of DNA and ion transport in nanopores with novel ion-ion and ion-nucleotides effective potentials.

    PubMed

    De Biase, Pablo M; Markosyan, Suren; Noskov, Sergei

    2014-04-05

    We developed a novel scheme based on the grand-canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics simulations and have extended it to studies of ion currents across three nanopores with the potential for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sequencing: solid-state nanopore Si₃N₄, α-hemolysin, and E111N/M113Y/K147N mutant. To describe nucleotide-specific ion dynamics compatible with ssDNA coarse-grained model, we used the inverse Monte Carlo protocol, which maps the relevant ion-nucleotide distribution functions from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined with the previously developed simulation platform for Brownian dynamics simulations of ion transport, it allows for microsecond- and millisecond-long simulations of ssDNA dynamics in the nanopore with a conductance computation accuracy that equals or exceeds that of all-atom MD simulations. In spite of the simplifications, the protocol produces results that agree with the results of previous studies on ion conductance across open channels and provide direct correlations with experimentally measured blockade currents and ion conductances that have been estimated from all-atom MD simulations.

  3. An FFT-based method for modeling protein folding and binding under crowding: benchmarking on ellipsoidal and all-atom crowders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    It is now well recognized that macromolecular crowding can exert significant effects on protein folding and binding stability. In order to calculate such effects in direct simulations of proteins mixed with bystander macromolecules, the latter (referred to as crowders) are usually modeled as spheres and the proteins represented at a coarse-grained level. Our recently developed postprocessing approach allows the proteins to be represented at the all-atom level but, for computational efficiency, has only been implemented for spherical crowders. Modeling crowder molecules in cellular environments and in vitro experiments as spheres may distort their effects on protein stability. Here we present a new method that is capable for treating aspherical crowders. The idea, borrowed from protein-protein docking, is to calculate the excess chemical potential of the proteins in crowded solution by fast Fourier transform (FFT). As the first application, we studied the effects of ellipsoidal crowders on the folding and binding free energies of all-atom proteins, and found, in agreement with previous direct simulations with coarse-grained protein models, that the aspherical crowders exert greater stabilization effects than spherical crowders of the same volume. Moreover, as demonstrated here, the FFT-based method has the important property that its computational cost does not increase strongly even when the level of details in representing the crowders is increased all the way to all-atom, thus significantly accelerating realistic modeling of protein folding and binding in cell-like environments. PMID:24187527

  4. An FFT-based method for modeling protein folding and binding under crowding: benchmarking on ellipsoidal and all-atom crowders.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    It is now well recognized that macromolecular crowding can exert significant effects on protein folding and binding stability. In order to calculate such effects in direct simulations of proteins mixed with bystander macromolecules, the latter (referred to as crowders) are usually modeled as spheres and the proteins represented at a coarse-grained level. Our recently developed postprocessing approach allows the proteins to be represented at the all-atom level but, for computational efficiency, has only been implemented for spherical crowders. Modeling crowder molecules in cellular environments and in vitro experiments as spheres may distort their effects on protein stability. Here we present a new method that is capable for treating aspherical crowders. The idea, borrowed from protein-protein docking, is to calculate the excess chemical potential of the proteins in crowded solution by fast Fourier transform (FFT). As the first application, we studied the effects of ellipsoidal crowders on the folding and binding free energies of all-atom proteins, and found, in agreement with previous direct simulations with coarse-grained protein models, that the aspherical crowders exert greater stabilization effects than spherical crowders of the same volume. Moreover, as demonstrated here, the FFT-based method has the important property that its computational cost does not increase strongly even when the level of details in representing the crowders is increased all the way to all-atom, thus significantly accelerating realistic modeling of protein folding and binding in cell-like environments.

  5. Interplay among tertiary contacts, secondary structure formation and side-chain packing in the protein folding mechanism: all-atom representation study of protein L.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Cecilia; García, Angel E; Onuchic, José N

    2003-02-21

    Experimental and theoretical results suggest that, since proteins are energetically minimally frustrated, the native fold, or topology, plays a primary role in determining the structure of the transition state ensemble and on-pathway intermediate states in protein folding. Although the central role of native state topology in determining the folding mechanism is thought to be a quite general result-at least for small two-state folding proteins-there are remarkable exceptions. Recent experimental findings have shown that topology alone cannot always determine the folding mechanism, and demonstrated that the balance between topology and energetics is very delicate. This balance seems to be particularly critical in proteins with a highly symmetrical native structure, such as proteins L and G, which have similar native structure topology but fold by different mechanisms. Simplified, C(alpha)-atom only protein models have shown not be sufficient to differentiate these mechanisms. An all-atom Gō model provides a valuable intermediate model between structurally simplified protein representations and all-atom protein simulations with explicit/implicit solvent descriptions. We present here a detailed study of an all-atom Gō-like representation of protein L, in close comparison with the experimental results and with the results obtained from a simple C(alpha)-atom representation of the same protein. We also perform simulations for protein G, where we obtain a folding mechanism in which the protein symmetry is broken exactly in the opposite way to protein L as has been observed experimentally. A detailed analysis for protein L also shows that the role of specific residues is correctly and quantitatively reproduced by the all-atom Gō model over almost the entire protein.

  6. Two-dimensional NMR and All-atom Molecular Dynamics of Cytochrome P450 CYP119 Reveal Hidden Conformational Substates*

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Jed N.; Brandman, Relly; Sivaramakrishnan, Santhosh; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are versatile catalysts involved in a wide variety of biological processes from hormonal regulation and antibiotic synthesis to drug metabolism. A hallmark of their versatility is their promiscuous nature, allowing them to recognize a wide variety of chemically diverse substrates. However, the molecular details of this promiscuity have remained elusive. Here, we have utilized two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectroscopy to examine a series of mutants site-specific labeled with the unnatural amino acid, [13C]p-methoxyphenylalanine, in conjunction with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to examine substrate and inhibitor binding to CYP119, a P450 from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The results suggest that tight binding hydrophobic ligands tend to lock the enzyme into a single conformational substate, whereas weak binding low affinity ligands bind loosely in the active site, resulting in a distribution of localized conformers. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the ligand-free enzyme samples ligand-bound conformations of the enzyme and, therefore, that ligand binding may proceed largely through a process of conformational selection rather than induced fit. PMID:20097757

  7. Molecular modeling of the binding modes of the Iron-sulfur protein to the Jac1 co-chaperone from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by all-atom and coarse-grained approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mozolewska, Magdalena A.; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The Iron sulfur protein 1 (Isu1) from yeast, and the J-type co-chaperone Jac1, are part of a huge ATP-dependent system, and both interact with Hsp70 chaperones. Interaction of Isu1 and Jac1 is a part of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis system in mitochondria. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the yeast Isu1-Jac1 complex has been modeled. First, the complete structure of Isu1 was obtained by homology modeling using the I-TASSER server and YASARA software and thereafter tested for stability in the all-atom force field AMBER. Then, the known experimental structure of Jac1 was adopted to obtain initial models of the Isu1-Jac1 complex by using the ZDOCK server for global and local docking and the AutoDock software for local docking. Three most probable models were subsequently subjected to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the UNRES force field to obtain the final structures of the complex. In the most probable model, Isu1 binds to the left face of the “Γ” shaped Jac1 molecule by the β-sheet section of Isu1. Residues L105, L109, and Y163 of Jac1 have been assessed by mutation studies to be essential for binding (Ciesielski et al., J. Mol. Biol. 2012, 417, 1–12). These residues were also found, by UNRES/MD simulations, to be involved in strong interactions between Isu1 and Jac1 in the complex. Moreover, N95, T98, P102, H112, V159, L167 and A170 of Jac1, not yet tested experimentally, were also found important in binding. PMID:25973573

  8. Characterization of biaryl torsional energetics and its treatment in OPLS all-atom force fields.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Markus K; Schyman, Patric; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2013-05-24

    The frequency of biaryl substructures in a database of approved oral drugs has been analyzed. This led to designation of 20 prototypical biaryls plus 10 arylpyridinones for parametrization in the OPLS all-atom force fields. Bond stretching, angle-bending, and torsional parameters were developed to reproduce the MP2 geometries and torsional energy profiles. The transferability of the new parameters was tested through their application to three additional biaryls. The torsional energetics for the 33 biaryl molecules are analyzed and factors leading to preferences for planar and nonplanar geometries are identified. For liquid biphenyl, the computed density and heat of vaporization at the boiling point (255 °C) are also reported.

  9. An All-Atom Force Field for Tertiary Structure Prediction of Helical Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herges, T.; Wenzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an all-atom free-energy force field (PFF01) for protein tertiary structure prediction. PFF01 is based on physical interactions and was parameterized using experimental structures of a family of proteins believed to span a wide variety of possible folds. It contains empirical, although sequence-independent terms for hydrogen bonding. Its solvent-accessible surface area solvent model was first fit to transfer energies of small peptides. The parameters of the solvent model were then further optimized to stabilize the native structure of a single protein, the autonomously folding villin headpiece, against competing low-energy decoys. Here we validate the force field for five nonhomologous helical proteins with 20–60 amino acids. For each protein, decoys with 2–3 Å backbone root mean-square deviation and correct experimental Cβ–Cβ distance constraints emerge as those with the lowest energy. PMID:15507688

  10. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  11. MD-2 binds cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26806306

  12. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanopatterning with multivalent inks.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Thompson, Damien

    2008-06-21

    A coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) model is developed to study the multivalent, or multisite, binding of small functionalized dendrimer molecules to beta-cyclodextrin-terminated self-assembled monolayers, the so-called "molecular printboards" used to print "ink" molecules on surfaces with a high degree of positional control and specificity. Some current and future bionanotechnology applications are in the creation of nanoparticle assemblies, directed protein assembly, platforms for biosensing, and cell:surface attachment. The coarse-grained model allows us to probe up to microsecond timescales and model ink diffusion, crucial for the application of the printboard in, for example, medical diagnostics. Recent all-atom MD simulations identified and quantified the molecular strain limiting the stability of nanopatterns created with small dendrimer inks, and explained the different patterns obtained experimentally with different dendrimer inks. In the present work, the all-atom simulations are "scaled up" to longer timescales via coarse graining, without incurring significant additional computational expense, and, crucially, without significant loss in atom-scale detail, the coarse-grained MD simulations yielding properties similar to those obtained from the all-atom simulations. The anchoring of the ink molecules to the monolayer is of multivalent nature and the degree of multivalency shows a sharp dependence on temperature, control of temperature thus providing a further operational "switch" for directed molecular assembly. The computational protocol developed can, in principle, be extended to model any multivalent assembly, for example, virus-cell complexation.

  13. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanopatterning with multivalent inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Thompson, Damien

    2008-06-01

    A coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) model is developed to study the multivalent, or multisite, binding of small functionalized dendrimer molecules to β-cyclodextrin-terminated self-assembled monolayers, the so-called ``molecular printboards'' used to print ``ink'' molecules on surfaces with a high degree of positional control and specificity. Some current and future bionanotechnology applications are in the creation of nanoparticle assemblies, directed protein assembly, platforms for biosensing, and cell:surface attachment. The coarse-grained model allows us to probe up to microsecond timescales and model ink diffusion, crucial for the application of the printboard in, for example, medical diagnostics. Recent all-atom MD simulations identified and quantified the molecular strain limiting the stability of nanopatterns created with small dendrimer inks, and explained the different patterns obtained experimentally with different dendrimer inks. In the present work, the all-atom simulations are ``scaled up'' to longer timescales via coarse graining, without incurring significant additional computational expense, and, crucially, without significant loss in atom-scale detail, the coarse-grained MD simulations yielding properties similar to those obtained from the all-atom simulations. The anchoring of the ink molecules to the monolayer is of multivalent nature and the degree of multivalency shows a sharp dependence on temperature, control of temperature thus providing a further operational ``switch'' for directed molecular assembly. The computational protocol developed can, in principle, be extended to model any multivalent assembly, for example, virus-cell complexation.

  14. A Hybrid All-Atom Structure-Based Model for Protein Folding and Large Scale Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Sutto, Ludovico; Mereu, Ilaria; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2011-12-13

    Structure-based models are successful at conjugating the essence of the energy landscape theory of protein folding with an easy and efficient implementation. Recently, their realm expanded beyond a single protein structure, and structure-based potentials have been used profitably to widely study complex conformational transitions. Still, when dealing with structural rearrangements between two, or more, well-defined structures, an unbiased and transferable description of the local backbone and side chain interactions could be advantageous. Here, we propose an all-atom model that merges a classical force field description of these local interactions with a structure-based long-range potential that takes into account the different conformations. We first validate the model simulating and characterizing the folding reaction and the transition state of two well-known proteins: the villin headpiece and the SH3 domain. Then, we characterize the activation mechanism of the catalytic domain of c-Src kinase. Such a process involves the conformational rearrangement of a large loop and the swing of an α helix. The appearance of a stable intermediate state in the free energy landscape between the two conformational end points suggests the mechanism of the loop opening. The low computational cost of the model together with the satisfactory accuracy of the results make it a promising approach to studying conformational transitions in large protein systems.

  15. Template-free protein structure prediction and quality assessment with an all-atom free-energy model.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Klenin, Konstantin; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2009-11-01

    Biophysical forcefields have contributed less than originally anticipated to recent progress in protein structure prediction. Here, we have investigated the selectivity of a recently developed all-atom free-energy forcefield for protein structure prediction and quality assessment (QA). Using a heuristic method, but excluding homology, we generated decoy-sets for all targets of the CASP7 protein structure prediction assessment with <150 amino acids. The decoys in each set were then ranked by energy in short relaxation simulations and the best low-energy cluster was submitted as a prediction. For four of nine template-free targets, this approach generated high-ranking predictions within the top 10 models submitted in CASP7 for the respective targets. For these targets, our de-novo predictions had an average GDT_S score of 42.81, significantly above the average of all groups. The refinement protocol has difficulty for oligomeric targets and when no near-native decoys are generated in the decoy library. For targets with high-quality decoy sets the refinement approach was highly selective. Motivated by this observation, we rescored all server submissions up to 200 amino acids using a similar refinement protocol, but using no clustering, in a QA exercise. We found an excellent correlation between the best server models and those with the lowest energy in the forcefield. The free-energy refinement protocol may thus be an efficient tool for relative QA and protein structure prediction.

  16. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Jain, Abhinandan

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  17. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  18. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  19. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  20. Multiscale Free Energy Simulations: An Efficient Method for Connecting Classical MD Simulations to QM or QM/MM Free Energies Using Non-Boltzmann Bennett Reweighting Schemes.

    PubMed

    König, Gerhard; Hudson, Phillip S; Boresch, Stefan; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-04-08

    THE RELIABILITY OF FREE ENERGY SIMULATIONS (FES) IS LIMITED BY TWO FACTORS: (a) the need for correct sampling and (b) the accuracy of the computational method employed. Classical methods (e.g., force fields) are typically used for FES and present a myriad of challenges, with parametrization being a principle one. On the other hand, parameter-free quantum mechanical (QM) methods tend to be too computationally expensive for adequate sampling. One widely used approach is a combination of methods, where the free energy difference between the two end states is computed by, e.g., molecular mechanics (MM), and the end states are corrected by more accurate methods, such as QM or hybrid QM/MM techniques. Here we report two new approaches that significantly improve the aforementioned scheme; with a focus on how to compute corrections between, e.g., the MM and the more accurate QM calculations. First, a molecular dynamics trajectory that properly samples relevant conformational degrees of freedom is generated. Next, potential energies of each trajectory frame are generated with a QM or QM/MM Hamiltonian. Free energy differences are then calculated based on the QM or QM/MM energies using either a non-Boltzmann Bennett approach (QM-NBB) or non-Boltzmann free energy perturbation (NB-FEP). Both approaches are applied to calculate relative and absolute solvation free energies in explicit and implicit solvent environments. Solvation free energy differences (relative and absolute) between ethane and methanol in explicit solvent are used as the initial test case for QM-NBB. Next, implicit solvent methods are employed in conjunction with both QM-NBB and NB-FEP to compute absolute solvation free energies for 21 compounds. These compounds range from small molecules such as ethane and methanol to fairly large, flexible solutes, such as triacetyl glycerol. Several technical aspects were investigated. Ultimately some best practices are suggested for improving methods that seek to connect

  1. A Real-Time All-Atom Structural Search Engine for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new “designability”-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license). PMID:25079944

  2. MolProbity: all-atom contacts and structure validation for proteins and nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ian W.; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Chen, Vincent B.; Block, Jeremy N.; Kapral, Gary J.; Wang, Xueyi; Murray, Laura W.; Arendall, W. Bryan; Snoeyink, Jack; Richardson, Jane S.; Richardson, David C.

    2007-01-01

    MolProbity is a general-purpose web server offering quality validation for 3D structures of proteins, nucleic acids and complexes. It provides detailed all-atom contact analysis of any steric problems within the molecules as well as updated dihedral-angle diagnostics, and it can calculate and display the H-bond and van der Waals contacts in the interfaces between components. An integral step in the process is the addition and full optimization of all hydrogen atoms, both polar and nonpolar. New analysis functions have been added for RNA, for interfaces, and for NMR ensembles. Additionally, both the web site and major component programs have been rewritten to improve speed, convenience, clarity and integration with other resources. MolProbity results are reported in multiple forms: as overall numeric scores, as lists or charts of local problems, as downloadable PDB and graphics files, and most notably as informative, manipulable 3D kinemage graphics shown online in the KiNG viewer. This service is available free to all users at http://molprobity.biochem.duke.edu. PMID:17452350

  3. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  4. Protein model refinement using an optimized physics-based all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Jagielska, Anna; Wroblewska, Liliana; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2008-06-17

    One of the greatest challenges in protein structure prediction is the refinement of low-resolution predicted models to high-resolution structures that are close to the native state. Although contemporary structure prediction methods can assemble the correct topology for a large fraction of protein domains, such approximate models are often not of the resolution required for many important applications, including studies of reaction mechanisms and virtual ligand screening. Thus, the development of a method that could bring those structures closer to the native state is of great importance. We recently optimized the relative weights of the components of the Amber ff03 potential on a large set of decoy structures to create a funnel-shaped energy landscape with the native structure at the global minimum. Such an energy function might be able to drive proteins toward their native structure. In this work, for a test set of 47 proteins, with 100 decoy structures per protein that have a range of structural similarities to the native state, we demonstrate that our optimized potential can drive protein models closer to their native structure. Comparing the lowest-energy structure from each trajectory with the starting decoy, structural improvement is seen for 70% of the models on average. The ability to do such systematic structural refinements by using a physics-based all-atom potential represents a promising approach to high-resolution structure prediction.

  5. MolProbity: all-atom contacts and structure validation for proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ian W; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Chen, Vincent B; Block, Jeremy N; Kapral, Gary J; Wang, Xueyi; Murray, Laura W; Arendall, W Bryan; Snoeyink, Jack; Richardson, Jane S; Richardson, David C

    2007-07-01

    MolProbity is a general-purpose web server offering quality validation for 3D structures of proteins, nucleic acids and complexes. It provides detailed all-atom contact analysis of any steric problems within the molecules as well as updated dihedral-angle diagnostics, and it can calculate and display the H-bond and van der Waals contacts in the interfaces between components. An integral step in the process is the addition and full optimization of all hydrogen atoms, both polar and nonpolar. New analysis functions have been added for RNA, for interfaces, and for NMR ensembles. Additionally, both the web site and major component programs have been rewritten to improve speed, convenience, clarity and integration with other resources. MolProbity results are reported in multiple forms: as overall numeric scores, as lists or charts of local problems, as downloadable PDB and graphics files, and most notably as informative, manipulable 3D kinemage graphics shown online in the KiNG viewer. This service is available free to all users at http://molprobity.biochem.duke.edu.

  6. Characteristics of K+ and Rb+ as "structure-breaking" ions in dilute aqueous solution: Insights from ONIOM-XS MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripa, Pattrawan; Tongraar, Anan; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2016-11-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of the K+ and Rb+ hydrates have been investigated by means of the ONIOM-XS MD approach. For both the K+ and Rb+ hydrates, the ONIOM-XS MD results clearly reveal a high degree of flexibility within the first shell, with the average coordination numbers of 6.4 and 6.6, respectively. In this respect, it is observed that water molecules in the vicinity of K+ and Rb+ are rather labile, i.e., they are arranged with respect to the influence of the ion as well as to the hydrogen bond (HB) interactions among the first-shell waters and between the first-shell waters and the bulk. These observed phenomena clearly confirm the very loose first hydration shell of both the K+ and Rb+ ions, i.e., the weak ion-water interactions which correspond to the "structure-breaking" effects of K+ and Rb+ in aqueous solution.

  7. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of three novel F-18 labeled and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) targeted 5-bromo pyrimidines as radiotracers for tumor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Xingyu; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Aiqin; Li, Xiang; Xue, Qianqian; Wang, Huan; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Huabei

    2017-02-15

    inhibited the activity of FAK with IC50 value of 1.5 nM) at 1 h before the injection of radiotracer. In combination with the above kinase profiling assay, it could be indicated that the uptake of [(18)F]2 in tumor of the mouse model was due to FAK expression, and that [(18)F]2 might be a kind of selectively FAK targeted tumor imaging agents. What's more, the results of the MD (molecular dynamics) simulations were in agreement with the changing trends of the interaction between the different F-19 standards and the FAK (expressed as the in vitro inhibitory abilities of enzymatic activities of FAK in this article), which was also in agreement with and had great effect on the changing trends of the uptake of the corresponding F-18 labeled tracers in tumor and some of theirs target/non-target ratios.

  8. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  9. MolProbity: all-atom structure validation for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vincent B; Arendall, W Bryan; Headd, Jeffrey J; Keedy, Daniel A; Immormino, Robert M; Kapral, Gary J; Murray, Laura W; Richardson, Jane S; Richardson, David C

    2010-01-01

    MolProbity is a structure-validation web service that provides broad-spectrum solidly based evaluation of model quality at both the global and local levels for both proteins and nucleic acids. It relies heavily on the power and sensitivity provided by optimized hydrogen placement and all-atom contact analysis, complemented by updated versions of covalent-geometry and torsion-angle criteria. Some of the local corrections can be performed automatically in MolProbity and all of the diagnostics are presented in chart and graphical forms that help guide manual rebuilding. X-ray crystallography provides a wealth of biologically important molecular data in the form of atomic three-dimensional structures of proteins, nucleic acids and increasingly large complexes in multiple forms and states. Advances in automation, in everything from crystallization to data collection to phasing to model building to refinement, have made solving a structure using crystallography easier than ever. However, despite these improvements, local errors that can affect biological interpretation are widespread at low resolution and even high-resolution structures nearly all contain at least a few local errors such as Ramachandran outliers, flipped branched protein side chains and incorrect sugar puckers. It is critical both for the crystallographer and for the end user that there are easy and reliable methods to diagnose and correct these sorts of errors in structures. MolProbity is the authors' contribution to helping solve this problem and this article reviews its general capabilities, reports on recent enhancements and usage, and presents evidence that the resulting improvements are now beneficially affecting the global database.

  10. Free-energy function based on an all-atom model for proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Oda, Koji; Harano, Yuichi; Roth, Roland; Sugita, Yuji; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a free-energy function based on an all-atom model for proteins. It comprises two components, the hydration entropy (HE) and the total dehydration penalty (TDP). Upon a transition to a more compact structure, the number of accessible configurations arising from the translational displacement of water molecules in the system increases, leading to a water-entropy gain. To fully account for this effect, the HE is calculated using a statistical-mechanical theory applied to a molecular model for water. The TDP corresponds to the sum of the hydration energy and the protein intramolecular energy when a fully extended structure, which possesses the maximum number of hydrogen bonds with water molecules and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, is chosen as the standard one. When a donor and an acceptor (e.g., N and O, respectively) are buried in the interior after the break of hydrogen bonds with water molecules, if they form an intramolecular hydrogen bond, no penalty is imposed. When a donor or an acceptor is buried with no intramolecular hydrogen bond formed, an energetic penalty is imposed. We examine all the donors and acceptors for backbone-backbone, backbone-side chain, and side chain-side chain intramolecular hydrogen bonds and calculate the TDP. Our free-energy function has been tested for three different decoy sets. It is better than any other physics-based or knowledge-based potential function in terms of the accuracy in discriminating the native fold from misfolded decoys and the achievement of high Z-scores.

  11. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-04-28

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand-strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases.

  12. Automatic protein design with all atom force-fields by exact and heuristic optimization.

    PubMed

    Wernisch, L; Hery, S; Wodak, S J

    2000-08-18

    A fully automatic procedure for predicting the amino acid sequences compatible with a given target structure is described. It is based on the CHARMM package, and uses an all atom force-field and rotamer libraries to describe and evaluate side-chain types and conformations. Sequences are ranked by a quantity akin to the free energy of folding, which incorporates hydration effects. Exact (Branch and Bound) and heuristic optimisation procedures are used to identifying highly scoring sequences from an astronomical number of possibilities. These sequences include the minimum free energy sequence, as well as all amino acid sequences whose free energy lies within a specified window from the minimum. Several applications of our procedure are illustrated. Prediction of side-chain conformations for a set of ten proteins yields results comparable to those of established side-chain placement programs. Applications to sequence optimisation comprise the re-design of the protein cores of c-Crk SH3 domain, the B1 domain of protein G and Ubiquitin, and of surface residues of the SH3 domain. In all calculations, no restrictions are imposed on the amino acid composition and identical parameter settings are used for core and surface residues. The best scoring sequences for the protein cores are virtually identical to wild-type. They feature no more than one to three mutations in a total of 11-16 variable positions. Tests suggest that this is due to the balance between various contributions in the force-field rather than to overwhelming influence from packing constraints. The effectiveness of our force-field is further supported by the sequence predictions for surface residues of the SH3 domain. More mutations are predicted than in the core, seemingly in order to optimise the network of complementary interactions between polar and charged groups. This appears to be an important energetic requirement in absence of the partner molecules with which the SH3 domain interacts, which were not

  13. Charge-leveling and proper treatment of long-range electrostatics in all-atom molecular dynamics at constant pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jason A.; Shen, Jana K.

    2012-11-01

    Recent development of constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) methods has offered promise for adding pH-stat in molecular dynamics simulations. However, until now the working pH molecular dynamics (pHMD) implementations are dependent in part or whole on implicit-solvent models. Here we show that proper treatment of long-range electrostatics and maintaining charge neutrality of the system are critical for extending the continuous pHMD framework to the all-atom representation. The former is achieved here by adding forces to titration coordinates due to long-range electrostatics based on the generalized reaction field method, while the latter is made possible by a charge-leveling technique that couples proton titration with simultaneous ionization or neutralization of a co-ion in solution. We test the new method using the pH-replica-exchange CpHMD simulations of a series of aliphatic dicarboxylic acids with varying carbon chain length. The average absolute deviation from the experimental pKa values is merely 0.18 units. The results show that accounting for the forces due to extended electrostatics removes the large random noise in propagating titration coordinates, while maintaining charge neutrality of the system improves the accuracy in the calculated electrostatic interaction between ionizable sites. Thus, we believe that the way is paved for realizing pH-controlled all-atom molecular dynamics in the near future.

  14. All-atom ab initio native structure prediction of a mixed fold (1FME): a comparison of structural and folding characteristics of various beta beta alpha miniproteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunae; Jang, Soonmin; Pak, Youngshang

    2009-11-21

    We performed an all-atom ab initio native structure prediction of 1FME, which is one of the computationally challenging mixed fold beta beta alpha miniproteins, by combining a novel conformational search algorithm (multiplexed Q-replica exchange molecular dynamics scheme) with a well-balanced all-atom force field employing a generalized Born implicit solvation model (param99MOD5/GBSA). The nativelike structure of 1FME was identified from the lowest free energy minimum state and in excellent agreement with the NMR structure. Based on the interpretation of the free energy landscape, the structural properties as well as the folding behaviors of 1FME were compared with other beta beta alpha miniproteins (1FSD, 1PSV, and BBA5) that we have previously studied with the same force field. Our simulation showed that the 28-residue beta beta alpha miniproteins (1FME, 1FSD, and 1PSV) share a common feature of the free energy topography and exhibit the three local minimum states on each computed free energy map, but the 23-residue miniprotein (BBA5) follows a downhill folding with a single minimum state. Also, the structure and stability changes resulting from the two point mutation (Gln1-->Glu1 and Ile7-->Tyr7) of 1FSD were investigated in details for direct comparison with the experiment. The comparison shows that upon mutation, the experimentally observed turn type switch from an irregular turn (1FSD) to type I(') turn (1FME) was well reproduced with the present simulation.

  15. Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in an all-atom Go model.

    PubMed

    Berhanu, W M; Jiang, P; Hansmann, U H E

    2013-01-01

    The 84-residue homotetrameric BBAT1 is one of the smallest stable protein complexes and therefore is a good test system to study the self-assembly of multimeric proteins. We have researched for this protein the interplay between the folding of monomers and their assembly into tetramers. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations relying on a Go model are compared with earlier simulations that use the physics-based coarse-grained UNRES model.

  16. Transition state of a SH3 domain detected with principle component analysis and a charge-neutralized all-atom protein model.

    PubMed

    Mitomo, Daisuke; Nakamura, Hironori K; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Higo, Junichi

    2006-09-01

    The src SH3 domain has been known to be a two-state folder near room temperature. However, in a previous study with an all-atom model simulation near room temperature, the transition state of this protein was not successfully detected on a free-energy profile using two axes: the radius of gyration (R(g)) and native contact reproduction ratio (Q value). In this study, we focused on an atom packing effect to characterize the transition state and tried another analysis to detect it. To explore the atom packing effect more efficiently, we introduced a charge-neutralized all-atom model, where all of the atoms in the protein and water molecules were treated explicitly, but their partial atomic charges were set to zero. Ten molecular dynamics simulations were performed starting from the native structure at 300 K, where the simulation length of each run was 90 ns, and the protein unfolded in all runs. The integrated trajectories (10 x 90 = 900 ns) were analyzed by a principal component analysis (PCA) and showed a clear free-energy barrier between folded- and unfolded-state conformational clusters in a conformational space generated by PCA. There were segments that largely deformed when the conformation passed through the free-energy barrier. These segments correlated well with the structural core regions characterized by large phi-values, and the atom-packing changes correlated with the conformational deformations. Interestingly, using the same simulation data, no significant barrier was found in a free-energy profile using the R(g) and Q values for the coordinate axes. These results suggest that the atom packing effect may be one of the most important determinants of the transition state.

  17. Computational methods toward accurate RNA structure prediction using coarse-grained and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods can provide significant insights into RNA structure and dynamics, bridging the gap in our understanding of the relationship between structure and biological function. Simulations enrich and enhance our understanding of data derived on the bench, as well as provide feasible alternatives to costly or technically challenging experiments. Coarse-grained computational models of RNA are especially important in this regard, as they allow analysis of events occurring in timescales relevant to RNA biological function, which are inaccessible through experimental methods alone. We have developed a three-bead coarse-grained model of RNA for discrete molecular dynamics simulations. This model is efficient in de novo prediction of short RNA tertiary structure, starting from RNA primary sequences of less than 50 nucleotides. To complement this model, we have incorporated additional base-pairing constraints and have developed a bias potential reliant on data obtained from hydroxyl probing experiments that guide RNA folding to its correct state. By introducing experimentally derived constraints to our computer simulations, we are able to make reliable predictions of RNA tertiary structures up to a few hundred nucleotides. Our refined model exemplifies a valuable benefit achieved through integration of computation and experimental methods.

  18. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L; Song, Guang

    2015-10-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations--how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models.

  19. Verina Morton Jones, MD.

    PubMed

    Rishworth, Susan K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this historical article is to demonstrate, as the biography of Verina Morton Jones, MD, is uncovered, the difficulties inherent in researching original source material on the lives of 19th- and early 20th-century African American physicians as well as the great benefits derived from doing this research. The procedures used include basic archival research and close examination of published materials about her in the past, in conjunction with oral history. Original correspondence from Dr Morton Jones to her niece and nephew is used to illustrate events in her life and the thoughts and attitudes she expressed. Some of these thoughts and attitudes reflect those current situations in which African Americans found themselves, and others are quite unique, no doubt owing to her privileged position in the African American community. The principle conclusions reached include the great benefits derived from doing this kind of research, as difficult and time-consuming as that may be, with the enhanced knowledge and appreciation of the heritage of African American physicians, and insights into American social history during this period.

  20. John M. Eisenberg, MD.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J M

    1995-08-01

    The complicated interaction between government, academic medical centers, health care payers, and burgeoning market forces has tested the leadership skills of a generation of academicians with little formal training in economics. The emergence of a new breed of physician investigator with solid business credentials has therefore proved attractive to many segments of the medical community. John M. Eisenberg received his MD from Washington University in 1972, his MBA from the Wharton School in 1976, and shortly thereafter headed the division of general internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition to championing the role of the generalist in health care delivery, Eisenberg has also played a major part in the reformation of Medicare reimbursement. He has been a commissioner on the Congressional Physician Payment Review Commission since 1986, serving as chairman since 1993. After assuming the chairmanship of the department of medicine at Georgetown University in 1992, Eisenberg served as an advisor to the Clinton administration during its efforts towards national health care reform. Interviewed in his office in Georgetown, Eisenberg reflected on the economic forces twisting post-graduate medical education, the role of non-physician providers in future health care delivery, and the evolving relationship between specialists and generalists.

  1. All-atom molecular dynamics study of EAK16 peptide: the effect of pH on single-chain conformation, dimerization and self-assembly behavior.

    PubMed

    Emamyari, Soheila; Fazli, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Single-chain equilibrium conformation and dimerization of the three types of ionic EAK16 peptide are studied under three pH conditions using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that both the single-chain conformation and the dimerization process of EAK16-IV are considerably different from those of the two other types, EAK16-I and EAK16-II. The value of pH is found to have a stronger effect on the single-chain conformation and dimerization of EAK16-IV. It is shown that in addition to the charge pattern on the peptide chains, the size of the side chains of the charged amino acids plays role in the conformation of the peptide chains and their dimerization. The results shed light on the pH-dependent self-assembly behavior of EAK16 peptide in the bulk solution, which has been reported in the literature.

  2. Calculation of the water-cyclohexane transfer free energies of neutral amino acid side-chain analogs using the OPLS all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, Justin L; Tieleman, D Peter

    2003-11-30

    We calculated the free energy of solvation of the neutral analogs of 18 amino acid side-chains (not including glycine and proline) using the OPLS all-atom force field in TIP4P water, SPC water, and cyclohexane by molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic integration. The average unsigned errors in the free energies of solvation in TIP4P, SPC, and cyclohexane are 4.4, 4.9, and 2.1 kJ/mol respectively. Most of the calculated hydration free energies are not favorable enough compared to experiment. The largest errors are found for tryptophan, histidine, glutamic acid, and glutamine. The average unsigned errors in the free energy of transfer from TIP4P to cyclohexane and from SPC to cyclohexane are 4.0 and 4.1 kJ/mol, respectively. The largest errors, of more than 7.5 kJ/mol, are found for histidine, glutamine, and glutamatic acid.

  3. Penetration of HIV-1 Tat47–57 into PC/PE Bilayers Assessed by MD Simulation and X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Chris; Huang, Kun; García, Angel E.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of the basic, cell-penetrating region (Y47GRKKRRQRRR57) of the HIV-1 Tat protein with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers were previously assessed by comparing experimental X-ray diffuse scattering with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids. Using experimental bilayer form factors derivedfrom X-ray diffuse scattering data as a guide, our simulations indicate that Tat peptides localize close to the carbonyl-glycerol group in the headgroup region of bilayers composed of either DOPC or DOPC:DOPE (1:1) lipid. Our results also suggest that Tat peptides may more frequently insert into the hydrophobic core of bilayers composed of PC:PE (1:1) lipids than into bilayers composed entirely of PC lipids. PE lipids may facilitate peptide translocation across a lipid bilayer by stabilizing intermediate states in which hydrated peptides span the bilayer. PMID:26402709

  4. Unraveling the dynamics and structure of functionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold using 2D IR spectroscopy and MD simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chang; Yuan, Rongfeng; Pfalzgraff, William C.; Nishida, Jun; Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are the focus of ongoing investigations because they can be chemically tuned to control their structure and dynamics for a wide variety of applications, including electrochemistry, catalysis, and as models of biological interfaces. Here we combine reflection 2D infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy (R-2D IR) and molecular dynamics simulations to determine the relationship between the structures of functionalized alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces and their underlying molecular motions on timescales of tens to hundreds of picoseconds. We find that at higher head group density, the monolayers have more disorder in the alkyl chain packing and faster dynamics. The dynamics of alkanethiol SAMs on gold are much slower than the dynamics of alkylsiloxane SAMs on silica. Using the simulations, we assess how the different molecular motions of the alkyl chain monolayers give rise to the dynamics observed in the experiments. PMID:27044113

  5. The Molecular Mechanism of Bisphenol A (BPA) as an Endocrine Disruptor by Interacting with Nuclear Receptors: Insights from Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA. PMID:25799048

  6. The molecular mechanism of bisphenol A (BPA) as an endocrine disruptor by interacting with nuclear receptors: insights from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA.

  7. Toward a Coarse Graining/All Atoms Force Field (CG/AA) from a Multiscale Optimization Method: An Application to the MCM-41 Mesoporous Silicates.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, A; Morineau, D; Lefort, R; Malfreyt, P

    2010-10-12

    Many interesting physical phenomena occur on length and time scales that are not accessible by atomistic molecular simulations. By introducing a coarse graining of the degrees of freedom, coarse-grained (CG) models allow ther study of larger scale systems for longer times. Coarse-grained force fields have been mostly derived for large molecules, including polymeric materials and proteins. By contrast, there exist no satisfactory CG potentials for mesostructured porous solid materials in the literature. This issue has become critical among a growing number of studies on confinement effects on fluid properties, which require both long time and large scale simulations and the conservation of a sufficient level of atomistic description to account for interfacial phenomena. In this paper, we present a general multiscale procedure to derive a hybrid coarse grained/all atoms force field CG/AA model for mesoporous systems. The method is applied to mesostructured MCM-41 molecular sieves, while the parameters of the mesoscopic interaction potentials are obtained and validated from the computation of the adsorption isotherm of methanol by grand canonical molecular dynamic simulation.

  8. Role of the Electrostatic Interactions in the Stabilization of Ionic Liquid Crystals: Insights from Coarse-Grained MD Simulations of an Imidazolium Model.

    PubMed

    Saielli, Giacomo; Wang, Yanting

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the electrostatic interactions in stabilizing various phases of ionic liquids, especially smectic ionic liquid crystals, we have employed a coarse-grained model of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C16mim][NO3], to perform molecular dynamics simulations with the partial charges artificially rescaled by a factor from 0.7 to 1.2. The simulated systems have been characterized by means of orientational and translational order parameters and by distribution functions. We have found that increasing the total charge of the ions strongly stabilizes the ionic smectic phase by shifting the clearing point (melting into the isotropic liquid phase) to higher temperatures, while a smaller effect is observed on the stability of the crystal phase. Our results highlight the importance of the electrostatic interactions in promoting the formation of ionic liquid crystals through microphase segregation. Moreover, as the total charge of the model is increased, we observe a transformation from a homogeneous to a nanosegregated isotropic structure typical of ionic liquids. Therefore, a connection can be established between the degree of nanosegregation of ILs and the stability of ILC phases. All the above can be understood by the competition among electrostatic interactions between charged groups (cationic head groups and anions), van der Waals interactions between nonpolar cationic tail groups, and thermal fluctuations.

  9. All-Atom Molecular-Level Analysis of the Ballistic-Impact-Induced Densification and Devitrification of Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Barsoum, R. S.

    2015-08-01

    All-atom molecular-level computations are carried out to infer the dynamic response and material microstructure/topology changes of fused silica subjected to ballistic impact by a hard projectile. The analysis was focused on the investigation of specific aspects of the dynamic response and of the microstructural changes such as the deformation of highly sheared and densified regions and the conversion of amorphous fused silica to SiO2 crystalline allotropic modifications (in particular, α-quartz and stishovite). The microstructural changes in question were determined by carrying out a post-processing atom-coordination procedure. This procedure suggested the formation of stishovite (and perhaps α-quartz) within fused silica during ballistic impact. To rationalize the findings obtained, the all-atom molecular-level computational analysis is complemented by a series of quantum-mechanics density functional theory (DFT) computations. The latter computations enable determination of the relative potential energies of the fused silica, α-quartz, and stishovite under ambient pressure (i.e., under their natural densities) as well as under imposed (as high as 50 GPa) pressures (i.e., under higher densities) and shear strains. In addition, the transition states associated with various fused-silica devitrification processes were identified. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with their respective experimental counterparts.

  10. Classification of functional d-metal/graphene interfaces according to a sorption mechanism and the resistance to thermoactivated disordering and melting. MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polukhin, V. A.; Kurbanova, E. D.; Galashev, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    The thermally activated formation of a two-dimensional ring-cluster phase in the zone of contact of a transition metal (Ni, Pd, Cu) with graphene and its disordering and melting upon heating in the temperature range 850-3900 K are studied by molecular dynamics simulation with a correctly parameterized multiparticle potential. The diffusion mobilities in the interface plane and in the perpendicular direction are comprehensively analyzed with allowance for the character of interparticle interactions and a sorption mechanism, which are considered as the main factors that determine the thermal stability of the interface phase and the specific features of the order-disorder transition (which is an analog of melting in two-dimensional systems).

  11. Inverse Temperature Transition of Elastin Like Motifs in Major Ampullate Dragline Silk: MD Simulations of Short Peptides and NMR Studies of Water Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ukpebor, Obehi T.; Shah, Anup; Bazov, Emmanuel; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Using deuterium 2D T1-T2 Inverse Laplace Transform (ILT) NMR we have investigated the distribution, population, and dynamics of waters of hydration in major ampullate N. clavipes and A. aurantia silk as a function of temperature. In both samples studied, correlation times much larger than that of free water are measured and in some cases appear to increase with increasing temperature over the range of 5 to 60 °C(corresponding to reduced tumbling). In addition, the experimental data point to a reduction in the population of water localized in the silk with increasing temperature in the range of 20 to 50°C. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to probe the thermal characteristics of a variety of repeating motifs found in the two silk samples. The repeating motifs GLGSQ, GAAAAAAG, GPGGY, GPGQQ, GPSG, and GPSGPGS found in N. clavipes, GLGSQ, GYGSG, GPGSG, and GPGSQ found in A. aurantia silk were found to exhibit a thermal property observed in short elastin peptides known as the “inverse temperature transition”. This is a well known characteristic exhibited by short peptides consisting of (VPGXG)n motifs (where X is any amino acid other than proline) found in elastin, a protein responsible for the elasticity of vertebrate tissues. In qualitative agreement with experimental measurements of water in the silks, all the peptides studied in simulation show evidence of an increase in sidechain contacts and peptide hydrogen bonds, concomitant with a decrease in radius of gyration and localized water as the temperature is raised from approximately 5 to 60° C. PMID:24511323

  12. Inverse temperature transition of elastin like motifs in major ampullate dragline silk: MD simulations of short peptides and NMR studies of water dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ukpebor, Obehi T; Shah, Anup; Bazov, Emanuel; Boutis, Gregory S

    2014-02-07

    Using deuterium 2D T1 − T2 Inverse Laplace Transform (ILT) NMR, we have investigated the distribution, population, and dynamics of waters of hydration in major ampullate N. clavipes and A. aurantia silk as a function of temperature. In both samples studied, correlation times much larger than that of free water are measured, and in some cases, appear to increase with increasing temperature over the range of 5 to 60 °C (corresponding to reduced tumbling). In addition, the experimental data point to a reduction in the population of water localized in the silk with increasing temperature in the range of 20 to 50 °C. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to probe the thermal characteristics of a variety of repeating motifs found in the two silk samples. The repeating motifs GLGSQ, GAAAAAAG, GPGGY, GPGQQ, GPSG, and GPSGPGS found in N. clavipes, GLGSQ, GYGSG, GPGSG, and GPGSQ found in A. aurantia silk were found to exhibit a thermal property observed in short elastin peptides known as the "inverse temperature transition". This is a well known characteristic exhibited by short peptides consisting of (VPGXG)n motifs (where X is any amino acid other than proline) found in elastin--a protein responsible for the elasticity of vertebrate tissues. In qualitative agreement with experimental measurements of water in the silks, all the peptides studied in simulation show evidence of an increase in sidechain contacts and peptide hydrogen bonds, concomitant with a decrease in radius of gyration and localized water as the temperature is raised from approximately 5 to 60 °C.

  13. Oil-soluble and water-soluble BTPhens and their europium complexes in octanol/water solutions: interface crossing studied by MD and PMF simulations.

    PubMed

    Benay, G; Wipff, G

    2013-01-31

    Bistriazinyl-phenantroline "BTPhen" ligands L display the remarkable feature to complex trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions, with a marked selectivity for the latter. We report on molecular dynamics studies of tetrasubstituted X(4)BTPhens: L(4+) (X = (+)Et(3)NCH(2)-), L(4-) (X = (-)SO(3)Ph-), and L(0) (X = CyMe(4)) and their complexes with Eu(III) in binary octanol/water solutions. Changes in free energies upon interface crossing are also calculated for typical solutes by potential of mean force PMF simulations. The ligands and their complexes partition, as expected, to either the aqueous or the oil phase, depending on the "solubilizing" group X. Furthermore, most of them are found to be surface active. The water-soluble L(4+) and L(4-) ligands and their (L)Eu(NO(3))(3) complexes adsorb at the aqueous side of the interface, more with L(4-) than with L(4+). The oil soluble ligand L(0) is not surface active in its endo-endo form but adsorbs on the oil side of the interface in its most polar endo-exo form, as well as in its protonated L(0)H(+) and complexed (L(0))Eu(NO(3))(3) states. Furthermore, comparing PMFs of the Eu(III) complexes with and without nitric acid shows that acidifying the aqueous phase has different effects, depending on the ligand charge. In particular, acid promotes the Eu(III) extraction by L(0) via the (L(0))(2)Eu(NO(3))(2+) complex, as observed experimentally. Overall, the results point to the importance of interfacial adsorption for the liquid-liquid extraction of trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations by BTPhens and analogues.

  14. SPFP: Speed without compromise—A mixed precision model for GPU accelerated molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Grand, Scott; Götz, Andreas W.; Walker, Ross C.

    2013-02-01

    A new precision model is proposed for the acceleration of all-atom classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). This precision model replaces double precision arithmetic with fixed point integer arithmetic for the accumulation of force components as compared to a previously introduced model that uses mixed single/double precision arithmetic. This significantly boosts performance on modern GPU hardware without sacrificing numerical accuracy. We present an implementation for NVIDIA GPUs of both generalized Born implicit solvent simulations as well as explicit solvent simulations using the particle mesh Ewald (PME) algorithm for long-range electrostatics using this precision model. Tests demonstrate both the performance of this implementation as well as its numerical stability for constant energy and constant temperature biomolecular MD as compared to a double precision CPU implementation and double and mixed single/double precision GPU implementations.

  15. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    phosphatase domains. In the bound state, PTEN's regulatory C-terminal tail is displaced from the membrane and organized on the far side of the protein, ˜ 60 å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact structure. The combination of binding studies and neutron reflection allows us to distinguish between PTEN mutant proteins and ultimately may identify the structural features required for membrane binding and activation of PTEN. Molecular dynamics simulations, currently in progress, refine this structural picture further.

  16. Measurement of the Md3+/Md2+ reduction potential studied with flow electrolytic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Li, Zijie; Asai, Masato; Sato, Nozomi; Sato, Tetsuya K; Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kaneya, Yusuke; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Nagame, Yuichiro; Schädel, Matthias; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Shinohara, Atsushi; Haba, Hiromitsu; Even, Julia

    2013-11-04

    The reduction behavior of mendelevium (Md) was studied using a flow electrolytic chromatography apparatus. By application of the appropriate potentials on the chromatography column, the more stable Md(3+) is reduced to Md(2+). The reduction potential of the Md(3+) + e(-) → Md(2+) couple was determined to be -0.16 ± 0.05 V versus a normal hydrogen electrode.

  17. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kucerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  18. Structural features of small benzene clusters (C6H6)n (n ≤ 30) as investigated with the all-atom OPLS potential.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-18

    The structures of the simplest aromatic clusters, benzene clusters (C(6)H(6))(n), are not well elucidated. In the present study, benzene clusters (C(6)H(6))(n) (n ≤ 30) were investigated with the all-atom optimized parameters for liquid simulation (OPLS) potential. The global minima and low-lying minima of the benzene clusters were searched with the heuristic method combined with geometrical perturbations. The structural features and growth sequence of the clusters were examined by carrying out local structure analyses and structural similarity evaluation with rotational constants. Because of the anisotropic interaction between the benzene molecules, the local structures consisting of 13 molecules are considerably deviated from regular icosahedron, and the geometries of some of the clusters are inconsistent with the shapes constructed by the interior molecules. The distribution of the angle between the lines normal to two neighboring benzene rings is anisotropic in the clusters, whereas that in the liquid benzene is nearly isotropic. The geometries and energies of the low-lying configurations and the saddle points between them suggest that most of the configurations previously detected in supersonic expansions take different orientations for one to four neighboring molecules.

  19. All-atom models of the membrane-spanning domain of HIV-1 gp41 from metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K; Abrams, Cameron F

    2010-11-17

    The 27-residue membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 bears conserved sequence elements crucial to the biological function of the virus, in particular a conserved GXXXG motif and a midspan arginine. However, structure-based explanations for the roles of these and other MSD features remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics and metadynamics calculations of an all-atom, explicit solvent, and membrane-anchored model, we study the conformational variability of the HIV-1 gp41 MSD. We find that the MSD peptide assumes a stable tilted α-helical conformation in the membrane. However, when the side chain of the midspan Arg (694) "snorkels" to the outer leaflet of the viral membrane, the MSD assumes a metastable conformation where the highly-conserved N-terminal core (between Lys(681) and Arg(694) and containing the GXXXG motif) unfolds. In contrast, when the Arg(694) side chain snorkels to the inner leaflet, the MSD peptide assumes a metastable conformation consistent with experimental observations where the peptide kinks at Phe(697) to facilitate Arg(694) snorkeling. Both of these models suggest specific ways that gp41 may destabilize viral membrane, priming the virus for fusion with a target cell.

  20. Modeling the nanoscale viscoelasticity of fluids by bridging non-Markovian fluctuating hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.; Satish, Siddarth; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-12-01

    A multiscale computational method is developed to model the nanoscale viscoelasticity of fluids by bridging non-Markovian fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To capture the elastic responses that emerge at small length scales, we attach an additional rheological model parallel to the macroscopic constitutive equation of a fluid. The widely used linear Maxwell model is employed as a working choice; other models can be used as well. For a fluid that is Newtonian in the macroscopic limit, this approach results in a parallel Newtonian-Maxwell model. For water, argon, and an ionic liquid, the power spectrum of momentum field autocorrelation functions of the parallel Newtonian-Maxwell model agrees very well with those calculated from all-atom MD simulations. To incorporate thermal fluctuations, we generalize the equations of FHD to work with non-Markovian rheological models and colored noise. The fluctuating stress tensor (white noise) is integrated in time in the same manner as its dissipative counterpart and numerical simulations indicate that this approach accurately preserves the set temperature in a FHD simulation. By mapping position and velocity vectors in the molecular representation onto field variables, we bridge the non-Markovian FHD with atomistic MD simulations. Through this mapping, we quantitatively determine the transport coefficients of the parallel Newtonian-Maxwell model for water and argon from all-atom MD simulations. For both fluids, a significant enhancement in elastic responses is observed as the wave number of hydrodynamic modes is reduced to a few nanometers. The mapping from particle to field representations and the perturbative strategy of developing constitutive equations provide a useful framework for modeling the nanoscale viscoelasticity of fluids.

  1. All-atom structural models of insulin binding to the insulin receptor in the presence of a tandem hormone-binding element.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Harish; Abrams, Cameron F

    2013-06-01

    Insulin regulates blood glucose levels in higher organisms by binding to and activating insulin receptor (IR), a constitutively homodimeric glycoprotein of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily. Therapeutic efforts in treating diabetes have been significantly impeded by the absence of structural information on the activated form of the insulin/IR complex. Mutagenesis and photo-crosslinking experiments and structural information on insulin and apo-IR strongly suggest that the dual-chain insulin molecule, unlike the related single-chain insulin-like growth factors, binds to IR in a very different conformation than what is displayed in storage forms of the hormone. In particular, hydrophobic residues buried in the core of the folded insulin molecule engage the receptor. There is also the possibility of plasticity in the receptor structure based on these data, which may in part be due to rearrangement of the so-called CT-peptide, a tandem hormone-binding element of IR. These possibilities provide opportunity for large-scale molecular modeling to contribute to our understanding of this system. Using various atomistic simulation approaches, we have constructed all-atom structural models of hormone/receptor complexes in the presence of CT in its crystallographic position and a thermodynamically favorable displaced position. In the "displaced-CT" complex, many more insulin-receptor contacts suggested by experiments are satisfied, and our simulations also suggest that R-insulin potentially represents the receptor-bound form of hormone. The results presented in this work have further implications for the design of receptor-specific agonists/antagonists.

  2. A Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (MD) Method for the Study of Folding, Based on the Analysis of the Stabilization Determinants of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Massimiliano; Colombo, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange protocol for classical molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding/unfolding. The scheme starts from the analysis of the energy-networks responsible for the stabilization of the folded conformation, by means of the energy-decomposition approach. In this framework, the compact energetic map of the native state is generated by a preliminary short molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the protein in explicit solvent. This map is simplified by means of an eigenvalue decomposition. The highest components of the eigenvector associated with the lowest eigenvalue indicate which sites, named “hot spots”, are likely to be responsible for the stability and correct folding of the protein. In the Hamiltonian replica exchange protocol, we use modified force-field parameters to treat the interparticle non-bonded potentials of the hot spots within the protein and between protein and solvent atoms, leaving unperturbed those relative to all other residues, as well as solvent-solvent interactions. We show that it is possible to reversibly simulate the folding/unfolding behavior of two test proteins, namely Villin HeadPiece HP35 (35 residues) and Protein A (62 residues), using a limited number of replicas. We next discuss possible implications for the study of folding mechanisms via all atom simulations. PMID:23743827

  3. 76 FR 53346 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes AGENCY... Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9 a.m. and...) This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83),...

  4. 76 FR 41651 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes AGENCY... Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...) This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83),...

  5. 78 FR 14547 - Praxedes E. Alverez Santiago, M.D., Daniel Perez Brisebois, M.D., Jorge Grillasca Palou, M.D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Garcia Nieves, M.D., Francis M. Vazques Roura, M.D., Angel B. Rivera Santos, M.D., Cosme D. Santos Torres... M. V zquez Roura, M.D., Angel B. Rivera Santos, M.D., Cosme D. Santos Torres, M.D., and Juan...

  6. Molecular Basis of the Functional differences between soluble human vs. murine MD-2: Role of Val-135 in transfer of LPS from CD14 to MD-21

    PubMed Central

    Vašl, Jožica; Oblak, Alja; Peternelj, Tina T.; Klett, Javier; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Gioannini, Theresa L.; Weiss, Jerrold P.; Jerala, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor (MD-2) is an extracellular protein, associated with the ectodomain of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), that plays a critical role in the recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Despite high overall structural and functional similarity, human (h) and murine (m) MD-2 exhibit several species-related differences. hMD-2 is capable of binding LPS in the absence of TLR4, whereas mMD-2 supports LPS responsiveness only when mMD-2 and mTLR4 are coexpressed in the same cell. Previously, charged residues at the edge of LPS binding pocket have been attributed to this difference. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to explore the hydrophobic residues within MD-2 binding pocket, as the source of functional differences between hMD-2 and mMD-2. While decreased hydrophobicity of residues 61 and 63 in hMD-2 binding pocket retained the characteristics of wild type hMD-2, a relatively minor change of valine to alanine at position 135 completely abolished the binding of LPS to the hMD-2 mutant. The mutant, however, retained the LPS binding in complex with TLR4 and also cell activation, resulting in a murine-like phenotype. These results were supported by the molecular dynamics simulation. We propose that the residue at position 135 of MD-2 governs the dynamics of the binding pocket and its ability to accommodate lipid A, which is allosterically affected by bound TLR4. PMID:26826249

  7. H5MD: A structured, efficient, and portable file format for molecular data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Buyl, Pierre; Colberg, Peter H.; Höfling, Felix

    2014-06-01

    We propose a new file format named "H5MD" for storing molecular simulation data, such as trajectories of particle positions and velocities, along with thermodynamic observables that are monitored during the course of the simulation. H5MD files are HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format) files with a specific hierarchy and naming scheme. Thus, H5MD inherits many benefits of HDF5, e.g., structured layout of multi-dimensional datasets, data compression, fast and parallel I/O, and portability across many programming languages and hardware platforms. H5MD files are self-contained, and foster the reproducibility of scientific data and the interchange of data between researchers using different simulation programs and analysis software. In addition, the H5MD specification can serve for other kinds of data (e.g. experimental data) and is extensible to supplemental data, or may be part of an enclosing file structure.

  8. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Riyaz; Reeve, Sam; Juallmes, Luc; Asal, Sameer Abu; Landmehr, Aaron; Gaffer, Sanian; Teodor Bercea, Gheorghe; Rubinstein, Zach

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tau Peptides for the Investigation of Conformational Changes Induced by Specific Phosphorylation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Neha S; Kukic, Predrag; Lippens, Guy; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2017-01-01

    The Tau protein plays an important role due to its biomolecular interactions in neurodegenerative diseases. The lack of stable structure and various posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation at various sites in the Tau protein pose a challenge for many experimental methods that are traditionally used to study protein folding and aggregation. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can help around deciphering relationship between phosphorylation and various intermediate and stable conformations of the Tau protein which occur on longer timescales. This chapter outlines protocols for the preparation, execution, and analysis of all-atom MD simulations of a 21-amino acid-long phosphorylated Tau peptide with the aim of generating biologically relevant structural and dynamic information. The simulations are done in explicit solvent and starting from nearly extended configurations of the peptide. The scaled MD method implemented in AMBER14 was chosen to achieve enhanced conformational sampling in addition to a conventional MD approach, thereby allowing the characterization of folding for such an intrinsically disordered peptide at 293 K. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the simulation trajectories to establish correlations with NMR data (i.e., chemical shifts and NOEs). Finally, in-depth discussions are provided for commonly encountered problems.

  10. 76 FR 1993 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes AGENCY... Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83...

  11. 76 FR 13543 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes AGENCY... Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail... stabilizer is similar in design and loading to that of the Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC- 9-82 (MD-82),...

  12. 76 FR 39251 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes AGENCY... Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roger Durbin, Aerospace.... Applicability (c) This AD applies to all The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83...

  13. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-14

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Abeta16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50 ns time scale. Based on two 220 ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Abeta16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded beta sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  14. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Aβ16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50ns time scale. Based on two 220ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Aβ16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded β sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  15. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  16. Identifying native-like protein structures with scoring functions based on all-atom ECEPP force fields, implicit solvent models and structure relaxation.

    PubMed

    Arnautova, Yelena A; Vorobjev, Yury N; Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-10-01

    Availability of energy functions which can discriminate native-like from non-native protein conformations is crucial for theoretical protein structure prediction and refinement of low-resolution protein models. This article reports the results of benchmark tests for scoring functions based on two all-atom ECEPP force fields, that is, ECEPP/3 and ECEPP05, and two implicit solvent models for a large set of protein decoys. The following three scoring functions are considered: (i) ECEPP05 plus a solvent-accessible surface area model with the parameters optimized with a set of protein decoys (ECEPP05/SA); (ii) ECEPP/3 plus the solvent-accessible surface area model of Ooi et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1987;84:3086-3090) (ECEPP3/OONS); and (iii) ECEPP05 plus an implicit solvent model based on a solution of the Poisson equation with an optimized Fast Adaptive Multigrid Boundary Element (FAMBEpH) method (ECEPP05/FAMBEpH). Short Monte Carlo-with-Minimization (MCM) simulations, following local energy minimization, are used as a scoring method with ECEPP05/SA and ECEPP3/OONS potentials, whereas energy calculation is used with ECEPP05/FAMBEpH. The performance of each scoring function is evaluated by examining its ability to distinguish between native-like and non-native protein structures. The results of the tests show that the new ECEPP05/SA scoring function represents a significant improvement over the earlier ECEPP3/OONS version of the force field. Thus, it is able to rank native-like structures with C(alpha) root-mean-square-deviations below 3.5 A as lowest-energy conformations for 76% and within the top 10 for 87% of the proteins tested, compared with 69 and 80%, respectively, for ECEPP3/OONS. The use of the FAMBEpH solvation model, which provides a more accurate description of the protein-solvent interactions, improves the discriminative ability of the scoring function to 89%. All failed tests in which the native-like structures cannot be discriminated as those with low

  17. 76 FR 52225 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... Model DC-9-81 (MD- 81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes AGENCY... Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81),...

  18. C-type related order in the defective fluorites La2Ce2O7 and Nd2Ce2O7 studied by neutron scattering and ab initio MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Kalland, Liv-Elisif; Norberg, Stefan T; Kyrklund, Jakob; Hull, Stephen; Eriksson, Sten G; Norby, Truls; Mohn, Chris E; Knee, Christopher S

    2016-09-14

    This work presents a structural investigation of La2-xNdxCe2O7 (x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0) using X-ray powder diffraction and total scattering neutron powder diffraction, analysed using Rietveld and the reverse Monte Carlo method (RMC). Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) modelling is also performed for further investigations of the local order. The main intensities in the neutron diffraction data for the La2-xNdxCe2O7 series correspond to the fluorite structure. However, additional C-type superlattice peaks are visible for x > 0 and increase in intensity with increasing x. The Nd-containing compositions (x > 0) are best fitted with Rietveld analysis by using a combination of oxygen deficient fluorite and oxygen excess C-type structures. No indications of cation order are found in the RMC or Rietveld analysis, and the absence of cation order is supported by the MD modelling. We argue that the superlattice peaks originate from oxygen vacancy ordering and associated shift in the cation position away from the ideal fluorite site similar to that in the C-type structure, which is seen from the Rietveld refinements and the observed ordering in the MD modelling. The vacancies favour alignments in the 〈110〉, 〈111〉 and especially the 〈210〉 direction. Moreover, we find that such ordering might also be found to a small extent in La2Ce2O7, explaining the discernible modulated background between the fluorite peaks. The observed overlap of the main Bragg peaks between the fluorite and C-type phase supports the co-existence of vacancy ordered and more disordered domains. This is further supported by the observed similarity of the radial distribution functions as modelled with MD. The increase in long range oxygen vacancy order with increasing Nd-content in La2-xNdxCe2O7 corresponds well with the lower oxide ion conductivity in Nd2Ce2O7 compared to La2Ce2O7 reported earlier.

  19. Significant reduction in errors associated with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures: automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey A; Ho, Kenneth L; Farid, Ramy

    2012-08-01

    All-atom models are essential for many applications in molecular modeling and computational chemistry. Nonbonded atomic contacts much closer than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the two atoms (clashes) are commonly observed in such models derived from protein crystal structures. A set of 94 recently deposited protein structures in the resolution range 1.5-2.8 Å were analyzed for clashes by the addition of all H atoms to the models followed by optimization and energy minimization of the positions of just these H atoms. The results were compared with the same set of structures after automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX and with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures at a resolution equal to or better than 0.9 Å. The additional PrimeX refinement produced structures with reasonable summary geometric statistics and similar R(free) values to the original structures. The frequency of clashes at less than 0.8 times the sum of van der Waals radii was reduced over fourfold compared with that found in the original structures, to a level approaching that found in the ultrahigh-resolution structures. Moreover, severe clashes at less than or equal to 0.7 times the sum of atomic radii were reduced 15-fold. All-atom refinement with PrimeX produced improved crystal structure models with respect to nonbonded contacts and yielded changes in structural details that dramatically impacted on the interpretation of some protein-ligand interactions.

  20. ST-analyzer: a web-based user interface for simulation trajectory analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Cheol; Jo, Sunhwan; Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Yeom, Min Sun; Gorenstein, Lev; Chen, Feng; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2014-05-05

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has become one of the key tools to obtain deeper insights into biological systems using various levels of descriptions such as all-atom, united-atom, and coarse-grained models. Recent advances in computing resources and MD programs have significantly accelerated the simulation time and thus increased the amount of trajectory data. Although many laboratories routinely perform MD simulations, analyzing MD trajectories is still time consuming and often a difficult task. ST-analyzer, http://im.bioinformatics.ku.edu/st-analyzer, is a standalone graphical user interface (GUI) toolset to perform various trajectory analyses. ST-analyzer has several outstanding features compared to other existing analysis tools: (i) handling various formats of trajectory files from MD programs, such as CHARMM, NAMD, GROMACS, and Amber, (ii) intuitive web-based GUI environment--minimizing administrative load and reducing burdens on the user from adapting new software environments, (iii) platform independent design--working with any existing operating system, (iv) easy integration into job queuing systems--providing options of batch processing either on the cluster or in an interactive mode, and (v) providing independence between foreground GUI and background modules--making it easier to add personal modules or to recycle/integrate pre-existing scripts utilizing other analysis tools. The current ST-analyzer contains nine main analysis modules that together contain 18 options, including density profile, lipid deuterium order parameters, surface area per lipid, and membrane hydrophobic thickness. This article introduces ST-analyzer with its design, implementation, and features, and also illustrates practical analysis of lipid bilayer simulations.

  1. Functional Domain Motions in Proteins on the 1 100 ns Timescale: Comparison of Neutron Spin-Echo Spectroscopy of Phosphoglycerate Kinase with Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Smolin, Nikolai; Biehl, R; Kneller, Gerald; Richter, Dieter O; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Protein function often requires large-scale domain motion. An exciting new development in the experimental characterization of domain motions in proteins is the application of neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). NSE directly probes coherent (i.e., pair correlated) scattering on the 1 100 ns timescale. Here, we report on all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of a protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, from which we calculate small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and NSE scattering properties. The simulation-derived and experimental-solution SANS results are in excellent agreement. The contributions of translational and rotational whole-molecule diffusion to the simulation-derived NSE and potential problems in their estimation are examined. Principal component analysis identifies types of domain motion that dominate the internal motion's contribution to the NSE signal, with the largest being classic hinge bending. The associated free-energy profiles are quasiharmonic and the frictional properties correspond to highly overdamped motion. The amplitudes of the motions derived by MD are smaller than those derived from the experimental analysis, and possible reasons for this difference are discussed. The MD results confirm that a significant component of the NSE arises from internal dynamics. They also demonstrate that the combination of NSE with MD is potentially useful for determining the forms, potentials of mean force, and time dependence of functional domain motions in proteins.

  2. Tuning of dye optical properties by environmental effects: a QM/MM and experimental study† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Force field parameters for the a and b fluorophores and (ii) MD simulation analysis of the b fluorophore. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp00841k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Del Frate, Gianluca; Bellina, Fabio; Mancini, Giordano; Marianetti, Giulia; Minei, Pierpaolo; Pucci, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The present work is aimed at a deeper investigation of two recently synthesized heteroaromatic fluorophores by means of a computational multilayer approach, integrating quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM). In particular, dispersion of the title dyes in a polymer matrix is studied in connection with potential applications as photoactive species in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Molecular dynamics simulations, based on accurate QM-derived force fields, reveal increased stiffness of these organic dyes when going from CHCl3 solution to the polymer matrix. QM/MM computations of UV spectra for snapshots extracted from MD simulations show that this different flexibility permits explaining the different spectral shapes obtained experimentally for the two different environments. Moreover, the general spectroscopic trends are reproduced well by static computations employing a polarizable continuum description of environmental effects. PMID:27001346

  3. Orbital ATK – Elkton, MD MDD003067121

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is announcing its environmental remediation and draft corrective action permit under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended (RCRA), as complete with Controls for the Orbital ATK Inc. Facility (ATK), Elkton MD, (EPA ID: MDD0030671)

  4. Obituary of Philip H. Cooper, MD.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James W; Wick, Mark R; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-08-01

    Dermatopathology lost a giant in the field with the death of Philip H. Cooper, MD, on Friday, January 30, 2015. The following obituary represents a celebration of his life and his contributions to our field.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of highly cross-linked polymer networks: prediction of thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenogina, Natalia; Tsige, Mesfin; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila; Patnaik, Soumya

    2012-02-01

    We use all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the mechanical and thermal properties of thermosetting polymers. Atomistic simulation is a promising tool which can provide detailed structure-property relationships of densely cross-linked polymer networks. In this work we study the thermo-mechanical properties of thermosetting polymers based on amine curing agents and epoxy resins and have focused on the DGEBA/DETDA epoxy system. At first we describe the modeling approach to construction of realistic all-atom models of densely cross-linked polymer matrices. Subsequently, a series of atomistic simulations was carried out to examine the simulation cell size effect as well as the role of cross-linking density and chain length of the resin strands on thermo-mechanical properties at different temperatures. Two different methods were used to deform the polymer networks. Both static and dynamic approaches to calculating the mechanical properties were considered and the thermo-mechanical properties obtained from our simulations were found in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  6. Protein simulation using coarse-grained two-bead multipole force field with polarizable water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-02-01

    A recently developed two-bead multipole force field (TMFF) is employed in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of proteins in combination with polarizable CG water models, the Martini polarizable water model, and modified big multipole water model. Significant improvement in simulated structures and dynamics of proteins is observed in terms of both the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of the structures and residue root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSFs) from the native ones in the present simulation compared with the simulation result with Martini's non-polarizable water model. Our result shows that TMFF simulation using CG water models gives much stable secondary structures of proteins without the need for adding extra interaction potentials to constrain the secondary structures. Our result also shows that by increasing the MD time step from 2 fs to 6 fs, the RMSD and RMSF results are still in excellent agreement with those from all-atom simulations. The current study demonstrated clearly that the application of TMFF together with a polarizable CG water model significantly improves the accuracy and efficiency for CG simulation of proteins.

  7. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica{sup ®} package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics . Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  8. VIEW IN OPPOSITE DIRECTION AS MD1351 AND MD1352. RAW MATERIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW IN OPPOSITE DIRECTION AS MD-135-1 AND MD-135-2. RAW MATERIAL CONVEYOR AT LEFT DEPOSITS SHELL INTO MILLING MACHINE AT LOWER LEFT. ENGINE IS AT LOWER RIGHT AND RADIATOR AT LOWER CENTER. ROLLER SORTER IS AT TOP OF CONVEYOR. - F. & H. Benning Company Oyster Mill, 14430 Solomons Island Road (moved from 1014 Benning Road, Galesville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland), Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  9. All-atom molecular dynamics study of a spherical micelle composed of N-acetylated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(gamma-benzyl L-glutamate) block copolymers: a potential carrier of drug delivery systems for cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Hiroshi; Andoh, Yoshimichi; Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2009-11-19

    An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a spherical micelle composed of amphiphilic N-acetylated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(gamma-benzyl L-glutamate) (PEG-PBLG-Ac) block copolymers was performed in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and 1 atm. Such copolymers have received considerable attention as carriers in drug delivery systems. In this study, we used copolymers consisting of 11 EG units and 9 BLG units as models. Starting from the copolymers arranged spherically, the calculation predicted an equilibrium state consisting of a slightly elliptical micelle structure with a hydrophobic PBLG inner core and a hydrophilic PEG outer shell. The micelle structure was dynamically stable during the simulation, with the PEG blocks showing a compact helical conformation and the PBLG blocks an alpha-helix form. Multiple hydrogen bonds with solvent water molecules stabilized the helical conformation of the PEG blocks, leading to their hydration as shown by longer residence times of water molecules near the PEG ether oxygen atoms compared with that of bulk water. Some water molecules have also been found distributed within the hydrophobic core; they showed continuous exchange with bulk water during the simulation. Those molecules existed mostly as a cluster in spaces between the copolymers, forming hydrogen bonds among themselves as well as with the hydrophobic core through hydrophilic groups such as esters and amides. The water molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the micelle may play an important role in the stabilization of the micelle structure.

  10. 75 FR 6162 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Corporation Model DC- 9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes... Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 airplanes. This... material fatigue from normal flap operating loads. We are proposing this AD to detect and correct...

  11. 75 FR 34661 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Corporation Model DC- 9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9- 87 (MD-87), and MD-88 airplanes. This proposed AD would...

  12. 75 FR 80744 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Corporation Model DC- 9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD-87), and MD-88 Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD-83), DC-9-87 (MD- 87) and MD-88 airplanes. This proposed AD would require...

  13. Coulombic free energy and salt ion association per phosphate of all-atom models of DNA oligomer: dependence on oligomer size.

    PubMed

    Shkel, Irina A; Record, M Thomas

    2012-08-23

    We investigate how the coulombic Gibbs free energy and salt ion association per phosphate charge of DNA oligomers vary with oligomer size (i.e. number of charged residues ∣ZD∣) at 0.15 M univalent salt by non-linear Poisson Boltzmann (NLPB) analysis of all-atom DNA models. Calculations of these quantities ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) are performed for short and long double-stranded (ds) and single-stranded (ss) DNA oligomers, ranging from 4 to 118 phosphates (ds) and from 2 to 59 phosphates (ss). Behaviors of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] as functions of ∣ZD∣ provide a measure of the range of the coulombic end effect and determine the size of an oligomer at which an interior region with the properties (per charge) of the infinite-length polyelectrolyte first appears. This size (10-11 phosphates at each end for ds DNA and 6-9 for ss DNA at 0.15 M salt) is in close agreement with values obtained previously by Monte Carlo and NLPB calculations for cylindrical models of polyions, and by analysis of binding of oligocations to DNA oligomers. Differences in [Formula: see text] and in [Formula: see text] between ss and ds DNA are used to predict effects of oligomeric size and salt concentration on duplex stability in the vicinity of 0.15 M salt. Results of all-atom calculations are compared with results of less structurally detailed models and with experimental data.

  14. Folding mechanisms of individual beta-hairpins in a Go model of Pin1 WW domain by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhonglin; Ding, Jiandong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2008-06-14

    This paper examines the folding mechanism of an individual beta-hairpin in the presence of other hairpins by using an off-lattice model of a small triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet protein, Pin1 WW domain. The turn zipper model and the hydrophobic collapse model originally developed for a single beta-hairpin in literature is confirmed to be useful in describing beta-hairpins in model Pin1 WW domain. We find that the mechanism for folding a specific hairpin is independent of whether it folds first or second, but the formation process are significantly dependent on temperature. More specifically, beta1-beta2 hairpin folds via the turn zipper model at a low temperature and the hydrophobic collapse model at a high temperature, while the folding of beta2-beta3 hairpin follows the turn zipper model at both temperatures. The change in folding mechanisms is interpreted by the interplay between contact stability (enthalpy) and loop lengths (entropy), the effect of which is temperature dependent.

  15. Hybrid MC/MD Method For High Entropy Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bojun; Widom, Michael

    High entropy alloys (HEA) are materials that contain multiple components of elements consisting of a single solid solution phase which could make the entropy of mixing very high. From recent investigations, HEA's possess promising properties such as strength at high temperature, tensile strength, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. In this talk, a hybrid Molecular Dynamics (MD)/Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method is introduced to the computational analysis of HEA, treating atomic displacement by MD as well as swapping atomic species by MC. This method efficiently models the phase separation and short range order by swapping between different types of atoms, while structural deviation from the perfect lattice sites of atoms is equilibrated quickly by MD. We apply this method to HfNbTaZr HEA modeled using an embedded-atom potential. The result gives a strong phase separation of Hf-Zr and Nb-Ta pairs shown by the pair correlation function. Diffuse scattering patterns are predicted and compared to experiments. Doe Grant No. DE-SC0014506.

  16. The ABCs of molecular dynamics simulations on B-DNA, circa 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, David L; Cheatham, Thomas E; Mezei, Mihaly

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a retrospective on the ABC initiative in the area of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations including explicit solvent on all tetranucleotide steps of duplex B-form DNA duplex, ca. 2012. The ABC consortium has completed two phases of simulations, the most current being a set of 50–100 trajectories based on the AMBER ff99 force field together with the parmbsc0 modification. Some general perspectives on the field of MD on DNA and sequence effects on DNA structure are provided, followed by an overview our MD results, including a detailed comparison of the ff99/parmbsc0 results with crystal and NMR structures available for d(CGCGAATTCGCG). Some projects inspired by or related to the ABC initiative and database are also reviewed, including methods for the trajectory analyses, informatics of dealing with the large database of results, compressions of trajectories for efficacy of distribution, DNA solvation by water and ions, parameterization of coarse-grained models with applications and gene finding and genome annotation PMID:22750978

  17. Registration of cotton germplasm line md 10-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MD 10-5 (Reg. No. ______, PI 675077) is a noncommercial breeding line of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) released by the USDA-ARS at Stoneville, MS in 2015. MD 10-5 was selected in F4 progenies from a cross between MD 15 (PI 642769) and JJ 1145ne. MD 10-5 has a desirable combination between lint yi...

  18. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hua; Victor, Jean-Marc; Mozziconacci, Julien

    2007-09-12

    In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  19. Simulating the Distance Distribution between Spin-Labels Attached to Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    EPR/DEER spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the characterization of the conformational states of proteins. In this study, force field parameters for the bifunctional spin-label (RX) used in EPR/DEER are parametrized and tested with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The dihedral angles connecting the Cα atom of the backbone to the nitroxide ring moiety of the RX spin-label attached to i and i + 4 positions in a polyalanine α-helix agree very well with those observed in the X-ray crystallography. Both RXi,i+4 and RXi,i+3 are more rigid than the monofunctional spin-label (R1) commonly used in EPR/DEER, while RXi,i+4 is more rigid and causes less distortion in a protein backbone than RXi,i+3. Simplified dummy spin-label models with a single effective particle representing the RXi,i+3 and RXi,i+4 are also developed and parametrized from the all-atom simulations. MD simulations with dummy spin-labels (MDDS) provide distance distributions that can be directly compared to distance distributions obtained from EPR/DEER to rapidly assess if a hypothetical three-dimensional (3D) structural model is consistent with experiment. The dummy spin-labels can also be used in the restrained-ensemble MD (re-MD) simulations to carry out structural refinement of 3D models. Applications of this methodology to T4 lysozyme, KCNE1, and LeuT are shown to provide important insights about their conformational dynamics. PMID:25645890

  20. Lipid Models for United-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2009-03-10

    United-atom force fields for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a higher computational efficiency, especially in lipid membrane simulations, with little sacrifice in accuracy, when compared to all-atom force fields. Excellent united-atom lipid models are available, but in combination with depreciated protein force fields. In this work, a united-atom model of the lipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine has been built with standard parameters of the force field GROMOS96 53a6 that reproduces the experimental area per lipid of a lipid bilayer within 3% accuracy to a value of 0.623 ± 0.011 nm(2) without the assumption of a constant surface area or the inclusion of surface pressure. In addition, the lateral self-diffusion constant and deuterium order parameters of the acyl chains are in agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, models for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) result in areas per lipid of 0.625 nm(2) (DMPC), 0.693 nm(2) (POPC), and 0.700 nm(2) (POPG) from 40 ns MD simulations. Experimental lateral self-diffusion coefficients are reproduced satisfactorily by the simulation. The lipid models can form the basis for molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins with current and future versions of united-atom protein force fields.

  1. Hazardous Waste Minimization Assessment: Fort Meade, MD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Audit." in Wuem Mbdmi1zmim Mama (Govarmmu Inlmdu he.. Roeehdmf, MD. 19), pp 61-73 M.L R=. "Haudow Wons Mhbdms Aisu Usi4 a Two-Timed Appm." rw£nwwd...severe health problems (e.g.. gastric disorders, skin lesions. swollen limbs, cancers. tumors , eye problems. liver disorders, menstrual irregularities

  2. 78 FR 2707 - Maryland Disaster # MD-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Deadline Date: 10/02/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  3. Howard Parnes, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Howard Parnes received a BA from Cornell University in 1977 and an MD from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 1981. He trained in internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center from 1981 to 1984 followed by a medical oncology fellowship at the University of Maryland Cancer Center (UMCC) from 1984 to 1987. |

  4. 76 FR 77579 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00017

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00017 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  5. Enhanced Sampling of an Atomic Model with Hybrid Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations Guided by a Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2015-08-11

    Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories based on a classical equation of motion provide a straightforward, albeit somewhat inefficient approach, to explore and sample the configurational space of a complex molecular system. While a broad range of techniques can be used to accelerate and enhance the sampling efficiency of classical simulations, only algorithms that are consistent with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution yield a proper statistical mechanical computational framework. Here, a multiscale hybrid algorithm relying simultaneously on all-atom fine-grained (FG) and coarse-grained (CG) representations of a system is designed to improve sampling efficiency by combining the strength of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (neMD) and Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC). This CG-guided hybrid neMD-MC algorithm comprises six steps: (1) a FG configuration of an atomic system is dynamically propagated for some period of time using equilibrium MD; (2) the resulting FG configuration is mapped onto a simplified CG model; (3) the CG model is propagated for a brief time interval to yield a new CG configuration; (4) the resulting CG configuration is used as a target to guide the evolution of the FG system; (5) the FG configuration (from step 1) is driven via a nonequilibrium MD (neMD) simulation toward the CG target; (6) the resulting FG configuration at the end of the neMD trajectory is then accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis criterion before returning to step 1. A symmetric two-ends momentum reversal prescription is used for the neMD trajectories of the FG system to guarantee that the CG-guided hybrid neMD-MC algorithm obeys microscopic detailed balance and rigorously yields the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. The enhanced sampling achieved with the method is illustrated with a model system with hindered diffusion and explicit-solvent peptide simulations. Illustrative tests indicate that the method can yield a speedup of about 80 times for the model system and up

  6. Derivation of original RESP atomic partial charges for MD simulations of the LDAO surfactant with AMBER: applications to a model of micelle and a fragment of the lipid kinase PI4KA.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Esra; Taveneau, Cyntia; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Marchi, Massimo; Robert, Bruno; Abel, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the derivation and the validation of original RESP atomic partial charges for the N, N-dimethyl-dodecylamine oxide (LDAO) surfactant. These charges, designed to be fully compatible with all the AMBER force fields, are at first tested against molecular dynamics simulations of pure LDAO micelles and with a fragment of the lipid kinase PIK4A (DI) modeled with the QUARK molecular modeling server. To model the micelle, we used two distinct AMBER force fields (i.e. Amber99SB and Lipid14) and a variety of starting conditions. We find that the micelle structural properties (such as the shape, size, the LDAO headgroup hydration, and alkyl chain conformation) slightly depend on the force field but not on the starting conditions and more importantly are in good agreement with experiments and previous simulations. We also show that the Lipid14 force field should be used instead of the Amber99SB one to better reproduce the C(sp3)C(sp3)C(sp3)C(sp3) conformation in the surfactant alkyl chain. Concerning the simulations with LDAO-DI protein, we carried out different runs at two NaCl concentrations (i.e. 0 and 300 mM) to mimic, in the latter case, the experimental conditions. We notice a small dependence of the simulation results with the LDAO parameters and the salt concentration. However, we find that in the simulations, three out of four tryptophans of the DI protein are not accessible to water in agreement with our fluorescence spectroscopy experiments reported in the paper.

  7. TMFF-A Two-Bead Multipole Force Field for Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Liu, Fengjiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-12-13

    Coarse-grained (CG) models are desirable for studying large and complex biological systems. In this paper, we propose a new two-bead multipole force field (TMFF) in which electric multipoles up to the quadrupole are included in the CG force field. The inclusion of electric multipoles in the proposed CG force field enables a more realistic description of the anisotropic electrostatic interactions in the protein system and, thus, provides an improvement over the standard isotropic two-bead CG models. In order to test the accuracy of the new CG force field model, extensive molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for a series of benchmark protein systems. These simulation studies showed that the TMFF model can realistically reproduce the structural and dynamical properties of proteins, as demonstrated by the close agreement of the CG results with those from the corresponding all-atom simulations in terms of root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) and root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSFs) of the protein backbones. The current two-bead model is highly coarse-grained and is 50-fold more efficient than all-atom method in MD simulation of proteins in explicit water.

  8. sTLR4/MD-2 complex inhibits colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting LPS

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jie; Wei, Liuhua; Wu, Chunlin; Zhang, Qiaoyun; Wei, Dong; Chen, Xiang; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiaoli; Dai, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is aggressive and associated with TLR4-MD-2 signaling. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) were highly expressed in human CRC. The soluble form of extracellular TLR4 domain (sTLR4) and MD-2 may have important roles in binding lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, sTLR4 and MD-2 protein and prepared sTLR4/MD-2 complex were synthesized successfully to restrain LPS-TLR4/MD-2 activation by competing with cellular membrane TLR4 for binding LPS. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex can significantly attenuate LPS induced pro-inflammatory and migration cytokine production in vitro and in vivo, and inhibit the effect of LPS on the cell cycle, migration and invasion of human CRC cells in vitro. Administration of sTLR4/MD-2 complex protected mice from tumor both in xenograft and implantation metastasis model. The sTLR4/MD-2 complex treated mice had smaller tumor, less body weight loss and lower expression of inflammatory cytokines. Here, the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM/DSS) murine model was used as an experimental platform to simulate the physiological and pathological processes of cancers associated with chronic intestinal inflammation. AOM/DSS-induced tumors were inhibited in mice treated by sTLR4/MD-2 complex. It is demonstrated in our study that sTLR4/MD-2 complex could inhibit CRC by competing with binding LPS, raising the complex's possibility of a new prevention agent against CRC. PMID:27409669

  9. C6 Coefficients and Dipole Polarizabilities for All Atoms and Many Ions in Rows 1-6 of the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Gould, Tim; Bučko, Tomáš

    2016-08-09

    Using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with exchange kernels, we calculate and test imaginary frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities for all atoms and many ions in rows 1-6 of the periodic table. These are then integrated over frequency to produce C6 coefficients. Results are presented under different models: straight TDDFT calculations using two different kernels; "benchmark" TDDFT calculations corrected by more accurate quantum chemical and experimental data; and "benchmark" TDDFT with frozen orbital anions. Parametrizations are presented for 411+ atoms and ions, allowing results to be easily used by other researchers. A curious relationship, C6,XY ∝ [αX(0)αY(0)](0.73), is found between C6 coefficients and static polarizabilities α(0). The relationship C6,XY = 2C6,XC6,Y/[(αX/αY)C6,Y + (αY/αX)C6,X] is tested and found to work well (<5% errors) in ∼80% of the cases, but can break down badly (>30% errors) in a small fraction of cases.

  10. An all-atom model of the pore-like structure of hexameric VP40 from Ebola: structural insights into the monomer-hexamer transition.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam Luong; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Hermone, Ann R; Burnett, James C; Panchal, Rekha G; McGrath, Connor; Zaharevitz, Dan W; Aman, M Javad; Gussio, Rick; Bavari, Sina

    2005-07-01

    The matrix protein VP40 is an indispensable component of viral assembly and budding by the Ebola virus. VP40 is a monomer in solution, but can fold into hexameric and octameric states, two oligomeric conformations that play central roles in the Ebola viral life cycle. While the X-ray structures of monomeric and octameric VP40 have been determined, the structure of hexameric VP40 has only been solved by three-dimensional electron microscopy (EM) to a resolution of approximately 30 A. In this paper, we present the refinement of the EM reconstruction of truncated hexameric VP40 to approximately 20 A and the construction of an all-atom model (residues 44-212) using the EM model at approximately 20 A and the X-ray structure of monomeric VP40 as templates. The hexamer model suggests that the monomer-hexamer transition involves a conformational change in the N-terminal domain that is not evident during octamerization and therefore, may provide the basis for elucidating the biological function of VP40.

  11. Development of a new meta-score for protein structure prediction from seven all-atom distance dependent potentials using support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Matsuyuki; Ishida, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2009-10-01

    An accurate scoring function is required for protein structure prediction. The scoring function should distinguish the native structure among model structures (decoys) and it also should have correlation with the quality of the decoys. However, we had observed the trade-off between the two requirements for seven all-atom distance dependent potentials in the previous study, where the native structure could be discriminated by examining the fine atomic details, whereas the correlation could be improved by examining coarse-grained interactions, To overcome this problem, in this study, we tried to make an improved scoring function by combining the seven potentials. First, the seven potentials were normalized by the expected energy values of the native and reference states of the target protein. Second, the relationship between the seven normalized energies and the quality (GDT_TS) of the structure were learned using support vector regression with the decoy sets of CASP6 as the training set. Then the meta-score was obtained as the predicted GDT_TS and it was tested with the decoys of the CASP7 experiment. The meta-score showed improvement in correlations with the GDT_TS and in the Z-score of the native structure. It also showed comparable performances in the GDT and enrichment criteria, with the best component potentials. The meta-score could be also used as the absolute quality of the structures. Our study suggests the benefit of combining several different scoring functions for model evaluation.

  12. Toxic wastes discovered in Cecil County, MD

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report focuses on the clean-up activities following toxic waste contamination in Cecil County, MD. The potentially hazardous leakage from waste containers buried in a quarry was addressed before it was turned into a civil emergency of the magnitude of Love Canal. US Superfund is a federal government trust fund largely comprised of taxes on the chemical and petrochemical industries. Local governments share in the cost of removing the waste and other aspects of emergency management.

  13. Toxic wastes discovered in Cecil County, MD

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This report focuses on the clean-up activities following toxic waste contamination in Cecil County, MD. The potentially hazardous leakage from waste containers buried in a quarry was addressed before it was turned into a civil emergency of the magnitude of Love Canal. US Superfund is a federal government trust fund largely comprised of taxes on the chemical and petrochemical industries. Local governments share in the cost of removing the waste and other aspects of emergency management.

  14. Eva Szabo, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Eva Szabo is Chief of the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group at the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. She graduated from Yale University with a BS in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, received her MD from Duke University, and completed her internal medicine residency at Bellevue-NYU Medical Center. After completing her medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute, Dr. |

  15. Graphs for Isotopes of 101-Md (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 101-Md (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101).

  16. Loudon Park Substation. Violetville, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Loudon Park Substation. Violetville, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 100.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. B & P Tunnel west portal. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    B & P Tunnel west portal. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 97.43. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. Bacon Hill Substation. Bacon Hill, Cecil Co., MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bacon Hill Substation. Bacon Hill, Cecil Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 48.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  19. Molecular modeling of the binding modes of the iron-sulfur protein to the Jac1 co-chaperone from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by all-atom and coarse-grained approaches.

    PubMed

    Mozolewska, Magdalena A; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A; Liwo, Adam

    2015-08-01

    The iron-sulfur protein 1 (Isu1) and the J-type co-chaperone Jac1 from yeast are part of a huge ATP-dependent system, and both interact with Hsp70 chaperones. Interaction of Isu1 and Jac1 is a part of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis system in mitochondria. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the yeast Isu1-Jac1 complex has been modeled. First, the complete structure of Isu1 was obtained by homology modeling using the I-TASSER server and YASARA software and thereafter tested for stability in the all-atom force field AMBER. Then, the known experimental structure of Jac1 was adopted to obtain initial models of the Isu1-Jac1 complex by using the ZDOCK server for global and local docking and the AutoDock software for local docking. Three most probable models were subsequently subjected to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the UNRES force field to obtain the final structures of the complex. In the most probable model, Isu1 binds to the left face of the Γ-shaped Jac1 molecule by the β-sheet section of Isu1. Residues L105 , L109 , and Y163 of Jac1 have been assessed by mutation studies to be essential for binding (Ciesielski et al., J Mol Biol 2012; 417:1-12). These residues were also found, by UNRES/molecular dynamics simulations, to be involved in strong interactions between Isu1 and Jac1 in the complex. Moreover, N(95), T(98), P(102), H(112), V(159), L(167), and A(170) of Jac1, not yet tested experimentally, were also found to be important in binding.

  20. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    performing a 15 mus all-atom MD simulation of a DPPC-CHOL bilayer. We find that the CHOL flip-flop rates are on the sub microsecond timescale. These results are verified by performing various independent parallel replica (PR) simulations. Our PR simulations provide significant boost in sampling of the flip-flop events. We observe that the CHOL flip-flop can induce membrane order, regulate membrane-bending energy, and facilitate membrane relaxation. The rapid flip-flop rates reported here have important implications for the role of CHOL in mechanical properties of cell membranes, formation of domains, and maintaining CHOL concentration asymmetry in plasma membrane. Our PR approach can reach submillisecond time scales and bridge the gap between MD simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on CHOL flip-flop dynamics in membranes. The last project deals with transfection barriers encountered by a bare small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a phospholipid bilayer. SiRNA molecules play a pivotal role in therapeutic applications. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA-based therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. We have examined structural and mechanical barriers to siRNA passage across a phospholipid bilayer using all-atom MD simulations. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the anionic siRNA and head groups of phospholipid molecules induces a phase transformation from the liquid crystalline to ripple phase. Steered MD simulations reveal that the siRNA transfection through the ripple phase requires a force of ˜ 1.5 nN.

  1. 75 FR 81125 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sassafras River, Georgetown, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sassafras River, Georgetown, MD... of the Sassafras River (Route 213) Bridge, mile 10.0, in Georgetown, MD. The deviation is necessary... Sassafras River Bridge (Route 213), at mile 10.0, in Georgetown, MD has a vertical clearance in the...

  2. 77 FR 5201 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The proposed change will alter the... Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4 between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. This change would require...

  3. 77 FR 73967 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... highway bridge at Wise Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The... Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 5201). The rulemaking concerned...

  4. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  5. 75 FR 54069 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...-2010-0265] RIN 1625--AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD AGENCY: Coast....9, across Curtis Creek at Baltimore, MD. The requested change would have allowed the bridge to... Regulation Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 30747-30750). The...

  6. Partitioning into Colloidal Structures of Fasted State Intestinal Fluid Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain insights into the structure and molecular interactions of colloidal structures present in fasted state intestinal fluid. Drug partitioning and interaction were studied with a mixed system of the bile salt taurocholate (TCH) and 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC). Spontaneous aggregation of TCH and DLiPC from unconstrained MD simulations at the united-atom level using the Berger/Gromos54A7 force fields demonstrated that intermolecular hydrogen bonding between TCH molecules was an important factor in determining the overall TCH and DLiPC configuration. In bilayered systems, these intermolecular hydrogen bonds resulted in embedded transmembrane TCH clusters. Free energy simulations using the umbrella sampling technique revealed that the stability of these transmembrane TCH clusters was superior when they consisted of 3 or 4 TCH per bilayer leaflet. All-atom simulations using the Slipids/GAFF force fields showed that the TCH embedded in the bilayer decreased the energy barrier to penetrate the bilayer (ΔGpen) for water, ethanol, and carbamazepine, but not for the more lipophilic felodipine and danazol. This suggests that diffusion of hydrophilic to moderately lipophilic molecules through the bilayer is facilitated by the embedded TCH molecules. However, the effect of embedded TCH on the overall lipid/water partitioning was significant for danazol, indicating that the incorporation of TCH plays a crucial role for the partitioning of lipophilic solutes into e.g. lipidic vesicles existing in fasted state intestinal fluids. To conclude, the MD simulations revealed important intermolecular interactions in lipidic bilayers, both between the bile components themselves and with the drug molecules. PMID:27934534

  7. Probing the importance of lipid diversity in cell membranes via molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Khakbaz, Pouyan; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2015-11-01

    Lipid membranes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes have a wide array of lipids that are necessary for proper membrane structure and function. In this paper, an introduction to lipid diversity in biology and a mini-review on how molecular simulations have been used to model biological membranes (primarily limited to one to three lipid types in most simulation-based models) is provided, which motivates the use of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of lipid diversity on properties of realistic membrane models of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. As an example, cytoplasmic membrane models of Escherichia coli were developed at different stages of the colony growth cycle (early-log, mid-log, stationary and overnight). The main difference between lipid compositions at each stage was the concentration of a cyclopropane-containing moiety on the sn-2 lipid acyl chain (cyC17:0). Triplicate MD simulations for each stage were run for 300 ns to study the influence of lipid diversity on the surface area per lipid, area compressibility modulus, deuterium order parameters, and electron density profiles. The overnight stage (also known as the death stage) had the highest average surface area per lipid, highest rigidity, and lowest bilayer thickness compare to other stages of E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. Although bilayer thickness did depend on the growth stage, the changes between these were small suggesting that the hydrophobic core of transmembrane proteins fit well with the membrane in all growth stages. Although it is still common practise in MD simulations of membrane proteins to use simple one- or two-component membranes, it can be important to use diverse lipid model membranes when membrane protein structure and function are influenced by changes in lipid membrane composition.

  8. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD.

    PubMed

    Laganapan, A M K; Videcoq, A; Bienia, M; Ala-Nissila, T; Bochicchio, D; Ferrando, R

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  9. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  10. Discovery of /sup 260/Md and the decay properties of /sup 258/Fm, /sup 258m,g/Md, and /sup 259/Md

    SciTech Connect

    Lougheed, R.W.; Hulet, E.K.; Dougan, R.J.; Wild, J.F.; Dupzyk, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.; Moody, K.J.; Hahn, R.L.; Suemmerer, K.; Bethune, G.

    1985-08-01

    We have discovered a new neutron-rich isotope, /sup 260/Md, from /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne bombardments of /sup 254/Es. We observed a spontaneous-fission (SF) activity with a 32-day half-life in electromagnetically separated mass-260 fractions from these bombardments and we have measured the mass and kinetic energy distributions of this SF activity. The mass distribution was symmetric with the principal energy peak at 234-MeV total kinetic energy (TKE), similar to previous observations for heavy Fm isotopes. Surprisingly, we also observed a smaller symmetric component with 195-MeV TKE. We interpret these two peaks in the TKE distribution as arising from two types of fission in the same nucleus, or bimodal fission. The observed fission activity may be either from the SF decay of /sup 260/Md or /sup 260/Fm which would arise from electron capture (EC) decay of /sup 260/Md. We have eliminated the possible ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 260/Md by measuring ..beta../sup -/-SF time correlations for the decay of /sup 260/Md and we plan to determine if /sup 260/Md decays by EC by measuring time correlations between Fm x-rays and SF events. We also measured properties for heavy Fm and Md isotopes which include: (1) more accurate cross sections for the neutron-rich Md isotopes which we use to predict the production rates of yet undiscovered nuclides; (2) improved half-live measurements for /sup 258m,g/Md and /sup 259/Md; (3) confirmation of the EC decay of /sup 258m/Md by measuring Fm x-rays preceding the SF decay of /sup 258/Fm; and (4) very substantially improved mass and TKE distributions for the SF decay of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Md.

  11. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds lowered activation energy and improved catalytic efficiency in TALipB from Trichosporon asahii MSR54: MD simulations revealed flexible lid and extended substrate binding area in the mutant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogesh; Gupta, Namita; Verma, Ved Vrat; Goel, Manisha; Gupta, Rani

    2016-03-25

    TALipB (33 kDa) is a solvent stable, enantioselective lipase from Trichosporon asahii MSR54. It is cysteine-rich and shows activation in presence of thiol reducing agents. DIANNA server predicted three disulphide bridges C53-C195 (S1), C89-C228 (S2) and C164-C254 (S3) in the enzyme. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds by cysteine to alanine mutations at Cys53 and Cys89 of S1 and S2 bonds resulted in enzyme activation. Mutant mTALipB (S1+S2) showed increase in specific activity by ∼4-fold (834 mM/mg) and improved Vmax of 6.27 μmol/ml/min at 40 °Con pNP caprate. Temperature optima of mTALipB shifted from 50 to 40 °C and activation energy decreased by 0.7 kcal mol(-1). However, the mutant was less thermostable with a t1/2 of 18 min at 60 °C as compared to t1/2 of 38 min for the native enzyme. Mutant also displayed an improved activity on all pNP esters and higher enantiomeric excess (61%) during esterification of (±) 1-phenylethanol. Far-UV CD analysis showed significant changes in secondary structure after S-S bridge disruption with 7.16% decrease in α-helices and 1.31% increase in β-sheets. In silico analysis predicted two lids (α5 and α9) in TALipB. Molecular dynamic simulations at 40 °C and 50 °C revealed that in the mTALipB, both the lids opened at 40 °C with clockwise and anticlockwise rotations in Lid1 and Lid2, respectively. In the native protein, however, the lid was only partially open even at 50 °C. Concomitant to lid flexibility, there was an extension of accessible catalytic triad surface area resulting in improved catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzyme.

  12. Modification of Martini force field for molecular dynamics simulation of hydrophobic charge induction chromatography of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2011-06-01

    Modeling, especially the force field, is crucial for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In order for more accurate description of adsorption and desorption behaviors of lysozyme in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC), the Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field has been modified based on the statistical analysis and comparison of an all-atom (AA) force field, GROMOS96 43A1, and the Martini force field. The parameters describing the protein-adsorbent interactions have been adjusted to avoid too strong and unrealistic adsorption of lysozyme on the agarose matrix and HCIC ligands. It is found that the adsorption and desorption behaviors monitored using the modified Martini force field and MD simulation are consistent with previous simulation results with 46-bead β-barrel model protein. Repeated adjustment of both protein position and orientation is necessary to generate enough contacts for a stable adsorption. After reducing the pH in the mobile phase, the lysozyme-ligand electrostatic repulsion leads to protein desorption. In the adsorption process, little conformational transition of lysozyme is observed due to its stable structure, which is in line with previous experimental observations. So, it is concluded that after appropriate modification, the Martini force field can be used to examine the HCIC process of lysozyme. The modification strategy has thus extended the applicability of the Martini force field to protein chromatography, and it is expected to facilitate studies of exploring the molecular details in adsorption chromatography of proteins.

  13. Orlando C. Kirton, MD, FACS, FCCM, FCCP.

    PubMed Central

    Pyrtek, Ludwig J.

    2007-01-01

    The chair is named for Ludwig J. Pyrtek, MD, an esteemed surgeon at Hartford Hospital, who was devoted to the care of his patients and was an outstanding educator within his chosen field. A unique aspect of the chair is that its income is not used to support the salary of the director but is used to enhance the education activities of the department, such as the purchasing of state-of-the-art teaching devices, support of surgical resident research activities, educational travel for residents and honoraria for nationally/internationally known clinicians/scientists to speak at grand rounds. Images p1420-a PMID:18229781

  14. Orlando C. Kirton, MD, FACS, FCCM, FCCP.

    PubMed

    Pyrtek, Ludwig J

    2007-12-01

    The chair is named for Ludwig J. Pyrtek, MD, an esteemed surgeon at Hartford Hospital, who was devoted to the care of his patients and was an outstanding educator within his chosen field. A unique aspect of the chair is that its income is not used to support the salary of the director but is used to enhance the education activities of the department, such as the purchasing of state-of-the-art teaching devices, support of surgical resident research activities, educational travel for residents and honoraria for nationally/internationally known clinicians/scientists to speak at grand rounds.

  15. Geometry and Excitation Energy Fluctuations of NMA in Aqueous Solution with CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS, and GROMOS Force Fields: Implications for Protein Ultraviolet Spectra Simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Yu, Haibo; Zhuang, Wei; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-02-04

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for N-methylamide (NMA) in water at 300 K with different force fields. Compared to the three all-atom force fields (CHARMM22, AMBER03, and OPLS-AA), the united-atom force field (GROMOS96) predicts a broader distribution of the peptide OCNH dehedral angle. A map constructed by fitting the npi* and pipi* transition energies as quadratic functions of the NMA geometric variables is used to simulate the excitation energy fluctuations. GROMOS96 predicts blue-shifted npi* and pipi* energies and stronger fluctuations compared to the other three force fields, which indicates that different force fields may predict different spectral lineshapes for proteins.

  16. Geometry and excitation energy fluctuations of NMA in aqueous solution with CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS, and GROMOS force fields: Implications for protein ultraviolet spectra simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenyu; Yu, Haibo; Zhuang, Wei; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for N-methylacetamide (NMA) in water at 300 K with different force fields. Compared to the three all-atom force fields (CHARMM22, AMBER03, and OPLS-AA), the united-atom force field (GROMOS96) predicts a broader distribution of the peptide OCNH dehedral angle. A map constructed by fitting the nπ∗ and ππ∗ transition energies as quadratic functions of the NMA geometric variables is used to simulate the excitation energy fluctuations. GROMOS96 predicts blue shifted nπ∗ and ππ∗ energies and stronger fluctuations compared to the other three force fields, which indicates that different force fields may predict different spectral lineshapes for proteins.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of cyclosporin A: The crystal structure and dynamic modelling of a structure in apolar solution based on NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, J.; Kessler, H.; Kaptein, R.; van Gunsteren, W. F.

    1987-10-01

    The conformation of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CPA), both in apolar solution and in crystalline state, has been studied by computer simulation techniques. Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed: one modelling the crystal structure and two modelling the structure in apolar solution, using a restrained MD approach in which data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are taken into account. The simulation of the crystalline state (MDC) concerns a system of 4 unit cells containing 16 cyclosporin A molecules and 22 water molecules, which is simulated using crystalline periodic boundary conditions. The simulations modelling the apolar solvent conformation (MDS) concern one isolated cyclosporin A molecule. In these simulations an extra term in the interatomic potential function is used, which forces the molecule to satisfy a set of 57 atom-atom distance constraints originating from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) obtained from NMR spectroscopy and one distance constraint deduced from IR spectroscopy. From a comparison of the results of the crystal simulation to those of the X-ray experiment in terms of structure, atomic fluctuations, hydrogen bond pattern, etc., it is concluded that the force field that is used yields an adequate representation of crystalline cyclosporin A. Secondly, it is shown that the dynamic modelling technique that is used to obtain a structure in a polar solution from NMR distance information works well. Starting from initial conformations which have a root mean square difference of 0.14 nm both distance restrained MD simulations converge to the same final solution structure. A comparison of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the one in apolar solution shows that there are significant differences. The overall difference in atomic positions is 0.09 nm for the Cx atoms and 0.17 nm for all atoms. In apolar solution, the molecule is slightly more bent and the side chains of 1

  18. Ab Initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on the Deamination Reaction by Cytidine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-08-23

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to the hydrolytic deamination of cytidine by cytidine deaminase, which is an essential step of the activation process of the anticancer drug inside the human body. The direct MD simulations were performed for the realistic model of cytidine deaminase calculating the energy and its gradient by the ab initio ONIOM method on the fly. The ONIOM-MD calculations including the thermal motion show that the neighboring amino acid residue is an important factor of the environmental effects and significantly affects not only the geometry and energy of the substrate trapped in the pocket of the active site but also the elementary step of the catalytic reaction. We successfully simulate the second half of the catalytic cycle, which has been considered to involve the rate-determining step, and reveal that the rate-determing step is the release of the NH3 molecule. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  19. Interview with Steven J. Levin, MD.

    PubMed

    Levin, S J

    1997-11-01

    Steven J. Levin, MD, is the only full-time physician at St. John's Health Center in New Brunswick. The Center provides primary medical services to 3,000 uninsured people and has a waiting list of almost 600 more. Levin's workdays are consumed by procuring free medications, treating patients who are poor and possibly homeless, arranging specialty consults, seeking out grants and equipment donations, and training medical students. The family physician also helped create a statefunded sexually transmitted diseases clinic, a home safety program for inner-city children, a Latino diabetes support group, and a computer database to track indigent patients in need of immunizations and other followup services. St. John's is run under an arrangement with Catholic Charities, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and St. Peter's Medical Center.

  20. Ashley W. Oughterson, MD: Surgeon, Soldier, Leader

    PubMed Central

    Kunstman, John W.; Longo, Walter E.

    2015-01-01

    Ashley W. Oughterson, MD, (1895-1956) was a longtime faculty surgeon at Yale University. He performed some of the earliest pancreatic resections in the United States. During World War II, Colonel Oughterson was the primary “Surgical Consultant” in the South Pacific and present at nearly every major battle. His meticulously kept diary is regarded as the foremost source detailing wartime surgical care. Colonel Oughterson led the initial Army team to survey Hiroshima and Nagasaki following the nuclear attacks. Thoughout his academic career at Yale, Oughterson was a key leader in several medical and surgical societies. As scientific director of the American Cancer Society, Oughterson lectured widely and guided research priorities in oncology following World War II. Oughterson also authored numerous benchmark papers in surgical oncology that continue to be cited today. These extensive contributions are examined here and demonstrate the wide-ranging impact Oughterson exerted during a formative period of American surgery. PMID:26029018

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation on adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lu; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene (Py-PE) onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that solvent polarity and pyrene group are two critical factors in the Py-PE decoration on ultrathin SWNT. Combined MD simulations with free energy calculations, our results indicate that larger solvent polarity can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy, but contributes little to the interaction energy, moreover, larger SWNT diameter can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy but lead to the increasing of the interaction energy. In polar organic solvent (N, N-Dimethylacetamide), the pyrene group plays a key role in the adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, not only facilitates the spontaneous adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, but also helps to form compact structure between themselves in the final adsorption states. While in aqueous solution, pyrene group no longer works as an anchor, but still affects a lot to the final adsorption conformation. Our present work provides detailed theoretical clue to understand the noncovalent interaction between aromatic segment appended polymer and ultrathin SWNT, and helps to explore the potential application of ultrathin SWNT in the fields of hybrid material, biomedical and electronic materials.

  2. Wettability of graphitic-carbon and silicon surfaces: MD modeling and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2015-07-28

    The wettability of graphitic carbon and silicon surfaces was numerically and theoretically investigated. A multi-response method has been developed for the analysis of conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of droplets wettability. The contact angle and indicators of the quality of the computations are tracked as a function of the data sets analyzed over time. This method of analysis allows accurate calculations of the contact angle obtained from the MD simulations. Analytical models were also developed for the calculation of the work of adhesion using the mean-field theory, accounting for the interfacial entropy changes. A calibration method is proposed to provide better predictions of the respective contact angles under different solid-liquid interaction potentials. Estimations of the binding energy between a water monomer and graphite match those previously reported. In addition, a breakdown in the relationship between the binding energy and the contact angle was observed. The macroscopic contact angles obtained from the MD simulations were found to match those predicted by the mean-field model for graphite under different wettability conditions, as well as the contact angles of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces. Finally, an assessment of the effect of the Lennard-Jones cutoff radius was conducted to provide guidelines for future comparisons between numerical simulations and analytical models of wettability.

  3. CHARMM-GUI 10 years for biomolecular modeling and simulation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhwan; Cheng, Xi; Lee, Jumin; Kim, Seonghoon; Park, Sang-Jun; Patel, Dhilon S; Beaven, Andrew H; Lee, Kyu Il; Rui, Huan; Park, Soohyung; Lee, Hui Sun; Roux, Benoît; MacKerell, Alexander D; Klauda, Jeffrey B; Qi, Yifei; Im, Wonpil

    2016-11-14

    CHARMM-GUI, http://www.charmm-gui.org, is a web-based graphical user interface that prepares complex biomolecular systems for molecular simulations. CHARMM-GUI creates input files for a number of programs including CHARMM, NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, GENESIS, LAMMPS, Desmond, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. Since its original development in 2006, CHARMM-GUI has been widely adopted for various purposes and now contains a number of different modules designed to set up a broad range of simulations: (1) PDB Reader & Manipulator, Glycan Reader, and Ligand Reader & Modeler for reading and modifying molecules; (2) Quick MD Simulator, Membrane Builder, Nanodisc Builder, HMMM Builder, Monolayer Builder, Micelle Builder, and Hex Phase Builder for building all-atom simulation systems in various environments; (3) PACE CG Builder and Martini Maker for building coarse-grained simulation systems; (4) DEER Facilitator and MDFF/xMDFF Utilizer for experimentally guided simulations; (5) Implicit Solvent Modeler, PBEQ-Solver, and GCMC/BD Ion Simulator for implicit solvent related calculations; (6) Ligand Binder for ligand solvation and binding free energy simulations; and (7) Drude Prepper for preparation of simulations with the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field. Recently, new modules have been integrated into CHARMM-GUI, such as Glycolipid Modeler for generation of various glycolipid structures, and LPS Modeler for generation of lipopolysaccharide structures from various Gram-negative bacteria. These new features together with existing modules are expected to facilitate advanced molecular modeling and simulation thereby leading to an improved understanding of the structure and dynamics of complex biomolecular systems. Here, we briefly review these capabilities and discuss potential future directions in the CHARMM-GUI development project. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 77 FR 24838 - Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD AGENCY... waters of the Magothy River, in Sillery Bay, Maryland. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the... ``Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 11423). We received...

  5. Leroy D Vandam, MD: an anesthesia journey.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rafael A

    2005-08-01

    Leroy D Vandam, MD was a remarkable man--an intricate amalgamation of an artist, scientist, and physician. He was a bastion of medical historical knowledge. Dr Vandam became a most influential anesthesiologist, some say, a giant. He was an example of someone who, with resolve, overcame adversity. His artwork is displayed in countless places, and several of his paintings form part of the Wood Library Museum Heritage Series. Dr Vandam was first a surgeon, but he abandoned surgery and pursued a career in anesthesiology under the leadership of Robert Dripps. He completed his residency training at the University of Pennsylvania and joined its staff in 1949. When he arrived at Brigham and Women's Hospital in the 1950s as director of anesthesia, he embarked on one of the most illustrious careers in American anesthesiology. Dr Vandam published more than 250 original articles, chapters, abstracts, and other reports on a wide variety of subjects including history, art, and pharmacology. His classic article on the complications of neuroaxial blocks is a seminal work in anesthesiology. This article describes how an anesthesiologist who shared an interest with Dr Vandam in the history of anesthesiology came to produce a movie based on his career, the evolution of anesthesia equipment, and the transformation of our specialty.

  6. The JIM interview. David Korn, MD.

    PubMed

    Korn, D

    1995-04-01

    When David Korn, MD, was named dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine on October 9, 1984, he assumed leadership of a world class research institution. Stanford was at the forefront of medicine in the areas of transplantation and oncology, and the steady influx of privately insured patients had generated a net operating surplus of $17 million in that year alone. However, in the same issue of the Stanford University Hospital newsletter which announced the selection of Korn as Dean, a small article appeared on a new prospective payment system based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs). The article stated that the new system had begun smoothly, though some payments for cost outliers had been delayed. Other cost containment measures soon followed, most notably the implementation of managed care, and by 1990, Stanford was $14 million in the red. Buffeted by changes in medical reimbursement, competition with less costly hospitals, and a nasty squabble with Congress over indirect research costs, Stanford has been on the frontlines of a struggle now confronting many academic medical centers. After successfully consolidating the university's clinical services into a unified Stanford Health System, Korn announced that he would be stepping down as Dean on April 1. Interviewed in his office in Palo Alto, Korn reflected on the difficulties of dealing with managed care, the current financial state of the institution, and what Stanford's experience may predict for other academic medical centers.

  7. Alkyl Chain Length and Temperature Effects on Structural Properties of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids: A Combined Atomistic Simulation and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Guo, Jianchang; Anovitz, Lawrence; Rother, Gernot; Shaw, Robert W.; Hillesheim, Patrick C.; Dai, Sheng; Baker, Gary A.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2011-12-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMPy][Tf₂N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) were conducted using an all-atom model. Radial distribution functions (RDF) were computed and structure functions were generated to compare with new X-ray scattering experimental results, reported herein. The scattering peaks in the structure functions generally shift to lower Q values with increased temperature for all the liquids in this series. However, the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the longer alkyl chain liquids displays a marked shift to higher Q values with increasing temperature. Alkyl chain-dependent ordering of the polar groups and increased tail aggregation with increasing alkyl chain length were observed in the partial pair correlation functions and the structure functions. The reasons for the observed alkyl chain-dependent phenomena and temperature effects were explored.

  8. Alkyl Chain Length and Temperature Effects on Structural Properties of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids: A Combined Atomistic Simulation and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Guo, Jianchang; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Rother, Gernot; Shaw, Robert W; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Baker, Gary A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium 12 bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMPy][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) were conducted 13 using an all-atom model. Radial distribution functions (RDF) were computed and structure 14 functions were generated to compare with new X-ray scattering experimental results, 15 reported herein. The scattering peaks in the structure functions generally shift to lower Q 16 values with increased temperature for all the liquids in this series. However, the first sharp 17 diffraction peak (FSDP) in the longer alkyl chain liquids displays a marked shift to higher Q 18 values with increasing temperature. Alkyl chain-dependent ordering of the polar groups and 19 increased tail aggregation with increasing alkyl chain length were observed in the partial pair 20 correlation functions and the structure functions. The reasons for the observed alkyl chain- 21 dependent phenomena and temperature effects were explored.

  9. Theoretical investigation of loratadine reactivity in order to understand its degradation properties: DFT and MD study.

    PubMed

    Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J; Abramović, Biljana F

    2016-10-01

    Antihistamines are frequently used pharmaceuticals that treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Loratadine (LOR) is an active component of the second generation of selective antihistaminic pharmaceutical usually known as Claritin. Frequent usage of this type of pharmaceuticals imposes the need for understanding their fundamental reactive properties. In this study we have theoretically investigated reactive properties of LOR using both density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. DFT study is used for collecting information related to the molecule stability, structure, frontier molecular orbitals, quantum molecular descriptors, charge distribution, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, charge polarization, and local reactivity properties according to average local ionization energy surfaces. Based on these results, N24 atom of pyridine ring and oxygen atom O1 were identified with nucleophilic nature. In order to collect the information necessary for the proposition of degradation compounds we also calculated bond dissociation energies (BDE) for hydrogen abstraction and single acyclic bonds as well. According to BDE, the oxidation is likely to occur in the piperidine and cycloheptane rings. MD simulations were used in order to understand the interactions with water through radial distribution functions (RDF). Based on RDFs the most important interactions with solvent are determined for carbon atom C5, chlorine atom Cl15, and oxygen atom O1. Collected results based on DFT calculations and MD simulations provided information important for suggestion of possible degradation compounds. Covalent and noncovalent interactions between LOR and (•)OH have also been investigated.

  10. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2016-05-24

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively char- acterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight in understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  11. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2016-05-01

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however, the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively characterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight into understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  12. 75 FR 12464 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-11 and MD-11F Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD- 11 and MD-11F Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Management, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, MC D800-0019, Long Beach, California 90846- 0001; telephone 206-544-5000.... The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new AD: McDonnell Douglas Corporation: Docket...

  13. MD-1324 and MD-1324A 5kHz Modem Overview, Issues and Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Contactor providing TSN support on DMR , MD-1324 1 Mar 2011 "Sustaining the Tactical Edge through reliable C4ISR UHF SATCOM Support" Distribution...UHF SATCOM Antenna and an External HPA / Up Converter (like a UHF SATCOM AN/WSC-3, ARC-210, or DMR RFS). ▼ Supports 5kHz and 25kHz DAMA and Non...Low cost light weight comms to manpac radio users and low data rate reliable comms to disadvantaged users. ▼ Simultaneously supports two

  14. Molecular Dynamics Fingerprints (MDFP): Machine-Learning from MD Data to Predict Free-Energy Differences.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina

    2017-04-03

    While the use of machine-learning (ML) techniques is well established in cheminformatics for the prediction of physicochemical properties and binding affinities, the training of ML models based on data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations remains largely unexplored. Here, we present a fingerprint termed MDFP which is constructed from the distributions of properties such as potential-energy components, radius of gyration and solvent-accessible surface area extracted from MD simulations. The corresponding fingerprint elements are the first two statistical moments of the distributions and the median. By considering not only the average but also the spread of the distribution in the fingerprint, some degree of entropic information is encoded. Short MD simulations of the molecules in water (and in vacuum) are used to generate the MDFP. These are further combined with simple counts based on the 2D structure of the molecules into MDFP+. The resulting information-rich MDFP+ are used to train ML models for the prediction of solvation free energies in five different solvents (water, octanol, chloroform, hexadecane and cyclohexane) as well as partition coefficients in octanol/water, hexadecane/water and cyclohexane/water. The approach is easy to implement and computationally relatively inexpensive. Yet, it performs similarly well compared to more rigorous MD-based free-energy methods such as free-energy pertur- bation (FEP) as well as end-state methods such as linear interaction energy (LIE), the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) and the SMx family of solvation models.

  15. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Sewell, Thomas D; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-14

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock.

  16. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-14

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock.

  17. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment.

  18. Michael S. Brown, MD and Joseph L. Goldstein, MD. 1985 Nobel laureates in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-02-01

    When Michael S. Brown, MD and Joseph L. Goldstein, MD first met as interns at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1966, they could hardly have imagined that their careers would continue to be intertwined some 30 years later. It was shortly following their arrival as clinical associates at the National Institutes of Health in 1968 that the pair developed an interest in abnormalities of cholesterol metabolism. Bolstered by epidemiologic data that showed elevated cholesterol levels in many patients with myocardial infarction, Brown and Goldstein, who relocated to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 1972, began a search for receptors important in cholesterol homeostasis. These studies, performed in their early stages while juggling clinical duties at Parkland Hospital, culminated in a series of scientific achievements which merited among other honors the Hazen Award in 1982, the Lasker Award in 1985, and the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1985. Today, as Regental Professors of the University of Texas, Brown and Goldstein head a laboratory group which continues to test the cutting edge of medical research. Although impressed with the pace of technological advances in biology, the declining role of clinically oriented physicians in biomedical research troubles the pair. Interviewed in their library in Dallas, Brown and Goldstein spoke about the complicated balance of science, medicine, and education necessary to produce another generation of successful investigators.

  19. Preparing MD-PhD students for clinical rotations: navigating the interface between PhD and MD training.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Charles; Insel, Paul A

    2013-06-01

    Many aspects of MD-PhD training are not optimally designed to prepare students for their future roles as translational clinician-scientists. The transition between PhD research efforts and clinical rotations is one hurdle that must be overcome. MD-PhD students have deficits in clinical skills compared with those of their MD-only colleagues at the time of this transition. Reimmersion programs (RPs) targeted to MD-PhD students have the potential to help them navigate this transition.The authors draw on their experience creating and implementing an RP that incorporates multiple types of activities (clinical exam review, objective structured clinical examination, and supervised practice in patient care settings) designed to enhance the participants' skills and readiness for clinical efforts. On the basis of this experience, they note that MD-PhD students' time away from the clinical environment negatively affects their clinical skills, causing them to feel underprepared for clinical rotations. The authors argue that participation in an RP can help students feel more comfortable speaking with and examining patients and decrease their anxiety regarding clinical encounters. The authors propose that RPs can have positive outcomes for improving the transition from PhD to clinical MD training in dual-degree programs. Identifying and addressing this and other transitions need to be considered to improve the educational experience of MD-PhD students.

  20. [Photodensitometry: microdensitometry (MD): digital image processing method (DIP)].

    PubMed

    Ohama, K; Sanada, M; Nakagawa, H

    1994-09-01

    The principles of microdensitometry (MD) and digital image processing method (DIP), as well as the application of these methods to measure bone mineral density in clinical practice, were mentioned in the report. MD and DIP assess bone mineral content and bone mineral density by analyzing relative contrast of the metacarpus II on X-ray image. However, the parameters obtained by these methods have been reported to be closely related to lumber vertebral bone mineral density and whole-body bone mineral content as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Being easy to use, MD and DIP are adequate for the screening of osteoporosis. Once any reduction in bone mineral content or bone mineral density is shown by MD or DIP, it is recommendable to measure bone mineral density of vertebrae and femoral neck by DXA.

  1. University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts & History Home Shared Governance Committee Institutional Profile Moon Shots Program Joint Commission Survey Who Was MD ... ORBIT Proteomics Translational Research Accelerator B-Cell Lymphoma Moon Shot™ The B-Cell Lymphoma Moon Shot is ...

  2. Eastman Specialties Corporation – Chestertown MD - MDD001890060

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA is announcing its proposed decision of Corrective Action Complete with Controls under the RCRA, for the Eastman Specialties Corporation Facility EPA ID: MDD001890060, located in Chestertown MD.

  3. Powercon Corp. settles hazardous waste violations at Severn, Md. facility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (November 19, 2015) - Powercon Corporation has agreed to pay a $40,000 penalty to settle alleged violations of hazardous waste regulations at its manufacturing facility in Severn, Md., the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today.

  4. RadNet Air Data From Baltimore, MD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Baltimore, MD from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  5. The Construction and Validation of All-Atom Bulk-Phase Models of Amorphous Polymers Using the TIGER2/TIGER3 Empirical Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, Sanjeeva; Latour, Robert A

    2011-07-12

    A new empirical sampling method termed "temperature intervals with global exchange of replicas and reduced radii" (TIGER3) is presented and demonstrated to efficiently equilibrate entangled long-chain molecular systems such as amorphous polymers. The TIGER3 algorithm is a replica exchange method in which simulations are run in parallel over a range of temperature levels at and above a designated baseline temperature. The replicas sampled at temperature levels above the baseline are run through a series of cycles with each cycle containing four stages - heating, sampling, quenching, and temperature level reassignment. The method allows chain segments to pass through one another at elevated temperature levels during the sampling stage by reducing the van der Waals radii of the atoms, thus eliminating chain entanglement problems. Atomic radii are then returned to their regular values and re-equilibrated at elevated temperature prior to quenching to the baseline temperature. Following quenching, replicas are compared using a Metropolis Monte Carlo exchange process for the construction of an approximate Boltzmann-weighted ensemble of states and then reassigned to the elevated temperature levels for additional sampling. Further system equilibration is performed by periodic implementation of the previously developed TIGER2 algorithm between cycles of TIGER3, which applies thermal cycling without radii reduction. When coupled with a coarse-grained modeling approach, the combined TIGER2/TIGER3 algorithm yields fast equilibration of bulk-phase models of amorphous polymer, even for polymers with complex, highly branched structures. The developed method was tested by modeling the polyethylene melt. The calculated properties of chain conformation and chain segment packing agreed well with published data. The method was also applied to generate equilibrated structural models of three increasingly complex amorphous polymer systems: poly(methyl methacrylate), poly

  6. Distinguishing native conformations of proteins from decoys with an effective free energy estimator based on the OPLS all-atom force field and the Surface Generalized Born solvent model.

    PubMed

    Felts, Anthony K; Gallicchio, Emilio; Wallqvist, Anders; Levy, Ronald M

    2002-08-01

    Protein decoy data sets provide a benchmark for testing scoring functions designed for fold recognition and protein homology modeling problems. It is commonly believed that statistical potentials based on reduced atomic models are better able to discriminate native-like from misfolded decoys than scoring functions based on more detailed molecular mechanics models. Recent benchmark tests on small data sets, however, suggest otherwise. In this work, we report the results of extensive decoy detection tests using an effective free energy function based on the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field and the Surface Generalized Born (SGB) model for the solvent electrostatic effects. The OPLS-AA/SGB effective free energy is used as a scoring function to detect native protein folds among a total of 48,832 decoys for 32 different proteins from Park and Levitt's 4-state-reduced, Levitt's local-minima, Baker's ROSETTA all-atom, and Skolnick's decoy sets. Solvent electrostatic effects are included through the Surface Generalized Born (SGB) model. All structures are locally minimized without restraints. From an analysis of the individual energy components of the OPLS-AA/SGB energy function for the native and the best-ranked decoy, it is determined that a balance of the terms of the potential is responsible for the minimized energies that most successfully distinguish the native from the misfolded conformations. Different combinations of individual energy terms provide less discrimination than the total energy. The results are consistent with observations that all-atom molecular potentials coupled with intermediate level solvent dielectric models are competitive with knowledge-based potentials for decoy detection and protein modeling problems such as fold recognition and homology modeling.

  7. Simulating protein dynamics: Novel methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishal, V.

    This Ph.D dissertation describes several methodological advances in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods like Markov State Models can be used effectively in combination with distributed computing to obtain long time scale behavior from an ensemble of short simulations. Advanced computing architectures like Graphics Processors can be used to greatly extend the scope of MD. Applications of MD techniques to problems like Alzheimer's Disease and fundamental questions in protein dynamics are described.

  8. MdSOS2L1 forms a complex with MdMYB1 to control vacuolar pH by transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in apples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cui-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Yan; Sun, Mei-Hong; Hu, Da-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar pH is important and involves in many different physiological processes in plants. A recent paper published in Plant Physiology reveals that MdMYB1 regulates vacuolar pH by directly transcriptionally regulating proton pump genes and malate transporters genes, such as V-ATPase subunit gene MdVHA-B1. Here, we found that MdSOS2L1 in vitro did not directly interact with MdMYB1, however, in vivo formed a complex with MdMYB1 in the nucleus to regulate MdVHA-B1-mediated vacuolar acidification. This finding shed light on the role of MdSOS2L1 in transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in addition to its post-modified function in apples.

  9. MdSOS2L1 forms a complex with MdMYB1 to control vacuolar pH by transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in apples

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cui-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Yan; Sun, Mei-Hong; Hu, Da-Gang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vacuolar pH is important and involves in many different physiological processes in plants. A recent paper published in Plant Physiology reveals that MdMYB1 regulates vacuolar pH by directly transcriptionally regulating proton pump genes and malate transporters genes, such as V-ATPase subunit gene MdVHA-B1. Here, we found that MdSOS2L1 in vitro did not directly interact with MdMYB1, however, in vivo formed a complex with MdMYB1 in the nucleus to regulate MdVHA-B1-mediated vacuolar acidification. This finding shed light on the role of MdSOS2L1 in transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in addition to its post-modified function in apples. PMID:26910596

  10. Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA -Annual Report FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Deter, Dean D.

    2015-10-01

    There are many areas of MD and HD vehicles that can be improved by new technologies and optimized control strategies. Component optimization and idle reduction need to be addressed, this is best done by a two part approach that includes selecting the best component technology, and/or architecture, and optimized controls that are vehicle focused. While this is a common focus in the light duty industry it has been gaining momentum in the MD and HD market as the market gets more competitive and the regulations become more stringent. When looking into systems optimization and idle reduction technologies, affected vehicle systems must first be considered, and if possible included in the new architecture to get the most benefit out of these new capabilities. Typically, when looking into idle reduction or component optimization for MD/HD, the vehicle s accessories become a prime candidate for electrification or hybridization. While this has already been studied on light duty vehicles (especially on hybrids and electric vehicles) it has not made any head way or market penetration in most MD and HD applications. If hybrids and electric MD and HD vehicles begin to break into the market this would be a necessary step into the ability to make those vehicles successful by allowing for independent, optimized operation separate from the engine.

  11. MD Family Medicine - Calicut experience: History is made here

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Government Medical College, Calicut, Kerala - the first medical college in India to start Doctor of Medicine (MD) in family medicine as a postgraduate course. This was in the year 2012. Till date, this is the only medical college to have MD Family Medicine program in India. The college was allowed two MD Family Medicine seats per year by the Medical Council of India, and this is a 3 year course. The first batch of MD Family Medicine students has passed out from the Government Medical College, Calicut in July 2015. In this article, the author, who has been working as an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine, ever since the department started in the year 2012, shares her experiences in setting up the department, its functioning and the achievement of bringing out the first batch of successful MD Family Medicine specialists. Another laurel, of which the institution is proud of, is that they were able to incorporate family medicine teaching program in the MBBS curriculum. A brief introduction about Government Medical College, Calicut, is also given. PMID:27843820

  12. 3MdB: the Mexican Million Models database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.

    2014-10-01

    The 3MdB is an original effort to construct a large multipurpose database of photoionization models. This is a more modern version of a previous attempt based on Cloudy3D and IDL tools. It is accessed by MySQL requests. The models are obtained using the well known and widely used Cloudy photoionization code (Ferland et al, 2013). The database is aimed to host grids of models with different references to identify each project and to facilitate the extraction of the desired data. We present here a description of the way the database is managed and some of the projects that use 3MdB. Anybody can ask for a grid to be run and stored in 3MdB, to increase the visibility of the grid and the potential side applications of it.

  13. Apple MdACS6 Regulates Ethylene Biosynthesis During Fruit Development Involving Ethylene-Responsive Factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tan, Dongmei; Liu, Zhi; Jiang, Zhongyu; Wei, Yun; Zhang, Lichao; Li, Xinyue; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Aide

    2015-10-01

    Ethylene biosynthesis in plants involves different 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) genes. The regulation of each ACS gene during fruit development is unclear. Here, we characterized another apple (Malus×domestica) ACS gene, MdACS6. The transcript of MdACS6 was observed not only in fruits but also in other tissues. During fruit development, MdACS6 was initiated at a much earlier stage, whereas MdACS3a and MdACS1 began to be expressed at 35 d before harvest and immediateley after harvest, respectively. Moreover, the enzyme activity of MdACS6 was significantly lower than that of MdACS3a and MdACS1, accounting for the low ethylene biosynthesis in young fruits. Overexpression of MdACS6 (MdACS6-OE) by transient assay in apple showed enhanced ethylene production, and MdACS3a was induced in MdACS6-OE fruits but not in control fruits. In MdACS6 apple fruits silenced by the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system (MdACS6-AN), neither ethylene production nor MdACS3a transcript was detectable. In order to explore the mechanism through which MdACS3a was induced in MdACS6-OE fruits, we investigated the expression of apple ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) genes. The results showed that the expression of MdERF2 was induced in MdACS6-OE fruits and inhibited in MdACS6-AN fruits. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that MdERF2 protein could bind to the promoter of MdACS3a. Moreover, down-regulation of MdERF2 in apple flesh callus led to a decrease of MdACS3a expression, demonstrating the regulation of MdERF2 on MdACS3a. The mechanism through which MdACS6 regulates the action of MdACS3a was discussed.

  14. Multimillion Atom Simulations of Nanoenergetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    mechanisms of detonation of nanostructured materials consisting of Al nanoparticles encapsulated in nanophase RDX and oxidizers. Quantum ...adaptive hierarchical quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework, which invokes higher accuracy simulations only when and...scales of quantum -mechanically accurate and well validated, chemically reactive atomistic simulations—1.72 billion-atom reactive MD and 1.68 trillion

  15. Molecular energetics in the capsomere of virus-like particle revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2013-05-09

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly organized nanoparticles that have great potential in vaccinology, gene therapy, drug delivery, and materials science. However, the application of VLPs is hindered by obstacles in their design and production due to low efficiency of self-assembly. In the present study, all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method are utilized to examine the molecular interactions in the capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP. It is found that both low ionic strength and the intracapsomere disulfide bonds are favorable for maintaining a stable capsomere. Simulation results examining the effects of solution conditions on the stabilization of a capsomere were verified by calorimetry experiments. Simulation results of free energy decomposition indicate that hydrophobic interaction is favorable for the formation of a capsomere, whereas electrostatic interaction is unfavorable. With increasing ionic strength, the dominant interaction for the stabilization of a capsomere changes from hydrophobic to electrostatic. By comprehensive analyses, the key amino acid residues (hot spots) in VP1 protein aiding formation of a capsomere in different solution conditions have been identified. These results provide molecular insights into the stabilization of building blocks for VLP and are expected to have implications in their partitioning between the correct and off-pathway reactions in VLP assembly.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Selectivity of a Silica Polymer for Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Concu, Riccardo; Cordeiro, M. Natalia D. S.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the sol-gel polycondensation technique has been increasingly employed with great success as an alternative approach to the preparation of molecularly imprinted materials (MIMs). The main aim of this study was to study, through a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the selectivity of an imprinted silica xerogel towards a new template—the (±)-2-(P-Isobutylphenyl) propionic acid (Ibuprofen, IBU). We have previously demonstrated the affinity of this silica xerogel toward a similar molecule. In the present study, we simulated the imprinting process occurring in a sol-gel mixture using the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA) force field, in order to evaluate the selectivity of this xerogel for a template molecule. In addition, for the first time, we have developed and verified a new parameterisation for the Ibuprofen® based on the OPLS-AA framework. To evaluate the selectivity of the polymer, we have employed both the radial distribution functions, interaction energies and cluster analyses. PMID:27399685

  17. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  18. Screening for the Location of RNA using the Chloride Ion Distribution in Simulations of Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Daniel S D; van der Spoel, David

    2012-07-10

    The complete structure of the genomic material inside a virus capsid remains elusive, although a limited amount of symmetric nucleic acid can be resolved in the crystal structure of 17 icosahedral viruses. The negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA and DNA as well as the large positive charge of the interior surface of the virus capsids suggest that electrostatic complementarity is an important factor in the packaging of the genomes in these viruses. To test how much packing information is encoded by the electrostatic and steric envelope of the capsid interior, we performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of virus capsids with explicit water molecules and solvent ions. The model systems were two small plant viruses in which significant amounts of RNA has been observed by X-ray crystallography: satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV, 62% RNA visible) and satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV, 34% RNA visible). Simulations of half-capsids of these viruses with no RNA present revealed that the binding sites of RNA correlated well with regions populated by chloride ions, suggesting that it is possible to screen for the binding sites of nucleic acids by determining the equilibrium distribution of negative ions. By including the crystallographically resolved RNA in addition to ions, we predicted the localization of the unresolved RNA in the viruses. Both viruses showed a hot-spot for RNA binding at the 5-fold symmetry axis. The MD simulations were compared to predictions of the chloride density based on nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) calculations with mobile ions. Although the predictions are superficially similar, the PBE calculations overestimate the ion concentration close to the capsid surface and underestimate it far away, mainly because protein dynamics is not taken into account. Density maps from chloride screening can be used to aid in building atomic models of packaged virus genomes. Knowledge of the principles of

  19. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved-up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  20. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  1. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) in mitochondrial diseases (MD).

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Arpa, J; Santiago, S; Pérez-Conde, C; Gutiérrez-Molina, M; Campos, Y

    2004-01-01

    Conventional EMG, nerve conduction studies and SFEMG were performed in 18 patients with various phenotypes of MD. 14 cases showed findings consistent with mild myopathy, 2 patients signs of sensory-motor axonal neuropathy and 2 cases a mixture of myopathy and axonal neuropathy. Motor unit fiber density was mild increased in 8 out of 13 tested cases. Jitter was abnormal in 10 out of 18 tested patients. Jitter abnormalities were not related to myopathic or neurogenic features in the EMG study, and may be observed in muscles without clinical weakness. The results suggest the existence of neuromuscular transmission disturbances in patients with MD.

  2. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  3. Using collective variables to drive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorin, Giacomo; Klein, Michael L.; Hénin, Jérôme

    2013-12-01

    A software framework is introduced that facilitates the application of biasing algorithms to collective variables of the type commonly employed to drive massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The modular framework that is presented enables one to combine existing collective variables into new ones, and combine any chosen collective variable with available biasing methods. The latter include the classic time-dependent biases referred to as steered MD and targeted MD, the temperature-accelerated MD algorithm, as well as the adaptive free-energy biases called metadynamics and adaptive biasing force. The present modular software is extensible, and portable between commonly used MD simulation engines.

  4. MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 are involved in the regulation of the JA-induced biosynthesis of anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin in apples.

    PubMed

    An, Xiu-Hong; Tian, Yi; Chen, Ke-Qin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Dan-Dan; Xie, Xing-Bin; Cheng, Cun-Gang; Cong, Pei-Hua; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) are important secondary metabolites and beneficial to human health. Their biosynthesis is induced by jasmonate (JA) treatment and regulated by MYB transcription factors (TFs). However, which and how MYB TFs regulate this process is largely unknown in apple. In this study, MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 which were induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were functionally characterized. Overexpression of MdMYB9 or MdMYB11 promoted not only anthocyanin but also PA accumulation in apple calluses, and the accumulation was further enhanced by MeJA. Subsequently, yeast two-hybrid, pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that both MYB proteins interact with MdbHLH3. Moreover, Jasmonate ZIM-domain (MdJAZ) proteins interact with MdbHLH3. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR and yeast one-hybrid assays demonstrated that both MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 bind to the promoters of ANS, ANR and LAR, whereas MdbHLH3 is recruited to the promoters of MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 and regulates their transcription. In addition, transient expression assays indicated that overexpression of MdJAZ2 inhibits the recruitment of MdbHLH3 to the promoters of MdMYB9 and MdMYB11. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of how MeJA regulates anthocyanin and PA accumulation in apple.

  5. Delineating residues for haemolytic activities of snake venom cardiotoxin 1 from Naja naja as probed by molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro validations.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Biswajit; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2017-02-01

    Cardiotoxins (CTXs) are single polypeptide chain consisting of 59-62 amino acids with four disulfide bridges and globular proteins of simple β-sheet folds. The CTXs are one of principal toxic components causing haemolysis and damaging various cells and belong to three-finger toxin (TFT) superfamily of snake venoms. However, there is no natural or synthetic small molecular inhibitor to the protein toxins to date. In the present study, modes of interaction of cardiotoxin 1 (CTX1) from Indian cobra (Naja naja) with heterogeneous erythrocyte membrane (EM) model system have been extensively examined by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in near physiological conditions and comprehensive analyses of the MD data revealed two distinct principal regions ('head groove' and 'loop groove') of the protein toxin for establishing structural interactions with the EM system. Moreover, combined analyses of data from high-throughput virtual screening of NCI small molecular database, in vitro haemolytic assays for top-hits of the chemical compounds against crude venom of Naja naja and as well CTXs purified from the venom and pharmacokinetic examinations on the chemical compounds retarding haemolytic activities of CTXs suggested that Etidronic acid and Zoledronic acid are promising prototypic chemical inhibitors to CTXs of snake venoms.

  6. 76 FR 51887 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11,'' which consists of aerial practices, performance demonstrations and air shows, to be held over certain waters of the Patuxent River adjacent...

  7. 76 FR 36447 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... a temporary safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11'', which consists of aerial practices, performance demonstrations and air shows, to be held over certain waters of the Patuxent...

  8. 77 FR 64709 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ...), Model MD900 helicopters. The existing AD requires a visual inspection, and if necessary, an eddy current...-117, dated January 14, 2011 (SB). The SB specifies an initial 100-hour and recurring 300-hour visual... hub. (ii) If the lower hub is not replaced as a result of the visual inspection required by...

  9. 77 FR 11423 - Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD AGENCY... a safety zone in certain waters of the Magothy River, in Sillery Bay, Maryland. This safety zone is... water craft held in the Magothy River, in Sillery Bay, Maryland. The proposed rule is needed to...

  10. 75 FR 30747 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... to change the regulations that govern the operation of the Pennington Avenue Bridge across Curtis... Curtis Creek in Baltimore, MD. DATES: Comments and related material must reach the Coast Guard on...

  11. 77 FR 12476 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore..., across Curtis Creek, mile 1.0, at Baltimore, MD. This deviation allows the bridge to operate on...

  12. 75 FR 50707 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... operation of the Pennington Avenue Bridge, across Curtis Creek, mile 0.9, at Baltimore, MD. This deviation... vessels bound for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, as well as a significant amount of commercial...

  13. 75 FR 1705 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek... operation of the I695 Bridge across Curtis Creek, mile 0.9, at Baltimore, MD. The deviation is necessary to... section of Curtis Creek and the bridge will not be able to open in the event of an emergency. Coast...

  14. Stephen Baylin, M.D., Explains Genetics and Epigenetics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen Baylin, M.D., at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discusses the how alterations in the DNA code are deciphered in a combined effort with The Cancer Genome Atlas at the National Cancer Institute to decode the brain cancer genome.

  15. 76 FR 70528 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... the following areas as adversely affected by the disaster. Primary Counties: Baltimore, Harford....

  16. 76 FR 70527 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely affected by the disaster. Primary...

  17. Avery D. Weisman, M.D.: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 1993

    1993-01-01

    In this interview, Avery D. Weisman, M.D., distinguished contributor to study of human encounter with death, discusses personal and professional facets of his long and productive career. Includes review of his concepts of appropriate death and middle knowledge; and findings of Project Omega, clinical research study directed by Weisman for 18…

  18. Milestone report on MD potential development for uranium silicide

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jianguo; Zhang, Yongfeng; Hales, Jason Dean

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the interatomic potential development of triuranium-disilicide (U3Si2) for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The development is based on the Tersoff type potentials for single element U and Si. The Si potential is taken from the literature and a Tersoff type U potential is developed in this project. With the primary focus on the U3Si2 phase, some other U-Si systems such as U3Si are also included as a test of the transferability of the potentials for binary U-Si phases. Based on the potentials for unary U and Si, two sets of parameters for the binary U-Si system are developed using the Tersoff mixing rules and the cross-term fitting, respectively. The cross-term potential is found to give better results on the enthalpy of formation, lattice constants and elastic constants than those produced by the Tersoff mixing potential, with the reference data taken from either experiments or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In particular, the results on the formation enthalpy and lattice constants for the U3Si2 phase and lattice constants for the high temperature U3Si (h-U3Si) phase generated by the cross-term potential agree well with experimental data. Reasonable agreements are also reached on the elastic constants of U3Si2, on the formation enthalpy for the low temperature U3Si (m-U3Si) and h-U3Si phases, and on the lattice constants of m-U3Si phase. All these phases are predicted to be mechanically stable. The unary U potential is tested for three metallic U phases (α, β, γ). The potential is found capable to predict the cohesive energies well against experimental data for all three phases. It matches reasonably with previous experiments on the lattice constants and elastic constants of αU.

  19. Developing polarized protein-specific charges for protein dynamics: MD free energy calculation of pKa shifts for Asp26/Asp20 in thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Ji, Changge; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z H

    2008-08-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanical calculation of protein in solution is carried out to generate polarized protein-specific charge(s) (PPC) for molecular dynamics (MD) stimulation of protein. The quantum calculation of protein is made possible by developing a fragment-based quantum chemistry approach in combination with the implicit continuum solvent model. The computed electron density of protein is utilized to derive PPCs that represent the polarized electrostatic state of protein near the native structure. These PPCs are atom-centered like those in the standard force fields and are thus computationally attractive for molecular dynamics simulation of protein. Extensive MD simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and dynamics of thioredoxin. Our study shows that the dynamics of thioredoxin is stabilized by electronic polarization through explicit comparison between MD results using PPC and AMBER charges. In particular, MD free-energy calculation using PPCs accurately reproduced the experimental value of pK(a) shift for ionizable residue Asp(26) buried inside thioredoxin, whereas previous calculations using standard force fields overestimated pK(a) shift by twice as much. Accurate prediction of pK(a) shifts by rigorous MD free energy simulation for ionizable residues buried inside protein has been a significant challenge in computational biology for decades. This study presented strong evidence that electronic polarization of protein plays an important role in protein dynamics.

  20. Implicit Solvent Model for Million-Atom Atomistic Simulations: Insights into the Organization of 30-nm Chromatin Fiber.