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Sample records for all-atom md simulation

  1. Accelerating All-Atom MD Simulations of Lipids Using a Modified Virtual-Sites Technique.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Bastien; Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-12-01

    We present two new implementations of the virtual sites technique which completely suppresses the degrees of freedom of the hydrogen atoms in a lipid bilayer allowing for an increased time step of 5 fs in all-atom simulations of the CHARMM36 force field. One of our approaches uses the derivation of the virtual sites used in GROMACS while the other uses a new definition of the virtual sites of the CH2 groups. Our methods is tested on a DPPC (no unsaturated chain), a POPC (one unsaturated chain), and a DOPC (two unsaturated chains) lipid bilayers. We calculate various physical properties of the membrane of our simulations with and without virtual sites and explain the differences and similarity observed. The best agreements are obtained for the GROMACS original virtual sites on the DOPC bilayer where we get an area per lipid of 67.3 ± 0.3 Å(2) without virtual sites and 67.6 ± 0.3 Å(2) with virtual sites. In conclusion the virtual-sites technique on lipid membranes is a powerful simulation tool, but it should be used with care. The procedure can be applied to other force fields and lipids in a straightforward manner.

  2. All-atom Simulation of Amyloid Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Alred, Erik J.; Bernhardt, Nathan A.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    Molecular simulations are now commonly used to complement experiments in the investigation of amyloid formation and their role in human diseases. While various simulations based on enhanced sampling techniques are used in amyloid formation simulations, this article will focus on those using standard atomistic simulations to evaluate the stability of fibril models. Such studies explore the limitations that arise from the choice of force field or polymorphism; and explore the stability of in vivo and in vitro forms of Aβ fibril aggregates, and the role of heterologous seeding as a link between different amyloid diseases.

  3. Coupling all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of ions in water with Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ions (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Cl−) in aqueous solutions are investigated. Water is described using the SPC/E model. A stochastic coarse-grained description for ion behaviour is presented and parametrized using MD simulations. It is given as a system of coupled stochastic and ordinary differential equations, describing the ion position, velocity and acceleration. The stochastic coarse-grained model provides an intermediate description between all-atom MD simulations and Brownian dynamics (BD) models. It is used to develop a multiscale method which uses all-atom MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) BD simulations in the remainder of the domain. PMID:27118886

  4. Simulation of lipid bilayer self-assembly using all-atom lipid force fields.

    PubMed

    Skjevik, Åge A; Madej, Benjamin D; Dickson, Callum J; Lin, Charles; Teigen, Knut; Walker, Ross C; Gould, Ian R

    2016-04-21

    In this manuscript we expand significantly on our earlier communication by investigating the bilayer self-assembly of eight different types of phospholipids in unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using three widely used all-atom lipid force fields. Irrespective of the underlying force field, the lipids are shown to spontaneously form stable lamellar bilayer structures within 1 microsecond, the majority of which display properties in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The lipids self-assemble via the same general mechanism, though at formation rates that differ both between lipid types, force fields and even repeats on the same lipid/force field combination. In addition to zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids, anionic phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) lipids are represented. To our knowledge this is the first time bilayer self-assembly of phospholipids with negatively charged head groups is demonstrated in all-atom MD simulations.

  5. Microtubule Elasticity: Connecting All-Atom Simulations with Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sept, David; Mackintosh, Fred C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of microtubules have been extensively studied using a wide range of biophysical techniques, seeking to understand the mechanics of these cylindrical polymers. Here we develop a method for connecting all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with continuum mechanics and show how this can be applied to understand microtubule mechanics. Our coarse-graining technique applied to the microscopic simulation system yields consistent predictions for the Young’s modulus and persistence length of microtubules, while clearly demonstrating how binding of the drug Taxol decreases the stiffness of microtubules. The techniques we develop should be widely applicable to other macromolecular systems.

  6. Benchmarking all-atom simulations using hydrogen exchange

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J.; Yu, Wookyung; Gichana, Elizabeth K.; Baxa, Michael C.; Hinshaw, James R.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are now able to fold small proteins reversibly to their native structures [Lindorff-Larsen K, Piana S, Dror RO, Shaw DE (2011) Science 334(6055):517–520]. These results indicate that modern force fields can reproduce the energy surface near the native structure. To test how well the force fields recapitulate the other regions of the energy surface, MD trajectories for a variant of protein G are compared with data from site-resolved hydrogen exchange (HX) and other biophysical measurements. Because HX monitors the breaking of individual H-bonds, this experimental technique identifies the stability and H-bond content of excited states, thus enabling quantitative comparison with the simulations. Contrary to experimental findings of a cooperative, all-or-none unfolding process, the simulated denatured state ensemble, on average, is highly collapsed with some transient or persistent native 2° structure. The MD trajectories of this protein G variant and other small proteins exhibit excessive intramolecular H-bonding even for the most expanded conformations, suggesting that the force fields require improvements in describing H-bonding and backbone hydration. Moreover, these comparisons provide a general protocol for validating the ability of simulations to accurately capture rare structural fluctuations. PMID:25349413

  7. All-atom simulations of crowding effects on ubiquitin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Spiga, Enrico; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that crowded environments affect the stability of proteins, with strong biological and biotechnological implications; however, beyond this, crowding is also expected to affect the dynamic properties of proteins, an idea that is hard to probe experimentally. Here we report on a simulation study aimed at evaluating the effects of crowding on internal protein dynamics, based on fully all-atom descriptions of the protein, the solvent and the crowder. Our model system consists of ubiquitin, a protein whose dynamic features are closely related to its ability to bind to multiple partners, in a 325 g L-1 solution of glucose in water, a condition widely employed in in vitro studies of crowding effects. We observe a slight reduction in loop flexibility accompanied by a dramatic restriction of the conformational space explored in the timescale of the simulations (˜0.5 µs), indicating that crowding slows down collective motions and the rate of exploration of the conformational space. This effect is attributed to the extensive and long-lasting interactions observed between protein residues and glucose molecules throughout the entire protein surface. Potential implications of the observed effects are discussed.

  8. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  9. Beyond Modeling: All-Atom Olfactory Receptor Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peter C.; Crasto, Chiquito J.

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are a type of GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). These receptors are responsible for mediating the sense of smell through their interaction with odor ligands. OR-odorant interactions marks the first step in the process that leads to olfaction. Computational studies on model OR structures can generate focused and novel hypotheses for further bench investigation by providing a view of these interactions at the molecular level beyond inferences that are drawn merely from static docking. Here we have shown the specific advantages of simulating the dynamic environment associated with OR-odorant interactions. We present a rigorous protocol which ranges from the creation of a computationally derived model of an olfactory receptor to simulating the interactions between an OR and an odorant molecule. Given the ubiquitous occurrence of GPCRs in the membranes of cells, we anticipate that our OR-developed methodology will serve as a model for the computational structural biology of all GPCRs. PMID:22563330

  10. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a photosystem i/detergent complex.

    PubMed

    Harris, Bradley J; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2014-10-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to investigate the solution structure and dynamics of the photosynthetic pigment-protein complex photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus embedded in a toroidal belt of n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) detergent. Evaluation of root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) relative to the known crystal structure show that the protein complex surrounded by DDM molecules is stable during the 200 ns simulation time, and root-mean-square fluctuation (RMSF) analysis indicates that regions of high local mobility correspond to solvent-exposed regions such as turns in the transmembrane α-helices and flexible loops on the stromal and lumenal faces. Comparing the protein-detergent complex to a pure detergent micelle, the detergent surrounding the PSI trimer is found to be less densely packed but with more ordered detergent tails, contrary to what is seen in most lipid bilayer models. We also investigated any functional implications for the observed conformational dynamics and protein-detergent interactions, discovering interesting structural changes in the psaL subunits associated with maintaining the trimeric structure of the protein. Importantly, we find that the docking of soluble electron mediators such as cytochrome c6 and ferredoxin to PSI is not significantly impacted by the solubilization of PSI in detergent.

  11. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  12. Resolution-Adapted All-Atomic and Coarse-Grained Model for Biomolecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Hu, Hao

    2014-06-10

    We develop here an adaptive multiresolution method for the simulation of complex heterogeneous systems such as the protein molecules. The target molecular system is described with the atomistic structure while maintaining concurrently a mapping to the coarse-grained models. The theoretical model, or force field, used to describe the interactions between two sites is automatically adjusted in the simulation processes according to the interaction distance/strength. Therefore, all-atomic, coarse-grained, or mixed all-atomic and coarse-grained models would be used together to describe the interactions between a group of atoms and its surroundings. Because the choice of theory is made on the force field level while the sampling is always carried out in the atomic space, the new adaptive method preserves naturally the atomic structure and thermodynamic properties of the entire system throughout the simulation processes. The new method will be very useful in many biomolecular simulations where atomistic details are critically needed.

  13. An all-atom simulation study of the ordering of liquid squalane near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Mesfin; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2008-05-01

    An all-atom molecular dynamics study using the OPLS force field has been carried out to obtain new insights in to the orientation and ordering of liquid squalane near a solid surface. As observed in previous experiments, the squalane molecules closest to a SiO 2 substrate are found to be tightly bound with their molecular axis preferentially parallel to the interface. Unlike linear alkanes, the squalane molecules are also found to lie preferentially parallel to the liquid/vapor interface. The simulation results predict that the molecular plane orientation of the squalane molecules changes from mainly parallel to perpendicular to the substrate in going further away from the substrate.

  14. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases.

  15. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  16. Examining the origins of the hydration force between lipid bilayers using all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Gentilcore, Anastasia N; Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Crozier, Paul S; Stevens, Mark J; Woolf, Thomas B

    2010-05-01

    Using 237 all-atom double bilayer simulations, we examined the thermodynamic and structural changes that occur as a phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer stack is dehydrated. The simulated system represents a micropatch of lipid multilayer systems that are studied experimentally using surface force apparatus, atomic force microscopy and osmotic pressure studies. In these experiments, the hydration level of the system is varied, changing the separation between the bilayers, in order to understand the forces that the bilayers feel as they are brought together. These studies have found a curious, strongly repulsive force when the bilayers are very close to each other, which has been termed the "hydration force," though the origins of this force are not clearly understood. We computationally reproduce this repulsive, relatively free energy change as bilayers come together and make qualitative conclusions as to the enthalpic and entropic origins of the free energy change. This analysis is supported by data showing structural changes in the waters, lipids and salts that have also been seen in experimental work. Increases in solvent ordering as the bilayers are dehydrated are found to be essential in causing the repulsion as the bilayers come together.

  17. Effect of calcium and magnesium on phosphatidylserine membranes: experiments and all-atomic simulations.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-05-01

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS(-)) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) induces very different aggregation behavior for PS(-) liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS(-) lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS(-) membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca(2+) cations present a peak at a distance ~2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg(2+) cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca(2+) peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca(2+) and Mg(2

  18. Dissociation of a Dynamic Protein Complex Studied by All-Atom Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2016-02-23

    The process of protein complex dissociation remains to be understood at the atomic level of detail. Computers now allow microsecond timescale molecular-dynamics simulations, which make the visualization of such processes possible. Here, we investigated the dissociation process of the EphA2-SHIP2 SAM-SAM domain heterodimer complex using unrestrained all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations. Previous studies on this system have shown that alternate configurations are sampled, that their interconversion can be fast, and that the complex is dynamic by nature. Starting from different NMR-derived structures, mutants were designed to stabilize a subset of configurations by swapping ion pairs across the protein-protein interface. We focused on two mutants, K956D/D1235K and R957D/D1223R, with attenuated binding affinity compared with the wild-type proteins. In contrast to calculations on the wild-type complexes, the majority of simulations of these mutants showed protein dissociation within 2.4 μs. During the separation process, we observed domain rotation and pivoting as well as a translation and simultaneous rolling, typically to alternate and weaker binding interfaces. Several unsuccessful recapturing attempts occurred once the domains were moderately separated. An analysis of protein solvation suggests that the dissociation process correlates with a progressive loss of protein-protein contacts. Furthermore, an evaluation of internal protein dynamics using quasi-harmonic and order parameter analyses indicates that changes in protein internal motions are expected to contribute significantly to the thermodynamics of protein dissociation. Considering protein association as the reverse of the separation process, the initial role of charged/polar interactions is emphasized, followed by changes in protein and solvent dynamics. The trajectories show that protein separation does not follow a single distinct pathway, but suggest that the mechanism of dissociation is common in

  19. Effect of calcium and magnesium on phosphatidylserine membranes: experiments and all-atomic simulations.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-05-01

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS(-)) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) induces very different aggregation behavior for PS(-) liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS(-) lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS(-) membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca(2+) cations present a peak at a distance ~2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg(2+) cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca(2+) peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca(2+) and Mg(2

  20. Effect of Calcium and Magnesium on Phosphatidylserine Membranes: Experiments and All-Atomic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS−) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ induces very different aggregation behavior for PS− liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS− lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS− membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca2+ cations present a peak at a distance ∼2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg2+ cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca2+ peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. PMID:22824273

  1. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Translocation through an α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Di Marino, Daniele; Bonome, Emma Letizia; Tramontano, Anna; Chinappi, Mauro

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore sensing is attracting the attention of a large and varied scientific community. One of the main issues in nanopore sensing is how to associate the measured current signals to specific features of the molecule under investigation. This is particularly relevant when the translocating molecule is a protein and the pore is sufficiently narrow to necessarily involve unfolding of the translocating protein. Recent experimental results characterized the cotranslocational unfolding of Thioredoxin (Trx) passing through an α-hemolisin pore, providing evidence for the existence of a multistep process. In this study we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the same system. Our data indicate that Trx translocation involves two main barriers. The first one is an unfolding barrier associated with a translocation intermediate where the N-terminal region of Trx is stuck at the pore entrance in a conformation that strongly resembles the native one. After the abrupt unfolding of the N-terminal region, the Trx enters the α-hemolisin vestibule. During this stage, the constriction is occupied not only by the translocating residue but also by a hairpin-like structure forming a tangle in the constriction. The second barrier is associated with the disentangling of this region.

  2. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost.

  3. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost. PMID:24676684

  4. Dissociation of a Dynamic Protein Complex Studied by All-Atom Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2016-02-23

    The process of protein complex dissociation remains to be understood at the atomic level of detail. Computers now allow microsecond timescale molecular-dynamics simulations, which make the visualization of such processes possible. Here, we investigated the dissociation process of the EphA2-SHIP2 SAM-SAM domain heterodimer complex using unrestrained all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations. Previous studies on this system have shown that alternate configurations are sampled, that their interconversion can be fast, and that the complex is dynamic by nature. Starting from different NMR-derived structures, mutants were designed to stabilize a subset of configurations by swapping ion pairs across the protein-protein interface. We focused on two mutants, K956D/D1235K and R957D/D1223R, with attenuated binding affinity compared with the wild-type proteins. In contrast to calculations on the wild-type complexes, the majority of simulations of these mutants showed protein dissociation within 2.4 μs. During the separation process, we observed domain rotation and pivoting as well as a translation and simultaneous rolling, typically to alternate and weaker binding interfaces. Several unsuccessful recapturing attempts occurred once the domains were moderately separated. An analysis of protein solvation suggests that the dissociation process correlates with a progressive loss of protein-protein contacts. Furthermore, an evaluation of internal protein dynamics using quasi-harmonic and order parameter analyses indicates that changes in protein internal motions are expected to contribute significantly to the thermodynamics of protein dissociation. Considering protein association as the reverse of the separation process, the initial role of charged/polar interactions is emphasized, followed by changes in protein and solvent dynamics. The trajectories show that protein separation does not follow a single distinct pathway, but suggest that the mechanism of dissociation is common in

  5. Simplified protein models can rival all atom simulations in predicting folding pathways and structure

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of simultaneously determining a protein’s folding pathway and structure using a properly formulated model without prior knowledge of the native structure. Our model employs a natural coordinate system for describing proteins and a search strategy inspired by the observation that real proteins fold in a sequential fashion by incrementally stabilizing native-like substructures or "foldons". Comparable folding pathways and structures are obtained for the twelve proteins recently studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [K. Lindorff-Larsen, S. Piana, R.O. Dror, D. E. Shaw, Science 334, 517 (2011)], with our calculations running several orders of magnitude faster. We find that native-like propensities in the unfolded state do not necessarily determine the order of structure formation, a departure from a major conclusion of the MD study. Instead, our results support a more expansive view wherein intrinsic local structural propensities may be enhanced or overridden in the folding process by environmental context. The success of our search strategy validates it as an expedient mechanism for folding both in silico and in vivo. PMID:23889448

  6. Insight into the Properties of Cardiolipin Containing Bilayers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Using a Hybrid All-Atom/United-Atom Force Field.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Chipot, Christophe

    2012-05-01

    Simulation of three models of cardiolipin (CL) containing membranes using a new set of parameters for tetramyristoyl and tetraoleoyl CLs has been developed in the framework of the united-atom CHARMM27-UA and the all-atom CHARMM36 force fields with the aim of performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cardiolipin-containing mixed-lipid membranes. The new parameters use a hybrid representation of all-atom head groups in conjunction with implicit-hydrogen united-atom (UA) to describe the oleoyl and myristoyl chains of the CLs, in lieu of the fully atomistic description, thereby allowing longer simulations to be undertaken. The physicochemical properties of the bilayers were determined and compared with previously reported data. Furthermore, using tetramyristoyl CL mixed with POPG and POPE lipids, a mitochondrial membrane was simulated. The results presented here show the different behavior of the bilayers as a result of the lipid composition, where the length of the acyl chain and the conformation of the headgroup can be associated with the mitochondrial membrane properties. The new hybrid CL parameters prove to be well suited for the simulation of the molecular structure of CL-containing bilayers and can be extended to other lipid bilayers composed of CLs with different acyl chains or alternate head groups.

  7. Insight into the Properties of Cardiolipin Containing Bilayers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Using a Hybrid All-Atom/United-Atom Force Field.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Chipot, Christophe

    2012-05-01

    Simulation of three models of cardiolipin (CL) containing membranes using a new set of parameters for tetramyristoyl and tetraoleoyl CLs has been developed in the framework of the united-atom CHARMM27-UA and the all-atom CHARMM36 force fields with the aim of performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cardiolipin-containing mixed-lipid membranes. The new parameters use a hybrid representation of all-atom head groups in conjunction with implicit-hydrogen united-atom (UA) to describe the oleoyl and myristoyl chains of the CLs, in lieu of the fully atomistic description, thereby allowing longer simulations to be undertaken. The physicochemical properties of the bilayers were determined and compared with previously reported data. Furthermore, using tetramyristoyl CL mixed with POPG and POPE lipids, a mitochondrial membrane was simulated. The results presented here show the different behavior of the bilayers as a result of the lipid composition, where the length of the acyl chain and the conformation of the headgroup can be associated with the mitochondrial membrane properties. The new hybrid CL parameters prove to be well suited for the simulation of the molecular structure of CL-containing bilayers and can be extended to other lipid bilayers composed of CLs with different acyl chains or alternate head groups. PMID:26593668

  8. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of actin-myosin interactions: a comparative study of cardiac α myosin, β myosin, and fast skeletal muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Zheng, Wenjun

    2013-11-26

    Myosins are a superfamily of actin-binding motor proteins with significant variations in kinetic properties (such as actin binding affinity) between different isoforms. It remains unknown how such kinetic variations arise from the structural and dynamic tuning of the actin-myosin interface at the amino acid residue level. To address this key issue, we have employed molecular modeling and simulations to investigate, with atomistic details, the isoform dependence of actin-myosin interactions in the rigor state. By combining electron microscopy-based docking with homology modeling, we have constructed three all-atom models for human cardiac α and β and rabbit fast skeletal muscle myosin in complex with three actin subunits in the rigor state. Starting from these models, we have performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (total of 100 ns per system) and then used the MD trajectories to calculate actin-myosin binding free energies with contributions from both electrostatic and nonpolar forces. Our binding calculations are in good agreement with the experimental finding of isoform-dependent differences in actin binding affinity between these myosin isoforms. Such differences are traced to changes in actin-myosin electrostatic interactions (i.e., hydrogen bonds and salt bridges) that are highly dynamic and involve several flexible actin-binding loops. By partitioning the actin-myosin binding free energy to individual myosin residues, we have also identified key myosin residues involved in the actin-myosin interactions, some of which were previously validated experimentally or implicated in cardiomyopathy mutations, and the rest make promising targets for future mutational experiments. PMID:24224850

  9. All-atom simulation study of protein PTH(1-34) by using the Wang-Landau sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon; Kwak, Wooseop

    2014-12-01

    We perform simulations of the N-terminal 34-residue protein fragment PTH(1-34), consisting of 581 atoms, of the 84-residue human parathyroid hormone by using the all-atom ECEPP/3 force field and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Through a massive high-performance computation, the density of states and the partition function Z( T), as a continuous function of T, are obtained for PTH(1-34). From the continuous partition function Z( T), the partition function zeros of PTH(1-34) are evaluated for the first time. From both the specific heat and the partition function zeros, two characteristic transition temperatures are obtained for the all-atom protein PTH(1-34). The higher transition temperature T 1 and the lower transition temperature T 2 of PTH(1-34) can be interpreted as the collapse temperature T θ and the folding temperature T f , respectively.

  10. Putative membrane lytic sites of P-type and S-type cardiotoxins from snake venoms as probed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Biswajit; Karthikeyan, Muthusamy; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2016-10-01

    Cardiotoxins (CTXs) belonging to the three-finger toxin superfamily of snake venoms are one of principal toxic components and the protein toxins exhibit membrane lytic activities when the venoms are injected into victims. In the present study, complex formations between CTX VI (a P-type CTX from Naja atra) and CTX1 (an S-type CTX from Naja naja) on zwitterionic POPC bilayers (a major lipid component of cell membranes) have been studied in near physiological conditions for a total dynamic time scale of 1.35 μs using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Comprehensive analyses of the MD data revealed that residues such as Leu1, Lys2, Tyr11, Lys31, Asp57 and Arg58 of CTX VI, and Ala16, Lys30 and Arg58 of CTX1 were crucial for establishing interactions with the POPC bilayer. Moreover, loop I, along with globular head and loop II of CTX VI, and loop II of CTX1 were found to be the structural regions chiefly governing complex formation of the respective proteins with POPC. Rationalizations for the differential binding modes of CTXs and implications of the findings for designing small molecular inhibitors to the toxins are also discussed. Graphical Abstract Binding modes of a P-type CTX and an S-type CTX towards the POPC bilayer. PMID:27628673

  11. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA+ ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named ‘the ADP model’ and ‘the ATP model’, where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA+ ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  12. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  13. Gordon Fullerton in PCA (MD-11) Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA research pilot Gordon Fullerton 'flying' in the MD-11 simulator during the Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) project. This investigation grew out of the crash of a DC-10 airliner on July 19, 1989, following an explosion in the rear engine which caused the loss of all manual flight controls. The flight crew attempted to control the airliner using only the thrust from the two remaining engines. Although the DC-10 crashed during the landing attempt, 184 of the 296 passengers and crew aboard survived. The PCA effort at the Dryden Flight Research Center grew out of the crash, and attempted to develop a means to successfully land an aircraft using only engine thrust. After more than five years of work, on August 29, 1995, Gordon Fullerton made the first PCA touchdown aboard an MD-11 airliner (a later version of the DC-10). The concept was further refined over the years that followed this first landing. Simulators were essential ingredients of the PCA development process. The feasibility of the concept was first tested with an F-15 simulator, then the results of actual flight tests in an F-15 were incorporated back into the simulator. Additional simulations were run on the Boeing 720 airliner simulator used in the Controlled Impact Demonstration project. After the MD-11 test landings, Boeing 747 and 757 simulators tested a wide range of possible situations. Simulations even helped develop a method of landing an airliner if it lost its complete hydraulic system as well as a wing engine, by transferring fuel to shift the center of gravity toward the working engine. The most extreme procedure was undertaken in a 747 simulator. The aircraft simulated the loss of the hydraulic system at 35,000 feet and rolled upside down. Then, the PCA mode was engaged, the airliner righted itself, leveled its wings, and made an approach nearly identical to that of a normal auto landing.

  14. Analysis of Ligand-Receptor Association and Intermediate Transfer Rates in Multienzyme Nanostructures with All-Atom Brownian Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-25

    We present the second-generation GeomBD Brownian dynamics software for determining interenzyme intermediate transfer rates and substrate association rates in biomolecular complexes. Substrate and intermediate association rates for a series of enzymes or biomolecules can be compared between the freely diffusing disorganized configuration and various colocalized or complexed arrangements for kinetic investigation of enhanced intermediate transfer. In addition, enzyme engineering techniques, such as synthetic protein conjugation, can be computationally modeled and analyzed to better understand changes in substrate association relative to native enzymes. Tools are provided to determine nonspecific ligand-receptor association residence times, and to visualize common sites of nonspecific association of substrates on receptor surfaces. To demonstrate features of the software, interenzyme intermediate substrate transfer rate constants are calculated and compared for all-atom models of DNA origami scaffold-bound bienzyme systems of glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Also, a DNA conjugated horseradish peroxidase enzyme was analyzed for its propensity to increase substrate association rates and substrate local residence times relative to the unmodified enzyme. We also demonstrate the rapid determination and visualization of common sites of nonspecific ligand-receptor association by using HIV-1 protease and an inhibitor, XK263. GeomBD2 accelerates simulations by precomputing van der Waals potential energy grids and electrostatic potential grid maps, and has a flexible and extensible support for all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Simulation software is written in C++ and utilizes modern parallelization techniques for potential grid preparation and Brownian dynamics simulation processes. Analysis scripts, written in the Python scripting language, are provided for quantitative simulation analysis. GeomBD2 is applicable to the fields of biophysics, bioengineering

  15. Dynamic performance of duolayers at the air/water interface. 2. Mechanistic insights from all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Christofferson, Andrew J; Yiapanis, George; Leung, Andy H M; Prime, Emma L; Tran, Diana N H; Qiao, Greg G; Solomon, David H; Yarovsky, Irene

    2014-09-18

    The novel duolayer system, comprising a monolayer of ethylene glycol monooctadecyl ether (C18E1) and the water-soluble polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), has been shown to resist forces such as wind stress to a greater degree than the C18E1 monolayer alone. This paper reports all-atom molecular dynamics simulations comparing the monolayer (C18E1 alone) and duolayer systems under an applied force parallel to the air/water interface. The simulations show that, due to the presence of PVP at the interface, the duolayer film exhibits an increase in chain tilt, ordering, and density, as well as a lower lateral velocity compared to the monolayer. These results provide a molecular rationale for the improved performance of the duolayer system under wind conditions, as well as an atomic-level explanation for the observed efficacy of the duolayer system as an evaporation suppressant, which may serve as a useful guide for future development for thin films where resistance to external perturbation is desirable.

  16. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  17. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  18. Insights into activation and RNA binding of trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) through all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Falck, Emma

    2008-06-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus stearothermophilus is regulated by a trp RNA binding attenuation protein (TRAP). It is a ring-shaped 11-mer of identical 74 residue subunits. Tryptophan binding pockets are located between adjacent subunits, and tryptophan binding activates TRAP to bind RNA. Here, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the system, complementing existing extensive experimental studies. We focus on two questions. First, we look at the activation mechanism, of which relatively little is known experimentally. We find that the absence of tryptophan allows larger motions close to the tryptophan binding site, and we see indication of a conformational change in the BC loop. However, complete deactivation seems to occur on much longer time scales than the 40 ns studied here. Second, we study the TRAP-RNA interactions. We look at the relative flexibilities of the different bases in the complex and analyze the hydrogen bonds between the protein and RNA. We also study the role of Lys37, Lys56, and Arg58, which have been experimentally identified as essential for RNA binding. Hydrophobic stacking of Lys37 with the nearby RNA base is confirmed, but we do not see direct hydrogen bonding between RNA and the other two residues, in contrast to the crystal structure. Rather, these residues seem to stabilize the RNA-binding surface, and their positive charge may also play a role in RNA binding. Simulations also indicate that TRAP is able to attract RNA nonspecifically, and the interactions are quantified in more detail using binding energy calculations. The formation of the final binding complex is a very slow process: within the simulation time scale of 40 ns, only two guanine bases become bound (and no others), indicating that the binding initiates at these positions. In general, our results are in good agreement with experimental studies, and provide atomic-scale insights into the processes. PMID:18186477

  19. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  20. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  1. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  2. DFT-MD simulations of shocked Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2009-03-01

    Xenon is not only a technologically important element used in laser technologies, jet propulsion and dental anesthesia, but it is also arguably the simplest material in which to study the metal-insulator transition at high pressure. Because of its closed shell electronic configuration, Xenon is often assumed to be chemically inert, interacting almost entirely through the van der Waals interaction, and at liquid density, is typically modeled well using Leonard-Jones potentials. However, such modeling has a limited range of validity as Xenon is known to form compounds at normal conditions and likely exhibits considerably more chemistry at higher densities when hybridization of occupied orbitals becomes significant. In this talk, we present DFT-MD simulations of shocked liquid Xenon with the goal of developing an improved equation of state. The relative importance of the van der Waals interaction compared to other Coulomb interactions is considered, and estimates of the relative accuracy of various density functionals are quantified. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Direct NOE simulation from long MD trajectories.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, G; Glushka, J N; Foley, B L; Woods, R J; Prestegard, J H

    2016-04-01

    A software package, MD2NOE, is presented which calculates Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) build-up curves directly from molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. It differs from traditional approaches in that it calculates correlation functions directly from the trajectory instead of extracting inverse sixth power distance terms as an intermediate step in calculating NOEs. This is particularly important for molecules that sample conformational states on a timescale similar to molecular reorientation. The package is tested on sucrose and results are shown to differ in small but significant ways from those calculated using an inverse sixth power assumption. Results are also compared to experiment and found to be in reasonable agreement despite an expected underestimation of water viscosity by the water model selected. PMID:26826977

  4. Direct NOE simulation from long MD trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, G.; Glushka, J. N.; Foley, B. L.; Woods, R. J.; Prestegard, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    A software package, MD2NOE, is presented which calculates Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) build-up curves directly from molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. It differs from traditional approaches in that it calculates correlation functions directly from the trajectory instead of extracting inverse sixth power distance terms as an intermediate step in calculating NOEs. This is particularly important for molecules that sample conformational states on a timescale similar to molecular reorientation. The package is tested on sucrose and results are shown to differ in small but significant ways from those calculated using an inverse sixth power assumption. Results are also compared to experiment and found to be in reasonable agreement despite an expected underestimation of water viscosity by the water model selected.

  5. Investigating a link between all-atom model simulation and the Ising-based theory on the helix-coil transition. II. Nonstationary properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Hironori K.; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Suyama, Akira

    2003-06-01

    The all-atom and the Ising-based models have both played their own roles to help our understanding of helix-coil transition. In this study, we address to what degree these two theoretical models can be consistent with each other in the nonstationary regime, complementing the preceding equilibrium study. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atom model polyalanine chain and Monte Carlo simulations of a corresponding kinetic Ising chain. Nonstationary properties of each model were characterized through power spectrum, Allan variance, and autocorrelation analyses regarding the time course of a system order parameter. A clear difference was indicated between the two models: the Ising-based model showed a Lorentzian spectrum in the frequency domain and a single exponential form in the time domain, whereas the all-atom model showed a 1/f spectrum and a stretched exponential form. The observed stretched exponential form is in agreement with a very recent T-jump experiment. The effect of viscous damping on helix-coil dynamics was also studied. A possible source of the observed difference between the two models is discussed by considering the potential energy landscape, and the idea of dynamical disorder was introduced into the original Glauber model in the hope of bridging the gap between the two models. Other possible sources, e.g., the limitations of the Ising framework and the validity of the Markovian dynamics assumption, are also discussed.

  6. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  7. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  8. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B

    2013-12-10

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states - as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  9. Evaluation of protein-protein docking model structures using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solution theory in the energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Guo, Hao; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2012-12-01

    We propose a method to evaluate binding free energy differences among distinct protein-protein complex model structures through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water using the solution theory in the energy representation. Complex model structures are generated from a pair of monomeric structures using the rigid-body docking program ZDOCK. After structure refinement by side chain optimization and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, complex models are evaluated based on the sum of their conformational and solvation free energies, the latter calculated from the energy distribution functions obtained from relatively short molecular dynamics simulations of the complex in water and of pure water based on the solution theory in the energy representation. We examined protein-protein complex model structures of two protein-protein complex systems, bovine trypsin/CMTI-1 squash inhibitor (PDB ID: 1PPE) and RNase SA/barstar (PDB ID: 1AY7), for which both complex and monomer structures were determined experimentally. For each system, we calculated the energies for the crystal complex structure and twelve generated model structures including the model most similar to the crystal structure and very different from it. In both systems, the sum of the conformational and solvation free energies tended to be lower for the structure similar to the crystal. We concluded that our energy calculation method is useful for selecting low energy complex models similar to the crystal structure from among a set of generated models.

  10. Conformational landscape of the HIV-V3 hairpin loop from all-atom free-energy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Abhinav; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    Small beta hairpins have many distinct biological functions, including their involvement in chemokine and viral receptor recognition. The relevance of structural similarities between different hairpin loops with near homologous sequences is not yet understood, calling for the development of methods for de novo hairpin structure prediction and simulation. De novo folding of beta strands is more difficult than that of helical proteins because of nonlocal hydrogen bonding patterns that connect amino acids that are distant in the amino acid sequence and there is a large variety of possible hydrogen bond patterns. Here we use a greedy version of the basin hopping technique with our free-energy forcefield PFF02 to reproducibly and predictively fold the hairpin structure of a HIV-V3 loop. We performed 20 independent basin hopping runs for 500cycles corresponding to 7.4×107 energy evaluations each. The lowest energy structure found in the simulation has a backbone root mean square deviation (bRMSD) of only 2.04Å to the native conformation. The lowest 9 out of the 20 simulations converged to conformations deviating less than 2.5Å bRMSD from native.

  11. Spontaneous conformational changes in the E. coli GroEL subunit from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Abrams, Cameron F

    2007-09-15

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL is a complex of identical subunit proteins (57 kDa each) arranged in a back-to-back stacking of two heptameric rings. Its hallmarks include nested positive intra-ring and negative inter-ring cooperativity in adenosine trisphosphate (ATP) binding and the ability to mediate the folding of newly transcribed and/or denatured substrate proteins. We performed unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of the GroEL subunit protein in explicit water both with and without the nucleotide KMgATP to understand better the details of the structural transitions that enable these behaviors. Placing KMgATP in the equatorial domain binding pocket of a t state subunit, which corresponds to a low ATP-affinity state, produced a short-lived (6 ns) state that spontaneously transitioned to the high ATP-affinity r state. The important feature of this transition is a large-scale rotation of the intermediate domain's helix M to close the ATP binding pocket. Pivoting of helix M is accompanied by counterclockwise rotation and slight deformation of the apical domain, important for lowering the affinity for substrate protein. Aligning simulation conformations into model heptamer rings demonstrates that the t-->r transition in one subunit is not sterically hindered by t state neighbors, but requires breakage of Arg(197)-Glu(386) intersubunit salt bridges, which are important for inter-ring positive cooperativity. Lowest-frequency quasi-harmonic modes of vibration computed pre- and post-transition clearly show that natural vibrations facilitate the transition. Finally, we propose a novel mechanism for inter-ring cooperativity in ATP binding inspired by the observation of spontaneous insertion of the side chain of Ala(480) into the empty nucleotide pocket. PMID:17513353

  12. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  13. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  14. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ˜120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (˜207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (˜70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  15. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  16. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems. PMID:25612718

  17. Relationship between population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state and oligomer formation times of peptides: Insights from all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hoang Bao; Kouza, Maksim; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2010-04-01

    Despite much progress in understanding the aggregation process of biomolecules, the factors that govern its rates have not been fully understood. This problem is of particular importance since many conformational diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, and type-II diabetes are associated with the protein oligomerization. Having performed all-atom simulations with explicit water and various force fields for two short peptides KFFE and NNQQ, we show that their oligomer formation times are strongly correlated with the population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state. The larger the population the faster the aggregation process. Our result not only suggests that this quantity plays a key role in the self-assembly of polypeptide chains but also opens a new way to understand the fibrillogenesis of biomolecules at the monomeric level. The nature of oligomer ordering of NNQQ is studied in detail.

  18. Enhancing MD simulations of proteins using vague and combinatorics information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Ken

    We have developed MELD, a method that `melds' together replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with external information. Traditionally, accelerating MD simulations has only been possible by using information that is precise and correct. In contrast, MELD allows us to leverage information that is vague or corrupted. For example, we give generic instructives, such as `make a hydrophobic core', `make good secondary structures', or `search only compact structures'. Normally, such information implies a loss of ability to compute free energies and populations. But, MELD satisfies detailed balance. We show that it can fold small proteins much faster than brute-force MD can, that it gives reasonable populations, and that it can succeed in CASP, the blind protein-structure prediction event.

  19. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  20. Understanding the mechanism of LCST phase separation of mixed ionic liquids in water by MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuling; Wang, Huiyong; Pei, Yuanchao; Liu, Zhiping; Wang, Jianji

    2016-08-17

    Recently, it has been found experimentally that two different amino acid ionic liquids (ILs) can be mixed to show unique lowest critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation in water. However, little is known about the mechanism of phase separation in these IL/water mixtures at the molecular level. In this work, five kinds of amino acid ILs were chosen to study the mechanism of LCST-type phase separation by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Toward this end, a series of all-atom MD simulations were carried out on the ternary mixtures consisting of two different ILs and water at different temperatures. The various interaction energies and radial distribution functions (RDFs) were calculated and analyzed for these mixed systems. It was found that for amino acid ILs, the -NH2 or -COOH group of one anion could have a hydrogen bonding interaction with the -COO(-) group of another anion. With the increase of temperature, this kind of hydrogen bonding interaction between anions was strengthened and then the anion-H2O electrostatic interaction was weakened, which led to the LCST-type phase separation of the mixed ILs in water. In addition, a series of MD simulations for [P6668]1[Lys]n[Asp]1-n/H2O systems were also performed to study the effect of the mixing ratio of ILs on phase separation. It was also noted that the experimental critical composition corresponding to the lowest critical solution temperature was well predicted from the total electrostatic interaction energies as a function of mole fraction of [P6668][Lys] in these systems. The conclusions drawn from this study may provide new insight into the LCST-type phase behavior of ILs in water, and motivate further studies on practical applications. PMID:27498928

  1. Structure and Properties of HELICAL CARBON NANOTUBES through MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Akshay; Verma, Deepti; Gupta, Shakti S.

    Helical Carbon Nanotubes (HCNTs) are coiled 3-valent carbon networks which represent pure carbon helix. Here we study the geometries of two classes: hexagonal helix containing purely polyhex networks and the second class with 5-and 7-membered rings besides hexagons. We followed a model of hexagonal, single wall HCNTs, and determined their relaxed configuration using MD simulations based on Tersoff potential. A race-track like structure is observed in the cross-section of HCNTs upon minimization. For generating class two helix, the adjacency matrix eigenvector's (AME) method is applied which utilizes 3-coordinated tiling of the plane by 5-,6-,and 7-membered ring for the construction of helical structures. The application of the AME method to torusenes is crucial for class two helix generation as it is based on an appropriate choice of bi-lobial eigenvectors triplet which can be selected on the basis of their nodal properties as verified here. After 3-D transformations the final structure was obtained with the help of MM3-potential based MD simulations on Tinker commercial code. The spring constants of HCNTs are computed through MD simulations.

  2. Effect of water on structure and dynamics of [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid: An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation investigation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anirban; Ghorai, Pradip Kr

    2016-03-21

    Composition dependent structural and dynamical properties of aqueous hydrophobic 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]) ionic liquid (IL) have been investigated by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. We observe that addition of water does not increase significant number of dissociated ions in the solution over the pure state. As a consequence, self-diffusion coefficient of the cation and anion is comparable to each other at all water concentration similar to that is observed for the pure state. Voronoi polyhedra analysis exhibits strong dependence on the local environment of IL concentration. Void and neck distributions in Voronoi tessellation are approximately Gaussian for pure IL but upon subsequent addition of water, we observe deviation from the Gaussian behaviour with an asymmetric broadening with long tail of exponential decay at large void radius, particularly at higher water concentrations. The increase in void space and neck size at higher water concentration facilitates ionic motion, thus, decreasing dynamical heterogeneity and IL reorientation time and increases self-diffusion coefficient significantly.

  3. Effect of water on structure and dynamics of [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid: An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anirban; Ghorai, Pradip Kr.

    2016-03-01

    Composition dependent structural and dynamical properties of aqueous hydrophobic 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]) ionic liquid (IL) have been investigated by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. We observe that addition of water does not increase significant number of dissociated ions in the solution over the pure state. As a consequence, self-diffusion coefficient of the cation and anion is comparable to each other at all water concentration similar to that is observed for the pure state. Voronoi polyhedra analysis exhibits strong dependence on the local environment of IL concentration. Void and neck distributions in Voronoi tessellation are approximately Gaussian for pure IL but upon subsequent addition of water, we observe deviation from the Gaussian behaviour with an asymmetric broadening with long tail of exponential decay at large void radius, particularly at higher water concentrations. The increase in void space and neck size at higher water concentration facilitates ionic motion, thus, decreasing dynamical heterogeneity and IL reorientation time and increases self-diffusion coefficient significantly.

  4. Energetics of nonpolar and polar compounds in cationic, anionic, and nonionic micelles studied by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with a theory of solutions.

    PubMed

    Date, Atsushi; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-21

    Energetic analysis was conducted for nonpolar and polar solutes bound in a cationic micelle of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), an anionic micelle of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and a nonionic micelle of tetraethylene glycol monododecyl ether (Brij30). All-atom molecular dynamics simulation was performed, and the free energies of binding the solutes in the hydrophobic-core and headgroup regions of the micelles were computed using the energy-representation method. It was found in all the micelles examined that aromatic naphthalene is preferably located more outward than aliphatic propane and that the polar solutes are localized at the interface of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. The roles of the surfactant and water were then elucidated by decomposing the free energy into the contributions from the respective species. Water was observed to play a decisive role in determining the binding location of the solute, while the surfactant was found to be more important for the overall stabilization of the solute within the micelle. The effects of attractive and repulsive interactions of the solute with the surfactant and water were further examined, and their competition was analyzed in connection with the preferable location of the solute in the micellar system.

  5. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  6. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  7. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  8. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  9. MD-simulations of Beta-Amyloid Protein Insertion Efficiency and Kinetics into Neuronal Membrane Mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (A β) peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used all-atom MD simulations to study the protein insertion efficiency and kinetics of monomeric A β40 and A β42 into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers (PC) with and without 40 mole% cholesterol (CHOL) that mimic the cholesterol-enriched and depleted lipid nanodomains of the neuronal plasma membranes. Independent replicates of 200-ns simulations of each protein pre-inserted in the upper lipid layer were generated. In PC bilayers, only 25% of A β40 and 50% of A β42 in the replicates showed complete insertion into the lower lipid layer, whereas the percentages increased to 50% and 100%, respectively, in PC/CHOL bilayers, providing evidence that cholesterol improves the protein insertion efficiency into the bilayers. The rate of protein insertion was proportional to the hydrophobic, transmembrane helix length of the inserted peptide and depended on the cholesterol content. We propose that the lysine snorkeling and C-terminus anchoring of A β to the PC headgroups at the upper and lower lipid/water interfaces represent the dual-transmembrane stabilization mechanisms of A β in the neuronal membrane domains.

  10. Plasticity and Failure in Nanocrystalline BCC Metals via MD Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2010-02-12

    Advances in the ability to generate extremely high pressures in dynamic experiments such as at the National Ignition Facility has motivated the need for special materials optimized for those conditions as well as ways to probe the response of these materials as they are deformed. We need to develop a much deeper understanding of the behavior of materials subjected to high pressure, especially the effect of rate at the extremely high rates encountered in those experiments. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the high-rate deformation of nanocrystalline tantalum at pressures less than 100 GPa to investigate the processes associated with plastic deformation for strains up to 100%. We focus on 3D polycrystalline systems with typical grain sizes of 10-20 nm. We also study a rapidly quenched liquid (amorphous solid) tantalum. We apply a constant volume (isochoric), constant temperature (isothermal) shear deformation over a range of strain rates, and compute the resulting stress-strain curves to large strains for both uniaxial and biaxial compression. We study the rate dependence and identify plastic deformation mechanisms. The identification of the mechanisms is facilitated through a novel technique that computes the local grain orientation, returning it as a quaternion for each atom. This analysis technique is robust and fast, and has been used to compute the orientations on the fly during our parallel MD simulations on supercomputers. We find both dislocation and twinning processes are important, and they interact in the weak strain hardening in these extremely fine-grained microstructures. We also present some results on void growth in nanocrystalline BCC metals under tension.

  11. Multiscale MD Simulations of Folding Dynamics and Mobility of Beta-Amyloid Peptide on Lipid Bilayer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilburg, Scott; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used multiscale Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to study the protein folding dynamics and lateral mobility of beta-amyloid protein on the cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid nano-domains. Several independent simulation replicates of all-atom and coarse-grained MD simulations of beta-amyloid on different lipid bilayer nano-domains have been generated. Using Define Secondary Structure of Proteins (DSSP) algorithm and mean-square-distance (MSD) analysis, the protein conformation and the lateral diffusion coefficients of protein, as well as the lipid and water, were calculated as a function of simulation time up to 200 nanoseconds for atomistic and 2 microseconds for coarse-grained simulations per replicate in different bilayer systems. Subtle differences in the conformation and mobility of the protein were observed in lipid bilayers with and without cholesterol. The structural dynamics information obtained from this work will provide useful insights into understanding the role of protein/lipid interactions in the membrane-associated aggregation of protein on neuronal membranes. HHMI-Trinity University and NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  12. Using MD Simulations To Calculate How Solvents Modulate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Cao, Shannon; Hoang, Kevin; Young, Kayla L; Paluch, Andrew S; Mobley, David L

    2016-04-12

    Here, our interest is in predicting solubility in general, and we focus particularly on predicting how the solubility of particular solutes is modulated by the solvent environment. Solubility in general is extremely important, both for theoretical reasons - it provides an important probe of the balance between solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions - and for more practical reasons, such as how to control the solubility of a given solute via modulation of its environment, as in process chemistry and separations. Here, we study how the change of solvent affects the solubility of a given compound. That is, we calculate relative solubilities. We use MD simulations to calculate relative solubility and compare our calculated values with experiment as well as with results from several other methods, SMD and UNIFAC, the latter of which is commonly used in chemical engineering design. We find that straightforward solubility calculations based on molecular simulations using a general small-molecule force field outperform SMD and UNIFAC both in terms of accuracy and coverage of the relevant chemical space. PMID:26878198

  13. MD Simulations of P-Type ATPases in a Lipid Bilayer System.

    PubMed

    Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Musgaard, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a computational method which provides insight on protein dynamics with high resolution in both space and time, in contrast to many experimental techniques. MD simulations can be used as a stand-alone method to study P-type ATPases as well as a complementary method aiding experimental studies. In particular, MD simulations have proved valuable in generating and confirming hypotheses relating to the structure and function of P-type ATPases. In the following, we describe a detailed practical procedure on how to set up and run a MD simulation of a P-type ATPase embedded in a lipid bilayer using software free of use for academics. We emphasize general considerations and problems typically encountered when setting up simulations. While full coverage of all possible procedures is beyond the scope of this chapter, we have chosen to illustrate the MD procedure with the Nanoscale Molecular Dynamics (NAMD) and the Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) software suites.

  14. Electroporation of archaeal lipid membranes using MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the electroporation of archaeal lipid bilayers when subjected to high transmembrane voltages induced by a charge imbalance, mimicking therefore millisecond electric pulse experiments. The structural characteristics of the bilayer, a 9:91 mol% 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) were compared to small angle X-ray scattering data. A rather good agreement of the electron density profiles at temperatures of 298 and 343 K was found assessing therefore the validity of the protocols and force fields used in simulations. Compared to dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the electroporation threshold for the bilayer was found to increase from ~2 V to 4.3 V at 323 K, and to 5.2 V at 298 K. Comparing the electroporation thresholds of the archaeal lipids to those of simple diphytanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers (2.5 V at 323 K) allowed one to trace back the stability of the membranes to the structure of their lipid head groups. Addition of DPPC in amounts of 50 mol% to the archaeal lipid bilayers decreases their stability and lowers the electroporation thresholds to 3.8 V and 4.1 V at respectively 323 and 298 K. The present study therefore shows how membrane compositions can be selected to cover a wide range of responses to electric stimuli. This provides new routes for the design of liposomes that can be efficiently used as drug delivery carriers, as the selection of their composition allows one to tune in their electroporation threshold for subsequent release of their load. PMID:24461702

  15. Electroporation of archaeal lipid membranes using MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the electroporation of archaeal lipid bilayers when subjected to high transmembrane voltages induced by a charge imbalance, mimicking therefore millisecond electric pulse experiments. The structural characteristics of the bilayer, a 9:91 mol% 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) were compared to small angle X-ray scattering data. A rather good agreement of the electron density profiles at temperatures of 298 and 343 K was found assessing therefore the validity of the protocols and force fields used in simulations. Compared to dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the electroporation threshold for the bilayer was found to increase from ~2 V to 4.3 V at 323 K, and to 5.2 V at 298 K. Comparing the electroporation thresholds of the archaeal lipids to those of simple diphytanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers (2.5 V at 323 K) allowed one to trace back the stability of the membranes to the structure of their lipid head groups. Addition of DPPC in amounts of 50 mol% to the archaeal lipid bilayers decreases their stability and lowers the electroporation thresholds to 3.8 V and 4.1 V at respectively 323 and 298 K. The present study therefore shows how membrane compositions can be selected to cover a wide range of responses to electric stimuli. This provides new routes for the design of liposomes that can be efficiently used as drug delivery carriers, as the selection of their composition allows one to tune in their electroporation threshold for subsequent release of their load.

  16. Simulating picosecond X-ray diffraction from crystals using FFT methods on MD output

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, Giles; Nagler, Bob; Higginbotham, Andrew; Murphy, William; Wark, Justin; Park, Nigel; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce

    2007-12-12

    Multi-million atom non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give significant insight into the transient processes that occur under shock compression. Picosecond X-ray diffraction enables the probing of materials on a timescale fast enough to test such effects. In order to simulate diffraction patterns, Fourier methods are required to gain a picture of reciprocal lattice space. We present here results of fast Fourier transforms of atomic coordinates of shocked crystals simulated by MD, and comment on the computing power required as a function of problem size. The relationship between reciprocal space and particular experimental geometries is discussed.

  17. Study on the structure of Bayer liquor with spectroscopy and MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Feng, Qiming; Liu, Kun; Chen, Yuandao; Zhang, Guofan

    2006-05-01

    The combination of spectroscopy analysis (Raman and IR) and MD simulation was applied to explore the structure characters of Bayer liquor. In this work, MD simulation had been used to probe the nature of sodium metal-aluminate ion pairing and its role in the stabilization of clusters. It was found that the maximum concentration of Al(OH)4- occurs in low caustic solutions, but in high caustic solution, the appearance of Al(OH)63- was found. Results of molecular dynamic simulation indicated that the formation of clustering of aluminates in solution, and the clusters stabilized by sodium ions made a contribution to the formation of polyaluminate.

  18. PuReMD-GPU: A reactive molecular dynamics simulation package for GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Kylasa, S.B.; Aktulga, H.M.; Grama, A.Y.

    2014-09-01

    We present an efficient and highly accurate GP-GPU implementation of our community code, PuReMD, for reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. PuReMD and its incorporation into LAMMPS (Reax/C) is used by a large number of research groups worldwide for simulating diverse systems ranging from biomembranes to explosives (RDX) at atomistic level of detail. The sub-femtosecond time-steps associated with ReaxFF strongly motivate significant improvements to per-timestep simulation time through effective use of GPUs. This paper presents, in detail, the design and implementation of PuReMD-GPU, which enables ReaxFF simulations on GPUs, as well as various performance optimization techniques we developed to obtain high performance on state-of-the-art hardware. Comprehensive experiments on model systems (bulk water and amorphous silica) are presented to quantify the performance improvements achieved by PuReMD-GPU and to verify its accuracy. In particular, our experiments show up to 16× improvement in runtime compared to our highly optimized CPU-only single-core ReaxFF implementation. PuReMD-GPU is a unique production code, and is currently available on request from the authors.

  19. Structure of overheated metal clusters: MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    The structure of overheated metal clusters appeared in condensation process was studied by computer simulation techniques. It was found that clusters with size larger than several tens of atoms have three layers: core part, intermediate dense packing layer and a gas- like shell with low density. The change of the size and structure of these layers with the variation of internal energy and the size of cluster is discussed.

  20. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-07-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package. PMID:23703210

  1. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package. PMID:23703210

  2. MD Simulation of Particle Orientation in Magnetic Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher; Günal

    1997-03-01

    We have done molecular-dynamics type simulations of particle re-orientation in a magnetic colloid, by a magnetic field during tape and disk manufacture. The model takes into account switching (in a Stoner- Wohlfarth model) as well as particle translation and rotation in response to magnetic, steric, Brownian, and hydrodynamic drag forces and torques. Magnetic interactions are fully included; hysteresis loops with and without magnetic interaction will be displayed, with corresponding Δ M curves. Images of the network structure at various points of the hysteresis loop will be shown. Further information is available at http:// www.mint.ua.edu/colloids/march.html.

  3. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Vener, M V; Odinokov, A V; Wehmeyer, C; Sebastiani, D

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)-glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898-915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short (+)N-H⋯O(-) bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm(-1). It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the (+)N-H⋯O(-) fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000-2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic

  4. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)-glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898-915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short +N-H⋯O- bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm-1. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the +N-H⋯O- fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000-2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic

  5. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Vener, M V; Odinokov, A V; Wehmeyer, C; Sebastiani, D

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)-glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898-915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short (+)N-H⋯O(-) bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm(-1). It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the (+)N-H⋯O(-) fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000-2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic

  6. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)–glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded β-sheet structure. The 1 μs NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898–915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}N–H⋯O{sup −} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup −1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}N–H⋯O{sup −} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000–2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is

  7. Structure of Anion-Conducting Polymers from Waxs and MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisken, Barbara; Tahmasebi, Sepehr; Schibli, Eric; Holdcroft, Steven

    The structure of novel polymers for anion exchange membranes (AEMs) is investigated using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a united-atom force field model based on the DREIDING force field. The polymers being studied are poly(benzimidazole) (PBI) derivatives including poly(dimethylbenzimidazole) (PDMBI), mesitylene poly(benzimidazole) (mes-PBI), and mesitylene poly(dimethylbenzimidazole) (mes-PDMBI). WAXS reveals an amorphous structure with two main length scales. By comparing simulation results to WAXS data, we attribute features observed in the scattering data to side-to-side spacing between polymer chains and to the parallel-ring stacking of the benzimidazole rings. Overall, we are able to validate the interpretation of scattering data by combining MD simulations and scattering experiments.

  8. Large-scale MD simulations investigating H plasma interactions with Tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusentino, Mary Alice; Wirth, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten is a prime candidate material for the divertor in future fusion reactors such as ITER. However, the tungsten divertor will need to be able to withstand high fluxes, on the order of 1024m-2s-1, of low energy hydrogen. It is crucial to understand both the tungsten surface response as well as the hydrogen retention and recycling for the divertor region. Molecular dynamics (MD) is a useful tool to study these effects. One issue with MD is that implantation fluxes tend to be very high, on the order of 1027 m-2s-1, due to time and computational limitations. By performing large scale MD on supercomputers, it is possible to reach more realistic fluxes of 1025 m-2s-1. Results will be presented from MD simulations from a 50 nm x 50 nm x 25 nm tungsten box at 1200 K and 2000 K. Hydrogen is implanted every 10 ps based on the 60 eV depth distribution calculated by SRIM, which amounts to a flux of 4 x 1025 m-2s-1. A modified version of the Juslin bond order W-H potential is used to describe the W-H interactions. Preliminary results show an initially high retention of hydrogen that accumulates in a sub-surface region. These simulations provide insight into the early stages of surface deformation as well as hydrogen retention for the tungsten divertor.

  9. Delivery of nitric oxide to the interior of mammalian cell by carbon nanotube: MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Raczyński, Przemysław; Górny, Krzysztof; Dawid, Aleksander; Gburski, Zygmunt

    2014-07-15

    Computer simulations have been performed to study the nanoindentation of phospholipid bilayer by the single-walled armchair carbon nanotube, filled with the nitric oxide molecules. The process has been simulated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) technique at physiological temperature T = 310 K with a constant pulling velocity of the nanotube. The force acting on the nanotube during membrane penetration has been calculated. We show that the indentation by carbon nanotube does not permanently destroy the membrane structure (self-sealing of the membrane occurs). The mobility of nitric oxide molecules during the membrane nanoindentation is discussed.

  10. Kinetics of CH4 and CO2 hydrate dissociation and gas bubble evolution via MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M; Coombe, D

    2014-03-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of gas hydrate dissociation comparing the behavior of CH4 and CO2 hydrates are presented. These simulations were based on a structurally correct theoretical gas hydrate crystal, coexisting with water. The MD system was first initialized and stabilized via a thorough energy minimization, constant volume-temperature ensemble and constant volume-energy ensemble simulations before proceeding to constant pressure-temperature simulations for targeted dissociation pressure and temperature responses. Gas bubble evolution mechanisms are demonstrated as well as key investigative properties such as system volume, density, energy, mean square displacements of the guest molecules, radial distribution functions, H2O order parameter, and statistics of hydrogen bonds. These simulations have established the essential similarities between CH4 and CO2 hydrate dissociation. The limiting behaviors at lower temperature (no dissociation) and higher temperature (complete melting and formation of a gas bubble) have been illustrated for both hydrates. Due to the shift in the known hydrate stability curves between guest molecules caused by the choice of water model as noted by other authors, the intermediate behavior (e.g., 260 K) showed distinct differences however. Also, because of the more hydrogen-bonding capability of CO2 in water, as reflected in its molecular parameters, higher solubility of dissociated CO2 in water was observed with a consequence of a smaller size of gas bubble formation. Additionally, a novel method for analyzing hydrate dissociation based on H-bond breakage has been proposed and used to quantify the dissociation behaviors of both CH4 and CO2 hydrates. Activation energies Ea values from our MD studies were obtained and evaluated against several other published laboratory and MD values. Intrinsic rate constants were estimated and upscaled. A kinetic reaction model consistent with macroscale fitted kinetic models has been proposed to

  11. Sub-Terrahertz Spectroscopy of E.COLI Dna: Experiment, Statistical Model, and MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizov, I.; Dorofeeva, T.; Khromova, T.; Gelmont, B.; Globus, T.

    2012-06-01

    We will present result of combined experimental and computational study of sub-THz absorption spectra from Escherichia coli (E.coli) DNA. Measurements were conducted using a Bruker FTIR spectrometer with a liquid helium cooled bolometer and a recently developed frequency domain sensor operating at room temperature, with spectral resolution of 0.25 cm-1 and 0.03 cm-1, correspondingly. We have earlier demonstrated that molecular dynamics (MD) simulation can be effectively applied for characterizing relatively small biological molecules, such as transfer RNA or small protein thioredoxin from E. coli , and help to understand and predict their absorption spectra. Large size of DNA macromolecules ( 5 million base pairs for E. coli DNA) prevents, however, direct application of MD simulation at the current level of computational capabilities. Therefore, by applying a second order Markov chain approach and Monte-Carlo technique, we have developed a new statistical model to construct DNA sequences from biological cells. These short representative sequences (20-60 base pairs) are built upon the most frequently repeated fragments (2-10 base pairs) in the original DNA. Using this new approach, we constructed DNA sequences for several non-pathogenic strains of E.coli, including a well-known strain BL21, uro-pathogenic strain, CFT073, and deadly EDL933 strain (O157:H7), and used MD simulations to calculate vibrational absorption spectra of these strains. Significant differences are clearly present in spectra of strains in averaged spectra and in all components for particular orientations. The mechanism of interaction of THz radiation with a biological molecule is studied by analyzing dynamics of atoms and correlation of local vibrations in the modeled molecule. Simulated THz vibrational spectra of DNA are compared with experimental results. With the spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1 or better, which is now available in experiments, the very easy discrimination between different

  12. Ionic liquid induced dehydration and domain closure in lysozyme: FCS and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Parui, Sridip; Jana, Biman; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2015-09-28

    Effect of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) on the structure and dynamics of the protein, lysozyme, is investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The FCS data indicate that addition of the RTIL ([pmim][Br]) leads to reduction in size and faster conformational dynamics of the protein. The hydrodynamic radius (rH) of lysozyme decreases from 18 Å in 0 M [pmim][Br] to 11 Å in 1.5 M [pmim][Br] while the conformational relaxation time decreases from 65 μs to 5 μs. Molecular origin of the collapse (size reduction) of lysozyme in aqueous RTIL is analyzed by MD simulation. The radial distribution function of water, RTIL cation, and RTIL anion from protein clearly indicates that addition of RTIL causes replacement of interfacial water by RTIL cation ([pmim](+)) from the first solvation layer of the protein providing a comparatively dehydrated environment. This preferential solvation of the protein by the RTIL cation extends up to ∼30 Å from the protein surface giving rise to a nanoscopic cage of overall radius 42 Å. In the nanoscopic cage of the RTIL (42 Å), volume fraction of the protein (radius 12 Å) is only about 2%. RTIL anion does not show any preferential solvation near protein surface. Comparison of effective radius obtained from simulation and from FCS data suggests that the "dry" protein (radius 12 Å) alone diffuses in a nanoscopic cage of RTIL (radius 42 Å). MD simulation further reveals a decrease in distance ("domain closure") between the two domains (alpha and beta) of the protein leading to a more compact structure compared to that in the native state. PMID:26429044

  13. Dynamics of biopolymers on nanomaterials studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.

    Neutron scattering has been proved to be a powerful tool to study the dynamics of biological systems under various conditions. This thesis intends to utilize neutron scattering techniques, combining with MD simulations, to develop fundamental understanding of several biologically interesting systems. Our systems include a drug delivery system containing Nanodiamonds with nucleic acid (RNA), and two specific model proteins, beta-Casein and Inorganic Pyrophosphatase (IPPase). RNA and nanodiamond (ND) both are suitable for drug-delivery applications in nano-biotechnology. The architecturally flexible RNA with catalytic functionality forms nanocomposites that can treat life-threatening diseases. The non-toxic ND has excellent mechanical and optical properties and functionalizable high surface area, and thus actively considered for biomedical applications. In this thesis, we utilized two tools, quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations to probe the effect of ND on RNA dynamics. Our work provides fundamental understanding of how hydrated RNA motions are affected in the RNA-ND nanocomposites. From the experimental and Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MD), we found that hydrated RNA motion is faster on ND surface than a freestanding one. MD Simulation results showed that the failure of Stokes Einstein relation results the presence of dynamic heterogeneities in the biomacromolecules. Radial pair distribution function from MD Simulation confirmed that the hydrophilic nature of ND attracts more water than RNA results the de-confinement of RNA on ND. Therefore, RNA exhibits faster motion in the presence of ND than freestanding RNA. In the second project, we studied the dynamics of a natively disordered protein beta-Casein which lacks secondary structures. In this study, the temperature and hydration effects on the dynamics of beta-Casein are explored by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS). We investigated the mean square displacement (MSD) of

  14. Mimicking titration experiments with MD simulations: A protocol for the investigation of pH-dependent effects on proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich

    2016-03-01

    Protein structure and function are highly dependent on the environmental pH. However, the temporal or spatial resolution of experimental approaches hampers direct observation of pH-induced conformational changes at the atomic level. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation strategies (e.g. constant pH MD) have been developed to bridge this gap. However, one frequent problem is the sampling of unrealistic conformations, which may also lead to poor pKa predictions. To address this problem, we have developed and benchmarked the pH-titration MD (pHtMD) approach, which is inspired by wet-lab titration experiments. We give several examples how the pHtMD protocol can be applied for pKa calculation including peptide systems, Staphylococcus nuclease (SNase), and the chaperone HdeA. For HdeA, pHtMD is also capable of monitoring pH-dependent dimer dissociation in accordance with experiments. We conclude that pHtMD represents a versatile tool for pKa value calculation and simulation of pH-dependent effects in proteins.

  15. Mimicking titration experiments with MD simulations: A protocol for the investigation of pH-dependent effects on proteins.

    PubMed

    Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich

    2016-03-03

    Protein structure and function are highly dependent on the environmental pH. However, the temporal or spatial resolution of experimental approaches hampers direct observation of pH-induced conformational changes at the atomic level. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation strategies (e.g. constant pH MD) have been developed to bridge this gap. However, one frequent problem is the sampling of unrealistic conformations, which may also lead to poor pKa predictions. To address this problem, we have developed and benchmarked the pH-titration MD (pHtMD) approach, which is inspired by wet-lab titration experiments. We give several examples how the pHtMD protocol can be applied for pKa calculation including peptide systems, Staphylococcus nuclease (SNase), and the chaperone HdeA. For HdeA, pHtMD is also capable of monitoring pH-dependent dimer dissociation in accordance with experiments. We conclude that pHtMD represents a versatile tool for pKa value calculation and simulation of pH-dependent effects in proteins.

  16. Prediction of drug-packaging interactions via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Peter; Brunsteiner, Michael; Khinast, Johannes

    2012-07-15

    The interaction between packaging materials and drug products is an important issue for the pharmaceutical industry, since during manufacturing, processing and storage a drug product is continuously exposed to various packaging materials. The experimental investigation of a great variety of different packaging material-drug product combinations in terms of efficacy and safety can be a costly and time-consuming task. In our work we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to evaluate the applicability of such methods to pre-screening of the packaging material-solute compatibility. The solvation free energy and the free energy of adsorption of diverse solute/solvent/solid systems were estimated. The results of our simulations agree with experimental values previously published in the literature, which indicates that the methods in question can be used to semi-quantitatively reproduce the solid-liquid interactions of the investigated systems.

  17. A study of QM/Langevin-MD simulation for oxygen-evolving center of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Waka; Kimura, Yoshiro; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Ogata, Koji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Yokojima, Satoshi

    2013-12-10

    We have performed three QM/Langevin-MD simulations for oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) and surrounding residues, which are different configurations of the oxidation numbers on Mn atoms in the Mn{sub 4}O{sub 5}Ca cluster. By analyzing these trajectories, we have observed sensitivity of the change to the configuration of Mn oxidation state on O atoms of carboxyl on three amino acids, Glu354, Ala344, and Glu333. The distances from Mn to O atoms in residues contacting with the Mn{sub 4}O{sub 5}Ca cluster were analyzed for the three trajectories. We found the good correlation of the distances among the simulations. However, the distances with Glu354, Ala344, and Glu333 have not shown the correlation. These residues can be sensitive index of the changes of Mn oxidation numbers.

  18. Diffusion of hydrocarbon in zeolite and effect due to pore topology: Neutron scattering and MD simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V. K.; Chaplot, S. L.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2014-02-01

    Here we report detailed dynamical landscape of propylene adsorbed in ZSM5 and Na-Y zeolites as studied by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Separation of propylene molecule from propane in the petrochemical industry is an important issue because it is one of the most demanding energetic separation processes due to their very close relative volatilities and molecular sizes. Aim here is to investigate the correlation of the host topology towards the dynamics of guest molecules. ZSM5 zeolite is typified by a network of intersecting channels while Na-Y has a network of spherical supercages interconnected by windows. Both neutron scattering and MD simulation studies indicated that translational diffusion of propylene is more restricted in ZSM5 compared to Na-Y zeolite. Fully atomistic MD simulation studies showed that the translation involves three different time scales and rotational motion of the propylene is much faster than translation. The observed dynamics in QENS spectrometer (ΔE ˜ 200 μeV) corresponds to one of the three translational components indicated in the MD simulation. The faster rotational motion is observed in a wider energy window spectrometer (ΔE ˜ 3 meV). MD simulation results also show some interesting features like, non-isotropic rotation in ZSM5 while it has been isotropic in Na-Y zeolite. It is also found that propylene molecules prefer to orient along channels of ZSM5 zeolite.

  19. Structural and dynamical aspects of Streptococcus gordonii FabH through molecular docking and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Amen; Abbasi, Sumra Wajid; Azam, Syed Sikander

    2015-07-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP-synthase III (FabH or KAS III) has become an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents which can overcome the multidrug resistance. Unraveling the fatty acid biosynthesis (FAB) metabolic pathway and understanding structural coordinates of FabH will provide valuable insights to target Streptococcus gordonii for curing oral infection. In this study, we designed inhibitors against therapeutic target FabH, in order to block the FAB pathway. As compared to other targets, FabH has more interactions with other proteins, located on the leading strand with higher codon adaptation index value and associated with lipid metabolism category of COG. Current study aims to gain in silico insights into the structural and dynamical aspect of S. gordonii FabH via molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The FabH protein is catalytically active in dimerization while it can lock in monomeric state. Current study highlights two residues Pro88 and Leu315 that are close to each other by dimerization. The active site of FabH is composed of the catalytic triad formed by residues Cys112, His249, and Asn279 in which Cys112 is involved in acetyl transfer, while His249 and Asn279 play an active role in decarboxylation. Docking analysis revealed that among the studied compounds, methyl-CoA disulfide has highest GOLD score (82.75), binding affinity (-11 kcal/mol) and exhibited consistently better interactions. During MD simulations, the FabH structure remained stable with the average RMSD value of 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å for undocked protein and docked complex, respectively. Further, crucial hydrogen bonding of the conserved catalytic triad for exhibiting high affinity between the FabH protein and ligand is observed by RDF analysis. The MD simulation results clearly demonstrated that binding of the inhibitor with S. gordonii FabH enhanced the structure and stabilized the dimeric FabH protein. Therefore, the inhibitor has the potential to become

  20. MD simulations of a doped ceria surface very large surface ion motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Micael; Wojcik, Mark; Hermansson, Kersti; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.; Muhammed, Mamoun

    2001-03-01

    Mean-square displacements (MSDs) and individual-ion square-displacements (ISDs) for the different constituents in Ca-doped CeO 2(0 1 1) slabs at 300 K have been studied as a function of depth from the surface. Constant pressure-constant temperature MD simulations were used. The MSDs are 2-3 times larger at the surface than in the bulk, but ISDs as large as ca. 150 times the surface MSD value were observed during short-time periods for anions next to an anion vacancy at the surface. The chemical implications of this kind of motion are important, since transient structural distortions of this magnitude will lead to large electron re-distributions.

  1. QM/MM MD simulations of La(III)-phosphopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Messner, Christoph B; Bonn, Günther K; Hofer, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Several bioanalytical enrichment techniques are based on the interactions of phosphopeptides with Ln(III) ions. In order to gain an improved understanding of these complexes and the respective ion-peptide interactions, hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of La(III) coordinating to the phosphopeptide VPQLEIVPNSpAEER were conducted. Simulations of di- as well as monoanionic phosphate groups were carried out. The La(III) ion and its first hydration layer, including the sidechain of the phosphoserine residue were treated quantum mechanically at RI-MP2/triple zeta level, whereas the remaining part of the system was treated with classical potentials. The simulation of the dianionic phosphopeptide revealed a 9-fold coordinated La(III) ion, with the phosphopeptide binding bi- as well as monodentate. The mean residence times (τ) of the first shell water molecules were 82 ps and 37 ps for the bi- and monodentate complexes, respectively, which is much higher compared to free La(III) in aqueous solution (τ=17 ps). The simulation of the monoanionic La(III)-phosphopeptide complex revealed a bidentate coordination throughout the 80 ps sampling period. An intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydrogen of the phosphate group and the backbone was observed and a τ value of 14 ps was obtained, which is much lower as for the dianionic complex.

  2. Structure of Bolaamphiphile Sophorolipid Micelles Characterized with SAXS, SANS, and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Manet, Sabine; Cuvier, Anne-Sophie; Valotteau, Claire; Fadda, Giulia C; Perez, Javier; Karakas, Esra; Abel, Stéphane; Baccile, Niki

    2015-10-15

    The micellar structure of sophorolipids, a glycolipid bolaamphiphile, is analyzed using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Numerical modeling of SAXS curves shows that micellar morphology in the noncharged system (pH< 5) is made of prolate ellipsoids of revolution with core-shell morphology. Opposed to most surfactant systems, the hydrophilic shell has a nonhomogeneous distribution of matter: the shell thickness in the axial direction of the ellipsoid is found to be practically zero, while it measures about 12 Å at its cross-section, thus forming a "coffee bean"-like shape. The use of a contrast-matching SANS experiment shows that the hydrophobic component of sophorolipids is actually distributed in a narrow spheroidal region in the micellar core. These data seem to indicate a complex distribution of sophorolipids within the micelle, divided into at least three domains: a pure hydrophobic core, a hydrophilic shell, and a region of less defined composition in the axial direction of the ellipsoid. To account for these results, we make the hypothesis that sophorolipid molecules acquire various configurations within the micelle including bent and linear, crossing the micellar core. These results are confirmed by MD simulations which do show the presence of multiple sophorolipid configurations when passing from spherical to ellipsoidal aggregates. Finally, we also used Rb(+) and Sr(2+) counterions in combination with anomalous SAXS experiments to probe the distribution of the COO(-) group of sophorolipids upon small pH increase (5 < pH < 7), where repulsive intermicellar interactions become important. The poor ASAXS signal shows that the COO(-) groups are rather diffused in the broad hydrophilic shell rather than at the outer micellar/water interface. PMID:26430903

  3. Carbon Nanotubes in Water: MD Simulations of Internal and External Flow, Self Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Halicioglu, Timur; Werder, Thomas; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have developed computational tools, based on particle codes, for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in aqueous environments. The interaction of CNTs with water is envisioned as a prototype for the design of engineering nano-devices, such as artificial sterocillia and molecular biosensors. Large scale simulations involving thousands of water molecules are possible due to our efficient parallel MD code that takes long range electrostatic interactions into account. Since CNTs can be considered as rolled up sheets of graphite, we expect the CNT-water interaction to be similar to the interaction of graphite with water. However, there are fundamental differences between considering graphite and CNTs, since the curvature of CNTs affects their chemical activity and also since capillary effects play an important role for both dynamic and static behaviour of materials inside CNTs. In recent studies Gordillo and Marti described the hydrogen bond structure as well as time dependent properties of water confined in CNTs. We are presenting results from the development of force fields describing the interaction of CNTs and water based on ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations. Furthermore, our results include both water flows external to CNTs and the behaviour of water nanodroplets inside heated CNTs. In the first case (external flows) the hydrophobic behaviour of CNTs is quantified and we analyze structural properties of water in the vicinity of CNTs with diagnostics such as hydrogen bond distribution, water dipole orientation and radial distribution functions. The presence of water leads to attractive forces between CNTs as a result of their hydrophobicity. Through extensive simulations we quantify these attractive forces in terms of the number and separation of the CNT. Results of our simulations involving arrays of CNTs indicate that these exhibit a hydrophobic behaviour that leads to self-organising structures capable of trapping water clusters

  4. Estimation of Hydrogen-Exchange Protection Factors from MD Simulation Based on Amide Hydrogen Bonding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hee; Venable, John D; Steckler, Caitlin; Cellitti, Susan E; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-09-28

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) studies have provided critical insight into our understanding of protein folding, structure, and dynamics. More recently, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) has become a widely applicable tool for HX studies. The interpretation of the wealth of data generated by HX-MS experiments as well as other HX methods would greatly benefit from the availability of exchange predictions derived from structures or models for comparison with experiment. Most reported computational HX modeling studies have employed solvent-accessible-surface-area based metrics in attempts to interpret HX data on the basis of structures or models. In this study, a computational HX-MS prediction method based on classification of the amide hydrogen bonding modes mimicking the local unfolding model is demonstrated. Analysis of the NH bonding configurations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation snapshots is used to determine partitioning over bonded and nonbonded NH states and is directly mapped into a protection factor (PF) using a logistics growth function. Predicted PFs are then used for calculating deuteration values of peptides and compared with experimental data. Hydrogen exchange MS data for fatty acid synthase thioesterase (FAS-TE) collected for a range of pHs and temperatures was used for detailed evaluation of the approach. High correlation between prediction and experiment for observable fragment peptides is observed in the FAS-TE and additional benchmarking systems that included various apo/holo proteins for which literature data were available. In addition, it is shown that HX modeling can improve experimental resolution through decomposition of in-exchange curves into rate classes, which correlate with prediction from MD. Successful rate class decompositions provide further evidence that the presented approach captures the underlying physical processes correctly at the single residue level. This assessment is further strengthened in a comparison of

  5. Methodologies for the Analysis of Instantaneous Lipid Diffusion in MD Simulations of Large Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chavent, Matthieu; Reddy, Tyler; Goose, Joseph; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Stone, John E.; Jobard, Bruno; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between lipids and membrane proteins play a key role in determining the nanoscale dynamic and structural properties of biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a valuable tool for studying membrane models, complementing experimental approaches. It is now possible to simulate large membrane systems, such as simplified models of bacterial and viral envelope membranes. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop tools to visualize and quantify the dynamics of these immense systems, which typically are comprised of millions of particles. To tackle this issue, we have developed visual and quantitative analyses of molecular positions and their velocity field using path line, vector field and streamline techniques. This allows us to highlight large, transient flow-like movements of lipids and to better understand crowding within the lipid bilayer. The current study focuses on visualization and analysis of lipid dynamics. However, the methods are flexible and can be readily applied to e.g. proteins and nanoparticles within large complex membranes. The protocols developed here are readily accessible both as a plugin for the molecular visualization program VMD and as a module for the MDAnalysis library. PMID:25341001

  6. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  7. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  8. A hierarchical coarse-grained (all-atom to all residue) approach to peptides (P1, P2) binding with a graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Kuang, Zhifeng; Farmer, Barry; Kim, Sang; Naik, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    Recently, Kim et al. [1] have found that peptides P1: HSSYWYAFNNKT and P2: EPLQLKM bind selectively to graphene surfaces and edges respectively which are critical in modulating both the mechanical as well as electronic transport properties of graphene. Such distinctions in binding sites (edge versus surface) observed in electron micrographs were verified by computer simulation by an all-atomic model that captures the pi-pi bonding. We propose a hierarchical approach that involves input from the all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) study (with atomistic detail) into a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation to extend this study further to a larger scale. The binding energy of a free amino acid with the graphene sheet from all-atom simulation is used in the interaction parameter for the coarse-grained approach. Peptide chain executes its stochastic motion with the Metropolis algorithm. We investigate a number of local and global physical quantities and find that peptide P1 is likely to bind more strongly to graphene sheet than P2 and that it is anchored by three residues ^4Y^5W^6Y. [1] S.N. Kim et al J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 14480 (2011).

  9. Investigation of spreading characteristics of nano-droplet on solid substrate using MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Nahid

    Surface wettability and spreading of liquid droplets on solid surfaces are of significant fundamental and practical importance in various fields of science and technology, ranging from classical coating and spray systems to the modern micro and nanofluidic devices, and biotechnology. Due to the complexity of solid/liquid/vapor interfaces, there are still difficulties in accurately predicting the behavior of liquid droplets on solid surfaces. Droplet spreading on a surface represents a multi-scale phenomenon with scales ranging from continuum to molecular. In this thesis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been employed to investigate wetting and spreading characteristics of a nanodroplet on solid surfaces. The work focuses on the development of correlations and scaling laws to examine the effect of droplet size on the spreading characters. The dynamic spreading of an initially spherical liquid droplet in contact with a solid surface and surrounded by ambient gas has been studied under forced and spontaneous spreading. An efficient algorithm has been developed to track the liquid-phase interface and the dynamic contact angle. The algorithm was demonstrated to reproduce the entire wetting regime by varying the solid-liquid interaction energy parameters. Extensive simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of surface and liquid droplet characteristics on the wetting phenomena and contact angle. In the first set of the simulations, liquid droplet, solid surface and ambient gas were modeled using argon atoms. The next set of simulations was performed using more realistic potential functions to simulate water SVS-B molecules for liquid, silicon crystal for solid surface, and nitrogen molecules for the ambient gas. Results for the argon droplet indicate a highly complex relationship between the contact angle and surface and liquid parameters. The spreading behavior was analyzed in terms of the temporal evolution of the dynamic contact angle and

  10. Atomic level insights into realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes through MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Maiti, Prabal K.; Bharatam, Prasad V.

    2016-09-01

    Computational studies performed on dendrimer-drug complexes usually consider 1:1 stoichiometry, which is far from reality, since in experiments more number of drug molecules get encapsulated inside a dendrimer. In the present study, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were implemented to characterize the more realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes (1:n stoichiometry) in order to understand the effect of high drug loading on the structural properties and also to unveil the atomistic level details. For this purpose, possible inclusion complexes of model drug Nateglinide (Ntg) (antidiabetic, belongs to Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II) with amine- and acetyl-terminated G4 poly(amidoamine) (G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac)) dendrimers at neutral and low pH conditions are explored in this work. MD simulation analysis on dendrimer-drug complexes revealed that the drug encapsulation efficiency of G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac) dendrimers at neutral pH was 6 and 5, respectively, while at low pH it was 12 and 13, respectively. Center-of-mass distance analysis showed that most of the drug molecules are located in the interior hydrophobic pockets of G4 PAMAM(NH2) at both the pH; while in the case of G4 PAMAM(Ac), most of them are distributed near to the surface at neutral pH and in the interior hydrophobic pockets at low pH. Structural properties such as radius of gyration, shape, radial density distribution, and solvent accessible surface area of dendrimer-drug complexes were also assessed and compared with that of the drug unloaded dendrimers. Further, binding energy calculations using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach revealed that the location of drug molecules in the dendrimer is not the decisive factor for the higher and lower binding affinity of the complex, but the charged state of dendrimer and drug, intermolecular interactions, pH-induced conformational changes, and surface groups of dendrimer do play an

  11. All-atom force field for molecular dynamics simulations on organotransition metal solids and liquids. Application to M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) compounds.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Carlos E S; Canongia Lopes, José N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2013-10-31

    A previously developed OPLS-based all-atom force field for organometallic compounds was extended to a series of first-, second-, and third-row transition metals based on the study of M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) complexes. For materials that are solid at ambient temperature and pressure (M = Cr, Mo, W) the validation of the force field was based on reported structural data and on the standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at 298.15 K, experimentally determined by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry using samples corresponding to a specific and well-characterized crystalline phase: Δ(sub)H(m)° = 72.6 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Cr(CO)(6), 73.4 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Mo(CO)(6), and 77.8 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for W(CO)(6). For liquids, where problems of polymorphism or phase mixtures are absent, critically analyzed literature data were used. The force field was able to reproduce the volumetric properties of the test set (density and unit cell volume) with an average deviations smaller than 2% and the experimentally determined enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization with an accuracy better than 2.3 kJ·mol(–1). The Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function parameters used to calculate the repulsive and dispersion contributions of the metals within the framework of the force field were found to be transferable between chromium, iron, and nickel (first row) and between molybdenum and ruthenium (second row). PMID:24079472

  12. PUPIL: A Software Integration System for Multi-Scale QM/MM-MD Simulations and Its Application to Biomolecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Torras, Juan; Roberts, Benjamin P; Seabra, Gustavo M; Trickey, Samuel B

    2015-01-01

    PUPIL (Program for User Package Interfacing and Linking) implements a distinctive multi-scale approach to hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations. Originally developed to interface different external programs for multi-scale simulation with applications in the materials sciences, PUPIL is finding increasing use in the study of complex biological systems. Advanced MD techniques from the external packages can be applied readily to a hybrid QM/MM treatment in which the forces and energy for the QM region can be computed by any of the QM methods available in any of the other external packages. Here, we give a survey of PUPIL design philosophy, main features, and key implementation decisions, with an orientation to biomolecular simulation. We discuss recently implemented features which enable highly realistic simulations of complex biological systems which have more than one active site that must be treated concurrently. Examples are given.

  13. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigating protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.

  14. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigatingmore » protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.« less

  15. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C-H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: 1H-13C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C-H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of 13C or 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R1, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C-H bond effective reorientational correlation time τe, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of 13C R1 and R1ρ relaxation rates, as well as 1H-13C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τe from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g1 methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τe-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τe-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C-H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C-H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD simulations of amphiphilic bilayers such as lipid membranes.

  16. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C–H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C–H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of {sup 13}C or {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R{sub 1}, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C–H bond effective reorientational correlation time τ{sub e}, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of {sup 13}C R{sub 1} and R{sub 1ρ} relaxation rates, as well as {sup 1}H−{sup 13}C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τ{sub e} from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g{sub 1} methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τ{sub e}-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τ{sub e}-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C–H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C–H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD

  17. Kinetic Cooperativity, Loop Dynamics, and Allostery from NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschweiler, Rafael

    The hallmark of glucokinase (GCK), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose during glycolysis, is its kinetic cooperativity whose understanding at atomic detail has remained open since its discovery over 40 years ago. I will discuss how the origin of kinetic cooperativity is rooted in intramolecular protein dynamics using NMR relaxation data of 17 isoleucines distributed over all parts of GCK. Residues of glucose-free GCK located in the small domain display a distinct exchange behavior involving multiple conformers that are substantially populated, whereas in the glucose-bound form these dynamic processes are quenched. The conformational exchange process directly competes with the enzymatic turnover at physiological glucose concentrations, thereby generating the sigmoidal rate dependence that defines kinetic cooperativity. The flexible nature of protein loops and the timescales of their dynamics are critical for many biologically important events at the molecular level, such as protein interaction and recognition processes. Based on a library of proteins, rules about loop dynamics in terms of amplitude and timescales can be derived using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and NMR data. These rules have been implemented in the new web server ToeLoop (for Timescales Of Every Loop) that permits the prediction of loop dynamics based on an average 3D protein structure (http://spin.ccic.ohio-state.edu/index.php/loop/index).

  18. Conformation switching of AIM2 PYD domain revealed by NMR relaxation and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haobo; Yang, Lijiang; Niu, Xiaogang

    2016-04-29

    Protein absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a double-strand DNA (ds DNA) sensor mainly located in cytoplasm of cell. It includes one N terminal PYD domain and one C terminal HIN domain. When the ds DNA such as DNA viruses and bacteria entered cytoplasm, the HIN domain of AIM2 will recognize and bind to DNA, and the PYD domain will bind to ASC protein which will result in the formation of AIM2 inflammasome. Three AIM2 PYD domain structures have been solved, but every structure yields a unique conformation around the α3 helix region. To understand why different AIM2 PYD structures show different conformations in this region, we use NMR relaxation techniques to study the backbone dynamics of mouse AIM2 PYD domain and perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on both mouse and human AIM2 PYD structures. Our results indicate that this region is highly flexible in both mouse and human AIM2 PYD domains, and the PYD domain may exist as a conformation ensemble in solution. Different environment makes the population vary among pre-existing conformational substrates of the ensemble, which may be the reason why different AIM2 PYD structures were observed under different conditions. Further docking analysis reveals that the conformation switching may be important for the autoinhibition of the AIM2 protein.

  19. Distribution of Drug Molecules in Lipid Membranes: Neutron Diffraction and MD Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Mihailescu, Ella; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. In this study, using neutron diffraction, the DOPC lipid bilayer structure (with and without drug) as well as the distribution of a model NSAID (Ibuprofen) as a function of its position along the membrane normal was obtained at sub-nanometer resolution. It was found that the bilayer thickness reduces as the drug is added. Further, the results are successfully compared with atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. Based on this successful comparison and motivated by atomic details from MD, quasi-molecular modeling of the lipid membrane is being carried out and will be presented. The above study is expected to provide an effective methodology to design drug delivery nanoparticles based on a variety of soft condensed matter such as lipids or polymers.

  20. An effective all-atom potential for proteins

    PubMed Central

    Irbäck, Anders; Mitternacht, Simon; Mohanty, Sandipan

    2009-01-01

    We describe and test an implicit solvent all-atom potential for simulations of protein folding and aggregation. The potential is developed through studies of structural and thermodynamic properties of 17 peptides with diverse secondary structure. Results obtained using the final form of the potential are presented for all these peptides. The same model, with unchanged parameters, is furthermore applied to a heterodimeric coiled-coil system, a mixed α/β protein and a three-helix-bundle protein, with very good results. The computational efficiency of the potential makes it possible to investigate the free-energy landscape of these 49–67-residue systems with high statistical accuracy, using only modest computational resources by today's standards. PACS Codes: 87.14.E-, 87.15.A-, 87.15.Cc PMID:19356242

  1. From force-fields to photons: MD simulations of dye-labeled nucleic acids and Monte Carlo modeling of FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldner, Lori

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful technique for understanding the structural fluctuations and transformations of RNA, DNA and proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a window into the nature of these fluctuations on a different, faster, time scale. We use Monte Carlo methods to model and compare FRET data from dye-labeled RNA with what might be predicted from the MD simulation. With a few notable exceptions, the contribution of fluorophore and linker dynamics to these FRET measurements has not been investigated. We include the dynamics of the ground state dyes and linkers in our study of a 16mer double-stranded RNA. Water is included explicitly in the simulation. Cyanine dyes are attached at either the 3' or 5' ends with a 3 carbon linker, and differences in labeling schemes are discussed.[4pt] Work done in collaboration with Peker Milas, Benjamin D. Gamari, and Louis Parrot.

  2. Single molecule force spectroscopy data and BD- and MD simulations on the blood protein von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Posch, Sandra; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Schwarzl, Richard; Karner, Andreas; Radtke, Matthias; Gräter, Frauke; Obser, Tobias; König, Gesa; Brehm, Maria A; Gruber, Hermann J; Netz, Roland R; Baldauf, Carsten; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We here give information for a deeper understanding of single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) data through the example of the blood protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). It is also shown, how fitting of rupture forces versus loading rate profiles in the molecular dynamics (MD) loading-rate range can be used to demonstrate the qualitative agreement between SMFS and MD simulations. The recently developed model by Bullerjahn, Sturm, and Kroy (BSK) was used for this demonstration. Further, Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, which can be utilized to estimate the lifetimes of intramolecular VWF interactions under physiological shear, are described. For interpretation and discussion of the methods and data presented here, we would like to directly point the reader to the related research paper, "Mutual A domain interactions in the force sensing protein von Willebrand Factor" (Posch et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27508268

  3. Single molecule force spectroscopy data and BD- and MD simulations on the blood protein von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Posch, Sandra; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Schwarzl, Richard; Karner, Andreas; Radtke, Matthias; Gräter, Frauke; Obser, Tobias; König, Gesa; Brehm, Maria A; Gruber, Hermann J; Netz, Roland R; Baldauf, Carsten; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We here give information for a deeper understanding of single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) data through the example of the blood protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). It is also shown, how fitting of rupture forces versus loading rate profiles in the molecular dynamics (MD) loading-rate range can be used to demonstrate the qualitative agreement between SMFS and MD simulations. The recently developed model by Bullerjahn, Sturm, and Kroy (BSK) was used for this demonstration. Further, Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations, which can be utilized to estimate the lifetimes of intramolecular VWF interactions under physiological shear, are described. For interpretation and discussion of the methods and data presented here, we would like to directly point the reader to the related research paper, "Mutual A domain interactions in the force sensing protein von Willebrand Factor" (Posch et al., 2016) [1].

  4. Dynamics of a globular protein and its hydration water studied by neutron scattering and MD simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Lagi, Marco; Chu, Xiang-qiang; Zhang, Yang; Kim, Chansoo; Faraone, Antonio; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-01-01

    This review article describes our neutron scattering experiments made in the past four years for the understanding of the single-particle (hydrogen atom) dynamics of a protein and its hydration water and the strong coupling between them. We found that the key to this strong coupling is the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon occurring at around T L = 225±5 K in the hydration water. On lowering of the temperature toward FSC, the structure of hydration water makes a transition from predominantly the high density form (HDL), a more fluid state, to predominantly the low density formmore » (LDL), a less fluid state, derived from the existence of a liquid–liquid critical point at an elevated pressure. We show experimentally that this sudden switch in the mobility of hydration water on Lysozyme, B-DNA and RNA triggers the dynamic transition, at a temperature T D = 220 K, for these biopolymers. In the glassy state, below T D , the biopolymers lose their vital conformational flexibility resulting in a substantial diminishing of their biological functions. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a realistic model of hydrated lysozyme powder, which confirms the existence of the FSC and the hydration level dependence of the FSC temperature. Furthermore, we show a striking feature in the short time relaxation ( β -relaxation) of protein dynamics, which is the logarithmic decay spanning 3 decades (from ps to ns). The long time α -relaxation shows instead a diffusive behavior, which supports the liquid-like motions of protein constituents. We then discuss our recent high-resolution X-ray inelastic scattering studies of globular proteins, Lysozyme and Bovine Serum Albumin. We were able to measure the dispersion relations of collective, intra-protein phonon-like excitations in these proteins for the first time. We found that the phonon energies show a marked softening and at the same time their population increases

  5. Coupling CP-MD simulations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy: exploring the structure of oxaliplatin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Beret, Elizabeth C; Provost, Karine; Müller, Diane; Marcos, Enrique Sánchez

    2009-09-10

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach applying X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics (CP-MD) simulations is used to get insight into the structural determination of oxaliplatin, a third-generation anticancer drug of the cisplatin family, in aqueous solution. Experimental Pt L(III)-edge EXAFS and XANES spectra of oxaliplatin in water are compared with theoretical XAS spectra. The latter are obtained as statistically averaged spectra computed for a set of selected snapshots extracted from the MD trajectory of ethyldiamineoxalatoplatinum(II) (EDO-Pt) in liquid water. This compound is a simplified structure of oxaliplatin, where the outer part of the cyclohexane ring contained in the cyclohexanediamine ligand of oxaliplatin has been removed. We show that EDO-Pt is an appropriate model to simulate the spectroscopical properties of oxaliplatin given that the cyclohexane ring does not generate particular features in neither the EXAFS nor the XANES spectra. The computation of average EXAFS spectra using structures from the MD simulation in which atoms are selected according to different cutoff radii around the Pt center allows the assignment of spectral features to particular structural motifs, both in k and R-spaces. The outer oxygen atoms of the oxalate ligand (R(Pt-O(II)) = 3.97 +/- 0.03 A) are responsible for a well-defined hump at around 6.5 A(-1) in the k(2)-weighted EXAFS spectrum. The conventional EXAFS analysis data procedure is reexamined by its application to the simulated average EXAFS spectra. The structural parameters resulting from the fit may then be compared with those obtained from the simulation, providing an estimation of the methodological error associated with the global fitting procedure. A thorough discussion on the synergy between the experimental and theoretical XAS approaches is presented, and evidence for the detection of a slight hydration structure around the Pt complex is shown, leading to the suggestion of a

  6. An Integrated Procedure for Tree N-body Simulations: FLY and AstroMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Buonomo, F.; Gheller, C.

    We present a new code for evolving three-dimensional self-gravitating collisionless systems with a large number of particles N >= 107. FLY (Fast Level-based N-bodY code) is a fully parallel code based on a tree algorithm. It adopts periodic boundary conditions implemented by means of the Ewald summation technique. FLY is based on the one-side communication paradigm for sharing data among the processors that access remote private data, avoiding any kind of synchronization. The code was originally developed on a CRAY T3E system using the SHMEM library and it was ported to SGI ORIGIN 2000 and IBM SP (on the latter making use of the LAPI library). FLY version 1.1 is open source, freely available code. FLY output data can be analysed with AstroMD, an analysis and visualization tool specifically designed for astrophysical data. AstroMD can manage different physical quantities. It can find structures without well defined shape or symmetries, and perform quantitative calculations on selected regions. AstroMD is freely available.

  7. Solvation structure and dynamics of Na+ in liquid ammonia studied by ONIOM-XS MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripradite, Jarukorn; Tongraar, Anan; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-12-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) technique based on the ONIOM-XS method, known as the ONIOM-XS MD, has been applied to investigate the solvation structure and dynamics of Na+ in liquid ammonia. Regarding the ONIOM-XS MD results, it is observed that Na+ is able to order the surrounding ammonia molecules to form its specific first and second solvation shells with the average coordination numbers of 5.1 and 11.2, respectively. The first solvation shell of Na+ is rather well-defined, forming a preferred 5-fold coordinated complex with a distorted square pyramidal geometry. In this respect, the most preferential Na+(NH3)5 species could convert back and forth to the lower probability Na+(NH3)6 and Na+(NH3)4 configurations. The second solvation shell of Na+ is detectable, in which a number of ammonia molecules, ranging from 7 to 14, are involved in this layer and they are arranged according to recognizable influence of the ion.

  8. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  9. All-atom molecular dynamics analysis of multi-peptide systems reproduces peptide solubility in line with experimental observations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yutaka; Suenaga, Atsushi; Sato, Yuji; Kosuda, Satoshi; Taiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the contribution of individual amino acids to protein and peptide solubility, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 106 Å3 cubic boxes containing ~3 × 104 water molecules and 27 tetra-peptides regularly positioned at 23 Å from each other and composed of a single amino acid type for all natural amino acids but cysteine and glycine. The calculations were performed using Amber with a standard force field on a special purpose MDGRAPE-3 computer, without introducing any “artificial” hydrophobic interactions. Tetra-peptides composed of I, V, L, M, N, Q, F, W, Y, and H formed large amorphous clusters, and those containing A, P, S, and T formed smaller ones. Tetra-peptides made of D, E, K, and R did not cluster at all. These observations correlated well with experimental solubility tendencies as well as hydrophobicity scales with correlation coefficients of 0.5 to > 0.9. Repulsive Coulomb interactions were dominant in ensuring high solubility, whereas both Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) energies contributed to the aggregations of low solubility amino acids. Overall, this very first all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a multi-peptide system appears to reproduce the basic properties of peptide solubility, essentially in line with experimental observations. PMID:26817663

  10. Folding of proteins with an all-atom Go-model.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, J; Qin, M; Liu, F; Wang, W

    2008-06-21

    The Go-like potential at a residual level has been successfully applied to the folding of proteins in many previous works. However, taking into consideration more detailed structural information in the atomic level, the definition of contacts used in these traditional Go-models may not be suitable for all-atom simulations. Here, in this work, we develop a rational definition of contacts considering the screening effect in the crowded intramolecular environment. In such a scheme, a large amount of screened atom pairs are excluded and the number of contacts is decreased compared to the case of the traditional definition. These contacts defined by such a new definition are compatible with the all-atom representation of protein structures. To verify the rationality of the new definition of contacts, the folding of proteins CI2 and SH3 is simulated by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. A high folding cooperativity and good correlation of the simulated Phi-values with those obtained experimentally, especially for CI2, are found. This suggests that the all-atom Go-model is improved compared to the traditional Go-model. Based on the comparison of the Phi-values, the roles of side chains in the folding are discussed, and it is concluded that the side-chain structures are more important for local contacts in determining the transition state structures. Moreover, the relations between side chain and backbone orderings are also discussed.

  11. Lipid bilayer permeation of aliphatic amine and carboxylic acid drugs: rates of insertion, translocation and dissociation from MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Tuğçe; Küçük, Sami Emre; Sezer, Deniz

    2016-09-21

    Aliphatic amines (AAs) and carboxylic acids (CAs) constitute the two most commonly occurring chemical groups among orally active drugs [Manallack, et al., ChemMedChem, 2013, 8, 242]. Here, we aim to rationalize this observation in terms of molecular properties that are essential for drug bioavailability. To this end, the permeation of the AA drug dyclonine and the CA drug 4-phenylbutyrate through a lipid bilayer is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Permeability coefficients for the neutral and ionized forms of these drugs are calculated using the inhomogeneous solubility-diffusion model. To draw conclusions about other AA and CA drugs, the permeability coefficient is expressed as a sum over contributions from drug insertion into, translocation across, and dissociation from the lipid bilayer. Simple but general expressions for each of these separate steps are obtained and validated against the MD simulations of dyclonine and phenylbutyrate. We conclude that the neutral forms of most AA and CA drugs have large permeability coefficients (>1 cm s(-1)), while their ionized forms ensure solubility in aqueous environments. Thus, a physicochemical rationale for the reported abundance of AAs and CAs among drugs is provided.

  12. Lipid bilayer permeation of aliphatic amine and carboxylic acid drugs: rates of insertion, translocation and dissociation from MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Tuğçe; Küçük, Sami Emre; Sezer, Deniz

    2016-09-21

    Aliphatic amines (AAs) and carboxylic acids (CAs) constitute the two most commonly occurring chemical groups among orally active drugs [Manallack, et al., ChemMedChem, 2013, 8, 242]. Here, we aim to rationalize this observation in terms of molecular properties that are essential for drug bioavailability. To this end, the permeation of the AA drug dyclonine and the CA drug 4-phenylbutyrate through a lipid bilayer is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Permeability coefficients for the neutral and ionized forms of these drugs are calculated using the inhomogeneous solubility-diffusion model. To draw conclusions about other AA and CA drugs, the permeability coefficient is expressed as a sum over contributions from drug insertion into, translocation across, and dissociation from the lipid bilayer. Simple but general expressions for each of these separate steps are obtained and validated against the MD simulations of dyclonine and phenylbutyrate. We conclude that the neutral forms of most AA and CA drugs have large permeability coefficients (>1 cm s(-1)), while their ionized forms ensure solubility in aqueous environments. Thus, a physicochemical rationale for the reported abundance of AAs and CAs among drugs is provided. PMID:27539552

  13. Static and dynamic properties of confined, cold ion plasmas: MD (molecular dynamics) simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Some four years ago it was suggested that in the new generation of heavy ion accelerator storage rings for multiply charged ions, being planned in Europe, one may well attain internal temperatures that would correspond to very cold plasmas. Since that time, the techniques of electron or laser cooling of such beams has evolved and it may well be possible to reach temperatures corresponding to a plasma coupling parameter {Gamma} >> 100. I was fortunate to have had an opportunity to collaborate during 1986-87 with my former colleague Aneesur Rahman, of Molecular Dynamics fame, and we adapted the MD method to the calculation of the properties of cold confined plasmas. After Rahman's premature death two years ago I have continued the exploration of these systems and would like to summarize the results here. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  14. A combination of docking, QM/MM methods, and MD simulation for binding affinity estimation of metalloprotein ligands.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Akash; Lukacova, Viera; Comez, Dogan; Kroll, Daniel M; Raha, Soumyendu; Balaz, Stefan

    2005-08-25

    To alleviate the problems in the receptor-based design of metalloprotein ligands due to inadequacies in the force-field description of coordination bonds, a four-tier approach was devised. Representative ligand-metalloprotein interaction energies are obtained by subsequent application of (1) docking with metal-binding-guided selection of modes, (2) optimization of the ligand-metalloprotein complex geometry by combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, (3) conformational sampling of the complex with constrained metal bonds by force-field-based molecular dynamics (MD), and (4) a single point QM/MM energy calculation for the time-averaged structures. The QM/MM interaction energies are, in a linear combination with the desolvation-characterizing changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas, correlated with experimental data. The approach was applied to structural correlation of published binding free energies of a diverse set of 28 hydroxamate inhibitors to zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Inclusion of steps 3 and 4 significantly improved both correlation and prediction. The two descriptors explained 90% of variance in inhibition constants of all 28 inhibitors, ranging from 0.08 to 349 nM, with the average unassigned error of 0.318 log units. The structural and energetic information obtained from the time-averaged MD simulation results helped understand the differences in binding modes of related compounds.

  15. "Structure-making" ability of Na+ in dilute aqueous solution: an ONIOM-XS MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Pattrawan; Tongraar, Anan; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2013-02-28

    An ONIOM-XS MD simulation has been performed to characterize the "structure-making" ability of Na(+) in dilute aqueous solution. The region of most interest, i.e., a sphere that includes Na(+) and its surrounding water molecules, was treated at the HF level of accuracy using LANL2DZ and DZP basis sets for the ion and waters, respectively, whereas the rest of the system was described by classical pair potentials. Detailed analyzes of the ONIOM-XS MD trajectories clearly show that Na(+) is able to order the structure of waters in its surroundings, forming two prevalent Na(+)(H(2)O)(5) and Na(+)(H(2)O)(6) species. Interestingly, it is observed that these 5-fold and 6-fold coordinated complexes can convert back and forth with some degrees of flexibility, leading to frequent rearrangements of the Na(+) hydrates as well as numerous attempts of inner-shell water molecules to interchange with waters in the outer region. Such a phenomenon clearly demonstrates the weak "structure-making" ability of Na(+) in aqueous solution.

  16. QMD and classical MD simulation of alpha boron and boron-carbide behavior under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilkin, Alexey; Korotaev, Pavel; Kuksin, Alexey; Pokatashkin, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    Boron and some boron-rich compounds are super-hard and light-weighted material with a wide range of different applications. Nevertheless, the question of its behavior under pressure is still open. In the present work we study the equation of state (EOS), stability and deformation of α-B and B4C under high pressure within quantum and classical molecular dynamics (QMD and MD). Based on QMD results the finite temperature EOSs are revealed. CBC chain bending, amorphization and recrystallization of B4C are investigated under hydrostatic, uniform and uniaxial compression. The influence of nonhydrostatic loading is discussed. Angular dependent interatomic potentials are derived by force-matching method. The properties of α-B and B4C, obtained by classical potential, are verified. Structure, bulk modulus, pressure-volume relation, Gruneisen and thermal expansion coefficients are in good agreement with both ab initio and experimental data. These potentials are used to study shock wave propagation in a single crystal of α-B and B4C. Two mechanisms of shear deformation are observed: stacking fault formation and local amorphization. The crystallographic orientations of defects are in a good agreement with experiments.

  17. Direct MD Simulations of Terahertz Absorption and 2D Spectroscopy Applied to Explosive Crystals.

    PubMed

    Katz, G; Zybin, S; Goddard, W A; Zeiri, Y; Kosloff, R

    2014-03-01

    A direct molecular dynamics simulation of the THz spectrum of a molecular crystal is presented. A time-dependent electric field is added to a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal slab. The absorption spectrum is composed from the energy dissipated calculated from a series of applied pulses characterized by a carrier frequency. The spectrum of crystalline cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) were simulated with the ReaxFF force field. The proposed direct method avoids the linear response and harmonic approximations. A multidimensional extension of the spectroscopy is suggested and simulated based on the nonlinear response to a single polarized pulse of radiation in the perpendicular polarization direction. PMID:26274066

  18. QM/MD simulation of SWNT nucleation on transition-metal carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Yamane, Honami; Ohta, Yasuhito; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-11-10

    The mechanism and kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation from Fe- and Ni-carbide nanoparticle precursors have been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. The dependence of the nucleation mechanism and its kinetics on environmental factors, including temperature and metal-carbide carbon concentration, has also been elucidated. It was observed that SWNT nucleation occurred via three distinct stages, viz. the precipitation of the carbon from the metal-carbide, the formation of a "surface/subsurface" carbide intermediate species, and finally the formation of a nascent sp(2)-hybidrized carbon structure supported by the metal catalyst. The SWNT cap nucleation mechanism itself was unaffected by carbon concentration and/or temperature. However, the kinetics of SWNT nucleation exhibited distinct dependences on these same factors. In particular, SWNT nucleation from Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticles proceeded more favorably compared to nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) nanoparticles. Although SWNT nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) and Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticle precursors occurred via an identical route, the ultimate outcomes of these processes also differed substantially. Explicitly, the Ni(x)-supported sp(2)-hybridized carbon structures tended to encapsulate the catalyst particle itself, whereas the Fe(x)-supported structures tended to form isolated SWNT cap structures on the catalyst surface. These differences in SWNT nucleation kinetics were attributed directly to the relative strengths of the metal-carbon interaction, which also dictates the precipitation of carbon from the nanoparticle bulk and the longevity of the resultant surface/subsurface carbide species. The stability of the surface/subsurface carbide was also influenced by the phase of the nanoparticle itself. The observations agree well with experimentally available data for SWNT growth on iron and nickel catalyst particles.

  19. Energetics of β-turn formation in a mutant peptide YPGDV from influenza hemagglutinin: an MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rashmi Tambe; Sasidhar, Yellamraju U

    2013-11-14

    Reverse turns play an important role in protein folding, molecular recognition and in eliciting immune response. While sequence determinants of reverse turns are known, not much is known about their energetics. In this paper we have investigated the thermodynamics of a reverse turn sequence YPGDV, an experimentally well characterized turn sequence, using molecular dynamics simulations performed over a range of temperatures from 280-360 K using GROMACS 4.0.4 software and all atom OPLS-AA/L force field. The change in folding free energy (ΔAfolding) for the β-turn formation in YPGDV peptide shows a linear relationship with temperature. We find that the entropy change (ΔSfolding) for the β-turn formation is close to zero and the internal energy change (ΔUfolding) is a modest -3.8 kJ mol(-1). These thermodynamic quantities are interpreted in terms of intra-molecular (intra-peptide) and inter-molecular (peptide-solvent) hydrogen bonding interactions. Implications for protein folding and peptide immunogenicity are discussed.

  20. Exploring Beta-Amyloid Protein Transmembrane Insertion Behavior and Residue-Specific Lipid Interactions in Lipid Bilayers Using Multiscale MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) interactions with neurons are linked to Alzheimer's. Using a multiscale MD simulation strategy that combines the high efficiency of phase space sampling of coarse-grained MD (CGD) and the high spatial resolution of Atomistic MD (AMD) simulations, we studied the Abeta insertion dynamics in cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid bilayers that mimic the neuronal membranes domains. Forward (AMD-CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) mappings were used. At the atomistic level, cholesterol promoted insertion of Abeta with high (folded) or low (unfolded) helical contents of the lipid insertion domain (Lys28-Ala42), and the insertions were stabilized by the Lys28 snorkeling and Ala42-anchoring to the polar lipid groups of the bilayer up to 200ns. After the forward mapping, the folded inserted state switched to a new extended inserted state with the Lys28 descended to the middle of the bilayer while the unfolded inserted state migrated to the membrane surface up to 4000ns. The two new states remained stable for 200ns at the atomistic scale after the reverse mapping. Our results suggested that different Abeta membrane-orientation states separated by free energy barriers can be explored by the multiscale MD more effectively than by Atomistic MD simulations alone. NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  1. Low-energy oxygen bombardment of silicon by MD simulations making use of a reactive force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, P.; Briquet, L.; Wirtz, T.; Kieffer, J.

    2011-07-01

    In the field of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), ion-matter interactions have been largely investigated by numerical simulations. For MD simulations related to inorganic samples, mostly classical force fields assuming stable bonding structure have been used. In materials science, level-three force fields capable of simulating the breaking and formation of chemical bonds have recently been conceived. One such force field has been developed by John Kieffer [1,2]. This potential includes directional covalent bonds, Coulomb and dipolar interaction terms, dispersion terms, etc. Important features of this force field for simulating systems that undergo significant structural reorganization are (i) the ability to account for the redistribution of electron density upon ionization, formation, or breaking of bonds, through a charge transfer term, and (ii) the fact that the angular constraints dynamically adjust when a change in the coordination number of an atom occurs. In this paper, the modification of the force field to allow for an exact description of the sputtering process, the influence of this modification on previous results obtained for phase transitions in glasses as well as properties of particles sputtered at 250-1000 eV from a mono-crystalline silicon sample will be presented. The simulation results agree qualitatively with predictions from experiments or models. Most atoms are sputtered from the first monolayer: for an impact energy of 250 eV up to 86% of the atoms are sputtered from the first monolayer and for 750 eV, this percentage drops to 61%, with 89% of the atoms being sputtered from the first two monolayers. For sputtering yields, 250 and 500 eV results agree with experimental data, but for 750 eV sub-channelling in the pristine sample becomes more important than in experiments where samples turn amorphous under ion bombardment.

  2. Surface signatures of bioactivity: MD simulations of 45S and 65S silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Tilocca, Antonio; Cormack, Alastair N

    2010-01-01

    The surface of a bioactive (45S) and a bioinactive (65S) glass composition has been modeled using shell-model classical molecular dynamics simulations. Direct comparison of the two structures allowed us to identify the potential role of specific surface features in the processes leading to integration of a bioglass implant with the host tissues, focusing in particular on the initial dissolution of the glass network. The simulations highlight the critical role of network fragmentation and sodium enrichment of the surface in determining the rapid hydrolysis and release of silica fragments in solution, characteristic of highly bioactive compositions. On the other hand, no correlation has been found between the surface density of small (two- and three-membered) rings and bioactivity, thus suggesting that additional factors need to be taken into account to fully understand the role of these sites in the mechanism leading to calcium phosphate deposition on the glass surface. PMID:19725567

  3. Impact of 2'-hydroxyl sampling on the conformational properties of RNA: update of the CHARMM all-atom additive force field for RNA.

    PubMed

    Denning, Elizabeth J; Priyakumar, U Deva; Nilsson, Lennart; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2011-07-15

    Here, we present an update of the CHARMM27 all-atom additive force field for nucleic acids that improves the treatment of RNA molecules. The original CHARMM27 force field parameters exhibit enhanced Watson-Crick base pair opening which is not consistent with experiment, whereas analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show the 2'-hydroxyl moiety to almost exclusively sample the O3' orientation. Quantum mechanical (QM) studies of RNA related model compounds indicate the energy minimum associated with the O3' orientation to be too favorable, consistent with the MD results. Optimization of the dihedral parameters dictating the energy of the 2'-hydroxyl proton targeting the QM data yielded several parameter sets, which sample both the base and O3' orientations of the 2'-hydroxyl to varying degrees. Selection of the final dihedral parameters was based on reproduction of hydration behavior as related to a survey of crystallographic data and better agreement with experimental NMR J-coupling values. Application of the model, designated CHARMM36, to a collection of canonical and noncanonical RNA molecules reveals overall improved agreement with a range of experimental observables as compared to CHARMM27. The results also indicate the sensitivity of the conformational heterogeneity of RNA to the orientation of the 2'-hydroxyl moiety and support a model whereby the 2'-hydroxyl can enhance the probability of conformational transitions in RNA.

  4. Carbon nanoscroll from C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattice: MD and MM simulation insights.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zilong; Xue, Qingzhong; Tao, Yehan; Li, Xiaofang; Wu, Tiantian; Jin, Yakang; Zhang, Zhongyang

    2015-02-01

    Morphology manipulation opens up a new avenue for controlling and tailoring the functional properties of graphene, enabling the exploration of graphene-based nanomaterials. Through mixing single-side-hydrogenated graphene (C4H) with fluorinated graphene (C4F) on one single sheet, the C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattices can self-scroll at room temperature. We demonstrate using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations that different proportions, sizes, directions of hydrogenation and fluorination, and geometry of graphene have a great influence on the self-scrolling of superlattices into a variety of well-defined carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs), thus providing a controllable approach to tune their structures. Based on molecular mechanics (MM) simulations, the CNSs bear more than eight times the radial pressure than that of their multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) counterparts, and an excellent radial elasticity of CNSs is also shown. Compared with conventional CNSs, these novel CNSs are endowed with more ample and flexible heterogeneous structures due to the on-demand hydrogenation and fluorination. Besides, this work provides a feasible route to achieve the necessary electronic and optical changes to be applied in graphene device applications. PMID:25531924

  5. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  6. Unraveling the Conformational Landscape of Ligand Binding to Glucose/Galactose-Binding Protein by Paramagnetic NMR and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Unione, Luca; Ortega, Gabriel; Mallagaray, Alvaro; Corzana, Francisco; Pérez-Castells, Javier; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Millet, Oscar

    2016-08-19

    Protein dynamics related to function can nowadays be structurally well characterized (i.e., instances obtained by high resolution structures), but they are still ill-defined energetically, and the energy landscapes are only accessible computationally. This is the case for glucose-galactose binding protein (GGBP), where the crystal structures of the apo and holo states provide structural information for the domain rearrangement upon ligand binding, while the time scale and the energetic determinants for such concerted dynamics have been so far elusive. Here, we use GGBP as a paradigm to define a functional conformational landscape, both structurally and energetically, by using an innovative combination of paramagnetic NMR experiments and MD simulations. Anisotropic NMR parameters induced by self-alignment of paramagnetic metal ions was used to characterize the ensemble of conformations adopted by the protein in solution while the rate of interconversion between conformations was elucidated by long molecular dynamics simulation on two states of GGBP, the closed-liganded (holo_cl) and open-unloaded (apo_op) states. Our results demonstrate that, in its apo state, the protein coexists between open-like (68%) and closed-like (32%) conformations, with an exchange rate around 25 ns. Despite such conformational heterogeneity, the presence of the ligand is the ultimate driving force to unbalance the equilibrium toward the holo_cl form, in a mechanism largely governed by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:27219646

  7. Carbon nanoscroll from C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattice: MD and MM simulation insights.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zilong; Xue, Qingzhong; Tao, Yehan; Li, Xiaofang; Wu, Tiantian; Jin, Yakang; Zhang, Zhongyang

    2015-02-01

    Morphology manipulation opens up a new avenue for controlling and tailoring the functional properties of graphene, enabling the exploration of graphene-based nanomaterials. Through mixing single-side-hydrogenated graphene (C4H) with fluorinated graphene (C4F) on one single sheet, the C4H/C4F-type graphene superlattices can self-scroll at room temperature. We demonstrate using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations that different proportions, sizes, directions of hydrogenation and fluorination, and geometry of graphene have a great influence on the self-scrolling of superlattices into a variety of well-defined carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs), thus providing a controllable approach to tune their structures. Based on molecular mechanics (MM) simulations, the CNSs bear more than eight times the radial pressure than that of their multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) counterparts, and an excellent radial elasticity of CNSs is also shown. Compared with conventional CNSs, these novel CNSs are endowed with more ample and flexible heterogeneous structures due to the on-demand hydrogenation and fluorination. Besides, this work provides a feasible route to achieve the necessary electronic and optical changes to be applied in graphene device applications.

  8. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in cooling to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.

  9. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  10. Evaluation of GEOS-5 Sulfur Dioxide Simulations During the Frostburg, MD 2010 Field Campaign.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchard, V.; Da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P.; Krotkov, N.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stehr, J. W.; Mount, G.; Spenei, E.; Arkinson, H. L.; He, H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a major atmospheric pollutant with a strong anthropogenic component mostly produced by the combustion of fossil fuel and other industrial activities. As a precursor of sulfate aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and human health, this gas needs to be monitored on a global scale. Global climate and chemistry models including aerosol processes along with their radiative effects are important tools for climate and air quality research. Validation of these models against in-situ and satellite measurements is essential to ascertain the credibility of these models and to guide model improvements. In this study the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running on-line inside the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model is used to simulate aerosol and SO2 concentrations. Data taken in November 2010 over Frostburg, Maryland during an SO2 field campaign involving ground instrumentation and aircraft are used to evaluate GEOS-5 simulated SO2 concentrations. Preliminary data analysis indicated the model overestimated surface SO2 concentration, which motivated the examination of mixing processes in the model and the specification of SO2 anthropogenic emission rates. As a result of this analysis, a revision of anthropogenic emission inventories in GEOS-5 was implemented, and the vertical placement of SO2 sources was updated. Results show that these revisions improve the model agreement with observations locally and in regions outside the area of this field campaign. In particular, we use the ground-based measurements collected by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for the year 2010 to evaluate the revised model simulations over North America.

  11. Evaluation of GEOS-5 sulfur dioxide simulations during the Frostburg, MD 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P.; Krotkov, N.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stehr, J. W.; Mount, G.; Spinei, E.; Arkinson, H. L.; He, H.

    2014-02-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a major atmospheric pollutant with a strong anthropogenic component mostly produced by the combustion of fossil fuel and other industrial activities. As a precursor of sulfate aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and human health, this gas needs to be monitored on a global scale. Global climate and chemistry models including aerosol processes along with their radiative effects are important tools for climate and air quality research. Validation of these models against in-situ and satellite measurements is essential to ascertain the credibility of these models and to guide model improvements. In this study, the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running on-line inside the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model is used to simulate aerosol and SO2 concentrations. Data taken in November 2010 over Frostburg, Maryland during an SO2 field campaign involving ground instrumentation and aircraft are used to evaluate GEOS-5 simulated SO2 concentrations. Preliminary data analysis indicated the model overestimated surface SO2 concentration, which motivated the examination of the specification of SO2 anthropogenic emission rates. As a result of this analysis, a revision of anthropogenic emission inventories in GEOS-5 was implemented, and the vertical placement of SO2 sources was updated. Results show that these revisions improve the model agreement with observations locally and in regions outside the area of this field campaign. In particular, we use the ground-based measurements collected by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for the year 2010 to evaluate the revised model simulations over North America.

  12. Evaluation of GEOS-5 sulfur dioxide simulations during the Frostburg, MD 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P.; Krotkov, N.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stehr, J. W.; Mount, G.; Spinei, E.; Arkinson, H. L.; He, H.

    2013-08-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a major atmospheric pollutant with a strong anthropogenic component mostly produced by the combustion of fossil fuel and other industrial activities. As a precursor of sulfate aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and human health, this gas needs to be monitored on a global scale. Global climate and chemistry models including aerosol processes along with their radiative effects are important tools for climate and air quality research. Validation of these models against in-situ and satellite measurements is essential to ascertain the credibility of these models and to guide model improvements. In this study the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running on-line inside the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model is used to simulate aerosol and SO2 concentrations. Data taken in November 2010 over Frostburg, Maryland during an SO2 field campaign involving ground instrumentation and aircraft are used to evaluate GEOS-5 simulated SO2 concentrations. Preliminary data analysis indicated the model overestimated surface SO2 concentration, which motivated the examination of mixing processes in the model and the specification of SO2 anthropogenic emission rates. As a result of this analysis, a revision of anthropogenic emission inventories in GEOS-5 was implemented, and the vertical placement of SO2 sources was updated. Results show that these revisions improve the model agreement with observations locally and in regions outside the area of this field campaign. In particular, we use the ground-based measurements collected by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for the year 2010 to evaluate the revised model simulations over North America.

  13. Properties of ultrathin cholesterol and phospholipid layers surrounding silicon-carbide nanotube: MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Raczyński, Przemysław; Raczyńska, Violetta; Górny, Krzysztof; Gburski, Zygmunt

    2015-08-15

    Computer simulation technique was used to study the dynamics of cholesterol and POPC phospholipid molecules forming a thin layer on the surface of the carbon and silicon-carbide nanotubes. Each nanotube was surrounded by an ultra-thin film formed by n lipid molecules, where n varies from 15 to 50. All studies were done for five temperatures, including physiological one (T=260, 285, 310, 335 and 360K). The influence of a nanotube on the dynamics of cholesterol or phospholipid molecules in a layer is presented and discussed. The water is ubiquitous in all biological milieus, where the cholesterol or lipids occur. Thus, simulations were performed in a water environment. Moreover, to show different behavior of lipids in systems with water the results were compared with the samples without it. The dynamical and structural observables, such as the mean square displacement, diffusion coefficient, radial distribution function, and activation energy were calculated to qualitatively investigate the behavior of cholesterol and phospholipid molecules in the layers. We observed remarkable differences between the cholesterol dynamics depending whether the ultrathin film surrounds carbon or silicon-carbide nanotube and whether the water environment appeared.

  14. α-tocopherol is well designed to protect polyunsaturated phospholipids: MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Xiaoling; Kinnun, Jacob A.; Marquardt, Drew; Ghefli, Mikel; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Harroun, Thad A.; Feller, Scott E.; Wassall, Stephen

    2015-10-20

    Here, the presumptive function for alpha-tocopherol (αtoc) in membranes is to protect polyunsaturated lipids against oxidation. Although the chemistry of the process is well established, the role played by molecular structure that we address here with atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations remains controversial. The simulations were run in the constant particle NPT ensemble on hydrated lipid bilayers composed of SDPC (1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-22:6PC) and SOPC (1-stearoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-18:1PC) in the presence of 20 mol % αtoc at 37°C. SDPC with SA (stearic acid) for the sn-1 chain and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) for the sn-2 chain is representative of polyunsaturated phospholipids, while SOPC with OA (oleic acid) substituted for the sn-2 chain serves as a monounsaturated control. Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction experiments provide validation. The simulations demonstrate that high disorder enhances the probability that DHA chains at the sn-2 position in SDPC rise up to the bilayer surface, whereby they encounter the chromanol group on αtoc molecules. This behavior is reflected in the van der Waals energy of interaction between αtoc and acyl chains, and illustrated by density maps of distribution for acyl chains around αtoc molecules that were constructed. An ability to more easily penetrate deep into the bilayer is another attribute conferred upon the chromanol group in αtoc by the high disorder possessed by DHA. By examining the trajectory of single molecules, we found that αtoc flip-flops across the SDPC bilayer on a submicrosecond timescale that is an order-of-magnitude greater than in SOPC. Our results reveal mechanisms by which the sacrificial hydroxyl group on the chromanol group can trap lipid peroxyl radicals within the interior and near the surface of a polyunsaturated membrane. At the same time, water-soluble reducing agents that regenerate αtoc can access the

  15. α-tocopherol is well designed to protect polyunsaturated phospholipids: MD simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Leng, Xiaoling; Kinnun, Jacob A.; Marquardt, Drew; Ghefli, Mikel; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Harroun, Thad A.; Feller, Scott E.; Wassall, Stephen

    2015-10-20

    Here, the presumptive function for alpha-tocopherol (αtoc) in membranes is to protect polyunsaturated lipids against oxidation. Although the chemistry of the process is well established, the role played by molecular structure that we address here with atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations remains controversial. The simulations were run in the constant particle NPT ensemble on hydrated lipid bilayers composed of SDPC (1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-22:6PC) and SOPC (1-stearoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-18:1PC) in the presence of 20 mol % αtoc at 37°C. SDPC with SA (stearic acid) for the sn-1 chain and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) for the sn-2 chain is representative of polyunsaturated phospholipids, while SOPC with OAmore » (oleic acid) substituted for the sn-2 chain serves as a monounsaturated control. Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction experiments provide validation. The simulations demonstrate that high disorder enhances the probability that DHA chains at the sn-2 position in SDPC rise up to the bilayer surface, whereby they encounter the chromanol group on αtoc molecules. This behavior is reflected in the van der Waals energy of interaction between αtoc and acyl chains, and illustrated by density maps of distribution for acyl chains around αtoc molecules that were constructed. An ability to more easily penetrate deep into the bilayer is another attribute conferred upon the chromanol group in αtoc by the high disorder possessed by DHA. By examining the trajectory of single molecules, we found that αtoc flip-flops across the SDPC bilayer on a submicrosecond timescale that is an order-of-magnitude greater than in SOPC. Our results reveal mechanisms by which the sacrificial hydroxyl group on the chromanol group can trap lipid peroxyl radicals within the interior and near the surface of a polyunsaturated membrane. At the same time, water-soluble reducing agents that regenerate αtoc can access

  16. Slow-Onset Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA: Revealing Molecular Determinants of Residence Time by MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Merget, Benjamin; Sotriffer, Christoph A.

    2015-01-01

    An important kinetic parameter for drug efficacy is the residence time of a compound at a drug target, which is related to the dissociation rate constant koff. For the essential antimycobacterial target InhA, this parameter is most likely governed by the ordering of the flexible substrate binding loop (SBL). Whereas the diphenyl ether inhibitors 6PP and triclosan (TCL) do not show loop ordering and thus, no slow-binding inhibition and high koff values, the slightly modified PT70 leads to an ordered loop and a residence time of 24 minutes. To assess the structural differences of the complexes from a dynamic point of view, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a total sampling time of 3.0 µs were performed for three ligand-bound and two ligand-free (perturbed) InhA systems. The individual simulations show comparable conformational features with respect to both the binding pocket and the SBL, allowing to define five recurring conformational families. Based on their different occurrence frequencies in the simulated systems, the conformational preferences could be linked to structural differences of the respective ligands to reveal important determinants of residence time. The most abundant conformation besides the stable EI* state is characterized by a shift of Ile202 and Val203 toward the hydrophobic pocket of InhA. The analyses revealed potential directions for avoiding this conformational change and, thus, hindering rapid dissociation: (1) an anchor group in 2'-position of the B-ring for scaffold stabilization, (2) proper occupation of the hydrophobic pocket, and (3) the introduction of a barricade substituent in 5'-position of the diphenyl ether B-ring. PMID:25996598

  17. The Unfolding MD Simulations of Cyclophilin: Analyzed by Surface Contact Networks and Their Associated Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sourav; Basu, Sankar; Dasgupta, Dipak; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Currently, considerable interest exists with regard to the dissociation of close packed aminoacids within proteins, in the course of unfolding, which could result in either wet or dry moltenglobules. The progressive disjuncture of residues constituting the hydrophobic core ofcyclophilin from L. donovani (LdCyp) has been studied during the thermal unfolding of the molecule, by molecular dynamics simulations. LdCyp has been represented as a surface contactnetwork (SCN) based on the surface complementarity (Sm) of interacting residues within themolecular interior. The application of Sm to side chain packing within proteins make it a very sensitive indicator of subtle perturbations in packing, in the thermal unfolding of the protein. Network based metrics have been defined to track the sequential changes in the disintegration ofthe SCN spanning the hydrophobic core of LdCyp and these metrics prove to be highly sensitive compared to traditional metrics in indicating the increased conformational (and dynamical) flexibility in the network. These metrics have been applied to suggest criteria distinguishing DMG, WMG and transition state ensembles and to identify key residues involved in crucial conformational/topological events during the unfolding process. PMID:26545107

  18. Effect of Aggregation on the Mechanical Properties of Ionomers from MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Janani; Hall, Lisa M.

    Ionomers are polymers with a small fraction of charged monomers; these bound ions, along with free counterions, tend to aggregate together strongly in the absence of solvent. Ionic aggregates can act like temporary cross-links, giving rise to interesting mechanical properties. We perform coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of ionomers with various spacings of charges along the chain, representing experimental precisely spaced, neutralized poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) materials. We calculate aggregate morphology, dynamics, and scattering profiles and study the systems during uniaxial tensile strain to understand how aggregate structure changes under deformation and affects mechanical properties. Anisotropic structure factors (parallel and perpendicular to the direction of pull) and visualization shows that the aggregates align, in qualitative agreement with experimental findings. Stress-strain curves at different strain rates are also obtained. A modification of the model to account for unneutralized acid groups by adjusting their Lennard-Jones interaction strengths with each other and with ionic groups will also be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant 1463103.

  19. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies.

  20. Influence of alkane chain length on adsorption on an α-alumina surface by MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, C.; Pandiyan, S.; Mether, L.; Belmahi, M.; Nordlund, K.; Philipp, P.

    2015-06-01

    Plasma surface techniques provide both an efficient and ecological tool for the functionalization of surfaces. Hence, a proper understanding of the plasma-surface interactions of precursors and radicals during the deposition process is of great importance. Especially during the initial deposition process, the deposition of molecules and fragments is difficult to investigate by experimental techniques and import insights can be obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, the reactive force field developed by the group of Kieffer at the University of Michigan was used to study the adsorption of single linear alkane chains on an α-alumina surface. The chain length was changed from 6 backbone carbon atoms to 16 carbon atoms, the deposition energy from 0.01 to 10 eV and the incidence angle from 0° to 60° with respect to the surface normal. Results show that the adsorption depends a lot on the ratio of deposition energy to alkane chain length and the incidence angle. More grazing incidence reduces the adsorption probability and a low ratio of energy to chain length increases it.

  1. Monovalent Ions and Water Dipoles in Contact with Dipolar Zwitterionic Lipid Headgroups-Theory and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Velikonja, Aljaž; Perutkova, Šarka; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Kramar, Peter; Polak, Andraž; Maček-Lebar, Alenka; Iglič, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    The lipid bilayer is a basic building block of biological membranes and can be pictured as a barrier separating two compartments filled with electrolyte solution. Artificial planar lipid bilayers are therefore commonly used as model systems to study the physical and electrical properties of the cell membranes in contact with electrolyte solution. Among them the glycerol-based polar phospholipids which have dipolar, but electrically neutral head groups, are most frequently used in formation of artificial lipid bilayers. In this work the electrical properties of the lipid layer composed of zwitterionic lipids with non-zero dipole moments are studied theoretically. In the model, the zwitterionic lipid bilayer is assumed to be in contact with aqueous solution of monovalent salt ions. The orientational ordering of water, resulting in spatial variation of permittivity, is explicitly taken into account. It is shown that due to saturation effect in orientational ordering of water dipoles the relative permittivity in the zwitterionic headgroup region is decreased, while the corresponding electric potential becomes strongly negative. Some of the predictions of the presented mean-field theoretical consideration are critically evaluated using the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. PMID:23434651

  2. Understanding self-assembly of charged-neutral block copolymer (BCP) and surfactant complexes using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby; Kilbey, Michael

    Here we report the formation of phase separated BCP-surfactant complexes resulting from the electrostatic self-assembly of charge-neutral block copolymers with oppositely charged surfactants. Complexation behaviors of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes has gained considerable attention in the field of soft condensed matter physics due to their potential application as functional nanomaterials for batteries, wastewater treatment and drug delivery systems. Numerous experiments have examined the self-assembled structures resulting from complexation of charge-neutral BCP and surfactants, however, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding at the fundamental level. To help bridge this gap, we use, MD simulations to study self-assembly and dynamics of the BCP-surfactant complex at the molecular level. Our results show an overcharging effect in BCPs with hydrophobic neutral blocks and a formation of core-shell colloidal structure. Hydrophilic neutral blocks, on the other hand, show stable, hairy colloidal structures with neutral blocks forming a loosely-bound, fuzzy outer layer. Our results qualitatively agree with previous SANS and SAXS experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  3. Degradation of the Adhesive Properties of MD-944 Diode Tape by Simulated Low Earth Orbit Environmental Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albyn, K.; Finckenor, M.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays utilize MD-944 diode tape with silicone pressure-sensitive adhesive to protect the underlying diodes and also provide a high-emittance surface. On-orbit, the silicone adhesive will be exposed and ultimately convert to a glass-like silicate due to atomic oxygen (AO). The current operational plan is to retract ISS solar array P6 and leave it stored under load for a long duration (6 mo or more). The exposed silicone adhesive must not cause the solar array to stick to itself or cause the solar array to fail during redeployment. The Environmental Effects Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, under direction from the ISS Program Office Environments Team, performed simulated space environment exposures with 5-eV AO, near ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation. The exposed diode tape samples were put under preload and then the resulting blocking force was measured using a tensile test machine. Test results indicate that high-energy AO, ultraviolet radiation, and electron ionizing radiation exposure all reduce the blocking force for a silicone-to-silicone bond. AO exposure produces the most significant reduction in blocking force

  4. An all-atom force field developed for Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxin; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    An all-atom force field is developed for metal organic frameworks Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ by fitting to quantum mechanics data. Molecular simulations are conducted to validate the force field by calculating thermal expansion coefficients, crystal bulk and Young's moduli, power spectra, self-diffusion coefficients, and activation energies of self-diffusions for benzene and n-hexane. The calculated results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The proposed force field is suitable for simulations of adsorption or diffusion of organic molecules with flexible frameworks. PMID:24562858

  5. Coupling between protonation and conformation in cytochrome c oxidase: Insights from constant-pH MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Sofia F; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (CcOs) are the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and most bacteria. These enzymes reduce dioxygen (O(2)) to water and, simultaneously, generate a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. Despite their importance in the aerobic metabolism and the large amount of structural and biochemical data available for the A1-type CcO family, there is still no consensually accepted description of the molecular mechanisms operating in this protein. A substantial number of questions about the CcO's working mechanism remain to be answered, including how the protonation behavior of some key residues is modulated during a reduction cycle and how is the conformation of the protein affected by protonation. The main objective of this work was to study the protonation-conformation coupling in CcOs and identify the molecular factors that control the protonation state of some key residues. In order to directly capture the interplay between protonation and conformational effects, we have performed constant-pH MD simulations of an A1-type CcO inserted into a lipid bilayer in two redox states (oxidized and reduced) at physiological pH. From the simulations, we were able to identify several groups with unusual titration behavior that are highly dependent on the protein redox state, including the A-propionate from heme a and the D-propionate from heme a3, two key groups possibly involved in proton pumping. The protonation state of these two groups is heavily influenced by subtle conformational changes in the protein (notably of R481(I) and R482(I)) and by small changes in the hydrogen bond network.

  6. Conformational Ensemble of the Poliovirus 3CD Precursor Observed by MD Simulations and Confirmed by SAXS: A Strategy to Expand the Viral Proteome?

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Gohara, David W; Uchida, Akira; Yennawar, Neela; Cameron, Craig E

    2015-11-23

    The genomes of RNA viruses are relatively small. To overcome the small-size limitation, RNA viruses assign distinct functions to the processed viral proteins and their precursors. This is exemplified by poliovirus 3CD protein. 3C protein is a protease and RNA-binding protein. 3D protein is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). 3CD exhibits unique protease and RNA-binding activities relative to 3C and is devoid of RdRp activity. The origin of these differences is unclear, since crystal structure of 3CD revealed "beads-on-a-string" structure with no significant structural differences compared to the fully processed proteins. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on 3CD to investigate its conformational dynamics. A compact conformation of 3CD was observed that was substantially different from that shown crystallographically. This new conformation explained the unique properties of 3CD relative to the individual proteins. Interestingly, simulations of mutant 3CD showed altered interface. Additionally, accelerated MD simulations uncovered a conformational ensemble of 3CD. When we elucidated the 3CD conformations in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments a range of conformations from extended to compact was revealed, validating the MD simulations. The existence of conformational ensemble of 3CD could be viewed as a way to expand the poliovirus proteome, an observation that may extend to other viruses.

  7. Distribution and Dynamic Properties of Xenon Dissolved in the Ionic Smectic Phase of [C16mim][NO3]: MD Simulation and Theoretical Model.

    PubMed

    Frezzato, Diego; Saielli, Giacomo

    2016-03-10

    We have investigated the structural and dynamic properties of Xe dissolved in the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) phase of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Xe is found to be preferentially dissolved within the hydrophobic environment of the alkyl chains rather than in the ionic layers of the smectic phase. The structural parameters and the estimated local diffusion coefficients concerning the short-time motion of Xe are used to parametrize a theoretical model based on the Smoluchowski equation for the macroscopic dynamics across the smectic layers, a feature which cannot be directly obtained from the relatively short MD simulations. This protocol represents an efficient combination of computational and theoretical tools to obtain information on slow processes concerning the permeability and diffusivity of the xenon in smectic ILCs.

  8. Local Structure in Terms of Nearest-Neighbor Approach in 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids: MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Koverga, Volodymyr A; Chesneau, Erwan; Kalugin, Oleg N; Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Jedlovszky, Pál; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2016-06-01

    Description of the local microscopic structure in ionic liquids (ILs) is a prerequisite to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the influence of the nature of ions on the properties of ILs. The local structure is mainly determined by the spatial arrangement of the nearest neighboring ions. Therefore, the main interaction patterns in ILs, such as cation-anion H-bond-like motifs, cation-cation alkyl tail aggregation, and ring stacking, were considered within the framework of the nearest-neighbor approach with respect to each particular interaction site. We employed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study in detail the spatial, radial, and orientational relative distribution of ions in a set of imidazolium-based ILs, in which the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C4mim(+)) cation is coupled with the acetate (OAc(-)), chloride (Cl(-)), tetrafluoroborate (BF4(-)), hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)), trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO(-)), or bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (TFSA(-)) anion. It was established that several structural properties are strongly anion-specific, while some can be treated as universally applicable to ILs, regardless of the nature of the anion. Namely, strongly basic anions, such as OAc(-) and Cl(-), prefer to be located in the imidazolium ring plane next to the C-H(2/4-5) sites. By contrast, the other four bulky and weakly coordinating anions tend to occupy positions above/below the plane. Similarly, the H-bond-like interactions involving the H(2) site are found to be particularly enhanced in comparison with the ones at H(4-5) in the case of asymmetric and/or more basic anions (C4mimOAc, C4mimCl, C4mimTfO, and C4mimTFSA), in accordance with recent spectroscopic and theoretical findings. Other IL-specific details related to the multiple H-bond-like binding and cation stacking issues are also discussed in this paper. The secondary H-bonding of anions with the alkyl hydrogen atoms of cations as well as the cation-cation alkyl chain

  9. Uncertainty quantification in MD simulations of concentration driven ionic flow through a silica nanopore. I. Sensitivity to physical parameters of the pore.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, F; Jones, R E; Debusschere, B J; Knio, O M

    2013-05-21

    In this article, uncertainty quantification is applied to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of concentration driven ionic flow through a silica nanopore. We consider a silica pore model connecting two reservoirs containing a solution of sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) ions in water. An ad hoc concentration control algorithm is developed to simulate a concentration driven counter flow of ions through the pore, with the ionic flux being the main observable extracted from the MD system. We explore the sensitivity of the system to two physical parameters of the pore, namely, the pore diameter and the gating charge. First we conduct a quantitative analysis of the impact of the pore diameter on the ionic flux, and interpret the results in terms of the interplay between size effects and ion mobility. Second, we analyze the effect of gating charge by treating the charge density over the pore surface as an uncertain parameter in a forward propagation study. Polynomial chaos expansions and Bayesian inference are exploited to isolate the effect of intrinsic noise and quantify the impact of parametric uncertainty on the MD predictions. We highlight the challenges arising from the heterogeneous nature of the system, given the several components involved, and from the substantial effect of the intrinsic thermal noise.

  10. Uncertainty quantification in MD simulations of concentration driven ionic flow through a silica nanopore. I. Sensitivity to physical parameters of the pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, F.; Jones, R. E.; Debusschere, B. J.; Knio, O. M.

    2013-05-01

    In this article, uncertainty quantification is applied to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of concentration driven ionic flow through a silica nanopore. We consider a silica pore model connecting two reservoirs containing a solution of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) ions in water. An ad hoc concentration control algorithm is developed to simulate a concentration driven counter flow of ions through the pore, with the ionic flux being the main observable extracted from the MD system. We explore the sensitivity of the system to two physical parameters of the pore, namely, the pore diameter and the gating charge. First we conduct a quantitative analysis of the impact of the pore diameter on the ionic flux, and interpret the results in terms of the interplay between size effects and ion mobility. Second, we analyze the effect of gating charge by treating the charge density over the pore surface as an uncertain parameter in a forward propagation study. Polynomial chaos expansions and Bayesian inference are exploited to isolate the effect of intrinsic noise and quantify the impact of parametric uncertainty on the MD predictions. We highlight the challenges arising from the heterogeneous nature of the system, given the several components involved, and from the substantial effect of the intrinsic thermal noise.

  11. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  12. A coarse-grained protein-protein potential derived from an all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Basdevant, Nathalie; Borgis, Daniel; Ha-Duong, Tap

    2007-08-01

    In order to study protein-protein nonbonded interactions, we present the development of a new reduced protein model that represents each amino acid residue with one to three coarse grains, whose physical properties are derived in a consistent bottom-up procedure from the higher-resolution all-atom AMBER force field. The resulting potential energy function is pairwise additive and includes distinct van-der-Waals and Coulombic terms. The van-der-Waals effective interactions are deduced from preliminary molecular dynamics simulations of all possible amino acid homodimers. They are best represented by a soft 1/r6 repulsion and a Gaussian attraction, with parameters obeying Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules. For the Coulombic interaction, coarse grain charges are optimized for each separate protein in order to best represent the all-atom electrostatic potential outside the protein core. This approach leaves the possibility of using any implicit solvent model to describe solvation effects and electrostatic screening. The coarse-grained force field is tested carefully for a small homodimeric complex, the magainin. It is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the specificity of the all-atom underlying potential, in particular within a PB/SA solvation model. The coarse-grained potential is applied to the redocking prediction of three different protein-protein complexes: the magainin dimer, the barnase-barstar, and the trypsin-BPTI complexes. It is shown to provide per se an efficient and discriminating scoring energy function for the protein-protein docking problem that remains pertinent at both the global and refinement stage. PMID:17616119

  13. A coarse-grained protein-protein potential derived from an all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Basdevant, Nathalie; Borgis, Daniel; Ha-Duong, Tap

    2007-08-01

    In order to study protein-protein nonbonded interactions, we present the development of a new reduced protein model that represents each amino acid residue with one to three coarse grains, whose physical properties are derived in a consistent bottom-up procedure from the higher-resolution all-atom AMBER force field. The resulting potential energy function is pairwise additive and includes distinct van-der-Waals and Coulombic terms. The van-der-Waals effective interactions are deduced from preliminary molecular dynamics simulations of all possible amino acid homodimers. They are best represented by a soft 1/r6 repulsion and a Gaussian attraction, with parameters obeying Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules. For the Coulombic interaction, coarse grain charges are optimized for each separate protein in order to best represent the all-atom electrostatic potential outside the protein core. This approach leaves the possibility of using any implicit solvent model to describe solvation effects and electrostatic screening. The coarse-grained force field is tested carefully for a small homodimeric complex, the magainin. It is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the specificity of the all-atom underlying potential, in particular within a PB/SA solvation model. The coarse-grained potential is applied to the redocking prediction of three different protein-protein complexes: the magainin dimer, the barnase-barstar, and the trypsin-BPTI complexes. It is shown to provide per se an efficient and discriminating scoring energy function for the protein-protein docking problem that remains pertinent at both the global and refinement stage.

  14. An Evolutionary Strategy for All-Atom Folding of the 60-Amino-Acid Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L20

    PubMed Central

    Schug, A.; Wenzel, W.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated an evolutionary algorithm for de novo all-atom folding of the bacterial ribosomal protein L20. We report results of two simulations that converge to near-native conformations of this 60-amino-acid, four-helix protein. We observe a steady increase of “native content” in both simulated ensembles and a large number of near-native conformations in their final populations. We argue that these structures represent a significant fraction of the low-energy metastable conformations, which characterize the folding funnel of this protein. These data validate our all-atom free-energy force field PFF01 for tertiary structure prediction of a previously inaccessible structural family of proteins. We also compare folding simulations of the evolutionary algorithm with the basin-hopping technique for the Trp-cage protein. We find that the evolutionary algorithm generates a dynamic memory in the simulated population, which leads to faster overall convergence. PMID:16565067

  15. A simple and transferable all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model to study membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Essex, Jonathan W

    2015-10-13

    We present an efficient all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model and apply it to membrane processes. This model is an extension of the all-atom/ELBA model applied previously to processes in water. Here, we improve the efficiency of the model by implementing a multiple-time step integrator that allows the atoms and the coarse-grained beads to be propagated at different timesteps. Furthermore, we fine-tune the interaction between the atoms and the coarse-grained beads by computing the potential of mean force of amino acid side chain analogs along the membrane normal and comparing to atomistic simulations. The model was independently validated on the calculation of small-molecule partition coefficients. Finally, we apply the model to membrane peptides. We studied the tilt angle of the Walp23 and Kalp23 helices in two different model membranes and the stability of the glycophorin A dimer. The model is efficient, accurate, and straightforward to use, as it does not require any extra interaction particles, layers of atomistic solvent molecules or tabulated potentials, thus offering a novel, simple approach to study membrane processes. PMID:26574264

  16. An All-Atom Model of the Structure of Human Copper Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharikov, Yuriy; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Miller, Mark A.; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Larson, Christopher A.; Howell, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is the major high affinity copper influx transporter in mammalian cells that also mediates uptake of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. A low resolution structure of hCTR1 determined by cryoelectron microscopy was recently published. Several protein structure simulation techniques were used to create an all-atom model of this important transporter using the low resolution structure as a starting point. The all-atom model provides new insights into the roles of specific residues of the N-terminal extracellular domain, the intracellular loop, and C-terminal region in metal ion transport. In particular, the model demonstrates that the central region of the pore contains four sets of methionine triads in the intramembranous region. The structure confirms that two triads of methionine residues delineate the intramembranous region of the transporter, and further identifies two additional methionine triads that are located in the extracellular N-terminal part of the transporter. Together, the four triads create a structure that promotes stepwise transport of metal ions into and then through the intramembranous channel of the transporter via transient thioether bonds to methionine residues. Putative copper-binding sites in the hCTR1 trimer were identified by a program developed by us for prediction of metal-binding sites. These sites correspond well with the known effects of mutations on the ability of the protein to transport copper and cisplatin. PMID:22569840

  17. Hydration of chloride anions in the NanC Porin from Escherichia coli: A comparative study by QM/MM and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrini, V.; Dreyer, J.; Ippoliti, E.; Carloni, P.

    2014-12-01

    Chloride anions permeate the bacterial NanC porin in physiological processes. Here we present a DFT-based QM/MM study of this porin in the presence of these anions. Comparison is made with classical MD simulations on the same system. In both QM/MM and classical approaches, the anions are almost entirely solvated by water molecules. However, the average water-Cl- distance is significantly larger in the first approach. Polarization effects of protein groups close to Cl- anion are sizeable. These effects might modulate the anion-protein electrostatic interactions, which in turn play a central role for selectivity mechanisms of the channel.

  18. Hydration of chloride anions in the NanC Porin from Escherichia coli: a comparative study by QM/MM and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Calandrini, V; Dreyer, J; Ippoliti, E; Carloni, P

    2014-12-14

    Chloride anions permeate the bacterial NanC porin in physiological processes. Here we present a DFT-based QM/MM study of this porin in the presence of these anions. Comparison is made with classical MD simulations on the same system. In both QM/MM and classical approaches, the anions are almost entirely solvated by water molecules. However, the average water-Cl(-) distance is significantly larger in the first approach. Polarization effects of protein groups close to Cl(-) anion are sizeable. These effects might modulate the anion-protein electrostatic interactions, which in turn play a central role for selectivity mechanisms of the channel.

  19. Local order parameters for use in driving homogeneous ice nucleation with all-atom models of water.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    We present a local order parameter based on the standard Steinhardt-Ten Wolde approach that is capable both of tracking and of driving homogeneous ice nucleation in simulations of all-atom models of water. We demonstrate that it is capable of forcing the growth of ice nuclei in supercooled liquid water simulated using the TIP4P/2005 model using over-biassed umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations. However, even with such an order parameter, the dynamics of ice growth in deeply supercooled liquid water in all-atom models of water are shown to be very slow, and so the computation of free energy landscapes and nucleation rates remains extremely challenging.

  20. Rapid Heme Transfer Reactions between NEAr Transporter Domains of Staphylococcus aureus: A Theoretical Study Using QM/MM and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshitaka; Terada, Tohru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, most iron is present as heme or is chelated by proteins. Thus, Gram-positive pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus have evolved an iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system that transports heme across thick cell walls into the cytoplasm. Recent studies have demonstrated that heme is rapidly transferred between the NEAr Transporter (NEAT) domains of the Isd system, despite its high affinity toward each domain, suggesting the presence of an intermediate NEAT•heme•NEAT complex. In the present study, we performed short restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dock the acceptor NEAT domain to the donor NEAT•heme complex and obtained models where the two NEAT domains were arranged with two-fold pseudo symmetry around the heme molecule. After turning off the restraints, complex structures were stably maintained during subsequent unrestrained MD simulations, except for the hydrogen bond between the propionate group of the heme molecule and the donor NEAT domain, potentially facilitating the transition of heme from the donor to the acceptor. Subsequent structural optimization using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method showed that two tyrosine residues, one from each NEAT domain, were simultaneously coordinated to the ferric heme iron in the intermediate complex only if they were deprotonated. Based on these results, we propose a reaction scheme for heme transfer between NEAT domains. PMID:26658942

  1. Changes in Transmembrane Helix Alignment by Arginine Residues revealed by Solid-State NMR Experiments and Coarse-Grained MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Hall, Benjamin A.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Independent experimental and computational approaches show agreement concerning arginine/membrane interactions when a single arginine is introduced at selected positions within the membrane-spanning region of acetyl-GGALW5LALALAL12AL14ALALW19LAGA-ethanolamide, designated GWALP23. Peptide sequence isomers having Arg in position 12 or position 14 display markedly different behaviors, as deduced by both solid-state NMR experiments and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations. With respect to the membrane normal of DOPC or DPPC lipid bilayer membranes, GWALP23-R14 shows one major state whose apparent average tilt is ~10° greater than that of GWALP23. The presence of R14 furthermore induces bilayer thinning and peptide displacement to “lift” the charged guanidinium toward the bilayer surface. By contrast, GWALP23-R12 exhibits multiple states that are in slow exchange on the NMR time scale, with CG-MD simulations indicating two distinct positions with different screw rotation angles in the membrane, along with an increased tendency to exit the lipid bilayer. PMID:20373735

  2. LDRD Final Report (08-ERD-037): Important Modes to Drive Protein MD Simulations to the Next Conformational Level

    SciTech Connect

    Sadigh, B

    2011-04-07

    Every action in biology is performed by dynamic proteins that convert between multiple states in order to engage their functions. Often binding to various ligands is essential for the rates of desired transitions to be enhanced. The goal of computational biology is to study these transitions and discover the different states to fully understand the protein's normal and diseased function, design drugs to target/bias specific states, and understand all of the interactions in between. We have developed a new methodology that is capable of calculating the absolute free energy of proteins while taking into account all the interactions with the solvent molecules. The efficiency of the new scheme is an order of magnitude greater than any existing technique. This method is now implemented in the massively parallel popular MD program package NAMD. This now makes it possible to calculate the relative stability of different conformational states of biological macromolecules as well as their binding free energies to various ligands.

  3. New insight into the architecture of oxy-anion pocket in unliganded conformation of GAT domains: A MD-simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bairagya, Hridoy R; Bansal, Manju

    2016-03-01

    Human Guanine Monophosphate Synthetase (hGMPS) converts XMP to GMP, and acts as a bifunctional enzyme with N-terminal "glutaminase" (GAT) and C-terminal "synthetase" domain. The enzyme is identified as a potential target for anti-cancer and immunosuppressive therapies. GAT domain of enzyme plays central role in metabolism, and contains conserved catalytic residues Cys104, His190, and Glu192. MD simulation studies on GAT domain suggest that position of oxyanion in unliganded conformation is occupied by one conserved water molecule (W1), which also stabilizes that pocket. This position is occupied by a negatively charged atom of the substrate or ligand in ligand bound crystal structures. In fact, MD simulation study of Ser75 to Val indicates that W1 conserved water molecule is stabilized by Ser75, while Thr152, and His190 also act as anchor residues to maintain appropriate architecture of oxyanion pocket through water mediated H-bond interactions. Possibly, four conserved water molecules stabilize oxyanion hole in unliganded state, but they vacate these positions when the enzyme (hGMPS)-substrate complex is formed. Thus this study not only reveals functionally important role of conserved water molecules in GAT domain, but also highlights essential role of other non-catalytic residues such as Ser75 and Thr152 in this enzymatic domain. The results from this computational study could be of interest to experimental community and provide a testable hypothesis for experimental validation. Conserved sites of water molecules near and at oxyanion hole highlight structural importance of water molecules and suggest a rethink of the conventional definition of chemical geometry of inhibitor binding site.

  4. New insight into the architecture of oxy-anion pocket in unliganded conformation of GAT domains: A MD-simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bairagya, Hridoy R; Bansal, Manju

    2016-03-01

    Human Guanine Monophosphate Synthetase (hGMPS) converts XMP to GMP, and acts as a bifunctional enzyme with N-terminal "glutaminase" (GAT) and C-terminal "synthetase" domain. The enzyme is identified as a potential target for anti-cancer and immunosuppressive therapies. GAT domain of enzyme plays central role in metabolism, and contains conserved catalytic residues Cys104, His190, and Glu192. MD simulation studies on GAT domain suggest that position of oxyanion in unliganded conformation is occupied by one conserved water molecule (W1), which also stabilizes that pocket. This position is occupied by a negatively charged atom of the substrate or ligand in ligand bound crystal structures. In fact, MD simulation study of Ser75 to Val indicates that W1 conserved water molecule is stabilized by Ser75, while Thr152, and His190 also act as anchor residues to maintain appropriate architecture of oxyanion pocket through water mediated H-bond interactions. Possibly, four conserved water molecules stabilize oxyanion hole in unliganded state, but they vacate these positions when the enzyme (hGMPS)-substrate complex is formed. Thus this study not only reveals functionally important role of conserved water molecules in GAT domain, but also highlights essential role of other non-catalytic residues such as Ser75 and Thr152 in this enzymatic domain. The results from this computational study could be of interest to experimental community and provide a testable hypothesis for experimental validation. Conserved sites of water molecules near and at oxyanion hole highlight structural importance of water molecules and suggest a rethink of the conventional definition of chemical geometry of inhibitor binding site. PMID:26756917

  5. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L; Latour, Robert A

    2016-06-24

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications.

  6. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  7. Step-edge self-assembly during graphene nucleation on a nickel surface: QM/MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Page, Alister J; Li, Hai-Bei; Qian, Hu-Jun; Jiao, Meng-Gai; Wu, Zhi-Jian; Morokuma, Keiji; Irle, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene nucleation on the Ni(111) surface show that graphene creates its own step-edge as it forms. This "step-edge self-assembly" is driven by the formation of thermodynamically favorable Ni-C σ-bonds at the graphene edge. This dynamic aspect of the Ni(111) catalyst is in contrast to the commonly accepted view that graphene nucleates on a pre-existing, static catalyst step-edge. Simulations also show that, simply by manipulating the subsurface carbon density, preferential formation of single-layer graphene instead of multi-layer graphene can be achieved on nickel catalysts. PMID:24202187

  8. Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and ab initio MD-simulations on single ion motions in molten NaF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    The ionic stochastic motions in the molten alkali halide NaF are investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering and first principles molecular dynamics simulation. Quasielastic neutron scattering was employed to extract the diffusion behavior of the sodium ions in the melt. An extensive first principles based simulation on a box of up to 512 particles has been performed to complement the experimental data. From that large box, a smaller 64-particle box has then been simulated over a runtime of 60 ps. A good agreement between calculated and neutron data on the level of spectral shape has been obtained. The obtained sodium diffusion coefficients agree very well. The simulation predicts a fluorine diffusion coefficient similar to the sodium one. Applying the Nernst-Einstein equation, a remarkable large cross correlation between both ions can be deduced. The velocity cross correlations demonstrate a positive correlation between the ions over a period of 0.1 ps. That strong correlation is evidence that the unlike ions do not move completely statistically independent and have a strong association over a short period of time.

  9. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  10. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  11. Reduction of All-Atom Protein Folding Dynamics to One-Dimensional Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwei; Best, Robert B

    2015-12-10

    Theoretical models have often modeled protein folding dynamics as diffusion on a low-dimensional free energy surface, a remarkable simplification. However, the accuracy of such an approximation and the number of dimensions required were not clear. For all-atom folding simulations of ten small proteins in explicit solvent we show that the folding dynamics can indeed be accurately described as diffusion on just a single coordinate, the fraction of native contacts (Q). The diffusion models reproduce both folding rates, and finer details such as transition-path durations and diffusive propagators. The Q-averaged diffusion coefficients decrease with chain length, as anticipated from energy landscape theory. Although the Q-diffusion model does not capture transition-path durations for the protein NuG2, we show that this can be accomplished by designing an improved coordinate Qopt. Overall, one-dimensional diffusion on a suitable coordinate turns out to be a remarkably faithful model for the dynamics of the proteins considered.

  12. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  13. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM). PMID:24745688

  14. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  15. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM).

  16. Elucidation of Enzymatic Mechanism of Phenazine Biosynthetic Protein PhzF Using QM/MM and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    The phenazine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the pharmaceutical industry. The pathway produces two products: phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. PhzF is an isomerase that catalyzes trans-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxyanthranilic acid isomerization and plays an essential role in the phenazine biosynthetic pathway. Although the PhzF crystal structure has been determined recently, an understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and the roles of key catalytic residues are still lacking. In this study, a computational strategy using a combination of molecular modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations was used to elucidate these important issues. The Apo enzyme, enzyme–substrate complexes with negatively charged Glu45, enzyme–transition state analog inhibitor complexes with neutral Glu45, and enzyme–product complexes with negatively charged Glu45 structures were optimized and modeled using a 200 ns molecular dynamics simulation. Residues such as Gly73, His74, Asp208, Gly212, Ser213, and water, which play important roles in ligand binding and the isomerization reaction, were comprehensively investigated. Our results suggest that the Glu45 residue at the active site of PhzF acts as a general base/acid catalyst during proton transfer. This study provides new insights into the detailed catalytic mechanism of PhzF and the results have important implications for PhzF modification. PMID:26414009

  17. Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Kritz, A.; Keyes, D.

    2007-05-18

    The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

  18. Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2007-05-16

    The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

  19. A MD Simulation and Analysis for Aggregation Behaviors of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Particles in Water via MS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei; Tang, Huan; Lu, Jing; Cui, Fuyi

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, more nanomaterials will enter into water environment system. Studying the existing form of nanomaterials in water environment will help people benefit from the correct use of them and to reduce the harm to human caused by them for some nanomaterials can bring polluting effect. Aggregation is a main behavior for nanoparticle in water environment. NZVI are used widely in many fields resulting in more NZVI in water environment. Molecular dynamics simulations and Materials Studio software are used to investigate the microaggregation behaviors of NZVI particles. Two scenes are involved: (1) particle size of NZVI in each simulation system is the same, but initial distance of two NZVI particles is different; (2) initial distance of two NZVI particles in each simulation system is the same, but particle size of NZVI is different. Atomistic trajectory, NP activity, total energy, and adsorption of H2O are analyzed with MS. The method provides new quantitative insight into the structure, energy, and dynamics of the aggregation behaviors of NZVI particles in water. It is necessary to understand microchange of NPs in water because it can provide theoretical research that is used to reduce polluting effect of NPs on water environment. PMID:25250388

  20. Effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-06-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr protein kinase family. It is regulated by the calcium-calmodulin dependent signal through a secondary messenger, Ca(2+), which leads to the activation of its autoinhibited form. The over-expression and mutation in CAMKIV as well as change in Ca(2+) concentration is often associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. We have successfully cloned, expressed, and purified a functionally active kinase domain of human CAMKIV. To observe the effect of different pH conditions on the structural and functional properties of CAMKIV, we have used spectroscopic techniques such as circular diachroism (CD) absorbance and fluorescence. We have observed that within the pH range 5.0-11.5, CAMKIV maintained both its secondary and tertiary structures, along with its function, whereas significant aggregation was observed at acidic pH (2.0-4.5). We have also performed ATPase activity assays under different pH conditions and found a significant correlation between the structure and enzymatic activities of CAMKIV. In-silico validations were further carried out by modeling the 3-dimensional structure of CAMKIV and then subjecting it to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand its conformational behavior in explicit water conditions. A strong correlation between spectroscopic observations and the output of molecular dynamics simulation was observed for CAMKIV. PMID:27032767

  1. The equilibrium properties and folding kinetics of an all-atom Go model of the Trp-cage.

    PubMed

    Linhananta, Apichart; Boer, Jesse; MacKay, Ian

    2005-03-15

    The ultrafast-folding 20-residue Trp-cage protein is quickly becoming a new benchmark for molecular dynamics studies. Already several all-atom simulations have probed its equilibrium and kinetic properties. In this work an all-atom Go model is used to accurately represent the side-chain packing and native atomic contacts of the Trp-cage. The model reproduces the hallmark thermodynamics cooperativity of small proteins. Folding simulations observe that in the fast-folding dominant pathway, partial alpha-helical structure forms before hydrophobic core collapse. In the slow-folding secondary pathway, partial core collapse occurs before helical structure. The slow-folding rate of the secondary pathway is attributed to the loss of side-chain rotational freedom, due to the early core collapse, which impedes the helix formation. A major finding is the observation of a low-temperature kinetic intermediate stabilized by a salt bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16. Similar observations [R. Zhou, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 13280 (2003)] were reported in a recent study using an all-atom model of the Trp-cage in explicit water, in which the salt-bridge stabilized intermediate was hypothesized to be the origin of the ultrafast-folding mechanism. A theoretical mutation that eliminates the Asp-9-Arg-16 salt bridge, but leaves the residues intact, is performed. Folding simulations of the mutant Trp-cage observe a two-state free-energy landscape with no kinetic intermediate and a significant decrease in the folding rate, in support of the hypothesis.

  2. All-atom molecular dynamics studies of the full-length β-amyloid peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttmann, Edgar; Fels, Gregor

    2006-03-01

    β-Amyloid peptides are believed to play an essential role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), due to their sedimentation in the form of β-amyloid aggregates in the brain of AD-patients, and the in vitro neurotoxicity of oligomeric aggregates. The monomeric peptides come in different lengths of 39-43 residues, of which the 42 alloform seems to be most strongly associated with AD-symptoms. Structural information on these peptides to date comes from NMR studies in acidic solutions, organic solvents, or on shorter fragments of the peptide. In addition X-ray and solid-state NMR investigations of amyloid fibrils yield insight into the structure of the final aggregate and therefore define the endpoint of any conformational change of an Aβ-monomer along the aggregation process. The conformational changes necessary to connect the experimentally known conformations are not yet understood and this process is an active field of research. In this paper, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on experimental data from four different peptides of 40 amino acids and two peptides consisting of 42 amino acids. The simulations allow for the analysis of intramolecular interactions and the role of structural features. In particular, they show the appearance of β-turn in the region between amino acid 21 and 33, forming a hook-like shape as it is known to exist in the fibrillar Aβ-structures. This folding does not depend on the formation of a salt bridge between Asp-23 and Lys-28 but requires the Aβ(1-42) as such structure was not observed in the shorter system Aβ(1-40).

  3. Enhanced dynamics of hydrated tRNA on nanodiamond surfaces: A combined neutron scattering and MD simulation study

    DOE PAGES

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O’Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang -qiang

    2016-09-01

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on NDmore » surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. As a result, our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.« less

  4. Discovery of a regioselectivity switch in nitrating P450s guided by MD simulations and Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Dodani, Sheel C.; Kiss, Gert; Cahn, Jackson K. B.; Su, Ye; Pande, Vijay S.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic motions of protein structural elements, particularly flexible loops, are intimately linked with diverse aspects of enzyme catalysis. Engineering of these loop regions can alter protein stability, substrate binding, and even dramatically impact enzyme function. When these flexible regions are structurally unresolvable, computational reconstruction in combination with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations can be used to guide the engineering strategy. Here, we present a collaborative approach consisting of both experiment and computation that led to the discovery of a single mutation in the F/G loop of the nitrating cytochrome P450 TxtE that simultaneously controls loop dynamics and completely shifts the enzyme's regioselectivity from the C4 to the C5 position of L-tryptophan. Furthermore, we find that this loop mutation is naturally present in a subset of homologous nitrating P450s and confirm that these uncharacterized enzymes exclusively produce 5-nitro-L-tryptophan, a previously unknown biosynthetic intermediate. PMID:27102675

  5. Amino acid tautomerization reactions in aqueous solution via concerted and assisted mechanisms using free energy curves from MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Santiago; Hidalgo, Antonio; Sansón, Jorge A

    2012-11-01

    A theoretical study is described of chemical reactions in solution by means of molecular dynamics simulations, with solute-solvent interaction potentials derived from AMBER van der Waals parameters and QM/MM electrostatic charges in solution. The solvent is used as the reaction coordinate, and the free energy curves to calculate the properties related to the reaction mechanism. The proposed scheme is applied to the tautomerization process in aqueous solution for some amino acids H(2)NCHR-COOH (with R = H being glycine, R = CH(3) alanine, R = CH(2)OH serine, and R = CH(2)COOH aspartic acid), focusing on the role of the solvent in the reaction (assisted versus unassisted mechanisms) and on the effect of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of the radical R on the activation and reaction energies.

  6. Conformational properties of α- or β-(1→6)-linked oligosaccharides: Hamiltonian replica exchange MD simulations and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhilon S; Pendrill, Robert; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; Widmalm, Göran; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-03-20

    Conformational sampling for a set of 10 α- or β-(1→6)-linked oligosaccharides has been studied using explicit solvent Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) simulations and NMR spectroscopy techniques. Validation of the force field and simulation methodology is done by comparing calculated transglycosidic J coupling constants and proton-proton distances with the corresponding NMR data. Initial calculations showed poor agreement, for example, with >3 Hz deviation of the calculated (3)J(H5,H6R) values from the experimental data, prompting optimization of the ω torsion angle parameters associated with (1→6)-linkages. The resulting force field is in overall good agreement (i.e., within ∼0.5 Hz deviation) from experimental (3)J(H5,H6R) values, although some small limitations are evident. Detailed hydrogen bonding analysis indicates that most of the compounds lack direct intramolecular H-bonds between the two monosaccharides; however, minor sampling of the O6···HO2' hydrogen bond is present in three compounds. The results verify the role of the gauche effect between O5 and O6 atoms in gluco- and manno-configured pyranosides causing the ω torsion angle to sample an equilibrium between the gt and gg rotamers. Conversely, galacto-configured pyranosides sample a population distribution in equilibrium between gt and tg rotamers, while the gg rotamer populations are minor. Water radial distribution functions suggest decreased accessibility to the O6 atom in the (1→6)-linkage as compared to the O6' atom in the nonreducing sugar. The role of bridging water molecules between two sugar moieties on the distributions of ω torsion angles in oligosaccharides is also explored. PMID:24552401

  7. Characterization of Zebrafish Cardiac and Slow Skeletal Troponin C Paralogs by MD Simulation and ITC.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Charles M; Rayani, Kaveh; Genge, Christine E; Singh, Gurpreet; Liang, Bo; Roller, Janine M; Li, Cindy; Li, Alison Yueh; Tieleman, D Peter; van Petegem, Filip; Tibbits, Glen F

    2016-07-12

    Zebrafish, as a model for teleost fish, have two paralogous troponin C (TnC) genes that are expressed in the heart differentially in response to temperature acclimation. Upon Ca(2+) binding, TnC changes conformation and exposes a hydrophobic patch that interacts with troponin I and initiates cardiac muscle contraction. Teleost-specific TnC paralogs have not yet been functionally characterized. In this study we have modeled the structures of the paralogs using molecular dynamics simulations at 18°C and 28°C and calculated the different Ca(2+)-binding properties between the teleost cardiac (cTnC or TnC1a) and slow-skeletal (ssTnC or TnC1b) paralogs through potential-of-mean-force calculations. These values are compared with thermodynamic binding properties obtained through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The modeled structures of each of the paralogs are similar at each temperature, with the exception of helix C, which flanks the Ca(2+) binding site; this region is also home to paralog-specific sequence substitutions that we predict have an influence on protein function. The short timescale of the potential-of-mean-force calculation precludes the inclusion of the conformational change on the ΔG of Ca(2+) interaction, whereas the ITC analysis includes the Ca(2+) binding and conformational change of the TnC molecule. ITC analysis has revealed that ssTnC has higher Ca(2+) affinity than cTnC for Ca(2+) overall, whereas each of the paralogs has increased affinity at 28°C compared to 18°C. Microsecond-timescale simulations have calculated that the cTnC paralog transitions from the closed to the open state more readily than the ssTnC paralog, an unfavorable transition that would decrease the ITC-derived Ca(2+) affinity while simultaneously increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilament. We propose that the preferential expression of cTnC at lower temperatures increases myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by this mechanism, despite the lower Ca(2+) affinity

  8. Parameterization and Adsorption Study of Hydrophobic Ethoxylated Urethane (HEUR) using Coarse-Grained MD Simulations with Implicit Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Larson, Ronald G.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.

    2015-03-01

    We parameterize a coarse-grained (CG) model using implicit water for a model Hydrophobic Ethoxylated Urethane (HEUR) composed of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) endcapped with hydrocarbon tails. Our model matches predictions using a CG Martini model with explicit water for PEO in water. We illustrate the strong adsorption of PEO onto hydrocarbon surfaces in water and obtain parameters for PEO at hydrocarbon/water interfaces. As a validation, we simulate the self-assembly of alkyl poly(ethylene glycol) surfactants and observe the transition from a lamellar phase to cylindrical micelles upon varying EO length, a result in agreement with previous studies. Lastly, we study the adsorption of HEURs onto hydrophobic surfaces. We observe bridge formation between two surfaces, interconnected flower-like micelles and their subsequent adsorption, in equilibrated systems. We discuss the influence of hydrophobe length and HEUR volume fraction on the adsorption process and the equilibrium adsorption. These results provide important insights for HEURs adsorption and are useful for comparisons with Self-Consistent Field Theory.

  9. Crystal structure and MD simulation of mouse EndoV reveal wedge motif plasticity in this inosine-specific endonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Ronander, Mia Elise; Solvoll, Anne Marthe; Blicher, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Endonuclease V (EndoV) is an enzyme with specificity for deaminated adenosine (inosine) in nucleic acids. EndoV from Escherichia coli (EcEndoV) acts both on inosines in DNA and RNA, whereas the human homolog cleaves only at inosines in RNA. Inosines in DNA are mutagenic and the role of EndoV in DNA repair is well established. In contrast, the biological function of EndoV in RNA processing is largely unexplored. Here we have characterized a second mammalian EndoV homolog, mouse EndoV (mEndoV), and show that mEndoV shares the same RNA selectivity as human EndoV (hEndoV). Mouse EndoV cleaves the same inosine-containing substrates as hEndoV, but with reduced efficiencies. The crystal structure of mEndoV reveals a conformation different from the hEndoV and prokaryotic EndoV structures, particularly for the conserved tyrosine in the wedge motif, suggesting that this strand separating element has some flexibility. Molecular dynamics simulations of mouse and human EndoV reveal alternative conformations for the invariant tyrosine. The configuration of the active site, on the other hand, is very similar between the prokaryotic and mammalian versions of EndoV.

  10. Comparative MD Simulations Indicate a Dual Role for Arg1323.50 in Dopamine-Dependent D2R Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Ralf C.; Clark, Timothy; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Residue Arg3.50 belongs to the highly conserved DRY-motif of class A GPCRs, which is located at the bottom of TM3. On the one hand, Arg3.50 has been reported to help stabilize the inactive state of GPCRs, but on the other hand has also been shown to be crucial for stabilizing active receptor conformations and mediating receptor-G protein coupling. The combined results of these studies suggest that the exact function of Arg3.50 is likely to be receptor-dependent and must be characterized independently for every GPCR. Consequently, we now present comparative molecular-dynamics simulations that use our recently described inactive-state and Gα-bound active-state homology models of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), which are either bound to dopamine or ligand-free, performed to identify the function of Arg1323.50 in D2R. Our results are consistent with a dynamic model of D2R activation in which Arg1323.50 adopts a dual role, both by stabilizing the inactive-state receptor conformation and enhancing dopamine-dependent D2R-G protein coupling. PMID:26741139

  11. Corresponding Functional Dynamics across the Hsp90 Chaperone Family: Insights from a Multiscale Analysis of MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Giulia; Potestio, Raffaello; Micheletti, Cristian; Colombo, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how local protein modifications, such as binding small-molecule ligands, can trigger and regulate large-scale motions of large protein domains is a major open issue in molecular biology. We address various aspects of this problem by analyzing and comparing atomistic simulations of Hsp90 family representatives for which crystal structures of the full length protein are available: mammalian Grp94, yeast Hsp90 and E.coli HtpG. These chaperones are studied in complex with the natural ligands ATP, ADP and in the Apo state. Common key aspects of their functional dynamics are elucidated with a novel multi-scale comparison of their internal dynamics. Starting from the atomic resolution investigation of internal fluctuations and geometric strain patterns, a novel analysis of domain dynamics is developed. The results reveal that the ligand-dependent structural modulations mostly consist of relative rigid-like movements of a limited number of quasi-rigid domains, shared by the three proteins. Two common primary hinges for such movements are identified. The first hinge, whose functional role has been demonstrated by several experimental approaches, is located at the boundary between the N-terminal and Middle-domains. The second hinge is located at the end of a three-helix bundle in the Middle-domain and unfolds/unpacks going from the ATP- to the ADP-state. This latter site could represent a promising novel druggable allosteric site common to all chaperones. PMID:22457611

  12. Metal Ion Coordination Essential for Specific Molecular Interactions of Butea monosperma Lectin: ITC and MD Simulation Studies.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, J; Haridas, M

    2015-05-01

    Crystal structure of Butea monosperma seed lectin (BML) was analyzed and the metal ion geometry identified. In order to understand the role of metal ions for the structural stability and ligand binding, studies of demetallized protein were carried out. Binding of different ligands like GalNAc, lactose, and galactose onto native and demetallized protein was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry as well as molecular simulation methods. Molecular dynamics was applied to the structure after removing the coordinates of metal ions, to identify the effect of demetallization in silico. Docking studies of different sugar molecules as well as the fungal α-amylase was carried out and compared the interactions in the native and apo states. It was found that metal ions are important for the ligand binding with increased affinity. However, their absence did not make any alteration to the secondary structure. Though the metal ions were not coordinated to the loops contacting the α-amylase, the absence of metal ions reduced the protein-protein binding strength due to long-range changes in irregular structures of the lectin.

  13. Crystal structure and MD simulation of mouse EndoV reveal wedge motif plasticity in this inosine-specific endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Ronander, Mia Elise; Solvoll, Anne Marthe; Blicher, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun; Dalhus, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease V (EndoV) is an enzyme with specificity for deaminated adenosine (inosine) in nucleic acids. EndoV from Escherichia coli (EcEndoV) acts both on inosines in DNA and RNA, whereas the human homolog cleaves only at inosines in RNA. Inosines in DNA are mutagenic and the role of EndoV in DNA repair is well established. In contrast, the biological function of EndoV in RNA processing is largely unexplored. Here we have characterized a second mammalian EndoV homolog, mouse EndoV (mEndoV), and show that mEndoV shares the same RNA selectivity as human EndoV (hEndoV). Mouse EndoV cleaves the same inosine-containing substrates as hEndoV, but with reduced efficiencies. The crystal structure of mEndoV reveals a conformation different from the hEndoV and prokaryotic EndoV structures, particularly for the conserved tyrosine in the wedge motif, suggesting that this strand separating element has some flexibility. Molecular dynamics simulations of mouse and human EndoV reveal alternative conformations for the invariant tyrosine. The configuration of the active site, on the other hand, is very similar between the prokaryotic and mammalian versions of EndoV. PMID:27108838

  14. Structural characterization of MG and pre-MG states of proteins by MD simulations, NMR, and other techniques.

    PubMed

    Naiyer, Abdullah; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Sundd, Monica; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins fold via a number of partially structured intermediates such as molten globule (MG) and pre-molten globule states. Understanding the structure of these intermediates at atomic level is often a challenge, as these states are observed under extreme conditions of pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants. Furthermore, several other processes such as chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis (or point mutation), and cleavage of covalent bond of natural proteins often lead to MG like partially unfolded conformation. However, the dynamic nature of proteins in these states makes them unsuitable for most structure determination at atomic level. Intermediate states studied so far have been characterized mostly by circular dichroism, fluorescence, viscosity, dynamic light scattering measurements, dye binding, infrared techniques, molecular dynamics simulations, etc. There is a limited amount of structural data available on these intermediate states by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and hence there is a need to characterize these states at the molecular level. In this review, we present characterization of equilibrium intermediates by biophysical techniques with special reference to NMR. PMID:25586676

  15. MD simulation study of direct permeation of a nanoparticle across the cell membrane under an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenta; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been attracting much attention for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In most of the applications, NPs are required to translocate across the cell membrane and to reach the cell cytosol. Experimental studies have reported that by applying an electric field NPs can directly permeate across the cell membrane without the confinement of NPs by endocytic vesicles. However, damage to the cell can often be a concern. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the direct permeation of NPs under an external electric field can greatly contribute to the realization of a technology for the direct delivery of NPs. Here we investigated the permeation of a cationic gold NP across a phospholipid bilayer under an external electric field using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. When an external electric field that is equal to the membrane breakdown intensity was applied, a typical NP delivery by electroporation was shown: the cationic gold NP directly permeated across a lipid bilayer without membrane wrapping of the NP, while a persistent transmembrane pore was formed. However, when a specific range of the electric field that is lower than the membrane breakdown intensity was applied, a unique permeation pathway was exhibited: the generated transmembrane pore immediately resealed after the direct permeation of NP. Furthermore, we found that the affinity of the NP for the membrane surface is a key for the self-resealing of the pore. Our finding suggests that by applying an electric field in a suitable range NPs can be directly delivered into the cell with less cellular damage.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been attracting much attention for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In most of the applications, NPs are required to translocate across the cell membrane and to reach the cell cytosol. Experimental studies have reported that by applying an electric field NPs can directly permeate across the cell membrane without the confinement of

  16. Constant-pH MD Simulations Portray the Protonation and Structural Behavior of Four Decapeptides Designed to Coordinate Cu(2+).

    PubMed

    Campos, Sara R R; Iranzo, Olga; Baptista, António M

    2016-02-18

    The cyclic decapeptide C-Asp, containing one Asp residue and three His residues, was designed by Fragoso et al. (Chem. Eur. J. 2013, 19, 2076) to bind Cu(2+) exclusively through the side chain groups and mimic copper coordination in metalloproteins. A variant of the cyclodecapeptide where Asp is substituted by Asn (C-Asn) has also been synthesized in addition to the linear ("open") counterparts of both forms (O-Asp and O-Asn), testing the importance of cyclization and the presence of Asp in Cu(2+) coordination (Chem. Eur. J. 2013, 19, 2076; Dalton Trans. 2013, 42, 6182). All peptides formed a major species at neutral pH that was able to coordinate Cu(2+) exclusively through the neutral imidazole groups and the Asp side chain, when present, with C-Asp being the most effective. A detailed description of the protonation behavior of each histidine could help understanding the coordination species being formed in the pH range and eventually further optimizing the peptide's design. However, the standard current methods (NMR titrations) are not very suited for proximal groups titrating in the same pH range. In this work, we used the stochastic titration constant-pH molecular dynamics method to calculate the protonation curves and pKa of each titrable residue in the four decapeptides, in the absence of Cu(2+) ions. The global protonation curves obtained in our simulations are in very good agreement with the existing potentiometric titration curves. The histidines are titrating very closely, and the Asp forms abundant salt bridges with the basic residues, displaying an unusually low pKa value. In addition, we could observe that the four peptides are very unstructured in the absence of copper, and not even the cyclic forms exhibit a significant β-sheet, unlike what could be expected from the presence of β-turn inducer units in this type of scaffold.

  17. Conformations of phenylalanine in the tripeptides AFA and GFG probed by combining MD simulations with NMR, FTIR, polarized Raman, and VCD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pizzanelli, Silvia; Forte, Claudia; Monti, Susanna; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Hagarman, Andrew; Measey, Thomas J; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2010-03-25

    Conformational properties of small, flexible peptides are a matter of ongoing interest since they can be considered as models for unfolded proteins. However, the investigation of the conformations of small peptides is challenging as they are ensembles of rapidly interconverting conformers; moreover, the different methods used are prone to different approximations and errors. In order to obtain more reliable results, it is prudent to combine different techniques; here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), polarized Raman, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) measurements were used to study the conformational propensity of phenylalanine in the tripeptides AFA and GFG, motivated by the relevance of phenylalanine for the self-aggregation of peptides. The results of this analysis indicate that the F residue predominantly populates the beta-strand (beta) and polyproline II (PPII) conformations in both AFA and GFG. However, while phenylalanine exhibits a propensity for beta-strand conformations in GFG (0.40 < or = beta population < or = 0.69 and 0.29 < or = PPII population < or = 0.42), the substitution of terminal glycines with alanine residues induces a higher population of PPII (0.31 < or = beta population < or = 0.50 and 0.37 < or = PPII population < or = 0.57).

  18. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-01-28

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2(-), chlorate, ClO3(-), and perchlorate, ClO4(-). In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO(-), bromate, BrO3(-), iodate, IO3(-) and metaperiodate, IO4(-), ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO6(3-), ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01-0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5 = 1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5 = 2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  19. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2−, chlorate, ClO3−, and perchlorate, ClO4−. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO−, bromate, BrO3−, iodate, IO3− and metaperiodate, IO4−, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63−, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5=1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5=2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  20. Hybrid MD-Nernst Planck Model of Alpha-hemolysin Conductance Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozmuta, Ioana; O'Keefer, James T.; Bose, Deepak; Stolc, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by experiments in which an applied electric field translocates polynucleotides through an alpha-hemolysin protein channel causing ionic current transient blockade, a hybrid simulation model is proposed to predict the conductance properties of the open channel. Time scales corresponding to ion permeation processes are reached using the Poisson-Nemst-Planck (PNP) electro-diffusion model in which both solvent and local ion concentrations are represented as a continuum. The diffusion coefficients of the ions (K(+) and Cl(-)) input in the PNP model are, however, calculated from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD). In the MD simulations, a reduced representation of the channel is used. The channel is solvated in a 1 M KCI solution, and an external electric field is applied. The pore specific diffusion coefficients for both ionic species are reduced 5-7 times in comparison to bulk values. Significant statistical variations (17-45%) of the pore-ions diffusivities are observed. Within the statistics, the ionic diffusivities remain invariable for a range of external applied voltages between 30 and 240mV. In the 2D-PNP calculations, the pore stem is approximated by a smooth cylinder of radius approx. 9A with two constriction blocks where the radius is reduced to approx. 6A. The electrostatic potential includes the contribution from the atomistic charges. The MD-PNP model shows that the atomic charges are responsible for the rectifying behaviour and for the slight anion selectivity of the a-hemolysin pore. Independent of the hierarchy between the anion and cation diffusivities, the anionic contribution to the total ionic current will dominate. The predictions of the MD-PNP model are in good agreement with experimental data and give confidence in the present approach of bridging time scales by combining a microscopic and macroscopic model.

  1. Deriving Coarse-Grained Charges from All-Atom Systems: An Analytic Solution.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Peter; Lake, Peter T; McCullagh, Martin

    2016-09-13

    An analytic method to assign optimal coarse-grained charges based on electrostatic potential matching is presented. This solution is the infinite size and density limit of grid-integration charge-fitting and is computationally more efficient by several orders of magnitude. The solution is also minimized with respect to coarse-grained positions which proves to be an extremely important step in reproducing the all-atom electrostatic potential. The joint optimal-charge optimal-position coarse-graining procedure is applied to a number of aggregating proteins using single-site per amino acid resolution. These models provide a good estimate of both the vacuum and Debye-Hückel screened all-atom electrostatic potentials in the vicinity and in the far-field of the protein. Additionally, these coarse-grained models are shown to approximate the all-atom dimerization electrostatic potential energy of 10 aggregating proteins with good accuracy.

  2. Exploring the potential of complex formation between a mutant DNA and the wild type protein counterpart: a MM and MD simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sujata; Sen, Srikanta

    2006-09-01

    We have demonstrated that the methods of molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation might be used to assess whether a specific mutation in the DNA would destabilize a known DNA-protein complex. The approach is based on probing the changes in the interaction that would be induced into the complex if within the already formed wild type complex the mutation could be introduced. We have used Hoxc8-DNA complex as a test system where it is known that the Hoxc8 binding affinity of the DNA is completely lost upon mutation of the DNA by replacing TAAT stretch to GCCG. Mutation was obtained by changing the relevant base pairs into the DNA of the model of the corresponding wild type complex developed by homology modeling and MD simulation in water for 2.0 ns. Comparison of the structure, dynamics and interactions between the hypothetical mutant model with those of the similarly refined wild type model shows that the loss of affinity of the mutant DNA to Hoxc8 has two different origins: (i) loss of several strong H-bonds as the direct consequences of mutation and (ii) reduced H-bonds in the common parts due to a net loss or inferior H-bonding geometry induced by the mutation as indirect effects. The net change in the interaction energy between the DNA and the protein in the best possible configuration indicated the experimentally observed destabilization effects. No significant change in the groove width was observed and no correlation was found between the water-bridges and the loss of affinity. PMID:16406716

  3. ProtoMD: A prototyping toolkit for multiscale molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, Endre; Mansour, Andrew Abi; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    ProtoMD is a toolkit that facilitates the development of algorithms for multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is designed for multiscale methods which capture the dynamic transfer of information across multiple spatial scales, such as the atomic to the mesoscopic scale, via coevolving microscopic and coarse-grained (CG) variables. ProtoMD can be also be used to calibrate parameters needed in traditional CG-MD methods. The toolkit integrates 'GROMACS wrapper' to initiate MD simulations, and 'MDAnalysis' to analyze and manipulate trajectory files. It facilitates experimentation with a spectrum of coarse-grained variables, prototyping rare events (such as chemical reactions), or simulating nanocharacterization experiments such as terahertz spectroscopy, AFM, nanopore, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. ProtoMD is written in python and is freely available under the GNU General Public License from github.com/CTCNano/proto_md.

  4. All-atom polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-15

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field (FF) for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages, and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting quantum mechanical (QM) data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude FF yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100-ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduce (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII substates of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive FF, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  5. Microsecond-Scale MD Simulations of HIV-1 DIS Kissing-Loop Complexes Predict Bulged-In Conformation of the Bulged Bases and Reveal Interesting Differences between Available Variants of the AMBER RNA Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Havrila, Marek; Zgarbová, Marie; Jurečka, Petr; Banáš, Pavel; Krepl, Miroslav; Otyepka, Michal; Šponer, Jiří

    2015-12-10

    We report an extensive set of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (∼25 μs of accumulated simulation time) of the RNA kissing-loop complex of the HIV-1 virus initiation dimerization site. Despite many structural investigations by X-ray, NMR, and MD techniques, the position of the bulged purines of the kissing complex has not been unambiguously resolved. The X-ray structures consistently show bulged-out positions of the unpaired bases, while several NMR studies show bulged-in conformations. The NMR studies are, however, mutually inconsistent regarding the exact orientations of the bases. The earlier simulation studies predicted the bulged-out conformation; however, this finding could have been biased by the short simulation time scales. Our microsecond-long simulations reveal that all unpaired bases of the kissing-loop complex stay preferably in the interior of the kissing-loop complex. The MD results are discussed in the context of the available experimental data and we suggest that both conformations are biochemically relevant. We also show that MD provides a quite satisfactory description of this RNA system, contrasting recent reports of unsatisfactory performance of the RNA force fields for smaller systems such as tetranucleotides and tetraloops. We explain this by the fact that the kissing complex is primarily stabilized by an extensive network of Watson-Crick interactions which are rather well described by the force fields. We tested several different sets of water/ion parameters but they all lead to consistent results. However, we demonstrate that a recently suggested modification of van der Waals interactions of the Cornell et al. force field deteriorates the description of the kissing complex by the loss of key stacking interactions stabilizing the interhelical junction and excessive hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  6. Extensive all-atom Monte Carlo sampling and QM/MM corrections in the SAMPL4 hydration free energy challenge.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Cabedo Martinez, Ana I; Criddle, Michael P; Essex, Jonathan W

    2014-03-01

    We present our predictions for the SAMPL4 hydration free energy challenge. Extensive all-atom Monte Carlo simulations were employed to sample the compounds in explicit solvent. While the focus of our study was to demonstrate well-converged and reproducible free energies, we attempted to address the deficiencies in the general Amber force field force field with a simple QM/MM correction. We show that by using multiple independent simulations, including different starting configurations, and enhanced sampling with parallel tempering, we can obtain well converged hydration free energies. Additional analysis using dihedral angle distributions, torsion-root mean square deviation plots and thermodynamic cycles support this assertion. We obtain a mean absolute deviation of 1.7 kcal mol(-1) and a Kendall's τ of 0.65 compared with experiment. PMID:24488307

  7. Reconciling structural and thermodynamic predictions using all-atom and coarse-grain force fields: the case of charged oligo-arginine translocation into DMPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-10-16

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide-water and peptide-membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer-water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are -2.51, -4.28, and -5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are -0.83, -3.33, and -3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of the ensemble of

  8. An atomistic MD simulation and pair-distribution-function study of disorder and reactivity of [alpha]-AlF[subscript 3] nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Santanu; Chupas, Peter; Morgan, Benjamin J.; Madden, Paul A.; Grey, Clare P.

    2008-06-18

    Cubic nanoparticles of {alpha}-AlF{sub 3} containing 864 and 2048 atoms were investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. Significant structural rearrangements of these particles occurred, primarily at the edges and corners of the particles, and 3 and 5 membered (Al-F-){sub n} ring structures were observed in addition to the 4-membered rings seen in bulk {alpha}-AlF{sub 3}. These 3 and 5 membered ring structures are, however, present in other metastable forms of AlF{sub 3}, which are formed at low temperatures from high surface area precursors. The surfaces of the nanoparticles were very dynamic on the timescale of the MD run, Al-F bonds being continually broken and formed, resulting in the movement of the low coordinate Lewis acid Al sites on the surfaces of the particles. The Lewis acid sites, which represent the catalytically active sites for F/Cl exchange reactions, are largely present at the corners and edges of the particles. The particles show larger rhombohedral distortions than present in the bulk phase and do not undergo a rhombohedral to cubic phase transition at elevated temperatures. The results are compared with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis results from fluorinated {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, nanoparticles of AlF{sub 3} prepared by plasma routes and {alpha}- and {beta}-AlF{sub 3}. Broad peaks between 3.3 and 4.5 {angstrom} in the PDF plots of the fluorinated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the nanoparticles indicate a distribution of Al-F distances arising from Al and F atoms in connected AlF{sub 6} octahedra; this is consistent with the presence of ring structures other than those found in {alpha}-AlF{sub 3}.

  9. Toward a rational design of bioactive glasses with optimal structural features: composition-structure correlations unveiled by solid-state NMR and MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Renny; Stevensson, Baltzar; Tilocca, Antonio; Edén, Mattias

    2014-01-23

    The physiological responses of silicate-based bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to depend critically on both the P content (n(P)) of the glass and its silicate network connectivity (N(BO)(Si)). However, while the bioactivity generally displays a nonmonotonic dependence on nP itself, recent work suggest that it is merely the net orthophosphate content that directly links to the bioactivity. We exploit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with ³¹P and ²⁹Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to explore the quantitative relationships between N(BO)(Si), n(P), and the silicate and phosphate speciations in a series of Na₂O-CaO-SiO₂-P₂O₅ glasses spanning 2.1 ≤ N(BO)(Si) ≤ 2.9 and variable P₂O₅ contents up to 6.0 mol %. The fractional population of the orthophosphate groups remains independent of n(P) at a fixed N(BO)(Si)-value, but is reduced slightly as N(BO)(Si) increases. Nevertheless, P remains predominantly as readily released orthophosphate ions, whose content may be altered essentially independently of the network connectivity, thereby offering a route to optimize the glass bioactivity. We discuss the observed composition-structure links in relation to known composition-bioactivity correlations, and define how Na₂O-CaO-SiO₂-P₂O₅ compositions exhibiting an optimal bioactivity can be designed by simultaneously altering three key parameters: the silicate network connectivity, the (ortho)phosphate content, and the n(Na)/n(Ca) molar ratio.

  10. Toward a Rational Design of Bioactive Glasses with Optimal Structural Features: Composition–Structure Correlations Unveiled by Solid-State NMR and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The physiological responses of silicate-based bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to depend critically on both the P content (nP) of the glass and its silicate network connectivity (N̅BOSi). However, while the bioactivity generally displays a nonmonotonic dependence on nP itself, recent work suggest that it is merely the net orthophosphate content that directly links to the bioactivity. We exploit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with 31P and 29Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to explore the quantitative relationships between N̅BOSi, nP, and the silicate and phosphate speciations in a series of Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses spanning 2.1 ≤ N̅BOSi ≤ 2.9 and variable P2O5 contents up to 6.0 mol %. The fractional population of the orthophosphate groups remains independent of nP at a fixed N̅BOSi-value, but is reduced slightly as N̅BOSi increases. Nevertheless, P remains predominantly as readily released orthophosphate ions, whose content may be altered essentially independently of the network connectivity, thereby offering a route to optimize the glass bioactivity. We discuss the observed composition-structure links in relation to known composition-bioactivity correlations, and define how Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 compositions exhibiting an optimal bioactivity can be designed by simultaneously altering three key parameters: the silicate network connectivity, the (ortho)phosphate content, and the nNa/nCa molar ratio. PMID:24364818

  11. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Method Combined with Hybrid All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Model: Theory and Application on Redox Potential Calculations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2016-04-12

    We developed a new multiresolution method that spans three levels of resolution with quantum mechanical, atomistic molecular mechanical, and coarse-grained models. The resolution-adapted all-atom and coarse-grained water model, in which an all-atom structural description of the entire system is maintained during the simulations, is combined with the ab initio quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. We apply this model to calculate the redox potentials of the aqueous ruthenium and iron complexes by using the fractional number of electrons approach and thermodynamic integration simulations. The redox potentials are recovered in excellent accordance with the experimental data. The speed-up of the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model renders it computationally more attractive. The accuracy depends on the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model used in the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. We have used another multiresolution model, in which an atomic-level layer of water molecules around redox center is solvated in supramolecular coarse-grained waters for the redox potential calculations. Compared with the experimental data, this alternative multilayer model leads to less accurate results when used with the coarse-grained polarizable MARTINI water or big multipole water model for the coarse-grained layer.

  12. Folding peptides and proteins with all-atom physics: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, M. Scott

    2008-03-01

    Computational methods offer powerful tools for investigating proteins and peptides at the molecular-level; however, it has proven challenging to reproduce the long time scale folding processes of these molecules at a level that is both faithful to the atomic driving forces and attainable with modern commodity cluster computing. Alternatively, the past decade has seen significant progress in using bioinformatics-based approaches to infer the three dimensional native structures of proteins, drawing upon extensive knowledge databases of known protein structures [1]. These methods work remarkably well when a homologous protein can be found to provide a structural template for a candidate sequence. However, in cases where homology to database proteins is low, where the folding pathway is of interest, or where conformational flexibility is substantial---as in many emerging protein and peptide technologies---bioinformatics methods perform poorly. There is therefore great interest in seeing purely physics-based approaches succeed. We discuss a purely physics-based, database-free folding method, relying on proper thermal sampling (replica exchange molecular dynamics) and molecular potential energy functions. In order to surmount the tremendous computational demands of all-atom folding simulations, our approach implements a conformational search strategy based on a putative protein folding mechanism called zipping and assembly [2-4]. That is, we explicitly seek out potential folding pathways inferred from short simulations, and iteratively pursue all such routes by coaxing a polypeptide chain along them. The method is called the Zipping and Assembly Method (ZAM) and it works in two parts: (1) the full polypeptide chain is broken into small fragments that are first simulated independently and then successively re-assembled into larger segments with further sampling, and (2) consistently stable structure in fragments is detected and locked into place, in order to avoid re

  13. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  14. All-Atom Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM) Force Field for Hexopyranoses and Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present an extension of the all-atom internal-coordinate force field, ICMFF, that allows for simulation of heterogeneous systems including hexopyranose saccharides and glycan chains in addition to proteins. A library of standard glycan geometries containing α- and β-anomers of the most common hexapyranoses, i.e., d-galactose, d-glucose, d-mannose, d-xylose, l-fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, sialic, and glucuronic acids, is created based on the analysis of the saccharide structures reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. The new force field parameters include molecular electrostatic potential-derived partial atomic charges and the torsional parameters derived from quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related molecules. The ϕ/ψ torsional parameters for different types of glycosidic linkages are developed using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates, i.e., glycosidic-linked tetrahydropyran–cyclohexane dimers. Target data for parameter optimization include two-dimensional energy surfaces corresponding to the ϕ/ψ glycosidic dihedral angles in the disaccharide analogues, as determined by quantum mechanical MP2/6-31G** single-point energies on HF/6-31G** optimized structures. To achieve better agreement with the observed geometries of glycosidic linkages, the bond angles at the O-linkage atoms are added to the internal variable set and the corresponding bond bending energy term is parametrized using quantum mechanical data. The resulting force field is validated on glycan chains of 1–12 residues from a set of high-resolution X-ray glycoprotein structures based on heavy atom root-mean-square deviations of the lowest-energy glycan conformations generated by the biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) molecular mechanics simulations from the native structures. The appropriate BPMC distributions for monosaccharide–monosaccharide and protein–glycan linkages are derived

  15. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  16. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  17. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  18. In Silico Folding of a Three Helix Protein and Characterization of Its Free-Energy Landscape in an All-Atom Force Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herges, T.; Wenzel, W.

    2005-01-01

    We report the reproducible first-principles folding of the 40 amino-acid, three-helix headpiece of the HIV accessory protein in a recently developed all-atom free-energy force field. Six of 20 simulations using an adapted basin-hopping method converged to better than 3Å backbone rms deviation to the experimental structure. Using over 60 000 low-energy conformations of this protein, we constructed a decoy tree that completely characterizes its folding funnel.

  19. Multiscale Free Energy Simulations: An Efficient Method for Connecting Classical MD Simulations to QM or QM/MM Free Energies Using Non-Boltzmann Bennett Reweighting Schemes.

    PubMed

    König, Gerhard; Hudson, Phillip S; Boresch, Stefan; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-04-01

    THE RELIABILITY OF FREE ENERGY SIMULATIONS (FES) IS LIMITED BY TWO FACTORS: (a) the need for correct sampling and (b) the accuracy of the computational method employed. Classical methods (e.g., force fields) are typically used for FES and present a myriad of challenges, with parametrization being a principle one. On the other hand, parameter-free quantum mechanical (QM) methods tend to be too computationally expensive for adequate sampling. One widely used approach is a combination of methods, where the free energy difference between the two end states is computed by, e.g., molecular mechanics (MM), and the end states are corrected by more accurate methods, such as QM or hybrid QM/MM techniques. Here we report two new approaches that significantly improve the aforementioned scheme; with a focus on how to compute corrections between, e.g., the MM and the more accurate QM calculations. First, a molecular dynamics trajectory that properly samples relevant conformational degrees of freedom is generated. Next, potential energies of each trajectory frame are generated with a QM or QM/MM Hamiltonian. Free energy differences are then calculated based on the QM or QM/MM energies using either a non-Boltzmann Bennett approach (QM-NBB) or non-Boltzmann free energy perturbation (NB-FEP). Both approaches are applied to calculate relative and absolute solvation free energies in explicit and implicit solvent environments. Solvation free energy differences (relative and absolute) between ethane and methanol in explicit solvent are used as the initial test case for QM-NBB. Next, implicit solvent methods are employed in conjunction with both QM-NBB and NB-FEP to compute absolute solvation free energies for 21 compounds. These compounds range from small molecules such as ethane and methanol to fairly large, flexible solutes, such as triacetyl glycerol. Several technical aspects were investigated. Ultimately some best practices are suggested for improving methods that seek to connect

  20. Molecular modeling of the binding modes of the Iron-sulfur protein to the Jac1 co-chaperone from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by all-atom and coarse-grained approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mozolewska, Magdalena A.; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The Iron sulfur protein 1 (Isu1) from yeast, and the J-type co-chaperone Jac1, are part of a huge ATP-dependent system, and both interact with Hsp70 chaperones. Interaction of Isu1 and Jac1 is a part of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis system in mitochondria. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the yeast Isu1-Jac1 complex has been modeled. First, the complete structure of Isu1 was obtained by homology modeling using the I-TASSER server and YASARA software and thereafter tested for stability in the all-atom force field AMBER. Then, the known experimental structure of Jac1 was adopted to obtain initial models of the Isu1-Jac1 complex by using the ZDOCK server for global and local docking and the AutoDock software for local docking. Three most probable models were subsequently subjected to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the UNRES force field to obtain the final structures of the complex. In the most probable model, Isu1 binds to the left face of the “Γ” shaped Jac1 molecule by the β-sheet section of Isu1. Residues L105, L109, and Y163 of Jac1 have been assessed by mutation studies to be essential for binding (Ciesielski et al., J. Mol. Biol. 2012, 417, 1–12). These residues were also found, by UNRES/MD simulations, to be involved in strong interactions between Isu1 and Jac1 in the complex. Moreover, N95, T98, P102, H112, V159, L167 and A170 of Jac1, not yet tested experimentally, were also found important in binding. PMID:25973573

  1. An FFT-based method for modeling protein folding and binding under crowding: benchmarking on ellipsoidal and all-atom crowders.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    It is now well recognized that macromolecular crowding can exert significant effects on protein folding and binding stability. In order to calculate such effects in direct simulations of proteins mixed with bystander macromolecules, the latter (referred to as crowders) are usually modeled as spheres and the proteins represented at a coarse-grained level. Our recently developed postprocessing approach allows the proteins to be represented at the all-atom level but, for computational efficiency, has only been implemented for spherical crowders. Modeling crowder molecules in cellular environments and in vitro experiments as spheres may distort their effects on protein stability. Here we present a new method that is capable for treating aspherical crowders. The idea, borrowed from protein-protein docking, is to calculate the excess chemical potential of the proteins in crowded solution by fast Fourier transform (FFT). As the first application, we studied the effects of ellipsoidal crowders on the folding and binding free energies of all-atom proteins, and found, in agreement with previous direct simulations with coarse-grained protein models, that the aspherical crowders exert greater stabilization effects than spherical crowders of the same volume. Moreover, as demonstrated here, the FFT-based method has the important property that its computational cost does not increase strongly even when the level of details in representing the crowders is increased all the way to all-atom, thus significantly accelerating realistic modeling of protein folding and binding in cell-like environments. PMID:24187527

  2. Comparison of the influence of fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon surfactants on the adsorptions of SDS, DTAB and C12E8 at the air/water interface by MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jinyu; Xu, Guiying

    2012-06-01

    Adsorptions of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12E8) at the air/water interface in the presence of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants (HCEP and FCEP) were investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. With the addition of HCEP or FCEP, the monolayer is more organized than in individual surfactant systems. Extremely expanded C12E8 chain in a smaller tilt angle is discovered in C12E8/HCEP system. In SDS or DTAB systems, relatively small tilt angle of surfactants is observed in the presence of FCEP. Their analog, a silicone surfactant DSEP shows a favorable effect on interfacial properties with DTAB.

  3. An All-Atom Force Field for Tertiary Structure Prediction of Helical Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herges, T.; Wenzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an all-atom free-energy force field (PFF01) for protein tertiary structure prediction. PFF01 is based on physical interactions and was parameterized using experimental structures of a family of proteins believed to span a wide variety of possible folds. It contains empirical, although sequence-independent terms for hydrogen bonding. Its solvent-accessible surface area solvent model was first fit to transfer energies of small peptides. The parameters of the solvent model were then further optimized to stabilize the native structure of a single protein, the autonomously folding villin headpiece, against competing low-energy decoys. Here we validate the force field for five nonhomologous helical proteins with 20–60 amino acids. For each protein, decoys with 2–3 Å backbone root mean-square deviation and correct experimental Cβ–Cβ distance constraints emerge as those with the lowest energy. PMID:15507688

  4. CHARMM additive all-atom force field for carbohydrate derivatives and its utility in polysaccharide and carbohydrate-protein modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Hatcher, Elizabeth; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Foster, Theresa J.; Jamison, Francis W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Monosaccharide derivatives such as xylose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GlaNAc), glucuronic acid, iduronic acid, and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) are important components of eukaryotic glycans. The present work details development of force-field parameters for these monosaccharides and their covalent connections to proteins via O-linkages to serine or threonine sidechains and via N-linkages to asparagine sidechains. The force field development protocol was designed to explicitly yield parameters that are compatible with the existing CHARMM additive force field for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and small molecules. Therefore, when combined with previously developed parameters for pyranose and furanose monosaccharides, for glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and for proteins, the present set of parameters enables the molecular simulation of a wide variety of biologically-important molecules such as complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins. Parametrization included fitting to quantum mechanical (QM) geometries and conformational energies of model compounds, as well as to QM pair interaction energies and distances of model compounds with water. Parameters were validated in the context of crystals of relevant monosaccharides, as well NMR and/or x-ray crystallographic data on larger systems including oligomeric hyaluronan, sialyl Lewis X, O- and N-linked glycopeptides, and a lectin:sucrose complex. As the validated parameters are an extension of the CHARMM all-atom additive biomolecular force field, they further broaden the types of heterogeneous systems accessible with a consistently-developed force-field model. PMID:22125473

  5. Reproducible In-Silico Folding of a Four Helix 60 Amino Acid Protein in a Transferable All-Atom Forcefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schug, Alexander

    2005-03-01

    For predicting the protein tertiary structure one approach describes the native state of a protein as the global minimum of an appropiate free-energy forcefield. We have recently developed such a all-atom protein forcefield (PFF01). As major challenge remains the search for the global minimum for which we developed efficient methods. Using these we were able to predict the structure of helical proteins from different families ranging in size from 20 to 60 amino acids starting with random configurations. For the four helix 60 amino acid protein Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L20 (pdb code: 1GYZ) we used a simple client-master model for distributed computing. Starting from a set of random structures three phases of different folding simulations refined this set to a final one with 50 configurations. During this process the amount of native-like structures increased strongly. Six out of the ten structures best in energy approached the native structure within 5 åbackbone rmsd. The conformation with the lowest energy had a backbone rmsd value of 4.6 åtherefore correctly predicting the tertiary structure of 1GYZ.ReferencesA. Schug et al, Phys. Rev. Letters, 91:158102, 2003A. Schug et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (in press), 2004

  6. The equilibrium properties and folding kinetics of an all-atom Go xAF model of the Trp-cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhananta, Apichart; Boer, Jesse; MacKay, Ian

    2005-03-01

    The ultrafast-folding 20-residue Trp-cage protein is quickly becoming a new benchmark for molecular dynamics studies. Already several all-atom simulations have probed its equilibrium and kinetic properties. In this work an all-atom Go ¯ model is used to accurately represent the side-chain packing and native atomic contacts of the Trp-cage. The model reproduces the hallmark thermodynamics cooperativity of small proteins. Folding simulations observe that in the fast-folding dominant pathway, partial α-helical structure forms before hydrophobic core collapse. In the slow-folding secondary pathway, partial core collapse occurs before helical structure. The slow-folding rate of the secondary pathway is attributed to the loss of side-chain rotational freedom, due to the early core collapse, which impedes the helix formation. A major finding is the observation of a low-temperature kinetic intermediate stabilized by a salt bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16. Similar observations [R. Zhou, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 13280 (2003)] were reported in a recent study using an all-atom model of the Trp-cage in explicit water, in which the salt-bridge stabilized intermediate was hypothesized to be the origin of the ultrafast-folding mechanism. A theoretical mutation that eliminates the Asp-9-Arg-16 salt bridge, but leaves the residues intact, is performed. Folding simulations of the mutant Trp-cage observe a two-state free-energy landscape with no kinetic intermediate and a significant decrease in the folding rate, in support of the hypothesis.

  7. Arnold Aberman, MD.

    PubMed

    Aberman, A

    1995-10-01

    When the United States embarked on its effort to provide universal health insurance, the Canadian Medicare System was cited as a possible model for American health care. Often touted as an example of low-cost, high quality medicine, the Canadian system has mirrored the problems of health care across its southern border. With rocketing health care expenditures and financing having largely been decentralized to the individual provinces, local officials have struggled to cut costs and services. A central focus of these efforts has been a move to decrease the numbers of physicians, most notably a 10% decrease in medical school class size in 1993. While some Western provinces have experimented with the privatization of health care, the Canadian system still remains the epitome of government operated fee-for-service medicine. Given the likelihood of dramatic change in the American Medicare system, Canadian academic centers offer a unique perspective on the impact of capitation, evolving relationships with government payors, and the flip side of market oriented reforms. At the helm of one of Canada's largest schools is Arnold Aberman, MD, dean of the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. Born in Montreal, Quebec, Aberman received his MD from McGill University, but then did his residency both in Canada and the US, followed by a pulmonary fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Cardiovascular Research Institute of the University of California, San Francisco. Interviewed at his office in Toronto, Aberman reflected on the trials and tribulations confronting medicine on both sides of the 48th parallel.

  8. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  9. All-atom semiclassical dynamics study of quantum coherence in photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Kelly, Aaron; Park, Jae Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2012-07-18

    Although photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes are in noisy environments, recent experimental and theoretical results indicate that their excitation energy transfer (EET) can exhibit coherent characteristics for over hundreds of femtoseconds. Despite the almost universal observations of the coherence to some degree, questions still remain regarding the detailed role of the protein and the extent of high-temperature coherence. Here we adopt a theoretical method that incorporates an all-atom description of the photosynthetic complex within a semiclassical framework in order to study EET in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. We observe that the vibrational modes of the chromophore tend to diminish the coherence at the ensemble level, yet much longer-lived coherences may be observed at the single-complex level. We also observe that coherent oscillations in the site populations also commence within tens of femtoseconds even when the system is initially prepared in a non-oscillatory stationary state. We show that the protein acts to maintain the electronic couplings among the system of embedded chromophores. We also investigate the extent to which the protein's electrostatic modulation that disperses the chromophore electronic energies may affect the coherence lifetime. Further, we observe that even though mutation-induced disruptions in the protein structure may change the coupling pattern, a relatively strong level of coupling and associated coherence in the dynamics still remain. Finally, we demonstrate that thermal fluctuations in the chromophore couplings induce some redundancy in the coherent energy-transfer pathway. Our results indicate that a description of both chromophore coupling strengths and their fluctuations is crucial to better understand coherent EET processes in photosynthetic systems. PMID:22708971

  10. RNABC: forward kinematics to reduce all-atom steric clashes in RNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyi; Kapral, Gary; Murray, Laura; Richardson, David; Richardson, Jane; Snoeyink, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Although accurate details in RNA structure are of great importance for understanding RNA function, the backbone conformation is difficult to determine, and most existing RNA structures show serious steric clashes (>or= 0.4 A overlap) when hydrogen atoms are taken into account. We have developed a program called RNABC (RNA Backbone Correction) that performs local perturbations to search for alternative conformations that avoid those steric clashes or other local geometry problems. Its input is an all-atom coordinate file for an RNA crystal structure (usually from the MolProbity web service), with problem areas specified. RNABC rebuilds a suite (the unit from sugar to sugar) by anchoring the phosphorus and base positions, which are clearest in crystallographic electron density, and reconstructing the other atoms using forward kinematics. Geometric parameters are constrained within user-specified tolerance of canonical or original values, and torsion angles are constrained to ranges defined through empirical database analyses. Several optimizations reduce the time required to search the many possible conformations. The output results are clustered and presented to the user, who can choose whether to accept one of the alternative conformations. Two test evaluations show the effectiveness of RNABC, first on the S-motifs from 42 RNA structures, and second on the worst problem suites (clusters of bad clashes, or serious sugar pucker outliers) in 25 unrelated RNA structures. Among the 101 S-motifs, 88 had diagnosed problems, and RNABC produced clash-free conformations with acceptable geometry for 71 of those (about 80%). For the 154 worst problem suites, RNABC proposed alternative conformations for 72. All but 8 of those were judged acceptable after examining electron density (where available) and local conformation. Thus, even for these worst cases, nearly half the time RNABC suggested corrections suitable to initiate further crystallographic refinement. The program is

  11. MolProbity: all-atom structure validation for macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Vincent B.; Arendall, W. Bryan III; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Immormino, Robert M.; Kapral, Gary J.; Murray, Laura W.; Richardson, Jane S.; Richardson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    MolProbity structure validation will diagnose most local errors in macromolecular crystal structures and help to guide their correction. MolProbity is a structure-validation web service that provides broad-spectrum solidly based evaluation of model quality at both the global and local levels for both proteins and nucleic acids. It relies heavily on the power and sensitivity provided by optimized hydrogen placement and all-atom contact analysis, complemented by updated versions of covalent-geometry and torsion-angle criteria. Some of the local corrections can be performed automatically in MolProbity and all of the diagnostics are presented in chart and graphical forms that help guide manual rebuilding. X-ray crystallography provides a wealth of biologically important molecular data in the form of atomic three-dimensional structures of proteins, nucleic acids and increasingly large complexes in multiple forms and states. Advances in automation, in everything from crystallization to data collection to phasing to model building to refinement, have made solving a structure using crystallography easier than ever. However, despite these improvements, local errors that can affect biological interpretation are widespread at low resolution and even high-resolution structures nearly all contain at least a few local errors such as Ramachandran outliers, flipped branched protein side chains and incorrect sugar puckers. It is critical both for the crystallographer and for the end user that there are easy and reliable methods to diagnose and correct these sorts of errors in structures. MolProbity is the authors’ contribution to helping solve this problem and this article reviews its general capabilities, reports on recent enhancements and usage, and presents evidence that the resulting improvements are now beneficially affecting the global database.

  12. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  13. John M. Eisenberg, MD.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J M

    1995-08-01

    The complicated interaction between government, academic medical centers, health care payers, and burgeoning market forces has tested the leadership skills of a generation of academicians with little formal training in economics. The emergence of a new breed of physician investigator with solid business credentials has therefore proved attractive to many segments of the medical community. John M. Eisenberg received his MD from Washington University in 1972, his MBA from the Wharton School in 1976, and shortly thereafter headed the division of general internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition to championing the role of the generalist in health care delivery, Eisenberg has also played a major part in the reformation of Medicare reimbursement. He has been a commissioner on the Congressional Physician Payment Review Commission since 1986, serving as chairman since 1993. After assuming the chairmanship of the department of medicine at Georgetown University in 1992, Eisenberg served as an advisor to the Clinton administration during its efforts towards national health care reform. Interviewed in his office in Georgetown, Eisenberg reflected on the economic forces twisting post-graduate medical education, the role of non-physician providers in future health care delivery, and the evolving relationship between specialists and generalists. PMID:7552581

  14. Charge-leveling and proper treatment of long-range electrostatics in all-atom molecular dynamics at constant pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jason A.; Shen, Jana K.

    2012-11-01

    Recent development of constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) methods has offered promise for adding pH-stat in molecular dynamics simulations. However, until now the working pH molecular dynamics (pHMD) implementations are dependent in part or whole on implicit-solvent models. Here we show that proper treatment of long-range electrostatics and maintaining charge neutrality of the system are critical for extending the continuous pHMD framework to the all-atom representation. The former is achieved here by adding forces to titration coordinates due to long-range electrostatics based on the generalized reaction field method, while the latter is made possible by a charge-leveling technique that couples proton titration with simultaneous ionization or neutralization of a co-ion in solution. We test the new method using the pH-replica-exchange CpHMD simulations of a series of aliphatic dicarboxylic acids with varying carbon chain length. The average absolute deviation from the experimental pKa values is merely 0.18 units. The results show that accounting for the forces due to extended electrostatics removes the large random noise in propagating titration coordinates, while maintaining charge neutrality of the system improves the accuracy in the calculated electrostatic interaction between ionizable sites. Thus, we believe that the way is paved for realizing pH-controlled all-atom molecular dynamics in the near future.

  15. Ab Initio MD Simulations of the Brønsted Acidity of Glutathione in Aqueous Solutions: Predicting pKa Shifts of the Cysteine Residue.

    PubMed

    Tummanapelli, Anil Kumar; Vasudevan, Sukumaran

    2015-12-10

    The tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is one of the most abundant peptides and the major repository for nonprotein sulfur in both animal and plant cells. It plays a critical role in intracellular oxidative stress management by the reversible formation of glutathione disulfide with the thiol-disulfide pair acting as a redox buffer. The state of charge of the ionizable groups of GSH can influence the redox couple, and hence the pKa value of the cysteine residue of GSH is critical to its functioning. Here we report ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of glutathione solvated by 200 water molecules, all of which are considered in the simulation. We show that the free-energy landscape for the protonation-deprotonation reaction of the cysteine residue of GSH computed using metadynamics sampling provides accurate estimates of the pKa and correctly predicts the shift in the dissociation constant values as compared with the isolated cysteine amino acid.

  16. On the origin of the distribution of potential barriers for methyl group dynamics in glassy polymers: Neutron scattering and MD-simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, F.; Alegria, A.; Colmenero, J.; Nicholson, T. M.; Davies, G. R.

    1999-06-15

    We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of methyl group torsional librations in glassy polyisoprene at 150 K using the Insight and Discover programs from MSI and the Polymer Consortium Force Field. The model system used was built using the MSI Amorphous Cell Builder. During the dynamics runs, the position and velocity of the atoms as well as the dihedral angle of each of the methyl groups were recorded at 10 fs intervals. The results obtained support the threefold approximation for the single particle methyl group potential. The density of states for methyl group torsional librations, calculated from the time evolution of the dihedral angles, agrees quite well with neutron scattering results and shows a broad feature reflecting a broad distribution of potentials barriers. Performing similar simulations, but under 'phantom-chain' conditions, we conclude that the width of this distribution is mainly controlled by the non-bonded interactions.

  17. Penetration of HIV-1 Tat47-57 into PC/PE Bilayers Assessed by MD Simulation and X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Huang, Kun; García, Angel E; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2015-09-22

    The interactions of the basic, cell-penetrating region (Y47GRKKRRQRRR57) of the HIV-1 Tat protein with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers were previously assessed by comparing experimental X-ray diffuse scattering with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids. Using experimental bilayer form factors derivedfrom X-ray diffuse scattering data as a guide, our simulations indicate that Tat peptides localize close to the carbonyl-glycerol group in the headgroup region of bilayers composed of either DOPC or DOPC:DOPE (1:1) lipid. Our results also suggest that Tat peptides may more frequently insert into the hydrophobic core of bilayers composed of PC:PE (1:1) lipids than into bilayers composed entirely of PC lipids. PE lipids may facilitate peptide translocation across a lipid bilayer by stabilizing intermediate states in which hydrated peptides span the bilayer.

  18. Penetration of HIV-1 Tat47–57 into PC/PE Bilayers Assessed by MD Simulation and X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Chris; Huang, Kun; García, Angel E.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of the basic, cell-penetrating region (Y47GRKKRRQRRR57) of the HIV-1 Tat protein with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers were previously assessed by comparing experimental X-ray diffuse scattering with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids. Using experimental bilayer form factors derivedfrom X-ray diffuse scattering data as a guide, our simulations indicate that Tat peptides localize close to the carbonyl-glycerol group in the headgroup region of bilayers composed of either DOPC or DOPC:DOPE (1:1) lipid. Our results also suggest that Tat peptides may more frequently insert into the hydrophobic core of bilayers composed of PC:PE (1:1) lipids than into bilayers composed entirely of PC lipids. PE lipids may facilitate peptide translocation across a lipid bilayer by stabilizing intermediate states in which hydrated peptides span the bilayer. PMID:26402709

  19. The Molecular Mechanism of Bisphenol A (BPA) as an Endocrine Disruptor by Interacting with Nuclear Receptors: Insights from Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA. PMID:25799048

  20. The molecular mechanism of bisphenol A (BPA) as an endocrine disruptor by interacting with nuclear receptors: insights from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanlan; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yuzhen; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) can interact with nuclear receptors and affect the normal function of nuclear receptors in very low doses, which causes BPA to be one of the most controversial endocrine disruptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism about how BPA interferes the normal function of nuclear receptors is still undiscovered. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the detailed interaction mechanism between BPA with three typical nuclear receptors, including hERα, hERRγ and hPPARγ. The simulation results and calculated binding free energies indicate that BPA can bind to these three nuclear receptors. The binding affinities of BPA were slightly lower than that of E2 to these three receptors. The simulation results proved that the binding process was mainly driven by direct hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, structural analysis suggested that BPA could interact with these nuclear receptors by mimicking the action of natural hormone and keeping the nuclear receptors in active conformations. The present work provided the structural evidence to recognize BPA as an endocrine disruptor and would be important guidance for seeking safer substitutions of BPA.

  1. Folding Thermodynamics and Mechanism of Five Trp-Cage Variants from Replica-Exchange MD Simulations with RSFF2 Force Field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen-Yang; Jiang, Fan; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-11-10

    To test whether our recently developed residue-specific force field RSFF2 can reproduce the mutational effect on the thermal stability of Trp-cage mini-protein and decipher its detailed folding mechanism, we carried out long-time replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on five Trp-cage variants, including TC5b and TC10b. Initiated from their unfolded structures, the simulations not only well-reproduce their experimental structures but also their melting temperatures and folding enthalpies reasonably well. For each Trp-cage variant, the overall folding free energy landscape is apparently two-state, but some intermediate states can be observed when projected on more detailed coordinates. We also found different variants have the same major folding pathway, including the well formed PII-helix in the unfolded state, the formation of W6-P12/P18/P19 contacts and the α-helix before the transition state, the following formation of most native contacts, and the final native loop formation. The folding mechanism derived here is consistent with many previous simulations and experiments.

  2. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein–lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sara Y.; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W.; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H.

    2016-01-01

    This data article supports the research article entitled “Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface” [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes. PMID:27054174

  3. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein-lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sara Y; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H

    2016-06-01

    This data article supports the research article entitled "Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface" [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes.

  4. Role of the Electrostatic Interactions in the Stabilization of Ionic Liquid Crystals: Insights from Coarse-Grained MD Simulations of an Imidazolium Model.

    PubMed

    Saielli, Giacomo; Wang, Yanting

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the electrostatic interactions in stabilizing various phases of ionic liquids, especially smectic ionic liquid crystals, we have employed a coarse-grained model of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C16mim][NO3], to perform molecular dynamics simulations with the partial charges artificially rescaled by a factor from 0.7 to 1.2. The simulated systems have been characterized by means of orientational and translational order parameters and by distribution functions. We have found that increasing the total charge of the ions strongly stabilizes the ionic smectic phase by shifting the clearing point (melting into the isotropic liquid phase) to higher temperatures, while a smaller effect is observed on the stability of the crystal phase. Our results highlight the importance of the electrostatic interactions in promoting the formation of ionic liquid crystals through microphase segregation. Moreover, as the total charge of the model is increased, we observe a transformation from a homogeneous to a nanosegregated isotropic structure typical of ionic liquids. Therefore, a connection can be established between the degree of nanosegregation of ILs and the stability of ILC phases. All the above can be understood by the competition among electrostatic interactions between charged groups (cationic head groups and anions), van der Waals interactions between nonpolar cationic tail groups, and thermal fluctuations.

  5. Role of the Electrostatic Interactions in the Stabilization of Ionic Liquid Crystals: Insights from Coarse-Grained MD Simulations of an Imidazolium Model.

    PubMed

    Saielli, Giacomo; Wang, Yanting

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the electrostatic interactions in stabilizing various phases of ionic liquids, especially smectic ionic liquid crystals, we have employed a coarse-grained model of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C16mim][NO3], to perform molecular dynamics simulations with the partial charges artificially rescaled by a factor from 0.7 to 1.2. The simulated systems have been characterized by means of orientational and translational order parameters and by distribution functions. We have found that increasing the total charge of the ions strongly stabilizes the ionic smectic phase by shifting the clearing point (melting into the isotropic liquid phase) to higher temperatures, while a smaller effect is observed on the stability of the crystal phase. Our results highlight the importance of the electrostatic interactions in promoting the formation of ionic liquid crystals through microphase segregation. Moreover, as the total charge of the model is increased, we observe a transformation from a homogeneous to a nanosegregated isotropic structure typical of ionic liquids. Therefore, a connection can be established between the degree of nanosegregation of ILs and the stability of ILC phases. All the above can be understood by the competition among electrostatic interactions between charged groups (cationic head groups and anions), van der Waals interactions between nonpolar cationic tail groups, and thermal fluctuations. PMID:27486996

  6. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies and MD simulation of atomic configurations in polyamorphic Y2O3-Al2O3 systems.

    PubMed

    Wilding, M C; Wilson, M; McMillan, P F

    2005-02-15

    Supercooled liquids in the Y(2)O(3)-Al(2)O(3) system undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition between a high-temperature, high-density amorphous (HDA) polymorph form and one with lower density (LDA form) that is stable at lower temperature. The two amorphous polymorphs have the same chemical composition, but they differ in their density (ca. 4% difference) and in their heat content (enthalpy) and entropy determined by calorimetry. Here we present new results of structural studies using neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction to study the structural differences between HDA and LDA polyamorphs. The combined datasets show no large differences in the average nearest-neighbour Al-O or Y-O bond lengths or coordination numbers between the low- and high-density liquids. However, the data indicate that substantial changes occur among the packing geometries and clustering of the Al-O and Y-O coordination polyhedra, i.e. within the second-nearest-neighbour shell defined by the metal-metal (i.e. Y-Y, Y-Al, Al-Al) interactions. Polarizable ion model molecular dynamics simulations of Y(2)O(3)-Al(2)O(3) liquids are used to help interpret the pair-correlation functions obtained from X-ray and neutron scattering data. Unexpectedly large density fluctuations are observed to occur during the simulation of nominally equilibrated systems. These are interpreted as being due to dynamic sampling of high- and low-density configurations within the single-phase liquid at temperatures above the critical point or phase transition line. Calculated partial radial distribution functions indicate that the primary differences between HDA and LDA configurations occur among the Y-Y correlations. PMID:15664901

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2016-06-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8].

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2016-06-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vitalini, F.; Noé, F.; Keller, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  10. Derivation and Systematic Validation of a Refined All-Atom Force Field for Phosphatidylcholine Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An all-atomistic force field (FF) has been developed for fully saturated phospholipids. The parametrization has been largely based on high-level ab initio calculations in order to keep the empirical input to a minimum. Parameters for the lipid chains have been developed based on knowledge about bulk alkane liquids, for which thermodynamic and dynamic data are excellently reproduced. The FFs ability to simulate lipid bilayers in the liquid crystalline phase in a tensionless ensemble was tested in simulations of three lipids: 1,2-diauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phospocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospcholine (DPPC). Computed areas and volumes per lipid, and three different kinds of bilayer thicknesses, have been investigated. Most importantly NMR order parameters and scattering form factors agree in an excellent manner with experimental data under a range of temperatures. Further, the compatibility with the AMBER FF for biomolecules as well as the ability to simulate bilayers in gel phase was demonstrated. Overall, the FF presented here provides the important balance between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic forces present in lipid bilayers and therefore can be used for more complicated studies of realistic biological membranes with protein insertions. PMID:22352995

  11. Mechanisms of large Stokes shift and aggregation-enhanced emission of osmapentalyne cations in solution: combined MD simulations and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Xu; Ju, Ming-Gang; Zang, Hang; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-01

    Osmapentalyne cations synthesized recently show remarkable optical properties, such as near-infrared emission, unusual large Stokes shift and aggregation-enhanced emission. Here, the mechanisms behind those novel optical behaviors are revealed from the combined molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The results demonstrate that the large Stokes shift in the gas phase comes from a photoexcitation-induced deformation of the osmium plane, whereas in solution it corresponds to the variation of osmium ring symmetry. Although the central chromophore ring dominates the absorption and emission processes, the protecting groups PPh3 join the emission. As osmapentalyne cations are aggregated together in solution, the radical distribution functions of their mass-central distances display several peaks immersed in a broad envelope due to different aggregation pathways. However, the chromophore centers are protected by the PPh3 groups, the aggregation structures do not affect the Stokes shift too much, and the calculated aggregate-enhanced emission is consistent with experimental measurements. PMID:26339695

  12. The Binding Mode Prediction and Similar Ligand Potency in the Active Site of Vitamin D Receptor with QM/MM Interaction, MESP, and MD Simulation.

    PubMed

    Selvaraman, Nagamani; Selvam, Saravana Kumar; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2016-08-01

    Non-secosteroidal ligands are well-known vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. In this study, we described a combined QM/MM to define the protein-ligand interaction energy a strong positive correlation in both QM-MM interaction energy and binding free energy against the biological activity. The molecular dynamics simulation study was performed, and specific interactions were extensively studied. The molecular docking results and surface analysis shed light on steric and electrostatic complementarities of these non-secosteroidal ligands to VDR. Finally, the drug likeness properties were also calculated and found within the acceptable range. The results show that bulky group substitutions in side chain decrease the VDR activity, whereas a small substitution increased it. Functional analyses of H393A and H301A mutations substantiate their roles in the VDR agonistic and antagonistic activities. Apart from the His393 and His301, two other amino acids in the hinge region viz. Ser233 and Arg270 acted as an electron donor/acceptor specific to the agonist in the distinct ligand potency. The results from this study disclose the binding mechanism of VDR agonists and structural modifications required to improve the selectivity.

  13. Role of Water in the Puzzling Mechanism of the Final Aromatization Step Promoted by the Human Aromatase Enzyme. Insights from QM/MM MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2015-10-26

    The enzyme human aromatase (HA) catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens via two hydroxylation reactions and a final unique aromatization step. Despite the great interest of HA as a drug target against breast cancer detailed structural and spectroscopic information on this enzyme became available only in the past few years. As such, the enigmatic mechanism of the final aromatization step is still a matter of debate. Here, we investigated the final step of the HA enzymatic cycle via hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) metadynamics and blue-moon ensemble simulations. Our results show that the rate-determining step of the aromatization process is the nucleophilic attack of the distal oxygen of a peroxo-ferric species on the formyl carbon of the enol-19-oxo-androstenedione, which occurs with a free energy barrier (ΔF(#)) of ∼ 16.7 ± 1.9 kcal/mol, in good agreement with experimental data. This reaction is followed by a water mediated 1β-hydrogen abstraction (ΔF(#) = 7.9 ± 0.8 kcal/mol) and by the formation of a hydroxo-ferric moiety. This latter may be finally protonated by a hydrogen delivery channel involving Asp309 and Thr310, both residues pointed out as crucial for HA activity. In the absence of the catalytic water in the active site the substrate does not assume a position suitable to undergo the nucleophilic attack. Our data not only reveal a novel possible mechanism for the aromatization process consistent with some of the spectroscopic and kinetic data available in the literature, complementing current knowledge on the mechanism of this enzyme, but also point out a remarkable influence of the level of theory used on the calculated free energy barriers. The structural information obtained in this study may be used for the rational structure-based drug design of HA inhibitors to be employed in breast cancer therapy. PMID:26381712

  14. Role of Water in the Puzzling Mechanism of the Final Aromatization Step Promoted by the Human Aromatase Enzyme. Insights from QM/MM MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2015-10-26

    The enzyme human aromatase (HA) catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens via two hydroxylation reactions and a final unique aromatization step. Despite the great interest of HA as a drug target against breast cancer detailed structural and spectroscopic information on this enzyme became available only in the past few years. As such, the enigmatic mechanism of the final aromatization step is still a matter of debate. Here, we investigated the final step of the HA enzymatic cycle via hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) metadynamics and blue-moon ensemble simulations. Our results show that the rate-determining step of the aromatization process is the nucleophilic attack of the distal oxygen of a peroxo-ferric species on the formyl carbon of the enol-19-oxo-androstenedione, which occurs with a free energy barrier (ΔF(#)) of ∼ 16.7 ± 1.9 kcal/mol, in good agreement with experimental data. This reaction is followed by a water mediated 1β-hydrogen abstraction (ΔF(#) = 7.9 ± 0.8 kcal/mol) and by the formation of a hydroxo-ferric moiety. This latter may be finally protonated by a hydrogen delivery channel involving Asp309 and Thr310, both residues pointed out as crucial for HA activity. In the absence of the catalytic water in the active site the substrate does not assume a position suitable to undergo the nucleophilic attack. Our data not only reveal a novel possible mechanism for the aromatization process consistent with some of the spectroscopic and kinetic data available in the literature, complementing current knowledge on the mechanism of this enzyme, but also point out a remarkable influence of the level of theory used on the calculated free energy barriers. The structural information obtained in this study may be used for the rational structure-based drug design of HA inhibitors to be employed in breast cancer therapy.

  15. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L.; Song, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations—how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models. PMID:26473491

  16. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L; Song, Guang

    2015-10-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations--how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models.

  17. Ionic velocities in an ionic liquid under high electric fields using all-atom and coarse-grained force field molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, John W.; Micci, Michael M.

    2009-09-01

    Molecular dynamics has been used to estimate ionic velocities and electrical conductivity in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium/tetraflouroborate (EMIM-BF4). Both an all-atom and coarse grained force fields were explored. The simulations were carried out at high electric fields where one might expect the Wien effect to become important in conventional electrolytes and that effect is observed. While the original Wilson theory used to explain the Wien effect in conventional electrolytes does not work well for ionic liquids, a minor modification of the theory allowed it to be used to qualitatively describe the data. The two coarse-graining methods were noisier as expected, but result in a significant savings in computational cost.

  18. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    phosphatase domains. In the bound state, PTEN's regulatory C-terminal tail is displaced from the membrane and organized on the far side of the protein, ˜ 60 å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact structure. The combination of binding studies and neutron reflection allows us to distinguish between PTEN mutant proteins and ultimately may identify the structural features required for membrane binding and activation of PTEN. Molecular dynamics simulations, currently in progress, refine this structural picture further.

  19. Effects of Lipid Composition on Bilayer Membranes Quantified by All-Atom Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Palaiokostas, Michail; Wang, Wen; Orsi, Mario

    2015-12-10

    Biological bilayer membranes typically contain varying amounts of lamellar and nonlamellar lipids. Lamellar lipids, such as dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), are defined by their tendency to form the lamellar phase, ubiquitous in biology. Nonlamellar lipids, such as dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), prefer instead to form nonlamellar phases, which are mostly nonbiological. However, nonlamellar lipids mix with lamellar lipids in biomembrane structures that remain overall lamellar. Importantly, changes in the lamellar vs nonlamellar lipid composition are believed to affect membrane function and modulate membrane proteins. In this work, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to quantify how a range of bilayer properties are altered by variations in the lamellar vs nonlamellar lipid composition. Specifically, we simulate five DOPC/DOPE bilayers at mixing ratios of 1/0, 3/1, 1/1, 1/3, and 0/1. We examine properties including lipid area and bilayer thickness, as well as the transmembrane profiles of electron density, lateral pressure, electric field, and dipole potential. While the bilayer structure is only marginally altered by lipid composition changes, dramatic effects are observed for the lateral pressure, electric field, and dipole potential profiles. Possible implications for membrane function are discussed.

  20. 78 FR 14547 - Praxedes E. Alverez Santiago, M.D., Daniel Perez Brisebois, M.D., Jorge Grillasca Palou, M.D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Praxedes E. Alverez Santiago, M.D., Daniel Perez Brisebois, M.D., Jorge Grillasca Palou, M.D., Rafael..., M.D., Daniel P rez Brisebois, M.D., Jorge Grillasca Palou, M.D., Rafael Garc a Nieves, M.D., Francis... and Dr. Daniel Perez, met with Humana representatives to discuss the 20 percent COB. During...

  1. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kucerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  2. Automatic distributed workflow generation with GridMD library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. V.; Valuev, I. A.

    2011-09-01

    GridMD is a C++ class library intended for constructing simulation applications and running them in distributed environments. The library abstracts away from details of distributed environments, so that almost no knowledge of distributed computing is required from a physicist working with the library. She or he just uses GridMD function calls inside the application C++ code to perform parameter sweeps or other tasks that can be distributed at run-time. In this paper we briefly review the GridMD architecture. We also describe the job manager component which submits jobs to a remote system. The C++ source code of our PBS job manager may be used as a standalone tool and it is freely available as well as the full library source code. As illustrative examples we use simple expression evaluation codes and the real application of Coulomb cluster explosion simulation by Molecular Dynamics.

  3. Atomic force microscopy and MD simulations reveal pore-like structures of all-D-enantiomer of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide: relevance to the ion channel mechanism of AD pathology.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Laura; Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Capone, Ricardo; Kotler, Samuel A; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kagan, Bruce L; Nussinov, Ruth; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a protein misfolding disease characterized by a buildup of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide as senile plaques, uncontrolled neurodegeneration, and memory loss. AD pathology is linked to the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis and involves Aβ peptide-plasma membrane interactions. In principle, there are two possible ways through which disturbance of the ionic homeostasis can take place: directly, where the Aβ peptide either inserts into the membrane and creates ion-conductive pores or destabilizes the membrane organization, or, indirectly, where the Aβ peptide interacts with existing cell membrane receptors. To distinguish between these two possible types of Aβ-membrane interactions, we took advantage of the biochemical tenet that ligand-receptor interactions are stereospecific; L-amino acid peptides, but not their D-counterparts, bind to cell membrane receptors. However, with respect to the ion channel-mediated mechanism, like L-amino acids, D-amino acid peptides will also form ion channel-like structures. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we imaged the structures of both D- and L-enantiomers of the full length Aβ(1-42) when reconstituted in lipid bilayers. AFM imaging shows that both L- and D-Aβ isomers form similar channel-like structures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations support the AFM imaged 3D structures. Previously, we have shown that D-Aβ(1-42) channels conduct ions similarly to their L- counterparts. Taken together, our results support the direct mechanism of Aβ ion channel-mediated destabilization of ionic homeostasis rather than the indirect mechanism through Aβ interaction with membrane receptors.

  4. All-atom normal-mode analysis reveals an RNA-induced allostery in a bacteriophage coat protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Twarock, Reidun

    2010-03-01

    Assembly of the T=3 bacteriophage MS2 is initiated by the binding of a 19 nucleotide RNA stem loop from within the phage genome to a symmetric coat protein dimer. This binding event effects a folding of the FG loop in one of the protein subunits of the dimer and results in the formation of an asymmetric dimer. Since both the symmetric and asymmetric forms of the dimer are needed for the assembly of the protein container, this allosteric switch plays an important role in the life cycle of the phage. We provide here details of an all-atom normal-mode analysis of this allosteric effect. The results suggest that asymmetric contacts between the A -duplex RNA phosphodiester backbone of the stem loop with the EF loop in one coat protein subunit results in an increased dynamic behavior of its FG loop. The four lowest-frequency modes, which encompass motions predominantly on the FG loops, account for over 90% of the increased dynamic behavior due to a localization of the vibrational pattern on a single FG loop. Finally, we show that an analysis of the allosteric effect using an elastic network model fails to predict this localization effect, highlighting the importance of using an all-atom full force field method for this problem.

  5. Developing Improved MD Codes for Understanding Processive Cellulases

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, M. F.; Uberbacher, E. C.; Brooks III, C. L.; Walker, R.C.; Nimlos, M. R.; Himmel, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of action of cellulose-degrading enzymes is illuminated through a multidisciplinary collaboration that uses molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and expands the capabilities of MD codes to allow simulations of enzymes and substrates on petascale computational facilities. There is a class of glycoside hydrolase enzymes called cellulases that are thought to decrystallize and processively depolymerize cellulose using biochemical processes that are largely not understood. Understanding the mechanisms involved and improving the efficiency of this hydrolysis process through computational models and protein engineering presents a compelling grand challenge. A detailed understanding of cellulose structure, dynamics and enzyme function at the molecular level is required to direct protein engineers to the right modifications or to understand if natural thermodynamic or kinetic limits are in play. Much can be learned about processivity by conducting carefully designed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the binding and catalytic domains of cellulases with various substrate configurations, solvation models and thermodynamic protocols. Most of these numerical experiments, however, will require significant modification of existing code and algorithms in order to efficiently use current (terascale) and future (petascale) hardware to the degree of parallelism necessary to simulate a system of the size proposed here. This work will develop MD codes that can efficiently use terascale and petascale systems, not just for simple classical MD simulations, but also for more advanced methods, including umbrella sampling with complex restraints and reaction coordinates, transition path sampling, steered molecular dynamics, and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations of systems the size of cellulose degrading enzymes acting on cellulose.

  6. GENESIS: a hybrid-parallel and multi-scale molecular dynamics simulator with enhanced sampling algorithms for biomolecular and cellular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaewoon; Mori, Takaharu; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Yoda, Takao; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    GENESIS (Generalized-Ensemble Simulation System) is a new software package for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of macromolecules. It has two MD simulators, called ATDYN and SPDYN. ATDYN is parallelized based on an atomic decomposition algorithm for the simulations of all-atom force-field models as well as coarse-grained Go-like models. SPDYN is highly parallelized based on a domain decomposition scheme, allowing large-scale MD simulations on supercomputers. Hybrid schemes combining OpenMP and MPI are used in both simulators to target modern multicore computer architectures. Key advantages of GENESIS are (1) the highly parallel performance of SPDYN for very large biological systems consisting of more than one million atoms and (2) the availability of various REMD algorithms (T-REMD, REUS, multi-dimensional REMD for both all-atom and Go-like models under the NVT, NPT, NPAT, and NPγT ensembles). The former is achieved by a combination of the midpoint cell method and the efficient three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform algorithm, where the domain decomposition space is shared in real-space and reciprocal-space calculations. Other features in SPDYN, such as avoiding concurrent memory access, reducing communication times, and usage of parallel input/output files, also contribute to the performance. We show the REMD simulation results of a mixed (POPC/DMPC) lipid bilayer as a real application using GENESIS. GENESIS is released as free software under the GPLv2 licence and can be easily modified for the development of new algorithms and molecular models. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:310–323. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1220 PMID:26753008

  7. A hybrid MD-DSMC coupling method to investigate flow characteristics of micro-devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watvisave, D. S.; Puranik, B. P.; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2015-12-01

    A new methodology is proposed to couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) methods to simulate high Knudsen number (Kn) flows. For this purpose a two-dimensional hybrid MD-DSMC code is developed. In this method gas-surface interactions are modeled using MD, and gas-gas interactions are modeled using DSMC method. Two-way coupling between MD and DSMC is implemented by employing buffer zones for both MD and DSMC regions. Bootstrap sampling and energy minimization algorithms are employed for dynamic coupling of these two methods since MD utilizes real number of molecules during simulation whereas DSMC utilizes a lesser number of simulated molecules. The hybrid methodology combines the advantages of both methods; it has the capability of modeling the gas-surface interaction accurately considering the effect of the presence of neighboring real number of gas molecules, while in the bulk it utilizes DSMC with only the simulated number of molecules thus increasing the computational efficiency significantly compared to pure MD codes. As a result comparatively large domain sizes can be simulated with realistic behavior at the walls. The utility of the hybrid method is demonstrated by simulating high Kn flows through a micro-channel, micro-nozzle and micro-scale shock tube. The effect of partial accommodation of gas molecules with the wall is seen to be captured dynamically with this approach.

  8. H5MD: A structured, efficient, and portable file format for molecular data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Buyl, Pierre; Colberg, Peter H.; Höfling, Felix

    2014-06-01

    We propose a new file format named "H5MD" for storing molecular simulation data, such as trajectories of particle positions and velocities, along with thermodynamic observables that are monitored during the course of the simulation. H5MD files are HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format) files with a specific hierarchy and naming scheme. Thus, H5MD inherits many benefits of HDF5, e.g., structured layout of multi-dimensional datasets, data compression, fast and parallel I/O, and portability across many programming languages and hardware platforms. H5MD files are self-contained, and foster the reproducibility of scientific data and the interchange of data between researchers using different simulation programs and analysis software. In addition, the H5MD specification can serve for other kinds of data (e.g. experimental data) and is extensible to supplemental data, or may be part of an enclosing file structure.

  9. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecularmore » dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.« less

  10. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Riyaz; Reeve, Sam; Juallmes, Luc; Asal, Sameer Abu; Landmehr, Aaron; Gaffer, Sanian; Teodor Bercea, Gheorghe; Rubinstein, Zach

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.

  11. Measurement of the Md3+/Md2+ reduction potential studied with flow electrolytic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Li, Zijie; Asai, Masato; Sato, Nozomi; Sato, Tetsuya K; Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kaneya, Yusuke; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Nagame, Yuichiro; Schädel, Matthias; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Shinohara, Atsushi; Haba, Hiromitsu; Even, Julia

    2013-11-01

    The reduction behavior of mendelevium (Md) was studied using a flow electrolytic chromatography apparatus. By application of the appropriate potentials on the chromatography column, the more stable Md(3+) is reduced to Md(2+). The reduction potential of the Md(3+) + e(-) → Md(2+) couple was determined to be -0.16 ± 0.05 V versus a normal hydrogen electrode. PMID:24116851

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of rotational relaxation in nitrogen: Implications for rotational collision number models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Zhang, Chonglin; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2012-10-01

    We study the rotational relaxation process in nitrogen using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). The intermolecular model used in the MD simulations is shown to (i) reproduce very well the shear viscosity of nitrogen over a wide range of temperatures, (ii) predict the near-equilibrium rotational collision number in good agreement with published trajectory calculations done on ab initio potential energy surfaces, and (iii) produce shock wave profiles in excellent accordance with the experimental measurements. We find that the rotational relaxation process is dependent not only on the near-equilibrium temperature (i.e., when systems relax to equilibrium after a small perturbation), but more importantly on both the magnitude and direction of the initial deviation from the equilibrium state. The comparison between MD and DSMC, based on the Borgnakke-Larsen model, for shock waves (both at low and high temperatures) and one-dimensional expansions shows that a judicious choice of a constant Zrot can produce DSMC results which are in relatively good agreement with MD. However, the selection of the rotational collision number is case-specific, depending not only on the temperature range, but more importantly on the type of flow (compression or expansion), with significant limitations for more complex simulations characterized both by expansion and compression zones. Parker's model, parametrized for nitrogen, overpredicts Zrot for temperatures above about 300 K. It is also unable to describe the dependence of the relaxation process on the direction to equilibrium. Finally, we present a demonstrative cell-based formulation of a rotational relaxation model to illustrate how, by including the key physics obtained from the MD data (dependence of the relaxation process on both the rotational and the translational state of the gas), the agreement between MD and DSMC solutions is drastically improved.

  13. CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF): A force field for drug-like molecules compatible with the CHARMM all-atom additive biological force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Hatcher, E.; Acharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Zhong, S.; Shim, J.; Darian, E.; Guvench, O.; Lopes, P.; Vorobyov, I.; MacKerell, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used CHARMM additive all-atom force field includes parameters for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. In the present paper an extension of the CHARMM force field to drug-like molecules is presented. The resulting CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) covers a wide range of chemical groups present in biomolecules and drug-like molecules, including a large number of heterocyclic scaffolds. The parametrization philosophy behind the force field focuses on quality at the expense of transferability, with the implementation concentrating on an extensible force field. Statistics related to the quality of the parametrization with a focus on experimental validation are presented. Additionally, the parametrization procedure, described fully in the present paper in the context of the model systems, pyrrolidine, and 3-phenoxymethylpyrrolidine will allow users to readily extend the force field to chemical groups that are not explicitly covered in the force field as well as add functional groups to and link together molecules already available in the force field. CGenFF thus makes it possible to perform “all-CHARMM” simulations on drug-target interactions thereby extending the utility of CHARMM force fields to medicinally relevant systems. PMID:19575467

  14. REACH coarse-grained simulation of a cellulose fiber.

    PubMed

    Glass, Dennis C; Moritsugu, Kei; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2012-09-10

    A molecular level understanding of the structure, dynamics and mechanics of cellulose fibers can aid in understanding the recalcitrance of biomass to hydrolysis in cellulosic biofuel production. Here, a residue-scale REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-grained force field was derived from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the crystalline Iβ cellulose fibril. REACH maps the atomistic covariance matrix onto coarse-grained elastic force constants. The REACH force field was found to reproduce the positional fluctuations and low-frequency vibrational spectra from the all-atom model, allowing elastic properties of the cellulose fibril to be characterized using the coarse-grained force field with a speedup of >20 relative to atomistic MD on systems of the same size. The calculated longitudinal/transversal Young's modulus and the velocity of sound are in agreement with experiment. The persistence length of a 36-chain cellulose microcrystal was estimated to be ~380 μm. Finally, the normal-mode analysis with the REACH force field suggests that intrinsic dynamics might facilitate the deconstruction of the cellulose fibril from the hydrophobic surface.

  15. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  16. ST-analyzer: a web-based user interface for simulation trajectory analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Cheol; Jo, Sunhwan; Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Yeom, Min Sun; Gorenstein, Lev; Chen, Feng; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2014-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has become one of the key tools to obtain deeper insights into biological systems using various levels of descriptions such as all-atom, united-atom, and coarse-grained models. Recent advances in computing resources and MD programs have significantly accelerated the simulation time and thus increased the amount of trajectory data. Although many laboratories routinely perform MD simulations, analyzing MD trajectories is still time consuming and often a difficult task. ST-analyzer, http://im.bioinformatics.ku.edu/st-analyzer, is a standalone graphical user interface (GUI) toolset to perform various trajectory analyses. ST-analyzer has several outstanding features compared to other existing analysis tools: (i) handling various formats of trajectory files from MD programs, such as CHARMM, NAMD, GROMACS, and Amber, (ii) intuitive web-based GUI environment--minimizing administrative load and reducing burdens on the user from adapting new software environments, (iii) platform independent design--working with any existing operating system, (iv) easy integration into job queuing systems--providing options of batch processing either on the cluster or in an interactive mode, and (v) providing independence between foreground GUI and background modules--making it easier to add personal modules or to recycle/integrate pre-existing scripts utilizing other analysis tools. The current ST-analyzer contains nine main analysis modules that together contain 18 options, including density profile, lipid deuterium order parameters, surface area per lipid, and membrane hydrophobic thickness. This article introduces ST-analyzer with its design, implementation, and features, and also illustrates practical analysis of lipid bilayer simulations.

  17. Unfolding stabilities of two structurally similar proteins as probed by temperature-induced and force-induced molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Biswajit; Prabhavadhni, Arasu; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2015-09-01

    Unfolding stabilities of two homologous proteins, cardiotoxin III and short-neurotoxin (SNTX) belonging to three-finger toxin (TFT) superfamily, have been probed by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined analysis of data obtained from steered MD and all-atom MD simulations at various temperatures in near physiological conditions on the proteins suggested that overall structural stabilities of the two proteins were different from each other and the MD results are consistent with experimental data of the proteins reported in the literature. Rationalization for the differential structural stabilities of the structurally similar proteins has been chiefly attributed to the differences in the structural contacts between C- and N-termini regions in their three-dimensional structures, and the findings endorse the 'CN network' hypothesis proposed to qualitatively analyse the thermodynamic stabilities of proteins belonging to TFT superfamily of snake venoms. Moreover, the 'CN network' hypothesis has been revisited and the present study suggested that 'CN network' should be accounted in terms of 'structural contacts' and 'structural strengths' in order to precisely describe order of structural stabilities of TFTs.

  18. Functional Domain Motions in Proteins on the 1 100 ns Timescale: Comparison of Neutron Spin-Echo Spectroscopy of Phosphoglycerate Kinase with Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Smolin, Nikolai; Biehl, R; Kneller, Gerald; Richter, Dieter O; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Protein function often requires large-scale domain motion. An exciting new development in the experimental characterization of domain motions in proteins is the application of neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). NSE directly probes coherent (i.e., pair correlated) scattering on the 1 100 ns timescale. Here, we report on all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of a protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, from which we calculate small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and NSE scattering properties. The simulation-derived and experimental-solution SANS results are in excellent agreement. The contributions of translational and rotational whole-molecule diffusion to the simulation-derived NSE and potential problems in their estimation are examined. Principal component analysis identifies types of domain motion that dominate the internal motion's contribution to the NSE signal, with the largest being classic hinge bending. The associated free-energy profiles are quasiharmonic and the frictional properties correspond to highly overdamped motion. The amplitudes of the motions derived by MD are smaller than those derived from the experimental analysis, and possible reasons for this difference are discussed. The MD results confirm that a significant component of the NSE arises from internal dynamics. They also demonstrate that the combination of NSE with MD is potentially useful for determining the forms, potentials of mean force, and time dependence of functional domain motions in proteins.

  19. MuSTAR MD: multi-scale sampling using temperature accelerated and replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Yu; Kitao, Akio

    2013-10-14

    A new and efficient conformational sampling method, MuSTAR MD (Multi-scale Sampling using Temperature Accelerated and Replica exchange Molecular Dynamics), is proposed to calculate the free energy landscape on a space spanned by a set of collective variables. This method is an extension of temperature accelerated molecular dynamics and can also be considered as a variation of replica-exchange umbrella sampling. In the MuSTAR MD, each replica contains an all-atom fine-grained model, at least one coarse-grained model, and a model defined by the collective variables that interacts with the other models in the same replica through coupling energy terms. The coarse-grained model is introduced to drive efficient sampling of large conformational space and the fine-grained model can serve to conduct more accurate conformational sampling. The collective variable model serves not only to mediate the coarse- and fine-grained models, but also to enhance sampling efficiency by temperature acceleration. We have applied this method to Ala-dipeptide and examined the sampling efficiency of MuSTAR MD in the free energy landscape calculation compared to that for replica exchange molecular dynamics, replica exchange umbrella sampling, temperature accelerated molecular dynamics, and conventional MD. The results clearly indicate the advantage of sampling a relatively high energy conformational space, which is not sufficiently sampled with other methods. This feature is important in the investigation of transition pathways that go across energy barriers. MuSTAR MD was also applied to Met-enkephalin as a test case in which two Gō-like models were employed as the coarse-grained model.

  20. Obituary of Philip H. Cooper, MD.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James W; Wick, Mark R; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-08-01

    Dermatopathology lost a giant in the field with the death of Philip H. Cooper, MD, on Friday, January 30, 2015. The following obituary represents a celebration of his life and his contributions to our field.

  1. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica{sup ®} package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics . Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  2. Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) to generate conformational transition pathway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2013-07-21

    Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) is proposed as a molecular simulation method to generate conformational transition pathway under the condition that a set of "reactant" and "product" structures is known a priori. In PaCS-MD, the cycle of short multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations and selection of the structures close to the product structure for the next cycle are repeated until the simulated structures move sufficiently close to the product. Folding of 10-residue mini-protein chignolin from the extended to native structures and open-close conformational transition of T4 lysozyme were investigated by PaCS-MD. In both cases, tens of cycles of 100-ps MD were sufficient to reach the product structures, indicating the efficient generation of conformational transition pathway in PaCS-MD with a series of conventional MD without additional external biases. Using the snapshots along the pathway as the initial coordinates, free energy landscapes were calculated by the combination with multiple independent umbrella samplings to statistically elucidate the conformational transition pathways.

  3. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the beta-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-28

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the beta(6.3)-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed beta(4.4)-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed beta(4.4)-helix, right-handed and left-handed beta(6.3)-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite beta-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed beta(6.3)-helix and beta(4.4)-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these beta-helix structures. The results suggested that beta(6.3)-helix is more stable than beta(4.4)-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the beta(6.3)-helix conformation.

  4. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the β-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-01

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the β6.3-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed β4.4-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed β4.4-helix, right-handed and left-handed β6.3-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite β-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed β6.3-helix and β4.4-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these β-helix structures. The results suggested that β6.3-helix is more stable than β4.4-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the β6.3-helix conformation.

  5. VIEW IN OPPOSITE DIRECTION AS MD1351 AND MD1352. RAW MATERIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW IN OPPOSITE DIRECTION AS MD-135-1 AND MD-135-2. RAW MATERIAL CONVEYOR AT LEFT DEPOSITS SHELL INTO MILLING MACHINE AT LOWER LEFT. ENGINE IS AT LOWER RIGHT AND RADIATOR AT LOWER CENTER. ROLLER SORTER IS AT TOP OF CONVEYOR. - F. & H. Benning Company Oyster Mill, 14430 Solomons Island Road (moved from 1014 Benning Road, Galesville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland), Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  6. Hybrid MC/MD Method For High Entropy Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bojun; Widom, Michael

    High entropy alloys (HEA) are materials that contain multiple components of elements consisting of a single solid solution phase which could make the entropy of mixing very high. From recent investigations, HEA's possess promising properties such as strength at high temperature, tensile strength, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. In this talk, a hybrid Molecular Dynamics (MD)/Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method is introduced to the computational analysis of HEA, treating atomic displacement by MD as well as swapping atomic species by MC. This method efficiently models the phase separation and short range order by swapping between different types of atoms, while structural deviation from the perfect lattice sites of atoms is equilibrated quickly by MD. We apply this method to HfNbTaZr HEA modeled using an embedded-atom potential. The result gives a strong phase separation of Hf-Zr and Nb-Ta pairs shown by the pair correlation function. Diffuse scattering patterns are predicted and compared to experiments. Doe Grant No. DE-SC0014506.

  7. New Message Differences for Collision Attacks on MD4 and MD5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yu; Wang, Lei; Kunihiro, Noboru; Ohta, Kazuo

    In 2005, collision resistance of several hash functions was broken by Wang et al. The strategy of determining message differences is the most important part of collision attacks against hash functions. So far, many researchers have tried to analyze Wang et al.'s method and proposed improved collision attacks. Although several researches proposed improved attacks, all improved results so far were based on the same message differences proposed by Wang et al. In this paper, we propose new message differences for collision attacks on MD4 and MD5. Our message differences of MD4 can generate a collision with complexity of less than two MD4 computations, which is faster than the original Wang et al.'s attack, and moreover, than the all previous attacks. This is the first result that improves the complexity of collision attack by using different message differences from Wang et al.'s. Regarding MD5, so far, no other message difference from Wang et al.'s is known. Therefore, study for constructing method of other message differences on MD5 should be interesting. Our message differences of MD5 generates a collision with complexity of 242 MD5 computations, which is slower than the latest best attack. However, since our attack needs only 1 bit difference, it has some advantages in terms of message freedom of collision messages.

  8. Enhanced Sampling of an Atomic Model with Hybrid Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations Guided by a Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2015-08-11

    Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories based on a classical equation of motion provide a straightforward, albeit somewhat inefficient approach, to explore and sample the configurational space of a complex molecular system. While a broad range of techniques can be used to accelerate and enhance the sampling efficiency of classical simulations, only algorithms that are consistent with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution yield a proper statistical mechanical computational framework. Here, a multiscale hybrid algorithm relying simultaneously on all-atom fine-grained (FG) and coarse-grained (CG) representations of a system is designed to improve sampling efficiency by combining the strength of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (neMD) and Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC). This CG-guided hybrid neMD-MC algorithm comprises six steps: (1) a FG configuration of an atomic system is dynamically propagated for some period of time using equilibrium MD; (2) the resulting FG configuration is mapped onto a simplified CG model; (3) the CG model is propagated for a brief time interval to yield a new CG configuration; (4) the resulting CG configuration is used as a target to guide the evolution of the FG system; (5) the FG configuration (from step 1) is driven via a nonequilibrium MD (neMD) simulation toward the CG target; (6) the resulting FG configuration at the end of the neMD trajectory is then accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis criterion before returning to step 1. A symmetric two-ends momentum reversal prescription is used for the neMD trajectories of the FG system to guarantee that the CG-guided hybrid neMD-MC algorithm obeys microscopic detailed balance and rigorously yields the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. The enhanced sampling achieved with the method is illustrated with a model system with hindered diffusion and explicit-solvent peptide simulations. Illustrative tests indicate that the method can yield a speedup of about 80 times for the model system and up

  9. Enhanced Sampling of an Atomic Model with Hybrid Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics—Monte Carlo Simulations Guided by a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories based on a classical equation of motion provide a straightforward, albeit somewhat inefficient approach, to explore and sample the configurational space of a complex molecular system. While a broad range of techniques can be used to accelerate and enhance the sampling efficiency of classical simulations, only algorithms that are consistent with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution yield a proper statistical mechanical computational framework. Here, a multiscale hybrid algorithm relying simultaneously on all-atom fine-grained (FG) and coarse-grained (CG) representations of a system is designed to improve sampling efficiency by combining the strength of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (neMD) and Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC). This CG-guided hybrid neMD-MC algorithm comprises six steps: (1) a FG configuration of an atomic system is dynamically propagated for some period of time using equilibrium MD; (2) the resulting FG configuration is mapped onto a simplified CG model; (3) the CG model is propagated for a brief time interval to yield a new CG configuration; (4) the resulting CG configuration is used as a target to guide the evolution of the FG system; (5) the FG configuration (from step 1) is driven via a nonequilibrium MD (neMD) simulation toward the CG target; (6) the resulting FG configuration at the end of the neMD trajectory is then accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis criterion before returning to step 1. A symmetric two-ends momentum reversal prescription is used for the neMD trajectories of the FG system to guarantee that the CG-guided hybrid neMD-MC algorithm obeys microscopic detailed balance and rigorously yields the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. The enhanced sampling achieved with the method is illustrated with a model system with hindered diffusion and explicit-solvent peptide simulations. Illustrative tests indicate that the method can yield a speedup of about 80 times for the model system and up

  10. 78 FR 2707 - Maryland Disaster # MD-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Deadline Date: 10/02/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  11. Howard Parnes, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Howard Parnes received a BA from Cornell University in 1977 and an MD from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 1981. He trained in internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center from 1981 to 1984 followed by a medical oncology fellowship at the University of Maryland Cancer Center (UMCC) from 1984 to 1987. |

  12. 76 FR 64421 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00018

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00018 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  13. 75 FR 79063 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Maryland dated 12/09... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  14. 75 FR 27010 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00012 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  15. 76 FR 77579 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00017

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00017 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Maryland, dated 12/07... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  16. The Multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidergor, Hava E.

    2010-01-01

    The multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM) helps teachers to better prepare gifted and able students for our changing world, acquiring much needed skills. It is influenced by general learning theory of constructivism, notions of preparing students for 21st century, Teaching the Future Model, and current comprehensive curriculum models for…

  17. 77 FR 76586 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Maryland (FEMA... Economic Injury Loans): Somerset. ] Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Maryland:...

  18. 75 FR 9005 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... the State of Maryland (FEMA- 1875-DR), dated 02/19/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and...

  19. 76 FR 59478 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Maryland (FEMA- 4034-DR), dated 09/16/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period:...

  20. 77 FR 48197 - Maryland Disaster #MD-00021

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00021 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Maryland (FEMA- 4075-DR), dated 08/02/2012. Incident: Severe storms and straight-line...

  1. MD-11 PCA - Research flight team photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On Aug. 30, 1995, a the McDonnell Douglas MD-11 transport aircraft landed equipped with a computer-assisted engine control system that has the potential to increase flight safety. In landings at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on August 29 and 30, the aircraft demonstrated software used in the aircraft's flight control computer that essentially landed the MD-11 without a need for the pilot to manipulate the flight controls significantly. In partnership with McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA), with Pratt & Whitney and Honeywell helping to design the software, NASA developed this propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system following a series of incidents in which hydraulic failures resulted in the loss of flight controls. This new system enables a pilot to operate and land the aircraft safely when its normal, hydraulically-activated control surfaces are disabled. This August 29, 1995, photo shows the MD-11 team. Back row, left to right: Tim Dingen, MDA pilot; John Miller, MD-11 Chief pilot (MDA); Wayne Anselmo, MD-11 Flight Test Engineer (MDA); Gordon Fullerton, PCA Project pilot; Bill Burcham, PCA Chief Engineer; Rudey Duran, PCA Controls Engineer (MDA); John Feather, PCA Controls Engineer (MDA); Daryl Townsend, Crew Chief; Henry Hernandez, aircraft mechanic; Bob Baron, PCA Project Manager; Don Hermann, aircraft mechanic; Jerry Cousins, aircraft mechanic; Eric Petersen, PCA Manager (Honeywell); Trindel Maine, PCA Data Engineer; Jeff Kahler, PCA Software Engineer (Honeywell); Steve Goldthorpe, PCA Controls Engineer (MDA). Front row, left to right: Teresa Hass, Senior Project Management Analyst; Hollie Allingham (Aguilera), Senior Project Management Analyst; Taher Zeglum, PCA Data Engineer (MDA); Drew Pappas, PCA Project Manager (MDA); John Burken, PCA Control Engineer.

  2. Counter-ion binding and mobility in the presence of hydrophobic polyions – combining molecular dynamics simulations and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druchok, Maksym; Malikova, Natalie; Rollet, Anne-Laure; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Counter-ion binding and mobility in aqueous solutions of partially hydrophobic ionene oligoions is studied here by a combination of all-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and NMR (19F and 81Br nuclei) measurements. We present results for 12, 12-ionenes in the presence of different halide ions (F-, Cl-, Br- and I-), as well as their mixtures; the latter allowing us to probe counter-ion selectivity of these oligoions. We consolidate both structural and dynamic information, in particular simulated radial distribution functions and average residence times of counter-ions in the vicinity of ionenes and NMR data in the form of counter-ion chemical shift and self-diffusion coefficients. On one hand, previously reported enthalpy of dilution and mixing measurements show a reverse counter-ion sequence for 12, 12-ionenes with respect to their less hydrophobic 3, 3- and 6, 6- analogues. On the other hand, the current MD and NMR data, reflecting the counter-ion binding tendencies to the ionene chain, give evidence for the same ordering as that observed by MD for 3, 3-ionenes. This is not seen as a contradiction and can be rationalized on the basis of increasing chain hydrophobicity, which has different consequences for enthalpy and ion-binding. The latter is reflecting free energy changes and as such includes both enthalpic and entropic contributions.

  3. Molecular structure of poly(methyl methacrylate) surface: Combination of interface-sensitive infrared-visible sum frequency generation, molecular dynamics simulations, and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, He; Jha, Kshitij C.; Bhatta, Ram S.; Tsige, Mesfin; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    The chemical composition and molecular structure of polymeric surfaces are important in understanding wetting, adhesion, and friction. Here, we combine interface-sensitive sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab initio calculations to understand the composition and the orientation of chemical groups on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface as a function of tacticity and temperature. The SFG spectral features for isotactic and syndiotactic PMMA surfaces are similar and the dominant peak in the spectra corresponds to the ester-methyl groups. The SFG spectra for solid and melt states are very similar for both syndiotactic and isotactic PMMA. In comparison, the MD simulation results show that both the ester-methyl and the α-methyl groups of syndiotactic-PMMA are ordered and tilted towards the surface normal. For the isotactic-PMMA, the α-methyl groups are less ordered compared to their ester-methyl groups. The backbone methylene groups have a broad angular distribution and on average tilt along the surface plane, independent of tacticity and temperature. We have compared the SFG results with theoretical spectra calculated using MD simulations and ab initio calculations. National Science Foundation.

  4. H++ 3.0: automating pK prediction and the preparation of biomolecular structures for atomistic molecular modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Aguilar, Boris; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2012-07-01

    The accuracy of atomistic biomolecular modeling and simulation studies depend on the accuracy of the input structures. Preparing these structures for an atomistic modeling task, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, can involve the use of a variety of different tools for: correcting errors, adding missing atoms, filling valences with hydrogens, predicting pK values for titratable amino acids, assigning predefined partial charges and radii to all atoms, and generating force field parameter/topology files for MD. Identifying, installing and effectively using the appropriate tools for each of these tasks can be difficult for novice and time-consuming for experienced users. H++ (http://biophysics.cs.vt.edu/) is a free open-source web server that automates the above key steps in the preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular modeling and simulations. H++ also performs extensive error and consistency checking, providing error/warning messages together with the suggested corrections. In addition to numerous minor improvements, the latest version of H++ includes several new capabilities and options: fix erroneous (flipped) side chain conformations for HIS, GLN and ASN, include a ligand in the input structure, process nucleic acid structures and generate a solvent box with specified number of common ions for explicit solvent MD.

  5. Prediction of nitroxide spin label EPR spectra from MD trajectories: application to myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kuprusevicius, Egidijus; White, Gaye; Oganesyan, Vasily S

    2011-01-01

    We report the prediction of motional EPR spectra of the metalloprotein sperm whale myoglobin spin labelled with nitroxide directly from Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations at the atomistic scale. We show that an accurate simulation of EPR spectra can be achieved from a single MD trajectory which is in excellent agreement with experiment. Simulations have been carried out using a general method reported previously by us for the simulation of EPR spectra form single dynamical trajectories. Our calculations demonstrate the complex nature of the dynamics of a spin label which is a superposition of the fast librational motions around dihedral states, of slow conformational flips among different rotameric states and of the slow rotational diffusion of the protein itself. The MD-EPR methodology reported does not require any additional stochastic modelling using adjustable parameters and opens, for the first time, the prospect of the simulation of EPR spectra entirely from single MD trajectories. Such a technique not only simplifies the interpretation and analysis of EPR spectra but also opens the possibility, for example, of "computer engineering" of spin-labelled proteins with the desired properties prior to actual EPR experiment. PMID:21322490

  6. Routine Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations with AMBER on GPUs. 1. Generalized Born.

    PubMed

    Götz, Andreas W; Williamson, Mark J; Xu, Dong; Poole, Duncan; Le Grand, Scott; Walker, Ross C

    2012-05-01

    We present an implementation of generalized Born implicit solvent all-atom classical molecular dynamics (MD) within the AMBER program package that runs entirely on CUDA enabled NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs). We discuss the algorithms that are used to exploit the processing power of the GPUs and show the performance that can be achieved in comparison to simulations on conventional CPU clusters. The implementation supports three different precision models in which the contributions to the forces are calculated in single precision floating point arithmetic but accumulated in double precision (SPDP), or everything is computed in single precision (SPSP) or double precision (DPDP). In addition to performance, we have focused on understanding the implications of the different precision models on the outcome of implicit solvent MD simulations. We show results for a range of tests including the accuracy of single point force evaluations and energy conservation as well as structural properties pertainining to protein dynamics. The numerical noise due to rounding errors within the SPSP precision model is sufficiently large to lead to an accumulation of errors which can result in unphysical trajectories for long time scale simulations. We recommend the use of the mixed-precision SPDP model since the numerical results obtained are comparable with those of the full double precision DPDP model and the reference double precision CPU implementation but at significantly reduced computational cost. Our implementation provides performance for GB simulations on a single desktop that is on par with, and in some cases exceeds, that of traditional supercomputers. PMID:22582031

  7. Routine Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations with AMBER on GPUs. 1. Generalized Born

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an implementation of generalized Born implicit solvent all-atom classical molecular dynamics (MD) within the AMBER program package that runs entirely on CUDA enabled NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs). We discuss the algorithms that are used to exploit the processing power of the GPUs and show the performance that can be achieved in comparison to simulations on conventional CPU clusters. The implementation supports three different precision models in which the contributions to the forces are calculated in single precision floating point arithmetic but accumulated in double precision (SPDP), or everything is computed in single precision (SPSP) or double precision (DPDP). In addition to performance, we have focused on understanding the implications of the different precision models on the outcome of implicit solvent MD simulations. We show results for a range of tests including the accuracy of single point force evaluations and energy conservation as well as structural properties pertainining to protein dynamics. The numerical noise due to rounding errors within the SPSP precision model is sufficiently large to lead to an accumulation of errors which can result in unphysical trajectories for long time scale simulations. We recommend the use of the mixed-precision SPDP model since the numerical results obtained are comparable with those of the full double precision DPDP model and the reference double precision CPU implementation but at significantly reduced computational cost. Our implementation provides performance for GB simulations on a single desktop that is on par with, and in some cases exceeds, that of traditional supercomputers. PMID:22582031

  8. Gunpowder River Bridge. Harewood, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Gunpowder River Bridge. Harewood, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 78.86. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. Edgewood Interlocking Tower. Edgewood, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Edgewood Interlocking Tower. Edgewood, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 75.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  10. Pennsylvania Railroad: Pennsylvania Station. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pennsylvania Railroad: Pennsylvania Station. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 95.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  11. B & O Railroad: Bayview Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    B & O Railroad: Bayview Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 92.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  12. Susquehanna River Bridge. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Susquehanna River Bridge. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.07. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  13. Edison Highway Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Edison Highway Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 92.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  14. Gunpowder River Bridge drawspan. Harewood, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Gunpowder River Bridge drawspan. Harewood, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 78.86. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  15. Wilkins Avenue Bridge. Violetville, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Wilkins Avenue Bridge. Violetville, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 100.59. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  16. Bush River Bridge drawspan. Bush River, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bush River Bridge drawspan. Bush River, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 72.14. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. Bush River Bridge. Bush River, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bush River Bridge. Bush River, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 72.14. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. Juniata Street Culvert. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Juniata Street Culvert. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.77. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  19. LANDOVER SUBSTATION. LANDOVER, PRINCE GEORGES CO., MD Sec, 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LANDOVER SUBSTATION. LANDOVER, PRINCE GEORGES CO., MD Sec, 1201, MP 129.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  20. BIG PATUXENT RIVER BRIDGE. ARUNDEL, ANNE ARUNDEL CO., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BIG PATUXENT RIVER BRIDGE. ARUNDEL, ANNE ARUNDEL CO., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 115.61. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  1. SEVERN RUN CULVERT. MAYFIELD, ANNE ARUNDEL CO., MD Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SEVERN RUN CULVERT. MAYFIELD, ANNE ARUNDEL CO., MD Sec. 1201, MP 112.17. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  2. Gwynns Falls Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Gwynns Falls Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 99.20. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  3. B & P Tunnel west portal. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    B & P Tunnel west portal. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 97.43. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  4. CHESTNUT AVENUE BRIDGE. BOWIE, PRINCE GEORGES CO., MD. Sec. 1201,, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CHESTNUT AVENUE BRIDGE. BOWIE, PRINCE GEORGES CO., MD. Sec. 1201,, MP 120.48. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  5. Boothby Hill Road Bridge. Aberdeen, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Boothby Hill Road Bridge. Aberdeen, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 66.88. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. Loudon Park Substation. Violetville, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Loudon Park Substation. Violetville, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 100.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  7. Union Junction Interlocking Tower. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Union Junction Interlocking Tower. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 95.49. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  8. North Avenue Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North Avenue Bridge. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 96.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. BOWIE SUBSTATION. BOWIE, PRINCE GEORGES CO., MD Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOWIE SUBSTATION. BOWIE, PRINCE GEORGES CO., MD Sec. 1201, MP 129.55. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  10. Analysis of solvation structure and thermodynamics of ethane and propane in water by reference interaction site model theory using all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qizhi; Smith, Vedene H.

    2001-08-01

    Following our previous paper on methane [Cui and Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 10240 (2000)], we study the solvation structures and thermodynamics of ethane and propane in water at the infinite dilution limit by using the hypernetted chain closure reference interaction site model (HNC-RISM) theory with all-atom representations for solute molecules. At four thermodynamic states: temperature T=283.15, 298.15, 313.15, 328.15 K and the corresponding bulk water density ρ=0.9997, 0.9970, 0.9922, 0.9875 g cm-3, all the atomic solute-solvent radial distribution functions are obtained, and the corresponding running coordination numbers and the hydration free energies, energies, enthalpies, and entropies are calculated with the radial distribution functions as input. The hydration structures of ethane and propane are presented and analyzed at the atomic level in terms of the atomic solute-solvent radial distribution functions. With the optimized nonbonded potential parameters based on the CHARMM96 all-atom model for alkanes [Yin and Mackerell, J. Comput. Chem. 19, 334 (1998)], the ethane and propane hydration thermodynamic properties predicted by the HNC-RISM theory are improved in the specified temperature range (10-55 °C).

  11. Graphs for Isotopes of 101-Md (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 101-Md (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101).

  12. Toxic wastes discovered in Cecil County, MD

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This report focuses on the clean-up activities following toxic waste contamination in Cecil County, MD. The potentially hazardous leakage from waste containers buried in a quarry was addressed before it was turned into a civil emergency of the magnitude of Love Canal. US Superfund is a federal government trust fund largely comprised of taxes on the chemical and petrochemical industries. Local governments share in the cost of removing the waste and other aspects of emergency management.

  13. Toxic wastes discovered in Cecil County, MD

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report focuses on the clean-up activities following toxic waste contamination in Cecil County, MD. The potentially hazardous leakage from waste containers buried in a quarry was addressed before it was turned into a civil emergency of the magnitude of Love Canal. US Superfund is a federal government trust fund largely comprised of taxes on the chemical and petrochemical industries. Local governments share in the cost of removing the waste and other aspects of emergency management.

  14. Eva Szabo, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Eva Szabo is Chief of the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group at the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. She graduated from Yale University with a BS in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, received her MD from Duke University, and completed her internal medicine residency at Bellevue-NYU Medical Center. After completing her medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Szabo led a laboratory effort studying lung cancer biology. |

  15. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    performing a 15 mus all-atom MD simulation of a DPPC-CHOL bilayer. We find that the CHOL flip-flop rates are on the sub microsecond timescale. These results are verified by performing various independent parallel replica (PR) simulations. Our PR simulations provide significant boost in sampling of the flip-flop events. We observe that the CHOL flip-flop can induce membrane order, regulate membrane-bending energy, and facilitate membrane relaxation. The rapid flip-flop rates reported here have important implications for the role of CHOL in mechanical properties of cell membranes, formation of domains, and maintaining CHOL concentration asymmetry in plasma membrane. Our PR approach can reach submillisecond time scales and bridge the gap between MD simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on CHOL flip-flop dynamics in membranes. The last project deals with transfection barriers encountered by a bare small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a phospholipid bilayer. SiRNA molecules play a pivotal role in therapeutic applications. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA-based therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. We have examined structural and mechanical barriers to siRNA passage across a phospholipid bilayer using all-atom MD simulations. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the anionic siRNA and head groups of phospholipid molecules induces a phase transformation from the liquid crystalline to ripple phase. Steered MD simulations reveal that the siRNA transfection through the ripple phase requires a force of ˜ 1.5 nN.

  16. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  17. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD.

    PubMed

    Laganapan, A M K; Videcoq, A; Bienia, M; Ala-Nissila, T; Bochicchio, D; Ferrando, R

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  18. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  19. Discovery of /sup 260/Md and the decay properties of /sup 258/Fm, /sup 258m,g/Md, and /sup 259/Md

    SciTech Connect

    Lougheed, R.W.; Hulet, E.K.; Dougan, R.J.; Wild, J.F.; Dupzyk, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.; Moody, K.J.; Hahn, R.L.; Suemmerer, K.; Bethune, G.

    1985-08-01

    We have discovered a new neutron-rich isotope, /sup 260/Md, from /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne bombardments of /sup 254/Es. We observed a spontaneous-fission (SF) activity with a 32-day half-life in electromagnetically separated mass-260 fractions from these bombardments and we have measured the mass and kinetic energy distributions of this SF activity. The mass distribution was symmetric with the principal energy peak at 234-MeV total kinetic energy (TKE), similar to previous observations for heavy Fm isotopes. Surprisingly, we also observed a smaller symmetric component with 195-MeV TKE. We interpret these two peaks in the TKE distribution as arising from two types of fission in the same nucleus, or bimodal fission. The observed fission activity may be either from the SF decay of /sup 260/Md or /sup 260/Fm which would arise from electron capture (EC) decay of /sup 260/Md. We have eliminated the possible ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 260/Md by measuring ..beta../sup -/-SF time correlations for the decay of /sup 260/Md and we plan to determine if /sup 260/Md decays by EC by measuring time correlations between Fm x-rays and SF events. We also measured properties for heavy Fm and Md isotopes which include: (1) more accurate cross sections for the neutron-rich Md isotopes which we use to predict the production rates of yet undiscovered nuclides; (2) improved half-live measurements for /sup 258m,g/Md and /sup 259/Md; (3) confirmation of the EC decay of /sup 258m/Md by measuring Fm x-rays preceding the SF decay of /sup 258/Fm; and (4) very substantially improved mass and TKE distributions for the SF decay of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Md.

  20. Probing the importance of lipid diversity in cell membranes via molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Khakbaz, Pouyan; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2015-11-01

    Lipid membranes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes have a wide array of lipids that are necessary for proper membrane structure and function. In this paper, an introduction to lipid diversity in biology and a mini-review on how molecular simulations have been used to model biological membranes (primarily limited to one to three lipid types in most simulation-based models) is provided, which motivates the use of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of lipid diversity on properties of realistic membrane models of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. As an example, cytoplasmic membrane models of Escherichia coli were developed at different stages of the colony growth cycle (early-log, mid-log, stationary and overnight). The main difference between lipid compositions at each stage was the concentration of a cyclopropane-containing moiety on the sn-2 lipid acyl chain (cyC17:0). Triplicate MD simulations for each stage were run for 300 ns to study the influence of lipid diversity on the surface area per lipid, area compressibility modulus, deuterium order parameters, and electron density profiles. The overnight stage (also known as the death stage) had the highest average surface area per lipid, highest rigidity, and lowest bilayer thickness compare to other stages of E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. Although bilayer thickness did depend on the growth stage, the changes between these were small suggesting that the hydrophobic core of transmembrane proteins fit well with the membrane in all growth stages. Although it is still common practise in MD simulations of membrane proteins to use simple one- or two-component membranes, it can be important to use diverse lipid model membranes when membrane protein structure and function are influenced by changes in lipid membrane composition.

  1. Hybrid Atomistic and Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Francesca; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-05-01

    In-silico design of polymeric biomaterials requires molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that retain essential atomistic/molecular details (e.g., explicit water around the biofunctional macromolecule) while simultaneously achieving large length and time scales pertinent to macroscale function. Such large-scale atomistically detailed macromolecular MD simulations with explicit solvent representation are computationally expensive. One way to overcome this limitation is to use an adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) in which the explicit solvent molecules dynamically adopt either atomistic or coarse-grained resolution depending on their location (e.g., near or far from the macromolecule) in the system. In this study we present the feasibility and the limitations of AdResS methodology for studying polyethylene glycol (PEG) in adaptive resolution water, for varying PEG length and architecture. We first validate the AdResS methodology for such systems, by comparing PEG and solvent structure with that from all-atom simulations. We elucidate the role of the atomistic zone size and the need for calculating thermodynamic force correction within this AdResS approach to correctly reproduce the structure of PEG and water. Lastly, by varying the PEG length and architecture, we study the hydration of PEG, and the effect of PEG architectures on the structural properties of water. Changing the architecture of PEG from linear to multiarm star, we observe reduction in the solvent accessible surface area of the PEG, and an increase in the order of water molecules in the hydration shells. PMID:27108869

  2. Dynamics of Lipids, Cholesterol, and Transmembrane α-Helices from Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (∼24 μs total) allowed exploration of configurational space and calculation of lateral diffusion coefficients of the components of a protein-embedded, cholesterol-containing model bilayer. The three model membranes are composed of an ∼50/50 (by mole) dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol bilayer and contained an α-helical transmembrane protein (HIV-1 gp41 TM). Despite the high concentration of cholesterol, normal Brownian motion was observed and the calculated diffusion coefficients (on the order of 10–9 cm2/s) are consistent with experiments. Diffusion is sensitive to a variety of parameters, and a temperature difference of ∼4 K from thermostat artifacts resulted in 2–10-fold differences in diffusion coefficients and significant differences in lipid order, membrane thickness, and unit cell area. Also, the specific peptide sequence likely underlies the consistently observed faster diffusion in one leaflet. Although the simulations here present molecular dynamics (MD) an order of magnitude longer than those from previous studies, the three systems did not approach ergodicity. The distributions of cholesterol and DPPC around the peptides changed on the microsecond time scale, but not significantly enough to thoroughly explore configurational space. These simulations support conclusions of other recent microsecond MD in that even longer time scales are needed for equilibration of model membranes and simulations of more realistic cellular or viral bilayers. PMID:25380392

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal proton transfer pathways in cytochrome C-dependent nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Pisliakov, Andrei V; Hino, Tomoya; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sugita, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide reductases (NORs) are membrane proteins that catalyze the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N(2)O), which is a critical step of the nitrate respiration process in denitrifying bacteria. Using the recently determined first crystal structure of the cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR) [Hino T, Matsumoto Y, Nagano S, Sugimoto H, Fukumori Y, et al. (2010) Structural basis of biological N2O generation by bacterial nitric oxide reductase. Science 330: 1666-70.], we performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cNOR within an explicit membrane/solvent environment to fully characterize water distribution and dynamics as well as hydrogen-bonded networks inside the protein, yielding the atomic details of functionally important proton channels. Simulations reveal two possible proton transfer pathways leading from the periplasm to the active site, while no pathways from the cytoplasmic side were found, consistently with the experimental observations that cNOR is not a proton pump. One of the pathways, which was newly identified in the MD simulation, is blocked in the crystal structure and requires small structural rearrangements to allow for water channel formation. That pathway is equivalent to the functional periplasmic cavity postulated in cbb(3) oxidase, which illustrates that the two enzymes share some elements of the proton transfer mechanisms and confirms a close evolutionary relation between NORs and C-type oxidases. Several mechanisms of the critical proton transfer steps near the catalytic center are proposed. PMID:22956904

  4. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds lowered activation energy and improved catalytic efficiency in TALipB from Trichosporon asahii MSR54: MD simulations revealed flexible lid and extended substrate binding area in the mutant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogesh; Gupta, Namita; Verma, Ved Vrat; Goel, Manisha; Gupta, Rani

    2016-03-25

    TALipB (33 kDa) is a solvent stable, enantioselective lipase from Trichosporon asahii MSR54. It is cysteine-rich and shows activation in presence of thiol reducing agents. DIANNA server predicted three disulphide bridges C53-C195 (S1), C89-C228 (S2) and C164-C254 (S3) in the enzyme. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds by cysteine to alanine mutations at Cys53 and Cys89 of S1 and S2 bonds resulted in enzyme activation. Mutant mTALipB (S1+S2) showed increase in specific activity by ∼4-fold (834 mM/mg) and improved Vmax of 6.27 μmol/ml/min at 40 °Con pNP caprate. Temperature optima of mTALipB shifted from 50 to 40 °C and activation energy decreased by 0.7 kcal mol(-1). However, the mutant was less thermostable with a t1/2 of 18 min at 60 °C as compared to t1/2 of 38 min for the native enzyme. Mutant also displayed an improved activity on all pNP esters and higher enantiomeric excess (61%) during esterification of (±) 1-phenylethanol. Far-UV CD analysis showed significant changes in secondary structure after S-S bridge disruption with 7.16% decrease in α-helices and 1.31% increase in β-sheets. In silico analysis predicted two lids (α5 and α9) in TALipB. Molecular dynamic simulations at 40 °C and 50 °C revealed that in the mTALipB, both the lids opened at 40 °C with clockwise and anticlockwise rotations in Lid1 and Lid2, respectively. In the native protein, however, the lid was only partially open even at 50 °C. Concomitant to lid flexibility, there was an extension of accessible catalytic triad surface area resulting in improved catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzyme.

  5. Dawbeney Turbervile, MD (1612-1696).

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2012-03-01

    The year 2012 marks the quatercentenary of the birth of Dawbeney Turbervile,MD(1612-1696), one-time Royalist soldier and later ophthalmologist to England’s Princess Anne, the diarist Samuel Pepys, the natural philosopher Robert Boyle, and the astronomer Walter Pope. Turbervile is remarkable for many reasons: He specialized at a time when generalization was prized; though he was a qualified physician, he also practiced the trade of surgery. Furthermore, he provided in his communications with the Royal Society early descriptions of achromatopsia, ocular foreign body removal with a magnet, and tic doloreaux. He is a forebear worth remembering

  6. Dawbeney Turbervile, MD (1612-1696).

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2012-03-01

    The year 2012 marks the quatercentenary of the birth of Dawbeney Turbervile,MD(1612-1696), one-time Royalist soldier and later ophthalmologist to England’s Princess Anne, the diarist Samuel Pepys, the natural philosopher Robert Boyle, and the astronomer Walter Pope. Turbervile is remarkable for many reasons: He specialized at a time when generalization was prized; though he was a qualified physician, he also practiced the trade of surgery. Furthermore, he provided in his communications with the Royal Society early descriptions of achromatopsia, ocular foreign body removal with a magnet, and tic doloreaux. He is a forebear worth remembering PMID:22411681

  7. 75 FR 12441 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. Model MD-900 Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... FR 42824, August 6, 1999), Docket No. 98-SW-42-AD, for the MDHI Model MD-900 helicopters was published in the Federal Register on October 22, 2009 (74 FR 54495). The action proposed to decrease the... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a...

  8. 75 FR 69862 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. Model MD900 Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... beam bolt hole locations during maintenance on two MDHI Model MD900 helicopters. The actions specified... loss of control of the helicopter. DATES: Effective December 1, 2010, to all persons except those... AD was prompted by two reports of cracks detected in the hub in the area near the flex beam bolt...

  9. Ab Initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on the Deamination Reaction by Cytidine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-08-23

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to the hydrolytic deamination of cytidine by cytidine deaminase, which is an essential step of the activation process of the anticancer drug inside the human body. The direct MD simulations were performed for the realistic model of cytidine deaminase calculating the energy and its gradient by the ab initio ONIOM method on the fly. The ONIOM-MD calculations including the thermal motion show that the neighboring amino acid residue is an important factor of the environmental effects and significantly affects not only the geometry and energy of the substrate trapped in the pocket of the active site but also the elementary step of the catalytic reaction. We successfully simulate the second half of the catalytic cycle, which has been considered to involve the rate-determining step, and reveal that the rate-determing step is the release of the NH3 molecule. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  10. Estimation of ligand efficacies of metabotropic glutamate receptors from conformational forces obtained from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Xue, Fengtian; Faden, Alan I; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2013-06-24

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are G-protein coupled receptors with a large bilobate extracellular ligand binding region (LBR) that resembles a Venus fly trap. Closing of this LBR in the presence of a ligand is associated with the activation of the receptor. From conformational sampling of the LBR-ligand complexes using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we characterized the conformational minima related to the hinge like motion associated with the LBR closing/opening in the presence of known agonists and antagonists. By applying a harmonic restraint on the LBR, we also determined the conformational forces generated by the different ligands. The change in the location of the minima and the conformational forces were used to quantify the efficacies of the ligands. This analysis shows that efficacies can be estimated from the forces of a single conformation of the receptor, indicating the potential of MD simulations as an efficient and useful technique to quantify efficacies, thereby facilitating the rational design of mGluR agonists and antagonists.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation on adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lu; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene (Py-PE) onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that solvent polarity and pyrene group are two critical factors in the Py-PE decoration on ultrathin SWNT. Combined MD simulations with free energy calculations, our results indicate that larger solvent polarity can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy, but contributes little to the interaction energy, moreover, larger SWNT diameter can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy but lead to the increasing of the interaction energy. In polar organic solvent (N, N-Dimethylacetamide), the pyrene group plays a key role in the adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, not only facilitates the spontaneous adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, but also helps to form compact structure between themselves in the final adsorption states. While in aqueous solution, pyrene group no longer works as an anchor, but still affects a lot to the final adsorption conformation. Our present work provides detailed theoretical clue to understand the noncovalent interaction between aromatic segment appended polymer and ultrathin SWNT, and helps to explore the potential application of ultrathin SWNT in the fields of hybrid material, biomedical and electronic materials.

  12. Combined Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Poly-Amido-Saccharides.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stacy L; Lu, Qing; Dane, Eric L; Dominguez, Laura; McKnight, Christopher J; Straub, John E; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-05-25

    Poly-amido-saccharides (PAS) are carbohydrate-based, enantiopure synthetic polymers in which sugar repeat units are joined by amide linkages. This unique and relatively rigid pyranose backbone contributes to their defined helical secondary structure and remarkable chemical properties. Glucose- (glc-) and galactose- (gal-) PAS 10-mer structures are synthesized and investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental measurements. Quantum mechanical DFT energy minimization calculations, as well as experimental observables including circular dichroism, (1)H,(13)C-HSQC, and (1)H,(1)H-NOESY 2D-NMR studies, validated the all-atom simulation models produced using a modified CHARMM force field. Water radial distribution functions show distinct differences in the glc- and gal-PAS systems that correlate well with observed differences in solubility between gal-PASs and glc-PASs. The computational analysis and MD simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, validating the proposed models as reliable representations of novel glc- and gal-PASs.

  13. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Alkane Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Kelly; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2006-03-01

    Thermal desorption has been the focus of much surface science research. Studies of alkanes on graphite^1 and gold^2 have shown prefactors that are constant with alkane chain length but vary by over six orders of magnitude. Other studies on magnesium oxide^3 and gold^4 show a prefactor that increases with increasing chain length. We have developed an all-atom model to study alkane desorption from graphite. Transition state theory is used to obtain rate constants from the simulation. Accelerated MD is used to extend the desorption simulation to experimentally relevant temperatures. Our results show a prefactor that increases with increasing chain length. We predict that it will become constant as internal conformational changes occur significantly. We examine the effect of desorption environment through varying the alkane surface coverage. 1. K.R. Paserba and A.J. Gellman, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6737 (2001). 2. S.M. Wetterer et al., J. Phys. Chem. 102, 9266 (1998). 3. S.L. Tait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 164707 (2005). 4. K.A. Fichthorn and R.A. Miron, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 196103 (2002).

  14. Benjamin Rush, MD: assassin or beloved healer?

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Benjamin Rush, MD (1745–1813), was not only the most well known physician in 18th-century America, he was also a patriot, philosopher, author, lecturer, fervent evangelist, politician, and dedicated social reformer. He was unshakable in his convictions, as well as self-righteous, caustic, satirical, humorless, and polemical. Unquestionably brilliant, he graduated from what later became Princeton University at age 14. He translated Hippocrates' Aphorisms from the Greek at age 17. He wrote the first textbook of chemistry to be published in America. He was by all accounts a devoted, if highly paternalistic, medical practitioner, who cared deeply for his patients' welfare. His principles or theories and his championship of extreme purging and bleeding (“depletion therapy”) have engendered 200 years of controversy and debate that continue today. The contradiction in his character is particularly well illustrated by his behavior during the Philadelphia yellow fever epidemic of 1793, as is briefly examined in this essay. PMID:16389324

  15. Benjamin Rush, MD: assassin or beloved healer?

    PubMed

    North, R L

    2000-01-01

    Benjamin Rush, MD (1745-1813), was not only the most well known physician in 18th-century America, he was also a patriot, philosopher, author, lecturer, fervent evangelist, politician, and dedicated social reformer. He was unshakable in his convictions, as well as self-righteous, caustic, satirical, humorless, and polemical. Unquestionably brilliant, he graduated from what later became Princeton University at age 14. He translated Hippocrates' Aphorisms from the Greek at age 17. He wrote the first textbook of chemistry to be published in America. He was by all accounts a devoted, if highly paternalistic, medical practitioner, who cared deeply for his patients' welfare. His principles or theories and his championship of extreme purging and bleeding ("depletion therapy") have engendered 200 years of controversy and debate that continue today. The contradiction in his character is particularly well illustrated by his behavior during the Philadelphia yellow fever epidemic of 1793, as is briefly examined in this essay. PMID:16389324

  16. Ashley W. Oughterson, MD: Surgeon, Soldier, Leader

    PubMed Central

    Kunstman, John W.; Longo, Walter E.

    2015-01-01

    Ashley W. Oughterson, MD, (1895-1956) was a longtime faculty surgeon at Yale University. He performed some of the earliest pancreatic resections in the United States. During World War II, Colonel Oughterson was the primary “Surgical Consultant” in the South Pacific and present at nearly every major battle. His meticulously kept diary is regarded as the foremost source detailing wartime surgical care. Colonel Oughterson led the initial Army team to survey Hiroshima and Nagasaki following the nuclear attacks. Thoughout his academic career at Yale, Oughterson was a key leader in several medical and surgical societies. As scientific director of the American Cancer Society, Oughterson lectured widely and guided research priorities in oncology following World War II. Oughterson also authored numerous benchmark papers in surgical oncology that continue to be cited today. These extensive contributions are examined here and demonstrate the wide-ranging impact Oughterson exerted during a formative period of American surgery. PMID:26029018

  17. C6 Coefficients and Dipole Polarizabilities for All Atoms and Many Ions in Rows 1-6 of the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Gould, Tim; Bučko, Tomáš

    2016-08-01

    Using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with exchange kernels, we calculate and test imaginary frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities for all atoms and many ions in rows 1-6 of the periodic table. These are then integrated over frequency to produce C6 coefficients. Results are presented under different models: straight TDDFT calculations using two different kernels; "benchmark" TDDFT calculations corrected by more accurate quantum chemical and experimental data; and "benchmark" TDDFT with frozen orbital anions. Parametrizations are presented for 411+ atoms and ions, allowing results to be easily used by other researchers. A curious relationship, C6,XY ∝ [αX(0)αY(0)](0.73), is found between C6 coefficients and static polarizabilities α(0). The relationship C6,XY = 2C6,XC6,Y/[(αX/αY)C6,Y + (αY/αX)C6,X] is tested and found to work well (<5% errors) in ∼80% of the cases, but can break down badly (>30% errors) in a small fraction of cases. PMID:27304856

  18. Large-scale relativistic calculations of ionization energies and total binding energies of all atoms and positive atomic ions with nuclear charge Z = 1-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Froese Fischer, Charlotte; Reader, Joseph; Indelicato, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The latest versions of advanced multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock atomic codes, MCDFGME and Grasp2K, are used to calculate ionization energies (IE) and total binding energies of all atomic systems. Comparison with experiment and other benchmark data shows an excellent accuracy achieved in these calculations for H-, He-, and Li-like ions. In particular, our results for H-like ions with Z >2, obtained with the MCDFGME code, are the most accurate available today. For multi-electron ions, we combine the accurate single-configuration MCDFGME calculations with the correlation-difference energy (difference between the multiconfiguration and single-configuration total energies) calculated with Grasp2K. This approach results in a dramatically improved agreement of calculated IEs with experiment (less than 0.7 eV on average) for all systems, excluding those involving open f-shells. The most probable ground states are found for most systems, leaving questionable only about 100 out of total 6105 considered systems.

  19. C6 Coefficients and Dipole Polarizabilities for All Atoms and Many Ions in Rows 1-6 of the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Gould, Tim; Bučko, Tomáš

    2016-08-01

    Using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with exchange kernels, we calculate and test imaginary frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities for all atoms and many ions in rows 1-6 of the periodic table. These are then integrated over frequency to produce C6 coefficients. Results are presented under different models: straight TDDFT calculations using two different kernels; "benchmark" TDDFT calculations corrected by more accurate quantum chemical and experimental data; and "benchmark" TDDFT with frozen orbital anions. Parametrizations are presented for 411+ atoms and ions, allowing results to be easily used by other researchers. A curious relationship, C6,XY ∝ [αX(0)αY(0)](0.73), is found between C6 coefficients and static polarizabilities α(0). The relationship C6,XY = 2C6,XC6,Y/[(αX/αY)C6,Y + (αY/αX)C6,X] is tested and found to work well (<5% errors) in ∼80% of the cases, but can break down badly (>30% errors) in a small fraction of cases.

  20. Molecular modeling of the binding modes of the iron-sulfur protein to the Jac1 co-chaperone from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by all-atom and coarse-grained approaches.

    PubMed

    Mozolewska, Magdalena A; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A; Liwo, Adam

    2015-08-01

    The iron-sulfur protein 1 (Isu1) and the J-type co-chaperone Jac1 from yeast are part of a huge ATP-dependent system, and both interact with Hsp70 chaperones. Interaction of Isu1 and Jac1 is a part of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis system in mitochondria. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the yeast Isu1-Jac1 complex has been modeled. First, the complete structure of Isu1 was obtained by homology modeling using the I-TASSER server and YASARA software and thereafter tested for stability in the all-atom force field AMBER. Then, the known experimental structure of Jac1 was adopted to obtain initial models of the Isu1-Jac1 complex by using the ZDOCK server for global and local docking and the AutoDock software for local docking. Three most probable models were subsequently subjected to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the UNRES force field to obtain the final structures of the complex. In the most probable model, Isu1 binds to the left face of the Γ-shaped Jac1 molecule by the β-sheet section of Isu1. Residues L105 , L109 , and Y163 of Jac1 have been assessed by mutation studies to be essential for binding (Ciesielski et al., J Mol Biol 2012; 417:1-12). These residues were also found, by UNRES/molecular dynamics simulations, to be involved in strong interactions between Isu1 and Jac1 in the complex. Moreover, N(95), T(98), P(102), H(112), V(159), L(167), and A(170) of Jac1, not yet tested experimentally, were also found to be important in binding.

  1. Wettability of graphitic-carbon and silicon surfaces: MD modeling and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2015-07-28

    The wettability of graphitic carbon and silicon surfaces was numerically and theoretically investigated. A multi-response method has been developed for the analysis of conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of droplets wettability. The contact angle and indicators of the quality of the computations are tracked as a function of the data sets analyzed over time. This method of analysis allows accurate calculations of the contact angle obtained from the MD simulations. Analytical models were also developed for the calculation of the work of adhesion using the mean-field theory, accounting for the interfacial entropy changes. A calibration method is proposed to provide better predictions of the respective contact angles under different solid-liquid interaction potentials. Estimations of the binding energy between a water monomer and graphite match those previously reported. In addition, a breakdown in the relationship between the binding energy and the contact angle was observed. The macroscopic contact angles obtained from the MD simulations were found to match those predicted by the mean-field model for graphite under different wettability conditions, as well as the contact angles of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces. Finally, an assessment of the effect of the Lennard-Jones cutoff radius was conducted to provide guidelines for future comparisons between numerical simulations and analytical models of wettability.

  2. 77 FR 24838 - Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... ``Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 11423). We received no... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Magothy River, Sillery Bay, MD AGENCY... waters of the Magothy River, in Sillery Bay, Maryland. This safety zone is necessary to provide for...

  3. 76 FR 51887 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ...) entitled ``Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 36447). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11,'' which consists of aerial...

  4. 77 FR 5201 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The proposed change will alter...

  5. 78 FR 35773 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. (MDHI), Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect... Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. (MDHI), Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION... the MDHI Model MD900 helicopters with certain main rotor blade (MRB) retention bolts (bolts)...

  6. 77 FR 42459 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc. (MDHI) Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ..., and MD900 helicopters to require determining the cure date for each NOTAR fan blade tension-torsion... (expiration date). For the MDHI Model MD900 helicopters, AD 2006-18-01 (71 FR 51095, August 29, 2006) already... these same type designs. Related Service Information We have reviewed one MDHI service bulletin,...

  7. 75 FR 10172 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Chester River, Chestertown, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... drawbridge operation regulations of the S213 Bridge, at mile 26.8, across Chester River at Chestertown, MD. This final rule allows the bridge to open on signal if at least six hours notice is given and will... Operation Regulations; Chester River, Chestertown, MD'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 48889). We...

  8. 33 CFR 110.72 - Blackhole Creek, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blackhole Creek, Md. 110.72... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72 Blackhole Creek, Md. The waters on the west side of Blackhole Creek, a tributary of Magothy River, southwest of a line bearing 310°30′ from the most...

  9. 33 CFR 110.72 - Blackhole Creek, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blackhole Creek, Md. 110.72... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72 Blackhole Creek, Md. The waters on the west side of Blackhole Creek, a tributary of Magothy River, southwest of a line bearing 310°30′ from the most...

  10. 33 CFR 110.72 - Blackhole Creek, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blackhole Creek, Md. 110.72... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72 Blackhole Creek, Md. The waters on the west side of Blackhole Creek, a tributary of Magothy River, southwest of a line bearing 310°30′ from the most...

  11. 33 CFR 110.72 - Blackhole Creek, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blackhole Creek, Md. 110.72... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72 Blackhole Creek, Md. The waters on the west side of Blackhole Creek, a tributary of Magothy River, southwest of a line bearing 310°30′ from the most...

  12. 33 CFR 110.72 - Blackhole Creek, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blackhole Creek, Md. 110.72... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72 Blackhole Creek, Md. The waters on the west side of Blackhole Creek, a tributary of Magothy River, southwest of a line bearing 310°30′ from the most...

  13. Steric effects on intramolecular reactivity in cyclic dipeptides: Conformational analysis validated by a combined MD/DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, A.; Carmichael, I.; Hörner, G.; Hug, G. L.; Marciniak, B.

    2011-08-01

    The present Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation study addresses the geometric requirements of close-contact formation in short peptides. This process, that is probed herein by intramolecular H-atom transfer, initiated by triplet-excited ketones, demands close contact between the H-donating and H-accepting moieties. Thus, any deduction about the compound's reactivity based just on MD simulations, requires independent verification of the computed conformational preferences. In this study, a procedure was developed using diketopiperazine-linked benzophenone/tyrosine dyads. Specifically, it involves a comparison of the dyads' experimental 3J(H α-H β(a/b)) spin-spin coupling constants with the theoretical values obtained by weighting DFT-computed spin-spin coupling constants with the MD-computed probability distributions for the dyads' configurations.

  14. Theoretical investigation of loratadine reactivity in order to understand its degradation properties: DFT and MD study.

    PubMed

    Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J; Abramović, Biljana F

    2016-10-01

    Antihistamines are frequently used pharmaceuticals that treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Loratadine (LOR) is an active component of the second generation of selective antihistaminic pharmaceutical usually known as Claritin. Frequent usage of this type of pharmaceuticals imposes the need for understanding their fundamental reactive properties. In this study we have theoretically investigated reactive properties of LOR using both density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. DFT study is used for collecting information related to the molecule stability, structure, frontier molecular orbitals, quantum molecular descriptors, charge distribution, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, charge polarization, and local reactivity properties according to average local ionization energy surfaces. Based on these results, N24 atom of pyridine ring and oxygen atom O1 were identified with nucleophilic nature. In order to collect the information necessary for the proposition of degradation compounds we also calculated bond dissociation energies (BDE) for hydrogen abstraction and single acyclic bonds as well. According to BDE, the oxidation is likely to occur in the piperidine and cycloheptane rings. MD simulations were used in order to understand the interactions with water through radial distribution functions (RDF). Based on RDFs the most important interactions with solvent are determined for carbon atom C5, chlorine atom Cl15, and oxygen atom O1. Collected results based on DFT calculations and MD simulations provided information important for suggestion of possible degradation compounds. Covalent and noncovalent interactions between LOR and (•)OH have also been investigated. PMID:27640160

  15. Leroy D Vandam, MD: an anesthesia journey.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rafael A

    2005-08-01

    Leroy D Vandam, MD was a remarkable man--an intricate amalgamation of an artist, scientist, and physician. He was a bastion of medical historical knowledge. Dr Vandam became a most influential anesthesiologist, some say, a giant. He was an example of someone who, with resolve, overcame adversity. His artwork is displayed in countless places, and several of his paintings form part of the Wood Library Museum Heritage Series. Dr Vandam was first a surgeon, but he abandoned surgery and pursued a career in anesthesiology under the leadership of Robert Dripps. He completed his residency training at the University of Pennsylvania and joined its staff in 1949. When he arrived at Brigham and Women's Hospital in the 1950s as director of anesthesia, he embarked on one of the most illustrious careers in American anesthesiology. Dr Vandam published more than 250 original articles, chapters, abstracts, and other reports on a wide variety of subjects including history, art, and pharmacology. His classic article on the complications of neuroaxial blocks is a seminal work in anesthesiology. This article describes how an anesthesiologist who shared an interest with Dr Vandam in the history of anesthesiology came to produce a movie based on his career, the evolution of anesthesia equipment, and the transformation of our specialty. PMID:16102694

  16. Leroy D Vandam, MD: an anesthesia journey.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rafael A

    2005-08-01

    Leroy D Vandam, MD was a remarkable man--an intricate amalgamation of an artist, scientist, and physician. He was a bastion of medical historical knowledge. Dr Vandam became a most influential anesthesiologist, some say, a giant. He was an example of someone who, with resolve, overcame adversity. His artwork is displayed in countless places, and several of his paintings form part of the Wood Library Museum Heritage Series. Dr Vandam was first a surgeon, but he abandoned surgery and pursued a career in anesthesiology under the leadership of Robert Dripps. He completed his residency training at the University of Pennsylvania and joined its staff in 1949. When he arrived at Brigham and Women's Hospital in the 1950s as director of anesthesia, he embarked on one of the most illustrious careers in American anesthesiology. Dr Vandam published more than 250 original articles, chapters, abstracts, and other reports on a wide variety of subjects including history, art, and pharmacology. His classic article on the complications of neuroaxial blocks is a seminal work in anesthesiology. This article describes how an anesthesiologist who shared an interest with Dr Vandam in the history of anesthesiology came to produce a movie based on his career, the evolution of anesthesia equipment, and the transformation of our specialty.

  17. Alkyl Chain Length and Temperature Effects on Structural Properties of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids: A Combined Atomistic Simulation and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Guo, Jianchang; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Rother, Gernot; Shaw, Robert W; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Baker, Gary A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium 12 bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMPy][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) were conducted 13 using an all-atom model. Radial distribution functions (RDF) were computed and structure 14 functions were generated to compare with new X-ray scattering experimental results, 15 reported herein. The scattering peaks in the structure functions generally shift to lower Q 16 values with increased temperature for all the liquids in this series. However, the first sharp 17 diffraction peak (FSDP) in the longer alkyl chain liquids displays a marked shift to higher Q 18 values with increasing temperature. Alkyl chain-dependent ordering of the polar groups and 19 increased tail aggregation with increasing alkyl chain length were observed in the partial pair 20 correlation functions and the structure functions. The reasons for the observed alkyl chain- 21 dependent phenomena and temperature effects were explored.

  18. Alkyl Chain Length and Temperature Effects on Structural Properties of Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquids: A Combined Atomistic Simulation and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Guo, Jianchang; Anovitz, Lawrence; Rother, Gernot; Shaw, Robert W.; Hillesheim, Patrick C.; Dai, Sheng; Baker, Gary A.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2011-12-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMPy][Tf₂N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10) were conducted using an all-atom model. Radial distribution functions (RDF) were computed and structure functions were generated to compare with new X-ray scattering experimental results, reported herein. The scattering peaks in the structure functions generally shift to lower Q values with increased temperature for all the liquids in this series. However, the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the longer alkyl chain liquids displays a marked shift to higher Q values with increasing temperature. Alkyl chain-dependent ordering of the polar groups and increased tail aggregation with increasing alkyl chain length were observed in the partial pair correlation functions and the structure functions. The reasons for the observed alkyl chain-dependent phenomena and temperature effects were explored.

  19. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md. 334.180 Section 334.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED...

  20. Gene Expression Profiling in rMd5- and rMd5-delta-meq-Infected Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder of domestic chickens caused by a highly contagious and oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MD is characterized by bursal/thymic atrophy and rapid onset of T cell lymphomas that infiltrate lymphoid tissues, visceral organs,...

  1. 75 FR 12464 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-11 and MD-11F Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ...'' (66 FR 23086, May 7, 2001). In addition to new airworthiness standards for transport airplanes and new... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD- 11 and MD-11F Airplanes AGENCY: Federal...

  2. First-passage-time analysis of atomic-resolution simulations of the ionic transport in a bacterial porin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, Carles; Faraudo, Jordi; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel

    2011-02-01

    We have studied the dynamics of chloride and potassium ions in the interior of the Outer membrane porin F (OmpF) under the influence of an external electric field. From the results of extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the system, we computed several first-passage-time (FPT) quantities to characterize the dynamics of the ions in the interior of the channel. Such FPT quantities obtained from MD simulations demonstrate that it is not possible to describe the dynamics of chloride and potassium ions inside the whole channel with a single constant diffusion coefficient. However, we showed that a valid, statistically rigorous description in terms of a constant diffusion coefficient D and an effective deterministic force Feff can be obtained after appropriate subdivison of the channel in different regions suggested by the x-ray structure. These results have important implications for popular simplified descriptions of channels based on the one-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. Also, the effect of entropic barriers on the diffusion of the ions is identified and briefly discussed.

  3. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2016-05-01

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however, the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively characterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight into understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  4. Moving Beyond Active-Site Detection: MixMD Applied to Allosteric Systems.

    PubMed

    Ghanakota, Phani; Carlson, Heather A

    2016-08-25

    Mixed-solvent molecular dynamics (MixMD) is a hotspot-mapping technique that relies on molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in binary solvent mixtures. Previous work on MixMD has established the technique's effectiveness in capturing binding sites of small organic compounds. In this work, we show that MixMD can identify both competitive and allosteric sites on proteins. The MixMD approach embraces full protein flexibility and allows competition between solvent probes and water. Sites preferentially mapped by probe molecules are more likely to be binding hotspots. There are two important requirements for the identification of ligand-binding hotspots: (1) hotspots must be mapped at very high signal-to-noise ratio and (2) the hotspots must be mapped by multiple probe types. We have developed our mapping protocol around acetonitrile, isopropanol, and pyrimidine as probe solvents because they allowed us to capture hydrophilic, hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding, and aromatic interactions. Charged probes were needed for mapping one target, and we introduce them in this work. In order to demonstrate the robust nature and wide applicability of the technique, a combined total of 5 μs of MixMD was applied across several protein targets known to exhibit allosteric modulation. Most notably, all the protein crystal structures used to initiate our simulations had no allosteric ligands bound, so there was no preorganization of the sites to predispose the simulations to find the allosteric hotspots. The protein test cases were ABL Kinase, Androgen Receptor, CHK1 Kinase, Glucokinase, PDK1 Kinase, Farnesyl Pyrophosphate Synthase, and Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. The success of the technique is demonstrated by the fact that the top-four sites solely map the competitive and allosteric sites. Lower-ranked sites consistently map other biologically relevant sites, multimerization interfaces, or crystal-packing interfaces. Lastly, we highlight the importance of including protein

  5. MD studies on conformational behavior of a DNA photolyase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushanov, E.; Kholmurodov, Kh.; Yasuoka, K.; Krasavin, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on a DNA photolyase protein with two cofactors, FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) and MTHF (methenyltetrahydrofolate), inside the enzyme pocket. A DNA photolyase is a highly efficient light-driven enzyme that repairs the UV-induced cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer in damaged DNA. We were aimed to compare the conformational changes of the FAD cofactor and other constituent fragments of the molecular system under consideration. The conformational behavior of the FAD molecule is very important for understanding the functional and structural properties of the DNA repair protein photolyase. The photoactive FAD is an essential cofactor both for specificial binding to damaged DNA and for catalysis. The second chromophore (MTHF or 8-HDF) is not necessary for catalysis and has no effect on specific enzyme—substrate binding. The obtained results were discussed to gain insight into the light-driven mechanism of DNA repair by a DNA photolyase enzyme—based on the enzyme structure, the FAD mobility, and conformation shape.

  6. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment. PMID:24280863

  7. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment.

  8. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-01

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock.

  9. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Sewell, Thomas D; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-14

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock. PMID:26874491

  10. Characteristics of energy exchange between inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) with implications for coarse-grained simulations of shock waves in polyatomic molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Sewell, Thomas D; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2016-02-14

    In this report, we characterize the kinetics and dynamics of energy exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom (DoF) in crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to obtain predictions for relaxation from certain limiting initial distributions of energy between the intra- and intermolecular DoF. The results are used to parameterize a coarse-grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy (DPDE) model for TATB. Each TATB molecule in the DPDE model is represented as an all-atom, rigid-molecule mesoparticle, with explicit external (molecular translational and rotational) DoF and coarse-grained implicit internal (vibrational) DoF. In addition to conserving linear and angular momentum, the DPDE equations of motion conserve the total system energy provided that particles can exchange energy between their external and internal DoF. The internal temperature of a TATB molecule is calculated using an internal equation of state, which we develop here, and the temperatures of the external and internal DoF are coupled using a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The DPDE force expression requires specification of the input parameter σ that determines the rate at which energy is exchanged between external and internal DoF. We adjusted σ based on the predictions for relaxation processes obtained from MD simulations. The parameterized DPDE model was employed in large-scale simulations of shock compression of TATB. We show that the rate of energy exchange governed by σ can significantly influence the transient behavior of the system behind the shock.

  11. Structural and Dynamic Analysis on IDPs by Modified AWSEM-MD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Papoian, Garegin; Papoian Theoretical Biophysics Group Team

    Unlike globular proteins, intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack both secondary and tertiary structures and can play key roles in various biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, molecular recognition and cellular signaling. These functions can be potentially elucidated by structural heterogeneity of IDPs. Because of their flexibility and disordered nature, it has been difficult to investigate IDPs both computationally and experimentally. In particular, it is desirable to develop coarse-grained, yet accurate models of IDPs, such that simulations exploring sufficient conformational ensembles could be carried out within feasible times. To achieve this goal, we modified the associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM-MD), which is typically used for folding of globular proteins or binding studies. We tested modified AWSEM-MD on several well-studied IDPs and found the transient secondary structure propensity is consistent with NMR experimental results. The rugged free energy landscapes obtained also show structural heterogeneity of these IDPs. Our proposed extension of AWSEM-MD may allow simulating a wider range of IDPs with high accuracy and computational efficiency.

  12. Michael S. Brown, MD and Joseph L. Goldstein, MD. 1985 Nobel laureates in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-02-01

    When Michael S. Brown, MD and Joseph L. Goldstein, MD first met as interns at the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1966, they could hardly have imagined that their careers would continue to be intertwined some 30 years later. It was shortly following their arrival as clinical associates at the National Institutes of Health in 1968 that the pair developed an interest in abnormalities of cholesterol metabolism. Bolstered by epidemiologic data that showed elevated cholesterol levels in many patients with myocardial infarction, Brown and Goldstein, who relocated to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 1972, began a search for receptors important in cholesterol homeostasis. These studies, performed in their early stages while juggling clinical duties at Parkland Hospital, culminated in a series of scientific achievements which merited among other honors the Hazen Award in 1982, the Lasker Award in 1985, and the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1985. Today, as Regental Professors of the University of Texas, Brown and Goldstein head a laboratory group which continues to test the cutting edge of medical research. Although impressed with the pace of technological advances in biology, the declining role of clinically oriented physicians in biomedical research troubles the pair. Interviewed in their library in Dallas, Brown and Goldstein spoke about the complicated balance of science, medicine, and education necessary to produce another generation of successful investigators.

  13. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon Page Content The Orthopaedic Distinction Who are Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeons? Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are ...

  14. Two types of spermine synthase gene: MdACL5 and MdSPMS are differentially involved in apple fruit development and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Hao, Yu-Jin; Honda, Chikako; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2005-11-21

    Three cDNAs with high homology to spermine (Spm) synthases in Arabidopsis were isolated from apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill. var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.]. MdACL5-1 and MdACL5-2 have high homology with ACL5 and MdSPMS has high homology with AtSPMS. The similarity of MdSPMS to spermidine synthases (SPDSs) was higher than that of MdACL5s, despite the fact that both are putative Spm synthases. However, MdSPMS could be discriminated from SPDSs by the presence of several characteristic amino acids, i.e., Val-149, Ser-161, Ala-205, and Val-235, in the decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM)-binding motif of MdSPMS. Both MdACL5-1 and MdSPMS complemented Spm biosynthesis in a yeast mutant deficient in Spm synthase, and ectopic expression of MdACL5-1 in the Arabidopsis dwarf mutant acl5 allowed recovery of the normal phenotype. RNA gel blot analysis showed that MdACL5 and MdSPMS are differentially expressed in tissues and suspension cells. These results suggest that functional MdACL5 and MdSPMS are independently involved in apple fruit development and cell growth.

  15. 75 FR 47203 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-11 and MD-11F Airplanes Equipped...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Corporation Model MD- 11 and MD-11F Airplanes Equipped With General Electric CF6-80C2 Series Engines AGENCY..., equipped with General Electric Model CF6-80C2 or CF6-80A series engines. These airplanes have been... partially agree with the commenter's request. We agree that the General Electric (GE) CF6-80C2 series...

  16. MdSOS2L1 forms a complex with MdMYB1 to control vacuolar pH by transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in apples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cui-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Yan; Sun, Mei-Hong; Hu, Da-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar pH is important and involves in many different physiological processes in plants. A recent paper published in Plant Physiology reveals that MdMYB1 regulates vacuolar pH by directly transcriptionally regulating proton pump genes and malate transporters genes, such as V-ATPase subunit gene MdVHA-B1. Here, we found that MdSOS2L1 in vitro did not directly interact with MdMYB1, however, in vivo formed a complex with MdMYB1 in the nucleus to regulate MdVHA-B1-mediated vacuolar acidification. This finding shed light on the role of MdSOS2L1 in transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in addition to its post-modified function in apples. PMID:26910596

  17. 76 FR 53346 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model DC-9-81 (MD-81), DC-9-82 (MD-82), DC-9-83 (MD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... proposed AD affects Model MD-80 series airplanes. We issued AD 2011-01-11, Amendment 39-16565 (76 FR 430... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... hinge bearing lugs of the aft face of the center section of the horizontal stabilizer; measuring...

  18. Shaping the water crevice to accommodate the voltage sensor in a down conformation: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Fuklang, Sunit; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-06-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSD) of voltage-dependent ion channels share a basic molecular structure with a voltage-sensing phosphatase and a voltage-gated proton channel. The VSD senses and responds to changes in the membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes associated with the movement of the charged arginines located on the S4 segment. Although several functional and structural studies have provided useful information about the conformational changes in many ion channels, a detailed and unambiguous explanation has not been published. Therefore, understanding the principle of voltage-dependent gating at an atomic level is required. In this study, we took advantage of the available spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry data and computational methods to investigate the structure and dynamic properties of the Up-state (activated) and Down-state (resting) conformations of the VSD by means of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD results of the Down conformation determined in bilayers with and without lipid phosphates both revealed a different shape of the aqueous crevice, in which more water molecules surround and fill the intracellular crevice in its Down state than in its Up state. The solvent accessible surface within the crevice has a complementary shape that can account for water-mediated interactions between the voltage sensor and the lipid bilayer. The results support the previously reported experimental data.

  19. Paleomagnetic Study of Core MD012380 from Banda Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Huang, Y.; Chen, C.; Yang, T.; Hsu, S.; Wei, K.

    2003-12-01

    This study presents the paleomagnetic results of core MD012380 taken from Banda Sea during IMAGES VII cruise in 2001. The locality of the coring site is 126o 54.25­ÝE and 5o45.64­ÝS, and the water depth is about 3232m. The total recovered length of this core is 39.9 m. The simulated paleo-intensity pattern is well correlated to that of the SINT 800 (Guyodo and Valet, 1999). Several magnetic events and excursions, such as Blake, Jarmaica, Lavantine, Big Lost Emperor, Delta and B/M Boundary could be identified. These events appeared at the depths of about 13.84 m, 18.05 m, 22.75 m, 31.81 m, 35.89 m, 38.70 m, respectively. Paleoinclination data also indicate that the boundary of Brunhes and Matuyama epochs appeared at the depth of 38.7 m. So, the paleomagnetic result is used to construct the age model of this core. Then, apply it to the studied oxygen isotope pattern and compare to that proposed by Bassinot et al. (1994), they are well correlated. In addition, the LAD of P. lacunosa is found at the depth of 28.4 m, which also supports the proposed age model. Result of magnetic susceptibility (c) shows several high peaks, especially at the bottom portion, which might relate to the volcanic activity in the surrounding area. Generally, high values occurred at the interglacial periods and low values appeared at the interglacial periods. However, magnetic susceptibility has a special increasing trend from stage 8 to the early stage 5. It may be worthy of further study.

  20. Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA -Annual Report FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Deter, Dean D.

    2015-10-01

    There are many areas of MD and HD vehicles that can be improved by new technologies and optimized control strategies. Component optimization and idle reduction need to be addressed, this is best done by a two part approach that includes selecting the best component technology, and/or architecture, and optimized controls that are vehicle focused. While this is a common focus in the light duty industry it has been gaining momentum in the MD and HD market as the market gets more competitive and the regulations become more stringent. When looking into systems optimization and idle reduction technologies, affected vehicle systems must first be considered, and if possible included in the new architecture to get the most benefit out of these new capabilities. Typically, when looking into idle reduction or component optimization for MD/HD, the vehicle s accessories become a prime candidate for electrification or hybridization. While this has already been studied on light duty vehicles (especially on hybrids and electric vehicles) it has not made any head way or market penetration in most MD and HD applications. If hybrids and electric MD and HD vehicles begin to break into the market this would be a necessary step into the ability to make those vehicles successful by allowing for independent, optimized operation separate from the engine.

  1. 76 FR 9965 - Amendment of Class E Airspace and Revocation of Class E Airspace; Easton, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... surface, and remove Class E airspace designated as an extension to Class D airspace at Easton, MD (75 FR... Class E airspace designated as an extension to Class D surface area, and, therefore, will be removed for... Designated as Surface Areas. * * * * * AEA MD E2 Easton, MD Easton Airport/Newnam Field, MD (Lat. 38...

  2. Apple MdACS6 Regulates Ethylene Biosynthesis During Fruit Development Involving Ethylene-Responsive Factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tan, Dongmei; Liu, Zhi; Jiang, Zhongyu; Wei, Yun; Zhang, Lichao; Li, Xinyue; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Aide

    2015-10-01

    Ethylene biosynthesis in plants involves different 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) genes. The regulation of each ACS gene during fruit development is unclear. Here, we characterized another apple (Malus×domestica) ACS gene, MdACS6. The transcript of MdACS6 was observed not only in fruits but also in other tissues. During fruit development, MdACS6 was initiated at a much earlier stage, whereas MdACS3a and MdACS1 began to be expressed at 35 d before harvest and immediateley after harvest, respectively. Moreover, the enzyme activity of MdACS6 was significantly lower than that of MdACS3a and MdACS1, accounting for the low ethylene biosynthesis in young fruits. Overexpression of MdACS6 (MdACS6-OE) by transient assay in apple showed enhanced ethylene production, and MdACS3a was induced in MdACS6-OE fruits but not in control fruits. In MdACS6 apple fruits silenced by the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system (MdACS6-AN), neither ethylene production nor MdACS3a transcript was detectable. In order to explore the mechanism through which MdACS3a was induced in MdACS6-OE fruits, we investigated the expression of apple ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) genes. The results showed that the expression of MdERF2 was induced in MdACS6-OE fruits and inhibited in MdACS6-AN fruits. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that MdERF2 protein could bind to the promoter of MdACS3a. Moreover, down-regulation of MdERF2 in apple flesh callus led to a decrease of MdACS3a expression, demonstrating the regulation of MdERF2 on MdACS3a. The mechanism through which MdACS6 regulates the action of MdACS3a was discussed.

  3. Constructing Atomic-Resolution RNA Structural Ensembles Using MD and Motionally Decoupled NMR RDCs

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Andrew C.; Frank, Aaron T.; Bailor, Maximillian H.; Andricioaei, Ioan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2012-01-01

    A broad structural landscape often needs to be characterized in order to fully understand how regulatory RNAs perform their biological functions at the atomic level. We present a protocol for visualizing thermally accessible RNA conformations at atomic-resolution and with timescales extending up to milliseconds. The protocol combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with experimental residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured in partially aligned 13C/15N isotopically enriched elongated RNA samples. The structural ensembles generated in this manner provide insights into RNA dynamics and its role in functionally important transitions. PMID:19699798

  4. 3MdB: the Mexican Million Models database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.

    2014-10-01

    The 3MdB is an original effort to construct a large multipurpose database of photoionization models. This is a more modern version of a previous attempt based on Cloudy3D and IDL tools. It is accessed by MySQL requests. The models are obtained using the well known and widely used Cloudy photoionization code (Ferland et al, 2013). The database is aimed to host grids of models with different references to identify each project and to facilitate the extraction of the desired data. We present here a description of the way the database is managed and some of the projects that use 3MdB. Anybody can ask for a grid to be run and stored in 3MdB, to increase the visibility of the grid and the potential side applications of it.

  5. 76 FR 78695 - Barry M. Schultz, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    .... [See Michael G. Dolin, M.D., 65 FR 5,661 (DEA 2000); Jesus R. Juarez, M.D., 62 FR 14,945 (DEA 1997... 1 (citing 21 U.S.C. 801(21), 823(f), 824(a)(3); Layfe Robert Anthony, M.D., 67 FR 20,346 (2009... Roy Chi Lung, M.D., 74 FR 20,346 (2009); Michael Chait, M.D., 73 FR 40,382 (2008); Shahid...

  6. MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 are involved in the regulation of the JA-induced biosynthesis of anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin in apples.

    PubMed

    An, Xiu-Hong; Tian, Yi; Chen, Ke-Qin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Dan-Dan; Xie, Xing-Bin; Cheng, Cun-Gang; Cong, Pei-Hua; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) are important secondary metabolites and beneficial to human health. Their biosynthesis is induced by jasmonate (JA) treatment and regulated by MYB transcription factors (TFs). However, which and how MYB TFs regulate this process is largely unknown in apple. In this study, MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 which were induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were functionally characterized. Overexpression of MdMYB9 or MdMYB11 promoted not only anthocyanin but also PA accumulation in apple calluses, and the accumulation was further enhanced by MeJA. Subsequently, yeast two-hybrid, pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that both MYB proteins interact with MdbHLH3. Moreover, Jasmonate ZIM-domain (MdJAZ) proteins interact with MdbHLH3. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR and yeast one-hybrid assays demonstrated that both MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 bind to the promoters of ANS, ANR and LAR, whereas MdbHLH3 is recruited to the promoters of MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 and regulates their transcription. In addition, transient expression assays indicated that overexpression of MdJAZ2 inhibits the recruitment of MdbHLH3 to the promoters of MdMYB9 and MdMYB11. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of how MeJA regulates anthocyanin and PA accumulation in apple. PMID:25527830

  7. MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 are involved in the regulation of the JA-induced biosynthesis of anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin in apples.

    PubMed

    An, Xiu-Hong; Tian, Yi; Chen, Ke-Qin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Dan-Dan; Xie, Xing-Bin; Cheng, Cun-Gang; Cong, Pei-Hua; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) are important secondary metabolites and beneficial to human health. Their biosynthesis is induced by jasmonate (JA) treatment and regulated by MYB transcription factors (TFs). However, which and how MYB TFs regulate this process is largely unknown in apple. In this study, MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 which were induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were functionally characterized. Overexpression of MdMYB9 or MdMYB11 promoted not only anthocyanin but also PA accumulation in apple calluses, and the accumulation was further enhanced by MeJA. Subsequently, yeast two-hybrid, pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that both MYB proteins interact with MdbHLH3. Moreover, Jasmonate ZIM-domain (MdJAZ) proteins interact with MdbHLH3. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR and yeast one-hybrid assays demonstrated that both MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 bind to the promoters of ANS, ANR and LAR, whereas MdbHLH3 is recruited to the promoters of MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 and regulates their transcription. In addition, transient expression assays indicated that overexpression of MdJAZ2 inhibits the recruitment of MdbHLH3 to the promoters of MdMYB9 and MdMYB11. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of how MeJA regulates anthocyanin and PA accumulation in apple.

  8. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  9. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved-up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages. PMID:26567653

  10. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Blodi, Christopher F

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927-2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966-1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner's work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  11. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  12. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy.

  13. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) in mitochondrial diseases (MD).

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Arpa, J; Santiago, S; Pérez-Conde, C; Gutiérrez-Molina, M; Campos, Y

    2004-01-01

    Conventional EMG, nerve conduction studies and SFEMG were performed in 18 patients with various phenotypes of MD. 14 cases showed findings consistent with mild myopathy, 2 patients signs of sensory-motor axonal neuropathy and 2 cases a mixture of myopathy and axonal neuropathy. Motor unit fiber density was mild increased in 8 out of 13 tested cases. Jitter was abnormal in 10 out of 18 tested patients. Jitter abnormalities were not related to myopathic or neurogenic features in the EMG study, and may be observed in muscles without clinical weakness. The results suggest the existence of neuromuscular transmission disturbances in patients with MD.

  14. Molecular energetics in the capsomere of virus-like particle revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly organized nanoparticles that have great potential in vaccinology, gene therapy, drug delivery, and materials science. However, the application of VLPs is hindered by obstacles in their design and production due to low efficiency of self-assembly. In the present study, all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method are utilized to examine the molecular interactions in the capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP. It is found that both low ionic strength and the intracapsomere disulfide bonds are favorable for maintaining a stable capsomere. Simulation results examining the effects of solution conditions on the stabilization of a capsomere were verified by calorimetry experiments. Simulation results of free energy decomposition indicate that hydrophobic interaction is favorable for the formation of a capsomere, whereas electrostatic interaction is unfavorable. With increasing ionic strength, the dominant interaction for the stabilization of a capsomere changes from hydrophobic to electrostatic. By comprehensive analyses, the key amino acid residues (hot spots) in VP1 protein aiding formation of a capsomere in different solution conditions have been identified. These results provide molecular insights into the stabilization of building blocks for VLP and are expected to have implications in their partitioning between the correct and off-pathway reactions in VLP assembly. PMID:23586433

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Selectivity of a Silica Polymer for Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Concu, Riccardo; Cordeiro, M. Natalia D. S.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the sol-gel polycondensation technique has been increasingly employed with great success as an alternative approach to the preparation of molecularly imprinted materials (MIMs). The main aim of this study was to study, through a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the selectivity of an imprinted silica xerogel towards a new template—the (±)-2-(P-Isobutylphenyl) propionic acid (Ibuprofen, IBU). We have previously demonstrated the affinity of this silica xerogel toward a similar molecule. In the present study, we simulated the imprinting process occurring in a sol-gel mixture using the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA) force field, in order to evaluate the selectivity of this xerogel for a template molecule. In addition, for the first time, we have developed and verified a new parameterisation for the Ibuprofen® based on the OPLS-AA framework. To evaluate the selectivity of the polymer, we have employed both the radial distribution functions, interaction energies and cluster analyses. PMID:27399685

  16. Edward Jenner, MD, and the scourge that was.

    PubMed

    White, P J; Shackelford, P G

    1983-09-01

    This article was inspired by the global eradication of smallpox in 1980. Rather than reiterate the recent history of this remarkable achievement, we have chosen to celebrate the event by reviewing the early history of smallpox immunization and the contribution of Edward Jenner, MD, to this endeavor. In addition, we present these historical events within the context of knowledge acquired by modern virologists.

  17. 77 FR 64709 - Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ..., at 77 FR 18963, the Federal Register published our notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), which... Order 12866; (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034..., Amendment 39-16740 (76 FR 41662, July 15, 2011), and adding the following new AD: 2012-21-01 MD...

  18. 75 FR 54069 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... (75 FR 30747-30750). The rulemaking concerned eliminating the need for a bridge tender by allowing the... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625--AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek... Avenue Bridge, at mile 0.9, across Curtis Creek at Baltimore, MD. The requested change would have...

  19. 77 FR 12476 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore..., across Curtis Creek, mile 1.0, at Baltimore, MD. This deviation allows the bridge to operate on...

  20. 75 FR 50707 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... operation of the Pennington Avenue Bridge, across Curtis Creek, mile 0.9, at Baltimore, MD. This deviation... vessels bound for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, as well as a significant amount of commercial...

  1. 76 FR 9225 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 50707). The temporary deviation... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... changing the drawbridge operation regulations of the Pennington Avenue Bridge, across Curtis Creek, mile...

  2. 75 FR 1705 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek... operation of the I695 Bridge across Curtis Creek, mile 0.9, at Baltimore, MD. The deviation is necessary to... section of Curtis Creek and the bridge will not be able to open in the event of an emergency. Coast...

  3. 77 FR 73967 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 5201). The rulemaking concerned would... proposed rulemaking the bridge owner displayed on the Wise Avenue Bridge signage that stated a 48-hour advance notice was required to open the draw bridge. This signage portrayed improper...

  4. 76 FR 70528 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of Maryland (FEMA-4038-DR), dated 10/05/2011 . Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Maryland, dated 10/05/2011, is hereby amended to...

  5. 78 FR 11725 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Maryland (FEMA-4091-DR), dated 12/14/ 2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Maryland, dated 12/14/2012 is...

  6. 75 FR 20400 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of MARYLAND (FEMA-1875-DR), dated 02/19/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Maryland, dated 02/19/2010, is hereby amended to...

  7. 76 FR 70527 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00018 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Maryland (FEMA-4038-DR), dated 10/05/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Maryland, dated 10/05/2011,...

  8. 77 FR 74908 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of MARYLAND (FEMA-4091-DR), dated 11/20/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of MARYLAND, dated 11/20/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  9. 78 FR 3496 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of Maryland (FEMA-4091-DR), dated 11/20/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Maryland, dated 11/20/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  10. 77 FR 76587 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of Maryland (FEMA-4091-DR), dated 11/20/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Maryland, dated 11/20/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  11. 76 FR 67245 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Maryland (FEMA-4034-DR), dated 09/16/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Maryland, dated 09/16/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  12. Structure and dynamics of La(III) in aqueous solution An ab initio QM/MM MD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Thomas S.; Scharnagl, Harald; Randolf, Bernhard R.; Rode, Bernd M.

    2006-08-01

    Ab initio QM/MM MD simulations have allowed to clarify some of the ambiguities arising from various studies on the hydrated La(III) ion. Both nine- and ten-coordinated hydrates co-exist and interchange in a dissociative process on the nano- or even subnanosecond scale, and thus much faster than any other trivalent main group or transition metal ions. The weak ion-ligand bond (53 N/m) supplies a reasonable explanation for it. The simulation results for La(III) are also compared to those for the isoelectronic ions Cs(I) and Ba(II) obtained by the same ab initio MD procedure, leading to conclusions on the influence of central ion charge on structural and dynamic properties of hydrate complexes.

  13. Spectroscopic studies beyond N = 152 neutron gap : decay of {sup 255 ovr sub 101}Md and {sup 256 ovr sub 101}Md.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Chasman, R. R.; Fields, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    The isotopes {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md were produced by the irradiation of {sup 253}Es with 35-45 MeV {alpha} particles by ({alpha},n) and ({alpha},2n) reactions and were removed from the target by a helium jet system. {alpha}, {gamma}, and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were measured with Si and Ge(Li) detectors. From the EC decays of {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md, levels in {sup 255}Fm and {sup 256}Fm were deduced. Favored {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Md was found to populate the 7/2{sup -}[514] single-particle state in {sup 251}Es, thus establishing the 7/2{sup -}[514] as the {sup 255}Md ground state. Several {gamma} rays were observed in the {sub 256}Md {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectrum. {sup 256}Fm is the heaviest nucleus in which excited intrinsic states have been identified.

  14. Spectroscopic studies beyond the N=152 neutron gap: Decay of {sub 101}{sup 255}Md and {sub 101}{sup 256}Md

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Chasman, R. R.; Fields, P. R.

    2000-04-01

    The isotopes {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md were produced by the irradiation of {sup 253}Es with 35-45 MeV {alpha} particles by ({alpha},n) and ({alpha},2n) reactions and were removed from the target by a helium jet system. {alpha}, {gamma}, and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were measured with Si and Ge(Li) detectors. From the EC decays of {sup 255}Md and {sup 256}Md, levels in {sup 255}Fm and {sup 256}Fm were deduced. Favored {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Md was found to populate the 7/2{sup -}[514] single-particle state in {sup 251}Es, thus establishing the 7/2{sup -}[514] as the {sup 255}Md ground state. Several {gamma} rays were observed in the {sup 256}Md {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence spectrum. {sup 256}Fm is the heaviest nucleus in which excited intrinsic states have been identified. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Apple fruit copper amine oxidase isoforms: peroxisomal MdAO1 prefers diamines as substrates, whereas extracellular MdAO2 exclusively utilizes monoamines.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P; Cooke, Alison R; Meyers, Ashley J; Hall, J Christopher; Shelp, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in apple fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. A potential source of GABA is the polyamine putrescine, which can be oxidized via copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO), resulting in the production 4-aminobutanal/Δ(1)-pyrroline, with the consumption of O2 and release of H2O2 and ammonia. Five putative CuAO genes (MdAO genes) were cloned from apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Empire) fruit, and the deduced amino acid sequences found to contain the active sites typically conserved in CuAOs. Genes encoding two of these enzymes, MdAO1 and MdAO2, were highly expressed in apple fruit and selected for further analysis. Amino acid sequence analysis predicted the presence of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 tripeptide in MdAO1 and an N-terminal signal peptide and N-glycosylation site in MdAO2. Transient expression of green fluorescent fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts or onion epidermal cells revealed a peroxisomal localization for MdAO1 and an extracellular localization for MdAO2. The enzymatic activities of purified recombinant MdAO1 and MdAO2 were measured continuously as H2O2 production using a coupled reaction. MdAO1 did not use monoamines or polyamines and displayed high catalytic efficiency for 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine and cadaverine, whereas MdAO2 exclusively utilized aliphatic and aromatic monoamines, including 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Together, these results indicate that MdAO1 may contribute to GABA production via putrescine oxidation in the peroxisome of apple fruit under controlled atmosphere conditions. MdAO2 seems to be involved in deamination of 2-phenylethylamine, which is a step in the biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol, a contributor to fruit flavor and flower fragrance.

  16. Apple fruit copper amine oxidase isoforms: peroxisomal MdAO1 prefers diamines as substrates, whereas extracellular MdAO2 exclusively utilizes monoamines.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P; Cooke, Alison R; Meyers, Ashley J; Hall, J Christopher; Shelp, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in apple fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. A potential source of GABA is the polyamine putrescine, which can be oxidized via copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO), resulting in the production 4-aminobutanal/Δ(1)-pyrroline, with the consumption of O2 and release of H2O2 and ammonia. Five putative CuAO genes (MdAO genes) were cloned from apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Empire) fruit, and the deduced amino acid sequences found to contain the active sites typically conserved in CuAOs. Genes encoding two of these enzymes, MdAO1 and MdAO2, were highly expressed in apple fruit and selected for further analysis. Amino acid sequence analysis predicted the presence of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 tripeptide in MdAO1 and an N-terminal signal peptide and N-glycosylation site in MdAO2. Transient expression of green fluorescent fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts or onion epidermal cells revealed a peroxisomal localization for MdAO1 and an extracellular localization for MdAO2. The enzymatic activities of purified recombinant MdAO1 and MdAO2 were measured continuously as H2O2 production using a coupled reaction. MdAO1 did not use monoamines or polyamines and displayed high catalytic efficiency for 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine and cadaverine, whereas MdAO2 exclusively utilized aliphatic and aromatic monoamines, including 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Together, these results indicate that MdAO1 may contribute to GABA production via putrescine oxidation in the peroxisome of apple fruit under controlled atmosphere conditions. MdAO2 seems to be involved in deamination of 2-phenylethylamine, which is a step in the biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol, a contributor to fruit flavor and flower fragrance. PMID:25378687

  17. Atomistic Simulation of Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xujun; Marchi, Massimo; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi; Abel, Stéphane

    2016-04-19

    Solubilization of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAP, 2-benzene-ring PAH) and pyrene (PYR, 4-benzene-ring PAH), into a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle was studied through all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that NAP as well as PYR could move between the micelle shell and core regions, contributing to their distribution in both regions of the micelle at any PAH concentration. Moreover, both NAP and PYR prefer to stay in the micelle shell region, which may arise from the greater volume of the micelle shell, the formation of hydrogen bonds between NAP and water, and the larger molecular volume of PYR. The PAHs are able to form occasional clusters (from dimer to octamer) inside the micelle during the simulation time depending on the PAH concentration in the solubilization systems. Furthermore, the micelle properties (i.e., size, shape, micelle internal structure, alkyl chain conformation and orientation, and micelle internal dynamics) are found to be nearly unaffected by the solubilized PAHs, which is irrespective of the properties and concentrations of PAHs.

  18. Samuel Smith, M.D.: first American professor of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pinta, E R

    1994-04-01

    In 1847 Samuel M. Smith, M.D., was appointed professor of medical jurisprudence and insanity at the Willoughby Medical College of Columbus, Ohio, making him the first person to chair a department of psychiatry at an American medical school. Using materials from newspaper reports, records of the medical school and state medical society, and other sources, the author presents a biographical sketch of this pioneer educator. Dr. Smith received his first practical experience in psychiatry as an assistant to William M. Awl, M.D., one of the 13 founders of the American Psychiatric Association. Over the course of his career, he held many prominent positions, including lecturer and dean at the medical school, president of the Ohio State Medical Society, and surgeon general of Ohio during the Civil War.

  19. 78 FR 38001 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Breton Bay; St. Mary's County, Leonardtown, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ...; St. Mary's County, Leonardtown, MD'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 21864). The rulemaking concerned... along longitude 076 38'30'' W, located at Leonardtown, MD. The regulations were needed to...

  20. Perryman Substation. Perryman, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 69.30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perryman Substation. Perryman, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 69.30 - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  1. Gunpowder Substation. Harewood, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 80.00. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Gunpowder Substation. Harewood, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 80.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  2. Orangeville Yards. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 91.00. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Orangeville Yards. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 91.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  3. Fulton Avenue Bridge/Tunnel. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fulton Avenue Bridge/Tunnel. Baltimore, Baltimore City, MD. Sec. 1201, MP 97.56. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  4. North Point Substation. Rosedale, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, 90.00. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North Point Substation. Rosedale, Baltimore Co., MD. Sec. 1201, 90.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  5. 76 FR 71369 - Robert G. Crummie, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... authority under the laws of the state in which he does business. See Scott Sandarg, D.M.D., 74 FR 17528 (DEA 2009); David W. Wang, M.D., 72 FR 54297 (DEA 2007); Sheran Arden Yeates, M.D., 71 FR 39130 (DEA 2006); Dominick A. Ricci, M.D., 58 FR 51104 (DEA 1993); Bobby Watts M.D., 53 FR 11919 (DEA 1988). In the...

  6. 77 FR 67669 - Wayne D. Longmore, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    .... Edwards, M.D., 75 FR 49,991 (DEA 2010); Joseph Baumstarck, M.D., 74 FR 17,525 (DEA 2009). In this case... Baumstarck, M.D., 74 FR at 17,527 (DEA 2009). Thus, because there is no dispute that the Respondent lacks... cancellation); William R. Lockridge, M.D., 71 FR 77,791, 77,797 (DEA 2006) (interpreting 21 CFR 1301.52(a)...

  7. 76 FR 71370 - Silviu Ziscovici, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... the state in which he does business. See Scott Sandarg, D.M.D., 74 FR 17,528 (DEA 2009); David W. Wang, M.D., 72 FR 54,297 (DEA 2007); Sheran ] Arden Yeates, M.D., 71 FR 39,130 (DEA 2006); Dominick A. Ricci, M.D., 58 FR 51,104 (DEA 1993); Bobby Watts M.D., 53 Fed. Reg. 11,919 (DEA 1988)....

  8. 78 FR 7813 - Sanjay Trivedi, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... authority''); Beverley P. Edwards, M.D., 75 FR 49,991 (DEA 2010); Joseph Baumstarck, M.D., 74 FR 17,525 (DEA... Florida. Consequently, his DEA registration must be revoked. See Joseph Baumstarck, M.D., 74 FR 17,525, 17... Coast Specialty Pharmacy, 76 FR 66,965 (DEA 2011); Roy Chi Lung, M.D., 74 FR 20,346 (DEA 2009);...

  9. 77 FR 7182 - Scott W. Houghton, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... practitioner who lacks .'' Roy Chi Lung, 74 FR 20346, 20347 (2009); Scott Sandarg, D.M.D., 74 FR 17528, 174529 (2009); John B. Freitas, D.O., 74 FR 17524, 17525 (2009); Roger A. Rodriguez, M.D., 70 FR 33206, 33207 (2005); Stephen J. Graham, M.D., 69 FR 11661 (2004); Dominick A. Ricci, M.D., 58 FR 51104...

  10. 78 FR 19009 - Gary Alfred Shearer, M.D.; Decision And Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... (2000); Jesus R. Juarez, M.D., 62 FR 14945 (1997); see also Philip E. Kirk, M.D., 48 FR 32887 (1983... proceeding under section 304, 21 U.S.C. 824, of the CSA.'' Zhiwei Lin, 77 FR 18862, 18864 (2012) (citing... Kentucky, not Florida.) \\16\\ See Michael G. Dolin, M.D., 65 FR 5661 (2000); see also Philip E. Kirk,...

  11. 77 FR 67673 - Fernando Valle, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... not required. See Jesus R. Juarez, M.D., 62 FR 14945 (1997); Dominick A. Ricci, M.D., 58 FR 51104... DEA registration. Serenity Caf , 77 FR 35027, 35028 (2012); David W. Wang, 72 FR 54297, 54298 (2007); Sheran Arden Yeates, 71 FR 39130, 39131 (2006); Dominick A. Ricci, M.D., 58 FR 51104 (1993); Bobby...

  12. 77 FR 67671 - Larry Elbert Perry, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Enforcement Administration Larry Elbert Perry, M.D.; Decision and Order On July 2, 2012, Chief Administrative... Elbert Perry, M.D., be, and it hereby is, revoked. I further order that any pending application of Larry Elbert Perry, M.D., to renew or modify his registration, be, and it hereby is, denied. This Order...

  13. The Application Research of MD5 Encryption Algorithm in DCT Digital Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xijin, Wang; Linxiu, Fan

    This article did the preliminary study of the application of algorithm for MD5 in the digital watermark. It proposed that copyright information will be encrypted using an algorithm MD5, and made rules for the second value image watermarks, through DCT algorithm that embeds an image by the carrier. The extraction algorithms can pick up the watermark and restore MD5 code.

  14. 76 FR 60889 - Stephen L. Reitman, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Enforcement Administration Stephen L. Reitman, M.D.; Decision and Order On July 20, 2010, Administrative Law... January 19, 2011. In re Stephen Lee Reitman, M.D., Decision at 1 (Cal. Med. Bd. Dec. 20, 2010). I take... substances properly if entrusted with a DEA registration.''' Id. (quoting Leonardo v. Lopez, M.D., 54...

  15. Crystal structure of soluble MD-1 and its interaction with lipid IVa

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-il; Hong, Minsun; Han, Gye Won; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-07-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria is a common pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) that induces potent innate immune responses. The host immune response against LPS is triggered by myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) in association with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the cell surface. The MD-2/TLR4-mediated LPS response is regulated by the evolutionarily related complex of MD-1 and Toll-like receptor homolog RP105. Here, we report crystallographic and biophysical data that demonstrate a previously unidentified direct interaction of MD-1 with LPS. The crystal structure of chicken MD-1 (cMD-1) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution exhibits a {beta}-cup-like fold, similar to MD-2, that encloses a hydrophobic cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. A lipid-like moiety was observed inside the cavity, suggesting the possibility of a direct MD-1/LPS interaction. LPS was subsequently identified as an MD-1 ligand by native gel electrophoresis and gel filtration analyses. The crystal structure of cMD-1 with lipid IVa, an LPS precursor, at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealed that the lipid inserts into the deep hydrophobic cavity of the {beta}-cup-like structure, but with some important differences compared with MD-2. These findings suggest that soluble MD-1 alone, in addition to its complex with RP105, can regulate host LPS sensitivity.

  16. Validity of the Medical College Admission Test for Predicting MD-PhD Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, James L.; VanHouten, Jacob; Grundy, Michelle M.; Chalkley, Roger; Dermody, Terence S.

    2016-01-01

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a quantitative metric used by MD and MD-PhD programs to evaluate applicants for admission. This study assessed the validity of the MCAT in predicting training performance measures and career outcomes for MD-PhD students at a single institution. The study population consisted of 153 graduates of the…

  17. 75 FR 52461 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Pocomoke River, Snow Hill, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Pocomoke River, Snow Hill, MD AGENCY... the S12 ] Bridge across the Pocomoke River, mile 29.9, at Snow Hill, MD. The deviation restricts the... hours advance notice is given. The S12 Bridge across Pocomoke River, mile 29.9 at Snow Hill MD, has...

  18. Full-Scale Crash Test of a MD-500 Helicopter with Deployable Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    A new externally deployable energy absorbing system was demonstrated during a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter. The deployable system is a honeycomb structure and utilizes composite materials in its construction. A set of two Deployable Energy Absorbers (DEAs) were fitted on the MD-500 helicopter for the full-scale crash demonstration. Four anthropomorphic dummy occupants were also used to assess human survivability. A demonstration test was performed at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR). The test involved impacting the helicopter on a concrete surface with combined forward and vertical velocity components of 40-ft/s and 26-ft/s, respectively. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance of the DEA concept under realistic crash conditions and to generate test data for validation of dynamic finite element simulations. Descriptions of this test as well as other component and full-scale tests leading to the helicopter test are discussed. Acceleration data from the anthropomorphic dummies showed that dynamic loads were successfully attenuated to within non-injurious levels. Moreover, the airframe itself survived the relatively severe impact and was retested to provide baseline data for comparison for cases with and without DEAs.

  19. The Class of 1989 and post-MD training

    PubMed Central

    Ryten, E; Thurber, A D; Buske, L

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: "The Class of 1989" is a longitudinal study of 1722 people who were awarded an MD degree by a Canadian university in 1989. This paper reports on the details of their post-MD training up to spring 1996. METHODS: Several medical professional and educational associations in Canada and the United States provided year-by-year information on field and location of post-MD training, certification achieved, whether in practice and location of practice through to spring 1996. Information from all sources was linked to a list of 1989 medical school graduates. RESULTS: Of the 1722 graduates 57 (3.3%) never entered post-MD training in Canada; 147 (8.5%) did 1 or more years of training in the United States. A total of 222 graduates (12.9%) took a break of at least 1 year from training, and 301 (17.5%) changed their choice of field or specialty after starting training. Substantial numbers took 1 or more years longer to complete training than would be expected based on the prescribed length of the training program chosen. The field or specialty choices of the cohort produced a generalist:specialist ratio of 58:42. The final numbers in several fields depended heavily on trainees changing their initial career choice. INTERPRETATION: The data point out widely differing and often very long lead times from start to completion of training. Since 1993, changes to licensure requirements have reduced opportunities for recent graduating cohorts to delay final career choices, take a break in training, prolong training or change initial career choices. Rigidities in the post-1993 training environment point to the emergence of a number of serious problems, such as dissatisfaction and high anxiety levels among residents, licensing authorities being faced with people who have not completed a training program to certification, and insufficient provision of positions for post-MD training because of underestimates of the time needed to complete training programs. The insights gained

  20. A QM/MM-MD study on protein electronic properties: Circular dichroism spectra of oxytocin and insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yuya; Akinaga, Yoshinobu; Kawashima, Yukio; Jung, Jaewoon; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2012-06-01

    A QM/MM (quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical) molecular-dynamics approach based on the generalized hybrid-orbital (GHO) method, in conjunction with the second-order perturbation (MP2) theory and the second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) model, is employed to calculate electronic property accounting for a protein environment. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra originating from chiral disulfide bridges of oxytocin and insulin at room temperature are computed. It is shown that the sampling of thermal fluctuation of molecular geometries facilitated by the GHO-MD method plays an important role in the obtained spectra. It is demonstrated that, while the protein environments in an oxytocin molecule have significant electrostatic influence on its chiral center, it is compensated by solvent induced charges. This gives a reasonable explanation to experimental observations. GHO-MD simulations starting from different experimental structures of insulin indicate that existence of the disulfide bridges with negative dihedral angles is crucial.

  1. Bayesian uncertainty quantification and propagation in molecular dynamics simulations: A high performance computing framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Papadimitriou, Costas; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-10-01

    We present a Bayesian probabilistic framework for quantifying and propagating the uncertainties in the parameters of force fields employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We propose a highly parallel implementation of the transitional Markov chain Monte Carlo for populating the posterior probability distribution of the MD force-field parameters. Efficient scheduling algorithms are proposed to handle the MD model runs and to distribute the computations in clusters with heterogeneous architectures. Furthermore, adaptive surrogate models are proposed in order to reduce the computational cost associated with the large number of MD model runs. The effectiveness and computational efficiency of the proposed Bayesian framework is demonstrated in MD simulations of liquid and gaseous argon.

  2. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  3. An Insight into the Environmental Effects of the Pocket of the Active Site of the Enzyme. Ab initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2008-02-01

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to cytosine deaminase to examine the environmental effects of the amino acid residues in the pocket of the active site on the substrate taking account of their thermal motion. The ab initio ONIOM-MD simulations show that the substrate uracil is strongly perturbed by the amino acid residue Ile33, which sandwiches the uracil with His62, through the steric contact due to the thermal motion. As a result, the magnitude of the thermal oscillation of the potential energy and structure of the substrate uracil significantly increases. TM and MA were partly supported by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  4. Molecular-Dynamics Simulation of the Effects of Methyl Rotation and Other Protein Motions on the NOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, S. P.

    1994-03-01

    The internal motions of a 36-residue C-terminal fragment of cellobiohydrolase were simulated by a 550 ps all-atom molecular dynamics calculation. The trajectories of methyl group torsional fluctuations were appended to simulate longer (2.0 ns) trajectories for modeling ideal methyls undergoing torsional vibrations about the methyl axis and proton jumps among the three equivalent proton positions. Relaxation rates and NOEs of these ideal methyl groups were calculated for methyl systems with different geometries and proton jump rates (0, 4, 15, and 27 ns-1) using correlation functions derived from the MD trajectories. The exact results could be approximated by a three-site jump model in which the correlation time of methyl jumps was 50 ps. N-site jump models with N ≥ 6 gave results similar to those expected for a freely rotating methyl group. The relaxation rates of ideal methyl groups experiencing torsional motions were reduced, depending on geometry and proton jump rate, to 30-85% of the static methyl rates. Relaxation rates were also calculated for "real" methyl groups (and various nonmethyl interactions) using exact correlation functions derived directly from the MD trajectory of the protein. Contributions of conformational fluctuations from backbone and side-chain motions were apparent as reductions and enhancements of relaxation rates relative to a static average structure. When methyl groups of the static model were calculated with a three-site jump model, similar motional effects were observed for methyl and nonmethyl interactions. Distances back-calculated from the exact relaxation rates indicate that internal motions increase the apparent distance of nonmethyl interactions by less than 0.5 Å. For interactions involving methyl groups, internal motions result in back-calculated distances that are between r - 1.0 and r + 0.6 Å of the distance in the average structure.

  5. Molecular Simulation of Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzentruber, T. E.; Valentini, P.; Tump, P.

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale conventional time-driven molecular dynam- ics (MD) simulations of normal shock waves are performed for monatomic argon and argon-helium mixtures. For pure argon, near perfect agreement between MD and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results using the variable-hard-sphere model are found for density and temperature profiles as well as for velocity distribution functions throughout the shock. MD simulation results for argon are also in excellent agreement with experimental shock thickness data. Preliminary MD simulation results for argon-helium mixtures are in qualitative agreement with experimental density and temperature profile data, where separation between argon and helium density profiles due to disparate atomic mass is observed. Since conventional time-driven MD simulation of di- lute gases is computationally inefficient, a combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven MD algorithm is presented. The ED/TD-MD algorithm computes impending collisions and advances molecules directly to their next collision while evaluating the collision using conventional time-driven MD with an arbitrary interatomic potential. The method timestep thus approaches the mean-collision- time in the gas, while also detecting and simulating multi- body collisions with a small approximation. Extension of the method to diatomic and small polyatomic molecules is detailed, where center-of-mass velocities and extended cutoff radii are used to advance molecules to impending collisions. Only atomic positions are integrated during collisions and molecule sorting algorithms are employed to determine if atoms are bound in a molecule after a collision event. Rotational relaxation to equilibrium for a low density diatomic gas is validated by comparison with large-scale conventional time-driven MD simulation, where the final rotational distribution function is verified to be the correct Boltzmann rotational energy distribution.

  6. Fluorescence of PRODAN in Water: a Computational QM/MM MD Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pederzoli, Marek; Sobek, Lukas; Brabec, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Pittner, Jiri

    2014-03-28

    Fluorescent properties of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) in water were studied by means of excited state molecular dynamics simulations employing a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach with the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT QM/MM MD). The state of the art coupled cluster method was used to benchmark density functional theory calculations. The influence of the water environment on PRODAN emission was investigated by employing several computational schemes with varying description of the solvent. The issue of the molecular geometry of the excited state PRODAN molecule in water was addressed. The experimental emission spectrum was reproduced for the planar excited state conformer of PRODAN in the extended environment of 300 explicit water molecules. The planar conformer was shown to be predominantly responsible for fluorescence. The twisted isomer is strongly stabilized in water, but rapidly evolve towards a conical intersection, and hence the twisted conformer is fluorescently inactive.

  7. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation. PMID:26506102

  8. Extension of the M-D model for treating stress drops in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; DeVries, K.L.; Fossum, A.F.; Callahan, G.D.

    1993-07-01

    Development of the multimechanism deformation (M-D) constitutive model for steady state creep, which incorporates irreversible workhardening and recovery transient strains, was motivated by the need to predict very long term closures in underground rooms for radioactive waste repositories in salt. The multimechanism deformation model for the creep deformation of salt is extended to treat the response of salt to imposed stress drops. Stress drop tests produce a very distinctive behavior where both reversible elastic strain and reversible time dependent strain occur. These transient strains are negative compared to the positive transient strains produced by the normal creep workhardening and recovery processes. A simple micromechanical evolutionary process is defined to account for the accumulation of these reversible strains, and their subsequent release with decreases in stress. A number of experimental stress drop tests for various stress drop magnitudes and temperatures are adequately simulated with the model.

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-281 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-281 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 281).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-289 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-289 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 289).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-282 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-282 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 282).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-330 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-330 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 330).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-299 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-299 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 299).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-318 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-318 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 318).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-328 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-328 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 328).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-263 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-263 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 263).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-286 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-286 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 286).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-324 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-324 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 324).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-331 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-331 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 331).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Md-279 (Mendelevium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Md-279 (Mendelevium, atomic number Z = 101, mass number A = 279).