Science.gov

Sample records for all-cause hospital admission

  1. Apolipoprotein E-related all-cause mortality in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria G; Sancarlo, Daniele; Panza, Francesco; Gravina, Carolina; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Frisardi, Vincenza; Longo, Grazia; D'Ambrosio, Luigi P; Addante, Filomena; Copetti, Massimiliano; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Pilotto, Alberto

    2010-09-01

    The most common apolipoprotein E (APOE) allelic variation is implicated in many age-related diseases and human longevity with controversial findings. We investigated the effect of APOE gene polymorphism on all-cause mortality in elderly patients taking into consideration the functional disability, cognitive impairment, malnutrition, and the occurrence of common age-related diseases. APOE genotypes were determined in 2,124 geriatric hospitalized patients (46.5% men and 53.5% women; mean age, 78.2 +/- 7.1 years; range, 65-100 years). At hospital admission, all patients underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment to evaluate functional disability, cognitive status, nutritional status, and comorbidity. The main and secondary diagnoses at hospital discharge were also recorded. Mortality status was evaluated in all patients after a maximum follow-up of 5 years (range, from 1.26 to 5.23 years; median, 2.86 years). During the study period, 671 patients died (32.0%). At hospital admission, these patients showed a significant higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (56.3% vs 53.4%; p = 0.007), neoplasias (32.3% vs 13.7%; p < 0.001), and lower prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (17.7% vs 20.7%; p < 0.001) than survived patients. Moreover, they also showed an higher prevalence of disability (52.0% vs 25.6%; p < 0.001), cognitive impairment (31.0% vs 18.8%; p < 0.001), and malnutrition (74.0% vs 46.1%; p < 0.001) than survived patients. In the overall study population, the APOE epsilon2 allele was significantly associated to neurodegenerative diseases (odds ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37-0.94). No significant association between the APOE polymorphism and disability, malnutrition, co-morbidity status, and with all-cause mortality was observed. In patients with cardiovascular diseases, however, a decreased risk of all-cause mortality was found in the epsilon2 allele carriers (hazard ratio = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). In this population, APOE allele

  2. Impact of extreme temperature on hospital admission in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjuan; Xu, Xiaohui; Peng, Li; Kan, Haidong

    2011-09-01

    No previous study exists in China examining the impact of extreme temperature on morbidity outcomes. In this study, we investigated the impact of heat waves and cold spells on hospital admission in Shanghai, China. Daily hospital admission data between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008 were collected from the Shanghai Health Insurance Bureau. The heat wave was defined as a period of at least 7 consecutive days with daily maximum temperature above 35.0 °C and daily average temperatures above the 97th percentile during the study period. The cold spell was defined as a period of at least 7 consecutive days with daily maximum temperature and daily average temperatures below the 3rd percentile during the study period. We calculated excess cases of hospitalization and rate ratios (RRs) to estimate the impacts of both heat wave and cold spell on hospital admission. We identified one heat wave period (from 24 July to 2 August, 2007) and one cold spell period (from 28 January to 3 February, 2008) between 2005 and 2008. The heat wave was associated with 2% (95% CI: 1%-4%), 8% (95%CI: 5%-11%), and 6% (95%CI: 0%-11%) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admission. The cold spell was associated with 38% (95%CI: 35%, 40%), 33% (95%CI: 28%, 37%) and 32% (95%CI: 24%, 40%) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admission. The differences between heat wave and cold spell-related hospital admission were statistically significant for all causes and cardiovascular causes, but not for respiratory causes. In conclusion, both heat wave and cold spell were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions in Shanghai. Cold spell seemed to have a larger impact on hospital admission than heat wave. Public health programs should be tailored to prevent extreme temperature-related health problems in the city. PMID:21752430

  3. Direct admission to the hospital: An alternative approach to hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Leyenaar, JoAnna K; Lagu, Tara; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate use of emergency departments (EDs) is a focus of national healthcare reform efforts, and patients requiring hospital admission account for a substantial proportion of ED utilization. Despite this, little attention has been paid to evaluating direct admission to the hospital as an alternative to hospital admissions beginning in the ED. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of hospital medicine in the changing epidemiology of hospital admissions, the potential risks and benefits of direct admission to the hospital, and the need for research to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this admission approach. We propose that transitions of care research and quality improvement, historically focused on hospital-to-home transitions, be expanded to address transitions into the hospital. PMID:26588666

  4. Risks of all-cause and site-specific fractures among hospitalized patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high prevalence of osteoporosis. The clinical sequel of osteoporosis is fracture. Patients with COPD who experience a fracture also have increased morbidity and mortality. Currently, the types of all-cause and site-specific fracture among patients with COPD are unknown. Thus, we elucidated the all-cause and site-specific fractures among patients with COPD. A retrospective, population-based, cohort study was conducted utilizing the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. Patients with COPD were defined as those who were hospitalized with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code of 490 to 492 or 496 between 2001 and 2011. The index date was set as the date of discharge. The study patients were followed from the index date to the date when they sought care for any type of fracture, date of death, date of health insurance policy termination, or the last day of 2013. The types of fracture analyzed in this study included vertebral, rib, humeral, radial and ulnar/wrist, pelvic, femoral, and tibial and fibular fractures. The cohort consisted of 11,312 patients with COPD. Among these patients, 1944 experienced fractures. The most common site-specific fractures were vertebral, femoral, rib, and forearm fractures (radius, ulna, and wrist) at 32.4%, 31%, 12%, and 11.8%, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios of fracture were 1.71 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.56–1.87] for female patient with COPD and 1.50 (95% CI = 1.39–1.52) for patients with osteoporosis after covariate adjustment. Vertebral and hip fractures are common among patients with COPD, especially among males with COPD. Many comorbidities contribute to the high risk of fracture among patients with COPD. PMID:27749576

  5. Seasonality of hospital admissions for mental disorders in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Phan Minh; Rocklöv, Joacim; Giang, Kim Bao; Nilsson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have shown a relationship between seasonality in weather patterns and depressive and behavioural disorders, especially in temperate climate regions. However, there is a lack of studies describing the seasonal patterns of hospital admissions for a variety of mental disorders in tropical and subtropical nations. The aim of this study has been to examine the relationship between seasons and daily hospital admissions for mental disorders in Hanoi, Vietnam. Designs A 5-year database (2008–2012) compiled by Hanoi Mental Hospital covering mental disorder admissions diagnosed by the International Classification of Diseases 10 was analysed. A negative binominal regression model was applied to estimate the associations between seasonality and daily hospital admissions for mental disorders, for all causes and for specific diagnoses. Results The summer season indicated the highest relative risk (RR=1.24, confidence interval (CI)=1.1–1.39) of hospital admission for mental disorders, with a peak in these cases in June (RR=1.46, CI=1.19–1.7). Compared to other demographic groups, males and the elderly (aged over 60 years) were more sensitive to seasonal risk changes. In the summer season, the RR of hospital visits among men increased by 26% (RR=1.26, CI=1.12–1.41) and among the elderly by 23% (RR=1.23, CI=1.03–1.48). Furthermore, when temperatures including minimum, mean, and maximum increased 1°C, the number of cases for mental disorders increased by 1.7%, 2%, and 2.1%, respectively. Conclusion The study results showed a correlation between hospital admission for mental disorders and season. PMID:27566716

  6. Change of Serum BNP Between Admission and Discharge After Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Is a Better Predictor of 6-Month All-Cause Mortality Than the Single BNP Value Determined at Admission

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Giandomenico, Giuseppe; Di Maio, Marco; Baldi, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Background B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is regarded as a reliable predictor of outcome in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). However, according to some scholars, a single isolated measurement of serum BNP at the time of hospital admission would not be sufficient to provide reliable prognostic information. Methods A retrospective study was carried out on patients hospitalized for ADHF, who had then undergone follow-up of at least 6 months, in order to see if there was any difference in midterm mortality among patients with rising BNP at discharge as compared to those with decreasing BNP at discharge. Medical records had to be carefully examined to divide the case records into two groups, the former characterized by an increase in BNP during hospitalization, and the latter showing a decrease in BNP from the time of admission to the time of discharge. Results Ultimately, 177 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study. Among them, 53 patients (29.94%) had increased BNPs at the time of discharge relative to admission, whereas 124 (70.06%) exhibited decreases in serum BNP during their hospital stay. The group with patients who exhibited BNP increases at the time of discharge had higher degree of congestion evident in the higher frequency of persistent jugular venous distention (odds ratio: 3.72; P = 0.0001) and persistent orthopnea at discharge (odds ratio: 2.93; P = 0.0016). Moreover, patients with increased BNP at the time of discharge had a lower reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter (1.58 ± 2.2 mm vs. 6.32 ± 1.82 mm; P = 0.001 (one-way ANOVA)). In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight loss when patients with increased BNP at discharge were compared to those with no such increase. A total of 14 patients (7.9%) died during the 6-month follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that BNP increase at the time of discharge was an independent predictor of 6-month all-cause mortality after

  7. Change of Serum BNP Between Admission and Discharge After Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Is a Better Predictor of 6-Month All-Cause Mortality Than the Single BNP Value Determined at Admission

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Giandomenico, Giuseppe; Di Maio, Marco; Baldi, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Background B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is regarded as a reliable predictor of outcome in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). However, according to some scholars, a single isolated measurement of serum BNP at the time of hospital admission would not be sufficient to provide reliable prognostic information. Methods A retrospective study was carried out on patients hospitalized for ADHF, who had then undergone follow-up of at least 6 months, in order to see if there was any difference in midterm mortality among patients with rising BNP at discharge as compared to those with decreasing BNP at discharge. Medical records had to be carefully examined to divide the case records into two groups, the former characterized by an increase in BNP during hospitalization, and the latter showing a decrease in BNP from the time of admission to the time of discharge. Results Ultimately, 177 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study. Among them, 53 patients (29.94%) had increased BNPs at the time of discharge relative to admission, whereas 124 (70.06%) exhibited decreases in serum BNP during their hospital stay. The group with patients who exhibited BNP increases at the time of discharge had higher degree of congestion evident in the higher frequency of persistent jugular venous distention (odds ratio: 3.72; P = 0.0001) and persistent orthopnea at discharge (odds ratio: 2.93; P = 0.0016). Moreover, patients with increased BNP at the time of discharge had a lower reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter (1.58 ± 2.2 mm vs. 6.32 ± 1.82 mm; P = 0.001 (one-way ANOVA)). In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight loss when patients with increased BNP at discharge were compared to those with no such increase. A total of 14 patients (7.9%) died during the 6-month follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that BNP increase at the time of discharge was an independent predictor of 6-month all-cause mortality after

  8. A Retrospective Study of the Clinical Burden of Hospitalized All-Cause and Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Shelly A.; Qizilbash, Nawab; Ye, Jian; Gray, Sharon; Zanotti, Giovanni; Munson, Samantha; Dartois, Nathalie; Laferriere, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Routine vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended in Canada for infants, the elderly, and individuals with chronic comorbidity. National incidence and burden of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia in Canada (excluding Quebec) were assessed. Methods. Incidence, length of stay, and case-fatality rates of hospitalized all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia were determined for 2004–2010 using ICD-10 discharge data from the Canadian Institutes for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. Population-at-risk data were obtained from the Statistics Canada census. Temporal changes in pneumococcal and all-cause pneumonia rates in adults ≥65 years were analyzed by logistic regression. Results. Hospitalization for all-cause pneumonia was highest in children <5 years and in adults >70 years and declined significantly from 1766/100,000 to 1537/100,000 per year in individuals aged ≥65 years (P < 0.001). Overall hospitalization for pneumococcal pneumonia also declined from 6.40/100,000 to 5.08/100,000 per year. Case-fatality rates were stable (11.6% to 12.3%). Elderly individuals had longer length of stay and higher case-fatality rates than younger groups. Conclusions. All-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates declined between 2004 and 2010 in Canada (excluding Quebec). Direct and indirect effects from pediatric pneumococcal immunization may partly explain some of this decline. Nevertheless, the burden of disease from pneumonia remains high. PMID:27445530

  9. [From admission team to hospital bed management].

    PubMed

    Pochini, Angelo; Augellone, Elisa; Enei, Rosanna; Gaetani, Laura; Paolucci, Simona; Ursumando, Diana; Mitello, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Reduction on number of hospital beds i.e. on patients' admission among hospitals in Lazio has lead to a reformulation of health service framework within Lazio indentifying hospital as the only place to go to treat acute and urgent diseases. San Camillo-Forlanini, the largest hospital in Rome, according to the regional health plan, the recovery plan and the redevelopment of network hospital has had a significant reduction of hospital beds leading, as consequence, to the need of an internal reorganization. In order to correctly address this issue, the management of the Hospital started in February 2008 a project, setting up a group made up by nursing coordinators which had as a main aim to manage the number of hospital beds needed for emergencies. This group has been called "Admission Team" and nurses within the group are familiar with hospital policies and organization. The team collaborates daily with physicians and nurses in  emergency room, in order to decide the most appropriate health care protocol for each patient. The project follows a specific methodology i.e. Systemic Analysis. Over the years this project has contributed to the improvement to a number of indicators and more generally to the health care within the hospital together with the enhancement of education of new managerial roles among health professional. In 2009, the Regional Council of Lazio has recognized this project as strategic within private and public hospitals.

  10. Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infections Estimating All-Cause Mortality and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Eric T.; Cole, Stephen R.; Weber, David J.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a health care–associated infection of increasing importance. The purpose of this study was to estimate the time until death from any cause and time until release among patients with C. difficile, comparing the burden of those in the intensive care unit (ICU) with those in the general hospital population. Methods A parametric mixture model was used to estimate event times, as well as the case-fatality ratio in ICU and non-ICU patients within a cohort of 609 adult incident cases of C. difficile in the Southeastern United States between 1 July 2009 and 31 December 2010. Results ICU patients had twice the median time to death (relative time = 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96–4.01]) and nearly twice the median time to release (1.88 [1.40–2.51]) compared with non-ICU patients. ICU patients also experienced 3.4 times the odds of mortality (95% CI = 1.8–6.2). Cause-specific competing risks analysis underestimated the relative survival time until death (0.65 [0.36–1.17]) compared with the mixture model. Conclusions Patients with C. difficile in the ICU experienced higher mortality and longer lengths of stay within the hospital. ICU patients with C. difficile infection represent a population in need of particular attention, both to prevent adverse patient outcomes and to minimize transmission of C. difficile to other hospitalized patients. PMID:24815305

  11. Hospital admissions before and after shipyard closure.

    PubMed

    Iversen, L; Sabroe, S; Damsgaard, M T

    1989-10-28

    To determine the effect of job loss on health an investigation was made of admissions to hospitals in 887 men five years before and three years after the closure of a Danish shipyard. The control group comprised 441 men from another shipyard. The information on hospital admissions was obtained from the Danish national register of patients. The relative risk of admission in the control group dropped significantly in terms of the number of men admitted from the study group from 1.29 four to five years before closure to 0.74 in the three years after closure. This was especially true of admissions due to accidents (1.33 to 0.46) and diseases of the digestive system (4.53 to 1.03). For diseases of the circulatory system, particularly cardiovascular diseases, the relative risk increased from 0.8 to 1.60, and from 1.0 to 2.6 respectively. These changes in risk of illness after redundancy are probably a consequence of a change from the effects of a high risk work environment to the effects of psychosocial stresses such as job insecurity and unemployment.

  12. Hospital admissions before and after shipyard closure.

    PubMed

    Bartley, M; Fagin, L

    1990-03-01

    "To determine the effect of job loss on health an investigation was made of admissions to hospitals in 887 men five years before and three years after the closure of a Danish shipyard. The control group comprised 441 men from another shipyard. The information on hospital admissions was obtained from the Danish national register of patients. The relative risk of admission in the control group dropped significantly in terms of the number of men admitted from the study group from 1.29 four to five years before closure to 0.74 in the three years after closure. This was especially true of admissions due to accidents (1.33 to 0.46) and diseases of the digestive system (4.53 to 1.03). For diseases of the circulatory system, particularly cardiovascular diseases, the relative risk increased from 0.8 to 1.60, and from 1.0 to 2.6 respectively. These changes in risk of illness after redundancy are probably a consequence of a change from the effects of a high risk work environment to the effects of psychosocial stresses such as job insecurity and unemployment."

  13. Level of incongruence during cardiac rehabilitation and prediction of future CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Fiorenza A; Stauber, Stefanie; Wilhelm, Matthias; Znoj, Hansjörg; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Independent of traditional risk factors, psychosocial risk factors increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies in the field of psychotherapy have shown that the construct of incongruence (meaning a discrepancy between desired and achieved goals) affects the outcome of therapy. We prospectively measured the impact of incongruence in patients after undergoing a cardiac rehabilitation program. We examined 198 CVD patients enrolled in a 8-12 week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Patients completed the German short version of the Incongruence Questionnaire and the SF-36 Health Questionnaire to measure quality of life (QoL) at discharge of rehabilitation. Endpoints at follow-up were CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality. During a mean follow-up period of 54.3 months, 29 patients experienced a CVD-related hospitalization and 3 patients died. Incongruence at discharge of rehabilitation was independent of traditional risk factors a significant predictor for CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality (HR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29-3.20, p = .002). We also found a significant interaction of incongruence with mental QoL (HR .96, 95% CI .92-.99, p = .027), i.e. incongruence predicted poor prognosis if QoL was low (p = .017), but not if QoL was high (p = .74). Incongruence at discharge predicted future CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality and mental QoL moderated this relationship. Therefore, incongruence should be considered for effective treatment planning and outcome measurement.

  14. SARS: hospital infection control and admission strategies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Tang, Xiao-Ping; Seto, Wing-Hong

    2003-11-01

    Nosocomial clustering with transmission to health care workers, patients and visitors is a prominent feature of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Hospital outbreaks of SARS typically occurred within the first week after admission of the very first SARS cases when the disease was not recognized and before isolation measures were implemented. In the majority of nosocomial infections, there was a history of close contact with a SARS patient, and transmission occurred via large droplets, direct contact with infectious material or by contact with fomites contaminated by infectious material. In a few instances, potential airborne transmission was reported in association with endotracheal intubation, nebulised medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation of SARS patients. In all SARS-affected countries, nosocomial transmission of the disease was effectively halted by enforcement of routine standard, contact and droplet precautions in all clinical areas and additional airborne precautions in the high-risk areas. In Hong Kong, where there are few private rooms for patient isolation, some hospitals have obtained good outcome by having designated SARS teams and separate wards for patient triage, confirmed SARS cases and step-down of patients in whom SARS had been ruled out. In conclusion, SARS represents one of the new challenges for those who are involved in hospital infection control. As SARS might re-emerge, all hospitals should take advantage of the current SARS-free interval to review their infection control programmes, alert mechanisms, response capability and to repair any identified inadequacies.

  15. Heat, Heat Waves, and Hospital Admissions among the Elderly in the United States, 1992–2006

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; O’Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heat-wave frequency, intensity, and duration are increasing with global climate change. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well documented, but less is known regarding associations with hospital admissions. Objectives: Our goal was to determine associations between moderate and extreme heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions for nonaccidental causes among Medicare beneficiaries ≥ 65 years of age in 114 cities across five U.S. climate zones. Methods: We used Medicare inpatient billing records and city-specific data on temperature, humidity, and ozone from 1992 through 2006 in a time-stratified case-crossover design to estimate the association between hospitalization and moderate [90th percentile of apparent temperature (AT)] and extreme (99th percentile of AT) heat and heat waves (AT above the 95th percentile over 2–8 days). In sensitivity analyses, we additionally considered confounding by ozone and holidays, different temperature metrics, and alternate models of the exposure–response relationship. Results: Associations between moderate heat and hospital admissions were minimal, but extreme heat was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 4%) increase in all-cause hospital admissions over the subsequent 8 days. In cause-specific analyses, extreme heat was associated with increased hospitalizations for renal (15%; 95% CI: 9%, 21%) and respiratory (4%; 95% CI: 2%, 7%) diseases, but not for cardiovascular diseases. An added heat-wave effect was observed for renal and respiratory admissions. Conclusion: Extreme heat is associated with increased hospital admissions, particularly for renal causes, among the elderly in the United States. Citation: Gronlund CJ, Zanobetti A, Schwartz JD, Wellenius GA, O’Neill MS. 2014. Heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions among the elderly in the United States, 1992–2006. Environ Health Perspect 122:1187–1192; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206132 PMID:24905551

  16. Hospital Re-Admissions among Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Michael L.; Tocco, Rachel S.; Bazick, Jessica; Rakoski, Mina O.; Lok, Anna S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Early re-hospitalizations have been well characterized in many disease states, but not among patients with cirrhosis. The aims of this study were to identify the frequency, costs, predictors, and preventable causes of hospital re-admissions among patients with decompensated cirrhosis. METHODS Rates of re-admission were calculated for 402 patients discharged after one of the following complications of cirrhosis: ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, renal failure, hepatic encephalopathy or variceal hemorrhage. Costs of re-admissions were calculated using the hospital accounting system. Predictors of time to first re-admission were determined using Cox regression, and predictors of hospitalization rate/person-years using negative binomial regression. The independent association between re-admission rate and mortality was determined using Cox regression. Admissions within 30 days of discharge were assessed by two reviewers to determine if preventable. RESULTS 276 (69%) subjects had at least one non-elective re-admission, with a median time to first re-admission of 67 days. By one week after discharge 14% of subjects had been re-admitted, and 37% were re-admitted within one month. The mean costs for re-admissions within one week and between weeks 1–4 were $28,898 and %20,581, respectively. During a median follow-up of 203 days, the median number of re-admissions was 2 (range 0–40), with an overall rate of 3 hospitalizations/person-years. Patients with more frequent re-admissions had higher risk of subsequent mortality, despite adjustment for confounders including the Model for End-stage Liver Disease score. Predictors of time to first re-admission included MELD score, serum sodium, and number of medications on discharge; predictors of hospitalization rate included these variables as well as the number of cirrhosis complications and being on the transplant list at discharge. Among 165 re-admissions within 30 days, 22% were possibly preventable

  17. Association between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Type of Infectious Respiratory Disease and All-Cause In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with HIV/AIDS: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Villafuerte-García, Adriana; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Melchor-Romero, Ada; García-García, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory manifestations of HIV disease differ globally due to differences in current availability of effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) programs and epidemiology of infectious diseases. Objective To describe the association between HAART and discharge diagnosis and all-cause in-hospital mortality among hospitalized patients with infectious respiratory disease and HIV/AIDS. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients hospitalized at a specialty hospital for respiratory diseases in Mexico City between January 1st, 2010 and December 31st, 2011. We included patients whose discharge diagnosis included HIV or AIDS and at least one infectious respiratory diagnosis. The information source was the clinical chart. We analyzed the association between HAART for 180 days or more and type of respiratory disease using polytomous logistic regression and all-cause hospital mortality by multiple logistic regressions. Results We studied 308 patients, of whom 206 (66.9%) had been diagnosed with HIV infection before admission to the hospital. The CD4+ lymphocyte median count was 68 cells/mm3 [interquartile range (IQR): 30–150]. Seventy-five (24.4%) cases had received HAART for more than 180 days. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) (n = 142), tuberculosis (n = 63), and bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (n = 60) were the most frequent discharge diagnoses. Receiving HAART for more than 180 days was associated with a lower probability of PJP [Adjusted odd ratio (aOR): 0.245, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.08–0.8, p = 0.02], adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical covariates. HAART was independently associated with reduced odds (aOR 0.214, 95% CI 0.06–0.75) of all-cause in-hospital mortality, adjusting for HIV diagnosis previous to hospitalization, age, access to social security, low socioeconomic level, CD4 cell count, viral load, and discharge diagnoses. Conclusions HAART for 180 days or more was associated

  18. [Compulsory admission to hospital in Tunisia: a necessary evolution].

    PubMed

    Ellouze, Faten; Lahmar, Aymen; Beji, Rami; Dridi, Anis; Fadhel M'rad, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the legislation governing compulsory admission to hospital in Tunisia is interesting for two reasons. The country's 2011 revolution notably brought about major changes to the legislative framework, from constitutional through to ordinary laws. At the same time, the current trend for globalisation is also affecting legislation: international laws, treaties and UN charters are imposed on the laws of individual countries. This article looks at how Tunisian law governing compulsory admission to hospital has had to evolve. PMID:26143219

  19. [Compulsory admission to hospital in Tunisia: a necessary evolution].

    PubMed

    Ellouze, Faten; Lahmar, Aymen; Beji, Rami; Dridi, Anis; Fadhel M'rad, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the legislation governing compulsory admission to hospital in Tunisia is interesting for two reasons. The country's 2011 revolution notably brought about major changes to the legislative framework, from constitutional through to ordinary laws. At the same time, the current trend for globalisation is also affecting legislation: international laws, treaties and UN charters are imposed on the laws of individual countries. This article looks at how Tunisian law governing compulsory admission to hospital has had to evolve.

  20. Prognostic value of rectal temperature at hospital admission in client-owned rabbits.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Toth, Giulia; Selleri, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether rectal temperature at hospital admission, independently or in conjunction with other parameters, was associated with all-cause mortality in client-owned rabbits. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. ANIMALS 316 client-owned rabbits consecutively hospitalized in an exotics-only animal hospital. PROCEDURES Rectal temperature of each hospitalized rabbit was measured at admission. Individual variables, including survival up to 1 week after hospital discharge, were recorded. Univariate, multivariate, and sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Rabbits with hypothermia at admission had a risk of death before or within 1 week after hospital discharge 3 times that of rabbits without hypothermia (relative risk, 3.09; 95% confidence interval, 2.17 to 4.39). For each 1°C (1.8°F) decrease in admission rectal temperature, the odds of death were doubled (OR, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.69 to 2.64). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the finding. Older age, suspected presence of a systemic disease, and presence of gastrointestinal stasis were also significantly associated with an increased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Rectal temperature was easily measured in rabbits and was a major predictor of death in the present patient cohort. Because of its association with death in both healthy and diseased rabbits in this study, rectal temperature should always be measured during physical examination of rabbits. Treatment of hypothermia in client-owned rabbits requires further research.

  1. Hospital Admission Patterns in Children with CAH: Admission Rates and Adrenal Crises Decline with Age

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, R. Louise; Falhammar, Henrik; Munns, Craig F.; Maguire, Ann M.; Torpy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine patterns of hospitalisation for acute medical conditions in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Design. A retrospective study of hospitalisation using administrative data. Setting. All hospitals in NSW, Australia. Patients. All patients admitted with CAH and a random sample of admissions in patients aged 0 to 18 years without adrenal insufficiency (AI). Main Outcome Measures. Admissions and comorbidities by age and sex. Results. Of 573 admissions for medical problems in CAH children, 286 (49.9%) were in males, and 236 (41.2%) had a principal diagnosis of CAH or had an adrenal crisis (AC). 37 (6.5%) ACs were recorded. An infection was found in 43.5% (n = 249) of the CAH patient admissions and 51.7% (n = 1613) of the non-AI group, p < 0.001. Children aged up to one year had the highest number of admissions (n = 149) and six ACs (four in males). There were 21 ACs recorded for children aged 1–5 years. Older CAH children had fewer admissions and fewer ACs. No in-hospital deaths were recorded. Conclusions. Admission for medical problems in CAH children declines with age. An AC was recorded in 6.5% of the admissions, with the majority of ACs occurring in the 1 to 5 years age group and there were no deaths. PMID:26880914

  2. Examination of hospital characteristics and patient quality outcomes using four inpatient quality indicators and 30-day all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Carretta, Henry J; Chukmaitov, Askar; Tang, Anqi; Shin, Jihyung

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to examine hospital mortality outcomes and structure using 2008 patient-level discharges from general community hospitals. Discharges from Florida administrative files were merged to the state mortality registry. A cross-sectional analysis of inpatient mortality was conducted using Inpatient Quality Indicators (IQIs) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, pneumonia, and all-payer 30-day postdischarge mortality. Structural characteristics included bed size, volume, ownership, teaching status, and system affiliation. Outcomes were risk adjusted using 3M APR-DRG. Volume was inversely correlated with AMI, CHF, stroke, and 30-day mortality. Similarities and differences in the direction and magnitude of the relationship of structural characteristics to 30-day postdischarge and IQI mortality measures were observed. Hospital volume was inversely correlated with inpatient mortality outcomes. Other hospital characteristics were associated with some mortality outcomes. Further study is needed to understand the relationship between 30-day postdischarge mortality and hospital quality.

  3. Frequency of low-risk hospital admissions for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Butler, J; Hanumanthu, S; Chomsky, D; Wilson, J R

    1998-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common reasons for admission to acute care hospitals. A proportion of these admissions are probably low risk and could be managed in subacute care facilities, resulting in substantial cost savings. To investigate the proportion of low-risk hospital admissions for heart failure, all admissions for heart failure to Vanderbilt University Medical Center between July 1993 and June 1995 were identified (n = 743). One hundred twenty of these admissions were randomly selected, reviewed, and classified into a high-risk versus low-risk group on admission based on the severity of heart failure and the presence of life-threatening complications. Of the 120 admissions, 57 (48%) were classified as high risk based on the presence of moderate to severe heart failure for the first time or recurrent heart failure with a major complicating factor. Sixteen admissions (28%) were associated with adverse outcomes, including myocardial infarction in 5 (9%), intubation in 6 (11%), and death in 4 (7%). Sixty-three admissions (52%) were classified as low risk based on the presence of new-onset mild heart failure or mild to moderate recurrent heart failure with no complicating factors. Most of these admissions were for dyspnea without any life-threatening complication; 57 (91%) had no evidence of interstitial or alveolar pulmonary edema, and arterial oxygen saturation averaged 95 +/- 3%. Only 3 of these low risk admissions (5%) were associated with an adverse cardiovascular event. None of the patients died. These data suggest that over half of the patients admitted for heart failure to an acute care facility are low risk and probably could be managed in a subacute care setting, resulting in large cost savings. PMID:9462604

  4. Hospital admissions syndromic surveillance--Connecticut, September 200-November 2003.

    PubMed

    Dembek, Zygmunt F; Carley, K; Siniscalchi, A; Hadler, J

    2004-09-24

    On September 11, 2001, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CDPH) initiated daily, statewide syndromic surveillance based on unscheduled hospital admissions (HASS). The system's objectives were to monitor for outbreaks caused by Category A biologic agents and evaluate limits in space and time of identified outbreaks. Thirty-two acute-care hospitals were required to report their previous day's unscheduled admissions for 11 syndromes (pneumonia, hemoptysis, respiratory distress, acute neurologic illness, nontraumatic paralysis, sepsis and nontraumatic shock, fever with rash, fever of unknown cause, acute gastrointestinal illness, and possible cutaneous anthrax, and suspected illness clusters). Admissions for pneumonia, gastrointestinal illness, and sepsis were reported most frequently; admissions for fever with rash, possible cutaneous anthrax, and hemoptysis were rare. A method for determining the difference between random and systemic variation was used to identify differences of >/=3 standard deviations for each syndrome from a 6-month moving average. HASS was adapted to meet changing surveillance needs (e.g., surveillance for anthrax, smallpox, and severe acute respiratory syndrome). HASS was sensitive enough to reflect annual increases in hospital-admission rates for pneumonia during the influenza season and to confirm an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness. Follow-up of HASS neurologic-admissions reports has led to diagnosis of West Nile virus encephalitis cases. Report validation, syndrome-criteria standardization among hospitals, and expanded use of outbreak-detection algorithms will enhance the system's usefulness.

  5. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to a Paediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Ruairi M.; Mason, Jennifer R.; Bird, Kim A.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Peak, Matthew; Williamson, Paula R.; Nunn, Anthony J.; Turner, Mark A.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) To obtain reliable information about the incidence of adverse drug reactions, and identify potential areas where intervention may reduce the burden of ill-health. Design Prospective observational study. Setting A large tertiary children’s hospital providing general and specialty care in the UK. Participants All acute paediatric admissions over a one year period. Main Exposure Any medication taken in the two weeks prior to admission. Outcome Measures Occurrence of adverse drug reaction. Results 240/8345 admissions in 178/6821 patients admitted acutely to a paediatric hospital were thought to be related to an adverse drug reaction, giving an estimated incidence of 2.9% (95% CI 2.5, 3.3), with the reaction directly causing, or contributing to the cause, of admission in 97.1% of cases. No deaths were attributable to an adverse drug reaction. 22.1% (95% CI 17%, 28%) of the reactions were either definitely or possibly avoidable. Prescriptions originating in the community accounted for 44/249 (17.7%) of adverse drug reactions, the remainder originating from hospital. 120/249 (48.2%) reactions resulted from treatment for malignancies. The drugs most commonly implicated in causing admissions were cytotoxic agents, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vaccines and immunosuppressants. The most common reactions were neutropenia, immunosuppression and thrombocytopenia. Conclusions Adverse drug reactions in children are an important public health problem. Most of those serious enough to require hospital admission are due to hospital-based prescribing, of which just over a fifth may be avoidable. Strategies to reduce the burden of ill-health from adverse drug reactions causing admission are needed. PMID:23226510

  6. Drug-related hospital admissions in a generic pharmaceutical system.

    PubMed

    Zargarzadeh, A H; Emami, M H; Hosseini, F

    2007-01-01

    1. Generically based pharmaceutical systems exist in a few countries of the world, such as Iran. Most developed countries have free market pharmaceutical systems. Drug-related problems (DRP) have been reported mostly in the Western world but few data are available for generic systems. In this study, we tried to measure the prevalence of drug-related problems leading to hospital admissions in Isfahan, Iran. 2. One thousand consecutive hospital admissions in three major teaching hospitals were studied for a period of 6 months for the presence of DRP as a cause of hospital admissions. Two subcategories of DRP were considered: (i) drug therapy failure; and (ii) adverse drug reactions. Preventability and outcome measures were also assessed. Medications responsible for DRP were classified according to the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification of the World Health Organization. 3. Of the 1000 admissions studied, 115 (11.5%) were owing to DRP, 81% as a result of drug therapy failure and 19% as adverse drug reactions. A total of 106 out of the 115 DRP cases (92%) were either preventable or probably preventable, most of which had to do with either prescriber or patient error. An overview of DRP showed that 58.3% resulted in complete recovery, 33.9% in relative recovery and 7.8% in death. Close to 1% of hospital admissions resulted in DRP-related deaths. 4. The overall prevalence of hospital admissions caused by DRP is similar to that in free market pharmaceutical systems. The high preventability rate of these problems should alert clinicians and policy makers to design strategies to curtail this. Also, reasons for differences in subtypes of DRP between the results of this study and those of the literature from free market systems needs to be investigated further.

  7. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  8. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables--namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature--influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  9. Inpatient Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits within 30 Days of a Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jesse J.; Chan, Theodore C.; Killeen, James P.; Castillo, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient hospital readmissions have become a focus for healthcare reform and cost-containment efforts. Initiatives targeting unanticipated readmissions have included care coordination for specific high readmission diseases and patients and health coaching during the post-discharge transition period. However, little research has focused on emergency department (ED) visits following an inpatient admission. The objective of this study was to assess 30-day ED utilization and all-cause readmissions following a hospital admission. Methods This was a retrospective study using inpatient and ED utilization data from two hospitals with a shared patient population in 2011. We assessed the 30-day ED visit rate and 30-day readmission rate and compared patient characteristics among individuals with 30-day inpatient readmissions, 30-day ED discharges, and no 30-day visits. Results There were 13,449 patients who met the criteria of an index visit. Overall, 2,453 (18.2%) patients had an ED visit within 30 days of an inpatient stay. However, only 55.6% (n=1,363) of these patients were admitted at one of these 30-day visits, resulting in a 30-day all-cause readmission rate of 10.1%. Conclusion Approximately one in five patients presented to the ED within 30 days of an inpatient hospitalization and over half of these patients were readmitted. Readmission measures that incorporate ED visits following an inpatient stay might better inform interventions to reduce avoidable readmissions. PMID:26759647

  10. A Study of Hospital Admission Rules During Pediatric Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Jane; Alpert, Joel J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of U.S. pediatric training programs to determine the role of rules in the hospital admission of pediatric patients is reported. The results support the hypothesis that rules are a widely used teaching tool. The rules relate to such factors as fevers, age, specific diseases, administrative concerns, head traumas, and poisonings. (JMD)

  11. Atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions due to pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    Negrisoli, Juliana; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between exposure to air pollutants and hospitalizations due to pneumonia in children of Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Time series ecological study, from 2007 to 2008. Daily data were obtained from the State Environmental Agency for Pollution Control for particulate matter, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, besides air temperature and relative humidity. The data concerning pneumonia admissions were collected in the public health system of Sorocaba. Correlations between the variables of interest using Pearson cofficient were calculated. Models with lags from zero to five days after exposure to pollutants were performed to analyze the association between the exposure to environmental pollutants and hospital admissions. The analysis used the generalized linear model of Poisson regression, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: There were 1,825 admissions for pneumonia, with a daily mean of 2.5±2.1. There was a strong correlation between pollutants and hospital admissions, except for ozone. Regarding the Poisson regression analysis with the multi-pollutant model, only nitrogen dioxide was statistically significant in the same day (relative risk - RR=1.016), as well as particulate matter with a lag of four days (RR=1.009) after exposure to pollutants. CONCLUSIONS: There was an acute effect of exposure to nitrogen dioxide and a later effect of exposure to particulate matter on children hospitalizations for pneumonia in Sorocaba. PMID:24473956

  12. Heatwaves and Hospital Admissions for Mental Disorders in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Phan Minh; Rocklöv, Joacim; Giang, Kim Bao; Kullgren, Gunnar; Nilsson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Studies in high-income countries have shown an association between heatwaves and hospital admissions for mental disorders. It is unknown whether such associations exist in subtropical nations like Vietnam. The study aim was to investigate whether hospital admissions for mental disorders may be triggered, or exacerbated, by heat exposure and heatwaves, in a low- and middle-income country, Vietnam. For this, we used data from the Hanoi Mental Hospital over five years (2008–2012) to estimate the effect of heatwaves on admissions for mental disorders. A zero-inflated negative binomial regression model accounting for seasonality, time trend, days of week, and mean humidity was used to analyse the relationship. Heatwave events were mainly studied as periods of three or seven consecutive days above the threshold of 35°C daily maximum temperature (90th percentile). The study result showed heatwaves increased the risk for admission in the whole group of mental disorders (F00-79) for more persistent heatwaves of at least 3 days when compared with non-heatwave periods. The relative risks were estimated at 1.04 (0.95–1.13), 1.15 (1.005–1.31), and 1.36 (1–1.90) for a one-, three- and seven-day heatwave, respectively. Admissions for mental disorders increased among men, residents in rural communities, and the elderly population during heatwaves. The groups of organic mental disorders, including symptomatic illnesses (F0-9) and mental retardation (F70-79), had increased admissions during heatwaves. The findings are novel in their focus on heatwave impact on mental diseases in a population habituating in a subtropical low- and middle-income country characterized by rapid epidemiological transitions and environmental changes. PMID:27195473

  13. Hospital admission avoidance through the introduction of a virtual ward.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joanne; Carroll, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The ageing British population is placing increased demands on the delivery of care in mainstream health-care institutions. While people are living longer, a significant percentage is also living with one or more long-term conditions. These issues, alongside continuing financial austerity measures, require a radical improvement in the care of patients away from hospitals. The Wyre Forest Clinical Commissioning Group introduced a virtual ward model for two main purposes: to save on spiralling costs of hospital admissions, and, secondly, to ensure the preferred wishes of most patients to be cared for and even die at home were achieved. This commentary describes how the virtual ward model was implemented and the impact of preventing unplanned emergency admissions to hospitals. The setting up of enhanced care services and virtual wards in one county is discussed, aiming to highlight success points and potential pitfalls to avoid. The results from the implementation of the virtual ward model show a significant reduction in emergency and avoidable patient admissions to hospital. The success of virtual wards is dependent on integrated working between different health-care disciplines.

  14. [Big data, Roemer's law and avoidable hospital admissions].

    PubMed

    van der Horst, H E

    2016-01-01

    From an analysis of data from 23 European countries to determine the impact of primary care on avoidable hospital admissions for uncontrolled diabetes it appeared that, contrary to expectation, countries with strong primary care did not have a lower rate of avoidable hospital admission. It is clear that Roemer's law, 'a bed built is a bed filled,' still applies. However, the validity of this sort of analysis can be questioned, as these data are highly aggregated, and registration quality differs between countries. It is also questionable if these datasets can be considered as 'big data' as there are relatively small numbers per country. Big data analyses are useful for discerning patterns and formulating hypotheses, but not for proving causality. An unwanted side effect of this kind of analysis might be that policymakers use these not so valid results to underpin their policy to their advantage. PMID:27484429

  15. Outpatient admissions and hospital costs of Syrian refugees in a Turkish university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tahirbegolli, Bernard; Çavdar, Sabanur; Sümer, Esin Çetinkaya; Akdeniz, Sıdıka I.; Vehid, Suphi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the most frequent admitted polyclinics, diagnoses, and the costs of Syrian refugee patient in a Turkish university hospital in the metropolitan city of Istanbul, Western part of Turkey. Methods: Research methodology consist of analyzing outpatient admissions to the Hospital Polyclinics of Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey from January-June 2014. We carried out diagnosis groups as classified in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, Australian Modification, and analyzed the hospital cost of first admission through records based in the hospital information system. Results: Median age of 251 Syrian refugee patients is 19 years, inter quartile rate 7-34 years. Patients aged 65 and older compared with those until 18 years and 19 to 64 years aged groups have made statistically significant (p<0.001) less hospital admissions. The Most frequented clinic was the emergency clinic. On June there have been significantly (p<0.001) more admissions compared with other months. The most common diagnoses were diseases of the respiratory system. The costs of per admission was estimated nearly 48 US Dollar/per patient and the total amount of hospital admissions was 12,031.93 US Dollar. Conclusion: On the specified dates, the clinics were mostly frequented from Syrian refugees until 18 years group. The most common presenting symptoms are respiratory diseases and most frequented clinic is emergency. PMID:27381545

  16. Admission avoidance and early discharge of acute hospital admissions: an accident and emergency based scheme

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, C; Whitwell, D; Sarsfield, B; Maimaris, C

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To validate an accident and emergency (A&E) based approach to assisting early discharge or avoiding admission to acute hospital beds by means of two separate teams, one in hospital and the other in the community, working closely together at the interface between primary and secondary health care. Design—A purpose designed admission avoidance (AA) team was established in the A&E department, and a target group of patients identified whose admissions might be avoided or curtailed. A rapid response community team (RRCT) based in Cambridge was also established to provide basic health care to patients in their homes after discharge from hospital. The key elements of the project were rapid assessment, careful selection of patients, early decision making at senior level, and close liaison with the community team. Results—During the first year (1999) of the project the AA team assessed 785 patients and 257 patients were eventually discharged home to the care of the RRCT. Of these, 149 patients (58%) were comparable to a historical control group (from 1997/98), with regard to their demographic and clinical characteristics and care needs, and had an average length of hospital stay of 1.7 days compared with 6.3 days for the control group. The remaining 108 patients were not directly comparable but were supported by the teams because the benefits were clear and exclusion would have been unethical. These patients had an average length of stay of seven days. The readmission rate was 3 of 257(1.2%) for the intervention group and 8 of 531(1.5%) for the control group. A limited patient satisfaction survey among patients cared for at home revealed that 97% of patients were "satisfied to very satisfied" with the care provided. The RRCT had also looked after an additional 194 patients from other sources (total = 451), including postoperative orthopaedic early discharges from an adjacent hospital. The average length of care at home by the RRCT for all 451 patients was 6

  17. Drug related hospital admissions in subspecialities of internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Hallas, J

    1996-04-01

    It is well established in the literature that adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug non-compliance contribute substantially to the admissions at medical wards. Some important questions, however, remain unanswered. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise the drug-related hospital admissions (DRH) and to assess the magnitude of the problem seen in relation to the demographic parameters and drug use of the background population. In addition, an attempt was made to reduce the DRH incidence by an intervention program. The scope of the study program was adverse drug reactions, intended self-poisoning, non-compliance, underdosing and interactions. The material included 1999 admissions to six departments of internal medicine at Odense University Hospital. The patients were reviewed prospectively, while they were still in the wards, but use of standardised criteria fOR assessment of drug-ADR causality. With inclusion of a definite, probable and possible causal relationship, ADRs and toxic reactions were found as an important factor in 8.4% of all admissions. The incidense of ADR related admissions was 400 per 100,000 per year for the background population as a whole, but showing a strong increase with age. The drug-specific ADR incidences were generally small compared to the drug sales figures. Non-compliance contributed to 2.0% of admissions with diuretics and anti-asthmatics as the drugs most frequently involved. Two departments were re-investigated after an intervention program, primarily targetting general practitioners. The over-all incidence of DRHs was unaffected by the intervention, but the subset classified as avoidable DRHs showed a significant decline. The case material was subject to a blinded evaluation by an external peer group using the same criteria as the investigators. There was no indication that the observed decline in avoidable DRHs should be explained by a shift in the investigators' assessment of cases. It was concluded that the intervention

  18. Incidence of “never events” among weekend admissions versus weekday admissions to US hospitals: national analysis

    PubMed Central

    Attenello, Frank J; Cen, Steven Y; Ng, Alvin; Kim-Tenser, May; Sanossian, Nerses; Amar, Arun P; Mack, William J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between weekend admission to hospital and 11 hospital acquired conditions recently considered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid as “never events” for which resulting healthcare costs are not reimbursed. Design National analysis. Setting US Nationwide Inpatient Sample discharge database. Participants 351 million patients discharged from US hospitals, 2002-10. Main outcome measures Univariate rates and multivariable likelihood of hospital acquired conditions among patients admitted on weekdays versus weekends, as well as the impacts of these events on prolonged length of stay and total inpatient charges. Results From 2002 to 2010, 351 170 803 patients were admitted to hospital, with 19% admitted on a weekend. Hospital acquired conditions occurred at an overall frequency of 4.1% (5.7% among weekend admissions versus 3.7% among weekday admissions). Adjusting for patient and hospital cofactors the probability of having one or more hospital acquired conditions was more than 20% higher in weekend admissions compared with weekday admissions (odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.24 to 1.26, P<0.01). Hospital acquired conditions have a negative impact on both hospital charges and length of stay. At least one hospital acquired condition was associated with an 83% (1.83, 1.77 to 1.90, P<0.01) likelihood of increased charges and 38% likelihood of prolonged length of stay (1.38, 1.36 to 1.41, P<0.01). Conclusion Weekend admission to hospital is associated with an increased likelihood of hospital acquired condition, cost, and length of stay. Future protocols and staffing regulations must be tailored to the requirements of this high risk subgroup. PMID:25876878

  19. Health conditions in a cohort of New Zealand Vietnam veterans: hospital admissions between 1988 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian; Broughton, John; Tong, Darryl

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To inform the provision of support to veterans by analysing hospital discharge data, thereby identifying which conditions show an excess risk, require specific management strategies and deserve further investigation. Setting Tertiary level care, including all public and private New Zealand hospitals. Participants All New Zealand Vietnam veterans with service between 1964 and 1972. Primary outcome measures Standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHRs) were calculated based on the number of first observed hospital admissions for a condition, those expected being based on New Zealand national hospitalisation rates. Results The SHR for all causes of hospitalisation was 1.18, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.21, with modest increases for the major common causes, cardio and cerebrovascular disease. Admission rates for chronic renal failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were highest in the 2006–2009 time period. The highest statistically significant hospitalisation risk was for alcohol-related mental disorder, SHR 1.91, 99% CI 1.39 to 2.43. Conclusions Chronic renal failure has limited attribution to veteran service but along with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has the potential to have high costs both to the individual and the health system. We suggest that routine surveillance of veterans by way of a ‘flag’ in national and primary care databases would facilitate the recognition of service-related conditions and the appropriate provision of healthcare. PMID:26656012

  20. Herpes Zoster Associated Hospital Admissions in Italy: Review of the Hospital Discharge Forms

    PubMed Central

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Serenelli, Carlotta; Cavallaro, Alessandra; Ragni, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    In Italy a specific surveillance system for zoster does not exist, and thus updated and complete epidemiological data are lacking. The objective of this study was to retrospectively review the national hospital discharge forms database for the period 1999–2005 using the code ICD9-CM053. In the period 1999–2005, 35,328 hospital admissions have been registered with annual means of 4,503 hospitalizations and 543 day-hospital admissions. The great part of hospitalizations (61.9%) involved subjects older than 65 years; the mean duration of stay was 8 days. These data, even if restricted to hospitalizations registered at national level, confirm the epidemiological impact of shingles and of its complications. PMID:19826547

  1. Economic recession and headache-related hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Chinta, Ravi; Rao, M B; Narendran, Vivek; Malla, Ganesh; Joshi, Hem

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of headaches across different regions and its relationship to unemployment rates in the United States before and during an economic recession was evaluated. Years 2008 and 2009 were determined as recessionary period. Headache-related admissions, particularly the uncomplicated headaches, increased significantly during recession. Proportion of women with headaches has increased and the age group of 25-54 years was the most affected during the recession. The hospital charges have increased even though the average length and charge of stay decreased. These findings are consistent with our understanding of effects of stress and unemployment on psychological and physical health.

  2. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services.

  3. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services. PMID:11781909

  4. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  5. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  6. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia requiring admission to hospital.

    PubMed

    Klimek, J J; Ajemian, E; Fontecchio, S; Gracewski, J; Klemas, B; Jimenez, L

    1983-06-01

    Patients who develop bacterial pneumonia in the community often require admission to acute-care hospitals. Knowledge of the incidence of pneumonia due to different pathogens that are brought into an institution from the community may play a role in determining the patterns of infecting organisms responsible for hospital-acquired pneumonia. For 1 year, we prospectively reviewed the records of patients admitted to our 1000-bed community hospital with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Patients had clinical signs and symptoms, positive radiologic findings, and pure cultures of potential pathogens from sputum, blood, pleural fluid, lung aspirate, lung biopsy, or transtracheal aspirate. Pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed by serum indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) titer greater than or equal to 1:256 and clinical signs and symptoms along with response to erythromycin. Of 204 patients with bacterial pneumonia, the following pathogens were implicated: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus species, L. pneumophila, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, oral anaerobic bacteria, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and others. Most patients were more than 50 years of age and many had evidence of underlying pulmonary disease. The etiology of CABP may not be as predictable as in the past. Empiric antimicrobial therapy for CABP should include agents with activity against the pathogens prevalent in the community.

  7. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  8. Association between annual river flood pulse and paediatric hospital admissions in the Mekong Delta area.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung; Huang, Cunrui; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia; Wang, Xiaoming; Nguyen, Minh

    2014-11-01

    The Mekong Delta is the most vulnerable region to extreme climate and hydrological conditions however the association between these conditions and children's health has been little studied. We examine the association between annual river flood pulse and paediatric hospital admissions in a Vietnam Mekong Delta city. Daily paediatric hospital admissions (PHA) were collected from the City Paediatric Hospital, and daily river water level (RWL) and meteorological data were retrieved from the Southern Regional Hydro-Meteorological Centre from 2008 to 2011. We evaluated the association between annual river flood pulse (>=90th percentile of RWL) and PHA using the Poisson distributed lag model, controlling for temperature, relative humidity, day of week, seasonal and long-term trends. The seasonal pattern of PHA was examined using harmonic and polynomial regression models. The cumulative risk ratios estimated for a 15-day period following an extreme RWL was 1.26 (95%CI, 1.2-1.38) for all age groups, 1.27 (95%CI, 1.23-1.30) for under five-years and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.07-1.20) for school-aged children, 1.24 (95%CI, 1.21-1.27) for all-causes, 1.18 (95%CI, 1.12-1.21) for communicable infection, 1.66 (95%CI, 1.57-1.74) for respiratory infection and 1.06 (95%CI, 1.01-1.1) for other diseases. The peak PHA risk is in the September-October period corresponding to the highest RWL, and the PHA-RWL association was modified by temperature. An increase in PHA is significantly associated with annual river flood, and the pattern of PHA is seasonally correspondent to the RWL. These findings combined with projected changes in climate conditions suggest important implications of climate change for human health in the Mekong Delta region. PMID:25282279

  9. Association between annual river flood pulse and paediatric hospital admissions in the Mekong Delta area.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung; Huang, Cunrui; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia; Wang, Xiaoming; Nguyen, Minh

    2014-11-01

    The Mekong Delta is the most vulnerable region to extreme climate and hydrological conditions however the association between these conditions and children's health has been little studied. We examine the association between annual river flood pulse and paediatric hospital admissions in a Vietnam Mekong Delta city. Daily paediatric hospital admissions (PHA) were collected from the City Paediatric Hospital, and daily river water level (RWL) and meteorological data were retrieved from the Southern Regional Hydro-Meteorological Centre from 2008 to 2011. We evaluated the association between annual river flood pulse (>=90th percentile of RWL) and PHA using the Poisson distributed lag model, controlling for temperature, relative humidity, day of week, seasonal and long-term trends. The seasonal pattern of PHA was examined using harmonic and polynomial regression models. The cumulative risk ratios estimated for a 15-day period following an extreme RWL was 1.26 (95%CI, 1.2-1.38) for all age groups, 1.27 (95%CI, 1.23-1.30) for under five-years and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.07-1.20) for school-aged children, 1.24 (95%CI, 1.21-1.27) for all-causes, 1.18 (95%CI, 1.12-1.21) for communicable infection, 1.66 (95%CI, 1.57-1.74) for respiratory infection and 1.06 (95%CI, 1.01-1.1) for other diseases. The peak PHA risk is in the September-October period corresponding to the highest RWL, and the PHA-RWL association was modified by temperature. An increase in PHA is significantly associated with annual river flood, and the pattern of PHA is seasonally correspondent to the RWL. These findings combined with projected changes in climate conditions suggest important implications of climate change for human health in the Mekong Delta region.

  10. Effectiveness of the influenza vaccine in preventing admission to hospital and death in people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vamos, Eszter P.; Pape, Utz J.; Curcin, Vasa; Harris, Matthew J.; Valabhji, Jonathan; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background: The health burden caused by seasonal influenza is substantial. We sought to examine the effectiveness of influenza vaccination against admission to hospital for acute cardiovascular and respiratory conditions and all-cause death in people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using primary and secondary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink in England, over a 7-year period between 2003/04 and 2009/10. We enrolled 124 503 adults with type 2 diabetes. Outcome measures included admission to hospital for acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, heart failure or pneumonia/influenza, and death. We fitted Poisson regression models for influenza and off-season periods to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) for cohorts who had and had not received the vaccine. We used estimates for the summer, when influenza activity is low, to adjust for residual confounding. Results: Study participants contributed to 623 591 person-years of observation during the 7-year study period. Vaccine recipients were older and had more comorbid conditions compared with nonrecipients. After we adjusted for covariates and residual confounding, vaccination was associated with significantly lower admission rates for stroke (IRR 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53–0.91), heart failure (IRR 0.78, 95% CI 0.65–0.92) and pneumonia or influenza (IRR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74–0.99), as well as all-cause death (IRR 0.76, 95% CI 0.65–0.83), and a nonsignificant change for acute MI (IRR 0.81, 95% CI 0.62–1.04) during the influenza seasons. Interpretation: In this cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes, influenza vaccination was associated with reductions in rates of admission to hospital for specific cardiovascular events. Efforts should be focused on improvements in vaccine uptake in this important target group as part of comprehensive secondary prevention. PMID:27455981

  11. Association between air pollution and hospital admission: Case study at three monitoring stations in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahari, Marina; Zin@Ibrahim, Wan Zawiah Wan; Ismail, Noriszura; Ni, Tan Hui

    2014-06-01

    The relationships between the exposure of pollutants towards hospitalized admission and mortality have been identified in several studies on Asian cities such as Taipei, Bangkok and Tokyo. In Malaysia, evidence on the health risks associated with exposure to pollutants is limited. In this study, daily time-series data were analysed to estimate risks of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalized admissions associated with particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ozone concentrations in Klang Valley during 2004-2009. Daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes were obtained from eleven hospitals while pollutants data were taken from several air quality monitoring stations located nearest to the hospitals. These data were fitted with Generalised Additive Poisson regression models. Additionally, temperature, humidity, and time data were also included to allow for potential effect of weather and time-varying influences on hospital admissions. CO showed the most significant (P < 0.05) relationship to cardiovascular admissions. An increment of 1 ppm in CO predicted an increase of 4% to 20% in cardiovascular admissions. Respiratory admissions were associated with PM10, which had about 1% increase in risk of admission per 10 ug/m3 increment in PM10. Exposure to CO and PM10 increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses in Klang Valley, Malaysia.

  12. Counting the cost of diabetic hospital admissions from a multi-ethnic population in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Gulliford, M C; Ariyanayagam-Baksh, S M; Bickram, L; Picou, D; Mahabir, D

    1995-12-01

    Many middle-income countries are experiencing an increase in diabetes mellitus but patterns of morbidity and resource use from diabetes in developing countries have not been well described. We evaluated hospital admission with diabetes among different ethnic groups in Trinidad. We compiled a register of all patients with diabetes admitted to adult medical, general surgical, and ophthalmology wards at Port of Spain Hospital, Trinidad. During 26 weeks, 1447 patients with diabetes had 1722 admissions. Annual admission rates, standardized to the World Population, for the catchment population aged 30-64 years were 1031 (95% CI 928 to 1134) per 100,000 in men and 1354 (1240 to 1468) per 100,000 in women. Compared with the total population, admission rates were 33% higher in the Indian origin population and 47% lower in those of mixed ethnicity. The age-standardized rate of amputation with diabetes in the general population aged 30-64 years was 54 (37 to 71) per 100,000. The hospital admission fatality rate was 8.9% (95%CI 7.6% to 10.2%). Mortality was associated with increasing age, admission with hyperglycaemia, elevated serum creatinine, cardiac failure or stroke and with lower-limb amputation during admission. Diabetes accounted for 13.6% of hospital admissions and 23% of hospital bed occupancy. Admissions associated with disorders of blood glucose control or foot problems accounted for 52% of diabetic hospital bed occupancy. The annual cost of admissions with diabetes was conservatively estimated at TT+ 10.66 million (UK 1.24 million pounds). In this community diabetes admission rates were high and varied according to the prevalence of diabetes. Admissions, fatalities and resource use were associated with acute and chronic complications of diabetes. Investing in better quality preventive clinical care for diabetes might provide an economically advantageous policy for countries like Trinidad and Tobago.

  13. Impact of Hospital Admission Care At a Pediatric Unit: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Macías, Marta; Zornoza, Carmen; Rodriguez, Elena; García, José A; Fernández, José A; Luque, Rafaela; Collado, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The time of admission to a hospital, especially when unplanned, has been reported as the most stressful moment of hospitalization for both parents and children (Odievre, 2001). This qualitative study explored parents and hospital staff's perceptions and experiences related to the process of admission to a pediatric unit. Focus groups, two with parents (total n = 12) and one with health care professionals (n = 6), were conducted, and content analysis inspired by Graneheim and Lundman (2004) was performed. Parents identified four categories of perceptions: 1) management of an uncertain situation at the time of admission, 2) feelings related to the child's illness, 3) parent perception of professional's performance, and 4) parent experience of their role. Health care professionals identified two categories: 1) hospital admission as a continuous care process, and 2) undertaking improvements in the admission process. A common theme emerged about the importance of parents' trust in professionals in order to build a therapeutic relationship. Findings underscore the need for strategies to improve the hospital pediatric admission process based on a parent-professional relationship of trust and confidence through continuous quality communication and support. These strategies would include providing a nurse in charge of the admission process to assure continuity of care throughout the child's hospitalization.

  14. The effects of the 2009 dust storm on emergency admissions to a hospital in Brisbane, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Adrian G.; Fraser, John F.; Munck, Lynette

    2012-07-01

    In September 2009 an enormous dust storm swept across eastern Australia. Dust is potentially hazardous to health as it interferes with breathing, and previous dust storms have been linked to increased risks of asthma and even death. We examined whether the 2009 Australian dust storm changed the volume or characteristics of emergency admissions to hospital. We used an observational study design, using time series analyses to examine changes in the number of admissions, and case-only analyses to examine changes in the characteristics of admissions. The admission data were from the Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, between 1 January 2009 and 31 October 2009. There was a 39% increase in emergency admissions associated with the storm (95% confidence interval: 5, 81%), which lasted for just 1 day. The health effects of the storm could not be detected using particulate matter levels. We found no significant change in the characteristics of admissions during the storm; specifically, there was no increase in respiratory admissions. The dust storm had a short-lived impact on emergency hospital admissions. This may be because the public took effective avoidance measures, or because the dust was simply not toxic, being composed mainly of soil. Emergency departments should be prepared for a short-term increase in admissions during dust storms.

  15. The effects of the 2009 dust storm on emergency admissions to a hospital in Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Adrian G; Fraser, John F; Munck, Lynette

    2012-07-01

    In September 2009 an enormous dust storm swept across eastern Australia. Dust is potentially hazardous to health as it interferes with breathing, and previous dust storms have been linked to increased risks of asthma and even death. We examined whether the 2009 Australian dust storm changed the volume or characteristics of emergency admissions to hospital. We used an observational study design, using time series analyses to examine changes in the number of admissions, and case-only analyses to examine changes in the characteristics of admissions. The admission data were from the Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, between 1 January 2009 and 31 October 2009. There was a 39% increase in emergency admissions associated with the storm (95% confidence interval: 5, 81%), which lasted for just 1 day. The health effects of the storm could not be detected using particulate matter levels. We found no significant change in the characteristics of admissions during the storm; specifically, there was no increase in respiratory admissions. The dust storm had a short-lived impact on emergency hospital admissions. This may be because the public took effective avoidance measures, or because the dust was simply not toxic, being composed mainly of soil. Emergency departments should be prepared for a short-term increase in admissions during dust storms.

  16. Impact of rotavirus disease in Spain: an estimate of hospital admissions due to rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Visser, L E; Cano Portero, R; Gay, N J; Martínez Navarro, J F

    1999-01-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infection in Spain was investigated using information from existing surveillance systems. Reports from laboratories and data on hospital admissions were used to estimate the number of hospital admissions due to rotavirus infection. Between January 1989 and December 1995 there were 8265 reports of rotavirus identification in the Sistema de Información Microbiológica, a voluntary national laboratory surveillance system. Where age was reported, 89.2% were in children under 5 y old. This represents 21.8% of all pathogens identified in faecal specimens in children of this age group. Between January and December 1994 there were 5639 admissions coded as "infectious intestinal disease" and 8225 as "non-infective gastroenteritis" in children under 5 y of age in the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos, an obligatory hospital admissions surveillance system which covers 83% of public hospitals. Using regression analysis of admission data and laboratory reports it was estimated that rotavirus infection accounted for 3519 (25.3%) of the hospital admissions. We estimate that 4239 admissions attributable to rotavirus occurred in children under 5 y of age in Spain in 1994, a rate of 2.5/1000 population in this age group. These estimates are lower than those published for other countries, where the burden of disease is considered high enough to warrant a national vaccination programme. A cost-effectiveness study with Spanish information is essential before embarking on a national vaccination programme. PMID:10088916

  17. The association between depressive symptoms in the community, non-psychiatric hospital admission and hospital outcomes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prina, A. Matthew; Cosco, Theodore D.; Dening, Tom; Beekman, Aartjan; Brayne, Carol; Huisman, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to systematically review observational studies that have analysed whether depressive symptoms in the community are associated with higher general hospital admissions, longer hospital stays and increased risk of re-admission. Methods We identified prospective studies that looked at depressive symptoms in the community as a risk factor for non-psychiatric general hospital admissions, length of stay or risk of re-admission. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library Database, and followed up with contact with authors and scanning of reference lists. Results Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and all were deemed to be of moderate to high quality. Meta-analysis of seven studies with relevant data suggested that depressive symptoms may be a predictor of subsequent admission to a general hospital in unadjusted analyses (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.28–1.44), but findings after adjustment for confounding variables were inconsistent. The narrative synthesis also reported depressive symptoms to be independently associated with longer length of stay, and higher re-admission risk. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation, longer length of stay and a higher re-admission risk. Some of these associations may be mediated by other factors, and should be explored in more details. PMID:25466985

  18. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  19. Concordance of effects of medical interventions on hospital admission and readmission rates with effects on mortality

    PubMed Central

    Hemkens, Lars G.; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Despina G.; Ioannidis, John P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many clinical trials examine a composite outcome of admission to hospital and death, or infer a relationship between hospital admission and survival benefit. This assumes concordance of the outcomes “hospital admission” and “death.” However, whether the effects of a treatment on hospital admissions and readmissions correlate to its effect on serious outcomes such as death is unknown. We aimed to assess the correlation and concordance of effects of medical interventions on admission rates and mortality. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from its inception to January 2012 (issue 1, 2012) for systematic reviews of treatment comparisons that included meta-analyses for both admission and mortality outcomes. For each meta-analysis, we synthesized treatment effects on admissions and death, from respective randomized trials reporting those outcomes, using random-effects models. We then measured the concordance of directions of effect sizes and the correlation of summary estimates for the 2 outcomes. Results: We identified 61 meta-analyses including 398 trials reporting mortality and 182 trials reporting admission rates; 125 trials reported both outcomes. In 27.9% of comparisons, the point estimates of treatment effects for the 2 outcomes were in opposite directions; in 8.2% of trials, the 95% confidence intervals did not overlap. We found no significant correlation between effect sizes for admission and death (Pearson r = 0.07, p = 0.6). Our results were similar when we limited our analysis to trials reporting both outcomes. Interpretation: In this metaepidemiological study, admission and mortality outcomes did not correlate, and discordances occurred in about one-third of the treatment comparisons included in our analyses. Both outcomes convey useful information and should be reported separately, but extrapolating the benefits of admission to survival is unreliable and should be avoided. PMID:24144601

  20. Centre-related variability in hospital admissions of patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca; Pérez-Vicente, Sabina; Carmona, Loreto; Vela, Paloma

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the variability in hospital admissions of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) in Spain, and the centre factors that may influence that variability. Descriptive cross-sectional study, part of the emAR II study, performed in Spain (2009-2010). Health records of patients with a diagnosis of SpA and at least one visit to the rheumatology units within the previous 2 years were reviewed. Variables related to hospital admissions, to the SpA, and to the patient and centre were collected. A multilevel logistic regression analysis of random intercept with non-random slopes was performed to assess variability between centres. From 45 centres, 1168 patients' health records were reviewed. Main SpA forms were ankylosing spondylitis (55.2 %) and psoriatic arthritis (22.2 %). A total of 248 admissions were registered for 196 patients (19.2 %, n = 1020). An adjusted variability of 17.6 % in hospitalizations between centres was noted. The following hospital-related factors showed a significant association with admissions: the total number of admissions of the centre, the existence of electronic admission, and the availability of ultrasound in rheumatology. However, these factors only explained 42.9 % of the inter-centre variability. The risk of a patient with SpA of being admitted could double (median OR 2.09), depending on the hospital where the patient was being managed. Hospital admissions of patients with SpA varied between hospitals due to centre characteristics. Further studies are needed to ascertain which specific factors may be causing the variation, as studied variables explained less than half of the variability.

  1. Temporal dynamics of emergency department and hospital admissions of pediatric asthmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel; Levine, Elissa; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila R.; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that can result in exacerbations leading to urgent care in emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals. We examined seasonal and temporal trends in pediatric asthma ED (1997-1999) and hospital (1986-1999) admission data so as to identify periods of increased risk of urgent care by age group, gender, and race. All pediatric ED and hospital admission data for Maryland residents occurring within the state of Maryland were evaluated. Distinct peaks in pediatric ED and hospital asthma admissions occurred each year during the winter-spring and autumn seasons. Although the number and timing of these peaks were consistent across age and racial groups, the magnitude of the peaks differed by age and race. The same number, timing, and relative magnitude of the major peaks in asthma admissions occurred statewide, implying that the variables affecting these seasonal patterns of acute asthma exacerbations occur statewide. Similar gross seasonal trends are observed worldwide. Although several environmental, infectious, and psychosocial factors have been linked with increases in asthma exacerbations among children, thus far they have not explained these seasonal patterns of admissions. The striking temporal patterns of pediatric asthma admissions within Maryland, as described here, provide valuable information in the search for causes.

  2. User fee exemption does not affect lower rates of hospital admission of girls in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Suzuki, Motoi; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Matsubayashi, Toru; Yanai, Hideki; Tho, Le Huu; Anh, Dang Duc; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2012-10-01

    In many countries, girls have been reported to be less often admitted to hospital than boys. We studied the influence of socio-economic factors, education and access to health care on girls' and boys' admission rates for pneumonia, diarrhoea and dengue fever in south-central Vietnam. We explored whether the user fee exemption for children under 6 years introduced in 2005 had an impact on girls' admission rates. In a cohort analysis, we used data from a large census in Khanh Hoa Province conducted in 2006, linked to hospital admission records at individual level. We further analysed a cross-sectional health care utilization survey in a sample of children reported ill at the census. There were 38 731 children under 6 years among a total census population of 353 891. Overall, girls under the age of 6 years were 29% less likely to be admitted to hospital than boys. The gender differences in admission rates in children under 6 years were similar for diarrhoea, pneumonia and dengue. None of the socio-economic and educational factors appeared to affect the gender difference. The user fee exemption starting from October 2005 had no impact on the girls/boys rate ratio of admission. In conclusion, the higher hospital admission rates of boys compared with girls in Vietnam are independent of socio-economic factors and user fees. Higher susceptibility of boys to severe disease could explain part of the gender gap, but profound cultural norms and beliefs may also have contributed to the findings.

  3. Depression predicts future emergency hospital admissions in primary care patients with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Elspeth A.; Dickens, Chris; Blakemore, Amy; Watson, Jennifer; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Lovell, Karina; Afzal, Cara; Kapur, Navneet; Tomenson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objective More than 15 million people currently suffer from a chronic physical illness in England. The objective of this study was to determine whether depression is independently associated with prospective emergency hospital admission in patients with chronic physical illness. Method 1860 primary care patients in socially deprived areas of Manchester with at least one of four exemplar chronic physical conditions completed a questionnaire about physical and mental health, including a measure of depression. Emergency hospital admissions were recorded using GP records for the year before and the year following completion of the questionnaire. Results The numbers of patients who had at least one emergency admission in the year before and the year after completion of the questionnaire were 221/1411 (15.7%) and 234/1398 (16.7%) respectively. The following factors were independently associated with an increased risk of prospective emergency admission to hospital: having no partner (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.15); having ischaemic heart disease (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.46); having a threatening experience (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29); depression (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.40); and emergency hospital admission in the year prior to questionnaire completion (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.98 to 5.86). Conclusion To prevent potentially avoidable emergency hospital admissions, greater efforts should be made to detect and treat co-morbid depression in people with chronic physical illness in primary care, with a particular focus on patients who have no partner, have experienced threatening life events, and have had a recent emergency hospital admission. PMID:26919799

  4. The role of the asthma nurse in treatment compliance and self-management following hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Morice, A H; Wrench, C

    2001-11-01

    Effective self-management and treatment compliance is important in achieving good symptom control in asthma. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma nurse intervention during hospital admission could increase knowledge and improve self-management and whether this would influence the number of emergency call-out visits by Genera Practitioners (GPs) and hospital re-admissions. Patients with acute asthma (n=80) were assessed by the asthma nurse within 24 h of admission using a British Thoracic Society (BTS) guideline-based questionnaire. Main outcome measures were: know edge of inhalers, self-management plans, peak flow monitoring, recognition of worsening symptoms and appropriate emergency action, Following randomization, half received nurse intervention during hospitalization. All received a follow-up questionnaire 6 weeks post-discharge and again at 6 months (response rates 86% and 81% respectively). GPs were contacted by postal questionnaire after 4 months. Questionnaire responses indicated an increase in knowledge in the intervention group, along with an ability to identify appropriate action on worsening symptoms. Emergency GP call-outs were more frequent in the control group in the 4 months post-discharge. Hospital re-admission rates were similar in both groups. Asthma nurse intervention appeared to increase knowledge of asthma management, maintained throughout the study period, but had no significant impact on reducing re-admissions to hospital.

  5. Hospital admissions before the age of 2 years in Western Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Read, A W; Gibbins, J; Stanley, F J; Morich, P

    1994-01-01

    A linked data file of birth records and hospital admissions was used to investigate inpatient hospital morbidity before 2 years of age for all non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal children born in Western Australia in 1986. Of the non-Aboriginal children, 31.8% were admitted to hospital at least once before the age of 2 years, with an overall admission rate of 526/1000 live births; the corresponding figures for Aboriginal children were 68.7% and 2797. The mean number of days in hospital for each non-Aboriginal child admitted was 7.4, and 26.5 for Aboriginal children. Of the total cohort, 21% of non-Aboriginal and 20% of Aboriginal children were admitted only once, and 4% of non-Aboriginal and 36% of Aboriginal children were admitted at least three times; 23% of non-Aboriginal and 24% of Aboriginal children were admitted for only one major disease category, and 1% of non-Aboriginal and 16% of Aboriginal children were in at least four categories. The highest admission rates and highest percentages of the cohort admitted were for gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases and social admissions. These results illustrate the importance for both descriptive and analytical research of relating admissions to hospital for the total population to the individual child, and of using clinically relevant disease classifications. PMID:8135564

  6. Social networks enabled coordination model for cost management of patient hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we introduce a social networks enabled coordination model for exploring the effect of network position of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors in a patient-centered care network that evolves during patient hospitalization period on the total cost of coordination. An actor is a node, which represents an entity such as individual and organization in a social network. In our analysis of actor networks and coordination in the healthcare literature, we identified that there is significant gap where a number of promising hospital coordination model have been developed (e.g., Guided Care Model, Chronic Care Model) for the current healthcare system focusing on quality of service and patient satisfaction. The health insurance dataset for total hip replacement (THR) from hospital contribution fund, a prominent Australian Health Insurance Company, are analyzed to examine our proposed coordination model. We consider network attributes of degree, connectedness, in-degree, out-degree, and tie strength to measure network position of actors. To measure the cost of coordination for a particular hospital, average of total hospitalization expenses for all THR hospital admissions is used. Results show that network positions of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors considering all hospital admissions that a particular hospital has have effect on the average of total hospitalization expenses of that hospital. These results can be used as guidelines to set up a cost-effective healthcare practice structure for patient hospitalization expenses. PMID:23845132

  7. Social networks enabled coordination model for cost management of patient hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we introduce a social networks enabled coordination model for exploring the effect of network position of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors in a patient-centered care network that evolves during patient hospitalization period on the total cost of coordination. An actor is a node, which represents an entity such as individual and organization in a social network. In our analysis of actor networks and coordination in the healthcare literature, we identified that there is significant gap where a number of promising hospital coordination model have been developed (e.g., Guided Care Model, Chronic Care Model) for the current healthcare system focusing on quality of service and patient satisfaction. The health insurance dataset for total hip replacement (THR) from hospital contribution fund, a prominent Australian Health Insurance Company, are analyzed to examine our proposed coordination model. We consider network attributes of degree, connectedness, in-degree, out-degree, and tie strength to measure network position of actors. To measure the cost of coordination for a particular hospital, average of total hospitalization expenses for all THR hospital admissions is used. Results show that network positions of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors considering all hospital admissions that a particular hospital has have effect on the average of total hospitalization expenses of that hospital. These results can be used as guidelines to set up a cost-effective healthcare practice structure for patient hospitalization expenses.

  8. Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Raven, Maria C; Carrier, Emily R; Lee, Joshua; Billings, John C; Marr, Mollie; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2010-01-01

    Substance use (SU) disorders adversely impact health status and contribute to inappropriate health services use. This qualitative study sought to determine SU-related factors contributing to repeated hospitalizations and to identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Fifty Medicaid-insured inpatients identified by a validated statistical algorithm as being at high-risk for frequent hospitalizations were interviewed at an urban public hospital. Patient drug/alcohol history, experiences with medical, psychiatric and addiction treatment, and social factors contributing to readmission were evaluated. Three themes related to SU and frequent hospitalizations emerged: (a) barriers during hospitalization to planning long-term treatment and follow-up, (b) use of the hospital as a temporary solution to housing/family problems, and (c) unsuccessful SU aftercare following discharge. These data indicate that homelessness, brief lengths of stay complicating discharge planning, patient ambivalence regarding long-term treatment, and inadequate detox-to-rehab transfer resources compromise substance-using patients' likelihood of avoiding repeat hospitalization. Intervention targets included supportive housing, detox-to-rehab transportation, and postdischarge patient support.

  9. Air pollution and hospital admissions for asthma in a tropical city: Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Shang-Shyue Tsai; Meng-Hsuan Cheng; Hui-Fen Chiu; Trong-Neng Wu; Chun-Yuh Yang

    2006-07-15

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there is an association between air pollutants levels and hospital admissions for asthma in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for asthma and ambient air pollution data for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 1996 through 2003. The relative risk of hospital admission was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. In the single-pollutant models, on warm days ({>=}25{sup o}C) statistically significant positive associations were found in all pollutants except sulfur dioxide. On cool days ({<=} 25{sup o}C) all pollutants were significantly associated with asthma admissions. For the two pollutant models, CO and O{sub 3} were significant in combination with each of the other four pollutants on warm days. On cool days NO{sub 2} remained statistically significant in all the two-pollutant models. This study provides evidence that higher levels of ambient pollutants increase the risk of hospital admissions for asthma.

  10. Air pollution and emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Valencia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, F; Tenias, J; Perez-Hoyos, S

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To estimate the short-term association between air pollution levels and emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Valencia, within 1994-1996 period.
DESIGN—Daily levels of air pollution and emergency admissions for cardiovascular diseases were related to using an ecological time series design. The number of admissions was obtained from the hospital records database. Selected groups of causes were all cardiovascular diseases, heart admissions, and admissions for cerebrovascular diseases. The number of admissions for digestive diseases was used as control. Pollutants were black smoke, sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3). Magnitude of association was estimated by Poisson autoregresive regression. Estimations were calculated according the hottest (May to October) and the coldest (November to April) periods.
SETTING—City of Valencia, Spain, about 750 000 inhabitants.
PARTICIPANTS—People being admitted to the two major hospitals in the city, with a catchment area of nearly 400 000 inhabitants.
MAIN RESULTS—For the whole period, a significant association for SO2-24 h was found so a rise in its levels of 10 µg/m3 was associated with an increment of 3% (95%CI 0.4 to 5.7%) in the expected number of cardiovascular admissions. A significant association for black smoke, SO2-24 h, SO2-1 h, and CO-1 h was found in the hottest semester. All these associations were verified with a lag of two days. The estimates of the associations for particles, SO2, and CO were affected by the inclusion of the other pollutants in their models. NO2 was independently associated with cerebrovascular admissions. There were no significant associations between air pollution and admissions for digestive diseases.
CONCLUSIONS—Current levels of air pollution and emergency cardiovascular admissions are significantly related in Valencia.


Keywords: air pollution; cardiovascular disease

  11. Childhood Malaria Admission Rates to Four Hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Okiro, Emelda A.; Kazembe, Lawrence N.; Kabaria, Caroline W.; Ligomeka, Jeffrey; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Ali, Doreen; Snow, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions. Methods Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection. Results In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend P<0.05). At these hospitals clinical malaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from <6% across all sites in 2000 to maximum of 33% at one hospital site by 2010. Additionally, malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000–2010 across all sites. Discussion Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may

  12. Consultant input in acute medical admissions and patient outcomes in hospitals in England: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Derek; Lambourne, Adrian; Percival, Frances; Laverty, Anthony A; Ward, David K

    2013-01-01

    Recent recommendations for physicians in the UK outline key aspects of care that should improve patient outcomes and experience in acute hospital care. Included in these recommendations are Consultant patterns of work to improve timeliness of clinical review and improve continuity of care. This study used a contemporaneous validated survey compared with clinical outcomes derived from Hospital Episode Statistics, between April 2009 and March 2010 from 91 acute hospital sites in England to evaluate systems of consultant cover for acute medical admissions. Clinical outcomes studied included adjusted case fatality rates (aCFR), including the ratio of weekend to weekday mortality, length of stay and readmission rates. Hospitals that had an admitting Consultant presence within the Acute Medicine Unit (AMU, or equivalent) for a minimum of 4 hours per day (65% of study group) had a lower aCFR compared with hospitals that had Consultant presence for less than 4 hours per day (p<0.01) and also had a lower 28 day re-admission rate (p<0.01). An 'all inclusive' pattern of Consultant working, incorporating all the guideline recommendations and which included the minimum Consultant presence of 4 hours per day (29%) was associated with reduced excess weekend mortality (p<0.05). Hospitals with >40 acute medical admissions per day had a lower aCFR compared to hospitals with fewer than 40 admissions per day (p<0.03) and had a lower 7 day re-admission rate (p<0.02). This study is the first large study to explore the potential relationships between systems of providing acute medical care and clinical outcomes. The results show an association between well-designed systems of Consultant working practices, which promote increased patient contact, and improved patient outcomes in the acute hospital setting.

  13. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Background The UK government is pursuing policies to improve primary care access, as many patients visit accident and emergency (A and E) departments after being unable to get suitable general practice appointments. Direct admission to hospital via a general practitioner (GP) averts A and E use, and may reduce total hospital costs. It could also enhance the continuity of information between GPs and hospital doctors, possibly improving healthcare outcomes. Objective To determine whether primary care access is associated with the route of emergency admission—via a GP versus via an A and E department. Methods Retrospective analysis of national administrative data from English hospitals for 2011–2012. Adults admitted in an emergency (unscheduled) for ≥1 night via a GP or an A and E department formed the study population. The measure of primary care access—the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt—was derived from a large, nationally representative patient survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations, adjusting for patient and admission characteristics. Results The analysis included 2 322 112 emergency admissions (81.9% via an A and E department). With a 5 unit increase in the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt, the adjusted odds of GP admission (vs A and E admission) was estimated to increase by 15% (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.17). The probability of GP admission if ≥95% of appointment attempts were successful in each general practice was estimated to be 19.6%. This probability reduced to 13.6% when <80% of appointment attempts were successful. This equates to 139 673 fewer GP admissions (456 232 vs 316 559) assuming no change in the total number of admissions. Associations were consistent in direction across geographical regions of England. Conclusions Among hospital inpatients admitted as an emergency, patients

  14. Admission to psychiatric hospital in the early and late postpartum periods: Scottish national linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Langan Martin, Julie; McLean, Gary; Cantwell, Roch; Smith, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe weekly admission rates for affective and non-affective psychosis, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in the early and late postpartum periods. To assess the impact of socioeconomic status, age and parity on admission rates. Methods Scottish maternity records were linked to psychiatric hospital admissions. 3290 pregnancy-related psychiatric admissions were assessed. Weekly admission rates were calculated for the pregnancy period, early postpartum period (6 weeks after birth) and late postpartum period (up to 2 years after birth), and compared with pre-pregnancy rates (up to 2 years before pregnancy). Admission rates were generated by calculating the total number of admissions for each time period divided by the number of weeks in the period. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were generated for each time period, using deprivation, age, parity and record of previous psychiatric hospital care-adjusted Poisson regression models. Results Women from more deprived social quintiles accounted for the largest proportion of admissions across all time periods. Compared with pre-pregnancy period, admission rates fell during pregnancy, increased markedly during the early postpartum period, and remained elevated for 2 years after childbirth. Within the most affluent quintile, admission IRRs were higher in the early postpartum period (IRR=1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.59) than in the late postpartum period (IRR=0.87, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.98). For the late postpartum period, there was a positive association between higher maternal age and admission IRRs (ages 20–35 years, IRR=1.35, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.54 and age>40 years IRR=1.72, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.09). Conclusions Rates of psychiatric admission fell during pregnancy and increased in the early postpartum period (particularly during the first 2 weeks after birth), and remained elevated above baseline during the 2-year late postpartum period. An understanding of how social deprivation, age and parity

  15. A Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment predicts short- and long-term all-cause mortality in older hospitalized patients with transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Sancarlo, Daniele; Pilotto, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Copetti, Massimiliano; Longo, Maria Grazia; D'Ambrosio, Piero; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pilotto, Alberto

    2012-04-01

    A multidimensional impairment may influence the clinical outcome of acute diseases in older patients. The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) predicts short- and long-term all-cause mortality in older patients hospitalized for transient ischemic attack (TIA). In this prospective study with 1-year follow-up, 654 patients aged 65 and older with a diagnosis of TIA according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM 435.x) were enrolled. A standardized CGA that included information on functional (activities of daily living, ADL, and Instrumental ADL), cognitive status (Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire), nutrition (Mini Nutritional Assessment), risk of pressure sores (Exton-Smith Scale), comorbidities (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale), medications and co-habitation status was used to calculate the MPI for mortality using a previously validated algorithm. Higher MPI values were significantly associated with higher 1-month all-cause mortality (incidence rates: MPI-1 low risk = 0.32%, MPI-2 moderate risk = 5.36%, MPI-3 high risk = 10.42%; p < 0.001), 6-month all-cause mortality (MPI-1 = 1.95%, MPI-2 = 9.77%, MPI-3 = 27.22%; p < 0.001) and 12-month all-cause mortality (MPI-1 = 5.19%, MPI-2 = 16.47%, MPI-3 = 44.32%; p < 0.001). Age- and gender-adjusted Cox regression analyses demonstrated that MPI was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality. MPI showed a significant high discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.819, 95% CI = 0.749-0.888 for 1-month mortality, 0.799, 95% CI = 0.738-0.861 for 6-month mortality and 0.770, 95% CI = 0.716-0.824 for 12-month mortality. The MPI, calculated from information collected in a standardized CGA, appeared to be effective in estimating short- and long-term all-cause mortality in

  16. Hospital Admissions, Transfers and Costs of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Nikki; Lingsma, Hester F.; Vanrolleghem, Ann M.; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jacobs, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has a highly variable clinical course, leading to frequent transfers within and between hospitals and high associated costs. We defined the current admissions, transfers and costs in relation to disease severity of GBS. Methods Dutch neurologists were requested to report patients diagnosed with GBS between November 2009 and November 2010. Information regarding clinical course and transfers was obtained via neurologists and general practitioners. Results 87 GBS patients were included with maximal GBS disability score of 1 or 2 (28%), 3 or 4 (53%), 5 (18%) and 6 (1%). Four mildly affected GBS patients were not hospital admitted. Of the 83 hospitalized patients 68 (82%) were initially admitted at a neurology department, 4 (5%) at an ICU, 4 (5%) at pediatrics, 4 (5%) at pediatrics neurology and 3 (4%) at internal medicine. Median hospital stay was 17 days (IQR 11–26 days, absolute range 1–133 days). Transfers between departments or hospitals occurred in 33 (40%) patients and 25 (30%) were transferred 2 times or more. From a cost-effectiveness perspective 21 (25%) of the admissions was suboptimal. Median costs for hospital admission of GBS patients were 15,060 Euro (IQR 11,226–23,683). Maximal GBS disability score was significantly correlated with total length of stay, number of transfers, ICU admission and costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for GBS patients are highly heterogeneous, with frequent transfers and higher costs for those with more severe disease. Future research should aim to develop prediction models to early identify the most cost-effective allocation in individual patients. PMID:26859880

  17. Increased hospital admissions associated with extreme-heat exposure in King County, Washington, 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Tania Busch; Yost, Michael G.; Hom, Elizabeth K.; Ren, You; Lyons, Hilary; Fenske, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality have been associated with extreme heat events, particularly in temperate climates. Few epidemiologic studies have considered the impact of extreme heat events on hospitalization rates in the Pacific Northwest region. This study quantifies the historical (May to September 1990-2010) heat-morbidity relationship in the most populous Pacific Northwest County -King County, Washington. A relative risk (RR) analysis was used to explore the association between heat and all non-traumatic hospitalizations on 99th percentile heat days, while a time series analysis using a piece-wise linear model approximation was used to estimate the effect that heat’s intensity has on hospitalizations, adjusted for temporal trends and day of the week. A non-statistically significant 2% [95% CI: 1.02 (0.98, 1.05)] increase in hospitalization risk, on a heat day versus a non-heat day, was noted for all-ages, all non-traumatic causes. When considering the effect heat intensity has on admissions, we found a statistically significant 1.59% (95% CI: 0.9%, 2.29%) increase in admissions per degree increase in humidex above 37.4 °C. Admissions stratified by cause and age produced statistically significant results with both relative risk and time series analyses for nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure and natural heat exposure hospitalizations. This study demonstrates that heat, expressed as humidex, is associated with increased hospital admissions. When stratified by age and cause of admission, the non-elderly (less than 85) age groups experience significant risk for: nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure, natural heat exposure, COPD and asthma hospitalizations. PMID:25719287

  18. Hazards of Hospitalization: Residence Prior to Admission Predicts Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Mendelson, Daniel A.; Bingham, Karilee W.; McCann, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies investigating adverse outcomes of hospitalized elders have focused on community-dwelling patients. Given the rapid growth of populations living in other settings, such as assisted living facilities, it is important to understand whether these patients are at higher risk of experiencing specific adverse outcomes during…

  19. Hospital Pre-Admission Orientation and Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ramona L.

    1987-01-01

    The study examined effects of a physician-delivered orientation on patient satisfaction for a short hospital stay (3 days or less). Using a comparative study design, the researcher found that, when patients had an orientation, satisfaction with services improved, as did perception of the physician's professionalism. (Author/CH)

  20. Clinical Audit of COPD Patients Requiring Hospital Admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-Campos, Jose Luis; Álvarez-Martínez, Carlos J.; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Agüero, Ramón; Hueto, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Barrón, Manuel; Abraira, Victor; Forte, Anabel; Sanchez Nieto, Juan Miguel; Lopez-Gabaldón, Encarnación; Cosío, Borja G.; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD), assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients’ characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. Methodology/Principal Findings An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible) were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0–35%). Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0–62%) and 6.5% died (0–35%). The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0–50%). Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50%) addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. Conclusions/Significance The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement. PMID:22911875

  1. Involuntary admission to hospital and treatment in Ontario: is pessimism among physicians warranted?

    PubMed Central

    Menuck, M.; Littmann, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    In 1978 the Ontario Mental Health Act was revised to contain more specific and objective criteria for involuntary admission to hospital and treatment. The new requirements have elicited critical and pessimistic comments from psychiatrists and other physicians in Ontario. Two recent cases, described in this paper, indicate that the changes in the law have not obstructed good clinical care and treatment and may, in fact, be salutary to the management of patients who are involuntarily admitted to hospital. PMID:7074438

  2. Examining patient race and area predictors of inpatient admission for schizophrenia among hospital users in California.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna; Rudoler, David; Durbin, Janet; Laporte, Audrey; Callaghan, Russell C

    2014-12-01

    According to international research African-Caribbean and Black African populations have increased risk of hospitalization for schizophrenia, compared to Whites. Less is known about admission risk for other racial-ethnic groups. This study investigated racial-ethnic differences in hospital admission for schizophrenia in California. It also investigated the influence of area social factors (racial-ethnic neighborhood composition, and per capita income) and health service factors (presence of primary care clinics). The study sample included individuals admitted to a California hospital during 1990-2005 with a primary appendicitis related diagnosis, and without a prior or concurrent indication of schizophrenia. The adjusted logistic model examined how patient racial-ethnicity (White, Black, Hispanic, Other), other personal, area social characteristics and presence of primary care clinics influenced hospital admissions for schizophrenia. Black individuals were almost twice as likely as Whites to be admitted while Hispanics and Other race individuals were less to be admitted. In addition, male sex, having more comorbidities and living in areas with greater proportions of non-Whites increased risk. The increased risk for Blacks compared to Whites was consistent with the existing literature. However, this is among the first studies to report that Hispanics had a reduced risk of admission for schizophrenia, compared to Whites. Future studies may want to include a broader range of health services to better understand patterns of care use among individuals with schizophrenia.

  3. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear…

  4. The relationship of respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions to the southern California wildfires of 2003

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, R J; Brummel, S; Wu, J; Stern, H; Ostro, B; Lipsett, M; Winer, A; Street, D H; Zhang, L; Tjoa, T; Gillen, D L

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is limited information on the public health impact of wildfires. The relationship of cardiorespiratory hospital admissions (n = 40 856) to wildfire-related particulate matter (PM2.5) during catastrophic wildfires in southern California in October 2003 was evaluated. Methods Zip code level PM2.5 concentrations were estimated using spatial interpolations from measured PM2.5, light extinction, meteorological conditions, and smoke information from MODIS satellite images at 250 m resolution. Generalised estimating equations for Poisson data were used to assess the relationship between daily admissions and PM2.5, adjusted for weather, fungal spores (associated with asthma), weekend, zip code-level population and sociodemographics. Results Associations of 2-day average PM2.5 with respiratory admissions were stronger during than before or after the fires. Average increases of 70 μg/m3 PM2.5 during heavy smoke conditions compared with PM2.5 in the pre-wildfire period were associated with 34% increases in asthma admissions. The strongest wildfire-related PM2.5 associations were for people ages 65– 99 years (10.1% increase per 10 μg/m3 PM2.5, 95% CI 3.0% to 17.8%) and ages 0–4 years (8.3%, 95% CI 2.2% to 14.9%) followed by ages 20–64 years (4.1%, 95% CI 20.5% to 9.0%). There were no PM2.5–asthma associations in children ages 5–18 years, although their admission rates significantly increased after the fires. Per 10 μg/m3 wildfire-related PM2.5, acute bronchitis admissions across all ages increased by 9.6% (95% CI 1.8% to 17.9%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admissions for ages 20–64 years by 6.9% (95% CI 0.9% to 13.1%), and pneumonia admissions for ages 5–18 years by 6.4% (95% CI 21.0% to 14.2%). Acute bronchitis and pneumonia admissions also increased after the fires. There was limited evidence of a small impact of wildfire-related PM2.5 on cardiovascular admissions. Conclusions Wildfire-related PM2.5 led to increased respiratory

  5. The risk factors for hospital re-admission in medical patients in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, Moon Fai; Wong, Frances K Y

    2014-09-01

    Unplanned hospital re-admissions are common, expensive and often unpreventable in the community. The study aimed to identify risk factors associated with unplanned hospital re-admission in Singapore. In a cross-sectional survey, 1509 patients admitted to the medical wards of a large acute hospital in Singapore during 2010 were recruited (78.8% response rate), data being collected using a structured questionnaire based on the Andersen behavioural model underlying healthcare use. The dependent variable was re-admission within 28 days, with independent variables in the four areas of predisposing characteristics, needs, enabling resources and health behaviour. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to evaluate the risk factors associated with unplanned hospital re-admission. There were 222 inpatients re-admitted (14.7%) within 28 days and the final model showed that patients who were unemployed (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1-2.1) and had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.1-3.7) with abnormal respiratory patterns (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1-2.2) were more likely to be re-admitted. Less likely to be re-admitted were patients doing regular daily activities (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5-0.9), those assisted by a social worker (OR = 0.3; 95% CI = 0.2-0.6), those referred to other health professionals when sick (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.7) and those who had received health education programmes before discharge in the previous admission (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9). Unplanned re-admissions are a concern to healthcare providers because this suggests that patients are discharged with unresolved problems that reflect ineffective care in hospital. This study provides evidence to prompt more effective discharge educational care programmes that incorporate patients' enabling and need outcomes, thereby reducing re-admission rates. Community-based healthcare should play an important role in reducing patients' re-admission rates.

  6. Spatiotemporal relationship between particle air pollution and respiratory emergency hospital admissions in Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linping; Mengersen, Kerrie; Tong, Shilu

    2007-02-01

    The nature of spatial variation in the relationship between air pollution and health outcomes within a city remains an open and important question. This study investigated the spatial variability of particle matter air pollution and its association with respiratory emergency hospital admissions across six geographic areas in Brisbane, Australia. Data on particles of 10 microm or less in aerodynamic diameter per cubic metre (PM10), meteorological conditions, and daily respiratory emergency hospital admissions were obtained for the period of 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2001. A Poisson generalised linear model was used to estimate the specific effects of PM10 on respiratory emergency hospital admissions for each geographic area. A pooled effect of PM10 was then estimated using a meta-analysis approach for the whole city. The results of this study indicate that the magnitude of the association between particulate matter and respiratory emergency hospital admissions varied across different geographic areas in Brisbane. This relationship appeared to be stronger in areas with heavy traffic. We found an overall increase of 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-6.9%) in respiratory emergency hospital admissions associated with an increase of 10 microg /m3 in PM10 in the single pollutant model. The association was weaker but still statistically significant (an increase of 2.6%; 95% CI: 1.0-5.5%) after adjusting for O3, but did not appear to be affected by NO2. The effect estimates of PM10 were generally consistent for three spatial methods used in this study, but appeared to be underestimated if the spatial nature of the data was ignored. Therefore, the spatial variation in the relationship between PM10 and health outcomes needs to be considered when the health impact of air pollution is assessed, particularly for big cities.

  7. The impact of heat, cold, and heat waves on hospital admissions in eight cities in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Ji-Young; Bell, Michelle L.; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Although the impact of temperature on mortality is well documented, relatively fewer studies have evaluated the associations of temperature with morbidity outcomes such as hospital admissions, and most studies were conducted in North America or Europe. We evaluated weather and hospital admissions including specific causes (allergic disease, asthma, selected respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease) in eight major cities in Korea from 2003 to 2008. We also explored potential effect modification by individual characteristics such as sex and age. We used hierarchical modeling to first estimate city-specific associations between heat, cold, or heat waves and hospitalizations, and then estimated overall effects. Stratified analyses were performed by cause of hospitalization, sex, and age (0-14, 15-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years). Cardiovascular hospitalizations were significantly associated with high temperature, whereas hospitalizations for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease were significantly associated with low temperature. The overall heat effect for cardiovascular hospitalization was a 4.5 % (95 % confidence interval 0.7, 8.5 %) increase in risk comparing hospitalizations at 25 to 15 °C. For cold effect, the overall increase in risk of hospitalizations comparing 2 with 15 °C was 50.5 (13.7, 99.2 %), 43.6 (8.9, 89.5 %), and 53.6 % (9.8, 114.9 %) for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease, respectively. We did not find statistically significant effects of heat waves compared with nonheat wave days. Our results suggest susceptible populations such as women and younger persons. Our findings provide suggestive evidence that both high and low ambient temperatures are associated with the risk of hospital admissions, particularly in women or younger person, in Korea.

  8. Respiratory hospital admissions associated with PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache Valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Pope CA, I.I.I. )

    1991-03-01

    This study assessed the association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache valleys during April 1985 through March 1989. Utah and Salt Lake valleys had high levels of PM10 pollution that violated both the annual and 24-h standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Much lower PM10 levels occurred in the Cache Valley. Utah Valley experienced the intermittent operation of its primary source of PM10 pollution: an integrated steel mill. Bronchitis and asthma admissions for preschool-age children were approximately twice as frequent in Utah Valley when the steel mill was operating versus when it was not. Similar differences were not observed in Salt Lake or Cache valleys. Even though Cache Valley had higher smoking rates and lower temperatures in winter than did Utah Valley, per capita bronchitis and asthma admissions for all ages were approximately twice as high in Utah Valley. During the period when the steel mill was closed, differences in per capita admissions between Utah and Cache valleys narrowed considerably. Regression analysis also demonstrated a statistical association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution. The results suggest that PM10 pollution plays a role in the incidence and severity of respiratory disease.

  9. Air pollution and hospital admissions in Southern Ontario: the acid summer haze effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.V.; Sizto, R.

    1987-08-01

    Air pollution data from 17 sampling stations between Windsor and Peterborough in Southern Ontario, for January, February, July, and August in 1974 and 1976 to 1983, have been analyzed. Each station reported O/sub 3/, NO/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/, and the coefficient of haze (COH) every hour and aerosol sulfates for a 24-hr period every sixth day using glass-fiber filters. Data on mean daily temperature and relative humidity for the region were also recorded. It is shown that there are high correlations between different pollutants and between these and temperature in the summer. In the summer, sulfate levels were significantly correlated with relative humidity. In winter, the highest correlation was between COH and NO/sub 2/. Over the 9-year period, SO/sub 2/ levels in both winter and summer have fallen considerably; there have been no significant trends in O/sub 3/, NO/sub 3/, or COH data. Aerosol sulfates increased between 1976 and 1980 in both summer and winter and have since declined slightly. Hospital admission data for the 79 acute care hospitals serving the region, which contains about 5.9 million people, have been analyzed on a daily basis for the same months of the same years. Total admissions and total respiratory admissions have declined about 15% over the period, but asthma admissions appear to have risen. The asthma category of admissions is complicated by the effects of a change in ICD coding in 1979. It has been shown that significant correlations exist between O/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, SO/sub 2/, and temperature, on the one hand, and deviations from the mean respiratory admissions for that day of the week, for that season, for that year, on the other. These correlations exist if asthma is excluded from the diagnoses. In winter, asthma admissions are correlated with temperature only. A group of nonrespiratory conditions showed no correlations with air pollutants in winter or summer.

  10. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions as a cause of admission to a paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    MARTÍNEZ-MIR, I.; GARCÍA-LÓPEZ, M.; PALOP, V.; FERRER, J. M.; ESTAÑ, L.; RUBIO, E.; MORALES-OLIVAS, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1A total of 512 consecutive paediatric hospital admissions of children 2 years old or less were evaluated to assess the extent and pattern of admission caused by suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The proportion of suspected ADRs related to hospital admissions was 4.3%. 2The organ-systems most commonly implicated were the central nervous system (40.5%), digestive system (16.7%), and skin and appendages (14.3%). Together, they accounted for 71.5% of admissions attributed to ADRs. The most common clinical manifestations inducing admission were convulsions (4 cases), dizziness (4), vomiting (3), and tremor, fever, itching and apnoea (2 cases each). 3The four classes of drugs most frequently suspected in admissions due to ADRs were respiratory drugs (35%), anti-infective agents (25%), drugs active on the central nervous system (15%) and drugs used in dermatology (10%). The most common drugs related to ADRs were a combination of chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, phenylephrine, guaiphenesin and salicylic acid (4 cases), followed by fenoterol, adrenaline, paracetamol, DTP vaccine and antipolio vaccine (2 cases each). 4There were no significant differences between children older and younger than 1 year (odds ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.37–2.17) or between the sexes as regards hospital admittance due to suspected ADRs (odds ratio 1.94; 95% CI 0.72–5.42). 5The results of this kind of study may be influenced by patterns of drug utilization. Nevertheless, the lack of specific studies of drug effects in young children makes it desirable to carry out pharmacoepidemiological studies in this age group. PMID:8877022

  11. Functional Health Literacy and the Risk of Hospital Admission Among Medicare Managed Care Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David W.; Gazmararian, Julie A.; Williams, Mark V.; Scott, Tracy; Parker, Ruth M.; Green, Diane; Ren, Junling; Peel, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study analyzed whether inadequate functional health literacy is an independent risk factor for hospital admission. Methods. We studied a prospective cohort of 3260 Medicare managed care enrollees. Results. Of the participants, 29.5% were hospitalized. The crude relative risk (RR) of hospitalization was higher for individuals with inadequate literacy (n = 800; RR = 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24, 1.65) and marginal literacy (n = 366; RR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.09, 1.61) than for those with adequate literacy (n = 2094). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted relative risk of hospital admission was 1.29 (95% CI = 1.07, 1.55) for individuals with inadequate literacy and 1.21 (95% CI = 0.97, 1.50) for those with marginal literacy. Conclusions. Inadequate literacy was an independent risk factor for hospital admission among elderly managed care enrollees. (Am J Public Health. 2002;92:1278–1283) PMID:12144984

  12. Characteristics of psychiatric admissions and aspects of overcrowding at the general Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Chin, C N; Kadir, A B; Jeyarajah, S

    1993-06-01

    This study examined admissions, final diagnoses and mean duration of stay of patients in the Psychiatric Wards at the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. The male ward was severely overcrowded by 125% over the maximum bed capacity. The majority were psychotic, mainly schizophrenic. The female ward had 76% occupancy, also mainly psychotic. Neurotics, alcohol dependents and personality disorders formed less than 5% of the admissions. There was no difference in the mean duration of stay of patients of both UKM and GHKL Units stratified for diagnosis and disposal except for newly diagnosed schizophrenics. There is an urgent need for more male psychiatric beds/wards.

  13. Predictive Value of Admission N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Renal Function in Older People Hospitalized for Dyspnoea

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, Alfredo; Pala, Marco; Zuliani, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background. We investigated the relationship between NT-pro-BNP, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and all-cause mortality rates in a cohort of older people discharged from an internal medicine unit after admission for dyspnoea. Patients and Methods. NT-pro-BNP was evaluated in serum samples of 134 patients aged 80 ± 6 years who presented to a single academic centre with worsening dyspnoea. History data and anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters including GFR were collected at the time of admission. 119 out of 134 were discharged alive from hospital and were included in the follow-up of 779 ± 370 days. Results. 35 out of 119 subjects died after a follow-up of 266 ± 251 days. Cox proportional hazards model showed that GFR and Ln (NT-pro-BNP) were predictors for all-cause mortality with estimated hazard ratios of 0.969 (95% confidence interval: 0.950–0.988; P = 0.001) and 2.360 (95% confidence interval: 1.208–4.610; P = 0.012), respectively. Patients characterized by high NT-pro-BNP levels and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 showed a dramatic reduction in survival duration compared with the groups with different combinations of the two variables (P = 0.008). Conclusions. In the elderly, NT-pro-BNP and GFR are predictors of all-cause mortality after admission because of dyspnoea. Since the fact that subjects with high NT-pro-BNP and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 exhibited a reduced survival, high admission NT-pro-BNP suggests future negative outcome. PMID:24324290

  14. Pneumonia and influenza, and respiratory and circulatory hospital admissions in Belgium: a retrospective database study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza infections can lead to viral pneumonia, upper respiratory tract infection or facilitate co-infection by other pathogens. Influenza is associated with the exacerbation of chronic conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease and consequently, these result in acute hospitalizations. This study estimated the number, proportions and costs from a payer perspective of hospital admissions related to severe acute respiratory infections. Methods We analyzed retrospectively, a database of all acute inpatient stays from a non-random sample of eleven hospitals using the Belgian Minimal Hospital Summary Data. Codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification was used to identify and diagnose cases of pneumonia and influenza (PI), respiratory and circulatory (RC), and the related complications. Results During 2002–2007, we estimated relative hospital admission rates of 1.69% (20960/1237517) and 21.79% (269634/1237517) due to primary PI and RC, respectively. The highest numbers of hospital admissions with primary diagnosis as PI were reported for the elderly patient group (n = 10184) followed by for children below five years of age (n = 3451). Of the total primary PI and RC hospital admissions, 56.14% (11768/20960) and 63.48% (171172/269634) of cases had at least one possible influenza-related complication with the highest incidence of complications reported for the elderly patient group. Overall mortality rate in patients with PI and RC were 9.25% (1938/20960) and 5.51% (14859/269634), respectively. Average lengths of hospital stay for PI was 11.6 ± 12.3 days whereas for RC it was 9.1 ± 12.7 days. Annual average costs were 20.2 and 274.6 million Euros for PI and RC hospitalizations. Average cost per hospitalization for PI and RC were 5779 and 6111 Euros (2007), respectively. These costs increased with the presence of complications (PI: 7159, RC: 7549 Euros). Conclusion The clinical and

  15. Ambient biomass smoke and cardio-respiratory hospital admissions in Darwin, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Fay H; Bailie, Ross S; Pilotto, Louis S; Hanigan, Ivan C

    2007-01-01

    Background Increasing severe vegetation fires worldwide has been attributed to both global environmental change and land management practices. However there is little evidence concerning the population health effects of outdoor air pollution derived from biomass fires. Frequent seasonal bushfires near Darwin, Australia provide an opportunity to examine this issue. We examined the relationship between atmospheric particle loadings <10 microns in diameter (PM10), and emergency hospital admissions for cardio-respiratory conditions over the three fire seasons of 2000, 2004 and 2005. In addition we examined the differential impacts on Indigenous Australians, a high risk population subgroup. Methods We conducted a case-crossover analysis of emergency hospital admissions with principal ICD10 diagnosis codes J00–J99 and I00–I99. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios for admission with 10 μg/m3 rises in PM10. These were adjusted for weekly influenza rates, same day mean temperature and humidity, the mean temperature and humidity of the previous three days, days with rainfall > 5 mm, public holidays and holiday periods. Results PM10 ranged from 6.4 – 70.0 μg/m3 (mean 19.1). 2466 admissions were examined of which 23% were for Indigenous people. There was a positive relationship between PM10 and admissions for all respiratory conditions (OR 1.08 95%CI 0.98–1.18) with a larger magnitude in the Indigenous subpopulation (OR1.17 95% CI 0.98–1.40). While there was no relationship between PM10 and cardiovascular admissions overall, there was a positive association with ischaemic heart disease in Indigenous people, greatest at a lag of 3 days (OR 1.71 95%CI 1.14–2.55). Conclusion PM10 derived from vegetation fires was predominantly associated with respiratory rather than cardiovascular admissions. This outcome is consistent with the few available studies of ambient biomass smoke pollution. Indigenous people appear to be at higher risk

  16. [Medicines reconciliation at hospital admission into an electronic prescribing program].

    PubMed

    Villamayor-Blanco, Lucía; Herrero-Poch, Leticia; De-Miguel-Bouzas, Jose Carlos; Freire Vazquez, M Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Objetivo: Describir y analizar los resultados obtenidos durante un año con un nuevo procedimiento de conciliación de la medicación al ingreso hospitalario basado en un programa de prescripción electrónica asistida. Método: Estudio observacional, prospectivo, no aleatorizado y no controlado de 12 meses de duración, en el que se incluyeron todos los pacientes que ingresaron, durante ese año, en un hospital general concertado de 450 camas. Para la conciliación de la medicación se utilizó el programa de prescripción electrónica como medio para el abordaje multidisciplinar (enfermería, médicos y farmacéuticos). La conciliación se realizó al ingreso hospitalario y se midieron los errores de conciliación. Resultados: Se incluyeron 23.701 pacientes, conciliándose 53.920 medicamentos, de los cuales no tenían discrepancias 48.744 (90,4%) y 5.176 (9,6%) presentaban discrepancias: 4.731 (8,8 % de los fármacos) justificadas y 445 (0,8% de los fármacos) no justificadas. La mayor parte de las discrepancias no justificadas, (n = 310; 69,7%) se debieron a errores en el registro de la medicación domiciliaria al ingreso: medicación no registrada o errores de medicamentos, dosis, frecuencia o vía de administración, omisiones de prescripción, 23,6% (n = 105) y duplicidades, 6,7% (n = 30). En ningún caso el error de conciliación llegó al paciente. Conclusiones: Mediante las ayudas informáticas incluidas en el programa de prescripción electrónica asistida y el abordaje multidisciplinar del proceso de conciliación se consigue realizar la conciliación de la medicación al ingreso en el 98% de los pacientes en el momento del ingreso, evidenciando errores de conciliación solo en el 1,3% de los pacientes.

  17. Association between PM10 and respiratory hospital admissions in different seasons in heavily polluted Lanzhou City.

    PubMed

    An, Xingqin; Yan, Tao; Mi, Shengquan; Sun, Zhaobin; Hou, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Exposure-response relationship between particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10) and human health in different seasons from 2001 to 2005 was examined based on hospital admissions data of respiratory system diseases from four major hospitals in Lanzhou, China. To quantify associations of respiratory system diseases with multiple air pollutants and meteorological conditions, a semiparametric generalized additive model was used in the authors' study by implementing daily ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and PM10 data collected from the Lanzhou Environmental Monitoring Station and daily meteorological data from Lanzhou Meteorological Bureau. Results showed that daily averaged PM10 increased per interquartile range the hospital admissions number of respiratory diseases by 3.3% in spring, 1.4% in summer, 3.6% in autumn, and 4.0% in winter from a single-pollutant model, or 3.1%, 1.4%, 3.0%, and 4.0% from a multi-pollutant model, respectively. The effect of PM10 on respiratory hospital admissions was lowest in summer and highest in winter. The relative risks of PM10 on female or the elderly (≥ 65 yrs.) were higher, showing a stronger association of PM10 with respiratory diseases in female and elderly groups than in males and people younger than 65.

  18. [Nutrition status on pediatric admissions in Spanish hospitals; DHOSPE study].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Varea Calderón, Vicente; Bousoño García, Carlos; Lama Moré, Rosa; Redecillas Ferreiro, Susana; Peña Quintana, Luis

    2013-01-01

    La desnutrición en los pacientes hospitalizados tiene repercusiones clínicas y se asocia con peores resultados: inmunodepresión, retraso en la cicatrización de las heridas, atrofia muscular, prolongación del ingreso hospitalario y mayor mortalidad. La tasa de desnutrición al ingreso en el paciente pediátrico varía con los estudios, aunque parece inferior a lo que ocurre en el paciente adulto. Sin embargo, es una población de mayor riesgo de desarrollar desnutrición durante el ingreso. Se precisa, por tanto, encontrar una buena herramienta de cribado nutricional. Objetivo: Como primer paso para alcanzar ese objetivo se realizó un estudio de ámbito nacional para determinar la tasa de desnutrición en el ingreso. Material y métodos: Se trató de un estudio transversal, multicéntrico realizado en 32 hospitales españoles entre junio y septiembre de 2011 en pacientes < 17 años que ingresaran en el hospital por un periodo > 48 horas. Se midieron peso y talla y se pasó el cuestionario STAMP en el momento del ingreso y a los 7, 14 días o en el momento del alta. El estado nutricional se clasificó de acuerdo con el índice de Waterlow para peso y talla. El estudio fue aprobado por el Comité Ético de Investigación de cada uno de los hospitales y se requirió la firma del consentimiento informado antes de su inclusión en el estudio. Resultados: 991 pacientes participaron en el estudio. La edad media fue de 5 años (DE: 4,6), distribuidos de forma uniforme entre todas las edades. Se encontró desnutrición moderada o grave en el 7,8% y sobrepeso-obesidad en el 37,9% de los ingresados. Encontramos una situación nutricional significativamente peor para todos los grupos de edad en función de la enfermedad de base. No encontramos correlación entre la desnutrición y la edad, o los niveles de albúmina sérica. Comentarios: Esta es la primera encuesta nacional para estudiar la prevalencia de desnutrición en el momento del ingreso. La cifra encontrada, 8

  19. Analysis of the medication reconciliation process conducted at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Contreras Rey, María Beatriz; Arco Prados, Yolanda; Sánchez Gómez, Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    fueron y en 93 (29,8%) la aceptación no procedía por un cambio en la situación del paciente. Las mayores oportunidades de mejora se identificaron en los servicios de Digestivo, Medicina Interna y Cirugía General y en los grupos terapéuticos: sangre y órganos hematopoyéticos, sistema cardiovascular y sistema nervioso. Conclusiones: En nuestro hospital solo una tercera parte de las intervenciones fueron aceptadas y reconocidas como errores de conciliación. No obstante, la conciliación de la medicación al ingreso realizada por un farmacéutico mostró ser útil en la identificación y prevención de errores de medicación. Un mejor entendimiento de los casos en los que las intervenciones no fueron aceptadas podría mejorar el resultado en el futuro.

  20. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B.; Havens, Joaquim M.; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.

    2016-01-01

    , while ED admission rates and surgical rates declined, with comorbidity, sociodemographic factors predicting hospitalization. Future work should focus on determining if these differences reflect increased disease prevalence, increased diagnosis, or changes in management. PMID:27429691

  1. Forecasting asthma-related hospital admissions in London using negative binomial models.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Health forecasting can improve health service provision and individual patient outcomes. Environmental factors are known to impact chronic respiratory conditions such as asthma, but little is known about the extent to which these factors can be used for forecasting. Using weather, air quality and hospital asthma admissions, in London (2005-2006), two related negative binomial models were developed and compared with a naive seasonal model. In the first approach, predictive forecasting models were fitted with 7-day averages of each potential predictor, and then a subsequent multivariable model is constructed. In the second strategy, an exhaustive search of the best fitting models between possible combinations of lags (0-14 days) of all the environmental effects on asthma admission was conducted. Three models were considered: a base model (seasonal effects), contrasted with a 7-day average model and a selected lags model (weather and air quality effects). Season is the best predictor of asthma admissions. The 7-day average and seasonal models were trivial to implement. The selected lags model was computationally intensive, but of no real value over much more easily implemented models. Seasonal factors can predict daily hospital asthma admissions in London, and there is a little evidence that additional weather and air quality information would add to forecast accuracy.

  2. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care. PMID:25122562

  3. Extreme weather and air pollution effects on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Tsangari, H; Paschalidou, A K; Kassomenos, A P; Vardoulakis, S; Heaviside, C; Georgiou, K E; Yamasaki, E N

    2016-01-15

    In many regions of the world, climatic change is associated with increased extreme temperatures, which can have severe effects on mortality and morbidity. In this study, we examine the effect of extreme weather on hospital admissions in Cyprus, for inland and coastal areas, through the use of synoptic weather classifications (air mass types). In addition, the effect of particulate air pollution (PM10) on morbidity is examined. Our results show that two air mass types, namely (a) warm, rainy days with increased levels of water vapour in the atmosphere and (b) cold, cloudy days with increased levels of precipitation, were associated with increased morbidity in the form of hospital admissions. This was true both for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, for all age groups, but particularly for the elderly, aged over 65. Particulate air pollution was also associated with increased morbidity in Cyprus, where the effect was more pronounced for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26519584

  4. The irritable hip: immediate ultrasound guided aspiration and prevention of hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Fink, A M; Berman, L; Edwards, D; Jacobson, S K

    1995-02-01

    A protocol for the management of irritable hip was assessed; this protocol avoids hospital admission while detecting all other serious causes of hip pain, in particular septic arthritis, at the earliest possible opportunity. Fifty children with painful hips were studied prospectively with immediate ultrasound guided aspiration and Gram stain of all hip effusions. Bone scintigraphy performed at an early stage was reserved for patients with unremitting symptoms. Thirty six hips were aspirated. Only two patients were admitted. The final diagnoses were transient synovitis (45 cases), Perthes' disease (three cases), fracture (one case), and septic arthritis (one case). The single case of hip sepsis was diagnosed on presentation. The traditional approach to management is questioned and the advantages of the protocol highlighted, including earliest diagnosis of sepsis and other serious pathology, avoidance of hospital admission, and the relief of pain by joint decompression.

  5. Extreme weather and air pollution effects on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Tsangari, H; Paschalidou, A K; Kassomenos, A P; Vardoulakis, S; Heaviside, C; Georgiou, K E; Yamasaki, E N

    2016-01-15

    In many regions of the world, climatic change is associated with increased extreme temperatures, which can have severe effects on mortality and morbidity. In this study, we examine the effect of extreme weather on hospital admissions in Cyprus, for inland and coastal areas, through the use of synoptic weather classifications (air mass types). In addition, the effect of particulate air pollution (PM10) on morbidity is examined. Our results show that two air mass types, namely (a) warm, rainy days with increased levels of water vapour in the atmosphere and (b) cold, cloudy days with increased levels of precipitation, were associated with increased morbidity in the form of hospital admissions. This was true both for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, for all age groups, but particularly for the elderly, aged over 65. Particulate air pollution was also associated with increased morbidity in Cyprus, where the effect was more pronounced for cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Long-term exposure to traffic pollution and hospital admissions in London.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Jaana I; Blangiardo, Marta; Toledano, Mireille B; Fecht, Daniela; Gulliver, John; Anderson, H Ross; Beevers, Sean D; Dajnak, David; Kelly, Frank J; Tonne, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the effects of long-term exposure to traffic pollution on health is inconsistent. In Greater London we examined associations between traffic pollution and emergency hospital admissions for cardio-respiratory diseases by applying linear and piecewise linear Poisson regression models in a small-area analysis. For both models the results for children and adults were close to unity. In the elderly, linear models found negative associations whereas piecewise models found non-linear associations characterized by positive risks in the lowest and negative risks in the highest exposure category. An increased risk was observed among those living in areas with the highest socioeconomic deprivation. Estimates were not affected by adjustment for traffic noise. The lack of convincing positive linear associations between primary traffic pollution and hospital admissions agrees with a number of other reports, but may reflect residual confounding. The relatively greater vulnerability of the most deprived populations has important implications for public health. PMID:26476693

  7. Insanity proceedings and black-white state hospital admission rate differences.

    PubMed

    See, J

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if the higher state hospital admission rates of blacks are due to greater proportions of blacks being adjudicated incompetent at county insanity hearings. The records of 2,264 cases from 12 Florida counties in 1969 and observations and interviews in the county courts were used to answer this question. With the exception of a slight difference in middle-sized counties, the higher rates of state hospital admission were found to be due to initial differences in petitioning to the court rather than to adjudication differences. The lack of difference is due to the fact that the proportion competent, when refined, proves to be very small for both blacks and whites, thus allowing for little variation by ethnicity. The operation of a racial stereotype was, however, demonstrated in a detailed analysis of one large county.

  8. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient.

    PubMed

    Haverkort, J J Mark; Minderhoud, A L C Ben; Wind, Jelte D D; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Ellerbroek, Pauline M

    2016-02-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital's preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery.

  9. European hospital adherence to GOLD recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation admissions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C Michael; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Hartl, Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how European care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) admissions vary against guideline standards provides an opportunity to target appropriate quality improvement interventions. In 2010-2011 an audit of care against the 2010 'Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease' (GOLD) standards was performed in 16 018 patients from 384 hospitals in 13 countries. Clinicians prospectively identified consecutive COPD admissions over a period of 8 weeks, recording clinical care measures on a web-based data tool. Data were analysed comparing adherence to 10 key management recommendations. Adherence varied between hospitals and across countries. The lack of available spirometry results and variable use of oxygen and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) are high impact areas identified for improvement. PMID:23729193

  10. Hyperoxia Early After Hospital Admission in Comatose Patients with Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Brand, Michael; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical effect of hyperoxia in patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains uncertain. We therefore initiated this study to find out whether there is an association between survival and hyperoxia early after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in OHCA patients admitted to our hospital. Material/Methods All OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2015 were identified by analysis of our central admission register. Data from individual patients were collected from patient health records and anonymously stored on a central database. Results Altogether, there were 280 OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2015, including 35 patients (12.5%) with hyperoxia and 99 patients (35.4%) with normoxia. Comparison of these 2 groups showed lower pH values in OHCA patients admitted with normoxia compared to those with hyperoxia (7.10±0.18 vs. 7.21±0.17; p=0.001) but similar rates of initial lactate (7.92±3.87 mmol/l vs. 11.14±16.40 mmol/l; p=0.072). Survival rates differed between both groups (34.4% vs. 54.3%; p=0.038) with better survival rates in OHCA patients with hyperoxia at hospital admission. Conclusions Currently, different criteria are used to define hyperoxia following OHCA, but if the negative effects of hyperoxia in OHCA patients are a cumulative effect over time, hyperoxia < 60 min after hospital admission as investigated in this study would be equivalent to a short period of hyperoxia. It may be that the positive effect of buffering metabolic acidosis early after cardiac arrest maintains the negative effects of hyperoxia in general. PMID:27638399

  11. Burden of hospital admissions for cervical cancer in Spain during 1999-2002.

    PubMed

    Gil, Angel; San-Martín, María; Gil, Ruth; Hernández, Valentín; Ribes, Josepa; González, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Population-based retrospective epidemiological study to estimate the burden of to hospitalizations by cervical cancer in Spain. It was conducted by using hospital discharge data from the national surveillance system for hospital data, Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD). Records of all patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the cervix (ICD-9-MC codes 180.0-180.9) or carcinoma in situ of cervix (code 233.1) during a four year period (1999-2002), were selected. An annual average of 4,151 hospitalizations with a primary or secondary diagnosis of cervical cancer and 2,761 hospitalizations due to carcinoma in situ were identified. Annually there were 25.5 and 17.0 hospitalizations by cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ per 100,000 women > or =20 years of age, respectively. Hospitalization rate by cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ peaks in between 45 and 59 years of age (39.4 admissions per 100,000 women) and 30 to 44 years of age (32.2 per 100,000 women), respectively. The mean cost of a hospitalization by cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ euro3,098 and euro2,192, respectively. The estimated annual cost of hospitalizations cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ in Spain was 19 million euro.

  12. PM10, ozone, and hospital admissions for the elderly in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported associations between airborne particles and/or ozone and hospital admissions for respiratory disease. PM10 has rarely been used as the particle exposure measure, however. This study examined whether such an association could be seen in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, which has daily monitoring data for PM10. Data on hospital admissions in persons aged 65 y and older were obtained from Medicare records for the years 1986 through 1989. Daily counts of admissions, by admit date, were computed for pneumonia (ICD9 480-487) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (ICD9 490-496). Classification was by discharge diagnosis. Daily air pollution data from all monitoring stations for ozone and PM10 in Minneapolis-St. Paul were obtained, and the daily average for each pollutant was computed. An average of approximately six pneumonia admissions and two admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease occurred each day. Poisson regression analysis was used to control for time trends, seasonal fluctuations, and weather. PM10 was a risk factor for pneumonia admissions (relative risk [RR] = 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-1.02) and COPD admissions (RR = 1.57, 95% CI = 2.06-1.20). Ozone was also associated with pneumonia admissions (RR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.36-0.97). The relative risks are for an increase of 100 micrograms/m3 in daily PM10 and 50 ppb in daily ozone concentration. Several alternative methods for controlling for seasonal patterns and weather were used, including nonparametric regression techniques. The results were not sensitive to the methods. When days exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for either pollutant were excluded, the association remained for both pneumonia (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.34-1.03 for PM10, and RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.41-0.99 for ozone) and COPD (RR = 1.54, 95% CI = 2.06-1.16 for PM10).

  13. Impacts of hot and cold temperature extremes on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.; Kříž, B.

    2010-09-01

    Elevated mortality associated with high ambient temperatures in summer represents one of the main impacts of weather extremes on human society. Increases in mortality during heat waves were examined in many European countries; much less is known about the effects of heat waves on morbidity, measured for example by the number of hospital admissions. Relatively less understood is also cold-related mortality and morbidity in winter, when the relationships between weather and human health are more complex, less direct, and confounded by other factors such as epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. The present study examines links between hot and cold temperature extremes and daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in the population of the Czech Republic over 1994-2007. We make use of a recently completed database of all admissions for cardiovascular diseases to hospitals in the area of the Czech Republic since 1994, with a detailed classification of diseases and detailed information concerning each patient (in total 1,467,675 hospital admissions over 1994-2007). The main goals of the study are (i) to identify excess/deficit morbidity during and after periods of heat waves in summer and cold spells in winter, (ii) to compare the links for individual diseases (e.g. acute myocardial infarction, I21; angina pectoris, I20; cerebral infarction, I63; brain ischemia, I64) and to identify those diagnoses that are most closely linked to weather, (iii) to identify population groups most vulnerable to temperature extremes, and (iv) to compare the links to temperature extremes for morbidity and mortality. Periods when morbidity data were affected by epidemics of influenza and acute respiratory infections in winter were excluded from the analysis.

  14. Social Welfare Centers Protect Outpatients with Mood Disorders from Risk of Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Jang, Suk Yong; Park, Sohee; Cho, Kyung Hee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Choi, Young; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background South Korea faces difficulties in the management of mental disorders, and those difficulties are expected to gradually worsen. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders. Methods We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002–2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 50,160 patients who were newly diagnosed with a mood disorder among the 1,025,340 individuals in a nationally representative sample. We performed a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to examine the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders (ICD-10: F3). Results There was a 3.9% admission rate among a total of 99,533 person-years. Outpatients who lived in regions with more social welfare centers were less likely to be admitted to a hospital (per increase of five social welfare centers per 100,000 people; OR: 0.958; 95% CI: 0.919–0.999). Social welfare centers had an especially strong protective effect on patients with relatively mild mood disorders and those who were vulnerable to medical expenditures. Conclusions Considering the protective role of social welfare centers in managing patients with mood disorders, health-policy makers need to consider strategies for activating mental healthcare. PMID:26745728

  15. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-01-01

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas. PMID:26580643

  16. Monitoring Child Abuse and Neglect at a Population Level: Patterns of Hospital Admissions for Maltreatment and Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Melissa; Nassar, Natasha; Leonard, Helen; Mathews, Richard; Patterson, Yvonne; Stanley, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of maltreatment and assault related hospital admissions and deaths among children; and identify common injuries and conditions associated with these admissions using routinely collected morbidity and mortality data. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of all children aged…

  17. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Methods Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. Results A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40–65 years and older than 65 years. Conclusions The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI. PMID:22337557

  18. Predictors of hospital re-admissions among Hispanics with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Atla, Pradeep R.; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.; Gill, Firdose; Kundu, Rabindra; Choudhury, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital re-admissions in decompensated cirrhosis are associated with worse patient outcomes. Hispanics have a disproportionately high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related morbidity and mortality. The goal of this study was to evaluate the factors affecting re-admission rates among Hispanics with HCV-related cirrhosis. Methods A total of 292 consecutive HCV-related cirrhosis admissions (Hispanics 189, non-Hispanics 103) from January 2009 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed; 132 were cirrhosis-related re-admissions. The statistical analysis was performed using STATA version 11.1. Chi-square/Fisher’s exact and Student’s t-tests were used to compare categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors for hospital readmissions. Results Among the 132 cirrhosis-related readmissions, 71% were Hispanics while 29% were non-Hispanics (P=0.035). Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and esophageal variceal hemorrhage were the most frequent causes of the first and subsequent readmissions. Hispanics with readmissions had a higher Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class (B and C) and higher model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores (≥15), as well as a higher incidence of alcohol use, HE, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and varices (P<0.05). The majority of the study patients (81%) had MELD scores <15. Multivariate regression analysis identified alcohol use (OR 2.63; 95%CI 1.1-6.4), HE (OR 5.5; 95%CI 2-15.3), varices (OR 3.2; 95%CI 1.3-8.2), and CTP class (OR 3.3; 95%CI 1.4–8.1) as predictors for readmissions among Hispanics. Conclusion CTP classes B and C, among other factors, were the major predictors for hospital readmissions in Hispanics with HCV-related cirrhosis. The majority of these readmissions were due to HE and variceal hemorrhage.

  19. Apparent Temperature and Cause-Specific Emergency Hospital Admissions in Greater Copenhagen, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Janine; Andersen, Zorana; Ketzel, Matthias; Ellermann, Thomas; Loft, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    One of the key climate change factors, temperature, has potentially grave implications for human health. We report the first attempt to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) and respiratory (RD), cardiovascular (CVD), and cerebrovascular (CBD) emergency hospital admissions in Copenhagen, controlling for air pollution. The study period covered 1 January 2002−31 December 2006, stratified in warm and cold periods. A case-crossover design was applied. Susceptibility (effect modification) by age, sex, and socio-economic status was investigated. For an IQR (8°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax, a 7% (95% CI: 1%, 13%) increase in the RD admission rate was observed in the warm period whereas an inverse association was found with CVD (−8%, 95% CI: −13%, −4%), and none with CBD. There was no association between the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax during the cold period and any of the cause-specific admissions, except in some susceptible groups: a negative association for RD in the oldest age group and a positive association for CVD in men and the second highest SES group. In conclusion, an increase in Tappmax is associated with a slight increase in RD and decrease in CVD admissions during the warmer months. PMID:21829550

  20. Medical causes of admissions to hospital among adults in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Etyang, Anthony O.; Scott, John Anthony Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the publication of several studies on the subject, there is significant uncertainty regarding the burden of disease among adults in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA). Objectives To describe the breadth of available data regarding causes of admission to hospital, to systematically analyze the methodological quality of these studies, and to provide recommendations for future research. Design We performed a systematic online and hand-based search for articles describing patterns of medical illnesses in patients admitted to hospitals in sSA between 1950 and 2010. Diseases were grouped into bodily systems using International Classification of Disease (ICD) guidelines. We compared the proportions of admissions and deaths by diagnostic category using χ2. Results Thirty articles, describing 86,307 admissions and 9,695 deaths, met the inclusion criteria. The leading causes of admission were infectious and parasitic diseases (19.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 19.6–20.1), respiratory (16.2%, 95% CI 16.0–16.5) and circulatory (11.3%, 95% CI 11.1–11.5) illnesses. The leading causes of death were infectious and parasitic (17.1%, 95% CI 16.4–17.9), circulatory (16%, 95% CI 15.3–16.8) and digestive (16.2%, 95% CI 15.4–16.9). Circulatory diseases increased from 3.9% of all admissions in 1950–59 to 19.9% in 2000–2010 (RR 5.1, 95% CI 4.5–5.8, test for trend p<0.00005). The most prevalent methodological deficiencies, present in two-thirds of studies, were failures to use standardized case definitions and ICD guidelines for classifying illnesses. Conclusions Cardiovascular and infectious diseases are currently the leading causes of admissions and in-hospital deaths in sSA. Methodological deficiencies have limited the usefulness of previous studies in defining national patterns of disease in adults. As African countries pass through demographic and health transition, they need to significantly invest in clinical research capacity to provide an accurate

  1. Distributed Lag Analyses of Daily Hospital Admissions and Source-Apportioned Fine Particle Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Ramona; Ito, Kazuhiko; Thurston, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Past time-series studies of the health effects of fine particulate matter [aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] have used chemically nonspecific PM2.5 mass. However, PM2.5 is known to vary in chemical composition with source, and health impacts may vary accordingly. Objective We tested the association between source-specific daily PM2.5 mass and hospital admissions in a time-series investigation that considered both single-lag and distributed-lag models. Methods Daily PM2.5 speciation measurements collected in midtown Manhattan were analyzed via positive matrix factorization source apportionment. Daily and distributed-lag generalized linear models of Medicare respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions during 2001–2002 considered PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 from five sources: transported sulfate, residual oil, traffic, steel metal works, and soil. Results Source-related PM2.5 (specifically steel and traffic) was significantly associated with hospital admissions but not with total PM2.5 mass. Steel metal works–related PM2.5 was associated with respiratory admissions for multiple-lag days, especially during the cleanup efforts at the World Trade Center. Traffic-related PM2.5 was consistently associated with same-day cardiovascular admissions across disease-specific subcategories. PM2.5 constituents associated with each source (e.g., elemental carbon with traffic) were likewise associated with admissions in a consistent manner. Mean effects of distributed-lag models were significantly greater than were maximum single-day effect models for both steel- and traffic-related PM2.5. Conclusions Past analyses that have considered only PM2.5 mass or only maximum single-day lag effects have likely underestimated PM2.5 health effects by not considering source-specific and distributed-lag effects. Differing lag structures and disease specificity observed for steel-related versus traffic-related PM2.5 raise the possibility of distinct mechanistic pathways of

  2. Effect of air pollution control on mortality and hospital admissions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Douglas W; Rich, David Q; Goodman, Patrick G; Clancy, Luke; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; George, Prethibha; Kotlov, Tania

    2013-07-01

    During the 1980s the Republic of Ireland experienced repeated severe pollution episodes. Domestic coal burning was a major source of this pollution. In 1990 the Irish government introduced a ban on the marketing, sale, and distribution of coal in Dublin. The ban was extended to Cork in 1995 and to 10 other communities in 1998 and 2000. We previously reported decreases in particulate black smoke (BS*) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations, measured as total gaseous acidity, in Dublin after the 1990 coal ban (Clancy et al. 2002). In the current study we explored and compared the effectiveness of the sequential 1990, 1995, and 1998 bans in reducing community air pollution and in improving public health. We compiled records of daily BS, total gaseous acidity (SO2), and counts of cause-specific deaths from 1981 to 2004 for Dublin County Borough (1990 ban), county Cork (1995 ban), and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1998 ban). We also compiled daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive diagnoses for Cork County Borough (1991 to 2004) and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1993 to 2004). We compared pre-ban and post-ban BS and SO2 concentrations for each city. Using interrupted time-series methods, we estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized mortality rates in each city or county after the corresponding local coal ban. We regressed weekly age- and sex-standardized mortality rates against an indicator of the post- versus pre-ban period, adjusting for influenza epidemics, weekly mean temperature, and a season smooth of the standardized mortality rates in Coastal counties presumably not affected by the bans. We compared these results with similar analyses in Midlands counties also presumably unaffected by the bans. We also estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized, weekly hospital admissions rates normalized for underreporting in each city or county after the 1995

  3. Coarse Particulate Air Pollution Associated with Increased Risk of Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in a Tropical City, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between coarse particles (PM2.5–10) levels and frequency of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases (RD) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for RD including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia, and ambient air pollution data levels for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 2006 to 2010. The relative risk of hospital admissions for RD was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased rate of admissions for RD were significantly associated with higher coarse PM levels only on cool days (<25 °C), with a 10 µg/m3 elevation in PM2.5–10 concentrations associated with a 3% (95% CI = 1%–5%) rise in COPD admissions, 4% (95% CI = 1%–7%) increase in asthma admissions, and 3% (95% CI = 2%–4%) rise in pneumonia admissions. No significant associations were found between coarse particle levels and the number of hospital admissions for RD on warm days. In the two-pollutant models, PM2.5–10 levels remained significantly correlated with higher rate of RD admissions even controlling for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, or ozone on cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM2.5–10 enhance the risk of hospital admissions for RD on cool days. PMID:26501308

  4. Low-level air pollution and hospital admissions for cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases in Helsinki.

    PubMed Central

    Pönkä, A; Virtanen, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether low concentrations of ambient air pollutants are associated with hospital admissions for ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases. METHODS: Associations between daily concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulates and daily hospital admissions due to ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases were studied in Helsinki, Finland, 1987 through 1989. The regression analyses controlled for weather, day of the week, season, long-term trends, and influenza epidemics. RESULTS: Admissions via emergency rooms due to ischemic cardiac diseases (n = 7005) were significantly associated with the prevailing levels of nitric oxide and ozone, and those due to cerebrovascular diseases (n = 3737) were associated with nitrogen dioxide; these levels were only moderate. Long-term transient myocardial ischemic attacks were related to particulates, and short-term ischemic attacks were related to nitrogen dioxide. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases may be provoked by pollutants in concentrations lower than those given as guidelines in many countries and lower than previously shown. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8806380

  5. Proximity to coke works and hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular disease in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Aylin, P; Bottle, A; Wakefield, J; Jarup, L; Elliott, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The incidence of hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in areas close to operating coke works in England and Wales was investigated.
METHODS—A small area study using distance from source as a proxy for exposure was undertaken in subjects aged 65 or over and children under 5 years within 7.5 km of four coke works (1991 estimated populations 87 760 and 43 932, respectively). The main outcome measures were emergency hospital admissions in 1992/3-1994/5 with a primary diagnosis of coronary heart disease (ICD 410-414), stroke (ICD 431-438), all respiratory diseases (ICD 460-519), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ICD 491-492), and asthma (ICD 493) in those aged 65 or over, and all respiratory and asthma admissions in children under 5 years of age.
RESULTS—At age 65 or over the combined estimate of relative risk with proximity to coke works (per km) ranged from 0.99 (95% CI 0.90to 1.09) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to 1.03 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.13) for asthma. For children under 5 years the combined estimate of risk was 1.08 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.20) for all respiratory disease and 1.07 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.18) for asthma. There was evidence of significant heterogeneity in risk estimates between coke work groups, especially in children under 5 years (p<0.001 and p=0.004 for respiratory disease and asthma, respectively). For the Teesside coke works in North East England the relative risk with proximity (per km) was 1.09 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.12) for respiratory disease and 1.09 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.15) for asthma.
CONCLUSIONS—No evidence overall was found for an association between hospital admissions and living near operational coke works in England and Wales. Trends of a higher risk of hospital admission for respiratory disease and asthma among children with proximity to the Teesside plant require further investigation.

 PMID:11182017

  6. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient

    PubMed Central

    Minderhoud, A.L.C. (Ben); Wind, Jelte D.D.; Leenen, Luke P.H.; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Ellerbroek, Pauline M.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital’s preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery. PMID:26812146

  7. Expiratory flow limitation relates to symptoms during COPD exacerbations requiring hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Jetmalani, Kanika; Timmins, Sophie; Brown, Nathan J; Diba, Chantale; Berend, Norbert; Salome, Cheryl M; Wen, Fu-Qiang; Chen, Peng; King, Gregory G; Farah, Claude S

    2015-01-01

    Background Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) is seen in some patients presenting with a COPD exacerbation; however, it is unclear how EFL relates to the clinical features of the exacerbation. We hypothesized that EFL when present contributes to symptoms and duration of recovery during a COPD exacerbation. Our aim was to compare changes in EFL with symptoms in subjects with and without flow-limited breathing admitted for a COPD exacerbation. Subjects and methods A total of 29 subjects with COPD were recruited within 48 hours of admission to West China Hospital for an acute exacerbation. Daily measurements of post-bronchodilator spirometry, resistance, and reactance using the forced oscillation technique and symptom (Borg) scores until discharge were made. Flow-limited breathing was defined as the difference between inspiratory and expiratory respiratory system reactance (EFL index) greater than 2.8 cmH2O·s·L−1. The physiological predictors of symptoms during recovery were determined by mixed-effect analysis. Results Nine subjects (31%) had flow-limited breathing on admission despite similar spirometry compared to subjects without flow-limited breathing. Spirometry and resistance measures did not change between enrolment and discharge. EFL index values improved in subjects with flow-limited breathing on admission, with resolution in four patients. In subjects with flow-limited breathing on admission, symptoms were related to inspiratory resistance and EFL index values. In subjects without flow-limited breathing, symptoms related to forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity. In the whole cohort, EFL index values at admission was related to duration of stay (Rs=0.4, P=0.03). Conclusion The presence of flow-limited breathing as well as abnormal respiratory system mechanics contribute independently to symptoms during COPD exacerbations. PMID:25999709

  8. Apparent temperature and acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in Copenhagen, Denmark: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of temperature on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been investigated as extensively as the effects of broader outcomes of morbidity and mortality. Sixteen studies reported inconsistent results and two considered confounding by air pollution. We addressed some of the methodological limitations of the previous studies in this study. Methods This is the first study of the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) and AMI hospital admissions in Copenhagen. The study period covered 1 January 1999-31 December 2006, stratified in warm (April - September) and cold (October - March) periods. A case-crossover epidemiology study design was applied. Models were adjusted for public holidays and influenza, confounding by PM10, NO2 and CO was investigated, the lag and non-linear effects of Tappmax was examined, effect modification by age, sex and SES was explored, and the results of the case-crossover models were compared to those of the generalised additive Poisson time-series and generalised estimating equation models. Results 14 456 AMI hospital admissions (12 995 people) occurred during the study period. For an inter-quartile range (6 or 7°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax, a 4% (95% CI:-2%; 10%) and 9% (95% CI: 3%; 14%) decrease in the AMI admission rate was observed in the warm and cold periods, respectively. The 19-65 year old group, men and highest SES group seemed to be more susceptible in the cold period. Conclusion An increase in Tappmax is associated with a decrease in AMI admissions during the colder months. PMID:22463704

  9. The reimbursement blues. A psychiatric hospital copes with decreasing reimbursement and declining admissions.

    PubMed

    Hume, S K

    1991-03-01

    Beginning in 1989, Harbor View Mercy Hospital, a freestanding psychiatric facility in Fort Smith, AR, saw a flattening of growth in inpatient days and declines in discharges. In addition to decreasing admissions, it faces the problems of decreasing reimbursement, the need to provide more services with fewer resources, and greater government regulations. The greatest problem is inadequate reimbursement. Psychiatric hospitals fare worse than their acute care counterparts under both Medicaid and Medicare. To fulfill its mission to serve those in need, Harbor View has allocated 43 percent of its revenue budget this year to cover charity care, bad debt, etc. Ron Summerhill, the hospital's chief administrative officer, predicts a slowdown in the growth and profitability of psychiatric services in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. But he is combating this trend by increasing use of managed care arrangements, diversifying, offering more outpatient services, and advocating for change in the reimbursement situation. PMID:10109228

  10. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  11. The effect of coarse ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Chen; Qiuying Yang; Daniel Krewski; Richard T. Burnett; Yuanli Shi; Kimberlyn M. McGrail

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this article is to examine differences in the effect of ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. 8989 adults 65 yr of age or older living in the greater Vancouver area who were admitted to hospital for any acute respiratory disease (ICD-9 codes 460-519) between June 1, 1995, and March 31, 1999 were studied. Time-series analysis was used to evaluate the association between respiratory admissions and daily measures of particulate matter (PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5}, and PM{sub 10-2.5} in urban air, after adjustment for gaseous copollutants (CO, O{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}) and meteorological variables. Repeated admissions for respiratory disease were common among the elderly. Approximately 30% of the subjects were readmitted to hospital after the first admission; 9% had more than 2 admissions for respiratory disease during the 4-yr study period. PM{sub 10-2.5} was significantly associated with the second and overall admissions for respiratory disease, but not with the first admission. The adjusted relative risks for an increment of 4.2 {mu} g/m{sup 3} in-day average PM{sub 10-2.5} concentrations were 1.03 for the first admission, 1.22 for the second admission, and 1.06 for overall admissions. There was no significant association between PM{sub 2.5} and hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. The data suggest that (1) people with a history of respiratory admissions are at a higher risk of respiratory disease in relation to particulate air pollution in urban areas, (2) analyses based on overall rather than repeated hospital admissions lead to lower estimates of the risk of respiratory disease associated with particulate air pollution, and (3) PM{sub 10-2.5} has a larger effect on respiratory admissions than PM{sub 2.5}.

  12. Road traffic noise is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and all-cause mortality in London

    PubMed Central

    Halonen, Jaana I.; Hansell, Anna L.; Gulliver, John; Morley, David; Blangiardo, Marta; Fecht, Daniela; Toledano, Mireille B.; Beevers, Sean D.; Anderson, Hugh Ross; Kelly, Frank J.; Tonne, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    Aims Road traffic noise has been associated with hypertension but evidence for the long-term effects on hospital admissions and mortality is limited. We examined the effects of long-term exposure to road traffic noise on hospital admissions and mortality in the general population. Methods and results The study population consisted of 8.6 million inhabitants of London, one of Europe's largest cities. We assessed small-area-level associations of day- (7:00–22:59) and nighttime (23:00–06:59) road traffic noise with cardiovascular hospital admissions and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in all adults (≥25 years) and elderly (≥75 years) through Poisson regression models. We adjusted models for age, sex, area-level socioeconomic deprivation, ethnicity, smoking, air pollution, and neighbourhood spatial structure. Median daytime exposure to road traffic noise was 55.6 dB. Daytime road traffic noise increased the risk of hospital admission for stroke with relative risk (RR) 1.05 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.09] in adults, and 1.09 (95% CI: 1.04–1.14) in the elderly in areas >60 vs. <55 dB. Nighttime noise was associated with stroke admissions only among the elderly. Daytime noise was significantly associated with all-cause mortality in adults [RR 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00–1.07) in areas >60 vs. <55 dB]. Positive but non-significant associations were seen with mortality for cardiovascular and ischaemic heart disease, and stroke. Results were similar for the elderly. Conclusions Long-term exposure to road traffic noise was associated with small increased risks of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in the general population, particularly for stroke in the elderly. PMID:26104392

  13. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers.

  14. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers. PMID:25856346

  15. Time Trends in Hospital Admissions for Bronchiectasis: Analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2004 to 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Gema; López de Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Pedraza-Serrano, Fernando; Puente-Maestu, Luis; de Miguel-Díez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze changes in the incidence, diagnostic procedures, comorbidity, length of hospital stay (LOHS), costs and in-hospital mortality (IHM) for patients with bronchiectasis who were hospitalized in Spain over a 10-year period. Methods We included all admissions for patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis as primary or secondary diagnosis during 2004–2013. Results 282,207 patients were admitted to the study. After controlling for possible confounders, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of hospitalizations over the study period when bronchiectasis was a secondary diagnosis. When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis we observed a significant decline in the incidence. In all cases, this pathology was more frequent in males, and the average age and comorbidity increased significantly during the study period (p<0.001). When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis, the most frequent secondary diagnosis was Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. When bronchiectasis was the secondary diagnosis, the most frequent primary diagnosis was COPD. IHM was low, tending to decrease from 2004 to 2013 (p<0.05). The average LOHS decreased significantly during the study period in both cases (p<0.001). The mean cost per patient decreased in patients with bronchiectasis as primary diagnosis, but it increased for cases of bronchiectasis as secondary diagnosis (p<0.001). Conclusions Our results reveal an increase in the incidence of hospital admissions for patients with bronchiectasis as a secondary diagnosis from 2004 to 2013, as opposed to cases of bronchiectasis as the primary diagnosis. Although the average age and comorbidity significantly increased over time, both IHM and average LOHS significantly decreased. PMID:27622273

  16. Effects of sudden air pressure changes on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Prague

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysely, Jan; Plavcova, Eva

    2013-04-01

    Sudden weather changes have long been supposed to be associated with negative impacts on human health. However, relatively few studies attempted to quantify these relationships. In this study, we use large 6-hour changes of atmospheric sea level pressure as proxy for sudden weather changes, and evaluate their association with hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases. Winter and summer seasons and positive and negative pressure changes are analyzed separately, using data for the city of Prague (population of 1.2 million) over 16-year period (1994-2009). We find that sudden pressure drops in winter are associated with significant increases in the number of hospital admissions. Increases in morbidity are not observed for pressure drops in summer, nor pressure increases in any season. Analysis of synoptic weather maps shows that the large pressure drops in winter are associated with strong zonal (westerly) flow and rapidly moving low pressure systems with centres over Northern Europe and atmospheric fronts affecting the area of Western and Central Europe. Several of the largest pressure decreases were associated with infamous winter storms (such as Lothar on December 25, 1999 and Kyrill on January 18, 2007). Analysis of links between passages of strong atmospheric fronts and hospital admissions shows that the links are much weaker if weather changes are characterized by frontal passages. Since climate models project strengthening of the zonal circulation in winter and increased frequency of winter storms, the negative effects of such weather phenomena and their possible changes in a warmer climate of the 21st century need to be better understood, particularly as their importance in inducing excess morbidity and mortality in winter may increase compared to cold spells.

  17. Effects of a provincial ban of two toxic organophosphorus insecticides on pesticide poisoning hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background. Pesticide self-poisoning causes one third of global suicides. Sri Lanka halved its suicide rate by banning WHO Class I organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and then endosulfan. However, poisoning with Class II toxicity OPs, particularly dimethoate and fenthion, remains a problem. We aimed to determine the effect and feasibility of a ban of the two insecticides in one Sri Lankan district. Methods. Sale was banned in June 2003 in most of Polonnaruwa District, but not Anuradhapura District. Admissions with pesticide poisoning to the district general hospitals was prospectively recorded from 2002. Results. Hospital admissions for dimethoate and fenthion poisoning fell by 43% after the ban in Polonnaruwa, while increasing by 23% in Anuradhapura. The pesticide case fatality fell from 14.4% to 9.0% in Polonnaruwa (odds ratio [OR] 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41–0.84) and 11.3% to 10.6% in Anuradhapura (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.70–1.25; p = 0.051). This reduction was not sustained, with case fatality in Polonnaruwa rising to 12.1% in 2006–2007. Further data analysis indicated that the fall in case fatality had actually been due to a coincidental reduction in case fatality for pesticide poisoning overall, in particular for paraquat poisoning. Conclusions. We found that the insecticides could be effectively banned from agricultural practice, as shown by the fall in hospital admissions, with few negative consequences. However, the ban had only a minor effect on pesticide poisoning deaths because it was too narrow. A study assessing the agricultural and health effects of a more comprehensive ban of highly toxic pesticides is necessary to determine the balance between increased costs of agriculture and reduced health care costs and fewer deaths. PMID:22372788

  18. New strategies to identify patients harbouring antibiotic-resistant bacteria at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, E

    2006-02-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most prevention strategies focus on cross-transmission, but the endemic state inside the hospital is also maintained through the influx of patients colonised or infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, balanced by the efflux of colonised patients following discharge. Epidemiological research has demonstrated that eradication can be achieved by preventing the influx of resistant bacteria. The presence of a central venous catheter and a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonisation are associated significantly with methicillin-resistant staphylococcal bacteraemia at admission. Previous antibiotic therapy and transfer from long-term care facilities or nursing homes are associated with bacteraemia caused by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, while skin ulcer and cellulites are independent risk-factors for MRSA bacteraemia. A scoring system using point values has been developed and validated to identify patients positive for vancomycin-resistant enterococci at admission. Six variables were identified: age > 60 years (2 points); hospitalisation in the previous year (3); use of two or more antibiotics during the previous 30 days (3); transfer from another hospital or long-term care facility (3); a requirement for chronic haemodialysis (2); and a previous history of MRSA infection (4). With a point score cut-off of > or = 10, the specificity of this prediction rule is 98%. Knowledge of variables identifying patients at high risk for being colonised or infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria may assist clinicians in targeting preventive measures and streamlining the use of vancomycin. Current studies are analysing risk-factors for harbouring multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria at hospital admission. PMID:16441446

  19. Indications to Hospital Admission and Isolation of Children With Possible or Defined Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Andrea Lo; Bocchino, Marialuisa; Lancella, Laura; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia; Scotto, Riccardo; Raffaldi, Irene; Assante, Luca Rosario; Villani, Alberto; Esposito, Susanna; Guarino, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) is a re-emerging health problem in developed countries. This paper is part of large guidelines on the global management of TB in children, by a group of scientific societies. It describes the indications to hospitalization of children with suspected or diagnosed TB, the isolation measures, hospital discharge, and re-admission into the community. Using the Consensus Conference method, relevant publications in English were identified by means of a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Available data on indications to hospitalization were mainly indirect and largely derived from observational studies. They include: (1) host-related risk factors, the main being age <12 months, immune deficiencies, and malnutrition; (2) TB-related clinical conditions that resemble those of pneumonia but also include drug-resistance; and (3) social and logistic conditions. The latter are based on opinion and depend on local conditions. Analysis of the literature showed that patients hospitalized with suspected pulmonary TB should be put in precautionary respiratory isolation regardless of their age while they await diagnosis. The general conditions for re-admission into the community are at least 14 days of effective treatment and negative microscopic tests of 3 consecutive samples in previously microscopically positive patients. This is the first paper that provides indications to hospitalization of children with TB. Most recommendations are generally applicable in all developed countries. Some might need an adaptation to local setting, epidemiological, parameters, and availability of specific health-care facilities. PMID:26683914

  20. The Effects of Fine Particle Components on Respiratory Hospital Admissions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ostro, Bart; Roth, Lindsey; Malig, Brian; Marty, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between acute exposure to ambient fine particles and both mortality and morbidity. Less is known about the relative impacts of the specific chemical constituents of particulate matter < 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) on hospital admissions. Objective This study was designed to estimate the risks of exposure to PM2.5 and several species on hospital admissions for respiratory diseases among children. Data and Methods We obtained data on daily counts of hospitalizations for children < 19 and < 5 years of age for total respiratory diseases and several subcategories including pneumonia, acute bronchitis, and asthma for six California counties from 2000 through 2003, as well as ambient concentrations of PM2.5 and its constituents, including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and nitrates (NO3). We used Poisson regression to estimate risks while controlling for important covariates. Results We observed associations between several components of PM2.5 and hospitalization for all of the respiratory outcomes examined. For example, for total respiratory admissions for children < 19 years of age, the interquartile range for a 3-day lag of PM2.5, EC, OC, NO3, and sulfates was associated with an excess risk of 4.1% [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8–6.4], 5.4% (95% CI, 0.8–10.3), 3.4% (95% CI, 1.1–5.7), 3.3% (95% CI, 1.1–5.5), and 3.0% (95% CI, 0.4–5.7), respectively. We also observed associations for several metals. Additional associations with several of the species, including potassium, were observed in the cool season. Conclusion Components of PM2.5 were associated with hospitalization for several childhood respiratory diseases including pneumonia, bronchitis, and asthma. Because exposure to components (e.g., EC, OC, NO3, and K) and their related sources, including diesel and gasoline exhaust, wood smoke, and other combustion sources, are ubiquitous in the urban environment, it

  1. Minimum Alcohol Prices and Outlet Densities in British Columbia, Canada: Estimated Impacts on Alcohol-Attributable Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhui; Martin, Gina; Macdonald, Scott; Vallance, Kate; Treno, Andrew; Ponicki, William; Tu, Andrew; Buxton, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether periodic increases in minimum alcohol prices were associated with reduced alcohol-attributable hospital admissions in British Columbia. Methods. The longitudinal panel study (2002–2009) incorporated minimum alcohol prices, density of alcohol outlets, and age- and gender-standardized rates of acute, chronic, and 100% alcohol-attributable admissions. We applied mixed-method regression models to data from 89 geographic areas of British Columbia across 32 time periods, adjusting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation, moving average effects, season, and a range of economic and social variables. Results. A 10% increase in the average minimum price of all alcoholic beverages was associated with an 8.95% decrease in acute alcohol-attributable admissions and a 9.22% reduction in chronic alcohol-attributable admissions 2 years later. A Can$ 0.10 increase in average minimum price would prevent 166 acute admissions in the 1st year and 275 chronic admissions 2 years later. We also estimated significant, though smaller, adverse impacts of increased private liquor store density on hospital admission rates for all types of alcohol-attributable admissions. Conclusions. Significant health benefits were observed when minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia were increased. By contrast, adverse health outcomes were associated with an expansion of private liquor stores. PMID:23597383

  2. Hospital Admission Rates for a Racially Diverse Low-Income Cohort of Patients With Diabetes: The Urban Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jessica M.; Webb, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective. We sought to determine the frequency and costs of hospitalization and to assess possible racial/ethnic disparities in a large cohort of low-income patients with diabetes who had received primary care at municipal health clinics. Methods. Administrative data from Philadelphia Health Care Centers were linked with discharge data from Pennsylvania hospitals for March 1993 through December 2001. We tested differences in hospitalization rates and mean hospital charges by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Results. A total of 18 800 patients with diabetes experienced 30 528 hospital admissions, for a hospitalization rate of 0.35 per person-year. Rates rose with age and with the interaction of male gender and age. Rates for non-Hispanic Whites were higher than those for African Americans, whereas those for Hispanics, Asian Americans, and “others” were lower. Patients who were hospitalized at least 5 times made up 10.5% of the study population and accounted for 64% of hospital admissions and hospital charges in this cohort. Conclusions. Hospitalization rates for this low-income cohort with access to primary care and pharmacy services were comparable to those of other diabetic patient populations, suggesting that reducing financial barriers to care may have benefited these patients. A subgroup of patients with multiple hospitalizations accounted for the majority of hospital admissions. PMID:16735627

  3. Geomagnetic storms: association with incidence of depression as measured by hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Kay, R W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis that geomagnetic storms may partly account for the seasonal variation in the incidence of depression, by acting as a precipitant of depressive illness in susceptible individuals, is supported by a statistically significant 36.2% increase in male hospital admissions with a diagnosis of depressed phase, manic-depressive illness in the second week following such storms compared with geomagnetically quiet control periods. There is a smaller but not statistically significant increase in female psychotic depression and non-psychotic depression admissions following storms. There was no correlation between geomagnetic storm levels and number of male admissions with psychotic depression, which is consistent with a threshold event affecting predisposed individuals. Phase advance in pineal circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis may be a possible mechanism of causation or be present as a consequence of 5-hydroxytryptamine and adrenergic system dysfunction associated with geomagnetic disturbance. Effects on cell membrane permeability, calcium channel activity and retinal magneto-receptors are suggested as possible underlying biochemical mechanisms. PMID:8199794

  4. Air pollution from biomass burning and asthma hospital admissions in a sugar cane plantation area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Arbex, Marcos Abdo; Martins, Lourdes Conceição; de Oliveira, Regiani Carvalho; Pereira, Luiz Alberto Amador; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Cançado, José Eduardo Delfini; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the total suspended particles (TSPs) generated from preharvest sugar cane burning and hospital admission due to asthma (asthma hospital admissions) in the city of Araraquara. Design An ecological time‐series study. Total daily records of asthma hospital admissions (ICD 10th J15) were obtained from one of the main hospitals in Araraquara, São Paulo State, Brazil, from 23 March 2003 to 27 July 2004. The daily concentration of TSP (μg/m3) was obtained using Handi‐vol equipment (Energética, Brazil) placed in downtown Araraquara. The local airport provided the daily mean figures of temperature and humidity. The daily number of asthma hospital admissions was considered as the dependent variable in Poisson's regression models and the daily concentration of TSP was considered the independent variable. The generalised linear model with natural cubic spline was adopted to control for long‐time trend. Linear terms were used for weather variables. Results TSP had an acute effect on asthma admissions, starting 1 day after TSP concentrations increased and remaining almost unchanged for the next four days. A 10 μg/m3 increase in the 5‐day moving average (lag1–5) of TSP concentrations was associated with an increase of 11.6% (95% CI 5.4 to 17.7) in asthma hospital admissions. Conclusion Increases in TSP concentrations were definitely associated with asthma hospital admissions in Araraquara and, despite using sugar cane alcohol to reduce air pollution from automotive sources in large Brazilian urban centres, the cities where sugar cane is harvested pay a high toll in terms of public health. PMID:17435205

  5. Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction, Angina, Stroke, and Asthma After Implementation of Arizona's Comprehensive Statewide Smoking Ban

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of Arizona's May 2007 comprehensive statewide smoking ban on hospital admissions for diagnoses for which there is evidence of a causal relationship with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], angina, stroke, and asthma). Methods. We compared monthly hospital admissions from January 2004 through May 2008 for these primary diagnoses and 4 diagnoses not associated with SHS (appendicitis, kidney stones, acute cholecystitis, and ulcers) for Arizona counties with preexisting county or municipal smoking bans and counties with no previous bans. We attributed reductions in admissions to the statewide ban if they occurred only in diagnoses associated with SHS and if they were larger in counties with no previous bans. We analyzed the data with Poisson regressions, controlling for seasonality and admissions trends. We also estimated cost savings. Results. Statistically significant reductions in hospital admissions were seen for AMI, angina, stroke, and asthma in counties with no previous bans over what was seen in counties with previous bans. No ban variable coefficients were statistically significant for diagnoses not associated with SHS. Conclusions. Arizona's statewide smoking ban decreased hospital admissions for AMI, stroke, asthma, and angina. PMID:20466955

  6. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  7. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  8. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  9. Reducing the risk of hospital admission: a call to action from the Italian Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Fenoglio, Luigi; Violi, Francesco; Perticone, Francesco; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The belief that hospital stays may constitute per se a risk for patients is not widespread among patients and health care professionals. In the balance between advantages and disadvantages of admission, we rarely take into account the impact of the hospital stay itself on the well-being of the patient. In a society that is getting older the hospital may become a hostile environment for the complex and frail patient. Reducing the risks associated with hospital admission implies a radical cultural change accepted and shared by all health care professionals. The critical reconsideration of admission is a way of reasoning not only on hospitalisation but also on what the correct health outcome paradigms should be. PMID:26170210

  10. Inpatient Dermatology: Characteristics of Patients and Admissions in a Tertiary Level Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arpita; Chowdhury, Satyendranath; Poddar, Indrasish; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27%) were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33%) and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%). Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2%) improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73%) patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64%) required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13%) were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses.

  11. Monotherapy With Major Antihypertensive Drug Classes and Risk of Hospital Admissions for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Boal, Angela H.; Smith, Daniel J.; McCallum, Linsay; Muir, Scott; Touyz, Rhian M.; Dominiczak, Anna F.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive and bipolar disorders predispose to atherosclerosis, and there is accruing data from animal model, epidemiological, and genomic studies that commonly used antihypertensive drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis or course of mood disorders. In this study, we propose to determine whether antihypertensive drugs have an impact on mood disorders through the analysis of patients on monotherapy with different classes of antihypertensive drugs from a large hospital database of 525 046 patients with follow-up for 5 years. There were 144 066 eligible patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria: age 40 to 80 years old at time of antihypertensive prescription and medication exposure >90 days. The burden of comorbidity assessed by Charlson and Elixhauser scores showed an independent linear association with mood disorder diagnosis. The median time to hospital admission with mood disorder was 847 days for the 299 admissions (641 685 person-years of follow-up). Patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers had the lowest risk for mood disorder admissions, and compared with this group, those on β-blockers (hazard ratio=2.11; [95% confidence interval, 1.12–3.98]; P=0.02) and calcium antagonists (2.28 [95% confidence interval, 1.13–4.58]; P=0.02) showed higher risk, whereas those on no antihypertensives (1.63 [95% confidence interval, 0.94–2.82]; P=0.08) and thiazide diuretics (1.56 [95% confidence interval, 0.65–3.73]; P=0.32) showed no significant difference. Overall, our exploratory findings suggest possible differential effects of antihypertensive medications on mood that merits further study: calcium antagonists and β-blockers may be associated with increased risk, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may be associated with a decreased risk of mood disorders. PMID:27733585

  12. Inpatient Dermatology: Characteristics of Patients and Admissions in a Tertiary Level Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arpita; Chowdhury, Satyendranath; Poddar, Indrasish; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27%) were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33%) and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%). Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2%) improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73%) patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64%) required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13%) were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses. PMID:27688450

  13. Admission Chest Radiographs Predict Illness Severity for Children Hospitalized with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Lauren; Hall, Matthew; Shah, Samir S.; Tieder, Joel S.; Myers, Angela L.; Auger, Katherine; Statile, Angela M.; Jerardi, Karen; Queen, Mary Ann; Fieldston, Evan; Williams, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether radiographic findings predict outcomes among children hospitalized with pneumonia. Methods This retrospective study included children <18 years of age from 4 children's hospitals admitted in 2010 with clinical and radiographic evidence of pneumonia. Admission radiographs were categorized as single lobar, unilateral or bilateral multilobar, or interstitial. Pleural effusions were classified as absent, small, or moderate/large. Propensity scoring was used to adjust for potential confounders, including need for supplemental oxygen, intensive care, and mechanical ventilation, as well as hospital length of stay and duration of supplemental oxygen. Results There were 406 children (median age, 3 years). Infiltrate patterns included: single lobar, 61%; multilobar unilateral, 13%; multilobar bilateral, 16%; and interstitial, 10%. Pleural effusion was present in 21%. Overall, 63% required supplemental oxygen (median duration 31.5 hours), 8% required intensive care, and 3% required mechanical ventilation. Median length of stay was 51.5 hours. Compared with single lobar infiltrate, all other infiltrate patterns were associated with need for intensive care; only bilateral multilobar infiltrate was associated with need for mechanical ventilation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.2, 7.9). Presence of effusion was associated with increased length of stay and duration of supplemental oxygen; only moderate/large effusion was associated with need for intensive care (aOR 3.2 [1.1, 8.9]) and mechanical ventilation (aOR 14.8 [9.8, 22.4]). Conclusions Admission radiographic findings are associated with important hospital outcomes and care processes and may help predict disease severity. PMID:24942619

  14. Residential exposure to aircraft noise and hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases: multi-airport retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Andrew W; Peters, Junenette L; Levy, Jonathan I; Melly, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether exposure to aircraft noise increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases in older people (≥65 years) residing near airports. Design Multi-airport retrospective study of approximately 6 million older people residing near airports in the United States. We superimposed contours of aircraft noise levels (in decibels, dB) for 89 airports for 2009 provided by the US Federal Aviation Administration on census block resolution population data to construct two exposure metrics applicable to zip code resolution health insurance data: population weighted noise within each zip code, and 90th centile of noise among populated census blocks within each zip code. Setting 2218 zip codes surrounding 89 airports in the contiguous states. Participants 6 027 363 people eligible to participate in the national medical insurance (Medicare) program (aged ≥65 years) residing near airports in 2009. Main outcome measures Percentage increase in the hospitalization admission rate for cardiovascular disease associated with a 10 dB increase in aircraft noise, for each airport and on average across airports adjusted by individual level characteristics (age, sex, race), zip code level socioeconomic status and demographics, zip code level air pollution (fine particulate matter and ozone), and roadway density. Results Averaged across all airports and using the 90th centile noise exposure metric, a zip code with 10 dB higher noise exposure had a 3.5% higher (95% confidence interval 0.2% to 7.0%) cardiovascular hospital admission rate, after controlling for covariates. Conclusions Despite limitations related to potential misclassification of exposure, we found a statistically significant association between exposure to aircraft noise and risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases among older people living near airports. PMID:24103538

  15. Development of a Patient Registry to Evaluate Hospital Admissions Related to Chemotherapy Toxicity in a Community Cancer Center1

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Treacy, Jean; Maloney, Betty; Lavino, Antoinette; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Most chemotherapy (CT) administration occurs in routine care settings, yet little is known about treatment-related toxicity outside of clinical trials. To examine trends in toxicity, modify practice, and establish benchmarks for severe toxicity in a community cancer center we created a prospective registry of all treatment-related hospitalizations at the North Shore Medical Center Cancer Center, a community-based cancer facility in Peabody, MA. Methods Eligible population consisted of all adult cancer patients admitted to the hospital within 30 days of their last CT administration. Each admission was reviewed by a panel of hospital staff to determine whether admission was treatment-related. Information on admission was collected using a standard form. Results Between October 2001 and December 2003, there were 365 hospitalizations among patients receiving CT, 117 (32%) of which were deemed treatment-related. The median age of the cohort with treatment-related toxicity was 67 years, and 41% were male. Most frequent diagnoses were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (23%) and colorectal cancer (21%), with 49% of the patients receiving treatment with palliative intent. The most common reasons for admission were gastrointestinal toxicity or infection. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days. Seven patients (6%) died during hospitalization. When the registry was reviewed to identify areas where care may be improved, several admissions for decadron-related hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients with myeloma were noted. This led to introduction of glucose monitoring guidelines with no subsequent admissions for this toxicity since then. Conclusions About one third of hospital admissions in patients receiving CT are treatment-related and most occur in patients with advanced disease. Collection of data on toxicity in the routine care setting is feasible and may facilitate quality improvement. PMID:20871674

  16. Do admissions and discharges to long-term care facilities influence hospital burden of Clostridium difficile infection?

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, R.; Nelson, J.; Griffith, J.L.; Concannon, T.W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Substantial geographical clustering of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) outbreaks in hospitals in the USA have previously been demonstrated. Aim To test the hypothesis that hospital burden of CDI is associated with admission from and discharge to long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods Hospital discharge data from 19 states in the USA were used to identify all patients discharged with a diagnosis of CDI from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2004. For every hospital, the proportion of discharges with a diagnosis of CDI was calculated, and those above the 90th percentile were classified as ‘high CDI’ hospitals. We tested the association between this measure of hospital burden of CDI and the rates of admission from and discharges to LTCFs. We adjusted for other hospital level characteristics, case-complexity and local population characteristics. Findings We identified 38,372,951 discharges during the three-year study period. Of all discharges, 274,311 (0.71%) had a primary or secondary diagnosis of CDI. Hospitals had a mean CDI burden of 7.8 cases per 1000 discharges. High CDI hospitals (N = 610; 10.0%) had a mean CDI burden of 34.8 cases per 1000 discharges. Compared to other hospitals, high CDI hospitals were more likely to have a high proportion of admissions from or discharges to LTCFs. This association persisted after adjustments for other hospital characteristics, case-complexity, and area population characteristics. Conclusion A high rate of admission from or discharge to LTCFs is associated with an increased hospital burden of CDI. PMID:22137065

  17. Factors affecting hospital admission and length of stay of poisoned patients in the north east of England.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S H; Lewis, S; Bevan, L; Bhattacharyya, S; Bramble, M G; Chew, K; Connolly, J; Dorani, B; Han, K H; Horner, J E; Rodgers, A; Sen, B; Tesfayohannes, B; Wynne, H; Bateman, D N

    1996-11-01

    1. Poisoning is a common reason for presentation to hospital and hospital admission but there is no agreed policy for managing these patients. This study examined the management of patients presenting with poisoning and the factors affecting the probability of hospital admission and prolonged stay. 2. Data on all cases of poisoning presenting to six Accident and Emergency departments in the North East of England over 12 weeks in 1994 was collected prospectively from A&E notes. Length of stay and outcome were recorded from hospital computer records. 3. Overall, 73% of patients were admitted to a medical ward. Probability of admission was not independently affected by age or gender but was increased in those with intentional poisoning (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.3 [95% CI 1.8, 6.1]), a history of self harm (OR 1.7, [1.0, 2.9]) or potentially hazardous poisoning (OR 3.7 [2.1, 6.6]). There were significant variations between hospitals (50-80%) which could not be attributed to case mix. 4. Prolonged stay (> 2 nights) was more common in patients over 65 years (OR 6.8 [2.9, 16.1]), those with intentional poisoning (OR 2.7 [1.1, 6.6]) and those with potentially hazardous poisoning (OR 2.6 [1.4, 4.9]). Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days and varied significantly between hospitals from 0.8 to 2.1 days and this was independent of case mix. 5. There are appreciable variations in the management of poisoning between hospitals which are not explained by patient characteristics. Savings would occur if rates of admission and duration of stay were reduced by those hospitals where admission is more frequent or hospital stay is longer. However, the impact of this on long term morbidity is unknown. PMID:8938488

  18. Impact of admission serum total cholesterol level on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xintian; Su, Xi; Zeng, Hesong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find out the association between serum total cholesterol (TC) on admission and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: From January 2007 to January 2014, we enrolled 1492 consecutive AAD patients with serum TC measured immediately on admission. Baseline characteristics and in-hospital mortality were compared between the patients with serum TC above and below the median (4.00 mmol/L). Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to account for known confounders in the study. Cox proportional hazard model was performed to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for admission serum TC levels. Results: With the use of PSM, 521 matched pairs of patients with AAD were yielded in this analysis due to their similar propensity scores. Patients with admission serum TC < 4.00 mmol/L, as compared with those with admission serum TC ≥ 4.00 mmol/L, had higher in-hospital mortality (11.7% vs. 5.8%; HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.33-3.19, P = 0.001). Stratified analysis according to Stanford classification showed that the inverse association between admission serum TC and in-hospital mortality was observed in patients with Type-A AAD (24.0% vs. 11.3%; HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.33 - 3.57, P = 0.002) but not in those with Type-B AAD (3.8% vs. 2.2%; HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 0.67 - 4.34, P = 0.261). Conclusions: Lower serum TC level on admission was strongly associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients with Type-A AAD. PMID:27648044

  19. Does referral to specialist paediatric palliative care services reduce hospital admissions in oncology patients at the end of life?

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, L K; van Laar, M; Miller, M; Aldridge, J; McKinney, P A; Parslow, R C; Feltbower, R G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in the treatment of childhood cancer, some children continue to die from their disease. This study aimed to assess the impact of specialist paediatric palliative care services (SPPCSs) on the number of hospital admissions in children who subsequently died from cancer in Yorkshire, UK. Methods: An extract of patients aged 0–19 years from the Yorkshire Specialist Register of Cancer in Children and Young People (YSRCCYP) diagnosed from 1990 to 2009 were linked to inpatient hospital episodes data and a SPPCS database. Deaths were included if they occurred before 31 August 2011. Differences in hospital admission patterns were assessed using negative binomial regression and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results: Of 2508 children on the YSRCCYP, 657 (26%) had died by the censoring date. A total of 211 children had been referred to the local SPPCS, of whom 182 (86%) had subsequently died. Referral to SPPCS was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of planned hospital admissions (IRR=0.60, 95% CI 0.43–0.85). Central nervous system tumours showed significant decreases for all planned and emergency admissions compared with all other diagnostic groups. Conclusion: Referral to SPPCS significantly reduced the number of planned hospital admissions for children and young people with cancer before their death, which are often integral to paediatric oncology treatment regimens. Overall, our findings show that SPPCS have a role in reducing hospital admissions during end of life care of paediatric cancer patients with potential personal, social and economic benefits. PMID:23449361

  20. Decreased Length of Stay and Cumulative Hospitalized Days Despite Increased Patient Admissions and Readmissions in an Area of Urban Poverty

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amit D.; Fisher, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Length of stay at US acute care hospitals has been steadily decreasing since 1960, and there is ongoing concern that increasing financial pressures on hospitals with high proportions of Medicaid patients may be causing unduly short lengths of stay. Objective To study temporal trends in hospital utilization on internal medicine services at Temple University Hospital, which has the highest percentage of Medicaid and uninsured patients in the state of Pennsylvania. Design Examination of temporal changes in hospital practice over three time periods spanning 13 years. Measurements Numbers of discharges, 1- and 12-month re-admission rates, and lengths of stay. US census data from 1990 to 2000 were examined for the eight major zip codes in which hospitalized patients live. Main Results The number of internal medicine admissions increased from 1991 (117/month) to 2004 (455/month); p < 0.0001. Mean length of stay for the index admission decreased from 8.7 to 4.9 days; p < 0.001. The percentage of patients readmitted within 12 months of the discharge date of the index admission increased from 42.3% to 49.5%; p = 0.045. Mean cumulative length of stay over 12 months, including readmissions, decreased significantly (15.8 to 12.5 days; p = 0.031). Compared to all US hospitals, our hospital had a greater increase in admissions and a greater decrease in length of stay. During this time period, in surrounding zip codes, there were decreases in total population and total number of persons living in poverty, but also multiple closures of area hospitals that served poor patients. Conclusion During the 13-year study period, despite increased readmission rates, the overall number of hospitalized days per year on the internal medicine inpatient service decreased. As local hospitals serving this inner city low income area have closed, our hospital had atypically high increases in numbers of admissions and decreases in length of stay. This raises questions

  1. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Fernando; Figueiredo, Francisco Winter dos Santos; Paiva, Laércio da Silva; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Santos, Edige Felipe de Sousa; Martins, Bruno Luis; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60–I64). Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference) and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0. Results There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15–49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54) in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32) in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90). During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67) in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11) in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05). There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group. Conclusion We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults. PMID:27332892

  2. Decreasing Emergency Department Visits and Hospital Admission in the Pediatric Tracheostomy Population.

    PubMed

    McGowin, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    Providing a child with a tracheostomy is often a life saving intervention. However, the impact on the family is frequently life changing. Parents of children with tracheostomies require specialized training in order to provide safe care for their child in the home setting. The purpose of this project was to investigate the outcomes of a parent education program delivered by a nurse practitioner and its impact on patient follow up for children with tracheostomies living at home. This quasi-experimental evidenced based project was based on an intervention group of five parent-child dyads and a control group of 23 parent-child dyads. It took place at a local children's hospital. This project compares the number of emergency room visits, inpatient admissions, phone calls and ENT clinic visits between the two groups. A significant increase in the number of phone calls to the clinic was found in the intervention group (p = 0.018). However, there was no significant change in the number of emergency room visits or inpatient admissions in the intervention group. The small number of participants in the intervention group limits the applicability of the results, however clinical significance exists. This study demonstrated that a structured parent education program with scheduled follow up with a nurse practitioner provides a positive impact on the care of the pediatric tracheostomy patient. PMID:26427184

  3. Winter circulation weather types and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Galicia, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royé, D.; Taboada, J. J.; Martí, A.; Lorenzo, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    The link between various pathologies and atmospheric conditions has been a constant topic of study over recent decades in many places across the world; knowing more about it enables us to pre-empt the worsening of certain diseases, thereby optimizing medical resources. This study looked specifically at the connections in winter between respiratory diseases and types of atmospheric weather conditions (Circulation Weather Types, CWT) in Galicia, a region in the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula. To do this, the study used hospital admission data associated with these pathologies as well as an automatic classification of weather types. The main result obtained was that weather types giving rise to an increase in admissions due to these diseases are those associated with cold, dry weather, such as those in the east and south-east, or anticyclonic types. A second peak was associated with humid, hotter weather, generally linked to south-west weather types. In the future, this result may help to forecast the increase in respiratory pathologies in the region some days in advance.

  4. Winter circulation weather types and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Galicia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Royé, D; Taboada, J J; Martí, A; Lorenzo, M N

    2016-04-01

    The link between various pathologies and atmospheric conditions has been a constant topic of study over recent decades in many places across the world; knowing more about it enables us to pre-empt the worsening of certain diseases, thereby optimizing medical resources. This study looked specifically at the connections in winter between respiratory diseases and types of atmospheric weather conditions (Circulation Weather Types, CWT) in Galicia, a region in the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula. To do this, the study used hospital admission data associated with these pathologies as well as an automatic classification of weather types. The main result obtained was that weather types giving rise to an increase in admissions due to these diseases are those associated with cold, dry weather, such as those in the east and south-east, or anticyclonic types. A second peak was associated with humid, hotter weather, generally linked to south-west weather types. In the future, this result may help to forecast the increase in respiratory pathologies in the region some days in advance.

  5. Epidemiology of paediatric surgical admissions to a government referral hospital in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bickler, S. W.; Sanno-Duanda, B.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of published data on the type of conditions that require surgery among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Such information is necessary for assessing the impact of such conditions on child health and for setting priorities to improve paediatric surgical care. METHODS: Described in the article is a 29-month prospective study of all children aged < 15 years who were admitted to a government referral hospital in the Gambia from January 1996 to May 1998. RESULTS: A total of 1726 children were admitted with surgical problems. Surgical patients accounted for 11.3% of paediatric admissions and 34,625 total inpatient days. The most common admission diagnoses were injuries (46.9%), congenital anomalies (24.3%), and infections requiring surgery (14.5%). The diagnoses that accounted for the greatest number of inpatient days were burns (18.8%), osteomyelitis (15.4%), fractures (12.7%), soft tissue injuries (3.9%), and head injuries (3.4%). Gambian children were rarely admitted for appendicitis and never admitted for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. The leading causes of surgical deaths were burns, congenital anomalies, and injuries other than burns. DISCUSSION: Prevention of childhood injuries and better trauma management, especially at the primary and secondary health care levels, should be the priorities for improving paediatric surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa. Surgical care of children should be considered an essential component of child health programmes in developing countries. PMID:11143193

  6. Analysis of the Spatial Variation of Hospitalization Admissions for Hypertension Disease in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhensheng; Du, Qingyun; Liang, Shi; Nie, Ke; Lin, De-nan; Chen, Yan; Li, Jia-jia

    2014-01-01

    In China, awareness about hypertension, the treatment rate and the control rate are low compared to developed countries, even though China’s aging population has grown, especially in those areas with a high degree of urbanization. However, limited epidemiological studies have attempted to describe the spatial variation of the geo-referenced data on hypertension disease over an urban area of China. In this study, we applied hierarchical Bayesian models to explore the spatial heterogeneity of the relative risk for hypertension admissions throughout Shenzhen in 2011. The final model specification includes an intercept and spatial components (structured and unstructured). Although the road density could be used as a covariate in modeling, it is an indirect factor on the relative risk. In addition, spatial scan statistics and spatial analysis were utilized to identify the spatial pattern and to map the clusters. The results showed that the relative risk for hospital admission for hypertension has high-value clusters in the south and southeastern Shenzhen. This study aimed to identify some specific regions with high relative risk, and this information is useful for the health administrators. Further research should address more-detailed data collection and an explanation of the spatial patterns. PMID:24394218

  7. Tobacco Stained Fingers and Its Association with Death and Hospital Admission: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Gregor; Genné, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Among smokers, the presence of tobacco stains on fingers has recently been associated with a high prevalence of tobacco related conditions and alcohol abuse. Objective we aimed to explore tobacco stains as a marker of death and hospital readmission. Method Seventy-three smokers presenting tobacco-tar staining on their fingers and 70 control smokers were followed during a median of 5.5 years in a retrospective cohort study. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the log-rank test to compare mortality and hospital readmission rates among smokers with and smokers without tobacco stains. Multivariable Cox models were used to adjust for confounding factors: age, gender, pack-year unit smoked, cancer, harmful alcohol use and diabetes. The number of hospital admissions was compared through a negative binomial regression and adjusted for the follow-up time, diabetes, and alcohol use. Results Forty-three patients with tobacco-stained fingers died compared to 26 control smokers (HR 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0 to 2.7; p 0.048). The association was not statistically significant after adjustment. Patients with tobacco-stained fingers needed a readmission earlier than smokers without stains (HR 2.1; 95%CI: 1.4 to 3.1; p<0.001), and more often (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.6; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.1). Associations between stains and the first hospital readmission (HR 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0 to 2.5), and number of readmissions (IRR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.1) persisted after adjustment for confounding factors. Conclusions Compared to other smokers, those presenting tobacco-stained fingers have a high unadjusted mortality rate and need early and frequent hospital readmission even when controlling for confounders. PMID:26375287

  8. Gastroenteritis among children in Riyadh: a prospective analysis of 254 hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Karrar, Z A; Abdullah, M A

    1981-06-01

    A prospective study was undertaken of 254 infants and children admitted with gastroenteritis to the Children's Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during the period 1 September 1980 to 1 February 1981. Analysis of data showed that 80% of the admissions were less than one year of age. The peak incidence occurred in the 0-five months age group. 65.4% were on bottle feeding. The incidence of second- and third-degree malnutrition was 38.9%. Marasmus was the commonest type of severe malnutrition seen. Hypernatraemic dehydration occurred in 12.6% of the cases. The parasitic and bacterial isolation rate was 23.8%, salmonella and entero-pathogenic E. coli being the commonest organisms. The mortality rate was 9.1% and was higher among malnourished patients, those with hypernatraemia and in the younger age groups.

  9. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  10. Respiratory hospital admissions and summertime haze air pollution in Toronto, Ontario: consideration of the role of acid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G D; Ito, K; Hayes, C G; Bates, D V; Lippmann, M

    1994-05-01

    A study of air pollution and daily hospital admissions for respiratory causes was conducted in Toronto, Ontario. Fine aerosol (da < 2.5 microns) samples were collected daily at a central city site during July and August 1986, 1987, and 1988 and were subsequently extracted and analyzed for daily particulate phase aerosol strong acidity (H+) and sulfates (SO4 =). Daily counts of respiratory admissions to 22 acute care hospitals and daily meteorological and environmental data (e.g. ozone [O3], total suspended particulate matter [TSP], and thoracic particle mass [PM10] were also obtained. Regression analyses indicated that only the O3, H+, and SO4 = associations with respiratory and asthma admissions remained consistently significant after controlling for temperature. Even after excluding days with maximum 1-hr O3 > 120 ppb, O3 was still strongly significant. In the various model specifications considered, the relative particle metric strengths of association with admissions were generally H+ > SO4 = > FP > PM10 > TSP, indicating that particle size and composition are of central importance in defining the adverse human health effects of particulate matter. On average, summertime haze air pollution was associated with 24% of all respiratory admissions (21% with O3, 3% with H+). On peak pollution days, however, aerosol acidity yielded the highest relative risk estimates (e.g., RR = 1.5 at 391 nmole/m3 H+), and summertime haze was associated with roughly half of all respiratory admissions.

  11. Association of Indoor Smoke-Free Air Laws with Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Three States

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Brett R.; Juster, Harlan R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether comprehensive smoke-free air laws enacted in Florida, New York, and Oregon are associated with reductions in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. Methods. Analyzed trends in county-level, age-adjusted, hospital admission rates for AMI and stroke from 1990 to 2006 (quarterly) for Florida, 1995 to 2006 (monthly) for New York, and 1998 to 2006 (monthly) for Oregon to identify any association between admission rates and passage of comprehensive smoke-free air laws. Interrupted time series analysis was used to adjust for the effects of preexisting moderate local-level laws, seasonal variation in hospital admissions, differences across counties, and a secular time trend. Results. More than 3 years after passage of statewide comprehensive smoke-free air laws, rates of hospitalization for AMI were reduced by 18.4% (95% CI: 8.8–28.0%) in Florida and 15.5% (95% CI: 11.0–20.1%) in New York. Rates of hospitalization for stroke were reduced by 18.1% (95% CI: 9.3–30.0%) in Florida. The few local comprehensive laws in Oregon were not associated with reductions in AMI or stroke statewide. Conclusion. Comprehensive smoke-free air laws are an effective policy tool for reducing the burden of AMI and stroke. PMID:22778759

  12. Examining the relationship between anxiety and depression and exacerbations of COPD which result in hospital admission: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pooler, Alison; Beech, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are the third largest cause of emergency hospital admissions in the UK. This systematic literature review explored the relationship between the hospitalization rates and the COPD comorbidities, anxiety, and depression. Methods The Centre for Research Dissemination’s framework for systematic reviews was followed using search terms relating to COPD, anxiety, depression, and hospital admission. Papers identified were assessed for relevance and quality, using a suitable Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool and Mixed Methods Assessment Tool. Results Twenty quantitative studies indicated that anxiety and depression led to a statistically significant increase in the likelihood of COPD patients being hospitalized. These comorbidities also led to an increased length of stay and a greater risk of mortality postdischarge. Other significant factors included lower Body-Mass Index, Airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise scores, female gender, lower socioeconomic status, poorer patient perceived quality of life, increased severity of lung function, and less improvement in dyspnea from admission to discharge. It was also highlighted that only 27%–33% of those with depression were being treated for it. Four qualitative studies revealed that patients saw anxiety and depression as a major factor that affected their ability to cope with and self-manage their condition. Implications Findings from the systematic review have highlighted a need for better recognition and treatment of anxiety and depression amongst individuals with COPD. Ongoing research will develop and test strategies for promoting better management and self-management as a means of reducing hospital admissions. PMID:24729698

  13. Impact of Rapid Molecular Screening at Hospital Admission on Nosocomial Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Cluster Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roisin, Sandrine; Laurent, Christine; Denis, Olivier; Dramaix, Michèle; Nonhoff, Claire; Hallin, Marie; Byl, Baudouin; Struelens, Marc J.

    2014-01-01

    Design Cluster randomised crossover trial with seven wards randomly allocated to intervention or control arm. Setting Medical and surgical wards of a university hospital with active MRSA control programme. Participants All patients hospitalized >48 h in study wards and screened for MRSA on admission and discharge Intervention: Rapid PCR-based screening test for MRSA compared with control screening test by enrichment culture using chromogenic agar. Objective We determined the benefit of PCR-detection versus culture-based detection of MRSA colonisation upon patient admission on early implementation of isolation precautions and reduction of hospital transmission of MRSA. Main outcome Cumulative rate of MRSA hospital acquisition of in patients screened negative on admission. Randomization The sequential order of inclusion of study wards in each arm was randomised by assigning a number to each ward and using a computer generated list of random numbers. Findings Of 3704 eligible patients, 67.8% were evaluable for the study. Compared with culture, PCR-screening reduced the median test reporting time from admission from 88 to 11 hours (p<0.001) and the median time from admission to isolation from 96 to 25 hours (p<0.001). MRSA acquisition was detected in 36 patients (3.2%) in the control arm and 34 (3.2%) in the intervention arm. The incidence density rate of hospital acquired MRSA was 2.82 and 2.57/1,000 exposed patient-days in the control and intervention arm, respectively (risk ratio 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.60–1.39). Poisson regression model adjusted for colonisation pressure, compliance with hand hygiene and antibiotic use indicated a RR 0.99 (95% CI, 0.69 to 1.44). Interpretation Universal PCR screening for MRSA on admission to medical and surgical wards in an endemic setting shortened the time to implement isolation precautions but did not reduce nosocomial acquisition of MRSA. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00846105 PMID:24836438

  14. The current and future financial burden of hospital admissions for heart failure in Canada: a cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Dat T.; Ohinmaa, Arto; Thanh, Nguyen X.; Howlett, Jonathan G.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; McAlister, Finlay A.; Kaul, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is a costly health condition and a major public health concern. We sought to examine the costs of hospital admissions for heart failure between fiscal years 2004 and 2013 in Canada and to model the future costs to 2030. Methods: Canadian Institutes for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database was used to identify admissions to hospital with heart failure as the primary diagnosis between fiscal years 2004 and 2013. Multiple linear regression models were used to calculate the trend in prevalence and extrapolate these to 2030. Canadian Institutes for Health Information patient cost estimates were used to identify costs of hospital admissions for heart failure. Generalized linear models were used to estimate average annual costs per heart failure patient. We conducted a sensitivity analysis including all admissions for heart failure in any diagnostic field. Results: In 2013, 45 600 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 43 800-47 200) patients were admitted with heart failure as the primary diagnosis, accounting for $482 (95% CI $464-$500) million. By 2030, we estimate 54 000 (95% CI 49 000-60 000) patients and costs of $722 (95% CI $650-$801) million, with older adults (age ≥ 80 yr) accounting for 52% of costs. Including admissions for which heart failure was a secondary diagnosis increases the total cost to $2.8 (95% CI $2.6-$3.0) billion in 2030. Interpretation: As in other developed countries, hospital costs related to heart failure in Canada are on the rise. Older adults are the main consumers of such hospital services. Strategies to improve outpatient care to reduce rates of admission for heart failure are needed.

  15. A Study on Hospital Admissions For Eye Trauma in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Movahedinejad, Tayebeh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zahedi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Eye trauma is among the most common reasons for referral to hospital emergency departments and ophthalmologists’ offices. It also is a common cause of vision loss worldwide. However, few studies are available on the changes in the epidemiology of eye trauma in Iran in recent years. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of hospital admissions for eye trauma in Kashan from August 2011 to February 2014. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out on the hospital records of all patients with eye trauma who were admitted to Kashan’s Matini hospital between August 2011 and February 2014. Having an eye trauma and being hospitalized for at least one day was selected as the criteria for inclusion in the study. The data were then recorded on a checklist devised by the researcher. After entering the data into the SPSS software, descriptive statistics (i.e., percentage, frequency, mean, and standard deviation) were calculated for all variables. Chi-square, Fisher’s exact test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyze the data. Results In total, 200 patients with eye trauma had been hospitalized in Matini Hospital between August 2011 and February 2014. Of these patients, 86% were males, 40% were in the age range of 20-39 years, 68% lived in urban areas, and 21% of those in employment were manual and industrial workers. Approximately 38.5% of eye traumas had occurred in the work place; 72.5% of patients had penetrating injuries and 98% of cases were injured in one eye. More injuries occurred in the cornea (25.5%) than elsewhere in the eye, and 75.5% of patients were treated surgically. Among all variables, only the type of trauma (P = 0.009) and cause of trauma (P = 0.004) were significantly related to the patients’ gender. Conclusions Eye trauma was prevalent among males, young people, urban residents, and manual and industrial workers. As the eyes play a vital role in daily life, communication, and work

  16. Tuberculosis in hospitalized patients: clinical characteristics of patients receiving treatment within the first 24 h after admission*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; da Silva, Larissa Pozzebon; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients hospitalized for tuberculosis, comparing those in whom tuberculosis treatment was started within the first 24 h after admission with those who did not. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study involving new tuberculosis cases in patients aged ≥ 18 years who were hospitalized after seeking treatment in the emergency room. Results: We included 305 hospitalized patients, of whom 67 (22.0%) received tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission ( ≤24h group) and 238 (88.0%) did not (>24h group). Initiation of tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission was associated with being female (OR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.06-3.74; p = 0.032) and with an AFB-positive spontaneous sputum smear (OR = 4.19; 95% CI: 1.94-9.00; p < 0.001). In the ≤24h and >24h groups, respectively, the ICU admission rate was 22.4% and 15.5% (p = 0.258); mechanical ventilation was used in 22.4% and 13.9% (p = 0.133); in-hospital mortality was 22.4% and 14.7% (p = 0.189); and a cure was achieved in 44.8% and 52.5% (p = 0.326). Conclusions: Although tuberculosis treatment was initiated promptly in a considerable proportion of the inpatients evaluated, the rates of in-hospital mortality, ICU admission, and mechanical ventilation use remained high. Strategies for the control of tuberculosis in primary care should consider that patients who seek medical attention at hospitals arrive too late and with advanced disease. It is therefore necessary to implement active surveillance measures in the community for earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25029651

  17. Trend study on the association between hospital admissions and the health of Dutch older adults (1995–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Galenkamp, Henrike; Deeg, Dorly J H; de Jongh, Renate T; Kardaun, Jan W P F; Huisman, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increase in hospital admission rates in older people may reflect improved access to healthcare, but also declining health trends in the older population. Owing to a lack of individual-level data, the latter possibility has received little attention. The current study examines associations between health status and hospitalisation rates of older adults in the Netherlands. Design Observational individual-level data linked to hospital register data. Setting Data from 1995 to 2009 from the nationally representative Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were linked to the Dutch Hospital Discharge Register. Participants A total of 5681 observations of 2520 respondents across 4 measurement points (each with a follow-up of 36 months; ages 65–88 years). Outcome measures The contribution of health, demographic, psychosocial and lifestyle characteristics to time trends in hospitalisation was assessed in multivariate models. Results Between 1995 and 2009, the percentage with 1 or more overnight admissions (planned or acute) increased slightly from 38.1% to 39.7%. This was due to an increase in acute admission only (22.2–27.0%). Increased prevalences of chronic diseases, functional limitations and polypharmacy accounted for part of the observed increase in acute admissions. In addition, a more than doubled prevalence of day admissions over time was observed (12.3–28.3%), a trend that was unrelated to changes in individual characteristics. Conclusions This trend study showed a contribution of declines in population health to increases in acute hospital admissions. Since these declines did not provide a full explanation, healthcare reforms and increases in treatment possibilities in this period are likely to have contributed as well. PMID:27531734

  18. Factors Associated with Severity and Hospital Admission of Motor-Vehicle Injury Cases in a Southern European Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Cirera, Eva; Plasència, Antoni; Ferrando, Josep; Seguí-Gomez, Maria

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND The knowledge of injury severity as a result of motor-vehicle (MV) crashes is a key tool to identify and evaluate prevention activities. Hospital and emergency department (ED) records are a useful source of information to measure injury severity. OBJECTIVES To describe the main characteristics of injured people admitted to ED as a result of a MV crash, and to assess factors related to injury severity and hospital admission. METHODS Cross-sectional design. Subjects were MV injury patients admitted to seven EDs in Barcelona from January 1994 to June 1996. The data analyzed were obtained from the information routinely transmitted from the EDs to the Municipal Institute of Health, based on the processing of ED logs. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistical analyses were performed, as well as multiple logistic regressions. RESULTS 60.7% of patients were males, 73.7% were younger than 40 years of age, while 42.2% were motorcycle and moped users and 25.2% were pedestrians. After adjusting for other variables, these three last user groups were at a higher risk of a more severe injury (OR=1.4; OR=1.5 and OR=1.7 respectively) and showed a higher likelihood of a hospital admission (OR=1.9; OR= 1.7 and OR= 2.1). Patients arriving at the hospital during night-time (OR=2.1) and in hospitals C or D (OR= 2.2 and OR= 2.3 respectively) were also at a higher risk of a hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS The study underscores that in Barcelona, pedestrians and two-wheel vehicle occupants, besides accounting for two-thirds of traffic injury cases, are also the user’s subgroups with a higher risk of a more severe injury as well as a higher chance of admission. The results also point out that decision criteria on the patient need for hospitalization may vary substantially among hospitals in the case of trauma patients.

  19. Utilization and Expenditure of Hospital Admission in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: National Health Insurance Claims Database Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lai, Chia-Im

    2011-01-01

    There were not many studies to provide information on health access and health utilization of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study describes a general profile of hospital admission and the medical cost among people with ASD, and to analyze the determinants of medical cost. A retrospective study was employed to analyze…

  20. Fever in returned travelers: review of hospital admissions for a 3-year period.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Tobin, S; Brown, G V; Torresi, J

    2001-09-01

    We reviewed 232 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital under the care of an infectious diseases unit for management of febrile illness acquired overseas. A total of 53% presented to hospital within 1 week of return and 96% within 6 months. Malaria was the most common diagnosis (27% of patients), followed by respiratory tract infection (24%), gastroenteritis (14%), dengue fever (8%), and bacterial pneumonia (6%). Pretravel vaccination may have prevented a number of admissions, including influenza (n=11), typhoid fever (n=8) and hepatitis A (n=6). Compared to those who had not traveled to Africa, those who had were 6 times more likely to present with falciparum than nonfalciparum malaria. An itinerary that included Asia was associated with a 13-fold increased risk of dengue, but a lower risk of malaria. Palpable splenomegaly was associated with an 8-fold risk of malaria and hepatomegaly with a 4-fold risk of malaria. As a cause of fever, bacterial pneumonia was > or =5 times more likely in those who were aged >40 years.

  1. Association of cannabis use with hospital admission and antipsychotic treatment failure in first episode psychosis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robin; Jackson, Richard; Ball, Michael; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cannabis use is associated with increased risk of relapse, as indexed by number of hospital admissions, and whether antipsychotic treatment failure, as indexed by number of unique antipsychotics prescribed, may mediate this effect in a large data set of patients with first episode psychosis (FEP). Design Observational study with exploratory mediation analysis. Setting Anonymised electronic mental health record data from the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Participants 2026 people presenting to early intervention services with FEP. Exposure Cannabis use at presentation, identified using natural language processing. Main outcome measures admission to psychiatric hospital and clozapine prescription up to 5 years following presentation. Mediator Number of unique antipsychotics prescribed. Results Cannabis use was present in 46.3% of the sample at first presentation and was particularly common in patients who were 16–25, male and single. It was associated with increased frequency of hospital admission (incidence rate ratio 1.50, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.80), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (OR 1.55, 1.16 to 2.08) and greater number of days spent in hospital (β coefficient 35.1 days, 12.1 to 58.1). The number of unique antipsychotics prescribed, mediated increased frequency of hospital admission (natural indirect effect 1.09, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.18; total effect 1.50, 1.21 to 1.87), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (natural indirect effect (NIE) 1.27, 1.03 to 1.58; total effect (TE) 1.76, 0.81 to 3.84) and greater number of days spent in hospital (NIE 17.9, 2.4 to 33.4; TE 34.8, 11.6 to 58.1). Conclusions Cannabis use in patients with FEP was associated with an increased likelihood of hospital admission. This was linked to the prescription of several different antipsychotic drugs, indicating clinical judgement of antipsychotic treatment failure. Together, this suggests that cannabis use might be

  2. Incidence, causes and severity of injuries in Aquitaine, France: a community-based study of hospital admissions and deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Tiret, L; Garros, B; Maurette, P; Nicaud, V; Thicoipe, M; Hatton, F; Erny, P

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of injuries conducted during a one-year period within a defined geographic population of 2.7 million persons (Aquitaine, France). Cases were defined as unintentional or intentional injuries, either resulting in immediate death before reaching hospital or requiring hospital admission. During the one-year period, 1,181 deaths were registered and 8,190 hospital admissions occurred during the sample periods. The three leading causes of injury were falls (40 per cent), traffic accidents (27 per cent), and poisonings (15 per cent). The overall incidence of injuries was 136 per 10,000 person years. Incidence by sex and age was assessed for the main external causes. The ratios of nonfatal to fatal cases were calculated by sex and age and by external cause. The origin of the injury was suicide in 14 per cent of cases and assault or homicide in 3 per cent. The severity of injuries, assessed using an automatic computation of the Injury Severity Score (ISS), ranged from 1 to 66 with a mean of 6.9. Substantial variations of ISS were observed according to external cause. At the 8th day following admission, 31 per cent of hospital-treated patients were still hospitalized and 0.8 per cent had died in hospital. The outcome correlated well with the ISS. PMID:2916718

  3. Epidemiology of Hospital Admissions with Influenza during the 2013/2014 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Season: Results from the Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Barberà, Joan; Natividad-Sancho, Angels; Trushakova, Svetlana; Sominina, Anna; Pisareva, Maria; Ciblak, Meral A.; Badur, Selim; Yu, Hongjie; Cowling, Benjamin J.; El Guerche-Séblain, Clotilde; Mira-Iglesias, Ainara; Kisteneva, Lidiya; Stolyarov, Kirill; Yurtcu, Kubra; Feng, Luzhao; López-Labrador, Xavier; Burtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network was established in 2012 to obtain valid epidemiologic data on hospital admissions with influenza-like illness. Here we describe the epidemiology of admissions with influenza within the Northern Hemisphere sites during the 2013/2014 influenza season, identify risk factors for severe outcomes and complications, and assess the impact of different influenza viruses on clinically relevant outcomes in at-risk populations. Methods Eligible consecutive admissions were screened for inclusion at 19 hospitals in Russia, Turkey, China, and Spain using a prospective, active surveillance approach. Patients that fulfilled a common case definition were enrolled and epidemiological data were collected. Risk factors for hospitalization with laboratory-confirmed influenza were identified by multivariable logistic regression. Findings 5303 of 9507 consecutive admissions were included in the analysis. Of these, 1086 were influenza positive (534 A(H3N2), 362 A(H1N1), 130 B/Yamagata lineage, 3 B/Victoria lineage, 40 untyped A, and 18 untyped B). The risk of hospitalization with influenza (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) was elevated for patients with cardiovascular disease (1.63 [1.33–2.02]), asthma (2.25 [1.67–3.03]), immunosuppression (2.25 [1.23–4.11]), renal disease (2.11 [1.48–3.01]), liver disease (1.94 [1.18–3.19], autoimmune disease (2.97 [1.58–5.59]), and pregnancy (3.84 [2.48–5.94]). Patients without comorbidities accounted for 60% of admissions with influenza. The need for intensive care or in-hospital death was not significantly different between patients with or without influenza. Influenza vaccination was associated with a lower risk of confirmed influenza (adjusted odds ratio = 0.61 [0.48–0.77]). Conclusions Influenza infection was detected among hospital admissions with and without known risk factors. Pregnancy and underlying comorbidity increased the risk of detecting influenza

  4. The severity of initial acute kidney injury at admission of geriatric patients significantly correlates with subsequent in-hospital complications.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shing; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-09-10

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with higher hospital mortality. However, the relationship between geriatric AKI and in-hospital complications is unclear. We prospectively enrolled elderly patients (≥65 years) from general medical wards of National Taiwan University Hospital, part of whom presented AKI at admission. We recorded subsequent in-hospital complications, including catastrophic events, incident gastrointestinal bleeding, hospital-associated infections, and new-onset electrolyte imbalances. Regression analyses were utilized to assess the associations between in-hospital complications and the initial AKI severity. A total of 163 elderly were recruited, with 39% presenting AKI (stage 1: 52%, stage 2: 23%, stage 3: 25%). The incidence of any in-hospital complication was significantly higher in the AKI group than in the non-AKI group (91% vs. 68%, p < 0.01). Multiple regression analyses indicated that elderly patients presenting with AKI had significantly higher risk of developing any complication (Odds ratio [OR] = 3.51, p = 0.01) and new-onset electrolyte imbalance (OR = 7.1, p < 0.01), and a trend toward more hospital-associated infections (OR = 1.99, p = 0.08). The risk of developing complications increased with higher AKI stage. In summary, our results indicate that initial AKI at admission in geriatric patients significantly increased the risk of in-hospital complications.

  5. Outcomes and Resource Use of Sepsis-associated Stays by Presence on Admission, Severity, and Hospital Type

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Carol M.; Kiehne, Lisa B.; Nicolas, Juan C.; Rose, Alexis L.; Shirkey, Beverly A.; Masud, Faisal; Wray, Nelda P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To establish a baseline for the incidence of sepsis by severity and presence on admission in acute care hospital settings before implementation of a broad sepsis screening and response initiative. Methods: A retrospective cohort study using hospital discharge abstracts of 5672 patients, aged 18 years and above, with sepsis-associated stays between February 2012 and January 2013 at an academic medical center and 5 community hospitals in Texas. Results: Sepsis was present on admission in almost 85% of cases and acquired in-hospital in the remainder. The overall inpatient death rate was 17.2%, but was higher in hospital-acquired sepsis (38.6%, medical; 29.2%, surgical) and Stages 2 (17.6%) and 3 (36.4%) compared with Stage 1 (5.9%). Patients treated at the academic medical center had a higher death rate (22.5% vs. 15.1%, P<0.001) and were more costly ($68,050±184,541 vs. $19,498±31,506, P<0.001) versus community hospitals. Conclusions: Greater emphasis is needed on public awareness of sepsis and the detection of sepsis in the prehospitalization and early hospitalization period. Hospital characteristics and case mix should be accounted for in cross-hospital comparisons of sepsis outcomes and costs. PMID:26759980

  6. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  7. Seasonal Changes in Hospital Admissions for Pulmonary Embolism in Metropolitan Areas of Tokyo (from the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network).

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Ayano; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-15

    Although several studies have shown the relation between temperature/atmospheric pressure and pulmonary embolism (PE), their results are inconsistent. Furthermore, diurnal temperature range (DTR) and diurnal pressure range (DPR) were not fully evaluated for their associations with hospital admissions for PE. Study subjects comprised cases of 1,148 PE treated at institutions belonging to the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network from January 2005 to December 2012. Patient data were combined with a variety of daily local climate parameters obtained from the Japan Meteorological Agency. Every 1°C increase in the DTR at lag0 corresponded to an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (odds ratio [OR] 1.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003 to 1.070). In the cooler season (November to April), an increase of 1 hPa (barometric pressure) in the DPR at lag4 and lag5 was associated with an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (OR 1.042, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.077 and OR 0.952, 95% CI 0.914 to 0.992, respectively). An increase in the PE hospitalization rate was seen only in the cool season. Using a metropolitan database, we showed that DTR and DPR have different impacts on hospital admissions for PE. In conclusion, we found that an increase in the DTR increases the PE hospitalization rate, especially during the cooler season. The impact of DTR and DPR on PE incidence and related hospitalizations needs to be further evaluated.

  8. Seasonal Changes in Hospital Admissions for Pulmonary Embolism in Metropolitan Areas of Tokyo (from the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network).

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Ayano; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-15

    Although several studies have shown the relation between temperature/atmospheric pressure and pulmonary embolism (PE), their results are inconsistent. Furthermore, diurnal temperature range (DTR) and diurnal pressure range (DPR) were not fully evaluated for their associations with hospital admissions for PE. Study subjects comprised cases of 1,148 PE treated at institutions belonging to the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network from January 2005 to December 2012. Patient data were combined with a variety of daily local climate parameters obtained from the Japan Meteorological Agency. Every 1°C increase in the DTR at lag0 corresponded to an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (odds ratio [OR] 1.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003 to 1.070). In the cooler season (November to April), an increase of 1 hPa (barometric pressure) in the DPR at lag4 and lag5 was associated with an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (OR 1.042, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.077 and OR 0.952, 95% CI 0.914 to 0.992, respectively). An increase in the PE hospitalization rate was seen only in the cool season. Using a metropolitan database, we showed that DTR and DPR have different impacts on hospital admissions for PE. In conclusion, we found that an increase in the DTR increases the PE hospitalization rate, especially during the cooler season. The impact of DTR and DPR on PE incidence and related hospitalizations needs to be further evaluated. PMID:26602077

  9. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor-II Antagonist Prescribing and Hospital Admissions with Acute Kidney Injury: A Longitudinal Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Abel, Gary A.; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tomson, Charles R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Roland, Martin O.; Payne, Rupert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background ACE Inhibitors (ACE-I) and Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonists (ARAs) are commonly prescribed but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) during intercurrent illness. Rates of hospitalization with AKI are increasing. We aimed to determine whether hospital AKI admission rates are associated with increased ACE-I/ARA prescribing. Methods and Findings English NHS prescribing data for ACE-I/ARA prescriptions were matched at the level of the general practice to numbers of hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of AKI. Numbers of prescriptions were weighted for the demographic characteristics of general practices by expressing prescribing as rates where the denominator is Age, Sex, and Temporary Resident Originated Prescribing Units (ASTRO-PUs). We performed a mixed-effect Poisson regression to model the number of admissions for AKI occurring in each practice for each of 4 years from 1/4/2007. From 2007/8-2010/11, crude AKI admission rates increased from 0.38 to 0.57 per 1000 patients (51.6% increase), and national annual ACE-I/ARA prescribing rates increased by 0.032 from 0.202 to 0.234 (15.8% increase). There was strong evidence (p<0.001) that increases in practice-level prescribing of ACE-I/ARA over the study period were associated with an increase in AKI admission rates. The increase in prescribing seen in a typical practice corresponded to an increase in admissions of approximately 5.1% (rate ratio = 1.051 for a 0.03 per ASTRO-PU increase in annual prescribing rate, 95%CI 1.047-1.055). Using the regression model we predict that 1,636 (95%CI 1,540-1,780) AKI admissions would have been avoided if prescribing rates were at the 2007/8 level, equivalent to 14.8% of the total increase in AKI admissions. Conclusion In this ecological analysis, up to 15% of the increase in AKI admissions in England over a 4-year time period is potentially attributable to increased prescribing of ACE-I and ARAs. However, these findings are limited by the lack of patient level

  10. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important predictor of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals(B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation predicted self-harm directly (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD [corrected]. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients.

  11. Risk of Care Home Placement following Acute Hospital Admission: Effects of a Pay-for-Performance Scheme for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kasteridis, Panagiotis; Goddard, Maria; Jacobs, Rowena; Santos, Rita; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Beatriz; McGonigal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Quality and Outcomes Framework, or QOF, rewards primary care doctors (GPs) in the UK for providing certain types of care. Since 2006, GPs have been paid to identify patients with dementia and to conduct an annual review of their mental and physical health. During the review, the GP also assesses the carer’s support needs, including impact of caring, and ensures that services are co-ordinated across care settings. In principle, this type of care should reduce the risk of admission to long-term residential care directly from an acute hospital ward, a phenomenon considered to be indicative of poor quality care. However, this potential effect has not previously been tested. Methods Using English data from 2006/07 to 2010/11, we ran multilevel logit models to assess the impact of the QOF review on the risk of care home placement following emergency admission to acute hospital. Emergency admissions were defined for (a) people with a primary diagnosis of dementia and (b) people with dementia admitted for treatment of an ambulatory care sensitive condition. We adjusted for a wide range of potential confounding factors. Results Over the study period, 19% of individuals admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of dementia (N = 31,120) were discharged to a care home; of those admitted for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (N = 139,267), the corresponding figure was 14%. Risk factors for subsequent care home placement included older age, female gender, vascular dementia, incontinence, fall, hip fracture, and number of comorbidities. Better performance on the QOF review was associated with a lower risk of care home placement but only when the admission was for an ambulatory care sensitive condition. Conclusions The QOF dementia review may help to reduce the risk of long-term care home placement following acute hospital admission. PMID:27227403

  12. Hospital Admission following Induced Abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea – A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Vallely, Lisa M.; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D. L.; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Methods Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Findings Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. Conclusion In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion. PMID:25329982

  13. External validation of the Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model for predicting death within 1 year after hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A.; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Hawken, Steven; Donzé, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting long-term survival after admission to hospital is helpful for clinical, administrative and research purposes. The Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model was derived and internally validated to predict the risk of death within 1 year after admission. We conducted an external validation of the model in a large multicentre study. Methods: We used administrative data for all nonpsychiatric admissions of adult patients to hospitals in the provinces of Ontario (2003–2010) and Alberta (2011–2012), and to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (2010–2012) to calculate each patient’s HOMR score at admission. The HOMR score is based on a set of parameters that captures patient demographics, health burden and severity of acute illness. We determined patient status (alive or dead) 1 year after admission using population-based registries. Results: The 3 validation cohorts (n = 2 862 996 in Ontario, 210 595 in Alberta and 66 683 in Boston) were distinct from each other and from the derivation cohort. The overall risk of death within 1 year after admission was 8.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.7% to 8.8%). The HOMR score was strongly and significantly associated with risk of death in all populations and was highly discriminative, with a C statistic ranging from 0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91) to 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.92). Observed and expected outcome risks were similar (median absolute difference in percent dying in 1 yr 0.3%, interquartile range 0.05%–2.5%). Interpretation: The HOMR score, calculated using routinely collected administrative data, accurately predicted the risk of death among adult patients within 1 year after admission to hospital for nonpsychiatric indications. Similar performance was seen when the score was used in geographically and temporally diverse populations. The HOMR model can be used for risk adjustment in analyses of health administrative data to predict long-term survival among hospital patients

  14. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to Medical Wards: A Cross-Sectional Survey at 4 Hospitals in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Johannes P; Njuguna, Christine; Kramer, Nicole; Stewart, Annemie; Mehta, Ushma; Blockman, Marc; Fortuin-De Smidt, Melony; De Waal, Reneé; Parrish, Andy G; Wilson, Douglas P K; Igumbor, Ehimario U; Aynalem, Getahun; Dheda, Mukesh; Maartens, Gary; Cohen, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Limited data exist on the burden of serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in sub-Saharan Africa, which has high HIV and tuberculosis prevalence. We determined the proportion of adult admissions attributable to ADRs at 4 hospitals in South Africa. We characterized drugs implicated in, risk factors for, and the preventability of ADR-related admissions.We prospectively followed patients admitted to 4 hospitals' medical wards over sequential 30-day periods in 2013 and identified suspected ADRs with the aid of a trigger tool. A multidisciplinary team performed causality, preventability, and severity assessment using published criteria. We categorized an admission as ADR-related if the ADR was the primary reason for admission.There were 1951 admissions involving 1904 patients: median age was 50 years (interquartile range 34-65), 1057 of 1904 (56%) were female, 559 of 1904 (29%) were HIV-infected, and 183 of 1904 (10%) were on antituberculosis therapy (ATT). There were 164 of 1951 (8.4%) ADR-related admissions. After adjustment for age and ATT, ADR-related admission was independently associated (P ≤ 0.02) with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-2.14), increasing drug count (aOR 1.14 per additional drug, 95% CI 1.09-1.20), increasing comorbidity score (aOR 1.23 per additional point, 95% CI 1.07-1.41), and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) if HIV-infected (aOR 1.92 compared with HIV-negative/unknown, 95% CI 1.17-3.14). The most common ADRs were renal impairment, hypoglycemia, liver injury, and hemorrhage. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, insulin, rifampicin, and warfarin were most commonly implicated, respectively, in these 4 ADRs. ART, ATT, and/or co-trimoxazole were implicated in 56 of 164 (34%) ADR-related admissions. Seventy-three of 164 (45%) ADRs were assessed as preventable.In our survey, approximately 1 in 12 admissions was because of an ADR. The range of ADRs and implicated drugs reflect South Africa's high HIV

  15. Patient-controlled hospital admission for patients with severe mental disorders: study protocol for a nationwide prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Christoffer Torgaard; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Hastrup, Lene Halling; Andersen, Per Kragh; Giacco, Domenico; Nordentoft, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient-controlled hospital admission for individuals with severe mental disorders is a novel approach in mental healthcare. Patients can admit themselves to a hospital unit for a short stay without being assessed by a psychiatrist or contacting the emergency department. Previous studies assessing the outcomes of patient-controlled hospital admission found trends towards reduction in the use of coercive measures and length of hospital stay; however, these studies have methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Larger studies are needed to estimate the effect of patient-controlled hospital admission on the use of coercion and of healthcare services. Design and methods We aim to recruit at least 315 patients who are offered a contract for patient-controlled hospital admissions in eight different hospitals in Denmark. Patients will be followed-up for at least 1 year to compare the use of coercive measures and of healthcare services, the use of medications and suicidal behaviour. Descriptive statistics will be used to investigate hospitalisations, global assessment of functioning (GAF) and patient satisfaction with treatment. To minimise selection bias, we will match individuals using patient-controlled hospital admission and controls with a 1:5 ratio via a propensity score based on the following factors: sex, age group, primary diagnosis, substance abuse as secondary diagnosis, coercion, number of psychiatric bed days, psychiatric history, urbanity and suicidal behaviour. Additionally, a historical control study will be undertaken in which patients serve as their own control group prior to index date. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by The Danish Health and Medicines Authority (j.nr.: 3-3013-934/1/) and by The Danish Data Protection Agency (j.nr.: 2012-58-0004). The study was categorised as a register study by The Danish Health Research Ethics Committee and therefore no further approval was needed (j.nr.: H-2-2014-FSP70

  16. An analysis of admissions from 155 United States hospitals to determine the influence of weather on stroke incidence.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Matthew C; Burnett, Mark G

    2011-05-01

    Weather is the most frequently proposed factor driving apparent seasonal trends in stroke admissions. Here, we present the largest study of the association between weather and ischemic stroke in the USA to date. We consider admissions to 155 United States hospitals in 20 states during the five-year period from 2004 to 2008. The data set included 196,439 stroke admissions, which were classified as ischemic (n=98,930), hemorrhagic (n=18,960), or transient ischemic attack (n=78,549). Variations in stroke admissions were tested to determine if they tracked seasonal and transient weather patterns over the same time period. Using autocorrelation analyses, no significant seasonal changes in stroke admissions were observed over the study period. Using time-series analyses, no significant association was observed between any weather variable and any stroke subtype over the five-year study. This study suggests that seasonal associations between weather and stroke are highly confounded, and an association between weather and stroke is virtually non-existent. Therefore, previous studies reporting an association between specific weather patterns and stroke should be interpreted with caution.

  17. An intervention to improve care and reduce costs for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A small percentage of high-risk patients accounts for a large proportion of Medicaid spending in the United States, which has become an urgent policy issue. Our objective was to pilot a novel patient-centered intervention for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions to determine its potential to improve care and reduce costs. Methods Community and hospital-based care management and coordination intervention with pre-post analysis of health care utilization. We enrolled Medicaid fee-for-service patients aged 18-64 who were admitted to an urban public hospital and identified as being at high risk for hospital readmission by a validated predictive algorithm. Enrolled patients were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative interview techniques to identify needs such as transportation to/advocacy during medical appointments, mental health/substance use treatment, and home visits. A community housing partner initiated housing applications in-hospital for homeless patients. Care managers facilitated appropriate discharge plans then worked closely with patients in the community using a harm reduction approach. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled; all were male, 18/19 were substance users, and 17/19 were homeless. Patients had a total of 64 inpatient admissions in the 12 months before the intervention, versus 40 in the following 12 months, a 37.5% reduction. Most patients (73.3%) had fewer inpatient admissions in the year after the intervention compared to the prior year. Overall ED visits also decreased after study enrollment, while outpatient clinic visits increased. Yearly study hospital Medicaid reimbursements fell an average of $16,383 per patient. Conclusions A pilot intervention for high-cost patients shows promising results for health services usage. We are currently expanding our model to serve more patients at additional hospitals to see if the pilot's success can be replicated. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT

  18. Traumatic brain injury in Portugal: trends in hospital admissions from 2000 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Dias, Celeste; Rocha, João; Pereira, Eduarda; Cerejo, António

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: O traumatismo crânio-encefálico tem um impacto sócio-económico considerável, sendo uma importante causa de mobimortalidade, frequentemente causador de incapacidade permanente. Procuramos caracterizar a utilização dos recursos de saúde de adultos com traumatismo crânio-encefálico em Portugal entre 2000-2010. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de registos de adultos com código ICD9 de traumatismo crânio-encefálico incluídos na Base-de-Dados Nacional de Grupos Diagnósticos Homogéneos de 2000-2010. Realizamos uma análise estatística descritiva e avaliamos as tendências durante a década. Resultados: Analisamos 72 865 admissões em 111 hospitais, 64,1% do sexo masculino, idade média de 57,9 ± 21,8 anos (18-107). Encontramos uma diminuição no número de traumatismo crânio-encefálico em pacientes jovens e um aumento nos mais velhos. O número de acidentes de trânsito diminuiu e o número de quedas aumentou. Houve um aumento de traumatismos crânio-encefálicos moderados-graves internados: 47,2% em 2000 / 80% em 2010. O número de admissões em Cuidados Intensivos quase duplicou (15,8% vs 29,5%), assim como o número de procedimentos neurocirúrgicos efectuados (8,2% vs 15,2%). A mortalidade total aumentou de 7,1% para 10,6%. Discussão: A diminuição do traumatismo crânio-encefálico observada pode estar associada com as campanhas de prevenção rodoviária, melhoria da rede rodoviária e políticas de saúde. O aumento da mortalidade poderá ser explicado pelo melhor atendimento pré-hospitalar, permitindo que casos mais graves cheguem ao hospital com vida e, embora tratados com mais frequência em Cuidados Intensivos e exigindo procedimentos neurocirúrgicos, vêm a falecer. Por outo lado, o aumento da idade dos doentes presumivelmente com maiores co-morbilidades associadas ao envelhecimento também estará a contribuir para a maior mortalidade. Conclusão: O traumatismo crânio-encefálico em Portugal está a mudar

  19. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  20. Analysis of repeat hospital admissions for dengue to estimate the frequency of third or fourth dengue infections resulting in admissions and dengue hemorrhagic fever, and serotype sequences.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Robert V; Kalanarooj, Siripen; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Vaughn, David W; Endy, Timothy P; Mammen, Mammen P; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon

    2007-11-01

    Immunity to a single dengue virus (DENV) infection does not provide heterologous immunity to subsequent infection. In fact, the greatest risk for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is with a second DENV serotype exposure. The risk for DHF with a third or fourth dengue infection relative to a first or second exposure is not known. An analysis of our database of children admitted to the Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health and Kamphaeng Phet Provincial Hospital with suspected dengue illness revealed that the number of dengue admissions caused by a third or fourth DENV infection was extremely low (0.08-0.8%). Once admitted, the risk for DHF relative to dengue fever was not different for those experiencing third or fourth DENV infections over those experiencing a second DENV infection. We document new dengue serotype infection sequences leading to DHF of 1-4, 2-3, 3-1, and 3-4.

  1. The Impact of Admission Diagnosis on Recurrent or Frequent Hospitalizations in 3 Dementia Subtypes: A Hospital-Based Cohort in Taiwan with 4 Years Longitudinal Follow-Ups.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Nai-Ching; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lui, Chun-Chung; Huang, Shu-Hua; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Chen-Chang; Lai, Wei-An

    2015-11-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with different types of dementia have resulted in the increasing medical care loads. It is not known whether explanatory factors for recurrent or prolong hospitalization were driven by the subtypes of dementia. We analyzed 203 dementia patients aged >65-year-old with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), or Parkinsonism-related dementia (PRD). With a 4-year follow-up period, logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of dementia diagnosis, cerebrovascular risk factors, chronic systemic diseases, and the etiology for admission for recurrent (>4 times/4 years) or prolonged hospitalization stay (>14 days per hospitalization). There were 48 AD, 96 VaD, and 59 PRD patients that completed the 4-year study. The average length of hospital stay was significant, the shortest in AD and the longest in PRD (P = 0.01), whereas the frequency of hospitalization was not different among 3 dementia subtypes. Although delirium is the most common etiology for admission in the patients, diabetes mellitus (Odds ratio, OR = 2.79, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 11.21, P < 0.001), and fall-related hip fracture (OR = 4.762, P = 0.029) were significantly associated with prolong hospitalization. Patients with coronary artery disease (OR = 9.87, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 84.48, P < 0.001), urinary tract infection (OR = 55.09, P < 0.001), and fall-related fracture (OR = 141.7, P < 0.001) predict recurrent hospitalization. Dementia subtypes did not influence directly on the hospitalization courses. The etiologies for admission carried higher clinical significance, compared with the coexisted systemic diseases. PMID:26579820

  2. The association between space weather conditions and emergency hospital admissions for myocardial infarction during different stages of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencloviene, J.; Antanaitiene, J.; Babarskiene, R.

    2016-11-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of space weather on the human cardio-vascular system. We investigated whether geomagnetic storms (GS), solar proton events (SPEs), and X-class solar flare affect the risk of emergency hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (MI) separately during declining (2004-2006) and rising (2010-2012) phases of solar activity. The data on hospital admissions for MI were obtained from the computer database of Lithuanian University of Health sciences from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2012. We evaluated the associations between space weather conditions and the daily number of emergency admissions for MI by Poisson regression, controlling for seasonal variation and weekdays. During 2004-2006, an increase in the risk of hospital admission for MI was observed on days of the daily mean proton >10 MeV flux >100 pfu (by 63%, p<0.001) and on days of GS concomitant with SPE, 1-2 days following these events, and on days of SPE occurring 1-2 days before GS concomitant with SPE (by 26%, p=0.019). During 2010-2012, an increase in the risk of hospital admission for MI was observed on days of the daily mean proton >10 MeV flux >100 pfu (by 52%, p=0.015) and on days of GS and 1-2 days after GS (by 17%, p=0.024). These findings suggest that the impact of hazardous space weather conditions on human health depends of the strength of space storm during the investigated period.

  3. Effects of sudden air pressure changes on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Prague, 1994-2009.

    PubMed

    Plavcová, Eva; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Sudden weather changes have long been thought to be associated with negative impacts on human health, but relatively few studies have attempted to quantify these relationships. We use large 6-h changes in atmospheric pressure as a proxy for sudden weather changes and evaluate their association with hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Winter and summer seasons and positive and negative pressure changes are analysed separately, using data for the city of Prague (population 1.2 million) over a 16-year period (1994-2009). We found that sudden pressure drops in winter are associated with significant rise in hospital admissions. Increased CVD morbidity was observed neither for pressure drops in summer nor pressure increases in any season. Analysis of synoptic weather maps shows that large pressure drops in winter are associated with strong zonal flow and rapidly moving low-pressure systems with centres over northern Europe and atmospheric fronts affecting western and central Europe. Analysis of links between passages of strong atmospheric fronts and hospital admissions, however, shows that the links disappear if weather changes are characterised by frontal passages. Sudden pressure drops in winter are associated also with significant excess CVD mortality. As climate models project strengthening of zonal circulation in winter and increased frequency of windstorms, the negative effects of such weather phenomena and their possible changes in a warmer climate of the twenty-first century need to be better understood, particularly as their importance in inducing excess morbidity and mortality in winter may increase compared to cold spells.

  4. Effects of sudden air pressure changes on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Prague, 1994-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavcová, Eva; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Sudden weather changes have long been thought to be associated with negative impacts on human health, but relatively few studies have attempted to quantify these relationships. We use large 6-h changes in atmospheric pressure as a proxy for sudden weather changes and evaluate their association with hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Winter and summer seasons and positive and negative pressure changes are analysed separately, using data for the city of Prague (population 1.2 million) over a 16-year period (1994-2009). We found that sudden pressure drops in winter are associated with significant rise in hospital admissions. Increased CVD morbidity was observed neither for pressure drops in summer nor pressure increases in any season. Analysis of synoptic weather maps shows that large pressure drops in winter are associated with strong zonal flow and rapidly moving low-pressure systems with centres over northern Europe and atmospheric fronts affecting western and central Europe. Analysis of links between passages of strong atmospheric fronts and hospital admissions, however, shows that the links disappear if weather changes are characterised by frontal passages. Sudden pressure drops in winter are associated also with significant excess CVD mortality. As climate models project strengthening of zonal circulation in winter and increased frequency of windstorms, the negative effects of such weather phenomena and their possible changes in a warmer climate of the twenty-first century need to be better understood, particularly as their importance in inducing excess morbidity and mortality in winter may increase compared to cold spells.

  5. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ˜55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ˜72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  6. [Particulate matter (PM10) air pollution, daily mortality, and hospital admissions: recent findings].

    PubMed

    Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Veronesi, Licia; Roveda, Anna Maria; Marangio, Emilio; Sansebastiano, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    The first studies conducted to evaluate a possible association between air pollution and mortality date back to the serious events that occurred in the Mosa Valley, Belgium (1930), in the small city of Donora ("killer fog" incident of 1948) and in London (1952). The latter episode led to the introduction of air pollution control policies. Following the introduction of air pollution control measures in economically advanced cities in the 60s and 70s, the concentration levels of pollutants reached were believed, for many years, to be risk free. However, despite improvements in air quality achieved by many industrialized countries the negative effects of air pollution remain today an important public health problem. Among all air pollutants, particulate matter is the type of air pollution that causes the most numerous and serious effects on human health, because of the broad range of diverse toxic substances it contains,. For this reason, when assessing human health risk, PM10 may be considered to be a reliable indicator of the impact of global air pollution. Various epidemiologic studies conducted in the last 10 years, such as the Air Pollution and Health-European Approach (APHEA) project, the National Morbidity, Mortality and Air Pollution (NMMAPS) Study and Italian Meta-analysis of Studies on the short-term effects of Air pollution (MISA), have shown that current ambient concentrations of PM10 may lead to increased mortality and morbidity. Various studies have reported mean increases in mortality below 1% for 10 ?g/mc increases of ambient PM10. Studies have also underscored the role of particulate matter in aggravating cardiorespiratory diseases and consequently increasing hospital admissions. Air quality standards have been recently revised by legislation. The EU has issued a directive that sets limiting values and, where appropriate, threshold values, for the different air pollutants.

  7. Survival to admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Seoul, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hue; Uhm, Tai-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) data derived according to the Utstein Style guidelines was used to try to determine factors influencing survival to admission (STA) and epidemiological rates of OHCA. Patients and methods This was an observational study of all age groups based on data from prehospital care reports in Seoul, South Korea. The collected data were reported according to the Utstein Style template for OHCA and analyzed in order to compare STA with non-STA. Univariate analysis was conducted using a binomial logistic regression model to identify predictors associated with trauma patients. Results Eighty-three (4.8%) OHCA survivors were admitted to the emergency department with carotid pulse. The median time from arrest to emergency medical personnel defibrillation was statistically significantly shorter in STA cases (8.0 minutes) than in non-STA cases (12.0 minutes; P<0.001). Factors independently associated with better prognosis in terms of trauma patients were female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 0.67; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.50–0.91; P=0.01), arrest at home (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.27–0.49; P<0.001), and witnessed arrest (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.94–3.39; P<0.001). Conclusion Early basic life support, performed by either a layperson or emergency medical personnel, had a positive effect on STA. Male sex, arrest outside of the home, and witnessed arrest are significantly associated with trauma. PMID:27147881

  8. Admission to hospital for bronchiolitis in England: trends over five decades, geographical variation and association with perinatal characteristics and subsequent asthma

    PubMed Central

    Green, Christopher A; Yeates, David; Goldacre, Allie; Sande, Charles; Parslow, Roger C; McShane, Philip; Pollard, Andrew J; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Admission of infants to hospital with bronchiolitis consumes considerable healthcare resources each winter. We report an analysis of hospital admissions in England over five decades. Methods Data were analysed from the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE, 1968–1985), Hospital Episode Statistics (HES, 1989–2011), Oxford Record Linkage Study (ORLS, 1963–2011) and Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet, 2003–2012). Cases were identified using International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in discharge records. Bronchiolitis was given a separate code in ICD9 (used in England from 1979). Geographical variation was analysed using Local Authority area boundaries. Maternal and perinatal risk factors associated with bronchiolitis and subsequent admissions for asthma were analysed using record-linkage. Results All-England HIPE and HES data recorded 468 138 episodes of admission for bronchiolitis in infants aged <1 year between 1979 and 2011. In 2011 the estimated annual hospital admission rate was 46.1 (95% CI 45.6 to 46.6) per 1000 infants aged <1 year. Between 2004 and 2011 the rates rose by an average of 1.8% per year in the all-England HES data, whereas admission rates to paediatric intensive care changed little (1.3 to 1.6 per 1000 infants aged <1 year). A fivefold geographical variation in hospital admission rates was observed. Young maternal age, low social class, low birth weight and maternal smoking were among factors associated with an increased risk of hospital admission with bronchiolitis. Conclusions Hospital admissions for infants with bronchiolitis have increased substantially in recent years. However, cases requiring intensive care have changed little since 2004. PMID:26342094

  9. Modelling the Costs and Effects of Selective and Universal Hospital Admission Screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hubben, Gijs; Bootsma, Martin; Luteijn, Michiel; Glynn, Diarmuid; Bishai, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Screening at hospital admission for carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been proposed as a strategy to reduce nosocomial infections. The objective of this study was to determine the long-term costs and health benefits of selective and universal screening for MRSA at hospital admission, using both PCR-based and chromogenic media-based tests in various settings. Methodology/Principal Findings A simulation model of MRSA transmission was used to determine costs and effects over 15 years from a US healthcare perspective. We compared admission screening together with isolation of identified carriers against a baseline policy without screening or isolation. Strategies included selective screening of high risk patients or universal admission screening, with PCR-based or chromogenic media-based tests, in medium (5%) or high nosocomial prevalence (15%) settings. The costs of screening and isolation per averted MRSA infection were lowest using selective chromogenic-based screening in high and medium prevalence settings, at $4,100 and $10,300, respectively. Replacing the chromogenic-based test with a PCR-based test costs $13,000 and $36,200 per additional infection averted, and subsequent extension to universal screening with PCR would cost $131,000 and $232,700 per additional infection averted, in high and medium prevalence settings respectively. Assuming $17,645 benefit per infection averted, the most cost-saving strategies in high and medium prevalence settings were selective screening with PCR and selective screening with chromogenic, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Admission screening costs $4,100–$21,200 per infection averted, depending on strategy and setting. Including financial benefits from averted infections, screening could well be cost saving. PMID:21483492

  10. Adherence to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and the effects of exposure misclassification on the risk of hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Mitchel, Edward F.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Describe the effect of different exposure classification strategies for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on drug-outcome associations. Methods We studied the association between DMARD initiation and all-cause hospitalizations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (1995-2005). Initiators of DMARDs and oral glucocorticoids were followed a maximum of 180 days. We compared two strategies for exposure classification: 1) A persistent exposure required (PER) approach, in which follow-up stopped when the regimen changed; and, 2) A persistent exposure ignored (PEI) approach, in which follow-up continued despite regimen changes. For PEI, adherence was assessed using the medication possession ratio. All-cause hospitalization risk was compared among RA regimen initiators using Cox models and methotrexate as the reference. Results We identified 28906 episodes of medication initiation. In PER analyses, TNFα-antagonists did not increase hospitalization risk compared with methotrexate, whereas leflunomide did (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.1-1.67). Glucocorticoids increased hospitalization risk (HR: 1.29, 1.54 and 2.03 for low, medium and high doses, respectively). PEI results were similar to PER except that infliximab initiation increased the risk of hospitalization compared with methotrexate (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.19-1.8), and most other effects were closer to the null. In PEI, adherence ranged from 73% for etanercept to 6% for glucocorticoids. Adherence to methotrexate was 59%. Conclusions Compared with methotrexate initiation, initiation of leflunomide or glucocorticoids consistently increased all-cause hospitalizations in the first 180 days of use. Most PER and PEI estimates were similar; observed differences in risk between these methods were likely due to differences in adherence. PMID:20191470

  11. Angioedema Related to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: Attack Severity, Treatment, and Hospital Admission in a Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Javaud, Nicolas; Achamlal, Jallal; Reuter, Paul-George; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Lekouara, Akim; Youssef, Mustapha; Hamza, Lilia; Karami, Ahmed; Adnet, Frédéric; Fain, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    The number of cases of acquired angioedema related to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors induced (ACEI-AAE) is on the increase, with a potential concomitant increase in life-threatening attacks of laryngeal edema. Our objective was to determine the main characteristics of ACEI-AAE attacks and, in doing so, the factors associated with likelihood of hospital admission from the emergency department (ED) after a visit for an attack.A prospective, multicenter, observational study (April 2012-December 2014) was conducted in EDs of 4 French hospitals in collaboration with emergency services (SAMU 93) and a reference center for bradykinin-mediated angioedema. For each patient presenting with an attack, emergency physicians collected demographic and clinical presentation data, treatments, and clinical course. They recorded time intervals from symptom onset to ED arrival and to treatment decision, from ED arrival to specific treatment with plasma-derived C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) or icatibant, and from specific treatment to onset of symptom relief. Attacks requiring hospital admission were compared with those not requiring admission.Sixty-two eligible patients with ACEI-AAE (56% men, median age 63 years) were included. Symptom relief occurred significantly earlier in patients receiving specific treatment than in untreated patients (0.5 [0.5-1.0] versus 3.9 [2.5-7.0] hours; P < 0.0001). Even though icatibant was injected more promptly than plasma-derived C1-INH, there, however, was no significant difference in median time to onset of symptom relief between the 2 drugs (0.5 [0.5-1.3] versus 0.5 [0.4-1.0] hours for C1-INH and icatibant, respectively, P = 0.49). Of the 62 patients, 27 (44%) were admitted to hospital from the ED. In multivariate analysis, laryngeal involvement and progressive swelling at ED arrival were independently associated with admission (Odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 6.2 [1.3-28.2] and 5.9 [1.3-26.5], respectively). A favorable course

  12. The effect of admitted patients in the emergency department on rates of hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Eoin M; Cummins, Fergal

    2013-01-01

    Emergency Department overcrowding with admitted inpatients is a common international occurrence. We undertook a retrospective review to compare patient admission rates from patients presenting to our Emergency Department with the level of overcrowding with admitted inpatients on that particular day in the Emergency Department. Over the 2-year study period there was no change in the rate or absolute number of admissions per day compared with the level of inpatient overcrowding. PMID:23073760

  13. The effect of admitted patients in the emergency department on rates of hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Eoin M; Cummins, Fergal

    2013-09-01

    Emergency Department overcrowding with admitted inpatients is a common international occurrence. We undertook a retrospective review to compare patient admission rates from patients presenting to our Emergency Department with the level of overcrowding with admitted inpatients on that particular day in the Emergency Department. Over the 2-year study period there was no change in the rate or absolute number of admissions per day compared with the level of inpatient overcrowding. PMID:23073760

  14. Insurance status and admission to hospital for head injuries: are we part of a two-tiered medical system?

    PubMed

    Svenson, J E; Spurlock, C W

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between insurance status and use of resources for inpatient care. We sought to assess whether insurance status influences decisions regarding the evaluation and treatment of head injured patients in the emergency department (ED). Head injured patients were identified from ED data from 4 hospitals reporting to the Kentucky Emergency Medical Services Information System. Multiple regression analysis using admission, ED length of stay, and ED charges as outcome variables was then performed. From 216,137 ED visits there were 8,591 (4%) head injured patients identified from the database. Eliminating those with revisits, transfers to another hospital in the database, and isolated facial lacerations, there were 3,821 cases. Controlling for age, hospital, race, primary diagnosis, and indicators of severity of the injury, insurance status was significantly associated with hospital admission. Those uninsured were the least likely to be admitted (OR 0.41; 95% CI (0.31, 0.50), whereas those with public insurance had an intermediate probability (OR 0.50 95% CI (0.37, 0.68) as compared with those with private insurance. Similarly, ED charges were lower for Medicaid patients than insured patients ($880) and tended to be slightly lower for uninsured patients ($1,043) than insured patients ($1,141) (P =.001). Length of stay in the ED was shorter for publicly insured patients (179 minutes) than uninsured (186 minutes) and privately insured patients (192 minutes) (P =.001). The extent of evaluation and admission for head injured patients is associated with insurance status. This creates a dual standard of care for patients. Practitioners should work to standardize the evaluation of patients independent of paying status. PMID:11146011

  15. The effect of testosterone and a nutritional supplement on hospital admissions in under-nourished, older people

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss and under-nutrition are relatively common in older people, and are associated with poor outcomes including increased rates of hospital admissions and death. In a pilot study of 49 undernourished older, community dwelling people we found that daily treatment for one year with a combination of testosterone tablets and a nutritional supplement produced a significant reduction in hospitalizations. We propose a larger, multicentre study to explore and hopefully confirm this exciting, potentially important finding (NHMRC project grant number 627178). Methods/Design One year randomized control trial where subjects are allocated to either oral testosterone undecanoate and high calorie oral nutritional supplement or placebo medication and low calorie oral nutritional supplementation. 200 older community-dwelling, undernourished people [Mini Nutritional Assessment score <24 and either: a) low body weight (body mass index, in kg/m2: <22) or b) recent weight loss (>7.5% over 3 months)]. Hospital admissions, quality-adjusted life years, functional status, nutritional health, muscle strength, body composition and other variables will be assessed. Discussion The pilot study showed that combined treatment with an oral testosterone and a supplement drink was well tolerated and safe, and reduced the number of people hospitalised and duration of hospital admissions in undernourished, community dwelling older people. This is an exciting finding, as it identifies a treatment which may be of substantial benefit to many older people in our community. We now propose to conduct a multi-centre study to test these findings in a substantially larger subject group, and to determine the cost effectiveness of this treatment. Trial registration Australian Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN 12610000356066 PMID:22023735

  16. Air pollution positively correlates with daily stroke admission and in hospital mortality: a study in the urban area of Como, Italy.

    PubMed

    Vidale, Simone; Bonanomi, A; Guidotti, M; Arnaboldi, M; Sterzi, R

    2010-04-01

    Some current evidences suggest that stroke incidence and mortality may be higher in elevated air pollution areas. Our study examined the hypothesis of a correlation between air pollution level and ischemic stroke admission and in Hospital mortality in an urban population. Data on a total of 759 stroke admissions and 180 deaths have been obtained over a 4-year period (2000-2003). Five air ambient particles have been studied. A general additive model estimating Poisson distribution has been used, adding meteorological variables as covariates. NO(2) and PM(10) were significantly associated with admission and mortality (P value < 0.05) and with estimated RR of 1.039 (95% CI 1.066-1.013) and 1.078 (95% CI 1.104-1.052) for hospital admission at 2- and 4-day lags, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests an association between short-term outdoor air pollution exposure and ischemic stroke admission and mortality.

  17. Relationship between mean daily ambient temperature range and hospital admissions for schizophrenia: Results from a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tzu-I; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lung, Shih-Chun; Su, Huey-Jen

    2011-12-01

    Environmental temperature is known to correlate with schizophrenia, but little is known about the association with changes in temperature. This 12-year study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the mean daily range of ambient temperature and schizophrenia admissions in a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan. Meteorological data provided by the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan were interpolated to create representative estimates. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in all hospitals with medical services enrolled in the current health care insurance system were retrieved from the 1996-2007 Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claim dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database. Generalized linear models with Poisson distributions were used to analyze the impact of mean diurnal change of temperature on schizophrenia admissions, controlling for internal correlations and demographic covariates. The daily temperature range varied between 1.7°C and 12.1°C (1st to 99th percentile). The relative risk of schizophrenia admission was significantly increased at a temperature range of 3.2°C (10th percentile), and the maximum was at 12.1°C (99th percentile); however, no such association was found with schizoaffective disorder. When restricted to the capital and largest city, the effects of temperature range were prominent and may correlate with temperature itself. The joint effect of temperature and temperature range was associated with elevated risk, particularly at cooler temperatures. A positive correlation was found between increasing temperature range and schizophrenia admissions. The increase in morbidity at high percentiles suggests that the increasing dynamics of temperature range are a valid reflection of risk, highlighting the need for precautionary action. PMID:22018962

  18. HIV-Related Medical Admissions to a South African District Hospital Remain Frequent Despite Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Scale-Up

    PubMed Central

    Meintjes, Graeme; Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Burton, Rosie; Schutz, Charlotte; Boulle, Andrew; Van Wyk, Gavin; Blumenthal, Liz; Nicol, Mark P.; Lawn, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The public sector scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa commenced in 2004. We aimed to describe the hospital-level disease burden and factors contributing to morbidity and mortality among hospitalized HIV-positive patients in the era of widespread ART availability. Between June 2012 and October 2013, unselected patients admitted to medical wards at a public sector district hospital in Cape Town were enrolled in this cross-sectional study with prospective follow-up. HIV testing was systematically offered and HIV-infected patients were systematically screened for TB. The spectrum of admission diagnoses among HIV-positive patients was documented, vital status at 90 and 180 days ascertained and factors independently associated with death determined. Among 1018 medical admissions, HIV status was ascertained in 99.5%: 60.1% (n = 609) were HIV-positive and 96.1% (n = 585) were enrolled. Of these, 84.4% were aware of their HIV-positive status before admission. ART status was naive in 35.7%, current in 45.0%, and interrupted in 19.3%. The most frequent primary clinical diagnoses were newly diagnosed TB (n = 196, 33.5%), other bacterial infection (n = 100, 17.1%), and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illnesses other than TB (n = 64, 10.9%). By 90 days follow-up, 175 (29.9%) required readmission and 78 (13.3%) died. Commonest causes of death were TB (37.2%) and other AIDS-defining illnesses (24.4%). Independent predictors of mortality were AIDS-defining illnesses other than TB, low hemoglobin, and impaired renal function. HIV still accounts for nearly two-thirds of medical admissions in this South African hospital and is associated with high mortality. Strategies to improve linkage to care, ART adherence/retention and TB prevention are key to reducing HIV-related hospitalizations in this setting. PMID:26683950

  19. Pediatric hospital admissions from influenza A (H1N1) in Brazil: effects of the 2010 vaccination campaign

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Ana Carolina Cavalcanti; Pelissoni, Fernanda D'Angelo Monteiro; Cunegundes, Kelly Simone Almeida; Abramczyk, Marcelo Luiz; Bellei, Nancy Cristina Junqueira; Sanches, Nivea Aparecida Pissaia; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the influenza A (H1N1) virus spread rapidly around the world, causing the first pandemic of the 21st Century. In 2010, there was a vaccination campaign against this new virus subtype to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the disease in some countries, including Brazil. Herein, we describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients under 19 years of age who were hospitalized with confirmed influenza A (H1N1) infection in 2009 and 2010. We retrospectively reviewed files from the pediatric patients who were admitted to a university hospital with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed influenza A (H1N1) infection in 2009 and 2010. There were 37 hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) in 2009 and 2 in 2010. In 2009, many of the hospitalized children had an underlying chronic disease and a lower median age than those not hospitalized. Of the hospitalized patients, 78% had a chronic disease, primarily pneumopathy (48%). The main signs and symptoms of influenza were fever (97%), cough (76%), and dyspnea (59%). Complications occurred in 81% of the patients. The median length of hospitalization was five days; 27% of the patients required intensive care, and two died. In 2010, two patients were hospitalized with influenza A (H1N1): one infant with adenovirus co-infection who had received one previous H1N1 vaccine dose and presented with respiratory sequelae and a 2-month-old infant who had a hospital-acquired infection. An impressive reduction in hospital admissions was observed in 2010 when the vaccination campaign took place in Brazil. PMID:23070350

  20. Impact of short-term temperature variability on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia stratified by season of birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Desheng; Zhang, Xulai; Xu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jian; Xie, Mingyu; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Shusi; Li, Kesheng; Yang, Huihui; Wen, Liying; Wang, Xu; Su, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature change between neighboring days (TCN) are important meteorological indicators closely associated with global climate change. However, up to date, there have been no studies addressing the impacts of both DTR and TCN on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia. We conducted a time-series analysis to assess the relationship between temperature variability and daily schizophrenia onset in Hefei, an inland city in southeast China. Daily meteorological data and emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia from 2005 to 2014 in Hefei were collected. After stratifying by season of birth, Poisson generalized linear regression combined with distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was used to examine the relationship between temperature variability and schizophrenia, adjusting for long-term trend and seasonality, mean temperature, and relative humidity. Our analysis revealed that extreme temperature variability may increase the risk for schizophrenia onset among patients born in spring, while no such association was found in patients born in summer and autumn. In patients born in spring, the relative risks of extremely high DTR comparing the 95th and 99th percentiles with the reference (50th, 10 °C) at 3-day lag were 1.078 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.025-1.135) and 1.159 (95 % CI 1.050-1.279), respectively. For TCN effects, only comparing 99th percentile with reference (50th, 0.7 °C) was significantly associated with emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia (relative risk (RR) 1.111, 95 % CI 1.002-1.231). This study suggested that exposure to extreme temperature variability in short-term may trigger later days of schizophrenia onset for patients born in spring, which may have important implications for developing intervention strategies to prevent large temperature variability exposure.

  1. Preparedness for admission of patients with suspected Ebola virus disease in European hospitals: a survey, August-September 2014.

    PubMed

    de Jong, M D; Reusken, C; Horby, P; Koopmans, M; Bonten, M; Chiche, Jd; Giaquinto, C; Welte, T; Leus, F; Schotsman, J; Goossens, H

    2014-01-01

    In response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, the World Health Organization has advised all nations to prepare for the detection, investigation and management of confirmed and suspected EVD cases in order to prevent further spread through international travel. To gain insights into the state of preparedness of European hospitals, an electronic survey was circulated in August–September 2014 to 984 medical professionals representing 736 hospitals in 40 countries. The survey addressed the willingness and capacity to admit patients with suspected EVD as well as specific preparedness activities in response to the current Ebola crisis. Evaluable responses were received from representatives of 254 (32%) hospitals in 38 countries, mostly tertiary care centres, of which 46% indicated that they would admit patients with suspected EVD. Patient transfer agreements were in place for the majority of hospitals that would not admit patients. Compared with non-admitting hospitals, admitting hospitals were more frequently engaged in various preparedness activities and more often contained basic infrastructural characteristics such as admission rooms and laboratories considered important for infection control, but some gaps and concerns were also identified. The results of this survey help to provide direction towards further preparedness activities and prioritisation thereof. PMID:25496571

  2. Exhaustion of Food Budgets at Month's End and Hospital Admissions for Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Bolger, Ann F.; Guzman, David; López, Andrea; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    One in seven US households cannot reliably afford food. Food budgets are more frequently exhausted at the end of a month than at other points in time. We postulated that this monthly pattern influenced health outcomes, such as risk for hypoglycemia among people with diabetes. Using administrative data on inpatient admissions in California for 2000–08, we found that admissions for hypoglycemia were more common in the low-income than the high-income population (270 versus 210 admissions per 1,000,000). Risk for hypoglycemia admission increased 27 percent in the last week of the month compared to the first week in the low-income population, but we observed no similar temporal variation in the high-income population. These findings suggest that exhaustion of food budgets might be an important driver of health inequities. Policy solutions to improve stable access to nutrition in low-income populations and raise awareness of the health risks of food insecurity might be warranted. PMID:24395943

  3. Exhaustion of food budgets at month's end and hospital admissions for hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Hilary K; Bolger, Ann F; Guzman, David; López, Andrea; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    One in seven US households cannot reliably afford food. Food budgets are more frequently exhausted at the end of a month than at other points in time. We postulated that this monthly pattern influenced health outcomes, such as risk for hypoglycemia among people with diabetes. Using administrative data on inpatient admissions in California for 2000-08, we found that admissions for hypoglycemia were more common in the low-income than the high-income population (270 versus 200 admissions per 100,000). Risk for hypoglycemia admission increased 27 percent in the last week of the month compared to the first week in the low-income population, but we observed no similar temporal variation in the high-income population. These findings suggest that exhaustion of food budgets might be an important driver of health inequities. Policy solutions to improve stable access to nutrition in low-income populations and raise awareness of the health risks of food insecurity might be warranted.

  4. Correspondence between hospital admission and the pneumonia severity index (PSI), CURB-65 criteria and comparison of their predictive value in mortality and hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Varshochi, Mojtaba; Kianmehr, Parisa; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Bayat-Makoo, Zhinous

    2013-06-01

    Pneumonia severity assessment systems, such as the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65, were designed to guide physicians to admit the patients involved to appropriate wards of hospitals. This study evaluated concordance rate of decisions leading to patients' hospitalization in accordance with PSI and CURB-65 criteria and comparison of the two systems' P-values in evaluating mortality and the hospitalization period of the patients in question. A total of 134 hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were evaluated. Patients were classified on the basis of risk factors implicated in the PSI and CURB-65 systems. Prognostic P-values and indication measures of hospitalization for the two systems were then compared. Eighty-seven males (64.9%) and 47 females (35.1%) with a mean age of 64.23±19.82 (15-103) years were enrolled in the study. Based on the results of both systems, hospitalization was indicated in 112 cases (83.6%) and there was total agreement between the two systems in 61 cases (45.5%). There was no significant association between hospitalization duration in the two systems. However, both systems significantly predicted mortality within the hospitalization period with rather equal accuracies. Patients expired more frequently in the group with indication of hospitalization based on the PSI classes. However, there was no significant difference in the mortality between the two groups with and without admission indication according to the CURB-65 system. A considerable portion of our hospitalizations met the related criteria of the PSI/CURB-65. The two evaluation systems have near equal sensitivity and specificity for predicting mortality among hospitalized patients with CAP when the PSI class IV-V and CURB-65 score ≥ 2.

  5. Diabetes mellitus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: admissions, complications and outcomes in a large referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Gizaw, M; Harries, A D; Ade, S; Tayler-Smith, K; Ali, E; Firdu, N; Yifter, H

    2015-03-21

    Contexte : Hôpital de référence du Black Lion, Addis Ababa, Ethiopie.Objectif : Documenter les indications d’admission, les complications et le devenir des patients atteints de diabète (DM) admis à l’hôpital entre 2010 et 2013.Schéma : Etude descriptive rétrospective sur dossiers médicaux.Résultats : Sur 8048 admissions, 523 (6,5%) avaient un DM et parmi eux, 418 dossiers médicaux ont été retrouvés : 301 (72%) patients avaient un DM de type 2 et 104 (28%) avaient un DM de type 1 ; les hommes (62%) et les personnes âgées (âge médian 60 ans) étaient caractéristiques du type 2. Les diagnostics d’admission les plus fréquents du type 2 étaient l’ulcère diabétique du pied (39%) et les problèmes cardiovasculaires (21%), et celui du type 1, l’acidocétose diabétique (62%). L’hypertension, les neuropathies, les néphropathies, la rétinopathie et le pied diabétique représentaient 85% des 756 complications existantes. La mortalité totale des patients admis a été de 21%. Sur ces 89 décès, 77 patients étaient de type 2 avec comme indications principales d’admission l’ulcère diabétique du pied/la gangrène et les problèmes cardiovasculaires.Conclusion : Le DM, surtout de type 2, est une cause importante d’admission dans le plus grand hôpital de référence du pays. De nombreux patients avaient déjà développé des complications liées au DM lors de l’admission, et la mortalité a été élevée. Il est nécessaire d’améliorer la connaissance et les soins relatifs au DM en Ethiopie.

  6. Distinguishing the associations between daily mortality and hospital admissions and nitrogen dioxide from those of particulate matter: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I C; Atkinson, R W; Anderson, H R; Maynard, R L; Strachan, D P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To quantitatively assess time-series studies of daily nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and mortality and hospital admissions which also controlled for particulate matter (PM) to determine whether or to what extent the NO2 associations are independent of PM. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Time-series studies—published in peer-reviewed journals worldwide, up to May 2011—that reported both single-pollutant and two-pollutant model estimates for NO2 and PM were ascertained from bibliographic databases (PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science) and reviews. Random-effects summary estimates were calculated globally and stratified by different geographical regions, and effect modification was investigated. Outcome measures Mortality and hospital admissions for various cardiovascular or respiratory diseases in different age groups in the general population. Results 60 eligible studies were identified, and meta-analysis was conducted on 23 outcomes. Two-pollutant model study estimates generally showed that the NO2 associations were independent of PM mass. For all-cause mortality, a 10 µg/m3 increase in 24-hour NO2 was associated with a 0.78% (95% CI 0.47% to 1.09%) increase in the risk of death, which reduced to 0.60% (0.33% to 0.87%) after control for PM. Heterogeneity between geographical region-specific estimates was removed by control for PM (I2 from 66.9% to 0%). Estimates of PM and daily mortality assembled from the same studies were greatly attenuated after control for NO2: from 0.51% (0.29% to 0.74%) to 0.18% (−0.11% to 0.47%) per 10 µg/m3 PM10 and 0.74% (0.34% to 1.14%) to 0.54% (−0.25% to 1.34%) for PM2.5. Conclusions The association between short-term exposure to NO2 and adverse health outcomes is largely independent of PM mass. Further studies should attempt to investigate whether this is a generic PM effect or whether it is modified by the source and physicochemical characteristics of PM. This finding strengthens the argument for

  7. The effect of hospital volume on length of stay, re-admissions, and complications of total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Hospital volume has been suggested to be one of the best indicators of adverse orthopedic events in patients undergoing THR surgery. We therefore evaluated the effect of hospital volume on the length of stay, re-admissions, and complications of THR at the population level in Finland. Methods 30,266 THRs performed for primary osteoarthritis were identified from the Hospital Discharge Register. Hospitals were classified into 4 groups according to the number of THRs performed on an annual basis over the whole study period: 1–50 (group 1), 51–150 (group 2), 151–300 (group 3), and > 300 (group 4). Results In 2005, the length of the period of surgical treatment was 5.5 days in group 4 and 6.8 days in group 1 (the reference group). During the whole study period (1998–2005), the length of surgical treatment period was shorter in group 4 than in group 1 (p < 0.001). The odds ratio for dislocations (0.7, 95% CI: 0.6–0.9) was lower in group 3 than in group 1. Interpretation Hip replacements performed in high-volume hospitals reduce costs by shortening the length of stay, and they may reduce the dislocation rate. PMID:21067430

  8. Recorded categories of non-principal diagnoses in Victorian public hospital transient ischaemic attack and stroke admissions.

    PubMed

    Nadathur, Shymala G

    2008-01-01

    Information about the number and types of non-principal diagnoses (NPDs) would make an important contribution to prediction of outcome and hence patient management. The study reported here is based on analysis of three fiscal years of the Victorian public hospital transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke admissions. The incidence of NPDs and co-occurrence of NPD-associated prefix categories (that identify the onset or relevance of each condition to the episode) are described in each of the broad stroke subtypes. The distributions of length of stay and in-hospital deaths in the cohorts without and with NPDs and in the various prefix categories are determined. The study also compares the age and gender distribution in the various subpopulations of interest. The importance of collecting complete and accurate data on nature of NPDs and its potential in describing the complexity of presentation are discussed. PMID:18941264

  9. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. Setting ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. Participants All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Primary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Secondary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. Results 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with ‘Severe’ or ‘Very Severe’ acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Conclusions Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. PMID:27324707

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection or colonization present at hospital admission: multivariable risk factor screening to increase efficiency of surveillance culturing.

    PubMed

    Haley, Clinton C; Mittal, Deepa; Laviolette, Amanda; Jannapureddy, Sai; Parvez, Najma; Haley, Robert W

    2007-09-01

    Identifying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization or infection present at admission has become important in reducing subsequent nosocomial transmission, but the most efficient surveillance methods remain to be defined. We performed anterior nares surveillance cultures of all patients upon admission to and discharge from the general internal medicine floor in our community hospital over a 7-week period, and patients completed a questionnaire on MRSA risk factors. Of the 401 patients, 41 (10.2%) had MRSA upon admission. Of the 48 risk measures analyzed, 10 were significantly associated with admission MRSA, and 7 of these were independently associated in stepwise logistic regression analysis. Factor analysis identified eight latent variables that contained most of the predictive information in the 48 risk measures. Repeat logistic regression analysis including the latent variables revealed three independent risk measures for admission MRSA: a nursing home stay (relative risk [RR], 6.18; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.56 to 10.72; P < 0.0001), prior MRSA infection (RR, 3.97; 95% CI, 1.94 to 8.12; P = 0.0002), and the third latent variable (factor 3; RR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.56 to 6.31; P = 0.0013), representing the combined effects of homelessness, jail stay, promiscuity, intravenous drug use, and other drug use. Multivariable models had greater sensitivity at detecting admission MRSA than any single risk measure and allowed detection of 78% to 90% of admission MRSA from admission surveillance cultures on 46% to 58% of admissions. If confirmed in additional studies, multivariable questionnaire screening at admission might identify a subset of admissions for surveillance cultures that would more efficiently identify most admission MRSA.

  11. eWasted time: Redundant work during hospital admission and discharge.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Thomas E; Slessarev, Marat; Etchells, Edward

    2016-03-01

    Potential unintended consequences of health information technology include fragmentation of workflow and redundant work. We could not identify any prior direct observation studies that quantified redundant work related to health information technology in the clinical setting. Our objective was to quantify redundant work during admission and discharge to our general internal medicine service at an academic medical center. We performed a time and motion study at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Canada. We observed 13 clinicians performing an admission or a discharge, and the type and length of each task was recorded using an Apple iPad tablet. We identified redundant tasks related to health information technology and calculated the time spent completing these tasks. We found that 22 percent of clinician time was spent on redundant tasks. Our finding highlights the importance of workflow and software integration when implementing health information technology.

  12. Estimating the cost of diabetes mellitus-related events from inpatient admissions in Sweden using administrative hospitalization data.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Clarke, Philip; Hayes, Alison; Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia

    2009-01-01

    To estimate short- and long-term costs of inpatient hospitalization in Sweden for major diabetes mellitus-related events. Costs were estimated using administrative hospital data from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, which is linked to the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Data were available for 179 749 patients with diabetes in Sweden from 1998 to 2003 (mean and median duration of 6 years' follow-up). Costing of inpatient admissions was based on Nordic diagnosis-related groups (NordDRG). Multiple regression analysis (linear and generalizing estimating equation models) was used to estimate inpatient care costs controlling for age, sex and co-morbidities. The data on hospitalizations were converted to costs (euro) using 2003 exchange rates. The average annual costs (linear model) associated with inpatient admissions for a 60-year-old male in the year the first event first occurred were as follows: euro6488 (95% CI 5034, 8354) for diabetic coma; euro6850 (95% CI 6514, 7204) for heart failure; euro7853 (95% CI 7559, 8144) for non-fatal stroke; euro8121 (95% CI 7104, 9128) for peripheral circulatory complications; euro8736 (95% CI 8474, 9001) for non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI); euro10 360 (95% CI 10 085, 10 643) for ischaemic heart disease; euro11 411 (95% CI 10 298, 12 654) for renal failure; and euro14 949 (95% CI 13 849, 16 551) for amputation. On average, the costs were higher when co-morbidity was accounted for (e.g. MI with co-morbidity was twice as costly as MI alone). Average hospital inpatient costs associated with common diabetes-related events can be estimated using panel data regression methods. These could assist in modelling of long-term costs of diabetes and in evaluating the cost effectiveness of improving care.

  13. Effects of Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Constituents on Elderly Hospital Admissions Due to Circulatory and Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiane Morais; Forti, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Nascimento, Felipe Parra; Junger, Washington Leite; Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Various fractions of particulate matter have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associations between concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5–10, PM10 and their chemical constituents (soluble ions) with hospital admissions due to circulatory and respiratory diseases among the elderly in a medium-sized city in Brazil. A time series study was conducted using Poisson regression with generalized additive models adjusted for confounders. Statistically significant associations were identified between PM10 and PM2.5–10 and respiratory diseases. Risks of hospitalization increased by 23.5% (95% CI: 13.5; 34.3) and 12.8% (95% CI: 6.0; 20.0) per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5-10 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 exhibited a significant association with circulatory system diseases, with the risk of hospitalization increasing by 19.6% (95% CI: 6.4; 34.6) per 10 μg/m3. Regarding the chemical species; SO42−, NO3−, NH4+ and K+ exhibited specific patterns of risk, relative to the investigated outcomes. Overall, SO42− in PM2.5–10 and K+ in PM2.5 were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions due to both types of diseases. The results agree with evidence indicating that the risks for different health outcomes vary in relation to the fractions and chemical composition of PM10. Thus, PM10 speciation studies may contribute to the establishment of more selective pollution control policies. PMID:27669280

  14. Effects of Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Constituents on Elderly Hospital Admissions Due to Circulatory and Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tatiane Morais; Forti, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Nascimento, Felipe Parra; Junger, Washington Leite; Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Various fractions of particulate matter have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associations between concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5-10, PM10 and their chemical constituents (soluble ions) with hospital admissions due to circulatory and respiratory diseases among the elderly in a medium-sized city in Brazil. A time series study was conducted using Poisson regression with generalized additive models adjusted for confounders. Statistically significant associations were identified between PM10 and PM2.5-10 and respiratory diseases. Risks of hospitalization increased by 23.5% (95% CI: 13.5; 34.3) and 12.8% (95% CI: 6.0; 20.0) per 10 μg/m³ of PM2.5-10 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 exhibited a significant association with circulatory system diseases, with the risk of hospitalization increasing by 19.6% (95% CI: 6.4; 34.6) per 10 μg/m³. Regarding the chemical species; SO₄(2-), NO₃(-), NH₄⁺ and K⁺ exhibited specific patterns of risk, relative to the investigated outcomes. Overall, SO₄(2-) in PM2.5-10 and K⁺ in PM2.5 were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions due to both types of diseases. The results agree with evidence indicating that the risks for different health outcomes vary in relation to the fractions and chemical composition of PM10. Thus, PM10 speciation studies may contribute to the establishment of more selective pollution control policies. PMID:27669280

  15. Hospital admissions for vitamin D related conditions and subsequent immune-mediated disease: record-linkage studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that there may be an association between vitamin D deficiency and the risk of developing immune-mediated diseases. Methods We analyzed a database of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and death registrations for the whole of England (from 1999 to 2011). Rate ratios for immune-mediated disease were determined, comparing vitamin D deficient cohorts (individuals admitted for vitamin D deficiency or markers of vitamin D deficiency) with comparison cohorts. Results After hospital admission for either vitamin D deficiency, osteomalacia or rickets, there were significantly elevated rates of Addison’s disease, ankylosing spondylitis, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic active hepatitis, celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, diabetes mellitus, pemphigoid, pernicious anemia, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, thyrotoxicosis, and significantly reduced risks for asthma and myxoedema. Conclusions This study shows that patients with vitamin D deficiency may have an increased risk of developing some immune-mediated diseases, although we cannot rule out reverse causality or confounding. Further study of these associations is warranted and these data may aid further public health studies. PMID:23885887

  16. Reduction in Fatalities, Ambulance Calls, and Hospital Admissions for Road Trauma After Implementation of New Traffic Laws

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Herbert; Brasher, Penelope; Erdelyi, Shannon; Desapriya, Edi; Asbridge, Mark; Purssell, Roy; Macdonald, Scott; Schuurman, Nadine; Pike, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the public health benefits of traffic laws targeting speeding and drunk drivers (British Columbia, Canada, September 2010). Methods. We studied fatal crashes and ambulance dispatches and hospital admissions for road trauma, using interrupted time series with multiple nonequivalent comparison series. We determined estimates of effect using linear regression models incorporating an autoregressive integrated moving average error term. We used neighboring jurisdictions (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Washington State) as external controls. Results. In the 2 years after implementation of the new laws, significant decreases occurred in fatal crashes (21.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 15.3, 26.4) and in hospital admissions (8.0%; 95% CI = 0.6, 14.9) and ambulance calls (7.2%; 95% CI = 1.1, 13.0) for road trauma. We found a very large reduction in alcohol-related fatal crashes (52.0%; 95% CI = 34.5, 69.5), and the benefits of the new laws are likely primarily the result of a reduction in drinking and driving. Conclusions. These findings suggest that laws calling for immediate sanctions for dangerous drivers can reduce road trauma and should be supported. PMID:25121822

  17. Drinking water quality and hospital admissions of elderly people for gastrointestinal illness in Eastern Massachusetts, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Beaudeau, Pascal; Schwartz, Joel; Levin, Ronnie

    2014-04-01

    We used a Poisson regression to compare daily hospital admissions of elderly people for acute gastrointestinal illness in Boston against daily variations in drinking water quality over an 11-year period, controlling for weather, seasonality and time trends. The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA), which provides non-filtered water to 1.5 million people in the greater Boston area, changed its disinfection method from chlorination to ozonation during the study period so we were also able to evaluate changes in risk associated with the change in disinfection method. Other available water quality data from the MWRA included turbidity, fecal coliforms, UV-absorbance, and planktonic algae and cyanobacteriae concentrations. Daily weather, rainfall data and water temperature were also available. Low water temperature, increases in turbidity and, to a lesser extent, in fecal coliform and cyanobacteriae were associated with a higher risk of hospital admissions, while the shift from chlorination to ozonation has possibly reduced the health risk. The MWRA complied with US drinking water regulations throughout the study period.

  18. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  19. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  20. A randomized trial of a standard dose of Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine given at 4.5 months of age: effect on total hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cesario L; Benn, Christine S; Andersen, Andreas; Balé, Carlito; Schaltz-Buchholzer, Frederik; Do, Vu An; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Whittle, Hilton; Garly, May-Lill

    2014-06-01

    Observational studies and trials from low-income countries indicate that measles vaccine has beneficial nonspecific effects, protecting against non-measles-related mortality. It is not known whether measles vaccine protects against hospital admissions. Between 2003 and 2007, 6417 children who had received the third dose of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine were randomly assigned to receive measles vaccine at 4.5 months or no measles vaccine; all children were offered measles vaccine at 9 months of age. Using hospital admission data from the national pediatric ward in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, we compared admission rates between enrollment and the 9-month vaccination in Cox models, providing admission hazard rate ratios (HRRs) for measles vaccine versus no measles vaccine. All analyses were conducted stratified by sex and reception of neonatal vitamin A supplementation (NVAS). Before enrollment the 2 groups had similar admission rates. Following enrollment, the measles vaccine group had an admission HRR of 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], .52-.95), with a ratio of 0.53 (95% CI, .32-.86) for girls and 0.86 (95% CI, .58-1.26) for boys. For children who had not received NVAS, the admission HRR was 0.53 (95% CI, .34-.84), with an effect of 0.30 (95% CI, .13-.70) for girls and 0.73 (95% CI, .42-1.28) for boys (P = .08, interaction test). The reduction in admissions was separately significant for measles infection (admission HRR, 0 [95% CI, 0-.24]) and respiratory infections (admission HRR, 0.37 [95% CI, .16-.89]). Early measles vaccine may have major benefits for infant morbidity patterns and healthcare costs. Clinical trials registration NCT00168558. PMID:24436454

  1. Analysis of the relationships between environmental factors (aeroallergens, air pollution, and weather) and asthma emergency admissions to a hospital in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Rosas, I; McCartney, H A; Payne, R W; Calderón, C; Lacey, J; Chapela, R; Ruiz-Velazco, S

    1998-04-01

    There have been several studies of the relationships between environmental factors, particularly air pollution, and attacks of asthma. Most of these studies have ignored the potential confounding effects of aeroallergens such as pollens and fungal spores. We report a statistical analysis of the relationships between emergency admissions for asthma to a hospital in Mexico City and daily average airborne concentrations of pollen, fungal spores, air pollutants (O3, NO2, SO2, and particulates) and weather factors. Asthma admissions had a seasonal pattern with more during the wet season (May-October) than the dry season (November-April). There were few statistical associations between asthma admissions and air pollutants for the three age groups studied (children under 15 years, adults, and seniors [adults over 59 years]) in either season. Grass pollen was associated with child and adult admissions for both the wet and dry seasons, and fungal spores were associated with child admissions during both the wet and dry seasons. The analysis was done with environmental data averaged over the day of admission and the 2 previous days. Our results suggest that aeroallergens may be statistically associated more strongly with asthma hospital admissions than air pollutants and may act as confounding factors in epidemiologic studies.

  2. Differential Effects of Temperature Extremes on Hospital Admission Rates for Respiratory Disease between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory.

    PubMed

    Green, Donna; Bambrick, Hilary; Tait, Peter; Goldie, James; Schultz, Rosalie; Webb, Leanne; Alexander, Lisa; Pitman, Andrew

    2015-12-03

    The health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians may be exacerbated by climate change if temperature extremes have disproportionate adverse effects on Indigenous people. To explore this issue, we analysed the effect of temperature extremes on hospital admissions for respiratory diseases, stratified by age, Indigenous status and sex, for people living in two different climates zones in the Northern Territory during the period 1993-2011. We examined admissions for both acute and chronic respiratory diagnoses, controlling for day of the week and seasonality variables. Our analysis showed that: (1) overall, Indigenous hospital admission rates far exceeded non-Indigenous admission rates for acute and chronic diagnoses, and Top End climate zone admission rates exceeded Central Australia climate zone admission rates; (2) extreme cold and hot temperatures were associated with inconsistent changes in admission rates for acute respiratory disease in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children and older adults; and (3) no response to cold or hot temperature extremes was found for chronic respiratory diagnoses. These findings support our two hypotheses, that extreme hot and cold temperatures have a different effect on hospitalisations for respiratory disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, and that these health risks vary between the different climate zones. We did not, however, find that there were differing responses to temperature extremes in the two populations, suggesting that any increased vulnerability to climate change in the Indigenous population of the Northern Territory arises from an increased underlying risk to respiratory disease and an already greater existing health burden.

  3. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  4. Hospital Mental Health Admissions in Women after Unsuccessful Infertility Treatment and In Vitro Fertilization: An Australian Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Louise M.; Holman, C. D’Arcy J.; Semmens, James B.; Preen, David; Mai, Qun; Hart, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between in vitro fertilization (IVF) and later admission to hospital with a mental health diagnosis in women who remained childless after infertility treatment. Methods This was a population-based cohort study using linked administrative hospital and registry data. The study population included all women commencing hospital treatment for infertility in Western Australia between the years 1982 and 2002 aged 20–44 years at treatment commencement who did not have a recorded birth by the end of follow-up (15 August 2010) and did not have a hospital mental health admission prior to the first infertility admission (n=6,567). Of these, 2,623 women had IVF and 3,944 did not. We used multivariate Cox regression modeling of mental health admissions and compared women undergoing IVF treatment with women having infertility treatment but not IVF. Results Over an average of 17 years of follow-up, 411 women in the cohort were admitted to hospital with a mental health diagnosis; 93 who had IVF and 318 who did not. The unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for a hospital mental health admission comparing women who had IVF with those receiving other infertility treatment was 0.50 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40–0.63). After adjustment for age, calendar year and socio-economic status the HR was 0.56 (95% CI 0.44–0.71). Conclusions IVF treatment is associated with a reduced risk of hospital mental health admissions in women after unsuccessful infertility treatment. This may be explained by the healthy cohort effect. PMID:25807258

  5. Physician documentation of nonspecific EKG changes predicts hospital admission among observation unit chest pain patients.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Troy; Bledsoe, Joseph; Bossart, Philip

    2009-03-01

    Our emergency department (ED) observation unit specifically excludes patients with "significant" electrocardiogram (EKG) findings, but patients may be admitted with "nonspecific" EKG findings. We evaluated whether physician documentation of nonspecific findings predicted eventual admission to an inpatient unit from the observation unit. We reviewed the charts of all chest pain patients admitted to our ED observation unit over a 14-month period. We recorded patients as having documented nonspecific EKG findings if the ED physician stated in the chart that the patient had nonspecific ST segment, T-wave, or Q-wave findings. We recorded baseline characteristics and admission rates among patients. Results were analyzed with chi2 statistics. Five hundred thirty-one chest pain patients were admitted to the observation unit during the study period, and 79 patients (14.9%) had documented nonspecific EKG findings. Patients (22.8%) with documented nonspecific EKG findings were admitted to an inpatient unit from the observation unit, compared with 14.2% of patients without documented nonspecific EKG findings (P = 0.041). Patients with documented nonspecific EKG changes also had higher rates of positive stress testing (17.5% vs. 10.5%, P = 0.103) and stent placement (5.1% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.309), although these were not statistically significant. Patients with documented nonspecific EKG findings were admitted to an inpatient unit from the observation unit at higher rates than those without these findings. Physicians may wish to use the ED EKG more effectively in screening patients for admission to the ED observation unit.

  6. Hospital admissions in Alicante (Spain): a comparative analysis of foreign citizens from high-income countries, immigrants from low-income countries, and Spanish citizens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, the number of foreign citizens (FCs) in Spain has increased. There is no doubt that their health has become a relevant subject from the point of view of public healthcare. Our study aimed to describe hospital admission rates, diagnoses at hospital discharge, and mortality during hospital admissions in FCs from high-income countries (FCHICs), FCs from low-income countries (FCLICs), and autochthonous citizens (ACs). Methods A cross-sectional study was performed at two public hospitals in the city of Alicante (Spain) and its surrounding area. Utilization rates were estimated. Multivariate analysis adjusting for age and sex was performed on hospital admission rates, diagnoses at hospital discharge, service of admission, and mortality during hospital admission in FCHICs and FCLICs compared with ACs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] with 95% confidence intervals [CI]). Results 42,839 patients ≥15 years were discharged from the hospitals. The utilization rate was lower in FCs than ACs, whose crude rate ratio was 0.676 (95% CI: 0.656-0.696). FCHICs had more risk of being diagnosed at discharge in the categories of the circulatory system (AOR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.35-1.77), neoplasms (AOR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.03-1.42), and injury and poisoning (AOR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.11-1.58). FCLICs had more risk of being diagnosed in the categories of pregnancy, childbirth & puerperium (AOR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.29-1.59), and injury and poisoning (AOR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03-1.36), and less risk in the mental disorder category (AOR: 0.32; 95% CI: 0.22-0.45). The length of hospitalization (in days) was lower in FCLICs (median: 3; IQR: 2–6) than both ACs (median: 4; IQR: 2–8) and FCHICs (median: 4; IQR: 2–8) (p < 0.001). The mortality rates on admission of ACs, FCHICs, and FCLICs were 4.2%, 3.3%, and 1.3%, respectively, but after adjusting for age and sex, the mortality rate risks were similar in FCHICs and FCLICs. Conclusion First, FCs utilized hospitalization less when

  7. National trends in inpatient admissions following stereotactic radiosurgery and the in-hospital patient outcomes in the United States from 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen L.; Li, Alexander Y.; Sussman, Eric S.; Pendharkar, Arjun V.; Iyer, Aditya; Thompson, Patricia A.; Tayag, Armine T.; Chang, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to examine trends in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and in-hospital patient outcomes on a national level by utilizing national administrative data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Methods and materials Using the NIS database, all discharges where patients underwent inpatient SRS were included in our study from 1998 – 2011 as designated by the ICD9-CM procedural codes. Trends in the utilization of primary and adjuvant SRS, in-hospital complications and mortality, and resource utilization were identified and analyzed. Results Our study included over 11,000 hospital discharges following admission for primary SRS or for adjuvant SRS following admission for surgery or other indication. The most popular indication for SRS continues to be treatment of intracranial metastatic disease (36.7%), but expansion to primary CNS lesions and other non-malignant pathology beyond trigeminal neuralgia has occurred over the past decade. Second, inpatient admissions for primary SRS have declined by 65.9% over this same period of time. Finally, as inpatient admissions for SRS become less frequent, the complexity and severity of illness seen in admitted patients has increased over time with an increase in the average comorbidity score from 1.25 in the year 2002 to 2.29 in 2011, and an increase in over-all in-hospital complication rate of 2.8 times over the entire study period. Conclusions As the practice of SRS continues to evolve, we have seen several trends in associated hospital admissions. Overall, the number of inpatient admissions for primary SRS has declined while adjuvant applications have remained stable. Over the same period, there has been associated increase in complication rate, length of stay, and mortality in inpatients. These associations may be explained by an increase in the comorbidity-load of admitted patients as more high-risk patients are selected for admission at inpatient centers while more stable patients are

  8. Barriers to and enablers of physical activity in patients with COPD following a hospital admission: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Olivia; Kumar, Saravana; Johnston, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a persistent blockage of airflow, prompting episodes of shortness of breath, commonly leading to hospitalization. Hospitalization may lead to a decline in physical activity following discharge. Physical activity has been shown to improve symptoms of COPD and reduce readmissions, and to decrease morbidity and mortality. This study aims to explore, from the perspectives of people with COPD, the barriers to and enablers of participation in physical activity following hospitalization for COPD. Methods This study had a qualitative descriptive design and included semistructured interviews with 28 adult COPD patients who had been admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of exacerbation of COPD. Results A plethora of barriers to but fewer enablers of participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation were identified for this cohort of people. The main barriers identified were health-related (comorbidities, COPD symptoms, and physical injury or illness) environment-related (weather, transport, and finance), and self-related. The main enabling factors reported were access to health professionals and equipment, social support, routine and extracurricular activities, personal goals and motivation, and the effect of physical activity and “feeling better”. Conclusion This research provides a snapshot of the barriers to and enablers of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation in people with COPD. It is evident that there are significant barriers which hinder the ability of people with COPD to undertake and continue participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. While there are some enablers that may counter these barriers, it is clear that health professionals dealing with people suffering from COPD need to actively recognize and address barriers to physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. Hospital admission may create an opportunity for implementation

  9. Reassessing the high proportion of involuntary psychiatric hospital admissions in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Bola, John R; Park, Eon-Ha; Kim, Seong-Yeon

    2011-10-01

    The 2007 WHO-AIMS report on the mental health system of South Korea documented progress towards a national mental health plan, protection of human rights, and growth of community based services. Yet concern was expressed that the high proportion of involuntary to total psychiatric hospitalizations (92%) may indicate an excessively coercive system. Involuntary hospitalization in Korea rose from 117 to 132 (per 100,000) between 2000 and 2006. In 2000, the median rate in the European Union (EU) was 74 per 100,000 (Range: 6-218). While Korea's involuntary hospitalization rate is within the EU range, its proportion of involuntary hospitalizations is three times that of the highest EU country (30%, Sweden). Underdevelopment of voluntary psychiatric services and culturally mandated family referrals resulting in involuntary hospitalization are apparent reasons for the high proportion of involuntary hospitalizations. Population-based rates per 100,000 more accurately describe involuntary hospitalization than the proportion (ratio) measure used in the WHO-AIMS reports. PMID:21416122

  10. In and out: user fees and other unfortunate events during hospital admission and discharge.

    PubMed

    Castro, Arachu

    2008-05-01

    In various countries it has been reported that patients who receive hospital care, for example assisted birth, are detained inside the health facility until they pay their bills. The practice of hospital detention, whose magnitude is unknown, has been criticized as anti-humanitarian by UNICEF and human rights organizations. However, according to the author, leaving the hospital with a confirmed diagnosis and the recommended treatment can prove more difficult than simply being detained, particularly when health budgets are allocated with disregard for the social conditions in which people live, as in Latin America and elsewhere.

  11. Impact of country of birth on hospital admission for women of childbearing age in Sweden: a five year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E; Malmstrom, M; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S

    2003-01-01

    Study objective: This study examines whether morbidity, defined as the first psychiatric hospital admission and the first somatic hospital admission, differs among subgroups of foreign born and second generation (that is, native born with at least one parent born abroad) women compared with Swedish born women (that is, with both parents native born) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Design Setting: In this follow up study the population consisted of 1 452 944 women, of whom 369 771 have an immigrant background (including second generation immigrants), aged 20–45 years. The population of 31 December 1993 was followed up to 31 December 1998. Differences in risk (hazard ratio) between different groups of immigrant women were estimated, adjusting for age, marital status, number of children, and disposable income. Main results: All four groups of foreign born women had higher age adjusted risks (HRs varied from 1.44 to 1.67) for a first psychiatric hospital admission than Swedish born women. The risk decreased only marginally when the sociodemographic factors were taken into consideration. Additionally, second generation women also had a higher age adjusted risk (HR = 1.42; CI = 1.37 to 1.48) than Swedish born women. The risk decreased only slightly in the main effect model. However, on analysing country of birth and first somatic hospital admissions, only non-European refugee women showed an increased age adjusted risk (HR = 1.26; CI = 1.24 to 1.29), which remained after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Conclusions: Foreign born and second generation women of childbearing age had a higher risk than Swedish born women for a first psychiatric hospital admission. However, only non-European refugees were at higher risk of somatic hospital admissions. PMID:14600113

  12. A multi-year study of air pollution and respiratory hospital admissions in three New York State metropolitan areas: results for 1988 and 1989 summers

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D.; Ito, K.; Kinney, P.L.; Lippmann, M. )

    1992-10-01

    As part of a multi-year study of air pollution and respiratory hospital admissions in the Buffalo, Albany, and New York City, New York, metropolitan areas, filter samples were collected daily at suburban air monitoring sites and analyzed for their content of particulate phase aerosol strong acidity (i.e., hydrogen ion, H+) and sulfate (SO4 =). In addition, daily hospital admissions for respiratory causes, other community air pollutant measurements (e.g., ozone, O3), and meteorological data (e.g., temperature) were also obtained for these metropolitan areas. The summer months (June-August) were selected for analysis because that is when the highest H+ (and O3) are usually experienced at these sites, and because these months are rarely complicated by other major influences (e.g., high pollen counts). Thus, any pollution-admissions relationships were expected to be most clearly discernible in this season. Prior to the health effects analysis, the summer admissions and environmental data were first detrended to eliminate long-wave autocorrelations, and day-of-week effects were removed via regression. Cross-correlations of the filtered 1988 and 1989 admissions and environmental data revealed strong associations between elevated summer haze pollution (i.e., H+, SO4 =, and O3) and increased total respiratory and asthma admissions on the same day and/or on subsequent days in Buffalo and New York City, especially during the summer of 1988 (when pollution levels were more extreme). Regression analyses indicated that the pollution-admissions associations remained significant (p < 0.05) even after the simultaneous inclusion of lagged daily maximum temperature. Mean effects calculations for these cities indicated that summertime haze can play a significant role in the occurrence of respiratory admissions in that season: accounting for an average 6 to 24% of 1988 Buffalo and NYC asthma admissions. O3 consistently had the highest mean effects estimates.

  13. Air Pollution and Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admission in Alberta, Canada: A Three-Step Procedure Case-Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Kindzierski, Warren; Kaul, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Adverse associations between air pollution and myocardial infarction (MI) are widely reported in medical literature. However, inconsistency and sensitivity of the findings are still big concerns. An exploratory investigation was undertaken to examine associations between air pollutants and risk of acute MI (AMI) hospitalization in Alberta, Canada. A time stratified case-crossover design was used to assess the transient effect of five air pollutants (carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), ozone (O3) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 (PM2.5)) on the risk of AMI hospitalization over the period 1999-2009. Subgroups were predefined to see if any susceptible group of individuals existed. A three-step procedure, including univariate analysis, multivariate analysis, and bootstrap model averaging, was used. The multivariate analysis was used in an effort to address adjustment uncertainty; whereas the bootstrap technique was used as a way to account for regression model uncertainty. There were 25,894 AMI hospital admissions during the 11-year period. Estimating health effects that are properly adjusted for all possible confounding factors and accounting for model uncertainty are important for making interpretations of air pollution-health effect associations. The most robust findings included: (1) only 1-day lag NO2 concentrations (6-, 12- or 24-hour average), but not those of CO, NO, O3 or PM2.5, were associated with an elevated risk of AMI hospitalization; (2) evidence was suggested for an effect of elevated risk of hospitalization for NSTEMI (Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction), but not for STEMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction); and (3) susceptible subgroups included elders (age ≥65) and elders with hypertension. As this was only an exploratory study there is a need to replicate these findings with other methodologies and datasets.

  14. Factors Influencing Hospital Admissions and Emergency Department Visits Among Children with Complex Chronic Conditions: A Qualitative Study of Parents' and Providers' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Shannon M.; Newman, Susan D.; Hester, William H.; FAAFP; Magwood, Gayenell S.; Mueller, Martina; Laken, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) have greater health care needs and use rates than children in general. Elevated health care use includes more frequent hospital admissions, longer hospital stays, and greater health care expenses. Prior studies have examined population characteristics associated with increased hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) use, and general healthcare use, yet few studies have investigated these events from the parents' or health care providers' point of view. The purpose of this study was to explore parents/caregivers' and health care providers' perceptions of the factors placing infants and young children with CCC at risk for or protecting them against hospital admissions and ED visits. Parents or primary caregivers participated in interviews, and health care providers in pediatric acute care, pediatric primary care, and emergency care participated in focus groups. Interview and focus group data were analyzed using directed content analysis and an ecological risk and protective factors model. The analysis revealed that parents/caregivers and health care providers described risk factors and protective factors on multiple ecological levels surrounding the child with CCC. This article presents these findings, which add to current knowledge of factors influencing hospital admissions and ED visits and may be used to inform interventions addressing high health care utilization in this population. This article concludes with the implications of the findings for future research and nursing practice. PMID:24423943

  15. Expenses related to hospital admissions for the elderly in Brazil: perspectives of a decade

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Rodrigo Eurípedes; Santos, Álvaro da Silva; de Sousa, Mariana Campos; Monteiro, Taciana Silva Alves

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the profile of morbidities and expenses related to hospitalization of the elderly compared to the adult population (20 to 59 years). Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional investigation of hospitalizations of the elderly (60 years or older) in Brazil during the period from 2002 to 2011, with data from DATASUS and based on ICD-10. Results: Although the highest number of hospitalizations were in the adult age range, the expenses were greater with the elderly, and in this case especially with mental and behavioral disorders, musculoskeletal and connective tissue diseases, followed by circulatory diseases and external causes. Conclusion: The results suggest the adoption of more comprehensive policies and increased investment in health promotion, disease prevention, and appropriate and suitable treatment for the most prevalent diseases in the elderly, particularly in primary care. PMID:24488394

  16. Can hematocrit and platelet determination on admission predict shock in hospitalized children with dengue hemorrhagic fever? A clinical observation from a small outbreak.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Manusvanich, Pornake

    2004-01-01

    Dengue infection is a major public health problem, affecting children in the Southeast Asia region. In Thailand, the dengue hemorrhagic fever is still a major infectious disease among the children with up to two to three epidemics per year. Hemoconcentration accompanied by platelet depletion are the predominant laboratory signs of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Findings from 23 hospitalized patients with dengue hemorrhafic fever in a small outbreak in a provincial hospital in Thailand are reported. The question if hematocrit and platelet determination on admission can predict shock in hospitalized children with dengue hemorrhagic fever was studied. The data from the discharge summary of these patients were studied, focusing on the admission hematology laboratory data. Regression analysis was used to test the correlation between the admission hematology laboratory data (hematocrit, white blood cell count, and platelet) and the focused outcome (shock or no shock). Of these 23 patients, shock did not develop in 19, and shock developed in four. There was no significant difference in admission hematology laboratory data between both groups (p < 0.05). The regression analysis revealed no significant correlation between the studied hematology laboratory data and the focused outcome (p > 0.05). It means that the three studied investigations on admission cannot predict shock in our hospitalized dengue hemorrhagic cases. From this study, it can imply that closed monitoring of dengue hemorrhagic patients is necessary. The general practitioner cannot rely on the admission hematology laboratory data to predict shock in these patients. Additionally, it might confirm that, although dengue infection can be fatal, with proper supportive treatment, especially hospitalization and hydration for severe cases, the outcome is very good.

  17. Admission of Hb S heterozygotes to a general hospital is relatively reduced in malarial areas.

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, B; Felicetti, L

    1985-01-01

    A comparison between the frequency of Hb S heterozygotes in blood donors, outpatients, and inpatients of a general hospital carried out at the Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique, where Plasmodium falciparum malaria is endemic, showed a statistically significant lower percentage of Hb S heterozygotes in the inpatient group. Evidence is thus provided that the protection given by Hb S to heterozygotes concerns not only malarial infection itself, but probably a wide spectrum of diseases to which persons who have a special resistance to P falciparum infection are less prone. PMID:4045956

  18. Referral patterns after a seizure admission in an English region: an opportunity for effective intervention? An observational study of routine hospital data

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Ruth; Pearson, Michael; Dixon, Peter; Devonport, Elizabeth; Timoney, Michelle; Bodger, Keith; Kirkham, Jamie; Marson, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify emergency seizure admissions to hospital and their subsequent access to specialist outpatient services. Design Algorithmic analysis of anonymised routine hospital data over 7 years using specialist follow-up by 3 months as the target outcome. Population All adults resident in Merseyside and Cheshire, England. Main Outcomes Whether, and when, access to the specialist advice that might prevent further admissions was offered. Results 1.4% of all emergency medical admissions are as a result of seizure. In the following 12 months 35% were readmitted and experienced a mean of 2.3 emergency department visits. Only 27% (48% of those already known to specialists and 13% of those not known) were offered appointments. Subsequent attendance at a specialist clinic is more likely if already known to a clinic, if aged <35 years, if female, or required a longer spell in hospital. Extrapolation from other work suggests 100 000 bed days per annum could be saved. Conclusions Most seizure admissions are not being referred for the help that could prevent future admissions. The majority of those that are referred are not seen within an appropriate time frame. Our service structures are not providing an optimum service for people with epilepsy. PMID:26792220

  19. CHILDHOOD RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS, HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS, AND LONG-TERM EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory symptoms and respiratory hospitalization (for asthma, bronchitis or pneumonia) were assessed in a cross-sectional study of children (ages 7--11 years, N=667) living in a moderately industrialized city in Central Sl...

  20. Ambient Coarse Particulate Matter and Hospital Admissions in the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Helen; Krall, Jenna R.; Wang, Yun; Bell, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years a number of studies have examined the short-term association between coarse particulate matter (PM10–2.5) and mortality and morbidity outcomes. These studies, however, have produced inconsistent conclusions. Objectives We estimated both the national- and regional-level associations between PM10–2.5 and emergency hospitalizations for both cardiovascular and respiratory disease among Medicare enrollees ≥ 65 years of age during the 12-year period 1999 through 2010. Methods Using air pollution data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency air quality monitoring network and daily emergency hospitalizations for 110 large urban U.S. counties assembled from the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study (MCAPS), we estimated the association between short-term exposure to PM10–2.5 and hospitalizations using a two-stage Bayesian hierarchical model and Poisson log-linear regression models. Results A 10-μg/m3 increase in PM10–2.5 was associated with a significant increase in same-day cardiovascular hospitalizations [0.69%; 95% posterior interval (PI): 0.45, 0.92]. After adjusting for PM2.5, this association remained significant (0.63%; 95% PI: 0.38, 0.88). A 10-μg/m3 increase in PM10–2.5 was not associated with a significant increase in respiratory-related hospitalizations. Conclusions We found statistically significant evidence that daily variation in PM10–2.5 is associated with emergency hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases among Medicare enrollees ≥ 65 years of age. This association was robust to adjustment for concentrations of PM2.5. Citation Powell H, Krall JR, Wang Y, Bell ML, Peng RD. 2015. Ambient coarse particulate matter and hospital admissions in the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study, 1999–2010. Environ Health Perspect 123:1152–1158; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408720 PMID:25872223

  1. A review of 187 gunshot wound admissions to a teaching hospital over a 54-month period: training and service implications.

    PubMed Central

    Cowey, A.; Mitchell, P.; Gregory, J.; Maclennan, I.; Pearson, R.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Violence involving the use of firearms has increased in the UK over the past decade. This study assesses the implications of such injuries for service provision and training by reviewing the experience at one hospital. METHODS: Accident and emergency triage data were searched for patients presenting with gunshot wounds over a 54-month period. Case notes were reviewed and patterns of care established. The resources required for clinical management were ascertained, and the financial consequences determined at contemporary full cost. RESULTS: There were 187 attendances with 247 wounds. Mean age was 21 years (range, 8-63 years). Of the attendances, 69% were out of normal working hours. Of the 187 cases, 97 patients were admitted to one hospital (83 of whom required surgery) and 10 patients were transferred to other hospitals (6 for plastic surgery not available at the Manchester Royal Infirmary and 4 due to lack of beds). Of the 80 patients who were not admitted, 4 died in accident and emergency, the rest were either air gun wounds or relatively simple higher calibre injuries. A wide range of surgical specialties was involved (limb injury, 53; thoraco-abdominal and vascular, 28; head and neck, 5; and orbit, 2), and combinations of injuries transgressed specialty and sub-specialty boundaries. The total cost of patient care was pound 267,000. CONCLUSIONS: Gunshot wounds present a heavy demand on the clinical and financial resources of the receiving hospital, and surgeons responsible for unselected acute admissions in "general surgery" should be capable of dealing with these indiscriminate injuries. Current training and service trends towards increasing sub-specialisation may mitigate against them achieving or retaining this capability. PMID:15005928

  2. Intermittent outpatient nesiritide infusion reduces hospital admissions in patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ernst R; Najam, Sabeen; Akel, Rami; Sulimanjee, Nasir; Bionat, Susan; Rosanio, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    Recombinant B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a therapeutic modality in patients with decompensated congestive heart failure. Retrospectively tested are the effects of intermittent outpatient nesiritide infusion on symptoms, hospital readmission rates, endogenous BNP, and renal function in patients with advanced heart failure. Twenty-four patients in heart failure in New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes III-IV received a 6- to 8-hour intermittent nesiritide outpatient infusion (0.01 mcg/kg/min continuously intravenously) once weekly for a total duration of 3 months in addition to standard medical therapy. Data were analyzed retrospectively to compare hospital readmission rates, endogenous BNP levels, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine levels 1 year before and up to 12 months after starting treatment. All patients tolerated nesiritide infusions well with no significant adverse events. At the end of the observation period, NYHA classes had improved 1 class in 16 patients and 2 classes in 4 patients and remained unchanged in 4 patients. There was a significant reduction in hospital readmissions within 1 year with nesiritide treatment compared with the year before (0.94 +/- 0.8 vs 3.6 +/- 2.2, P < .005). No significant changes were seen regarding endogenous BNP levels (1002 +/- 870 vs 1092 +/- 978 pg/mL, P = .95), blood urea nitrogen levels (45 +/- 28 vs 45 +/- 26 mg/dL, P = .96), and a tendency of slightly elevated creatinine levels that did not differ significantly compared with prior levels (1.76 +/- 0.85 vs 1.1 +/- 0.56 mg/dL, P = .5). Intermittent outpatient nesiritide treatment resulted in improved symptoms and reduced hospital readmission rates without a significant decline in renal function in patients with advanced heart failure but did not alter endogenous BNP levels.

  3. Influenza, Campylobacter and Mycoplasma Infections, and Hospital Admissions for Guillain-Barré Syndrome, England

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Sarah J.; Rodrigues, Laura C.

    2006-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in polio-free regions. Considerable evidence links Campylobacter infection with GBS, but evidence that implicates other pathogens as triggers remains scarce. We conducted a time-series analysis to investigate short-term correlations between weekly laboratory-confirmed reports of putative triggering pathogens and weekly hospitalizations for GBS in England from 1993 through 2002. We found a positive association between the numbers of reports of laboratory-confirmed influenza A in any given week and GBS hospitalizations in the same week. Different pathogens may trigger GBS in persons of different ages; among those <35 years, numbers of weekly GBS hospitalizations were associated with weekly Campylobacter and Mycoplasma pneumoniae reports, whereas among those >35 years, positive associations were with influenza. Further studies should estimate the relative contribution of different pathogens to GBS incidence, overall and by age group, and determine whether influenza is a real trigger for GBS or a marker for influenza vaccination. PMID:17326939

  4. [Problems in the admission to in-hospital oral surgical care from the patient's viewpoint--results of patient interviews in the hospital for dental and maxillo-facial surgery of the Karl Marx University, Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, F; Birnbaum, K; Langanke, B; Niemand, B; Thomzyk, I

    1979-06-01

    The author deals with the results from the interviewing of oral surgery patients on their problems concerning the sending and the admission to the hospital, with special attention to the problems of waiting for admission, the familiarization with the clinical environment and the improvement suggestions of the patients. The conclusions concern tasks arising from the medical and dental care for inpatients as well as for outpatients.

  5. The north Indian dengue outbreak 2006: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit admissions in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chandralekha; Gupta, Pratyush; Trikha, Anjan

    2008-02-01

    Dengue fever (DF), dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) have emerged as public health problems of international concern. During a dengue outbreak in north India in October 2006, more than 10000 patients presented to hospital with fever. We retrospectively analysed the presenting features, treatment given and the outcome of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS): a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. A total of 72 critically ill patients were referred for admission to the ICU. The common symptoms were fever (100%), myalgia (40%) and gastrointestinal bleed. Menorrhagia and haematuria were seen as the sole presenting features in many females. Treatment consisted of bed rest, oxygen therapy, intensive monitoring, antipyretics, platelet transfusions, hydration and electrolyte correction. On average, six units of platelets were required per patient. The average duration of stay in the ICU was 3 d. There were eight deaths. Adequate hydration and platelet replacement with transfusions, especially apheresis platelets to a target level above 60000 platelets/mm3, were effective means of combating the disease.

  6. The use of digoxin in patients with worsening chronic heart failure: reconsidering an old drug to reduce hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Ambrosy, Andrew P; Butler, Javed; Ahmed, Ali; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Colucci, Wilson S; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2014-05-13

    Digoxin is the oldest cardiac drug still in contemporary use, yet its role in the management of patients with heart failure (HF) remains controversial. A purified cardiac glycoside derived from the foxglove plant, digoxin increases ejection fraction, augments cardiac output, and reduces pulmonary capillary wedge pressure without causing deleterious increases in heart rate or decreases in blood pressure. Moreover, it is also a neurohormonal modulator at low doses. In the pivotal DIG (Digitalis Investigation Group) trial, digoxin therapy was shown to reduce all-cause and HF-specific hospitalizations but had no effect on survival. With the discovery of neurohormonal blockers capable of reducing mortality in HF with reduced ejection fraction, the results of the DIG trial were viewed as neutral, and the use of digoxin declined precipitously. Although modern drug and device-based therapies have dramatically improved the survival of ambulatory patients with HF, outcomes for patients with worsening chronic HF, defined as deteriorating signs and symptoms on standard therapy often leading to unscheduled clinic or emergency department visits or hospitalization, have largely remained unchanged over the past 2 decades. The available data suggest that a therapeutic trial of digoxin may be appropriate in patients with worsening chronic heart failure who remain symptomatic.

  7. Hospital Admission for Schizophrenia and Discharge Against Medical Advice in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Hospital discharge against medical advice may leave a patient at risk for adverse health outcomes and/or readmission, yet little is known regarding its occurrence, especially among patients with mental illness. The objective of this study was to discern the prevalence of, and predictive factors for, being discharged against medical advice among hospitalized patients with a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia. Method: The 2004 US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to discern demographic predictors, length of stay, and costs for discharge against medical advice relative to discharge with medical approval. Inpatient discharges from US community hospitals for patients of all ages with The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes 295.0–295.9 were included. Conditional logistic regression was used to discern factors predictive of discharge against medical advice, and least squares mean analysis was used to examine differences in length of stay and mean cost per day relative to discharge with medical approval. Least squares means were adjusted for age (continuous), sex, race, region, payer, hospital setting, and bed size. Results: Within the study population, 1.6% of patients admitted for schizophrenia were discharged against medical advice (n = 3,382/210,722). Patients discharged against medical advice were significantly more likely to be younger (OR = 0.985, 95% CI, 0.982–0.987) and male (OR = 1.421, 95% CI, 1.321–1.529). Race was not a significant factor. Mean ± SE length of stay for discharge against medical advice was 5.0 ± 0.24 days, as compared to 8.7 ± 0.06 days for patients discharged with medical approval (P < .0001). Mean cost per day was significantly higher for discharge against medical advice ($1,886.02 ± 49.67 vs $1,565.79 ± 13.42, P < .0001). Conclusions: Although the percentage of patients discharged against medical advice was small, the

  8. Global and regional burden of hospital admissions for severe acute lower respiratory infections in young children in 2010: a systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Harish; Simões, Eric AF; Rudan, Igor; Gessner, Bradford D; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Zhang, Jian Shayne F; Feikin, Daniel R; Mackenzie, Grant A; Moiïsi, Jennifer C; Roca, Anna; Baggett, Henry C; Zaman, Syed MA; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Lucero, Marilla G; Chandran, Aruna; Gentile, Angela; Cohen, Cheryl; Krishnan, Anand; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Arguedas, Adriano; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Ope, Maurice; Ruvinsky, Raúl Oscar; Hortal, María; McCracken, John P; Madhi, Shabir A; Bruce, Nigel; Qazi, Shamim A; Morris, Saul S; El Arifeen, Shams; Weber, Martin W; Scott, J Anthony G; Brooks, W Abdullah; Breiman, Robert F; Campbell, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The annual number of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths due to severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in young children worldwide is unknown. We aimed to estimate the incidence of admissions and deaths for such infections in children younger than 5 years in 2010. Methods We estimated the incidence of admissions for severe and very severe ALRI in children younger than 5 years, stratified by age and region, with data from a systematic review of studies published between Jan 1, 1990, and March 31, 2012, and from 28 unpublished population-based studies. We applied these incidence estimates to population estimates for 2010, to calculate the global and regional burden in children admitted with severe ALRI in that year. We estimated in-hospital mortality due to severe and very severe ALRI by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from hospital-based studies. Findings We identified 89 eligible studies and estimated that in 2010, 11·9 million (95% CI 10·3–13·9 million) episodes of severe and 3·0 million (2·1–4·2 million) episodes of very severe ALRI resulted in hospital admissions in young children worldwide. Incidence was higher in boys than in girls, the sex disparity being greatest in South Asian studies. On the basis of data from 37 hospital studies reporting case fatality ratios for severe ALRI, we estimated that roughly 265 000 (95% CI 160 000–450 000) in-hospital deaths took place in young children, with 99% of these deaths in developing countries. Therefore, the data suggest that although 62% of children with severe ALRI are treated in hospitals, 81% of deaths happen outside hospitals. Interpretation Severe ALRI is a substantial burden on health services worldwide and a major cause of hospital referral and admission in young children. Improved hospital access and reduced inequities, such as those related to sex and rural status, could substantially decrease mortality related to such infection

  9. Retrospective evaluation of urological admissions to emergency service of a training and research hospital

    PubMed Central

    Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aydın, Cemil; Akkoç, Ali; Yılmaz, Yakup

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many patients consult emergency services with urological complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatments of urological emergency cases in a training and research hospital. Material and methods: We retrospectively evaluated urological emergency patients referred to the emergency unit between July 2012 and July 2013 according to age, gender, affected organ, radiological imaging techniques and treatment. Results: Among 141.844 emergency cases, 3.113 (2.19%) were urological emergencies and 53.2% of the patients were male (mean age: 49.1), and 46.8% of them were female (median age: 42.8). The most frequent illness was genitourinary infection constituting 41.2% of the cases followed by renal colic (36.9%). Among the urological emergencies 483 (15.5%) patients were hospitalized and 152 surgical operations were performed. The mostly performed procedure was the placement of a suprapubic catheter in 34 patients constituting (22.3%) of the cases. Totally eight patients were referred to another experienced health center due to different reasons. Conclusion: Most of the urological emergency patients do not require emergency surgical interventions however, timely identification and management of urological emergencies with in-depth clinical evaluation are important to prevent late complications. Therefore the doctors working in emergency services must be heedful of urological emergencies. PMID:26328181

  10. Police referrals to a psychiatric hospital: experiences of nurses caring for police-referred admissions.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Reshin; O'Brien, Louise; Gillies, Donna; Andrew, Sharon

    2013-08-01

    Police are a major source of referral to psychiatric hospitals in industrialized countries with mental health legislation. However, little attention has been paid to nurses' experience of caring for police-referred patients to psychiatric hospitals. This study utilized a Heideggerian phenomenological framework to explore the experiences of nine nurses caring for patients referred by the police, through semistructured interviews. Two major themes emerged from the hermeneutic analyses of interviews conducted with nurse participants: (i) 'expecting "the worst" '; and (ii) 'balancing therapeutic care and forced treatment'. Expecting 'the worst' related to the perceptions nurse participants had about patients referred by the police. This included two sub-themes: (i) 'we are here to care for whoever they bring in'; and (ii) 'but who deserves care?' The second theme balancing therapeutic care and forced treatment included the sub-themes: (i) 'taking control, taking care'; and (ii) 'managing power'. The study raises ethical and skill challenges for nursing including struggling with the notion of who deserves care, and balancing the imperatives of legislation with the need to work within a therapeutic framework. PMID:23009594

  11. Nursing interventions for substance use during psychiatric hospital admissions: Clinical context and predictors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Warren, Jonathan; Odubanwo, Adewunmi; Bowers, Len

    2015-12-01

    Empirical information about how nurses manage substance use on psychiatric wards is lacking. The aims of the study were to identify the frequency and clinical features of incidents among a sample of inpatients over a 12-month period and how nursing staff intervened. Electronic, anonymized inpatient records were searched for incidents of substance use on 17 acute psychiatric wards in four hospitals in London. Searches were conducted for all patients admitted during 2012 and details of incidents and patient characteristics were extracted for analysis. Substance use was reported for 291 patients, with 25 incidents per 100 patients admitted to hospital. Only half of the incidents were followed by a response that specifically addressed the patients' substance use behaviour. These interactions usually concerned the circumstances and reasons for use, but rarely involved specific support for patients' substance use problems. The likelihood of staff taking any form of action was increased if the patient had been formally admitted, and was reduced if the patient was subject to containment during the shift or had a history of self-harm. The results demonstrate that nurses require specific training and guidance on supporting substance using patients. PMID:26300518

  12. Short-term relationships between emergency hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and fine particulate air pollution in Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Nakhlé, Myriam Mrad; Farah, Wehbeh; Ziadé, Nelly; Abboud, Maher; Salameh, Dominique; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    High levels of major outdoor air pollutants have been documented in Lebanon, but their health effects remain unknown. The Beirut Air Pollution and Health Effects study aimed to determine the relationship between short-term variations in ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and emergency hospital admissions in the city of Beirut, and whether susceptible groups are more greatly affected. An autoregressive Poisson model was used to evaluate the association between daily concentrations of particulate matter and respiratory and cardiovascular emergency hospital admissions after controlling for confounders. All variables were measured during 1 year from January 2012 to December 2012. Relative risks of admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases were calculated for an increase in 10 μg.m(-3) of pollutant concentrations. Total respiratory admissions were significantly associated with the levels of PM10 (1.012 [95% CI 1.004-1.02]) per 10 μg.m(-3) rise in daily mean pollutant concentration for PM10 and 1.016 [95% CI 1.000-1.032] for PM2.5 on the same day. With regard to susceptible groups, total respiratory admissions were associated with PM2.5 and PM10 within the same day in children (relative risk (RR), 1.013 and 1.014; 95% confidence interval, 0.985-1.042 and 1.000-1.029 for PM2.5 and PM10, respectively). Moreover, a nearly significant association was found between particles and total circulatory admissions for adults and elderly groups in the same day. These results are similar to other international studies. Therefore, air pollution control is expected to reduce the number of admissions of these diseases in Lebanon.

  13. Differential Effects of Temperature Extremes on Hospital Admission Rates for Respiratory Disease between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

    PubMed Central

    Green, Donna; Bambrick, Hilary; Tait, Peter; Goldie, James; Schultz, Rosalie; Webb, Leanne; Alexander, Lisa; Pitman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians may be exacerbated by climate change if temperature extremes have disproportionate adverse effects on Indigenous people. To explore this issue, we analysed the effect of temperature extremes on hospital admissions for respiratory diseases, stratified by age, Indigenous status and sex, for people living in two different climates zones in the Northern Territory during the period 1993–2011. We examined admissions for both acute and chronic respiratory diagnoses, controlling for day of the week and seasonality variables. Our analysis showed that: (1) overall, Indigenous hospital admission rates far exceeded non-Indigenous admission rates for acute and chronic diagnoses, and Top End climate zone admission rates exceeded Central Australia climate zone admission rates; (2) extreme cold and hot temperatures were associated with inconsistent changes in admission rates for acute respiratory disease in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children and older adults; and (3) no response to cold or hot temperature extremes was found for chronic respiratory diagnoses. These findings support our two hypotheses, that extreme hot and cold temperatures have a different effect on hospitalisations for respiratory disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, and that these health risks vary between the different climate zones. We did not, however, find that there were differing responses to temperature extremes in the two populations, suggesting that any increased vulnerability to climate change in the Indigenous population of the Northern Territory arises from an increased underlying risk to respiratory disease and an already greater existing health burden. PMID:26633456

  14. Inverted U-shape relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to carcinoma in situ and benign neoplasm in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to understand the relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to carcinoma in situ and benign neoplasms, which have been less paid attention to, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions from the included hospitals (n = 1618) across Germany that were available between 1 January, 2009 and 31 December, 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified D00-D48 in situ neoplasms, benign neoplasms and neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behaviour by International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that covered 13 German states including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). For most subtypes, peaks of admissions were observed in spring and late autumn. There could be four groups of phenomenon among these admissions. To be specific, D06, D16, D21, D24-25, D35 and D39 peaked when PET was at 0 °C. D46 peaked when PET was at 5-10 °C. D03, D04 and D33 had linear relationships. Other admissions peaked when PET was between 0 and 5 °C. All admissions were in common with a drop when PET reached 10 °C or higher. More medical resources could have been needed on days when PETs were at 0-10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for medical professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative. PMID:25874423

  15. Inverted U-shape relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to carcinoma in situ and benign neoplasm in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to understand the relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to carcinoma in situ and benign neoplasms, which have been less paid attention to, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions from the included hospitals (n = 1618) across Germany that were available between 1 January, 2009 and 31 December, 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified D00-D48 in situ neoplasms, benign neoplasms and neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behaviour by International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that covered 13 German states including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). For most subtypes, peaks of admissions were observed in spring and late autumn. There could be four groups of phenomenon among these admissions. To be specific, D06, D16, D21, D24-25, D35 and D39 peaked when PET was at 0 °C. D46 peaked when PET was at 5-10 °C. D03, D04 and D33 had linear relationships. Other admissions peaked when PET was between 0 and 5 °C. All admissions were in common with a drop when PET reached 10 °C or higher. More medical resources could have been needed on days when PETs were at 0-10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for medical professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative.

  16. Relationships of physiologically equivalent temperature and hospital admissions due to I30-I51 other forms of heart disease in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to understand relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to other forms of heart disease by subtypes, which have been paid less attention, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions of the included hospitals (n = 1618) across Germany that were available between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified I30-I51 other forms of heart disease by the International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that have covered 13 German states, including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure, were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). Admissions due to other diseases of pericardium, nonrheumatic mitral valve disorders, nonrheumatic aortic valve disorders, cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular and left bundle-branch block, other conduction disorders, atrial fibrillation and flutter, and other cardiac arrhythmias peaked when PET was between 0 and 10 °C. Complications and ill-defined descriptions of heart disease admissions peaked at PET 0 °C. Cardiac arrest and heart failure admissions peaked when PET was between 0 and -10 °C while the rest did not vary significantly. A common drop of admissions was found when PET was above 10 °C. More medical resources could have been needed for heart health on days when PETs were <10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for medical professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative. PMID:26620859

  17. Crohn's disease in Wales, 1967-1976; an epidemiological survey based on hospital admissions.

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, J. F.; Rhodes, J.; Newcombe, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    One thousand and ninety-eight patients from Wales were treated in hospital for Crohn's disease between 1967 and 1976, which gave an overall 'period prevalence' for the disease of 40 cases/10(5) of the total population. The data were analysed for each of the 8 counties and for rural as well as urban populations of different sizes. The disease was significantly more common in the urban counties of Gwent and the 3 parts of Glamorgan compared with the remainder of Wales. The highest prevalence was in South Glamorgan (54 cases/10(5)) and the lowest in Dyfed (30/10(5)). There was a relatively small but highly significant difference in the prevalence for urban populations larger than 10 000 (47/10(5)) compared with smaller communities which were chiefly rural (34/10(5)). PMID:6969396

  18. Vegetation fire smoke, indigenous status and cardio-respiratory hospital admissions in Darwin, Australia, 1996–2005: a time-series study

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Ivan C; Johnston, Fay H; Morgan, Geoffrey G

    2008-01-01

    Background Air pollution in Darwin, Northern Australia, is dominated by smoke from seasonal fires in the surrounding savanna that burn during the dry season from April to November. Our aim was to study the association between particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microns diameter (PM10) and daily emergency hospital admissions for cardio-respiratory diseases for each fire season from 1996 to 2005. We also investigated whether the relationship differed in indigenous Australians; a disadvantaged population sub-group. Methods Daily PM10 exposure levels were estimated for the population of the city from visibility data using a previously validated model. We used over-dispersed Poisson generalized linear models with parametric smoothing functions for time and meteorology to examine the association between admissions and PM10 up to three days prior. An interaction between indigenous status and PM10 was included to examine differences in the impact on indigenous people. Results We found both positive and negative associations and our estimates had wide confidence intervals. There were generally positive associations between respiratory disease and PM10 but not with cardiovascular disease. An increase of 10 μg/m3 in same-day estimated ambient PM10 was associated with a 4.81% (95%CI: -1.04%, 11.01%) increase in total respiratory admissions. When the interaction between indigenous status and PM10 was assessed a statistically different association was found between PM10 and admissions three days later for respiratory infections of indigenous people (15.02%; 95%CI: 3.73%, 27.54%) than for non-indigenous people (0.67%; 95%CI: -7.55%, 9.61%). There were generally negative estimates for cardiovascular conditions. For non-indigenous admissions the estimated association with total cardiovascular admissions for same day ambient PM10 and admissions was -3.43% (95%CI: -9.00%, 2.49%) and the estimate for indigenous admissions was -3.78% (95%CI: -13.4%, 6.91%), although ambient PM

  19. A multi-year study of air pollution and respiratory hospital admissions in three New York State metropolitan areas: results for 1988 and 1989 summers.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G D; Ito, K; Kinney, P L; Lippmann, M

    1992-01-01

    As part of a multi-year study of air pollution and respiratory hospital admissions in the Buffalo, Albany, and New York City, New York, metropolitan areas, filter samples were collected daily at suburban air monitoring sites and analyzed for their content of particulate phase aerosol strong acidity (i.e., hydrogen ion, H+) and sulfate (SO4 = ). In addition, daily hospital admissions for respiratory causes, other community air pollutant measurements (e.g., ozone, O3), and meteorological data (e.g., temperature) were also obtained for these metropolitan areas. The summer months (June-August) were selected for analysis because that is when the highest H+ (and O3) are usually experienced at these sites, and because these months are rarely complicated by other major influences (e.g., high pollen counts). Thus, any pollution-admissions relationships were expected to be most clearly discernible in this season. Prior to the health effects analysis, the summer admissions and environmental data were first detrended to eliminate long-wave autocorrelations, and day-of-week effects were removed via regression. Cross-correlations of the filtered 1988 and 1989 admissions and environmental data revealed strong associations between elevated summer haze pollution (i.e., H+, SO4 =, and O3) and increased total respiratory and asthma admissions on the same day and/or on subsequent days in Buffalo and New York City, especially during the summer of 1988 (when pollution levels were more extreme). Regression analyses indicated that the pollution-admissions associations remained significant (p < 0.05) even after the simultaneous inclusion of lagged daily maximum temperature. Mean effects calculations for these cities indicated that summertime haze can play a significant role in the occurrence of respiratory admissions in that season: accounting for an average 6 to 24% of 1988 Buffalo and NYC asthma admissions (depending on the pollutant index employed). O3 consistently had the highest mean

  20. Age, Spatial, and Temporal Variations in Hospital Admissions with Malaria in Kilifi County, Kenya: A 25-Year Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mogeni, Polycarp; Williams, Thomas N.; Nyundo, Christopher; Bauni, Evasius; Omedo, Irene; Njuguna, Patricia; Newton, Charles R.; Osier, Faith; Berkley, James A.; Hammitt, Laura L.; Awuondo, Ken; Mturi, Neema; Snow, Robert W.; Noor, Abdisalan; Marsh, Kevin; Bejon, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Encouraging progress has been seen with reductions in Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission in some parts of Africa. Reduced transmission might lead to increasing susceptibility to malaria among older children due to lower acquired immunity, and this has implications for ongoing control strategies. Methods and Findings We conducted a longitudinal observational study of children admitted to Kilifi County Hospital in Kenya and linked it to data on residence and insecticide-treated net (ITN) use. This included data from 69,104 children aged from 3 mo to 13 y admitted to Kilifi County Hospital between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2014. The variation in malaria slide positivity among admissions was examined in logistic regression models using the following predictors: location of the residence, calendar time, the child’s age, ITN use, and the enhanced vegetation index (a proxy for soil moisture). The proportion of malaria slide-positive admissions declined from 0.56 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–0.58) in 1998 to 0.07 (95% CI 0.06–0.08) in 2009 but then increased again through to 0.24 (95% CI 0.22–0.25) in 2014. Older children accounted for most of the increase after 2009 (0.035 [95% CI 0.030–0.040] among young children compared to 0.22 [95% CI 0.21–0.23] in older children). There was a nonlinear relationship between malaria risk and prevalence of ITN use within a 2 km radius of an admitted child’s residence such that the predicted malaria positive fraction varied from ~0.4 to <0.1 as the prevalence of ITN use varied from 20% to 80%. In this observational analysis, we were unable to determine the cause of the decline in malaria between 1998 and 2009, which pre-dated the dramatic scale-up in ITN distribution and use. Conclusion Following a period of reduced transmission, a cohort of older children emerged who have increased susceptibility to malaria. Further reductions in malaria transmission are needed to mitigate the increasing

  1. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during hospital admission on coronary events within 1 year in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencloviene, J.; Babarskiene, R.; Milvidaite, I.; Kubilius, R.; Stasionyte, J.

    2013-12-01

    Some evidence indicates the deterioration of the cardiovascular system during space storms. It is plausible that the space weather conditions during and after hospital admission may affect the risk of coronary events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed the data of 1400 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between geomagnetic storms (GS), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after hospital admission and the risk of cardiovascular death (CAD), non-fatal ACS, and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) during a period of 1 year; the evaluation was based on the multivariate logistic model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, GS occurring in conjunction with SF 1 day before admission increased the risk of CAD by over 2.5 times. GS 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the risk of CAD and CABG by over 2.8 times. The risk of CABG increased by over 2 times in patients admitted during the day of GS and 1 day after SPE. The risk of ACS was by over 1.63 times higher for patients admitted 1 day before or after solar flares.

  2. Anthropogenic Factors Are the Major Cause of Hospital Admission of a Threatened Species, the Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Scheelings, Titus Franciscus; Frith, Sarah Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reasons for presentation and outcomes of hospitalised grey-headed flying foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) in Victoria, Australia, a retrospective analysis was performed on 532 records from two wildlife hospitals. Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined. Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%). Overall the mortality rate for flying fox admissions was 59.3%. This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species. PMID:26207984

  3. Impact of Market Competition on Continuity of Care and Hospital Admissions for Asthmatic Children: A Longitudinal Analysis of Nationwide Health Insurance Data 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Hee; Park, Eun-Cheol; Nam, Young Soon; Lee, Seon-Heui; Nam, Chung Mo; Lee, Sang Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, including asthma, can be managed with timely and effective outpatient care, thereby reducing the need for hospitalization. Objective This study assessed the relationship between market competition, continuity of care (COC), and hospital admissions in asthmatic children according to their health care provider. Methods A longitudinal design was employed with a 5-year follow-up period, between 2009 and 2013, under a Korean universal health insurance program. A total of 253 geographical regions were included in the analysis, according to data from the Korean Statistical Office. Data from 9,997 patients, aged ≤ 12 years, were included. We measured the COC over a 5-year period using the Usual Provider Continuity (UPC) index. Random intercept models were calculated to assess the temporal and multilevel relationship between market competition, COC, and hospital admission rate. Results Of the 9,997 patients, 243 (2.4%) were admitted to the hospital in 2009. In the multilevel regression analysis, as the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index increased by 1,000 points (denoting decreased competitiveness), UPC scores also increased (ß = 0.001; p < 0.0001). In multilevel logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for hospital admissions for individuals with lower COC scores (≥ 2 ambulatory visits and a UPC index score of < 1) was 3.61 (95% CI: 2.98–4.38) relative to the reference group (≥ 2 ambulatory visits and a UPC index score of 1). Conclusions Market competition appears to reduce COC; decreased COC was associated with a higher OR for hospital admissions. PMID:26958850

  4. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiulin; Zhao, Wenji; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenhui; Tang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office) and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office) of the study area. Correspondingly, PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um) concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles. PMID:26402691

  5. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiulin; Zhao, Wenji; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenhui; Tang, Tao

    2015-09-22

    Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office) and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office) of the study area. Correspondingly, PM₁ (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um) concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles.

  6. [Senegal: installation of a microcomputer in the emergency admission service of the Ziguinchor Regional Hospital].

    PubMed

    Gueguen, G

    1995-01-01

    An Emergency Department was opened at the Regional Hospital of Ziguinchor in August 1993. Although adapted to local conditions, facilities are state-of-the-art and allow 24-hour reception of patients regardless of the gravity of their condition. There are many people involved: family, police, firemen, administration ... and there are also many questions. Records must be efficiently and accurately managed and the computer is the ideal tool for this purpose. The department was able to install a system at a particularly low cost since the PC computer and Epi-Info software were provided at no charge by the World Health Organization. To ensure consistent data entry, a coding system was used with some codes being specific to the department. Thanks to this system the department now has a 24 hour source of information for day-to-day management, statistical reporting, regional morbidity assessment, comparison of performance with similar facilities, and patient follow-up. Our experience shows that this type of low-cost computer system and simple processing techniques are perfectly suited to the special requirements of medical practice in Black Africa.

  7. Traffic related air pollution and acute hospital admission for respiratory diseases in Drammen, Norway 1995-2000.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Bente; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per; Bjørkly, Sonja; Skrondal, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the associations between seven ambient air pollutants [particulate matter (PM10), nitrous dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), benzene, formaldehyde and toluene] and acute hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Drammen, Norway 1995-2000. Time-series analysis of counts was performed by means of generalized additive models with log link and Poisson distribution. The results showed that benzene was the pollutant having the strongest association with respiratory diseases for the total study period, the relative risk of an interquartile increase of benzene was 1.095 with 95% confidence interval: 1.031-1.163. The corresponding results were 1.049 (0.990-1.112) for formaldehyde, 1.044 (1.000-1.090) for toluene, 1.064 (1.019-1.111) for NO2, 1.043 (1.011-1.075) for SO2, 0.990 (0.936-1.049) for O3 and 1.022 (0.990-1.055) for PM10. Dividing the total study period into two 3-year periods, there was a substantial reduction in the exposure levels of the volatile organic compounds (benzene, formaldehyde and toluene) from the first to the second period. Separate analyses for the second time period showed weaker association between these pollutants and the health outcome. This study provides further evidence for short-term respiratory health effects of traffic related air pollution.

  8. Characteristics of admissions and variations in the use of basic investigations, treatments and outcomes in Kenyan hospitals within a new Clinical Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Makone, Boniface; Julius, Thomas; Mbevi, George; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Nyamai, Rachel; Were, Fred; Githanga, David; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of detailed information about hospital activities, processes and outcomes hampers planning, performance monitoring and improvement in low-income countries (LIC). Clinical networks offer one means to advance methods for data collection and use, informing wider health system development in time, but are rare in LIC. We report baseline data from a new Clinical Information Network (CIN) in Kenya seeking to promote data-informed improvement and learning. Methods Data from 13 hospitals engaged in the Kenyan CIN between April 2014 and March 2015 were captured from medical and laboratory records. We use these data to characterise clinical care and outcomes of hospital admission. Results Data were available for a total of 30 042 children aged between 2 months and 15 years. Malaria (in five hospitals), pneumonia and diarrhoea/dehydration (all hospitals) accounted for the majority of diagnoses and comorbidity was found in 17 710 (59%) patients. Overall, 1808 deaths (6%) occurred (range per hospital 2.5%–11.1%) with 1037 deaths (57.4%) occurring by day 2 of admission (range 41%–67.8%). While malaria investigations are commonly done, clinical health workers rarely investigate for other possible causes of fever, test for blood glucose in severe illness or ascertain HIV status of admissions. Adherence to clinical guideline-recommended treatment for malaria, pneumonia, meningitis and acute severe malnutrition varied widely across hospitals. Conclusion Developing clinical networks is feasible with appropriate support. Early data demonstrate that hospital mortality remains high in Kenya, that resources to investigate severe illness are limited, that care provided and outcomes vary widely and that adoption of effective interventions remains slow. Findings suggest considerable scope for improving care within and across sites. PMID:26662925

  9. Waiving the Three-Day Rule: Admissions and Length-of-Stay at Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities did not Increase

    PubMed Central

    Grebla, Regina C.; Keohane, Laura; Lee, Yoojin; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Rahman, Momotazur; Trivedl, Amal N.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Medicare program requires an enrollee to have a hospital stay of at least three consecutive calendar days to qualify for coverage of subsequent postacute care in a skilled nursing facility. This long-standing policy, implemented to discourage premature discharges from hospitals, might now be inappropriately lengthening hospital stays for patients who could be transferred sooner. To assess the implications of eliminating the three-day qualifying stay requirement, we compared hospital and postacute skilled nursing facility utilization among Medicare Advantage enrollees in matched plans that did or did not eliminate that requirement in 2006–10. Among hospitalized enrollees with a skilled nursing facility admission, the mean hospital length-of-stay declined from 6.9 days to 6.7 days for those no longer subject to the qualifying stay but increased from 6.1 to 6.6 days among those still subject to it, for a net decline of 0.7 day when the three-day stay requirement was eliminated. The elimination was not associated with more hospital or skilled nursing facility admissions or with longer lengths-of-stay in a skilled nursing facility. These findings suggest that eliminating the three-day stay requirement conferred savings on Medicare Advantage plans and that study of the requirement in traditional Medicare plans is warranted. PMID:26240246

  10. Waiving the three-day rule: admissions and length-of-stay at hospitals and skilled nursing facilities did not increase.

    PubMed

    Grebla, Regina C; Keohane, Laura; Lee, Yoojin; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Rahman, Momotazur; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-08-01

    The traditional Medicare program requires an enrollee to have a hospital stay of at least three consecutive calendar days to qualify for coverage of subsequent postacute care in a skilled nursing facility. This long-standing policy, implemented to discourage premature discharges from hospitals, might now be inappropriately lengthening hospital stays for patients who could be transferred sooner. To assess the implications of eliminating the three-day qualifying stay requirement, we compared hospital and postacute skilled nursing facility utilization among Medicare Advantage enrollees in matched plans that did or did not eliminate that requirement in 2006-10. Among hospitalized enrollees with a skilled nursing facility admission, the mean hospital length-of-stay declined from 6.9 days to 6.7 days for those no longer subject to the qualifying stay but increased from 6.1 to 6.6 days among those still subject to it, for a net decline of 0.7 day when the three-day stay requirement was eliminated. The elimination was not associated with more hospital or skilled nursing facility admissions or with longer lengths-of-stay in a skilled nursing facility. These findings suggest that eliminating the three-day stay requirement conferred savings on Medicare Advantage plans and that study of the requirement in traditional Medicare plans is warranted.

  11. Demographic and socioeconomic inequalities in the risk of emergency hospital admission for violence: cross-sectional analysis of a national database in Wales

    PubMed Central

    Fone, David; Gartner, Andrea; Bellis, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the risk of emergency hospital admissions for violence (EHAV) associated with demographic and socioeconomic factors in Wales between 2007/2008 and 2013/2014, and to describe the site of injury causing admission. Design Database analysis of 7 years’ hospital admissions using the Patient Episode Database for Wales (PEDW). Setting and participants Wales, UK, successive annual populations ∼2.8 million aged 0–74 years. Primary outcome The first emergency admission for violence in each year of the study, defined by the International Classification of Diseases V.10 (ICD-10) codes for assaults (X85-X99, Y00-Y09) in any coding position. Results A total of 11 033 admissions for assault. The majority of admissions resulted from head injuries. The overall crude admission rate declined over the study period, from 69.9 per 100 000 to 43.2 per 100 000, with the largest decrease in the most deprived quintile of deprivation. A generalised linear count model with a negative binomial log link, adjusted for year, age group, gender, deprivation quintile and settlement type, showed the relative risk was highest in age group 18–19 years (RR=6.75, 95% CI 5.88 to 7.75) compared with the reference category aged 10–14 years. The risk decreased with age after 25 years. Risk of admission was substantially higher in males (RR=4.55, 95% CI 4.31 to 4.81), for residents of the most deprived areas of Wales (RR=3.60, 95% CI 3.32 to 3.90) compared with the least deprived, and higher in cities (RR=1.37, 95% CI 1.27 to 1.49) and towns (RR=1.32, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.45) compared with villages. Conclusions Despite identifying a narrowing in the gap between prevalence of violence in richer and poorer communities, violence remains strongly associated with young men living in areas of socioeconomic deprivation. There is potential for a greater reduction, given that violence is mostly preventable. Recommendations for reducing inequalities in the risk of

  12. Impact of a chronic disease management program on hospital admissions and readmissions in an Australian population with heart disease or diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamar, G Brent; Rula, Elizabeth Y; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Larkin, Shaun

    2013-04-01

    Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) were introduced in Australia to reduce unnecessary health care utilization by the growing population with chronic conditions; however, evidence of effectiveness is needed. This study evaluated the impact of a comprehensive CDMP, My Health Guardian (MHG), on rate of hospital admissions, readmissions, and average length of hospital stay (ALOS) for insured individuals with heart disease or diabetes. Primary outcomes were assessed through retrospective comparison of members in MHG (treatment; n=5053) to similar nonparticipating members (comparison; n=23,077) using a difference-in-differences approach with the year before program commencement serving as baseline and the subsequent 12 or 18 months serving as the program periods. All outcomes were evaluated for the total study population and for disease-matched subgroups (heart disease and diabetes). Statistical tests were performed using multivariate regression controlling for age, sex, number of chronic diseases, and past hospitalization status. After both 12 and 18 months, treatment members displayed decreases in admissions (both, P≤0.001) and readmissions (both, P≤0.01), and ALOS after 18 months (P≤0.01) versus the comparison group; magnitude of impact increased over time for these 3 measures. All outcomes for both disease-matched subgroups directionally mirrored the total study group, but the diabetes subgroup did not achieve significance for readmissions or ALOS. Within the treatment group, admissions decreased with increasing care calls to members (12 and 18 months, P<0.0001). These results show that MHG successfully reduced the frequency and duration of hospital admissions and presents a promising approach to reduce the burden associated with hospitalizations in populations with chronic disease.

  13. Why are some patients admitted to psychiatric hospital while others are not? A study assessing risk during the admission interview and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; O'Connor, Nick; Cleary, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient characteristics are used to decide whether a patient is or is not admitted to a psychiatric hospital, and what happens to those not admitted. A further aim was to determine if high levels of risk on admission predict seclusions, length of stay, or readmission within 28 days. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive presentations to an admission office via case notes and electronic databases. Eighty percent (100/127) of the adults presenting to the admission office over a typical month were admitted to hospital. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were experiencing psychosis or exacerbation of schizophrenia, referred by other doctors or mental health teams, had a legal reason for referral, or if they were homeless. There was no association between risk for violence or suicide and seclusion rates, length of stay, or being readmitted within 28 days. It was reassuring to find that 85% of those not admitted were referred to other mental health providers, and none required admission over the following month. This study found high rates of seclusion and readmissions within 1 year, which requires further study to find strategies to reduce these rates. PMID:22039923

  14. [MALNUTRITION IN THE ELDERLY PATIENT TO HOSPITAL ADMISSION, AN OLD PROBLEM UNSOLVED].

    PubMed

    Rentero Redondo, Lorena; Iniesta Navalón, Carles; Gascón Cánovas, Juan Jose; Tomás Jimenez, Cristina; Sánchez Álvarez, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de desnutrición en pacientes con edad igual o superior a 65 años al ingreso hospitalario y los factores asociados a su presencia. Analizar el exceso de estancia hospitalaria (EEH), el impacto económico y la tasa de reingresos prematuros asociados a la desnutrición hospitalaria en pacientes de edad avanzada. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo realizado en el Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía. Se incluyeron todos los pacientes con edad igual o mayor a 65 años que ingresaron en Medicina Interna durante 2011. Se calculó el tamaño muestral teniendo en cuenta los ingresos del año anterior, y considerando una prevalencia de desnutrición del 50% con un IC 95% y un error del 5%. Para definir el grado de desnutrición se empleó la herramienta Control Nutricional (CONUT), que establece una puntuación basada en la determinación de albúmina, colesterol total y linfocitos. Para determinar los factores asociados a la presencia de desnutrición moderada-grave se realizó un análisis de regresión logística multivariante. Para cada paciente se calculó el EEH, los reingresos prematuros y el coste asociado al EEH. Para todos los análisis se utilizó un dintel de significación estadística de 0,05 y se realizaron con el paquete estadístico SPSS v15.0. Resultados: se incluyeron 310 pacientes, de los cuales el 54,2% fueron mujeres, la edad media fue de 80,1 años (DE: 6,8), con un rango entre 65 y 95 años. En cuanto al diagnóstico al ingreso, el 27,4% correspondían a enfermedades del aparato respiratorio, 22,6% del circulatorio y 11,6% del digestivo. La mediana del Índice de Charlson fue de 2,0, encontrando que el 36,8% de los pacientes presentaban una comorbilidad alta. Las patologías crónicas más prevalentes fueron la diabetes mellitus (44,2%), la enfermedad renal crónica (25,2%) y la demencia (10,6). En relación con el CONUT, el 75,8% de los pacientes presentaban criterios de desnutrición: el 42,6% leve, el 28

  15. Association between Atmospheric Fine Particulate Matter and Hospital Admissions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Southwestern Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Su-Lun; Guo, Su-Er; Chi, Miao-Ching; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Lin, Yu-Ching; Lin, Chieh-Mo; Chou, Yen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This paper reports on the findings of a population-based study to evaluate the relationship between atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels and hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in southwestern Taiwan over a three-year period, 2008–2010. Methods: Data on hospital admissions for COPD and PM2.5 levels were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research database (NHIRD) and the Environmental Protection Administration from 2008 to 2010, respectively. The lag structure of relative risks (RRs) of hospital admissions for COPD was estimated using a Poisson regression model. Results: During the study period, the overall average hospitalization rate of COPD and mean 24-h average level of PM2.5 was 0.18% and 39.37 μg/m3, respectively. There were seasonal variations in PM2.5 concentrations in southwestern Taiwan, with higher PM2.5 concentrations in both spring (average: 48.54 μg/m3) and winter (49.96 μg/m3) than in summer (25.89 μg/m3) and autumn (33.37 μg/m3). Increased COPD admissions were significantly associated with PM2.5 in both spring (February–April) and winter (October–January), with the relative risks (RRs) for every 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 being 1.25 (95% CI = 1.22–1.27) and 1.24 (95% CI = 1.23–1.26), respectively, at a lag zero days (i.e., no lag days). Lag effects on COPD admissions were observed for PM2.5, with the elevated RRs beginning at lag zero days and larger RRs estimates tending to occur at longer lags (up to six days, i.e., lag 0–5 days). Conclusions: In general, findings reveal an association between atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and hospital admissions for COPD in southwestern Taiwan, especially during both spring and winter seasons. PMID:27023589

  16. Short-term Effect of Fine Particulate Matter on Children’s Hospital Admissions and Emergency Department Visits for Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: No children-specified review and meta-analysis paper about the short-term effect of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on hospital admissions and emergency department visits for asthma has been published. We calculated more precise pooled effect estimates on this topic and evaluated the variation in effect size according to the differences in study characteristics not considered in previous studies. Methods: Two authors each independently searched PubMed and EMBASE for relevant studies in March, 2016. We conducted random effect meta-analyses and mixed-effect meta-regression analyses using retrieved summary effect estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and some characteristics of selected studies. The Egger’s test and funnel plot were used to check publication bias. All analyses were done using R version 3.1.3. Results: We ultimately retrieved 26 time-series and case-crossover design studies about the short-term effect of PM2.5 on children’s hospital admissions and emergency department visits for asthma. In the primary meta-analysis, children’s hospital admissions and emergency department visits for asthma were positively associated with a short-term 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (relative risk, 1.048; 95% CI, 1.028 to 1.067; I2=95.7%). We also found different effect coefficients by region; the value in Asia was estimated to be lower than in North America or Europe. Conclusions: We strengthened the evidence on the short-term effect of PM2.5 on children’s hospital admissions and emergency department visits for asthma. Further studies from other regions outside North America and Europe regions are needed for more generalizable evidence. PMID:27499163

  17. Comparison of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients requiring hospital admission to treat eosinophilic and neutrophilic exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Seon; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Sung Kyoung; Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Haak; Yoon, Hyung Kyu; Ahn, Joong Hyun; Kim, Yong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with eosinophilic and neutrophilic COPD exacerbations requiring hospital admission. Patients and methods This was a retrospective multicenter study performed between January 2010 and December 2014. In all, 1,688 COPD patients admitted via the outpatient clinics or emergency departments of six university hospitals were enrolled. The patients were grouped by complete blood counts: eosinophilic group, >2% peripheral blood eosinophils, and neutrophilic group, >65% peripheral blood neutrophils or >11,000 leukocytes/mL. The patients with radiographic evidence of pneumonia at the time of admission, those with lung cancer, those admitted for treatment of other medical problems, and those who chronically used steroids were excluded. Results A total of 605 patients hospitalized with COPD exacerbations (177 eosinophilic and 380 neutrophilic) were included. Pulmonary functions, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity, were better in patients with eosinophilic exacerbations. Treatment outcomes, including the rate of admission to the intensive care unit and mortality, were poorer in patients with neutrophilic exacerbations (4.5% vs 12.4%, P=0.004; 1.1% vs 4.5%, P=0.043, respectively). Congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR] =3.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–9.01) and neutrophilic exacerbation (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 1.21–6.52) were independent risk factors for intensive care unit admission. Conclusion COPD patients with neutrophilic exacerbations experienced worse clinical outcomes than did those with eosinophilic exacerbations. The peripheral blood eosinophil count may be a useful predictor of clinical progress during hospitalization of COPD patients with acute exacerbations. PMID:27757029

  18. Hospital admissions due to diseases of arteries and veins peaked at physiological equivalent temperature -10 to 10 °C in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to understand relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to diseases of arteries and veins by subtypes, which have been scarcely studied, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions from the included hospitals (n = 1,618) across Germany that were available between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified I70-I79 Diseases of arteries, arterioles and capillaries and I80-I89 Diseases of veins, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that covered 13 German states including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). Two-way fractional-polynomial prediction was plotted with 95 % confidence intervals. For most of the subtypes from diseases of arteries and veins, hospital admissions slightly peaked in spring and dropped when PET was at 10 °C. There were no other large differences across 12 months. Admissions of peripheral vascular diseases, arterial embolism and thrombosis, phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, oesophageal varices and nonspecific lymphadenitis peaked when PET was between 0 and -10 °C, while others peaked when PET was between 0 and 10 °C. More medical resources could have been needed on days when PETs were at -10 to 10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for health professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative. PMID:26631019

  19. Does case management for patients with heart failure based in the community reduce unplanned hospital admissions? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, A L; Johnson, R; King, A; Morris, R W; Purdy, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled trials (non-RCTs, NRCTs) is to investigate the effectiveness and related costs of case management (CM) for patients with heart failure (HF) predominantly based in the community in reducing unplanned readmissions and length of stay (LOS). Setting CM initiated either while as an inpatient, or on discharge from acute care hospitals, or in the community and then continuing on in the community. Participants Adults with a diagnosis of HF and resident in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Intervention CM based on nurse coordinated multicomponent care which is applicable to the primary care-based health systems. Primary and secondary outcomes Primary outcomes of interest were unplanned (re)admissions, LOS and any related cost data. Secondary outcomes were primary healthcare resources. Results 22 studies were included: 17 RCTs and 5 NRCTs. 17 studies described hospital-initiated CM (n=4794) and 5 described community-initiated CM of HF (n=3832). Hospital-initiated CM reduced readmissions (rate ratio 0.74 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.92), p=0.008) and LOS (mean difference −1.28 days (95% CI −2.04 to −0.52), p=0.001) in favour of CM compared with usual care. 9 trials described cost data of which 6 reported no difference between CM and usual care. There were 4 studies of community-initiated CM versus usual care (2 RCTs and 2 NRCTs) with only the 2 NRCTs showing a reduction in admissions. Conclusions Hospital-initiated CM can be successful in reducing unplanned hospital readmissions for HF and length of hospital stay for people with HF. 9 trials described cost data; no clear difference emerged between CM and usual care. There was limited evidence for community-initiated CM which suggested it does not reduce admission. PMID:27165648

  20. Aerosol Optical Depth As a Measure of Particulate Exposure Using Imputed Censored Data, and Relationship with Childhood Asthma Hospital Admissions for 2004 in Athens, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Gary; Sterling, David A; Aryal, Subhash; Vemulapalli, Abhilash; Priftis, Kostas N; Sifakis, Nicolas I

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of human health implications from atmosphere exposure is a priority in both the geographic and the public health domains. The unique properties of geographic tools for remote sensing of the atmosphere offer a distinct ability to characterize and model aerosols in the urban atmosphere for evaluation of impacts on health. Asthma, as a manifestation of upper respiratory disease prevalence, is a good example of the potential interface of geographic and public health interests. The current study focused on Athens, Greece during the year of 2004 and (1) demonstrates a systemized process for aligning data obtained from satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) with geographic location and time, (2) evaluates the ability to apply imputation methods to censored data, and (3) explores whether AOD data can be used satisfactorily to investigate the association between AOD and health impacts using an example of hospital admission for childhood asthma. This work demonstrates the ability to apply remote sensing data in the evaluation of health outcomes, that the alignment process for remote sensing data is readily feasible, and that missing data can be imputed with a sufficient degree of reliability to develop complete datasets. Individual variables demonstrated small but significant effect levels on hospital admission of children for AOD, nitrogen oxides (NOx), relative humidity (rH), temperature, smoke, and inversely for ozone. However, when applying a multivari-able model, an association with asthma hospital admissions and air quality could not be demonstrated. This work is promising and will be expanded to include additional years. PMID:25987842

  1. Aerosol optical depth as a measure of particulate exposure using imputed censored data, and relationship with childhood asthma hospital admissions for 2004 in athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Gary; Sterling, David A; Aryal, Subhash; Vemulapalli, Abhilash; Priftis, Kostas N; Sifakis, Nicolas I

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of human health implications from atmosphere exposure is a priority in both the geographic and the public health domains. The unique properties of geographic tools for remote sensing of the atmosphere offer a distinct ability to characterize and model aerosols in the urban atmosphere for evaluation of impacts on health. Asthma, as a manifestation of upper respiratory disease prevalence, is a good example of the potential interface of geographic and public health interests. The current study focused on Athens, Greece during the year of 2004 and (1) demonstrates a systemized process for aligning data obtained from satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) with geographic location and time, (2) evaluates the ability to apply imputation methods to censored data, and (3) explores whether AOD data can be used satisfactorily to investigate the association between AOD and health impacts using an example of hospital admission for childhood asthma. This work demonstrates the ability to apply remote sensing data in the evaluation of health outcomes, that the alignment process for remote sensing data is readily feasible, and that missing data can be imputed with a sufficient degree of reliability to develop complete datasets. Individual variables demonstrated small but significant effect levels on hospital admission of children for AOD, nitrogen oxides (NOx), relative humidity (rH), temperature, smoke, and inversely for ozone. However, when applying a multivari-able model, an association with asthma hospital admissions and air quality could not be demonstrated. This work is promising and will be expanded to include additional years. PMID:25987842

  2. Association of Intensive Care Unit Admission With Mortality Among Older Patients With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Thomas S.; Sjoding, Michael W.; Ryan, Andrew M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Among patients whose need for intensive care is uncertain, the relationship of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and costs is unknown. OBJECTIVE To estimate the relationship between ICU admission and outcomes for elderly patients with pneumonia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries (aged >64 years) admitted to 2988 acute care hospitals in the United States with pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. EXPOSURES ICU admission vs general ward admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included Medicare spending and hospital costs. Patient and hospital characteristics were adjusted to account for differences between patients with and without ICU admission. To account for unmeasured confounding, an instrumental variable was used—the differential distance to a hospital with high ICU admission (defined as any hospital in the upper 2 quintiles of ICU use). RESULTS Among 1 112 394 Medicare beneficiaries with pneumonia, 328 404 (30%) were admitted to the ICU. In unadjusted analyses, patients admitted to the ICU had significantly higher 30-day mortality, Medicare spending, and hospital costs than patients admitted to a general hospital ward. Patients (n = 553 597) living closer than the median differential distance (<3.3 miles) to a hospital with high ICU admission were significantly more likely to be admitted to the ICU than patients living farther away (n = 558 797) (36%for patients living closer vs 23%for patients living farther, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, for the 13%of patients whose ICU admission decision appeared to be discretionary (dependent only on distance), ICU admission was associated with a significantly lower adjusted 30-day mortality (14.8%for ICU admission vs 20.5%for general ward admission, P = .02; absolute decrease, −5.7%[95%CI, −10.6%, −0.9%]), yet there were no significant differences in Medicare spending or hospital

  3. Drug-Related Hospital Visits and Admissions Associated with Laboratory or Physiologic Abnormalities—A Systematic-Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Hazi, Huda; El-Bedawi, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Countless studies have demonstrated that many emergency-room visits and hospital admissions are drug-related and that a significant proportion of these drug-related visits (DRVs) are preventable. It has not been previously studied which DRVs could be prevented through enhanced monitoring of therapy. The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of DRVs attributed to laboratory or physiologic abnormalities. Three authors independently performed comprehensive searches in relevant health care databases using pre-determined search terms. Articles discussing DRV associated with poisoning, substance abuse, or studied among existing in-patient populations were excluded. Study country, year, sample, design, duration, DRV identification method, proportion of DRVs associated with laboratory or physiologic abnormalities and associated medications were extracted. The three authors independently assessed selected relevant articles according to the Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE) as applicable according to the studies' methodology. The initial literature search yielded a total of 1,524 articles of which 30 articles meeting inclusion criteria and reporting sufficient laboratory or physiologic data were included in the overall analysis. Half employed prospective methodologies, which included both chart review and patient interview; however, the overwhelming majority of identified studies assessed only adverse drug reactions (ADRs) as a drug-related cause for DRV. The mean (range) prevalence of DRVs found in all studies was 15.4% (0.44%–66.7%) of which an association with laboratory or physiologic abnormalities could be attributed to a mean (range) of 29.4% (4.3%–78.1%) of cases. Most laboratory-associated DRVs could be linked to immunosuppressant, antineoplastic, anticoagulant and diabetes therapy, while physiologic-associated DRVs were attributed to cardiovascular therapies and NSAIDs. Significant proportions of

  4. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled.

  5. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled. PMID:27086426

  6. Clinical Profiles Related to Timing of Death, Including In-Hospital Deaths Before Admission, in Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Bogaty, Peter; L'Allier, Philippe L; Segal, Eli; Rinfret, Stéphane; Racine, Normand; Harvey, Richard; Ross, Dave; Maire, Sébastien; Kouz, Simon; Carroll, Céline; Boothroyd, Lucy J; Kezouh, Abbas; Azzi, Leila; Brown, Kevin A; Nasmith, James; Lambert, Laurie J

    2016-02-01

    Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who die in hospital before inpatient admission are generally not included in clinical studies and registries, and the clinical profiles of patients who die earlier versus later are not well defined. We aimed to characterize all patients with STEMI who arrived at emergency departments in the province of Quebec (Canada) based on inpatient admission status and when they died. All patients who presented with symptoms and core laboratory-confirmed STEMI or left bundle branch block during 6 months in 82 hospitals in Quebec were included. Death certificates were used to identify nonadmitted deaths. Of the 2017 patients with STEMI, 340 (16.9%) died within 1 year. Of the latter, 63 (18.5%) were nonadmitted deaths (group A), 179 (52.6%) were deaths after admission but within 30 days (group B), and 98 (28.8%) were deaths after 30 days to 1 year (group C). Group A was younger and most often hemodynamically unstable, followed for both features by B then C. Earliest presentation from symptom onset and most frequent ambulance use were found in group A, followed by B, then C. Presenting electrocardiogram (ECG) features were most severe in A, then B, then C (more arrhythmias, more anterior STEMI, more leads with ST elevation, and higher ST elevation). Patients who died earliest had the least frequency of previous myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, vascular disease, and heart failure, and the least noncardiac co-morbidity. In conclusion, patients with STEMI dying in hospital before inpatient admission contributed substantially to overall STEMI mortality. Although dying patients who presented earlier had severer presenting clinical profiles, they were paradoxically younger and had less co-morbidity. Previous co-morbidities may favor adaptive protective mechanisms on initial presentation with STEMI. PMID:26721650

  7. Effect of particulate matter air pollution on hospital admissions and medical visits for lung and heart disease in two southeast Idaho cities.

    PubMed

    Ulirsch, Gregory V; Ball, Louise M; Kaye, Wendy; Shy, Carl M; Lee, Carolyn V; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Symons, Michael; Holloway, Tracey

    2007-08-01

    Few, if any, published time series studies have evaluated the effects of particulate matter air exposures by combining hospital admissions with medical visit data for smaller populations. We investigated the relationship between daily particulate matter (<10 microm in aerometric diameter or PM10) exposures with admissions and medical visits (emergency room, urgent care, and family practice) for respiratory and cardiovascular disease in Pocatello and Chubbuck, Idaho (population about 60,000), from November 1994 through March 2000. Within generalized linear models, time, weather, influenza, and day-of-week effects were controlled. In single-pollutant models, respiratory disease admissions and visits increased (7.1-15.4% per 50 microg/m3 PM10) for each age group analyzed, with the highest increases in two groups, children and especially the elderly. Statistical analyses suggest that the results probably did not occur by chance. Sensitivity analyses did not provide strong evidence that the respiratory disease effect estimates were sensitive to reasonable changes in the final degrees of freedom choice for time and weather effects. No strong evidence of confounding by NO2 and SO2 was found from results of multi-pollutant models. Ozone and carbon monoxide data were not available to include multi-pollutant models, but evidence suggests that they were not a problem. Unexpectedly, evidence of an association between PM10 with cardiovascular disease was not found, possibly due to the lifestyles of the mostly Mormon study population. Successful time series analyses can be performed on smaller populations if diverse, centralized databases are available. Hospitals that offer urgent or other primary care services may be a rich source of data for researchers. Using data that potentially represented a wide-range of disease severity, the findings provide evidence that evaluating only hospital admissions or emergency room visit effects may underestimate the overall morbidity due to

  8. Abnormal Admission Chest X-Ray and MEWS as ICU Outcome Predictors in a Sub-Saharan Tertiary Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ssemmanda, Hannington; Lubulwa, Clare; Muyinda, Zeridah; Kwitonda, Pascal; Wanzira, Humphrey; Ejoku, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Critical care in Uganda is a neglected speciality and deemed costly with limited funding/prioritization. We studied admission X-ray and MEWS as mortality predictors of ICU patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods. We did a cross-sectional study in Mulago Hospital ICU and 87 patients for mechanical ventilation were recruited with mortality as the outcome of interest. Chest X-ray results were the main independent variable and MEWS was also gotten for all patients. Results. We recruited 87 patients; most were males (60.92%), aged between 16 and 45 years (59.77%), and most admissions for mechanical ventilation were from the Trauma Unit (30.77%). Forty-one (47.13%) of the 87 patients died and of these 34 (53.13%) had an abnormal CXR with an insignificant IRR = 1.75 (0.90–3.38) (p = 0.062). Patients with MEWS ≥ 5 (p values = 0.018) and/or having an abnormal superior mediastinum (p values = 0.013) showed a positive association with mortality while having a MEWS ≥ 5 had an incidence risk ratio = 3.29 (1.00–12.02) (p = 0.018). MEWS was a good predictor of mortality (predictive value = 0.6739). Conclusion. Trauma (31%) caused most ICU admissions, having an abnormal admission chest X-rays positively associated with mortality and a high MEWS was also a good predictor of mortality. PMID:27721991

  9. The impact of source contribution uncertainty on the effects of source-specific PM2.5 on hospital admissions: a case study in Boston, MA.

    PubMed

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Coull, Brent A; Dominici, Francesca; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel; Suh, Helen

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies of particulate sources and adverse health do not account for the uncertainty in the source contribution estimates. Our goal was to assess the impact of uncertainty on the effect estimates of particulate sources on emergency cardiovascular (CVD) admissions. We examined the effects of PM2.5 sources, identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and absolute principle component analysis (APCA), on emergency CVD hospital admissions among Medicare enrollees in Boston, MA, during 2003-2010, given stronger associations for this period. We propagated uncertainty in source contributions using a block bootstrap procedure. We further estimated average across-methods source-specific effect estimates using bootstrap samples. We estimated contributions for regional, mobile, crustal, residual oil combustion, road dust, and sea salt sources. Accounting for uncertainty, same-day exposures to regional pollution were associated with an across-methods average effect of 2.00% (0.18, 3.78%) increase in the rate of CVD admissions. Weekly residual oil exposures resulted in an average 2.12% (0.19, 4.22%) increase. Same-day and 2-day exposures to mobile-related PM2.5 were also associated with increased admissions. Confidence intervals when accounting for the uncertainty were wider than otherwise. Agreement in PMF and APCA results was stronger when uncertainty was considered in health models. Accounting for uncertainty in source contributions leads to more stable effect estimates across methods and potentially to fewer spurious significant associations.

  10. Validity of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision code for hyperkalaemia in elderly patients at presentation to an emergency department and at hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Fleet, Jamie L; Shariff, Salimah Z; Gandhi, Sonja; Weir, Matthew A; Jain, Arsh K; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the validity of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) code for hyperkalaemia (E87.5) in two settings: at presentation to an emergency department and at hospital admission. Design Population-based validation study. Setting 12 hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2010. Participants Elderly patients with serum potassium values at presentation to an emergency department (n=64 579) and at hospital admission (n=64 497). Primary outcome Sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value and negative-predictive value. Serum potassium values in patients with and without a hyperkalaemia code (code positive and code negative, respectively). Results The sensitivity of the best-performing ICD-10 coding algorithm for hyperkalaemia (defined by serum potassium >5.5 mmol/l) was 14.1% (95% CI 12.5% to 15.9%) at presentation to an emergency department and 14.6% (95% CI 13.3% to 16.1%) at hospital admission. Both specificities were greater than 99%. In the two settings, the positive-predictive values were 83.2% (95% CI 78.4% to 87.1%) and 62.0% (95% CI 57.9% to 66.0%), while the negative-predictive values were 97.8% (95% CI 97.6% to 97.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 96.8% to 97.1%). In patients who were code positive for hyperkalaemia, median (IQR) serum potassium values were 6.1 (5.7 to 6.8) mmol/l at presentation to an emergency department and 6.0 (5.1 to 6.7) mmol/l at hospital admission. For code-negative patients median (IQR) serum potassium values were 4.0 (3.7 to 4.4) mmol/l and 4.1 (3.8 to 4.5) mmol/l in each of the two settings, respectively. Conclusions Patients with hospital encounters who were ICD-10 E87.5 hyperkalaemia code positive and negative had distinct higher and lower serum potassium values, respectively. However, due to very low sensitivity, the incidence of hyperkalaemia is underestimated. PMID:23274674

  11. Effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Truong Giang; Ngo, Long; Mehta, Sumi; Do, Van Dzung; Thach, T Q; Vu, Xuan Dan; Nguyen, Dinh Tuan; Cohen, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    There is emerging evidence, largely from studies in Europe and North America, that economic deprivation increases the magnitude of morbidity and mortality related to air pollution. Two major reasons why this may be true are that the poor experience higher levels of exposure to air pollution, and they are more vulnerable to its effects--in other words, due to poorer nutrition, less access to medical care, and other factors, they experience more health impact per unit of exposure. The relations among health, air pollution, and poverty are likely to have important implications for public health and social policy, especially in areas such as the developing countries of Asia where air pollution levels are high and many live in poverty. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI*) and to explore whether such effects differed between poor children and other children. ALRI, which comprises pneumonia and bronchiolitis, is the largest single cause of mortality among young children worldwide and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease among young children in developing countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the health effects of air pollution in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. For these reasons, the results of this study have the potential to make an important contribution to the growing literature on the health effects of air pollution in Asia. The study focused on the short-term effects of daily average exposure to air pollutants on hospital admissions of children less than 5 years of age for ALRI, defined as pneumonia or bronchiolitis, in HCMC during 2003, 2004, and 2005. Admissions data were obtained from computerized records of Children's Hospital 1 and Children's Hospital 2 (CH1 and CH2) in HCMC. Nearly all children hospitalized for respiratory illnesses in the city are admitted to one of these two pediatric

  12. Effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Truong Giang; Ngo, Long; Mehta, Sumi; Do, Van Dzung; Thach, T Q; Vu, Xuan Dan; Nguyen, Dinh Tuan; Cohen, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    There is emerging evidence, largely from studies in Europe and North America, that economic deprivation increases the magnitude of morbidity and mortality related to air pollution. Two major reasons why this may be true are that the poor experience higher levels of exposure to air pollution, and they are more vulnerable to its effects--in other words, due to poorer nutrition, less access to medical care, and other factors, they experience more health impact per unit of exposure. The relations among health, air pollution, and poverty are likely to have important implications for public health and social policy, especially in areas such as the developing countries of Asia where air pollution levels are high and many live in poverty. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI*) and to explore whether such effects differed between poor children and other children. ALRI, which comprises pneumonia and bronchiolitis, is the largest single cause of mortality among young children worldwide and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease among young children in developing countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the health effects of air pollution in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. For these reasons, the results of this study have the potential to make an important contribution to the growing literature on the health effects of air pollution in Asia. The study focused on the short-term effects of daily average exposure to air pollutants on hospital admissions of children less than 5 years of age for ALRI, defined as pneumonia or bronchiolitis, in HCMC during 2003, 2004, and 2005. Admissions data were obtained from computerized records of Children's Hospital 1 and Children's Hospital 2 (CH1 and CH2) in HCMC. Nearly all children hospitalized for respiratory illnesses in the city are admitted to one of these two pediatric

  13. Oral Polio Vaccination and Hospital Admissions With Non-Polio Infections in Denmark: Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone G; Krause, Tyra G; Aaby, Peter; Benn, Christine S; Ravn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Live vaccines may have nonspecific beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. This study examines whether children who had the live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) as the most recent vaccine had a different rate of admissions for infectious diseases than children with inactivated diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (DTaP-IPV-Hib) or live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) as their most recent vaccine. Methods.  A nationwide, register-based, retrospective cohort study of 137 403 Danish children born 1997-1999, who had received 3 doses of DTaP-IPV-Hib, were observed from 24 months (first OPV dose) to 36 months of age. Results.  Oral polio vaccine was associated with a lower rate of admissions with any type of non-polio infection compared with DTaP-IPV-Hib as most recent vaccine (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], .77-.95). The association was separately significant for admissions with lower respiratory infections (adjusted IRR, 0.73; 95% CI, .61-.87). The admission rates did not differ for OPV versus MMR. Conclusions.  Like MMR, OPV was associated with fewer admissions for lower respiratory infections than having DTaP-IPV-Hib as the most recent vaccination. Because OPV is now being phased-out globally, further studies of the potential beneficial nonspecific effects of OPV are warranted. PMID:26885538

  14. Implementation of a Trauma Service Activation and Admission Policy for Very Elderly Trauma Patients: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Very elderly trauma patients (VETs) were routinely admitted to nonsurgical services at our institution; therefore, a trauma service activation and admission policy was implemented. Our goal was to determine policy success and impact on efficiency and outcomes. VETs, defined as trauma patients aged >89 years, admitted before and after policy implementation were reviewed. Demographics included age, gender, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Score, admission diagnosis, mechanism of injury, admission service, and comorbidities. Efficiency included intensive care unit length of stay (ICU-LOS) and hospital length of stay (H-LOS). Outcomes included complications, discharge disposition, and mortality. Statistical analysis included Chi square, Fisher's exact test, and regression analyses, significance denoted by P < 0.05. 375 VETs were investigated. Demographic analysis revealed differences in Injury Severity Score (9.4 + 5.4 vs 7.2 + 4.0, P < 0.001), coronary artery disease (2.1% vs 38.2%, P < 0.001), neurologic disease (7.4% vs 28.24%, P < 0.001), and intracranial hemorrhage (15.6% vs 6.1%, P = 0.01). The most common mechanism of injury and admission diagnosis was fall and femur fracture. VETs admitted to the trauma service increased from 28.3 per cent to 40.5 per cent, P = 0.02. Efficiency analysis revealed differences in ICU-LOS (4.0 + 4.2 days vs 0.7 + 1.3 days, P < 0.001) and H-LOS (7.3 + 4.9 days vs 6.3 + 5.5 days, P = 0.005). Outcomes analysis revealed differences in pneumonia (0.8% vs 5.3%, P = 0.01), acute respiratory distress syndrome (0% vs 2.3%, P = 0.04), discharge to skilled nursing facility (75.8% vs 57.3%, P < 0.001), but no difference in mortality. Regression analyses revealed that trauma service admission was associated with decreased ICU-LOS and H-LOS. The trauma service activation and admission policy for VETs led to improved hospital efficiency. PMID:27305879

  15. A Telephone Support Program to Reduce Costs and Hospital Admissions for Patients at Risk of Readmissions: Lessons from an Evaluation of a Complex Health Intervention.

    PubMed

    Morello, Renata T; Barker, Anna L; Watts, Jennifer J; Bohensky, Megan A; Forbes, Andrew B; Stoelwinder, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a telephone health coaching and support service provided to members of an Australian private health insurance fund-Telephonic Complex Care Program (TCCP)-on hospital use and associated costs. A case-control pre-post study design was employed using propensity score matching. Private health insurance members (n=273) who participated in TCCP between April and December 2012 (cases) were matched (1:1) to members who had not previously been enrolled in the program or any other disease management programs offered by the insurer (n=232). Eligible members were community dwelling, aged ≥65 years, and had 2 or more hospital admissions in the 12 months prior to program enrollment. Preprogram variables that estimated the propensity score included: participant demographics, diagnoses, and hospital use in the 12 months prior to program enrollment. TCCP participants received one-to-one telephone support, personalized care plan, and referral to community-based services. Control participants continued to access usual health care services. Primary outcomes were number of hospital admission claims and total benefits paid for all health care utilizations in the 12 months following program enrollment. Secondary outcomes included change in total benefits paid, hospital benefits paid, ancillary benefits paid, and total hospital bed days over the 12 months post enrollment. Compared with matched controls, TCCP did not appear to reduce health care utilization or benefits paid in the 12 months following program enrollment. However, program characteristics and implementation may have impacted its effectiveness. In addition, challenges related to evaluating complex health interventions such as TCCP are discussed. (Population Health Management 2016;19:187-195).

  16. Serum glucose level at hospital admission correlates with left ventricular systolic dysfunction in nondiabetic, acute coronary patients: the Hellenic Heart Failure Study.

    PubMed

    Chrysohoou, Christina; Pitsavos, Christos; Aggelopoulos, Panagiotis; Skoumas, John; Tsiamis, Eleftherios; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the relation between serum glucose levels at hospital admission and left ventricular systolic function in nondiabetic patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Of the 1000 ACS patients who were consecutively enrolled during 2007-2008, 583 (63 +/- 13 years, 20% females) nondiabetic patients were studied in this work. Of these, 254 presented left ventricular systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction <40%). Biochemical measurements and detailed medical information were recorded in all participants. Patients having glucose levels at hospital admission in the highest tertile (>155 mg/dl) had lower left ventricular ejection fraction (40% vs 45%, P = 0.003), were older (66 +/- 11 vs 61 +/- 13, P = 0.004) and less physically active (49% vs 63%, P = 0.02), had higher troponin (14.7 +/- 39.7 vs 5.6 +/- 13.5, P = 0.03), higher brain natriuretic peptide (510.39 +/- 932.33 vs 213.4 +/- 301.14, P = 0.008), higher C-RP (42.26 +/- 55.26 vs 26.46 +/- 38.18, P = 0.04), lower creatinine clearance levels (68 +/- 33 vs.81 +/- 31, P = 0.009), higher white blood cell count (13 416 +/- 16 420 vs 9310 +/- 3020, P = 0.001), and lower body mass index (26.8 +/- 4 vs 27.2 +/- 4.4, P = 0.07), compared to those in the lowest tertile (<114 mg/dl). The multiadjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that a 10 mg/dl difference in glucose levels was independently associated with 8% (95% confidence interval 2%-14%) higher likelihood of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Low glucose concentrations at hospital admission in nondiabetic post-ACS patients is a predictor for the appearance of left ventricular dysfunction, and could be a target marker for risk stratification.

  17. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  18. Clinical Prediction Rule for Patient Outcome after In-Hospital CPR: A New Model, Using Characteristics Present at Hospital Admission, to Identify Patients Unlikely to Benefit from CPR after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Merja, Satyam; Lilien, Ryan H; Ryder, Hilary F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physicians and patients frequently overestimate likelihood of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Discussions and decisions around resuscitation after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest often take place without adequate or accurate information. METHODS We conducted a retrospective chart review of 470 instances of resuscitation after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Individuals were randomly assigned to a derivation cohort and a validation cohort. Logistic Regression and Linear Discriminant Analysis were used to perform multivariate analysis of the data. The resultant best performing rule was converted to a weighted integer tool, and thresholds of survival and nonsurvival were determined with an attempt to optimize sensitivity and specificity for survival. RESULTS A 10-feature rule, using thresholds for survival and nonsurvival, was created; the sensitivity of the rule on the validation cohort was 42.7% and specificity was 82.4%. In the Dartmouth Score (DS), the features of age (greater than 70 years of age), history of cancer, previous cardiovascular accident, and presence of coma, hypotension, abnormal PaO2, and abnormal bicarbonate were identified as the best predictors of nonsurvival. Angina, dementia, and chronic respiratory insufficiency were selected as protective features. CONCLUSIONS Utilizing information easily obtainable on admission, our clinical prediction tool, the DS, provides physicians individualized information about their patients’ probability of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. The DS may become a useful addition to medical expertise and clinical judgment in evaluating and communicating an individual’s probability of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest after it is validated by other cohorts. PMID:26448686

  19. High-Efficiency Postdilution Online Hemodiafiltration Reduces All-Cause Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moreso, Francesc; Pons, Mercedes; Ramos, Rosa; Mora-Macià, Josep; Carreras, Jordi; Soler, Jordi; Torres, Ferran; Campistol, Josep M.; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective studies suggest that online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) may reduce the risk of mortality compared with standard hemodialysis in patients with ESRD. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in which we assigned 906 chronic hemodialysis patients either to continue hemodialysis (n=450) or to switch to high-efficiency postdilution OL-HDF (n=456). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality, and secondary outcomes included cardiovascular mortality, all-cause hospitalization, treatment tolerability, and laboratory data. Compared with patients who continued on hemodialysis, those assigned to OL-HDF had a 30% lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.53–0.92; P=0.01), a 33% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.44–1.02; P=0.06), and a 55% lower risk of infection-related mortality (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.21–0.96; P=0.03). The estimated number needed to treat suggested that switching eight patients from hemodialysis to OL-HDF may prevent one annual death. The incidence rates of dialysis sessions complicated by hypotension and of all-cause hospitalization were lower in patients assigned to OL-HDF. In conclusion, high-efficiency postdilution OL-HDF reduces all-cause mortality compared with conventional hemodialysis. PMID:23411788

  20. High-efficiency postdilution online hemodiafiltration reduces all-cause mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Maduell, Francisco; Moreso, Francesc; Pons, Mercedes; Ramos, Rosa; Mora-Macià, Josep; Carreras, Jordi; Soler, Jordi; Torres, Ferran; Campistol, Josep M; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Retrospective studies suggest that online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) may reduce the risk of mortality compared with standard hemodialysis in patients with ESRD. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in which we assigned 906 chronic hemodialysis patients either to continue hemodialysis (n=450) or to switch to high-efficiency postdilution OL-HDF (n=456). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality, and secondary outcomes included cardiovascular mortality, all-cause hospitalization, treatment tolerability, and laboratory data. Compared with patients who continued on hemodialysis, those assigned to OL-HDF had a 30% lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.53-0.92; P=0.01), a 33% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.44-1.02; P=0.06), and a 55% lower risk of infection-related mortality (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.21-0.96; P=0.03). The estimated number needed to treat suggested that switching eight patients from hemodialysis to OL-HDF may prevent one annual death. The incidence rates of dialysis sessions complicated by hypotension and of all-cause hospitalization were lower in patients assigned to OL-HDF. In conclusion, high-efficiency postdilution OL-HDF reduces all-cause mortality compared with conventional hemodialysis.

  1. A prospective observational study of the prevalence and risk factors for colonization by antibiotic resistant bacteria in patients at admission to hospital in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistant organisms pose an increasing threat to the successful treatment of common infections. Understanding colonization patterns of these bacteria is important for effective antibiotic treatment and infection control guidelines. Methods A prospective observational study was performed to determine the prevalence of colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) among patients admitted via the emergency department to a public tertiary hospital in Singapore. Anterior nares, groin, axillary and rectal swabs were collected at admission and cultured using standard bacteriological techniques. Clinical data including healthcare contact within the past 12 months and recent antibiotic use was collected and analyzed using a logistic regression model. Results 1006 patients were screened. 124 (12.4%) were colonized by ESBL-E, 18 (1.8%) by MRSA while no VRE was detected. Antibiotic use within the past month was the only significant predictor for ESBL-E colonization in the regression model, with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 2.58 (1.04 to 6.42). In participants recently prescribed antibiotics and hospitalized in the previous 3 months, 29.4% were colonized by ESBL-E. This represented 20.2% of the total ESBL-E burden, and ESBL-E was also detected in 6.3% of participants with no healthcare contact. Hospitalization and outpatient hospital visits predicted MRSA colonization in the univariate analysis. Neither was statistically significant in the logistic regression model, with AORs for MRSA colonization following hospitalization in the past 3 and 12 months of 3.81 [95% CI 0.84-17.28] and 3.48 [0.64-18.92] respectively. Conclusion A high prevalence of colonization with ESBL-E was evident among patients at admission, even in the absence of recent antibiotic use or contact with healthcare. PMID:24889720

  2. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay: experience through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Bianco, Eduardo; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K Michael; Glantz, Stanton A

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive smoke-free laws have been followed by drops in hospitalisations for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), including in a study with 2 years follow-up for such a law in Uruguay. Methods Multiple linear and negative binomial regressions for AMI admissions (ICD-10 code 121) from 37 hospitals for 2 years before and 4 years after Uruguay implemented a 100% nationwide smoke-free law. Results Based on 11 135 cases, there was a significant drop of −30.9 AMI admissions/month (95% CI −49.8 to −11.8, p=0.002) following implementation of the smoke-free law. The effect of the law did not increase or decrease over time following implementation (p=0.234). This drop represented a 17% drop in AMI admissions following the law (IRR=0.829, 95% CI 0.743 to 0.925, p=0.001). Conclusions Adding two more years of follow-up data confirmed that Uruguay’s smoke-free law was followed by a substantial and sustained reduction in AMI hospitalisations. PMID:25324157

  3. Suicidal Ideation is Associated With All-Cause Mortality.

    PubMed

    Shiner, Brian; Riblet, Natalie; Westgate, Christine Leonard; Young-Xu, Yinong; Watts, Bradley V

    2016-09-01

    Suicidal ideation may be associated with all-cause mortality. Available research shows that treatment of depression reduces the risk of all-cause mortality in patients with suicidal ideation. However, this finding has not been replicated in a clinical population, where patients have various mental health conditions. We examined the association between suicidal ideation and all-cause mortality in a clinical cohort. We stratified patients presenting to a mental health clinic from January 2005 through December 2007 based upon their degree of suicidal ideation and obtained vital status information through June 2015. We compared groups using survival analysis, adjusting for patient characteristics and treatment receipt. Among 1,869 patients who completed the initial assessment, there were 363 deaths. Patients with the highest levels of suicidal ideation died at increased rates. Cause-of-death data in the year following the initial assessment indicates that the difference in mortality is not likely attributable to suicide. Accounting for patient characteristics and treatment, which included medical care and mental health care, did not meaningfully diminish the relationship between suicidal ideation and all-cause mortality. Additional research is needed to determine specific treatment elements that may moderate the relationship between suicidal ideation and all-cause mortality. PMID:27612350

  4. Effectiveness of telemonitoring integrated into existing clinical services on hospital admission for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: researcher blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Janet; McCloughan, Lucy; Todd, Allison; Krishan, Ashma; Lewis, Stephanie; Stoddart, Andrew; van der Pol, Marjon; MacNee, William; Sheikh, Aziz; Pagliari, Claudia; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of telemonitoring integrated into existing clinical services such that intervention and control groups have access to the same clinical care. Design Researcher blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Setting UK primary care (Lothian, Scotland). Participants Adults with at least one admission for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the year before randomisation. We excluded people who had other significant lung disease, who were unable to provide informed consent or complete the study, or who had other significant social or clinical problems. Interventions Participants were recruited between 21 May 2009 and 28 March 2011, and centrally randomised to receive telemonitoring or conventional self monitoring. Using a touch screen, telemonitoring participants recorded a daily questionnaire about symptoms and treatment use, and monitored oxygen saturation using linked instruments. Algorithms, based on the symptom score, generated alerts if readings were omitted or breached thresholds. Both groups received similar care from existing clinical services. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was time to hospital admission due to COPD exacerbation up to one year after randomisation. Other outcomes included number and duration of admissions, and validated questionnaire assessments of health related quality of life (using St George’s respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ)), anxiety or depression (or both), self efficacy, knowledge, and adherence to treatment. Analysis was intention to treat. Results Of 256 patients completing the study, 128 patients were randomised to telemonitoring and 128 to usual care; baseline characteristics of each group were similar. The number of days to admission did not differ significantly between groups (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.66 to 1.44). Over one year, the mean number of COPD admissions was similar in both groups (telemonitoring 1.2 admissions per person

  5. Desert Dust Outbreaks in Southern Europe: Contribution to Daily PM10 Concentrations and Short-Term Associations with Mortality and Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Stafoggia, Massimo; Zauli-Sajani, Stefano; Pey, Jorge; Samoli, Evangelia; Alessandrini, Ester; Basagaña, Xavier; Cernigliaro, Achille; Chiusolo, Monica; Demaria, Moreno; Díaz, Julio; Faustini, Annunziata; Katsouyanni, Klea; Kelessis, Apostolos G.; Linares, Cristina; Marchesi, Stefano; Medina, Sylvia; Pandolfi, Paolo; Pérez, Noemí; Querol, Xavier; Randi, Giorgia; Ranzi, Andrea; Tobias, Aurelio; Forastiere, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the association between short-term exposure to desert dust and health outcomes is controversial. Objectives: We aimed to estimate the short-term effects of particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) on mortality and hospital admissions in 13 Southern European cities, distinguishing between PM10 originating from the desert and from other sources. Methods: We identified desert dust advection days in multiple Mediterranean areas for 2001–2010 by combining modeling tools, back-trajectories, and satellite data. For each advection day, we estimated PM10 concentrations originating from desert, and computed PM10 from other sources by difference. We fitted city-specific Poisson regression models to estimate the association between PM from different sources (desert and non-desert) and daily mortality and emergency hospitalizations. Finally, we pooled city-specific results in a random-effects meta-analysis. Results: On average, 15% of days were affected by desert dust at ground level (desert PM10 > 0 μg/m3). Most episodes occurred in spring–summer, with increasing gradient of both frequency and intensity north–south and west–east of the Mediterranean basin. We found significant associations of both PM10 concentrations with mortality. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in non-desert and desert PM10 (lag 0–1 days) were associated with increases in natural mortality of 0.55% (95% CI: 0.24, 0.87%) and 0.65% (95% CI: 0.24, 1.06%), respectively. Similar associations were estimated for cardio-respiratory mortality and hospital admissions. Conclusions: PM10 originating from the desert was positively associated with mortality and hospitalizations in Southern Europe. Policy measures should aim at reducing population exposure to anthropogenic airborne particles even in areas with large contribution from desert dust advections. Citation: Stafoggia M, Zauli-Sajani S, Pey J, Samoli E, Alessandrini E, Basagaña X, Cernigliaro A, Chiusolo M, Demaria M, Díaz J, Faustini A

  6. Asthma prescribing, ethnicity and risk of hospital admission: an analysis of 35,864 linked primary and secondary care records in East London.

    PubMed

    Hull, Sally A; McKibben, Shauna; Homer, Kate; Taylor, Stephanie Jc; Pike, Katy; Griffiths, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing in primary care was implicated in nearly half of asthma deaths reviewed in the UK's recent National Review of Asthma Deaths. Using anonymised EMIS-Web data for 139 ethnically diverse general practices (total population 942,511) extracted from the North and East London Commissioning Support Unit, which holds hospital Secondary Uses Services (SUS)-linked data, we examined the prevalence of over-prescribing of short-acting β2-agonist inhalers (SABA), under-prescribing of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) inhalers and solo prescribing of long-acting β2-agonists (LABA) to assess the risk of hospitalisation for people with asthma for 1 year ending August 2015. In a total asthma population of 35,864, multivariate analyses in adults showed that the risk of admission increased with greater prescription of SABA inhalers above a baseline of 1-3 (4-12 SABA: odds ratio (OR) 1.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.46, ⩾13 SABA: OR 3.22; 95% CI 2.04-5.07) with increasing British Thoracic Society step (Step 3: OR 2.90; 95% CI 1.79-4.69, Step 4/5: OR 9.42; 95% CI 5.27-16.84), and among Black (OR 2.30; 95% CI 1.64-3.23) and south Asian adult populations (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.36-2.47). Results in children were similar, but risk of hospitalisation was not related to ethnic group. There is a progressive risk of hospital admission associated with the prescription of more than three SABA inhalers a year. Adults (but not children) from Black and South Asian groups are at an increased risk of admission. Further work is needed to target care for these at-risk groups. PMID:27537194

  7. Asthma prescribing, ethnicity and risk of hospital admission: an analysis of 35,864 linked primary and secondary care records in East London

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Sally A; McKibben, Shauna; Homer, Kate; Taylor, Stephanie JC; Pike, Katy; Griffiths, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing in primary care was implicated in nearly half of asthma deaths reviewed in the UK’s recent National Review of Asthma Deaths. Using anonymised EMIS-Web data for 139 ethnically diverse general practices (total population 942,511) extracted from the North and East London Commissioning Support Unit, which holds hospital Secondary Uses Services (SUS)–linked data, we examined the prevalence of over-prescribing of short-acting β2-agonist inhalers (SABA), under-prescribing of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) inhalers and solo prescribing of long-acting β2-agonists (LABA) to assess the risk of hospitalisation for people with asthma for 1 year ending August 2015. In a total asthma population of 35,864, multivariate analyses in adults showed that the risk of admission increased with greater prescription of SABA inhalers above a baseline of 1–3 (4–12 SABA: odds ratio (OR) 1.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.46, ⩾13 SABA: OR 3.22; 95% CI 2.04–5.07) with increasing British Thoracic Society step (Step 3: OR 2.90; 95% CI 1.79–4.69, Step 4/5: OR 9.42; 95% CI 5.27–16.84), and among Black (OR 2.30; 95% CI 1.64–3.23) and south Asian adult populations (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.36–2.47). Results in children were similar, but risk of hospitalisation was not related to ethnic group. There is a progressive risk of hospital admission associated with the prescription of more than three SABA inhalers a year. Adults (but not children) from Black and South Asian groups are at an increased risk of admission. Further work is needed to target care for these at-risk groups. PMID:27537194

  8. The impact of 9/11 on the association of ambient air pollution with daily respiratory hospital admissions in a Canada-US border city, Windsor, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    LUGINAAH, ISAAC; FUNG, KAREN Y.; GOREY, KEVIN M.; KHAN, SHAHEDUL

    2010-01-01

    The 11 September 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks in the United States resulted in long lines of trucks at the border crossing in Windsor, Ontario. Public concern about the potential impact of these trucks spewing toxic pollutants into the air drew attention to the need to investigate the impact of 9/11 on the daily levels of air pollutants and respiratory hospitalization. In this study, significant increases in respiratory admissions were found one month and 6 months post-9/11. Mean daily respiratory admission was also significantly higher than the same period one year earlier and one year later. SO2 and CO concentration levels were found to be generally higher after 9/11 than one year before and immediately before. Relative risk estimates of respiratory hospitalization after 9/11 showed that SO2 (RR̂ = 1.15 for two-day, RR̂ = 1.18 for three-day, and RR̂ = 1.21 for five-day averages), NO2 (RR̂ = 1.10 for current day), and COH (RR̂ = 1.09 for current day, RR̂ = 1.10 for two-day average) had the most significant effects after 9/11. These results suggest the need for more stringent regulatory efforts in air quality in the region in response to the changing transportation dynamics at this Canada-US border crossing. PMID:21234298

  9. Faecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing enterobacteria among soldiers at admission in a French military hospital after aeromedical evacuation from overseas.

    PubMed

    Janvier, F; Delacour, H; Tessé, S; Larréché, S; Sanmartin, N; Ollat, D; Rapp, C; Mérens, A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the faecal carriage of carbapenemase-producing enterobacteria (CPE) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacteria among soldiers at admission in a French military hospital after aeromedical evacuation from overseas. During a period of 1 year, 83 rectal swabs collected in French soldiers at admission were screened for multidrug-resistant enterobacteria with a chromogenic medium. ESBL detection was performed with the double-disc synergy test in the absence or presence of cloxacillin. The genotypic characterisation of resistance mechanisms, sequence typing and phylotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing with bacterial DNA extracted from isolates. No CPE was detected. Eleven ESBL Escherichia coli isolates belonging to four phylogenetic groups were detected, including ten CTX-M-15 and one CTX-M-14. The overall gut colonisation with ESBL-producing bacteria (13.25 %) was 6-fold higher than that reported in soldiers in the suburbs of Paris in 2009. ESBL faecal carriage was particularly high (34.48 %) in soldiers repatriated from Afghanistan (risk ratio = 18.62; p = 0.0001). This study highlights the importance of systematic additional contact precautions and CPE/ESBL screening in soldiers repatriated from overseas in French hospitals.

  10. Medicare program; participation in CHAMPUS and CHAMPVA, hospital admissions for veterans, discharge rights notice, and hospital responsibility for emergency care--HCFA and OIG. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1994-06-22

    We are revising requirements for Medicare participating hospitals by adding the following: A hospital must provide inpatient hospital services to individuals who have health coverage provided by either the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS) or the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Veterans Administration (CHAMPVA), subject to limitations provided by regulations that require the hospital to collect the beneficiary's cost-share and accept payment from the CHAMPUS/CHAMPVA programs as payment in full. A hospital must provide inpatient hospital services to military veterans (subject to the limitations provided in 38 CFR 17.50 ff.) and accept payment from the Department of Veterans Affairs as payment in full. A hospital must give each Medicare beneficiary (or his or her representative) at or about the time of admission, a written statement of his or her rights concerning discharge from the hospital. A hospital (including a rural primary care hospital) with an emergency department must provide, upon request and within the capabilities of the hospital or rural primary care hospital, an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment and/or an appropriate transfer to another medical facility to any individual with an emergency medical condition, regardless of the individual's eligibility for Medicare. The statute provides for the termination of a provider's agreement for violation of any of these provisions. These revisions implement sections 9121 and 9122 of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (as amended by section 4009 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987), section 233 of the Veteran's Benefit Improvement and Health Care Authorization Act of 1986, sections 9305(b)(1) and 9307 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, sections 6003(g)(3)(D)(xiv), 6018 and 6211 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, and sections 4008(b), 4027(a), and 4027(k)(3) of the

  11. Medicare program; participation in CHAMPUS and CHAMPVA, hospital admissions for veterans, discharge rights notice, and hospital responsibility for emergency care--HCFA and OIG. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1994-06-22

    We are revising requirements for Medicare participating hospitals by adding the following: A hospital must provide inpatient hospital services to individuals who have health coverage provided by either the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS) or the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Veterans Administration (CHAMPVA), subject to limitations provided by regulations that require the hospital to collect the beneficiary's cost-share and accept payment from the CHAMPUS/CHAMPVA programs as payment in full. A hospital must provide inpatient hospital services to military veterans (subject to the limitations provided in 38 CFR 17.50 ff.) and accept payment from the Department of Veterans Affairs as payment in full. A hospital must give each Medicare beneficiary (or his or her representative) at or about the time of admission, a written statement of his or her rights concerning discharge from the hospital. A hospital (including a rural primary care hospital) with an emergency department must provide, upon request and within the capabilities of the hospital or rural primary care hospital, an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment and/or an appropriate transfer to another medical facility to any individual with an emergency medical condition, regardless of the individual's eligibility for Medicare. The statute provides for the termination of a provider's agreement for violation of any of these provisions. These revisions implement sections 9121 and 9122 of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (as amended by section 4009 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987), section 233 of the Veteran's Benefit Improvement and Health Care Authorization Act of 1986, sections 9305(b)(1) and 9307 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, sections 6003(g)(3)(D)(xiv), 6018 and 6211 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, and sections 4008(b), 4027(a), and 4027(k)(3) of the

  12. Score to identify the severity of adult patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Capelastegui, A; Quintana, J M; Bilbao, A; España, P P; Garin, O; Alonso, J; Astray, J; Cantón, R; Castilla, J; Castro, A; Delgado-Rodríguez, M; Godoy, P; Gónzález-Candelas, F; Martín, V; Mayoral, J M; Pumarola, T; Tamames, S; Soldevila, N; Baricot, M; Domínguez, A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper was to develop a prognostic index for severe complications among hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 618 inpatients with 2009 H1N1 virus infection admitted to 36 Spanish hospitals between July 2009 and February 2010. Risk factors evaluated included host-related factors and clinical data at admission. We developed a composite index of severe in-hospital complications (SIHC), which included: mortality, mechanical ventilation, septic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and requirement for resuscitation maneuvers. Six factors were independently associated with SIHC: age >45 years, male sex, number of comorbidities, pneumonia, dyspnea, and confusion. From the β parameter obtained in the multivariate model, a weight was assigned to each factor to compute the individual influenza risk score. The score shows an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77. The SIHC rate was 1.9 % in the low-risk group, 10.3 % in the intermediate-risk group, and 29.6 % in the high-risk group. The odds ratio for complications was 21.8 for the high-risk group compared with the low-risk group. This easy-to-score influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection risk index accurately stratifies patients hospitalized for H1N1 virus infection into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups for SIHC.

  13. Patient characteristics associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following primary care COPD diagnosis: a cohort study using linked electronic patient records

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, L C; Lee, R J; Butcher, I; Weir, C J; Fischbacher, C M; McAllister, D; Wild, S H; Hewitt, N; Hardie, R M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patient characteristics of an unselected primary care population associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Design Retrospective open cohort using pseudonymised electronic primary care data linked to secondary care data. Setting Primary care; Lothian (population approximately 800 000), Scotland. Participants Data from 7002 patients from 72 general practices with a COPD diagnosis date between 2000 and 2008 recorded in their primary care record. Patients were followed up until 2010, death or they left a participating practice. Main outcome measures First and subsequent admissions for AECOPD (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 codes J44.0, J44.1 in any diagnostic position) after COPD diagnosis in primary care. Results 1756 (25%) patients had at least 1 AECOPD admission; 794 (11%) had at least 1 readmission and the risk of readmission increased with each admission. Older age at diagnosis, more severe COPD, low body mass index (BMI), current smoking, increasing deprivation, COPD admissions and interventions for COPD prior to diagnosis in primary care, and comorbidities were associated with higher risk of first AECOPD admission in an adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model. More severe COPD and COPD admission prior to primary care diagnosis were associated with increased risk of AECOPD readmission in an adjusted Prentice-Williams-Peterson model. High BMI was associated with a lower risk of first AECOPD admission and readmission. Conclusions Several patient characteristics were associated with first AECOPD admission in a primary care cohort of people with COPD but fewer were associated with readmission. Prompt diagnosis in primary care may reduce the risk of AECOPD admission and readmission. The study highlights the important role of primary care in preventing or delaying a first AECOPD admission. PMID:26801463

  14. Medication reconciliation at hospital admission and discharge: insufficient knowledge, unclear task reallocation and lack of collaboration as major barriers to medication safety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medication errors are a leading cause of patient harm. Many of these errors result from an incomplete overview of medication either at a patient’s referral to or at discharge from the hospital. One solution is medication reconciliation, a formal process in which health care professionals partner with patients to ensure an accurate and complete transfer of medication information at interfaces of care. In 2007, the Dutch government compelled hospitals to implement a bundle concerning medication reconciliation at hospital admission and discharge. But to date many hospitals have failed to implement this bundle fully. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the barriers and drivers of the implementation process. Methods We performed face to face, semi-structured interviews with twenty health care professionals and managers from several departments at a 953 bed university hospital in the Netherlands and also from the surrounding community health services. The interviews were analysed using a combined theoretical framework of Grol and Cabana to classify the drivers and barriers identified. Results There is lack of awareness and insufficient knowledge of health care professionals about the health care problem and the bundle medication reconciliation. These result in a lack of support for implementing the bundle. In addition clinicians are reluctant to reallocate tasks to nurses or pharmacy technicians. Another major barrier is a lack of communication, understanding and collaboration between hospital and community caregivers. The introduction of more competitive market forces has made matters worse. Major drivers are a good implementation plan, patient awareness, and obligation by the government. Conclusions We identified a wide range of barriers and drivers which health care professionals believe influence the implementation of medication reconciliation. This reflects the complexity of implementation. Implementation can be improved if these factors are

  15. Statin Use Reduces Prostate Cancer All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Ni; Liang, Ji-An; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Studies have suggested that statin use is related to cancer risk and prostate cancer mortality. We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine whether using statins in prostate cancer patients is associated with reduced all-cause mortality rates. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5179 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who used statins for at least 6 months between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2010. To form a comparison group, each patient was randomly frequency-matched (according to age and index date) with a prostate cancer patient who did not use any type of statin-based drugs during the study period. The study endpoint was mortality. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using Cox regression models. Among prostate cancer patients, statin use was associated with significantly decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.60–0.71). This phenomenon was observed among various types of statin, age groups, and treatment methods. Analyzing the defined daily dose of statins indicated that both low- and high-dose groups exhibited significantly decreased death rates compared with nonusers, suggesting a dose–response relationship. The results of this population-based cohort study suggest that using statins reduces all-cause mortality among prostate cancer patients, and a dose–response relationship may exist. PMID:26426656

  16. Impact of antiviral treatment and hospital admission delay on risk of death associated with 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing our understanding of the factors affecting the severity of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in different regions of the world could lead to improved clinical practice and mitigation strategies for future influenza pandemics. Even though a number of studies have shed light into the risk factors associated with severe outcomes of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza infections in different populations (e.g., [1-5]), analyses of the determinants of mortality risk spanning multiple pandemic waves and geographic regions are scarce. Between-country differences in the mortality burden of the 2009 pandemic could be linked to differences in influenza case management, underlying population health, or intrinsic differences in disease transmission [6]. Additional studies elucidating the determinants of disease severity globally are warranted to guide prevention efforts in future influenza pandemics. In Mexico, the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic was characterized by a three-wave pattern occurring in the spring, summer, and fall of 2009 with substantial geographical heterogeneity [7]. A recent study suggests that Mexico experienced high excess mortality burden during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic relative to other countries [6]. However, an assessment of potential factors that contributed to the relatively high pandemic death toll in Mexico are lacking. Here, we fill this gap by analyzing a large series of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1 influenza cases, hospitalizations, and deaths monitored by the Mexican Social Security medical system during April 1 through December 31, 2009 in Mexico. In particular, we quantify the association between disease severity, hospital admission delays, and neuraminidase inhibitor use by demographic characteristics, pandemic wave, and geographic regions of Mexico. Methods We analyzed a large series of laboratory-confirmed pandemic A/H1N1 influenza cases from a prospective surveillance system maintained by the Mexican Social Security system

  17. Hospital admissions for severe mental illness in England: Changes in equity of utilisation at the small area level between 2006 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonathan; Gutacker, Nils; Jacobs, Rowena; Mason, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Severe Mental Illness (SMI) encompasses a range of chronic conditions including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and psychoses. Patients with SMI often require inpatient psychiatric care. Despite equity being a key objective in the English National Health Service (NHS) and in many other health care systems worldwide, little is known about the socio-economic equity of hospital care utilisation for patients with SMI and how it has changed over time. This analysis seeks to address that gap in the evidence base. We exploit a five-year (2006–2010) panel dataset of admission rates at small area level (n = 162,410). The choice of control variables was informed by a systematic literature search. To assess changes in socio-economic equity of utilisation, OLS-based standardisation was first used to conduct analysis of discrete deprivation groups. Geographical inequity was then illustrated by plotting standardised and crude admission rates at local purchaser level. Lastly, formal statistical tests for changes in socio-economic equity of utilisation were applied to a continuous measure of deprivation using pooled negative binomial regression analysis, adjusting for a range of risk factors. Our results suggest that one additional percentage point of area income deprivation is associated with a 1.5% (p < 0.001) increase in admissions for SMI after controlling for population size, age, sex, prevalence of SMI in the local population, as well as other need and supply factors. This finding is robust to sensitivity analyses, suggesting that a pro-poor inequality in utilisation exists for SMI-related inpatient services. One possible explanation is that the supply or quality of primary, community or social care for people with mental health problems is suboptimal in deprived areas. Although there is some evidence that inequity has reduced over time, the changes are small and not always robust to sensitivity analyses. PMID:25262312

  18. Associations of short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution with cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Samoli, Evangelia; Atkinson, Richard W; Analitis, Antonis; Fuller, Gary W; Green, David C; Mudway, Ian; Anderson, H Ross; Kelly, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is evidence of adverse associations between short-term exposure to traffic-related pollution and health, but little is known about the relative contribution of the various sources and particulate constituents. Methods For each day for 2011–2012 in London, UK over 100 air pollutant metrics were assembled using monitors, modelling and chemical analyses. We selected a priori metrics indicative of traffic sources: general traffic, petrol exhaust, diesel exhaust and non-exhaust (mineral dust, brake and tyre wear). Using Poisson regression models, controlling for time-varying confounders, we derived effect estimates for cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions at prespecified lags and evaluated the sensitivity of estimates to multipollutant modelling and effect modification by season. Results For single day exposure, we found consistent associations between adult (15–64 years) cardiovascular and paediatric (0–14 years) respiratory admissions with elemental and black carbon (EC/BC), ranging from 0.56% to 1.65% increase per IQR change, and to a lesser degree with carbon monoxide (CO) and aluminium (Al). The average of past 7 days EC/BC exposure was associated with elderly (65+ years) cardiovascular admissions. Indicated associations were higher during the warm period of the year. Although effect estimates were sensitive to the adjustment for other pollutants they remained consistent in direction, indicating independence of associations from different sources, especially between diesel and petrol engines, as well as mineral dust. Conclusions Our results suggest that exhaust related pollutants are associated with increased numbers of adult cardiovascular and paediatric respiratory hospitalisations. More extensive monitoring in urban centres is required to further elucidate the associations. PMID:26884048

  19. Shocking Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric; Millman, Sierra

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones's career had been a remarkable success. She joined Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) admissions office in 1979, landing a job in Cambridge at a time when boys ruled the sandbox of the admissions profession. Her job was to help MIT recruit more women, who then made up less than one-fifth of the institute's students. She…

  20. Association between anxiety and pain in the latent phase of labour upon admission to the maternity hospital: a prospective, descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Floris, Lucia; Irion, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the association between anxiety experienced by the mother, a request for analgesia, and the level of pain at maternity hospital admission in early labour. Anxiety levels were measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale. Anxiety and Visual Analogue Scale scores were compared using a linear regression model and indicated a statistically significant association between the anxiety state and degree of pain (p < 0.016; Y = 0.895 x score + 32.656). There was no significant association between anxiety and a request for epidural analgesia. During labour, an evaluation of anxiety should be associated with an assessment of the perceived degree of pain.

  1. Admissions Testing & Institutional Admissions Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don; Kalsbeek, David

    2009-01-01

    The array of admissions models and the underlying, and sometimes conflicting goals people have for college admissions, create the dynamics and the tensions that define the contemporary context for enrollment management. The senior enrollment officer must ask, for example, how does an institution try to assure transparency, equality of access,…

  2. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D.; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46–12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  3. Incidence, characteristics and risk factors of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized children – a prospective observational cohort study of 6,601 admissions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important cause of harm in children. Current data are incomplete due to methodological differences between studies: only half of all studies provide drug data, incidence rates vary (0.6% to 16.8%) and very few studies provide data on causality, severity and risk factors of pediatric ADRs. We aimed to determine the incidence of ADRs in hospitalized children, to characterize these ADRs in terms of type, drug etiology, causality and severity and to identify risk factors. Methods We undertook a year-long, prospective observational cohort study of admissions to a single UK pediatric medical and surgical secondary and tertiary referral center (Alder Hey, Liverpool, UK). Children between 0 and 16 years 11 months old and admitted for more than 48 hours were included. Observed outcomes were occurrence of ADR and time to first ADR for the risk factor analysis. Results A total of 5,118 children (6,601 admissions) were included, 17.7% of whom experienced at least one ADR. Opiate analgesics and drugs used in general anesthesia (GA) accounted for more than 50% of all drugs implicated in ADRs. Of these ADRs, 0.9% caused permanent harm or required admission to a higher level of care. Children who underwent GA were at more than six times the risk of developing an ADR than children without a GA (hazard ratio (HR) 6.40; 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.30 to 7.70). Other factors increasing the risk of an ADR were increasing age (HR 1.06 for each year; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.07), increasing number of drugs (HR 1.25 for each additional drug; 95% CI 1.22 to 1.28) and oncological treatment (HR 1.90; 95% CI 1.40 to 2.60). Conclusions ADRs are common in hospitalized children and children who had undergone a GA had more than six times the risk of developing an ADR. GA agents and opiate analgesics are a significant cause of ADRs and have been underrepresented in previous studies. This is a concern in view of the increasing number of pediatric short

  4. Effect of photochemical smog associated with synoptic weather patterns on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in metropolitan Taipei.

    PubMed

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between photochemical smog (PS) (hourly ozone conc. >100 ppb), PS-related diseases, and the synoptic weather patterns during 2005-2009 in metropolitan Taipei. The results show that compared to respiratory ailments (ICD code 460-519) and asthma (ICD code 493), cardiovascular ailments (ICD code 390-459) were more clearly influenced by PS events. On the PS event day, the number of admissions of babies, children, and adults increased by 0.04 [95% CI 0.01-0.06], 0.03 [95% CI 0.00-0.07], and 1.12 [95% CI 0.36-1.89] (P < 0.05), respectively. The investigation showed that more than 70% of the PS events were associated primarily with the peripheral circulation of typhoons, Pacific pressure, and discrete Pacific pressure. PS events are a threat to public health. To avoid the ill effects of air pollution, residents should be informed about the daily weather patterns and air quality. PMID:22098558

  5. Effect of photochemical smog associated with synoptic weather patterns on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in metropolitan Taipei.

    PubMed

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between photochemical smog (PS) (hourly ozone conc. >100 ppb), PS-related diseases, and the synoptic weather patterns during 2005-2009 in metropolitan Taipei. The results show that compared to respiratory ailments (ICD code 460-519) and asthma (ICD code 493), cardiovascular ailments (ICD code 390-459) were more clearly influenced by PS events. On the PS event day, the number of admissions of babies, children, and adults increased by 0.04 [95% CI 0.01-0.06], 0.03 [95% CI 0.00-0.07], and 1.12 [95% CI 0.36-1.89] (P < 0.05), respectively. The investigation showed that more than 70% of the PS events were associated primarily with the peripheral circulation of typhoons, Pacific pressure, and discrete Pacific pressure. PS events are a threat to public health. To avoid the ill effects of air pollution, residents should be informed about the daily weather patterns and air quality.

  6. Why Should I Talk about Emotion? Communication Patterns Associated with Physician Discussion of Patient Expressions of Negative Emotion in Hospital Admission Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Kristen; Cimino, Jenica EW; Arnold, Robert M.; Anderson, Wendy G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe hospital-based physicians' responses to patients' verbal expressions of negative emotion and identify patterns of further communication associated with different responses. Methods Qualitative analysis of physician-patient admission encounters audio-recorded between August 2008-March 2009 at two hospitals within a university system. A codebook was iteratively developed to identify patients' verbal expressions of negative emotion. We categorized physicians' responses by their immediate effect on further discussion of emotion - focused away (away), focused neither toward nor away (neutral), and focused toward (toward) - and examined further communication patterns following each response type. Results In 79 patients' encounters with 27 physicians, the median expression of negative emotion was 1, range 0–14. Physician responses were 25% away, 43% neutral, and 32% toward. Neutral and toward responses elicited patient perspectives, concerns, social and spiritual issues, and goals for care. Toward responses demonstrated physicians' support, contributing to physician-patient alignment and agreement about treatment. Conclusion Responding to expressions of negative emotion neutrally or with statements that focus toward emotion elicits clinically relevant information and is associated with positive physician-patient relationship and care outcomes. Practice Implications Providers should respond to expressions of negative emotion with statements that allow for or explicitly encourage further discussion of emotion. PMID:22575434

  7. Comparison of CATs, CURB-65 and PMEWS as Triage Tools in Pandemic Influenza Admissions to UK Hospitals: Case Control Analysis Using Retrospective Data

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Puja R.; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.; Lim, Wei Shen; Nicholson, Karl G.; Brett, Stephen J.; Enstone, Joanne E.; McMenamin, James; Openshaw, Peter J. M.; Read, Robert C.; Taylor, Bruce L.; Bannister, Barbara; Semple, Malcolm G.

    2012-01-01

    Triage tools have an important role in pandemics to identify those most likely to benefit from higher levels of care. We compared Community Assessment Tools (CATs), the CURB-65 score, and the Pandemic Medical Early Warning Score (PMEWS); to predict higher levels of care (high dependency - Level 2 or intensive care - Level 3) and/or death in patients at or shortly after admission to hospital with A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza. This was a case-control analysis using retrospectively collected data from the FLU-CIN cohort (1040 adults, 480 children) with PCR-confirmed A/H1N1 2009 influenza. Area under receiver operator curves (AUROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values were calculated. CATs best predicted Level 2/3 admissions in both adults [AUROC (95% CI): CATs 0.77 (0.73, 0.80); CURB-65 0.68 (0.64, 0.72); PMEWS 0.68 (0.64, 0.73), p<0.001] and children [AUROC: CATs 0.74 (0.68, 0.80); CURB-65 0.52 (0.46, 0.59); PMEWS 0.69 (0.62, 0.75), p<0.001]. CURB-65 and CATs were similar in predicting death in adults with both performing better than PMEWS; and CATs best predicted death in children. CATs were the best predictor of Level 2/3 care and/or death for both adults and children. CATs are potentially useful triage tools for predicting need for higher levels of care and/or mortality in patients of all ages. PMID:22509303

  8. Oral disopyramide after admission to hospital with suspected acute myocardial infarction. U. K. Rythmodan Multicentre Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A multi-centre double-blind randomized study is reported in which the effect on mortality of oral disopyramide (300 mg loading dose, then 100 mg qds) was compared with placebo in 1985 patients entering hospital with suspected acute myocardial infarction. Treatment was commenced with 24 hr of onset of symptoms (mean time to first dose 9 hr) and continued until discharge from hospital or 14 days, whichever came first. Nine-hundred and ninety-five patients were allocated to disopyramide and 990 to placebo. The overall mortality, calculated on an intention-to-treat basis, was 7.2% for the disopyramide and 5.6% for the placebo patients. Among those patients with proven infarction mortality was 9.5% of 687 on disopyramide and 7.4% of 716 on placebo. These differences are not statistically significant. Patients with cardiac failure or hypotension at entry did not fare worse on disopyramide, but those with a conduction defect did. Reinfarction was not significantly influenced by disopyramide. The prophylactic use of disopyramide in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction does not reduce mortality or the incidence of early reinfarction. PMID:6369290

  9. Association Between Interstitial Lung Abnormalities and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Rachel K.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Araki, Tetsuro; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Gao, Wei; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Dupuis, Josée; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Cho, Michael H.; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Coxson, Harvey O.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Zazueta, Oscar E.; Ross, James C.; Harmouche, Rola; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Elías F.; Eiríksdottír, Gudny; Aspelund, Thor; Budoff, Matthew J.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Hokanson, John E.; Williams, Michelle C; Murchison, John T.; MacNee, William; Hoffmann, Udo; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Harrris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Silverman, Edwin K.; O’Connor, George T.; Washko, George R.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Interstitial lung abnormalities have been associated with decreased six-minute walk distance, diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and total lung capacity; however to our knowledge, an association with mortality has not been previously investigated. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with increased mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, POPULATION Prospective cohort studies of 2633 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (CT scans obtained 9/08–3/11), 5320 from the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik (recruited 1/02–2/06), 2068 from COPDGene (recruited 11/07–4/10), and 1670 from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points (ECLIPSE) (between 12/05–12/06). EXPOSURES Interstitial lung abnormality status as determined by chest CT evaluation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All cause mortality over approximately 3 to 9 year median follow up time. Cause-of-death information was also examined in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort. RESULTS Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 177 (7%) of the participants from FHS, 378 (7%) from AGES-Reykjavik, 156 (8%) from COPDGene, and in 157 (9%) from ECLIPSE. Over median follow-up times of ~3–9 years there were more deaths (and a greater absolute rate of mortality) among those with interstitial lung abnormalities compared to those without interstitial lung abnormalities in each cohort; 7% compared to 1% in FHS (6% difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2%, 10%), 56% compared to 33% in AGES-Reykjavik (23% difference, 95% CI 18%, 28%), 16% compared to 11% in COPDGene (5% difference, 95% CI −1%, 11%) and 11% compared to 5% in ECLIPSE (6% difference, 95% CI 1%, 11%). After adjustment for covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with an increase in the risk of death in the FHS (HR=2.7, 95% CI, 1.1–65, P=0.030), AGES-Reykjavik (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4, P<0.001), COPDGene (HR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1, 2

  10. [The Health Department of Sicily "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event" decree].

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; De Luca, Giovanni; Gabriele, Michele; Tourkmani, Nidal

    2014-06-01

    Mortality and rehospitalizations still remain high after discharge for an acute cardiologic event. In this context, hospital discharge represents a potential pitfall for heart disease patients. In the setting of care transitions, the discharge letter is the main instrument of communication between hospital and primary care. Communication, besides, is an integral part of high-quality, patient-centered interventions aimed at improving the discharge process. Inadequate information at discharge significantly affects the quality of treatment compliance and the adoption of lifestyle modifications for an effective secondary prevention. The Health Department of Sicily, in 2013, established a task force with the aim to elaborate "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event", inviting to participate GICR-IACPR and many other scientific societies of cardiology and primary care, as discharge letter and communication are fundamental junctions of care transitions in cardiology. These recommendations have been published as a specific decree and contain: a structured model of discharge letter, which includes all of the parameters characterizing patients at high clinical risk, high thrombotic risk and low risk according to the Consensus document ANMCO/GICR-IACPR/GISE; is thus possible to identify these patients, choosing consequently the most appropriate follow-up pathways. A particular attention has been given to the "Medication Reconciliation" and to the identification of therapeutic targets; an educational Kit, with different forms on cardiac diseases, risk factors, drugs and lifestyle; a check-list about information given to the patient and caregivers. The "Recommendations" represent, in conclusion, the practical realization of the fruitful cooperation between scientific societies and political-administrative institutions that has been realized in Sicily in the last years.

  11. Shared component modelling as an alternative to assess geographical variations in medical practice: gender inequalities in hospital admissions for chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Small area analysis is the most prevalent methodological approach in the study of unwarranted and systematic variation in medical practice at geographical level. Several of its limitations drive researchers to use disease mapping methods -deemed as a valuable alternative. This work aims at exploring these techniques using - as a case of study- the gender differences in rates of hospitalization in elderly patients with chronic diseases. Methods Design and study setting: An empirical study of 538,358 hospitalizations affecting individuals aged over 75, who were admitted due to a chronic condition in 2006, were used to compare Small Area Analysis (SAVA), the Besag-York-Mollie (BYM) modelling and the Shared Component Modelling (SCM). Main endpoint: Gender spatial variation was measured, as follows: SAVA estimated gender-specific utilization ratio; BYM estimated the fraction of variance attributable to spatial correlation in each gender; and, SCM estimated the fraction of variance shared by the two genders, and those specific for each one. Results Hospitalization rates due to chronic diseases in the elderly were higher in men (median per area 21.4 per 100 inhabitants, interquartile range: 17.6 to 25.0) than in women (median per area 13.7 per 100, interquartile range: 10.8 to 16.6). Whereas Utilization Ratios showed a similar geographical pattern of variation in both genders, BYM found a high fraction of variation attributable to spatial correlation in both men (71%, CI95%: 50 to 94) and women (62%, CI95%: 45 to 77). In turn, SCM showed that the geographical admission pattern was mainly shared, with just 6% (CI95%: 4 to 8) of variation specific to the women component. Conclusions Whereas SAVA and BYM focused on the magnitude of variation and on allocating where variability cannot be due to chance, SCM signalled discrepant areas where latent factors would differently affect men and women. PMID:22188979

  12. Association between Air Pollutants and Asthma Emergency Room Visits and Hospital Admissions in Time Series Studies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xue-yan; Ding, Hong; Jiang, Li-na; Chen, Shao-wei; Zheng, Jin-ping; Qiu, Min; Zhou, Ying-xue; Chen, Qing; Guan, Wei-jie

    2015-01-01

    Background Air pollution constitutes a significant stimulus of asthma exacerbations; however, the impacts of exposure to major air pollutants on asthma-related hospital admissions and emergency room visits (ERVs) have not been fully determined. Objective We sought to quantify the associations between short-term exposure to air pollutants [ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and particulate matter ≤10μm (PM10) and PM2.5] and the asthma-related emergency room visits (ERV) and hospitalizations. Methods Systematic computerized searches without language limitation were performed. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were estimated using the random-effect models. Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were also performed. Results After screening of 246 studies, 87 were included in our analyses. Air pollutants were associated with significantly increased risks of asthma ERVs and hospitalizations [O3: RR(95%CI), 1.009 (1.006, 1.011); I2 = 87.8%, population-attributable fraction (PAF) (95%CI): 0.8 (0.6, 1.1); CO: RR(95%CI), 1.045 (1.029, 1.061); I2 = 85.7%, PAF (95%CI): 4.3 (2.8, 5.7); NO2: RR(95%CI), 1.018 (1.014, 1.022); I2 = 87.6%, PAF (95%CI): 1.8 (1.4, 2.2); SO2: RR(95%CI), 1.011 (1.007, 1.015); I2 = 77.1%, PAF (95%CI): 1.1 (0.7, 1.5); PM10: RR(95%CI), 1.010 (1.008, 1.013); I2 = 69.1%, PAF (95%CI): 1.1 (0.8, 1.3); PM2.5: RR(95%CI), 1.023 (1.015, 1.031); I2 = 82.8%, PAF (95%CI): 2.3 (1.5, 3.1)]. Sensitivity analyses yielded compatible findings as compared with the overall analyses without publication bias. Stronger associations were found in hospitalized males, children and elderly patients in warm seasons with lag of 2 days or greater. Conclusion Short-term exposures to air pollutants account for increased risks of asthma-related ERVs and hospitalizations that constitute a considerable healthcare utilization and socioeconomic burden. PMID:26382947

  13. Hospital admissions for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) associated diseases in Dominica.

    PubMed

    Adedayo, O; Grell, G; Bellot, P

    2003-06-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that is endemic in certain regions of the world, and may account for significant morbidity and mortality among hospitalised patients. Sixty six HTLV-1 seropositive patients admitted to hospital with HTLV-1 associated diseases from 1995-99 were studied. HTLV-1 screening was done with ELISA and confirmed on western blot testing. There were 32 females (48.5%) and 34 males (51.5%). The mean age was 56 years and the age range was 9-89 years. The main associated diseases were tropical spastic paraparesis or HTLV-1 associated myelopathy in 18.2% of cases, acute form of adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma 7.6%, lymphomas 15.2%, and ectoparasites/endoparasites in 40.9%. HTLV-1 is associated with diseases in Dominica and association with severe forms of strongyloidiasis and scabies is particularly noted.

  14. Short-Term Effects of Gaseous Pollutants and Particulate Matter on Daily Hospital Admissions for Cardio-Cerebrovascular Disease in Lanzhou: Evidence from a Heavily Polluted City in China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shan; Wang, Minzhen; Wang, Shigong; Tao, Yan; Shang, Kezheng

    2013-01-01

    Panel studies show a consistent association between increase in the cardiovascular hospitalizations with air pollutants in economically developed regions, but little evidence in less developed inland areas. In this study, a time-series analysis was used to examine the specific effects of major air pollutants [particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxides (NO2)] on daily hospital admissions for cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in Lanzhou, a heavily polluted city in China. We examined the effects of air pollutants for stratified groups by age and gender, and conducted the modifying effect of seasons on air pollutants to test the possible interaction. The significant associations were found between PM10, SO2 and NO2 and cardiac disease admissions, SO2 and NO2 were found to be associated with the cerebrovascular disease admissions. The elderly was associated more strongly with gaseous pollutants than younger. The modifying effect of seasons on air pollutants also existed. The significant effect of gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NO2) was found on daily hospital admissions even after adjustment for other pollutants except for SO2 on cardiac diseases. In a word, this study provides the evidence for the detrimental short-term health effects of urban gaseous pollutants on cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in Lanzhou. PMID:23358231

  15. Implementation of the presence of companions during hospital admission for childbirth: data from the Birth in Brazil national survey.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Schneck, Camilla A; Lansky, Sônia; Teixeira, Neuma Zamariano Fanaia; Rance, Susanna; Sandall, Jane

    2014-08-01

    Robust evidence of the benefits of continuous support during childbirth led to the recommendation that it should be offered for all women. In Brazil, it has been guaranteed by law since 2005, but scarce data on implementation is available. We aimed to estimate the frequency and associated socio-demographic, obstetric and institutional predictors of women having companionship during childbirth in the Birth in Brazil survey. Descriptive statistical analysis was done for the characterization of companions (at different moments of hospital stay), maternal and institutional factors; associations were investigated in bivariate and multivariate models. We found that 24.5% of women had no companion at all, 18.8% had continuous companionship and 56.7% had partial companionship. Independent predictors of having no or partial companionship at birth were: lower income and education, brown color of skin, using the public sector, multiparity, and vaginal delivery. Implementation of companionship was associated with having an appropriate environment, and clear institution al rules about women's rights to companionship. PMID:25167174

  16. Prediction of Mobility Limitations after Hospitalization in Older Medical Patients by Simple Measures of Physical Performance Obtained at Admission to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Petersen, Janne; Beyer, Nina; Andersen, Ove; Jørgensen, Lillian Mørch; Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mobility limitations relate to dependency in older adults. Identification of older patients with mobility limitations after hospital discharge may help stratify treatment and could potentially counteract dependency seen in older adults after hospitalization. We investigated the ability of four physical performance measures administered at hospital admission to identify older medical patients who manifest mobility limitations 30 days after discharge. Design Prospective cohort study of patients (≥65 years) admitted to the emergency department for acute medical illness. During the first 24 hours, we assessed: handgrip strength, 4-meter gait speed, the ability to rise from a chair (chair-stand), and the Cumulated Ambulation Score. The mobility level 30 days after discharge was evaluated using the de Morton Mobility Index. Results A total of 369 patients (77.9 years, 62% women) were included. Of those, 128 (40%) patients had mobility limitations at follow-up. Univariate analyzes showed that each of the physical performance measures was strongly associated with mobility limitations at follow-up (handgrip strength(women), OR 0.86 (0.81–0.91), handgrip strength(men), OR 0.90 (0.86–0.95), gait speed, OR 0.35 (0.26–0.46), chair-stand, OR 0.04 (0.02–0.08) and Cumulated Ambulation Score OR 0.49 (0.38–0.64). Adjustment for potential confounders did not change the results and the associations were not modified by any of the covariates: age, gender, cognitive status, the severity of the acute medical illness, and the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Based on prespecified cut-offs the prognostic accuracy of the four measures for mobility limitation at follow-up was calculated. The sensitivity and specificity were: handgrip strength(women), 56.8 (45.8–67.3), 75.7 (66.8–83.2), handgrip strength(men), 50.0 (33.8–66.2), 80.8 (69.9–89.1), gait speed, 68.4 (58.2–77.4), 81.4 (75.0–86.8), chair-stand 67.8 (58.6–76.1), 91.8 (86.8–95.3), and Cumulated

  17. Acute paediatric bite injuries treated on inpatient basis: a 10-year retrospective study and criteria for hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Shipkov, Hristo; Stefanova, Penka; Sirakov, Vladimir; Stefanov, Rumen; Dachev, Dimitar; Simeonov, Martin; Ivanov, Biser; Nenov, Momchil

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute bite wounds in children treated on an inpatient basis over a 10-year period and the criteria for inpatient treatment. This study comprised all acute mammalian bite injuries in relation to all paediatric bite injuries seen at the Emergency Surgical Department (ESD). Inclusion criteria were: aged between 0-18 years; acute human or animal bite injuries (presenting for the first time); and inpatient treatment. Exclusion criteria were: bite wounds treated elsewhere and referred for complications; bites treated on an outpatient basis referred for complications; and all insect bites. Over 10 years, 12,948 children were seen at the ESD. There were 167 children (0.77%) with mammalian bite wounds. Twelve of them responded to the inclusion criteria. They presented 7.18% of all mammalian bite injuries and 0.09% of all paediatric emergency visits at the ESD. The average age was 3.82 ± 1.63 years (from 1.3-7 years). The time elapsed between the accident to the wound debridement was 118.64 ± 101.39 minutes. There were 10 dogs, one horse, and one rabbit bite. Surgical treatment comprised debridement, saline irrigation, and primary closure or reconstruction. All patients received antibiotics in the postoperative period. The average hospital stay was 5.92 ± 2.39 days. In one case a partial distal flap necrosis occurred. Animal bite injuries treated on an inpatient basis are predominantly dog bites in young children under 10 years of age, with deep, extended, and commonly multiple injuries. Only 7% of paediatric bite injuries require inpatient treatment.

  18. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis. PMID:27354295

  19. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis.

  20. Comparative evaluation of two fully-automated real-time PCR methods for MRSA admission screening in a tertiary-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Hos, N J; Wiegel, P; Fischer, J; Plum, G

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated two fully-automated real-time PCR systems, the novel QIAGEN artus MRSA/SA QS-RGQ and the widely used BD MAX MRSA assay, for their diagnostic performance in MRSA admission screening in a tertiary-care university hospital. Two hundred sixteen clinical swabs were analyzed for MRSA DNA using the BD MAX MRSA assay. In parallel, the same specimens were tested with the QIAGEN artus MRSA/SA QS-RGQ. Automated steps included lysis of bacteria, DNA extraction, real-time PCR and interpretation of results. MRSA culture was additionally performed as a reference method for MRSA detection. Sensitivity values were similar for both assays (80 %), while the QIAGEN artus MRSA/SA QS-RGQ reached a slightly higher specificity (95.8 % versus 90.0 %). Positive (PPVs) and negative predictive values (NPVs) were 17.4 % and 99.4 % for the BD MAX MRSA assay and 33.3 % and 99.5 % for the QIAGEN artus MRSA/SA QS-RGQ, respectively. Total turn-around time (TAT) for 24 samples was 3.5 hours for both assays. In conclusion, both assays represent reliable diagnostic tools due to their high negative predictive values, especially for the rapid identification of MRSA negative patients in a low prevalence MRSA area. PMID:27259711

  1. Statistical Analysis Aiming at Predicting Respiratory Tract Disease Hospital Admissions from Environmental Variables in the City of São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coêlho, Micheline; Luiz Teixeira Gonçalves, Fabio; do Rosário Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed at creating a stochastic model, named Brazilian Climate and Health Model (BCHM), through Poisson regression, in order to predict the occurrence of hospital respiratory admissions (for children under thirteen years of age) as a function of air pollutants, meteorological variables, and thermal comfort indices (effective temperatures, ET). The data used in this study were obtained from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between 1997 and 2000. The respiratory tract diseases were divided into three categories: URI (Upper Respiratory tract diseases), LRI (Lower Respiratory tract diseases), and IP (Influenza and Pneumonia). The overall results of URI, LRI, and IP show clear correlation with SO2 and CO, PM10 and O3, and PM10, respectively, and the ETw4 (Effective Temperature) for all the three disease groups. It is extremely important to warn the government of the most populated city in Brazil about the outcome of this study, providing it with valuable information in order to help it better manage its resources on behalf of the whole population of the city of Sao Paulo, especially those with low incomes. PMID:20706674

  2. [Reliability of the diagnoses of hospital admissions for external causes financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System-SUS in two cities in the State of Paraná, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mathias, Thais Aidar de Freitas; de Andrade, Selma Maffei; Tomimatsu, Maria de Fátima Akemi Iwakura; Soares, Dorotéia Fátima Pelissari de Paula; Sapata, Maria da Penha Marques; Frascarelli, Andressa Suellen; de Souza, Regina Kazue Tanno

    2014-10-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the reliability of the diagnoses of hospital admissions for external causes financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). The diagnoses for hospital admissions from the Hospital Information System (SIH-SUS) data were compared with those from the research panel created from information culled from authorizations for hospital admission (AIH) complemented with information from other sources. The reliability was analyzed in groups using crude agreement and Kappa statistics. The crude agreement was 41.1% in Londrina and 15.8% in Maringá and the highest reliability was found for groupings for self-inflicted lesions and traffic accidents in Londrina (Kappa 0.57 and 0.56) while in Maringá reliability was acceptable for self-inflicted lesions (Kappa 0.28). The low agreement with differentiated standards according to groupings of causes and according to the municipalities highlight the fact that efforts must be made to improve the quality and use of the SIH-SUS in order to understand and intervene in accidents and violence in Brazil.

  3. Respiratory rate and pulse oximetry derived information as predictors of hospital admission in young children in Bangladesh: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Ainara; Zhou, Guohai; Raihana, Shahreen; Dunsmuir, Dustin; Karlen, Walter; Dekhordi, Parastoo; Huda, Tanvir; Arifeen, Shams El; Larson, Charles; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoxaemia is a strong predictor of mortality in children. Early detection of deteriorating condition is vital to timely intervention. We hypothesise that measures of pulse oximetry dynamics may identify children requiring hospitalisation. Our aim was to develop a predictive tool using only objective data derived from pulse oximetry and observed respiratory rate to identify children at increased risk of hospital admission. Setting Tertiary-level hospital emergency department in Bangladesh. Participants Children under 5 years (n=3374) presenting at the facility (October 2012–April 2013) without documented chronic diseases were recruited. 1-minute segments of pulse oximetry (photoplethysmogram (PPG), blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR)) and respiratory rate were collected with a mobile app. Primary outcome The need for hospitalisation based on expert physician review and follow-up. Methods Pulse rate variability (PRV) using pulse peak intervals of the PPG signal and features extracted from the SpO2 signal, all derived from pulse oximetry recordings, were studied. A univariate age-adjusted logistic regression was applied to evaluate differences between admitted and non-admitted children. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed using a stepwise selection of predictors and was internally validated using bootstrapping. Results Children admitted to hospital showed significantly (p<0.01) decreased PRV and higher SpO2 variability compared to non-admitted children. The strongest predictors of hospitalisation were reduced PRV-power in the low frequency band (OR associated with a 0.01 unit increase, 0.93; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98), greater time spent below an SpO2 of 98% and 94% (OR associated with 10 s increase, 1.4; 95% CI 1.3 to 1.4 and 1.5; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.6, respectively), high respiratory rate, high HR, low SpO2, young age and male sex. These variables provided a bootstrap-corrected AUC of the receiver operating characteristic

  4. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-06-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  5. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  6. Risk factors of direct heat-related hospital admissions during the 2009 heatwave in Adelaide, Australia: a matched case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Nitschke, Monika; Krackowizer, Antoinette; Dear, Keith; Pisaniello, Dino; Weinstein, Philip; Tucker, Graeme; Shakib, Sepehr; Bi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The extreme heatwave of 2009 in South Australia dramatically increased morbidity, with a 14-fold increase in direct heat-related hospitalisation in metropolitan Adelaide. Our study aimed to identify risk factors for the excess morbidity. Design A matched case–control study of risk factors was conducted. Setting Patients and matched community controls were interviewed to gather data on demographics, living environment, social support, health status and behaviour changes during the heatwave. Participants Cases were all hospital admissions with heat-related diagnoses during the 5-day heatwave in 2009. Controls were randomly selected from communities. Outcome measures Descriptive analyses, simple and multiple conditional logistic regressions were performed. Adjusted ORs (AORs) were estimated. Results In total, 143 hospital patients and 143 matched community controls were interviewed, with a mean age of 73 years (SD 21), 96% European ethnicity, 63% retired, 36% with high school or higher education, and 8% institutional living. The regression model indicated that compared with the controls, cases were more likely to have heart disease (AOR=13.56, 95% CI 1.27 to 144.86) and dementia (AOR=26.43, 95% CI 1.99 to 350.73). The protective factors included higher education level (AOR=0.48, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.99), having air-conditioner in the bedroom (AOR=0.12, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.74), having an emergency button (AOR=0.09, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.96), using refreshment (AOR=0.10, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.84), and having more social activities (AOR=0.11, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.57). Conclusions Pre-existing heart disease and dementia significantly increase the risk of direct heat-related hospitalisations during heatwaves. The presence of an air-conditioner in the bedroom, more social activities, a higher education level, use of emergency buttons and refreshments reduce the risk during heatwaves. PMID:27256088

  7. Thymic function failure and C-reactive protein levels are independent predictors of all-cause mortality in healthy elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Romero-Sánchez, María Concepción; Solana, Rafael; Delgado, Juan; de la Rosa, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Angeles; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    Relationship between thymic function and elderly survival has been suspected, despite the fact that formal proof is elusive due to technical limitations of thymic function-related markers. The newly described sj/β-TREC ratio allows now, by overcoming these limitations, an accurate measurement of thymic output in elderly humans. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the impact of thymic function and inflammatory markers on healthy elderly human survival. Healthy volunteers (n = 151), aged over 65, were asked to participate (CARRERITAS cohort). Subjects were excluded if diagnosed of dementia or, during the last 6 months, had clinical data of infection, hospital admission, antitumor therapy, or any treatment that could influence the immune status. Thymic function (sj/β-TREC ratio), CD4:CD8 T cell ratio, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and neutrophilia were determined from basal samples. All basal variables and age were associated with 2-year all-cause mortality. Multivariate analysis showed that only thymic function and C-reactive protein were independently associated with time to death. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, the direct role of thymic function in human survival. C-reactive protein raise is also a marker of mortality in the healthy elderly, in a thymic-independent way.

  8. Is there a Hispanic Health Paradox in Sensitivity to Air Pollution? Hospital Admissions for Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Congestive Heart Failure Associated with NO2 and PM2.5 in El Paso, TX, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Juana M.; Bulathsinhala, Priyangi; Staniswalis, Joan G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Linkages between pollution and morbidity have been observed in numerous studies. But race/ethnicity has been underemphasized as a modifier of that association, and few studies have tested for a Hispanic Health Paradox in sensitivity to air pollution. Methods Daily asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) hospital admissions in El Paso, Texas were studied in age groups and insurance groups. Daily PM2.5 and NO2 were calculated from pollution monitors and all models adjusted for apparent temperature and wind speed. Conditional logistic regression for the case-crossover design was used for a between-group comparison and for a within-group comparison for Hispanics. Results Hispanics were at lower risk than non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanics of other races for NO2-associated admissions, but at greater risk for PM2.5-associated admissions. While Hispanics were generally protected with regards to NO2, Hispanic children (vs. elderly) faced increased risk for asthma and uninsured Hispanics (vs. Private) faced increased risk for COPD admissions. While Hispanics were at increased risk of PM2.5-associated admissions, certain characteristics heightened their risks: being a Hispanic child (vs. Elderly) for asthma; being a Hispanic with Medicare (vs. Private) for asthma; and being a Hispanic with private insurance (vs. all other insurance types) for CHF. The main effect of pollution on admissions was more significant for asthma and CHF than for COPD, which had the fewest cases. Conclusions There was heterogeneity in sensitivity to air pollution based on social characteristics and moderate evidence for a Hispanic Health Paradox in sensitivity to NO2. PMID:26557023

  9. Development and Validation of a Clinical Risk-Assessment Tool Predictive of All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Ghalib A; Dumancas, Gerard G; Gennings, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In clinical settings, the diagnosis of medical conditions is often aided by measurement of various serum biomarkers through the use of laboratory tests. These biomarkers provide information about different aspects of a patient’s health and overall function of multiple organ systems. We have developed a statistical procedure that condenses the information from a variety of health biomarkers into a composite index, which could be used as a risk score for predicting all-cause mortality. It could also be viewed as a holistic measure of overall physiological health status. This health status metric is computed as a function of standardized values of each biomarker measurement, weighted according to their empirically determined relative strength of association with mortality. The underlying risk model was developed using the biomonitoring and mortality data of a large sample of US residents obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the National Death Index (NDI). Biomarker concentration levels were standardized using spline-based Cox regression models, and optimization algorithms were used to estimate the weights. The predictive accuracy of the tool was optimized by bootstrap aggregation. We also demonstrate how stacked generalization, a machine learning technique, can be used for further enhancement of the prediction power. The index was shown to be highly predictive of all-cause mortality and long-term outcomes for specific health conditions. It also exhibited a robust association with concurrent chronic conditions, recent hospital utilization, and current health status as assessed by self-rated health. PMID:26380550

  10. Trends in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and impacts of infection control practices including universal MRSA admission screening in a hospital in Scotland, 2006–2010: retrospective cohort study and time-series intervention analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Becky; López-Lozano, José-Maria; Gould, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe secular trends in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) and to assess the impacts of infection control practices, including universal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) admission screening on associated clinical burdens. Design Retrospective cohort study and multivariate time-series analysis linking microbiology, patient management and health intelligence databases. Setting Teaching hospital in North East Scotland. Participants All patients admitted to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010: n=420 452 admissions and 1 430 052 acute occupied bed days (AOBDs). Intervention Universal admission screening programme for MRSA (August 2008) incorporating isolation and decolonisation. Primary and secondary measures Hospital-wide prevalence density, hospital-associated incidence density and death within 30 days of MRSA or methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteraemia. Results Between 2006 and 2010, prevalence density of all SAB declined by 41%, from 0.73 to 0.50 cases/1000 AOBDs (p=0.002 for trend), and 30-day mortality from 26% to 14% (p=0.013). Significant reductions were observed in MRSA bacteraemia only. Overnight admissions screened for MRSA rose from 43% during selective screening to >90% within 4 months of universal screening. In multivariate time-series analysis (R2 0.45 to 0.68), universal screening was associated with a 19% reduction in prevalence density of MRSA bacteraemia (−0.035, 95% CI −0.049 to −0.021/1000 AOBDs; p<0.001), a 29% fall in hospital-associated incidence density (−0.029, 95% CI −0.035 to −0.023/1000 AOBDs; p<0.001) and a 46% reduction in 30-day mortality (−15.6, 95% CI −24.1% to −7.1%; p<0.001). Positive associations with fluoroquinolone and cephalosporin use suggested that antibiotic stewardship reduced prevalence density of MRSA bacteraemia by 0.027 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.039)/1000 AOBDs. Rates of MSSA bacteraemia were not

  11. An Observational Study of Blood Glucose Levels during Admission and 24 Hours Post-Operation in a Sample of Patients with Traumatic Injury in a Hospital in Kuala Lumpur

    PubMed Central

    Harun @ Haron, Rahmat; Imran, Musa Kamarul; Haspani, Mohammed Saffari Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with an acute stress response mediated by the sympathoadrenomedullary axis, which can be assessed by measuring blood glucose level. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted for a year in 2007 among 294 patients who had been treated for TBI in Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Patients fulfilling the set criteria were recruited into the study and data, including blood glucose level and Glasgow Outcome Score at 3-month follow-up, were collected. Results: 294 patients were included in the study: 50 females (17.0%) and 244 males (83.0%). The majority of cases were young adult patients (mean age of 34.2 years, SD 13.0). The mean blood glucose level during admission and post-surgery were 6.26 mmol/L (SD 1.30, n = 294) and 6.66 mmol/L (SD 1.44, n = 261), respectively. Specifically, the mean admission glucose level associated with mild TBI was 5.04 mmol/L (SD 0.71); moderate TBI, 5.78 mmol/L (SD 1.02); and severe TBI, 7.04 mmol/L (SD 1.18). The mean admission glucose level associated with a poor outcome in patients with isolated TBI was 6.98 mmol/L (SD 1.21). Patients with admission glucose of 5.56 mmol/L (SD 1.21) were more likely to have a favourable outcome. Conclusion: Mild, moderate, and severe TBI were associated with an increase in blood glucose levels during admission, and the mean increase in glucose levels is based on the severity of the isolated TBI. Surgical intervention did not cause further significant changes in blood glucose levels. Patients with isolated TBI and minimal increases in blood glucose levels were more likely to have a favourable outcome. PMID:22589675

  12. Can all cause readmission policy improve quality or lower expenditures? A historical perspective on current initiatives.

    PubMed

    Burgess, James F; Hockenberry, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    All-cause readmission to inpatient care is of wide policy interest in the United States and a number of other countries (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in the United Kingdom by the National Centre for Health Outcomes Development, and in Australia by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare). Contemporary policy efforts, including high powered incentives embedded in the current US Hospital Readmission Reduction Program, and the organizationally complex interventions derived in anticipation of this policy, have been touted based on potential cost savings. Strong incentives and resulting interventions may not enjoy the support of a strong theoretical model or the empirical research base that are typical of strong incentive schemes. We examine the historical broad literature on the issue, lay out a 'full' conceptual organizational model of patient transitions as they relate to the hospital, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of previous and proposed policies. We use this to set out a research and policy agenda on this critical issue rather than attempt to conduct a comprehensive structured literature review. We assert that researchers and policy makers should consider more fundamental societal issues related to health, social support and health literacy if progress is going to be made in reducing readmissions. PMID:23987089

  13. Can all cause readmission policy improve quality or lower expenditures? A historical perspective on current initiatives.

    PubMed

    Burgess, James F; Hockenberry, Jason M

    2014-04-01

    All-cause readmission to inpatient care is of wide policy interest in the United States and a number of other countries (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in the United Kingdom by the National Centre for Health Outcomes Development, and in Australia by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare). Contemporary policy efforts, including high powered incentives embedded in the current US Hospital Readmission Reduction Program, and the organizationally complex interventions derived in anticipation of this policy, have been touted based on potential cost savings. Strong incentives and resulting interventions may not enjoy the support of a strong theoretical model or the empirical research base that are typical of strong incentive schemes. We examine the historical broad literature on the issue, lay out a 'full' conceptual organizational model of patient transitions as they relate to the hospital, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of previous and proposed policies. We use this to set out a research and policy agenda on this critical issue rather than attempt to conduct a comprehensive structured literature review. We assert that researchers and policy makers should consider more fundamental societal issues related to health, social support and health literacy if progress is going to be made in reducing readmissions.

  14. Body Mass Index (BMI) and All-Cause Mortality Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The BMI and All-Cause Mortality Pooling Project quantified the risk associated with being overweight and the extent to which the relationship between BMI and all-cause mortality varies by certain factors.

  15. Risk factors associated with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae carriage at admission in an infant cohort at a tertiary teaching hospital in France.

    PubMed

    Rivard-Yazigi, Laila; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Le Guillou, Sandrine; Chalouhi, Christelle; Lecuyer, Hervé; Bureau, Constance; Nassif, Xavier; Gendrel, Dominique; Abadie, Véronique

    2013-09-01

    We describe risk factors associated with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae fecal carriage at admission in an infant population. 12.6% were carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were the most frequently identified species. Prior antibiotic therapy (P = .016; odds ratio, 4.07; 95% confidence interval: 1.29-12.81) and the presence tracheostomy or gastrostomy (P = .018; odds ratio, 3.62; 95% confidence interval: 1.24-10.53) were independently associated with carriage at admission.

  16. Hypothetical performance of syndrome-based management of acute paediatric admissions of children aged more than 60 days in a Kenyan district hospital.

    PubMed Central

    English, Mike; Berkley, James; Mwangi, Isiah; Mohammed, Shebbe; Ahmed, Maimuna; Osier, Faith; Muturi, Neema; Ogutu, Bernhards; Marsh, Kevin; Newton, Charles R. J. C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the outpatient, syndrome-based approach of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) protocol could be extended to the inpatient arena to give clear and simple minimum standards of care for poorly resourced facilities. METHODS: A prospective, one-year admission cohort retrospectively compared hypothetical performance of syndrome-based management with paediatrician-defined final diagnosis. Admission syndrome definitions were based on local adaptations to the IMCI protocol that encompassed 20 clinical features, measurement of oxygen saturation, and malaria microscopy. FINDINGS: After 315 children with clinically obvious diagnoses (e.g. sickle cell disease and burns) were excluded, 3705 admission episodes were studied. Of these, 2334 (63%) met criteria for at least one severe syndrome (mortality 8% vs <1% for "non-severe" cases), and half of these had features of two or more severe syndromes. No cases of measles were seen. Syndrome-based treatment would have been appropriate (sensitivity >95%) for severe pneumonia, severe malaria, and diarrhoea with severe dehydration, and probably for severe malnutrition (sensitivity 71%). Syndrome-directed treatment suggested the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in 75/133 (56% sensitivity) children with bacteraemic and 63/71 (89% sensitivity) children with meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty clinical features, oxygen saturation measurements, and results of malaria blood slides could be used for inpatient, syndrome-based management of acute paediatric admissions. The addition of microscopy of the cerebrospinal fluid and haemoglobin measurements would improve syndrome-directed treatment considerably. This approach might rationalize admission policy and standardize inpatient paediatric care in resource-poor countries, although the clinical detection of bacteraemia remains a problem. PMID:12764512

  17. 42 CFR 35.7 - Admissions; designation of person to be notified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.7 Admissions; designation of person to be notified. Every in-patient, at the time of admission to the hospital or station or as...

  18. 42 CFR 35.7 - Admissions; designation of person to be notified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.7 Admissions; designation of person to be notified. Every in-patient, at the time of admission to the hospital or station or as...

  19. 42 CFR 35.7 - Admissions; designation of person to be notified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.7 Admissions; designation of person to be notified. Every in-patient, at the time of admission to the hospital or station or as...

  20. 42 CFR 35.7 - Admissions; designation of person to be notified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.7 Admissions; designation of person to be notified. Every in-patient, at the time of admission to the hospital or station or as...

  1. 42 CFR 35.7 - Admissions; designation of person to be notified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.7 Admissions; designation of person to be notified. Every in-patient, at the time of admission to the hospital or station or as...

  2. Admission Values of D-dimer and C-reactive Protein (CRP) Predict the Long-term Outcomes in Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Tamune, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Admission D-dimer and C-reactive protein (CRP) values have been reported to predict the short-term outcomes in acute aortic dissection (AAD). However, the association between D-dimer values and the long-term outcomes has not been investigated. Methods The primary endpoints included events determined to be all-cause death, recurrence of aortic dissection, aortic rupture, and surgical intervention for the aortic aneurysm following the first hospital discharge. We performed a receiver operating characteristic analysis and determined the optimal cut-off levels of admission D-dimer, admission CRP and peak CRP values in terms of the sensitivity and specificity for predicting the presence of events. Using the optimal cut-off values, we performed a multiple Cox analysis and investigated the hazard ratio of admission D-dimer, admission CRP and peak CRP. Patients We retrospectively identified 173 AAD patients hospitalized between January 2005 and December 2013. Results A multiple Cox regression analysis revealed that the hazard ratios were 3.4 for admission D-dimer [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.5 to 7.3, p=0.004] and 2.7 for admission CRP (95% CI 1.2 to 5.5, p=0.014). Conclusion Admission D-dimer and CRP values may predict the long-term outcomes in AAD. Moreover, admission D-dimer values may be a valuable marker to predict not only the short-term outcomes, but also the long-term outcomes in AAD. PMID:27432090

  3. Procalcitonin as a Biomarker for a Bacterial Infection on Hospital Admission: A Critical Appraisal in a Cohort of Travellers with Fever after a Stay in (Sub)tropics

    PubMed Central

    Hesselink, Dennis A.; Bosmans-Timmerarends, Hanna; Burgerhart, Jan-Steven; Petit, Pieter L.; van Genderen, Perry J.

    2009-01-01

    Fever in a returned traveller may be the manifestation of a self-limiting, trivial infection but it can also presage an infection that can be rapidly progressive and lethal. We studied the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) as a biomarker for a bacterial cause of fever in a cohort of 157 consecutive travellers with fever after a stay in the (sub)tropics. Elevated procalcitonin levels were observed not only in about 50% of travellers with proven bacterial infection, but also in a significant proportion of travellers with a likely infection. Using a cutoff point of 0.5 ng/mL, procalcitonin had a sensitivity of 0.52 and a specificity of 0.76 for a bacterial cause of fever on admission. Interestingly, only 1 out of 16 patients with a proven viral infection had a marginally elevated PCT concentration on admission, suggesting that an increased PCT level likely excludes a viral infection as the cause of fever. However, the diagnostic accuracy of this semiquantitative procalcitonin test for a bacterial cause of fever on admission is too poor to advocate its use in the initial clinical evaluation of fever in a setting of ill-returned travellers. PMID:20016801

  4. Changes in Admissions, Length of Stay, and Discharge Diagnoses at a Major University-Affiliated Teaching Hospital: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosevear, G. Craig; Gary, Nancy E.

    1989-01-01

    A study of changes in hospital care suggests that for medical students and residents to be exposed to the same case mix of clinical disorders seen in the hospital in 1980, they must have experience in the ambulatory setting. (Author/MSE)

  5. What works in ‘real life’ to facilitate home deaths and fewer hospital admissions for those at end of life?: results from a realist evaluation of new palliative care services in two English counties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated end of life care services in two English counties including: coordination centres, telephone advice line, ‘Discharge in Reach’ nurses, a specialist community personal care team and community nurse educators. Elsewhere, we published findings detailing high family carer satisfaction and fewer hospital admissions, Accident and Emergency attendances and hospital deaths for service users compared to controls. The aim of this paper is to discuss what contributed to those outcomes. Methods Using realist evaluation, data collection included documentation (e.g. referral databases), 15 observations of services and interviews with 43 family carers and 105 professionals. Data were analysed using framework analysis, applying realist evaluation concepts. Findings were discussed at successive team meetings and further data was collected until team consensus was reached. Results Services ‘worked’ primarily for those with cancer with ‘fast track’ funding who were close to death. Factors contributing to success included services staffed with experienced palliative care professionals with dedicated (and sufficient) time for difficult conversations with family carers, patients and/or clinical colleagues about death and the practicalities of caring for the dying. Using their formal and informal knowledge of the local healthcare system, they accessed community resources to support homecare and delivered excellent services. This engendered confidence and reassurance for staff, family carers and patients, possibly contributing to less hospital admissions and A&E attendances and more home deaths. Conclusions With demand for 24-hour end of life care growing and care provision fragmented across health and social care boundaries, services like these that cut across organisational sectors may become more important. They offer an overview to help navigate those desiring a home death through the system. PMID:25075202

  6. Diabetes treatments and risk of heart failure, cardiovascular disease, and all cause mortality: cohort study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coupland, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between risks of cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and all cause mortality and different diabetes drugs in people with type 2 diabetes, particularly newer agents, including gliptins and thiazolidinediones (glitazones). Design Open cohort study. Setting 1243 general practices contributing data to the QResearch database in England. Participants 469 688 people with type 2 diabetes aged 25-84 years between 1 April 2007 and 31 January 2015. Exposures Diabetes drugs (glitazones, gliptins, metformin, sulphonylureas, insulin, other) alone and in combination. Main outcome measure First recorded diagnoses of cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and all cause mortality recorded on the patients’ primary care, mortality, or hospital record. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios for diabetes treatments, adjusting for potential confounders. Results During follow-up, 21 308 patients (4.5%) received prescriptions for glitazones and 32 533 (6.9%) received prescriptions for gliptins. Compared with non-use, gliptins were significantly associated with an 18% decreased risk of all cause mortality, a 14% decreased risk of heart failure, and no significant change in risk of cardiovascular disease; corresponding values for glitazones were significantly decreased risks of 23% for all cause mortality, 26% for heart failure, and 25% for cardiovascular disease. Compared with no current treatment, there were no significant associations between monotherapy with gliptins and risk of any complications. Dual treatment with gliptins and metformin was associated with a decreased risk of all three outcomes (reductions of 38% for heart failure, 33% for cardiovascular disease, and 48% for all cause mortality). Triple treatment with metformin, sulphonylureas, and gliptins was associated with a decreased risk of all three outcomes (reductions of 40% for heart failure, 30% for cardiovascular disease, and 51% for all cause

  7. Admission of hematopoietic cell transplantation patients to the intensive care unit at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Hospital.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Karen; Rojas, Patricio; Ernst, Daniel; Bertin, Pablo; Nervi, Bruno; Jara, Veronica; Garcia, Maria Jose; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ramirez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can have complications that require management in the intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a retrospective study of patients undergoing HCT between 2007 and 2011 with admission to the ICU. We analyzed 97 patients, with an average age of 37 (range, 15 to 68). The main indications for HCT were hematologic malignancies (84%, n = 82). Ninety percent (n = 87) received myeloablative conditioning. Thirty-one percent were admitted (autologous transplant recipients 15%, allogeneic transplant recipients 34%, and umbilical cord blood [UCB] transplant recipients 48%) with an average length of stay of 19 days (range, 1 to 73 days). The average time between transplantation and transfer was 15 days. The main causes of admission were acute respiratory failure (63%) and septic shock (20%). ICU mortality was 20% for autologous transplantations and 64% for allogeneic transplantations (adult donor and UCB combined). On average, patients died 108 days after the transplantation (range, 4 to 320 days). One-year overall survival, comparing patients entering the ICU with those never admitted, was 16% versus 82% (P < .0001) for allogeneic transplantations (adult donor and UCB combined) and 80% versus 89% (P = not significant) for autologous transplantations. Acute graft-versus-host disease was significantly associated with death in ICU after UCB HCT. ICU support is satisfactory in about one half of patients admitted, characterized by a short and medium term prognosis not as unfavorable as has been previously reported.

  8. Effects of acute organophosphate poisoning on pituitary target gland hormones at admission, discharge and three months after poisoning: A hospital based pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pinaki; Kamath, Shruthi S.; Bhalla, Ashish; Shah, V.N.; Srinivasan, Anand; Gupta, Prakamya; Singh, Surjit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate compound (OPC) poisoning is common in the developing countries such as India. The acute and later effects of OPC poisoning on pituitary and target gland hormones is largely unknown. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research between January 2012 and March 2013. Fourteen patients (8 males, age 18-50 years) with acute OPC poisoning were included in the study based on the history and clinical features, documented decreased in plasma cholinesterase activity or presence of the OPC in gastric lavage/blood samples. The hormonal parameters were done at baseline, at the time of discharge and at three months of follow-up. Results: A total of 14 patients out of 46 with the mean age of 30.1 ± 10.3 years were finally eligible for the study. Hormonal alterations at admission were similar to sick euhormonal syndrome. Overall 7 of them had nine hormonal deficits at three months of follow up, 4 having sub normal basal cortisol level and two each had low testosterone and growth hormone and only one had thyroxine deficiency. Conclusion: Acute organophosphate poisoning results in endocrine dysfunction akin to sick euhormonal syndrome. However, in a small subset of patients, varying level of hormonal insufficiency may occur either at admission or later. These observations need re-validation in a larger group of patients with specific OPC. PMID:25593838

  9. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sebastian; Warnke, Ingeborg; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2016-05-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of general clustering of the cases. PMID:27246269

  10. [The impact of the data collection method on the medico-economic classification of admissions for myocardial infarction at the public hospitals in Lyon].

    PubMed

    Rabilloud, M; Ecochard, R; Myard, A F; Delahaye, F; Colin, C; Matillon, Y

    1998-06-01

    The aim of the PMSI (Programme de Médicalisation du Système d'Information) is to describe the activity of hospitals for budget allocation. To control the quality of this information, the authors carried out a study comparing the classification in homogenous disease groups (HDG) obtained from the PMSI with that obtained from the epidemiological data base of the PRIMA trial for patients admitted to the Civil Hospitals of Lyon for myocardial infarction between September 1st 1993 and January 31st 1995. Six hundred and fifty standardised hospital summaries were reconstituted form PRIMA data and grouped using the GENRSA 3 software. Five hundred and forty-one of these hospital stays were found in the PMSI data base and grouped. The concordance not due to chance between the two classifications was then assessed by the global kappa coefficient. It was less than the 40% threshold under which concordance not due to chance is considered to be unlikely. The discordances were essentially due to the presence of an associated diagnosis classifying the hospital stay in the HDG corresponding to complicated myocardial infarction. The presence of a classifying associated diagnosis was observed significantly more often in the PRIMA than in the PMSI data base. This results in an underestimation of the hospital activity and could have important repercussions in terms of budget allocation.

  11. [The impact of the data collection method on the medico-economic classification of admissions for myocardial infarction at the public hospitals in Lyon].

    PubMed

    Rabilloud, M; Ecochard, R; Myard, A F; Delahaye, F; Colin, C; Matillon, Y

    1998-06-01

    The aim of the PMSI (Programme de Médicalisation du Système d'Information) is to describe the activity of hospitals for budget allocation. To control the quality of this information, the authors carried out a study comparing the classification in homogenous disease groups (HDG) obtained from the PMSI with that obtained from the epidemiological data base of the PRIMA trial for patients admitted to the Civil Hospitals of Lyon for myocardial infarction between September 1st 1993 and January 31st 1995. Six hundred and fifty standardised hospital summaries were reconstituted form PRIMA data and grouped using the GENRSA 3 software. Five hundred and forty-one of these hospital stays were found in the PMSI data base and grouped. The concordance not due to chance between the two classifications was then assessed by the global kappa coefficient. It was less than the 40% threshold under which concordance not due to chance is considered to be unlikely. The discordances were essentially due to the presence of an associated diagnosis classifying the hospital stay in the HDG corresponding to complicated myocardial infarction. The presence of a classifying associated diagnosis was observed significantly more often in the PRIMA than in the PMSI data base. This results in an underestimation of the hospital activity and could have important repercussions in terms of budget allocation. PMID:9749186

  12. Symptoms of depression and all-cause mortality in farmers, a cohort study: the HUNT study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Letnes, Jon Magne; Hilt, Bjørn; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Krokstad, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore all-cause mortality and the association between symptoms of depression and all-cause mortality in farmers compared with other occupational groups, using a prospective cohort design. Methods We included adult participants with a known occupation from the second wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (Helseundersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag 2 (HUNT2) 1995–1997), Norway. Complete information on emigration and death from all causes was obtained from the National Registries. We used the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to measure symptoms of depression. We compared farmers to 4 other occupational groups. Our baseline study population comprised 32 618 participants. Statistical analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards models. Results The estimated mortality risk in farmers was lower than in all other occupations combined, with a sex and age-adjusted HR (0.91, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.00). However, farmers had an 11% increased age-adjusted and sex-adjusted mortality risk compared with the highest ranked socioeconomic group (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.25). In farmers, symptoms of depression were associated with a 13% increase in sex-adjusted and age-adjusted mortality risk (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.45). Compared with other occupations this was the lowest HR, also after adjusting for education, marital status, long-lasting limiting somatic illness and lifestyle factors (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.39). Conclusions Farmers had lower all-cause mortality compared with the other occupational groups combined. Symptoms of depression were associated with an increased mortality risk in farmers, but the risk increase was smaller compared with the other occupational groups. PMID:27188811

  13. Apple intake is inversely associated with all-cause and disease-specific mortality in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Prince, Richard L; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ivey, Kerry L; Bondonno, Nicola; Rimm, Eric B; Ward, Natalie C; Croft, Kevin D; Lewis, Joshua R

    2016-03-14

    Higher fruit intake is associated with lower risk of all-cause and disease-specific mortality. However, data on individual fruits are limited, and the generalisability of these findings to the elderly remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to examine the association of apple intake with all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years in a cohort of women aged over 70 years. Secondary analyses explored relationships of other fruits with mortality outcomes. Usual fruit intake was assessed in 1456 women using a FFQ. Incidence of all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years was determined through the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Data system. Cox regression was used to determine the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality. During 15 years of follow-up, 607 (41·7%) women died from any cause. In the multivariable-adjusted analysis, the HR for all-cause mortality was 0·89 (95% CI 0·81, 0·97) per sd (53 g/d) increase in apple intake, HR 0·80 (95% CI 0·65, 0·98) for consumption of 5-100 g/d and HR 0·65 (95% CI 0·48, 0·89) for consumption of >100 g/d (an apple a day), compared with apple intake of <5 g/d (P for trend=0·03). Our analysis also found that higher apple intake was associated with lower risk for cancer mortality, and that higher total fruit and banana intakes were associated lower risk of CVD mortality (P<0·05). Our results support the view that regular apple consumption may contribute to lower risk of mortality. PMID:26787402

  14. Apple intake is inversely associated with all-cause and disease-specific mortality in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Prince, Richard L; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ivey, Kerry L; Bondonno, Nicola; Rimm, Eric B; Ward, Natalie C; Croft, Kevin D; Lewis, Joshua R

    2016-03-14

    Higher fruit intake is associated with lower risk of all-cause and disease-specific mortality. However, data on individual fruits are limited, and the generalisability of these findings to the elderly remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to examine the association of apple intake with all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years in a cohort of women aged over 70 years. Secondary analyses explored relationships of other fruits with mortality outcomes. Usual fruit intake was assessed in 1456 women using a FFQ. Incidence of all-cause and disease-specific mortality over 15 years was determined through the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Data system. Cox regression was used to determine the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality. During 15 years of follow-up, 607 (41·7%) women died from any cause. In the multivariable-adjusted analysis, the HR for all-cause mortality was 0·89 (95% CI 0·81, 0·97) per sd (53 g/d) increase in apple intake, HR 0·80 (95% CI 0·65, 0·98) for consumption of 5-100 g/d and HR 0·65 (95% CI 0·48, 0·89) for consumption of >100 g/d (an apple a day), compared with apple intake of <5 g/d (P for trend=0·03). Our analysis also found that higher apple intake was associated with lower risk for cancer mortality, and that higher total fruit and banana intakes were associated lower risk of CVD mortality (P<0·05). Our results support the view that regular apple consumption may contribute to lower risk of mortality.

  15. Emergency department census of patients awaiting admission following reorganisation of an admissions process

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, E D; Bennett, K; O'Riordan, D; Silke, B

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact of reorganisation of an acute admissions process on numbers of people in the emergency department (ED) awaiting admission to a hospital bed in a major teaching hospital. Methods We studied all emergency medical patients admitted to St James' Hospital, Dublin, between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2004. In 2002, patients were admitted to a variety of wards from the ED when a hospital bed became available. In 2003, two centrally located wards were reconfigured to function as an acute medical admissions unit (AMAU) (bed capacity 59), and all emergency patients were admitted directly to this unit from the ED (average 15 admissions per day). The maximum permitted length of stay on the AMAU was 5 days. We recorded the number of patients in the ED, who were awaiting the availability of a hospital bed, at 0700 and 1700 on the days of recording during the 36 month study period. Results The impact of the AMAU reduced overall hospital length of stay from 7 days in 2002 to 5 days in 2003 and 2004 (p<0.0001). The median number of patients waiting in the ED for a hospital bed reduced from 14 in 2002 to 9 in 2003 and 8 in 2004 (p<0.0001). While age and sex of patients did not differ over the years, the factors that independently contributed to the number of patients awaiting admission were the day of the week, the month of the year, and and the extent of the comorbidity index on the previous day's intake (p<0.0001). Conclusions This study found that reorganisation of a system for acute medical admissions can significantly impact on the number of patients awaiting admission to a hospital bed, and allow an ED to operate efficiently and at a level of risk acceptable to patients. PMID:16627837

  16. Risk factors for 30-day readmission following hypoglycemia-related emergency room and inpatient admissions

    PubMed Central

    Emons, M F; Bae, J P; Hoogwerf, B J; Kindermann, S L; Taylor, R J; Nathanson, B H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of diabetes treatment. This retrospective observational study characterized hypoglycemia-related hospital emergency room (ER) and inpatient (in-pt) admissions and identified risk factors for 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Research design and methods 4476 hypoglycemia-related ER and in-pt encounters with discharge dates from 1/1/2009 to 3/31/2014 were identified in a large, multicenter electronic health record database. Outcomes were 30-day all-cause ER/hospital readmission and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Multivariable logistic regression methods identified risk factors for both outcomes. Results 1095 (24.5%) encounters had ER/hospital all-cause readmission within 30 days and 158 (14.4%) of these were hypoglycemia-related. Predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission included recent exposure to a hospital/nursing home (NH)/skilled nursing facility (SNF; OR 1.985, p<0.001); age 25–34 and 35–44 (OR 2.334 and 1.996, respectively, compared with age 65–74, both p<0.001); and African-American (AA) race versus all other race categories (OR 1.427, p=0.011). Other factors positively associated with readmission include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, cardiac dysrhythmias, congestive heart disease, hypertension, and mood disorders. Predictors of readmissions attributable to hypoglycemia included recent exposure to a hospital/NH/SNF (OR 2.299, p<0.001), AA race (OR 1.722, p=0.002), age 35–44 (OR 3.484, compared with age 65–74, p<0.001), hypertension (OR 1.891, p=0.019), and delirium/dementia and other cognitive disorders (OR 1.794, p=0.038). Obesity was protective against 30-day hypoglycemia-related readmission (OR 0.505, p=0.017). Conclusions Factors associated with 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission among patients with diabetic hypoglycemia include recent exposure to hospital/SNF/NH, adults <45 years, AAs, and several cardiovascular and

  17. Dressing and Addressing the Mental Patient: The Uses of Clothing in the Admission, Care and Employment of Residents in English Provincial Mental Hospitals, c. 1860–1960

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Nicole; Melling, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scholars of insanity and its historical antecedents have paid very little attention to personal and institutional clothing. Such dress, distributed to patients in mental institutions, has always been inscribed with the conflicting narratives of the period in which it was made and worn. The language of civil and medical authority is more evident than personal choice in the shape and address of the attire. This article examines clothing worn by patients in three Devon mental hospitals during the century before 1960. We consider the ways in which institutional clothing formed part of a hospital regimen of overt control, as well as suiting considerations of economy and employment that figured in these institutions. PMID:26989271

  18. Patients' satisfaction and opinions of their experiences during admission in a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan – a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Sardar Zakariya; Syed, Khezar Shahzada; Ali, Syed Ahad; Ali, Syed Umer; Fatima, Kiran; Gill, Marium; Hassan, Muhammad Ovais; Hashmi, Saad Hasan; Siddiqi, Maham T; Khan, Hadi Muhammad; Jameel, Omar Farooq

    2007-01-01

    Background It is often felt that developing countries need to improve their quality of healthcare provision. This study hopes to generate data that can help managers and doctors to improve the standard of care they provide in line with the wishes of the patients. Methods It was a cross sectional study carried out at a major tertiary care hospital of Karachi. Patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years admitted to the hospital for at least one day were included. Patients in the maternity, psychiatry and chemotherapy wards and those in the ICU/CCU were excluded. A pretested, peer reviewed translation of a validated patient satisfaction scale developed by the Picker Institute of Europe was administered. Results A total of 173 patients (response rate: 78.6 %) filled the questionnaire. Patient satisfaction was at levels comparable to European surveys for most aspects of hospital care. However, nearly half the patients (48%) felt they had to wait too long to get a bed in the hospital after presenting to the ER. 68.6% of the patients said that they were never asked for views on the quality of care provided. 20% of the patients did not find anyone in the staff to talk to about their worries and fears while 27.6% felt that they were given emotional support to only some extent. Up to one third of the patients said they were not provided enough information regarding their operative procedures beforehand. Conclusion Although several components of patient care equal the quality levels of the west, many sections require considerable improvement in order to improve health care provision. The healthcare team needs to get more involved with the patients, providing them greater support and keeping them informed and involved with their medical treatment. Efforts should be made to get regular feedback from the patients. PMID:17915023

  19. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gilburt, Helen; Rose, Diana; Slade, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems. PMID:18439254

  20. Red meat and processed meat consumption and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Susanna C; Orsini, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    High consumption of red meat and processed meat has been associated with increased risk of several chronic diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from prospective studies on red meat and processed meat consumption in relationship to all-cause mortality. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed through May 2013 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. Prospective studies that reported relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association of red meat or processed meat consumption with all-cause mortality were eligible. Study-specific results were combined by using a random-effects model. Nine prospective studies were included in the meta-analysis. The summary relative risks of all-cause mortality for the highest versus the lowest category of consumption were 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98, 1.22; n = 6 studies) for unprocessed red meat, 1.23 (95% CI: 1.17, 1.28; n = 6 studies) for processed meat, and 1.29 (95% CI: 1.24, 1.35; n = 5 studies) for total red meat. In a dose-response meta-analysis, consumption of processed meat and total red meat, but not unprocessed red meat, was statistically significantly positively associated with all-cause mortality in a nonlinear fashion. These results indicate that high consumption of red meat, especially processed meat, may increase all-cause mortality.

  1. Effects of Running on Chronic Diseases and Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Lee, Duck-chul; Sui, Xuemei; Arena, Ross; O'Keefe, James H; Church, Timothy S; Milani, Richard V; Blair, Steven N

    2015-11-01

    Considerable evidence has established the link between high levels of physical activity (PA) and all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-specific mortality. Running is a popular form of vigorous PA that has been associated with better overall survival, but there is debate about the dose-response relationship between running and CVD and all-cause survival. In this review, we specifically reviewed studies published in PubMed since 2000 that included at least 500 runners and 5-year follow-up so as to analyze the relationship between vigorous aerobic PA, specifically running, and major health consequences, especially CVD and all-cause mortality. We also made recommendations on the optimal dose of running associated with protection against CVD and premature mortality, as well as briefly discuss the potential cardiotoxicity of a high dose of aerobic exercise, including running (eg, marathons). PMID:26362561

  2. The impact of prescription opioids on all-cause mortality in Canada.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Sameer; Rehm, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    An influential study from the United States generated considerable discussion and debate. This study documented rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century, with clear linkages of all-cause mortality to increasing rates of poisonings, suicides and chronic liver disease deaths. All of these causes of deaths are strongly related to the use of legal and illegal substances, but the study stressed the importance of prescription opioids. Given the similarities between the United States and Canada in prescription opioid use, the assessment of similar all-cause mortality trends is relevant for Canada. As this commentary highlights, the all-cause mortality shifts seen in the United States cannot be seen in Canada for either sex or age groups. The exact reasons for the differences between the two countries are not clear, but it is important for public health to further explore this question. PMID:27476513

  3. School holidays and admissions with asthma.

    PubMed

    Storr, J; Lenney, W

    1989-01-01

    The admission rate for asthma at a children's hospital was studied over an 11 year period. Admissions varied unpredictably over periods of a few days, but there was a repeated yearly pattern of peaks and troughs with an interval of several weeks. The short term variation could be attributed to chance effects alone, excluding any important role for short term influences--for example, weather changes--in precipitating asthma admissions. There was a definite association between the longer term variation and school holidays. The admission rate fell during holidays and there were two or more peaks during terms. The pattern is consistent with a largely viral aetiology for asthmatic attacks throughout the year. We postulate that school holidays disrupt the spread of viral infections in a community, with synchronisation of subsequent attacks. Travel during holidays may facilitate acquisition of new viral strains by the community.

  4. School holidays and admissions with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Storr, J; Lenney, W

    1989-01-01

    The admission rate for asthma at a children's hospital was studied over an 11 year period. Admissions varied unpredictably over periods of a few days, but there was a repeated yearly pattern of peaks and troughs with an interval of several weeks. The short term variation could be attributed to chance effects alone, excluding any important role for short term influences--for example, weather changes--in precipitating asthma admissions. There was a definite association between the longer term variation and school holidays. The admission rate fell during holidays and there were two or more peaks during terms. The pattern is consistent with a largely viral aetiology for asthmatic attacks throughout the year. We postulate that school holidays disrupt the spread of viral infections in a community, with synchronisation of subsequent attacks. Travel during holidays may facilitate acquisition of new viral strains by the community. PMID:2923458

  5. Birth characteristics and all-cause mortality: a sibling analysis using the Uppsala birth cohort multigenerational study.

    PubMed

    Juárez, S; Goodman, A; De Stavola, B; Koupil, I

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the association between perinatal health and all-cause mortality for specific age intervals, assessing the contribution of maternal socioeconomic characteristics and the presence of maternal-level confounding. Our study is based on a cohort of 12,564 singletons born between 1915 and 1929 at the Uppsala University Hospital. We fitted Cox regression models to estimate age-varying hazard ratios of all-cause mortality for absolute and relative birth weight and for gestational age. We found that associations with mortality vary by age and according to the measure under scrutiny, with effects being concentrated in infancy, childhood or early adult life. For example, the effect of low birth weight was greatest in the first year of life and then continued up to 44 years of age (HR between 2.82 and 1.51). These associations were confirmed in within-family analyses, which provided no evidence of residual confounding by maternal characteristics. Our findings support the interpretation that policies oriented towards improving population health should invest in birth outcomes and hence in maternal health. PMID:27138055

  6. Weight change and all-cause mortality in older adults: A meta-analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This meta-analysis of observational cohort studies examined the association between weight change (weight loss, weight gain, and weight fluctuation) and all-cause mortality among older adults. We used PubMed (MEDLINE), Web of Science, and Cochrane Library to identify prospective studies published in...

  7. Prospective study of coffee consumption and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality in Swedish women.

    PubMed

    Löf, Marie; Sandin, Sven; Yin, Li; Adami, Hans-Olov; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether coffee consumption was associated with all-cause, cancer, or cardiovascular mortality in a prospective cohort of 49,259 Swedish women. Of the 1576 deaths that occurred in the cohort, 956 were due to cancer and 158 were due to cardiovascular disease. We used Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders to estimate multivariable relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Compared to a coffee consumption of 0-1 cups/day, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.81 (95 % CI 0.69-0.94) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.88 (95 % CI 0.74-1.05) for >5 cups/day. Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality or cardiovascular mortality when analyzed in the entire cohort. However, in supplementary analyses of women over 50 years of age, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.74 (95 % CI 0.62-0.89) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.86 (95 % CI 0.70-1.06) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. In this same subgroup, the RRs for cancer mortality were 1.06 (95 % CI 0.81-1.38) for 2-5 cups/day and 1.40 (95 % CI 1.05-1.89) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. No associations between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality, or cardiovascular mortality were observed among women below 50 years of age. In conclusion, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower all-cause mortality when compared to a consumption of 0-1 cups/day. Furthermore, coffee may have differential effects on mortality before and after 50 years of age.

  8. Symmetric Dimethylarginine as Predictor of Graft loss and All-Cause Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pihlstrøm, Hege; Mjøen, Geir; Dahle, Dag Olav; Pilz, Stefan; Midtvedt, Karsten; März, Winfried; Abedini, Sadollah; Holme, Ingar; Fellström, Bengt; Jardine, Alan; Holdaas, Hallvard

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to predict cardiovascular events and all cause mortality in diverse populations. The potential role of SDMA as a risk marker in renal transplant recipients (RTR) has not been investigated. Methods We analyzed SDMA in the placebo arm of the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation study, a randomized controlled trial of fluvastatin in RTR. Mean follow-up was 5.1 years. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on SDMA levels at study inclusion. Relationships between SDMA and traditional risk factors for graft function and all-cause mortality were analyzed in 925 RTR using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Results In univariate analysis, SDMA was significantly associated with renal graft loss, all-cause death, and major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for established risk factors including estimated glomerular filtration rate, an elevated SDMA-level (4th quartile, >1.38 μmol/L) was associated with renal graft loss; hazard ratio (HR), 5.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.95–15.57; P=0.001, compared to the 1st quartile. Similarly, SDMA in the 4th quartile was independently associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 4.56; 95% CI, 2.15–9.71; P<0.001), and there was a strong borderline significant trend for an association with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 0.99–8.21; P=0.051). Conclusion In stable RTR, an elevated SDMA level is independently associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and renal graft loss. PMID:24999963

  9. What Admissions Officials Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades, college admissions has become a prime-time preoccupation. Most people know at least something about the process, especially if they have a teenager in high school and a college guide on their coffee table. Nonetheless, widespread public misconceptions persist about admissions requirements, the selection process, and the…

  10. A Stunning Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Few people set out to become admissions counselors, say people in the profession. But the field is requiring skills that are more demanding and varied than ever. And at a time when universities are looking especially hard at the bottom line, people in admissions need to constantly learn new things and make themselves indispensable. Counselors…

  11. Technology in International Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  12. Re-Admissions Following Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hahnel, James; Burdekin, Hannah; Anand, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hip fractures in the elderly are a growing problem with a predicted incidence of 117,000 cases per year by 2016. Re-admission following a healthcare episode is an important outcome measure, which reflects non-fatal adverse events and indicates the natural history of disease. The purpose of this observational, multicentre audit was to examine rates and reasons for re-admission following hip fracture, to identify areas in the index admission and rehabilitation care that could be improved to prevent re-admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 535 patients (> 65 years old) in two district general hospitals in the UK who underwent hip fracture surgery were recruited into the study. RESULTS Of the study cohort, 72 patients (13.5%) died during their index admission and 88 (19.0%) of 463 patients were re-admitted once within 3 months. Causes of re-admission were attributed to medical (54.8%), failure to rehabilitate (23.8%), orthopaedic (19.0%) and surgical (2.4%) reasons. Infection was the most common (31.0%) reason for re-admission and arguably the most treatable. During the 3-month postoperative period, the mortality rate was 21.3%, increasing in those re-admitted to 35.1% representing the frailty of this group of patients. CONCLUSIONS High rates of re-admission are seen following discharge in elderly patients with hip fractures. Re-admitted patients have high mortality rates. Understanding causes of re-admission may help to reduce this burden. PMID:19558764

  13. Predictors of emergency room visits or acute hospital admissions prior to death among hospice palliative care clients in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospice palliative care (HPC) is a philosophy of care that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of life for clients with life-threatening illnesses or end of life issues. The goals of HPC are not only to ameliorate clients’ symptoms but also to reduce unneeded or unwanted medical interventions such as emergency room visits or hospitalizations (ERVH). Hospitals are considered a setting ill-prepared for end of life issues; therefore, use of such acute care services has to be considered an indicator of poor quality end of life care. This study examines predictors of ERVH prior to death among HPC home care clients. Methods A retrospective cohort study of a sample of 764 HPC home care clients who received services from a community care access centre (CCAC) in southern Ontario, Canada. All clients were assessed using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Palliative Care (interRAI PC) as part of normal clinical practice between April 2008 and July 2010. The Andersen-Newman framework for health service utilization was used as a conceptual model for the basis of this study. Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were carried out to identify predictors of ERVH. Results Half of the HPC clients had at least one or more ERVH (n = 399, 52.2%). Wish to die at home (OR = 0.54) and advanced care directives (OR = 0.39) were protective against ERVH. Unstable health (OR = 0.70) was also associated with reduced probability, while infections such as prior urinary tract infections (OR = 2.54) increased the likelihood of ERVH. Clients with increased use of formal services had reduced probability of ERVH (OR = 0.55). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that predisposing characteristics are nearly as important as need variables in determining ERVH among HPC clients, which challenges the assumption that need variables are the most important determinants of ERVH. Ongoing assessment of HPC clients is essential in reducing ERVH

  14. 42 CFR 412.3 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES General Provisions § 412.3 Admissions. (a) For... patient history and comorbidities, the severity of signs and symptoms, current medical needs, and the...

  15. Housework Reduces All-Cause and Cancer Mortality in Chinese Men

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ruby; Leung, Jason; Woo, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background Leisure time physical activity has been extensively studied. However, the health benefits of non-leisure time physical activity, particular those undertaken at home on all-cause and cancer mortality are limited, particularly among the elderly. Methods We studied physical activity in relation to all-cause and cancer mortality in a cohort of 4,000 community-dwelling elderly aged 65 and older. Leisure time physical activity (sport/recreational activity and lawn work/yard care/gardening) and non-leisure time physical activity (housework, home repairs and caring for another person) were self-reported on the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly. Subjects with heart diseases, stroke, cancer or diabetes at baseline were excluded (n = 1,133). Results Among the 2,867 subjects with a mean age of 72 years at baseline, 452 died from all-cause and 185 died from cancer during the follow-up period (2001–2012). With the adjustment for age, education level and lifestyle factors, we found an inverse association between risk of all-cause mortality and heavy housework among men, with the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 0.72 (95%CI = 0.57–0.92). Further adjustment for BMI, frailty index, living arrangement, and leisure time activity did not change the result (HR = 0.71, 95%CI = 0.56–0.91). Among women, however, heavy housework was not associated with all-cause mortality. The risk of cancer mortality was significantly lower among men who participated in heavy housework (HR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.35–0.78), whereas among women the risk was not significant. Men participated in light housework also were at lower risk of cancer mortality than were their counterparts, however, the association was not significant. Leisure time physical activity was not related to all-cause or cancer mortality in either men or women. Conclusion Heavy housework is associated with reduced mortality and cancer deaths over a 9-year period. The underlying mechanism needs further

  16. Six-year outcomes in first admission adolescent inpatients: clinical and cognitive characteristics at admission as predictors.

    PubMed

    Pogge, David L; Insalaco, Brie; Bertisch, Hilary; Bilginer, Lale; Stokes, John; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Harvey, Philip D

    2008-07-15

    Persistent functional disability is common after even a single psychiatric admission in people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, but less is known about other conditions and about adolescent onset patients. This study examined clinical symptoms and cognitive performance at the time of the first admission for the prediction of 6-year outcomes. First admission adolescent patients with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with comprehensive clinical ratings of psychopathology, a neuropsychological assessment, and received clinical diagnoses while experiencing their first psychiatric admission. They were contacted 6 years after discharge and examined with a structured assessment of psychiatric symptoms and functioning. Despite the low levels of overall impairment at follow-up, at least 20% of the variance in depression, psychosis, poor peer relationships and poor school attendance 6 years after the hospital admission were predicted by information collected during the hospitalization. Attentional deficits during admission predicted the presence of psychosis at follow-up more substantially than psychotic symptoms during admission, as well as predicting risk for relapse. Attentional deficits during a first psychiatric admission predicted risk for manifesting psychosis at 6-year follow-up to a more substantial degree than either a psychosis diagnosis or psychotic symptoms at admission. In contrast to psychosis, depression at follow-up was predicted by admission symptomatology, but not by cognitive deficits. PMID:18534688

  17. HIV and/or AIDS-related deaths and modifiable risk factors: A descriptive study of medical admissions at Oshakati Intermediate Hospital in Northern Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Mgori, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background High rates of HIV infection have decreased life expectancy in many African countries. Regardless of worldwide efforts to escalate treatment, care and prevention strategies, the number of deaths due to AIDS-related disorders is still high. Local healthcare workers suspect that there are modifiable factors in the care of HIV and/or AIDS patients which can be identified and improved. Aim To describe the HIV and/or AIDS-related causes of adult mortality and identify modifiable factors amongst patients admitted to Oshakati Intermediate Hospital, northern Namibia. Methods Data was extracted retrospectively and coded using the modified CoDe protocol for AIDS. Modifiable factors relating to the patient, health system or clinical care were identified using a standardised data collection tool. Results A total of 177 HIV and/or AIDS patients were identified, 94 (53.1%) were male and 120 (68%) had a CD4 count of less than 200 cells/mL. The common HIV-related causes of death were tuberculosis (25.9%), renal failure (15.8%), Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (11.3%), cryptococcal meningitis (9%), HIV wasting syndrome (7.9%) and AIDS-defining malignancy (7.9%). The analysis revealed 281 modifiable factors; patient-related factors were the most common (153 [54.4%]), followed by health system factors (97 [34.5%]) and healthcare personnel factors (31 [11%]). Conclusion Our findings have highlighted the challenges in overall HIV and/or AIDS inpatient care and surrounding primary care facilities. The identification of specific modifiable factors can be used to reduce mortality by providing training as well as rational monitoring, planning and resource allocation.

  18. [Clinical and biochemical characteristics of patients with morbid obesity at the time of hospital admission and one year after undergoing bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Molina-Ayala, Mario; Rodríguez-González, Antonio; Albarrán-Sánchez, Alejandra; Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Luque-de León, Enrique; Bosco-Garate, Ilka; Laredo-Sánchez, Fernando; Contreras-Herrera, Roxana; Mac Gregor-Gooch, Julián; Cuevas-García, Carlos; Mendoza-Zubieta, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el 3 % de la población mexicana padece obesidad extrema. Sus comorbilidades disminuyen la calidad de vida, aumentan la mortalidad y los costos de atención médica. El único tratamiento con resultados a largo plazo es la cirugía bariátrica, aunque tiene indicaciones y riesgos específicos. Buscamos evaluar las características de los pacientes de cirugía bariátrica al inicio y un año después del tratamiento quirúrgico. Métodos: estudio cuasi experimental con los datos antropométricos, clínicos y bioquímicos de una muestra de pacientes operados en la Clínica de Obesidad del Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico Nacional de marzo del 2011 a octubre del 2015. Resultados: fueron analizados 150 pacientes (60 % mujeres), la media de edad fue de 41 ± 9 años y el índice de masa corporal (IMC) de 48 kg/m2 (42-53 kg/m2). Previo a la cirugía, 31 % tenía diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2) y 62 % hipertensión arterial (HAS). El 30 % eran obesos “metabólicamente sanos”. Un año después de la cirugía el porcentaje del exceso de peso perdido fue de 66 %. La remisión de DM2 y HAS fue de 70 y 50 %, respectivamente. Conclusión: la cirugía bariátrica es efectiva en la pérdida de peso y en la mejoría de parámetros bioquímicos y clínicos en pacientes con obesidad extrema.

  19. What palliative care–related problems do patients with drug-resistant or drug-susceptible tuberculosis experience on admission to hospital? A cross-sectional self-report study

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Richard; Defilippi, Kath; Cameron, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The new World Health Organization’s ‘End TB’ strategy specifies palliative care within its strategic pillars. Limited data on patient-reported problems are available to inform an effective care response. Aim: We aimed to (1) identify most burdensome problems, (2) compare intensity of problems for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis and (3) identify predictors of problem identifiers. Design: Cross-sectional self-report quantitative study. Setting/participants: Self-report palliative care problems (physical, psychological, social and spiritual) were collected among patients on admission to a general district hospital with tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis wards in South Africa. Results: Totally, 114 patients were recruited. The items with worst score responses were worry (60.5%), pain (42.1%), help and advice to plan for the future (35.1%), symptoms (29.0%) and ability to share feelings (25.1%). In ordinal logistic regression, age was predictive of a higher (worse) score for total Palliative Outcome Scale total score (0.058, 95% confidence interval = 0.0018–0.099, p = 0.005) and Factor 2 (interpersonal wellbeing: 0.038, 95% confidence interval = 0.003–0.073, p = 0.031). Interestingly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was predictive of lower (better) score for both total Palliative Outcome Scale score and Factor 1 (physical and psychological wellbeing). Weight, human immunodeficiency virus status and prior treatment were not significantly associated with any of the three. Conclusion: Currently, patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis are only admitted to hospital with complications, explaining their worse scores. The high burden of physical and psychosocial problems experienced by our sample provides strong evidence of the need for palliative care alongside potentially curative options. PMID:27468913

  20. Use and cost of hospitalization in dementia: longitudinal results from a community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Carolyn W.; Cosentino, Stephanie; Ornstein, Katherine; Gu, Yian; Andrews, Howard; Stern, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the relative contribution of functional impairment and cognitive deficits on risk of hospitalization and costs. Methods A prospective cohort of Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older who participated in the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) were followed approximately every 18 months for over 10 years (1805 never diagnosed with dementia during study period, 221 diagnosed with dementia at enrollment). Hospitalization and Medicare expenditures data (1999–2010) were obtained from Medicare claims. Multivariate analyses were conducted to examine (1) risk of all-cause hospitalizations, (2) hospitalizations from ambulatory care sensitive (ACSs) conditions, (3) hospital length of stay (LOS), and (4) Medicare expenditures. Propensity score matching methods were used to reduce observed differences between demented and non-demented groups at study enrollment. Analyses took into account repeated observations within each individual. Results Compared to propensity-matched individuals without dementia, individuals with dementia had significantly higher risk for all-cause hospitalization, longer LOS, and higher Medicare expenditures. Functional and cognitive deficits were significantly associated with higher risks for hospitalizations, hospital LOS, and Medicare expenditures. Functional and cognitive deficits were associated with higher risks of for some ACS but not all admissions. Conclusions These results allow us to differentiate the impact of functional and cognitive deficits on hospitalizations. To develop strategies to reduce hospitalizations and expenditures, better understanding of which types of hospitalizations and which disease characteristics impact these outcomes will be critical. PMID:25351909

  1. Reduction of drinking in problem drinkers and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Rehm, J; Roerecke, M

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has been linked with considerable mortality, and reduction of drinking, especially of heavy drinking, has been suggested as one of the main measures to reduce alcohol-attributable mortality. Aggregate-level studies including but not limited to natural experiments support this suggestion; however, causality cannot be established in ecological analysis. The results of individual-level cohort studies are ambiguous. On the other hand, randomized clinical trials with problem drinkers show that brief interventions leading to a reduction of average drinking also led to a reduction of all-cause mortality within 1 year. The results of these studies were pooled and a model