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Sample records for all-ceramic crown systems

  1. All-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C R; Schärer, P

    1992-06-01

    Despite the good appearance and biocompatibility of dental porcelains, failures are still of considerable concern because of some limited properties common to all-ceramic crown systems. As in the years before, pertinent scientific articles published between November 1990 and December 1991 focused on strengthening mechanisms and compared fracture toughness for different ceramic systems by using various test methods. Some evaluated the clinical implications thereon for seating and loading crowns and measured wear against different ceramic surface conditions. Recently introduced with pleasing aesthetic qualities, IPS-Empress (Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein), a new European leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, has finally drawn attention in some journals and has been reviewed with promising in vitro test results. Using a simple press-molding technique, well-fitting crowns, inlays, and veneers can be fabricated without an additional ceramming procedure. Again, only long-term clinical trials will validate achievements compared with other all-ceramic systems and with well-established metal ceramics.

  2. Influence of marginal fit and cement types on microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Ece; Zaimoğlu, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both marginal fit and cementing with different luting agents on the microleakage of all-ceramic crown systems. Thirty-six extracted upper central incisors were prepared for full-coverage crowns and were divided into three groups. Group 1: CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2, Group 2: Heat-pressed lithium-disilicate, and Group 3: Cast Cr-Co copings as the control group. Copings were made following standard techniques, and groups were assigned cementation with either self-adhesive resin cement (A) or glass-ionomer luting cement (B). The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, immersed in basic fuchsin solution, sectioned mesiodistally and buccolingually. The surface of each section was digitally photographed under a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was scored using a five-point scale, and the marginal gap was measured using image analysis software. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests (α: 0.05). The marginal discrepancy of each group was 82.7 ± 7 µm, 92.6 ± 4 µm and 96.5 ± 7 µm respectively. Group 1 showed significantly smaller gaps than Group 3 (P = 0.042). Self-adhesive resin cement (A) showed a lower level of microleakage than glass-ionomer luting cement (B) in all groups (P = 0.029). Microleakage scores of '0' were 83% for 1A, 50% for 1B, 50% for 2A, 16% for 2B, 33% for 3A and none for 3B. Marginal discrepancy and cement type both had significant effects on microleakage. Lower levels of microleakage were recorded with self-adhesive resin cement, while CAD/CAM-fabricated ZrO2 copings showed smaller marginal discrepancy and less microleakage in comparison to cast Cr-Co.

  3. Marginal and internal fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated with two different CAD/CAM systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Bok; Park, Charn-Woon; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2008-05-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of marginal and internal fit between the all-ceramic crowns manufactured by a conventional double-layer computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a single-layer system. Ten standardized crowns were fabricated from each of these two systems: conventional double-layer CAD/CAM system (Procera) and a single-layer system (Cerec 3D). The copings and completed crowns were seated on the abutments by a special device that facilitated uniform loading, and the marginal discrepancies were measured. Internal gaps were also measured using a low-viscosity silicone material. Marginal discrepancies of Procera copings were significantly smaller than those of Procera crowns and Cerec 3D crowns (p < 0.05), but Procera crowns and Cerec 3D crowns did not differ significantly from each other (p > 0.05). On internal gaps, Cerec 3D crowns showed significantly larger internal gaps than Procera copings and crowns (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, the single-layer system demonstrated acceptable marginal and internal fit.

  4. Internal fit of two all-ceramic systems and metal-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    MARTINS, Leandro Moura; LORENZONI, Fabio Cesar; de MELO, Alcides Oliveira; da SILVA, Luciana Mendonça; de OLIVEIRA, José Luiz G.; de OLIVEIRA, Pedro Cesar Garcia; BONFANTE, Gerson

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the internal fit (IF) of glass-infiltrated alumina (ICA - In-Ceram Alumina), yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP - IPS e.max ZirCAD), and metal-ceramic (MC - Ni-Cr alloy) crowns. Material and Methods Sixty standardized resin-tooth replicas of a maxillary first molar were produced for crown placement and divided into 3 groups (n=20 each) according to the core material used (metal, ICA or Y-TZP). The IF of the crowns was measured using the replica technique, which employs a light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material to simulate the cement layer thickness. The data were analyzed according to the surfaces obtained for the occlusal space (OS), axial space (AS) and total mean (TM) using two-way ANOVA with Tukey's multiple comparison test (p<0.05). Results No differences among the different areas were detected in the MC group. For the Y-TZP and ICA groups, AS was statistically lower than both OS and TM. No differences in AS were observed among the groups. However, OS and TM showed significantly higher values for ICA and Y-TZP groups than MC group. Comparisons of ICA and Y-TZP revealed that OS was significantly lower for Y-TZP group, whereas no differences were observed for TM. Conclusions The total mean achieved by all groups was within the range of clinical acceptability. However, the metal-ceramic group demonstrated significantly lower values than the all-ceramic groups, especially in OS. PMID:22666843

  5. All-ceramic restorative system for esthetic implant-supported crowns: in vitro evaluations and clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Castellon, Paulino; Potiket, Narong; Soltys, James L; Johnson, James; Zavala, Julio

    2003-09-01

    Patient demands for improved esthetics have prompted the development of all-ceramic restorative systems for dental implants, but material strength and restorative costs have presented clinical challenges. Therefore, a new restorative system with tooth-shaped ceramic copings for the anterior and premolar jaw regions has been introduced to address these problems. Fatigue and 17o. compression tests were conducted in vitro to assess the mechanical strength of the 6 tooth-shaped copings and several luting agents of the system. A case report on the clinical use of the components is presented. All 6 tooth-shaped copings significantly exceeded the range of forces associated with restoration in the anterior jaw. Crown-endurance limits for fatigue and 17o. compression were 70% higher and 46% higher, respectively, than the established minimum-fatigue-endurance limits in those categories. In clinical evaluation, the ceramic restorative system performed well and produced excellent results; it has potential for implant restorations in the anterior and premolar regions of the jaw.

  6. Marginal fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using two extraoral CAD/CAM systems in comparison with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Fawaz

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two extraoral computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) systems, in comparison with conventional techniques, on the marginal fit of monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic crowns. Study design This is an in vitro interventional study. Place and duration of study The study was carried out at the Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia, from December 2015 to April 2016. Methodology A marginal gap of 60 lithium disilicate crowns was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. In total, 20 pressable lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press [Ivoclar Vivadent]) ceramic crowns were fabricated using the conventional lost-wax technique as a control group. The experimental all-ceramic crowns were produced based on a scan stone model and milled using two extraoral CAD/CAM systems: the Cerec group was fabricated using the Cerec CAD/CAM system, and the Trios group was fabricated using Trios CAD and milled using Wieland Zenotec CAM. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Scheffe post hoc test were used for statistical comparison of the groups (α=0.05). Results The mean (±standard deviation) of the marginal gap of each group was as follows: the Control group was 91.15 (±15.35) µm, the Cerec group was 111.07 (±6.33) µm, and the Trios group was 60.17 (±11.09) µm. One-way ANOVA and the Scheffe post hoc test showed a statistically significant difference in the marginal gap between all groups. Conclusion It can be concluded from the current study that all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using the CAD/CAM system, show a marginal accuracy that is acceptable in clinical environments. The Trios CAD group displayed the smallest marginal gap. PMID:28352204

  7. Simulation of clinical fractures for three different all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Øilo, Marit; Kvam, Ketil; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of fracture strength and fracture modes of different all-ceramic crown systems is not straightforward. Established methods for reliable testing of all-ceramic crowns are not currently available. Published in-vitro tests rarely simulate clinical failure modes and are therefore unsuited to distinguish between the materials. The in-vivo trials usually lack assessment of failure modes. Fractographic analyses show that clinical crowns usually fail from cracks initiating in the cervical margins, whereas in-vitro specimens fail from contact damage at the occlusal loading point. The aim of this study was to compare three all-ceramic systems using a clinically relevant test method that is able to simulate clinical failure modes. Ten incisor crowns of three types of all-ceramic systems were exposed to soft loading until fracture. The initiation and propagation of cracks in these crowns were compared with those of a reference group of crowns that failed during clinical use. All crowns fractured in a manner similar to fracture of the clinical reference crowns. The zirconia crowns fractured at statistically significantly higher loads than alumina and glass-ceramic crowns. Fracture initiation was in the core material, cervically in the approximal areas. PMID:24698209

  8. Materials design in the performance of all-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Brian R; Pajares, Antonia; Zhang, Yu; Deng, Yan; Polack, Mariano A; Lloyd, Isabel K; Rekow, E Dianne; Thompson, Van P

    2004-06-01

    Results from a systematic study of damage in material structures representing the basic elements of dental crowns are reported. Tests are made on model flat-layer specimens fabricated from various dental ceramic combinations bonded to dentin-like polymer substrates, in bilayer (ceramic/polymer) and trilayer (ceramic/ceramic/polymer) configurations. The specimens are loaded at their top surfaces with spherical indenters, in simulation of occlusal function. The onset of fracture is observed in situ using a video camera system mounted beneath the transparent polymer substrate. Critical loads to induce fracture and deformation at the ceramic top and bottom surfaces are measured as functions of layer thickness and contact duration. Radial cracking at the ceramic undersurface occurs at relatively low loads, especially in thinner layers. Fracture mechanics relations are used to confirm the experimental data trends, and to provide explicit dependencies of critical loads in terms of key variables: material-elastic modulus, hardness, strength and toughness; geometric-layer thicknesses and contact radius. Tougher, harder and (especially) stronger materials show superior damage resistance. Critical loads depend strongly (quadratically) on crown net thickness. The analytic relations provide a sound basis for the materials design of next-generation dental crowns.

  9. Reduction of load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic crowns due to cement aging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglin; Wang, Raorao; Mao, Shuangshuang; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how water aging of the resin cement influences the stress distribution in all-ceramic crowns and if there is an increase in the propensity for crown failure. The failure of all-ceramic crowns attributed to cement degradation was explored using a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Sectioned all-ceramic crown specimens were fabricated of IPS e.max Ceram/e.max Press (CP) and Vita VM9/Cercon zirconia (VZ), and then stored in either air or distilled water for 30 days. Monotonic contact loads were applied to fracture near the buccal cusp ridge of each sample. Deformation within the crown layers during loading was analyzed by means of Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A 3D finite element model of the restoration including veneer, core, cement and tooth substrate was developed to evaluate the stress distribution in the crowns before and after cement degradation. There was a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the critical fracture load and a change in the fracture mode after cement water absorption in the CP crowns. In contrast, there was no significant influence of cement aging on fracture modes and fracture loads (p>0.05) in the VZ crowns. Finite element analysis showed that regardless of the crown types, the stress distribution is identical by degradation in Young's modulus of the cement. However, core/substrate debonding results in a change of the stress distribution and a significant increase in the magnitude. Water aging causes reduction of stiffness and bonding strength of cement agents. Degradation in bonding strength and stiffness could potentially lead to stress redistribution in the restored crown and reduce the load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic restorations after years of service.

  10. Two-piece zirconia implants supporting all-ceramic crowns: A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Cionca, Norbert; Müller, Nada; Mombelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this prospective clinical study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a new all-ceramic implant system to replace missing teeth in partially edentulous patients. Material and methods Thirty-two partially edentulous, systemically healthy patients were treated with 49 two-piece zirconia implants (ZERAMEX® T Implant System). Zirconia abutments were connected with adhesive resin cement. Single-unit full-ceramic crowns were cemented. The cases have been followed for 588±174 days after loading (range 369–889 days). All patients have been re-evaluated 1 year after loading. Results The cumulative survival rate 1 year after loading was 87% implants. All failures were the result of aseptic loosening, and no implants were lost after the first year. The results of the other cases were good, and the patients were very satisfied. The cumulative soft tissue complication rate was 0%, the cumulative technical complication rate was 4% implants, the cumulative complication rate for bone loss >2 mm was 0%, and the cumulative esthetic complication rate was 0%. Including the data from 20 patients treated with an earlier version of the system, an over-all 2-year cumulative survival rate of 86% was calculated for a total of 76 two-piece zirconia implants supporting all-ceramic crowns in 52 patients. Conclusions Replacement of single teeth in the posterior area was possible with this new full-ceramic implant system. Failures were due to aseptic loosening. PMID:24666352

  11. CAD/CAM fabricated single-unit all-ceramic post–core–crown restoration

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Chanana, Pallavi

    2011-01-01

    This case report explains about an innovative treatment strategy for the management of damaged anterior teeth with reduced incisal clearance by means of a single-unit all-ceramic post–core–crown zirconia ceramic restoration fabricated by Computer-aided designing and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. The reinforced zirconia ceramics allow fabrication of durable esthetic restorations in cases with high functional loading and the unification of the post, core, and crown in a single unit decreases the frequency of failure by creating a monobloc effect. In addition, the use of CAD/CAM technology for designing and fabricating ceramic restorations offers the option of expeditiously preparing these high-strength all-ceramic restorations. PMID:21691515

  12. Effect of Resin Bonded Luting Agents Influencing Marginal Discrepancy in All Ceramic Complete Veneer Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamoorthy, Anusha; Ranganathan, Hemalatha; Murthykumar, Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Marginal discrepancy severely affects the long term success of All ceramic complete veneer crowns. The precise role of resin luting agents influencing this phenomenon needs to be explored further. Aim To estimate and compare the marginal discrepancy in CAD/CAM processed All ceramic complete veneer crowns prior and following luting with resin bonded luting agents. Materials and Methods Extracted human maxillary first premolars were randomly allocated into four groups of 27 samples each Viz., Group I-Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) (RelyX), Group II-Bis-GMA based dual cure resin cement (Variolink II), Group III-PMMA based resin cement (Superbond), Group IV- Urethane Dimethacrylate resin cement (Calibra). Following tooth preparation, CAD/CAM All ceramic complete veneer crowns were fabricated and sectioned and marginal discrepancy was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (TESCAN, Magnification power-1,00,000x) prior and after luting with the experimental resin cements. Results The vertical and horizontal discrepancy before and after cementation with Group I [270.08±103.10μm, 165.3±53.00μm and 270.86±102.70μm, 166.62±54.96μm respectively]; Group II [254.21±79.20μm, 117.75±24.29μm and 234.81±79μm, 116.89±18.22μm respectively]; Group III [272.47±86.25μm, 142.08±50.83μm and 251.82±62.69μm, 136.07±44.95μm respectively]; Group IV were [260.28±64.81μm, 116.98±17.71μm and 233.08±69.44μm, 116.58±21.13μm respectively]. ANOVA inferred a statistically significant difference between the four test specimen with regards to vertical and horizontal marginal discrepancy after cementation (F=9.092, p<0.001), (F=10.97, p<0.001). Tukey HSD Post-hoc test observed significant differences in vertical and horizontal marginal discrepancies between the resin modified glass ionomer and resin cements (p<0.05). Conclusion Resin cements exhibited a greater reduction in the marginal discrepancy than the resin modified glass ionomer

  13. Micro-CT evaluation of the marginal fit of CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenes, Christian

    Objectives: Evaluate the marginal fit of CAD/CAM all ceramic crowns made from lithium disilicate and zirconia using two different fabrication protocols (model and model-less). METHODS: Forty anterior all ceramic restorations (20 lithium disilicate, 20 zirconia) were fabricated using a CEREC Bluecam scanner. Two different fabrication methods were used: a full digital approach and a printed model. Completed crowns were cemented and marginal gap was evaluated using Micro-CT. Each specimen was analyzed in sagittal and trans-axial orientations, allowing a 360° evaluation of the vertical and horizontal fit. RESULTS: Vertical measurements in the lingual, distal and mesial views had and estimated marginal gap from 101.9 to 133.9 microns for E-max crowns and 126.4 to 165.4 microns for zirconia. No significant differences were found between model and model-less techniques. CONCLUSION: Lithium disilicate restorations exhibited a more accurate and consistent marginal adaptation when compared to zirconia crowns. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing model or model-less approaches.

  14. Wear of primary teeth caused by opposed all-ceramic or stainless steel crowns

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ik-Hyun; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Ju, Sung-Won; Lee, Tae-Kyoung; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of full-coverage all-ceramic zirconia, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, leucite glass-ceramic, or stainless steel crowns on antagonistic primary tooth wear. MATERIALS AND METHODS There were four study groups: the stainless steel (Steel) group, the leucite glass-ceramic (Leucite) group, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (Lithium) group, and the monolithic zirconia (Zirconia) group. Ten flat crown specimens were prepared per group; opposing teeth were prepared using primary canines. A wear test was conducted over 100,000 chewing cycles using a dual-axis chewing simulator and a 50 N masticating force, and wear losses of antagonistic teeth and restorative materials were calculated using a three-dimensional profiling system and an electronic scale, respectively. Statistical significance was determined using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P<.05). RESULTS The Leucite group (2.670±1.471 mm3) showed the greatest amount of antagonist tooth wear, followed by in decreasing order by the Lithium (2.042±0.696 mm3), Zirconia (1.426±0.477 mm3), and Steel groups (0.397±0.192 mm3). Mean volume losses in the Leucite and Lithium groups were significantly greater than in the Steel group (P<.05). No significant difference was observed between mean volume losses in the Zirconia and Steel groups (P>.05). CONCLUSION Leucite glass-ceramic and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic cause more primary tooth wear than stainless steel or zirconia. PMID:26949487

  15. Fracture load of implant-supported zirconia all-ceramic crowns luted with various cements.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yoo, Jeong-Min; Park, Sang-Won; Yang, Hong-So

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the fracture load and failure types of implant-supported zirconia all-ceramic crowns cemented with various luting agents. The ceramic frameworks were fabricated from a presintered yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide block using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing technology, and were then veneered with feldspathic porcelain. Three luting agents were used. Composite resin cement (1,560.78 +/- 39.43 N) showed the highest mean fracture load, followed by acrylic/urethane cement (1,116.20 +/- 77.32 N) and zinc oxide eugenol cement (741.21 +/- 41.95 N) (P < .05). The types of failure varied between groups.

  16. The Comparative Evaluation of the Translucency of Crowns Fabricated with Three Different All-Ceramic Materials: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Y.V.; Rathod, Asha M.; Ram, Sabita M.; Turakhia, Hetal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: All-ceramic crowns with different core materials of different strength and aesthetics are available in recent years. The aesthetics of the crown depends mainly on the shade and translucency. Clinician should be aware of the quality and characteristics of these materials so that they will be able to opt for good material for successful clinical use. Aim and Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the translucency of crowns fabricated with three different commercially available all-ceramic materials viz. Alumina - CAD-CAM Procera, Lithium disilicate - Pressable IPS e.max Press, Zirconia - CAD-CAM Lava. Materials and Methods: All-ceramic crowns (5 per each group and total of 15 samples) were made of Alumina – CAD-CAM Procera (Group I), Lithium disilicate – Pressable IPS e.max Press (Group II), Zirconia – CAD-CAM Lava (Group III) and veneered with their respective layering ceramic. Evaluation for the Translucency (CR=Yb/Yw) over the White (Yw) and Black (Yb) backgrounds at the Incisal, Middle, Cervical, Mesial and Distal thirds of each crown were done using the Spectrophotometer. The results obtained were statistically analyzed by Paired t-test (p<0.05) and Analysis of Variance (p<0.05) for the test of significance among the groups. Results: Significant differences in the contrast ratios were obtained among the three Groups (p<0.001). In this study, Group II Lithium disilicate–Pressable IPS e.max Press showed higher translucency (0.54). Group III Zirconia – CAD-CAM Lava showed the least translucency (0.75) and the translucency of Group I Alumina – CAD-CAM Procera (0.7) was in between both the groups. Conclusion: Translucency of material gives fair idea to clinician for the choice of material in different zones during replacement and suitability for restoration in aesthetic zone. Selection of all ceramic system depends on the translucency needed for successful prosthesis of artificial tooth so that it mimics patient

  17. Veneer vs. core failure in adhesively bonded all-ceramic crown layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J-W; Kwon, J-Y; Bhowmick, S; Lloyd, I K; Rekow, E D; Lawn, B R

    2008-04-01

    Joining a brittle veneer to a strong ceramic core with an adhesive offers potential benefits over current fabrication methods for all-ceramic crowns. We tested the hypothesis that such joining can withstand subsurface radial cracking in the veneer, from enhanced flexure in occlusal loading, as well as in the core. Critical conditions to initiate fractures were investigated in model crown-like layer structures consisting of glass veneers epoxy-joined onto alumina or zirconia cores, all bonded to a dentin-like polymer base. The results showed a competition between critical loads for radial crack initiation in the veneers and cores. Core radial cracking was relatively independent of adhesive thickness. Zirconia cores were much less susceptible to fracture than alumina, attributable to a relatively high strength and low modulus. Veneer cracking did depend on adhesive thickness. However, no significant differences in critical loads for veneer cracking were observed for specimens containing alumina or zirconia cores.

  18. Fracture Analysis of an All-Ceramic Bearing System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    APPLICATION Miniature all- ceramic (NBD-200 silicon nitride) gimbal and spin bearings were developed for a common IR seeker, Figure 1, to be employed in the...as both a free gyro and optics system for the seeker. The main driving force behind the development of the all- ceramic bearings was to increase bearing ...sufficient for this ceramic bearing application. 1) Develop a machining procedure specifically for the raceways. 2) Reduce the material removal rate

  19. Tissue management and retraction technique combined with all-ceramic crowns: case reports.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Nathanson, D

    1995-04-01

    The need to preserve the gingival health during impression making for laboratory fabricated prostheses has been emphasized in literature and clinical practice. This article presents the placement of all-ceramic crowns utilizing a relatively new soft tissue retraction material, a polymer, cut into 2 mm wide strips. The sponge-like texture of the material expands with moisture and exerts gentle pressure on the gingival tissue, effecting a retraction for impressions. The gingival tissue returns to its original position within 24 hours. The learning objective of this article is to share the experience and observations of this procedure and the materials utilized. Several case reports are presented to illustrate the clinical procedure and the results obtained.

  20. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core build-up. The color measurements of all-ceramic crowns were made before try-in, before and after cementation. A repeated measure ANOVA was used for a statistical analysis of a color change of all-ceramic crowns at α=.05. Twenty four zirconia specimens, with different core thicknesses (0.4-1 mm) were also prepared to obtain the contrast ratio of zirconia materials after veneering. RESULTS L*, a*, and b* values of all-ceramic crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or on a prefabricated post did not show significant changes (P>.05). However, the slight color changes of zirconia crowns were detected and represented by ΔE*ab values, ranging from 1.2 to 3.1. The contrast ratios of zirconia specimens were 0.92-0.95 after veneering. CONCLUSION No significant differences were observed between the L*, a*, and b* values of zirconia crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or a prefabricated post and composite core. However, the color of a background substructure could affect the overall color of posterior zirconia restorations with clinically recommended core thickness according to ΔE*ab values. PMID:24049574

  1. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated canines restored with different sizes of fiber post and all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Alkumru, Hasan Necdet; Akalin, Buket

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the fracture resistance and the mode of fracture of endodontically treated teeth restored with different fiber posts and all-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two glass fiber reinforced post systems in two different sizes and polyethylene fiber ribbon in two different thicknesses (n=10) were used. The specimens, restored with all-ceramic crowns, were subjected to a compressive load (in N) delivered at a 130-degree angle to the long axis until a fracture could be noted. The results were analyzed statistically with a One-Way ANOVA test (P<.05). RESULTS Statistically significant differences were observed between the mean fracture resistance values of Postec, Snowlight, and Kerr Connect thin specimens (P<.0095). The Postec results (395.70 N) were found to be significantly higher than the others. No statistical difference was observed among the thick specimens (P<.2657). The mean fracture resistance values of the Snowlight thick samples were found to be higher than those of the Snowlight thin samples. The specimens were always fractured around the cemento-enamel junction at the palatinal side. No post fracture was observed for the thin Snowlight and Kerr Connect specimens or for the thick Postec and Kerr Connect specimens. Among the common failure types of the specimens, the worst was observed to be the root fracture failure. The highest post dislodgement failure result (80%) was obtained from the thin Kerr Connect specimen. CONCLUSION In terms of optimizing fracture resistance, the fiber post size selection should be done according to the forces applied to the restored teeth. PMID:27141261

  2. Influence of cyclic loading on the fracture toughness and load bearing capacities of all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rao-Rao; Lu, Cheng-Lin; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how cyclic loading influenced the fracture toughness of hot-press lithium disilicate and zirconia core materials and whether there was an increase in the propensity for crown failure. Two types of all-ceramic crowns including the IPS e.max Press system (n=24) and the Lava zirconia system (n=24), were selected. Sectioned specimens were subjected to cyclic loading with the maximum magnitude of 200 N (R=0.1) until two million cycles. The material properties including Young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) and the fracture toughness (KIC) of the core materials were evaluated using indentation methods (n=12 each). The load-bearing capacities of the specimens were examined by means of monotonic load to fracture (n=12 each). It was found that the material properties, including E, H and KIC, of the two types of dental ceramics, were reduced. Statistical analysis indicated that there were no significant influences of fatigue loading on material properties E and H for both types of dental ceramics or KIC for zirconia, while for the IPS e.max Press core, KIC, which was parallel to the direction of the lithium disilicate crystals, was significantly reduced (P=0.001). A conclusion was drawn that zirconia possesses high mechanical reliability and sustainable capacity to resist fatigue loading, while fatigue loading remarkably degraded the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of hot-press lithium disilicate ceramics. PMID:24335786

  3. Fit of zirconia all-ceramic crowns with different cervical margin designs, before and after porcelain firing and glazing.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shoko; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kasahara, Shin; Yoda, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the fit of zirconia cores and all-ceramic crowns prepared with different cervical margin designs. The radius of curvature between the axial wall and the occlusal surface was set to 1 mm in an abutment using the cervical shoulder marginal design (S) and to 0.2 and 0.5 mm in abutments with round shoulders (0.2RS and 0.5RS, respectively). The internal gaps of the cores were 45-138 μm (S), 41-141 μm (0.2RS), and 43-133 μm (0.5RS). The internal gaps of the all-ceramic crowns were 40-115 μm (S), 45-113 μm (0.2RS), and 42-126 μm (0.5RS). There were no significant differences in one-way ANOVA for any region in any marginal design before and after firing the porcelain. The marginal gaps between the all-ceramic crowns and dies were 27 ± 25 (S), 30 ± 29 (0.2RS), and 24 ± 27 μm (0.5RS), again with no significant differences in one-way ANOVA.

  4. Esthetic restoration of infra-occluded retained primary mandibular incisors with all-ceramic crowns in adult dentition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Shen, Yu-Fu

    2004-12-01

    The prevalence of hypodontia is reported to be between 1.5% to 10% in the permanent dentition. In the anterior teeth, maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular central incisors are the most frequently involved teeth. This causes esthetic problems for the patient. Several reports have focused on restoration of retained maxillary primary anterior teeth, but none have described restoration of retained mandibular primary incisors. This clinical report describes the restoration of infra-occluded retained primary mandibular central incisors of a 17 year-old girl diagnosed with hypodontia. All-ceramic crowns made with computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing technology were used to restore the teeth incisally and interproximally. Due to a relatively short root length and inadequate crown-root ratio, the primary mandibular central incisors were splinted and adjusted to distribute the protrusive force evenly across the maxillary and mandibular incisors. Functional and esthetic results were achieved.

  5. A comparison of all-ceramic restorative systems: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    Overall, any of these systems can provide well-fitting, natural looking restorations as long as care is taken during the preparation and fabrication procedures. A key to successful use of all-ceramic materials is proper selection based on the clinical conditions involved in specific restorative procedures (see table). All systems have limitations on their use and when we try to stretch those limits, success rates may fall drastically. High stress areas should shift selection to high strength, clinically documented materials. Low stress areas requiring high translucency may be restored successfully using the lower strength castable glasses. Intermediate areas may shift selection to higher strength yet still translucent materials such as In-Ceram Spinell or Empress 2. Posterior regions might best be addressed with the use of In-Ceram Alumina or Procera. The case of posterior bridges would lock the selection into In-Ceram Zirconia. Finally, it is important for each of us to continually educate ourselves and to examine the evidence in order to make an informed decision and maximize clinical success.

  6. Thickness of immediate dentin sealing materials and its effect on the fracture load of a reinforced all-ceramic crown

    PubMed Central

    Spohr, Ana Maria; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Platt, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate, in vitro, the thickness of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) materials on full crown preparations and its effect on the fracture load of a reinforced all-ceramic crown. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars received full crown preparation and were divided into the following groups according to the IDS technique: G1-control; G2-Clearfil SE Bond; and G3-Clearfil SE Bond and Protect Liner F. After the impressions were taken, the preparations were temporized with acrylic resin crowns. IPS empress 2 restorations were fabricated and later cemented on the preparations with Panavia F. 10 specimens from each group were submitted to fracture load testing. The other 10 specimens were sectioned buccolingually before the thicknesses of Panavia F, Clearfil SE Bond and Protect Liner F were measured in 10 different positions using a microscope. Results: According to analysis of variance and Tukey's test, the fracture load of Group 3 (1300 N) was significantly higher than that of Group 1 (1001 N) (P < 0.01). Group 2 (1189 N) was not significantly different from Groups 1 and 3. The higher thickness of Clearfil SE Bond was obtained in the concave part of the preparation. Protect Liner F presented a more uniform range of values at different positions. The thickness of Panavia F was higher in the occlusal portion of the preparation. Conclusions: The film thickness formed by the IDS materials is influenced by the position under the crown, suggesting its potential to increase the fracture load of the IPS empress 2 ceramic crowns. PMID:24932124

  7. Standards of teeth preparations for anterior resin bonded all-ceramic crowns in private dental practice in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    AL-DWAIRI, Ziad Nawaf; AL-HIYASAT, Ahmad Saleh; ABOUD, Haitham

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate if general dental practitioners (GDPs) in private practice in Jordan follow universal guidelines for preparation of anterior teeth for resin bonded all-ceramic crowns (RBCs). Material and Methods A sample (n=100) of laboratory models containing 208 tooth preparations for IPS Empress and In Ceram, featuring work from different GDPs, was obtained from 8 commercial dental laboratories. Aspects of preparations were quantified and compared with accepted criteria defined following a review of the literature and recommendations of the manufactures' guidelines. Results Subgingival margins on the buccal aspect were noticed in 36% of the preparations, 54% demonstrated overpreparation with a tendency to overprepare the teeth on the mesiodistal plane more than buccolingual plane. Twenty percent of samples presented a shoulder finish line while a chamfer margin design was noticed in 39%. Twenty-nine percent and 12% of samples had either a feathered or no clear margin design respectively. Incisal under preparation was observed in 18% of dies of each type. Only 17% of all preparations were found to follow the recommended anatomical labial preparations while 29% of the RBC preparations were found to have the recommended axial convergence angle. In total, 43% of preparations were found to have the recommended depth of the finish line. Conclusions It was found that relevant guidelines for RBC preparations were not being fully adhered to in private practice in Jordan. PMID:21710098

  8. Fracture resistance of a selection of full-contour all-ceramic crowns: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zesewitz, Tim F; Knauber, Andreas W; Northdurft, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic single crowns made from zirconia (ZI), lithium disilicate (LS2), or feldspar ceramic (FC). Five groups of crowns representing a maxillary first molar were made with the appropriate dimensions according to the manufacturer's instructions. The ZI and LS2 crowns were luted adhesively or cemented conventionally on a metal abutment tooth analog. The feldspar ceramic crowns were luted adhesively. All specimens underwent axial loading until fracture. The crowns in the ZI groups possessed the highest fracture resistance independent of the mode of fixation.

  9. In Vitro Evaluation and Comparison of the Translucency of Two Different All-Ceramic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the translucency of two different all-ceramic systems using Vita Easyshade digital shade matching device in an in vitro model. Materials and methods Translucency of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press) and zirconia all-ceramic system (Ceramill ZI) were evaluated and compared. A total of 5 square-shaped specimens with 0.5 mm thickness were fabricated from each ceramic system in A1 shade according to Vitapan Classical shade tab. Specimens were then veneered and glazed with corresponding veneer ceramics recommended by each system manufacturer and the total thickness was set to 1.5 mm. Translucency was evaluated using VITA Easyshade in two stages: before and after veneering and glazing on black and white background. Translucency parameter (TP) was calculated. A one-way ANOVA and Bonferonni tests were used when appropriate (α=0.05). Results Lithium disilicate glass-ceramic was significantly more translucent than the zirconia system in both stages (P<0.05). Translucency of all specimens was significantly decreased after veneering and glazing in both all-ceramic systems (P<0.05). Conclusion The translucency of two different dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and stages of preparation. Within the limitations of the experiment, these results can be valuable and help the clinician to make appropriate esthetic decisions. PMID:27688403

  10. Effect of resin coating on adhesion and microleakage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing fabricated all-ceramic crowns after occlusal loading: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Shuzo; Pilecki, Peter; Nasser, Nasser A; Bravis, Theodora; Wilson, Ron F; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Watson, Timothy F; Foxton, Richard M

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of resin coating and occlusal loading on adhesion and microleakage of all-ceramic crowns. Molars were prepared for an all-ceramic crown and were divided into two groups: non-coated (control) and resin-coated with Clearfil Tri-S Bond. Crowns were fabricated using CEREC 3 and cemented using Clearfil Esthetic Cement. After 24 h of storage in water, the restored teeth in each group were divided into two subgroups: unloaded, or loaded while stored in water. Mechanical loading was achieved with an axial force of 80 N at 2.5 cycles s(-1) for 250,000 cycles. After immersion in Rhodamine B, the specimens were sectioned and processed for microleakage evaluation by confocal microscopy, which was followed by further sectioning for microtensile bond testing. Loading had no significant effect on microleakage in either the resin-coated or non-resin-coated groups. Resin coating did not reduce the microleakage at the dentine interface but increased the microleakage at the enamel interface. All the beams fractured during slicing when non-coated and loaded. The bond strengths of non-coated and unloaded, resin-coated and unloaded, and resin-coated and loaded groups were 15.82 +/- 4.22, 15.17 +/- 5.24, and 12.97 +/- 5.82 MPa, respectively. Resin coating with Clearfil Tri-S Bond improved the bonding of resin cement to dentine for loaded specimens. However, it was not effective in reducing the microleakage, regardless of whether it was loaded or unloaded.

  11. Influence of finish line in the distribution of stress trough an all ceramic implant-supported crown.

    PubMed Central

    SANNINO, G.; GLORIA, F.; OTTRIA, L.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Porpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by finite element analysis (FEA), the influence of finish line on stress distribution and resistance to the loads of a ZrO2 crown and porcelain in implant-supported. Material and methods. The object of this analysis consisted of a fxture, an abutment, a passing screw, a layer of cement, a framework crown, a feldspatic porcelain veneering. The abutment’s marginal design was used in 3 different types of preparation: feather edge, slight chamfer and 50°, each of them was of 1 mm depth over the entire circumference. The ZrO2Y-TZP coping was 0.6 mm thick. Two material matching for the abutment and the framework was used for the simulations: ZrO2 framework and ZrO2 abutment, ZrO2 framework and T abutment. A 600 N axial force distributed over the entire surface of the crown was applied. The numerical simulations with finite elements were used to verify the different distribution of equivalent von Mises stress for three different geometries of abutment and framework. Results Slight chamfer on the matching ZrO2 - ZrO2 is the geometry with minimum equivalent stress of von Mises. Even for T abutment and ZrO2 framework slight chamfer is the best configuration to minimize the localized stress. Geometry that has the highest average stress is one with abutment at 50°, we see a downward trend for all three configurations using only zirconium for both components. Conclusions Finite element analysis. performed for the manifacturing of implant-supported crown, gives exact geometric guide lines about the choice of chamfer preparation, while the analysis of other marginal geometries suggests a possible improved behavior of the mating between ZrO2 abutment and ZrO2 coping. for three different geometries of the abutment and the coping. PMID:23285359

  12. Chairside Fabrication of an All-Ceramic Partial Crown Using a Zirconia-Reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Pabel, Anne-Kathrin; Rödiger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The chairside fabrication of a monolithic partial crown using a zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic is described. The fully digitized model-free workflow in a dental practice is possible due to the use of a powder-free intraoral scanner and the computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of the restorations. The innovative ZLS material offers a singular combination of fracture strength (>370 Mpa), optimum polishing characteristics, and excellent optical properties. Therefore, this ceramic is an interesting alternative material for monolithic restorations produced in a digital workflow. PMID:27042362

  13. Comparison of the translucency of shaded zirconia all-ceramic systems

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Mutahhar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the translucency of shaded zirconia all-ceramic systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS Translucency of 3 different zirconia all-ceramic systems colored by different techniques was compared with a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press). Square-shaped specimens with 0.5 mm thickness were fabricated from In-Ceram YZ, ICE Zirkon and Katana systems in A1, A2 and A3.5 shades according to Vitapan Classical shade tab (n=11). Specimens were then veneered and glazed with corresponding veneer ceramic recommended by each zirconia system manufacturer and the total thickness was set to 1.5 mm. Translucency measurements were performed with VITA Easyshade Compact spectrophotometer after each stage and translucency parameter was calculated. Data were statistically analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison test. RESULTS The control group was significantly more translucent than the zirconia systems (P<.05). ICE Zirkon cores showed the least translucency; neither In-Ceram YZ nor Katana systems were superior to each other in terms of translucency. Translucency of all specimens was decreased after veneering, and the translucency rankings were changed. CONCLUSION Coloring technique did not have a significant effect on translucency of zirconia cores. Although zirconia systems were less translucent than lithium disilicate glass ceramic, they had partial translucency and there were translucency differences among the zirconia systems. Chroma affected the translucency of precolored zirconia cores. PMID:25352964

  14. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  15. Esthetic and Clinical Performance of Implant-Supported All-Ceramic Crowns Made with Prefabricated or CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments.

    PubMed

    Wittneben, J G; Gavric, J; Belser, U C; Bornstein, M M; Joda, T; Chappuis, V; Sailer, I; Brägger, U

    2017-02-01

    Patients' esthetic expectations are increasing, and the options of the prosthetic pathways are currently evolving. The objective of this randomized multicenter clinical trial was to assess and compare the esthetic outcome and clinical performance of anterior maxillary all-ceramic implant crowns (ICs) based either on prefabricated zirconia abutments veneered with pressed ceramics or on CAD/CAM zirconia abutments veneered with hand buildup technique. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Forty implants were inserted in sites 14 to 24 (FDI) in 40 patients in 2 centers, the Universities of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland. After final impression, 20 patients were randomized into group A, restored with a 1-piece screw-retained single crown made of a prefabricated zirconia abutment with pressed ceramic as the veneering material using the cut-back technique, or group B using an individualized CAD/CAM zirconia abutment (CARES abutment; Institut Straumann AG) with a hand buildup technique. At baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y clinical, esthetic and radiographic parameters were assessed. Group A exhibited 1 dropout patient and 1 failure, resulting in a survival rate of 94.7% after 1 y, in comparison to 100% for group B. No other complications occurred. Clinical parameters presented stable and healthy peri-implant soft tissues. Overall, no or only minimal crestal bone changes were observed with a mean DIB (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) of -0.15 mm (group A) and 0.12 mm (group B) at 1 y. There were no significant differences at baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y for DIB values between the 2 groups. Pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) values at all 3 examinations indicated stability over time for both groups and pleasing esthetic outcomes. Both implant-supported prosthetic pathways represent a valuable treatment option for the restoration of single ICs in the anterior maxilla

  16. CAD/CAM generated all-ceramic primary telescopic prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kurbad, A; Ganz, S; Kurbad, S

    2012-01-01

    Computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have proven effective not only for the manufacture of crown and bridge frameworks, inlays, onlays and veneers, but also for the generation of all-ceramic primary telescopic prostheses in more than 10 years of use in dental technology. The new InLab 4.0 software generation makes it possible to design and mill primary telescopic prostheses with CAD/CAM technology. The computer-generated raw crowns for these restorations require very little manual adaptation. The secondary crowns are manufactured by electroforming and bonded onto the tertiary structure or framework.

  17. A 3-year follow-up study of all-ceramic single and multiple crowns performed in a private practice: a prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Sidoti, Ernesto; Sforza, Chiarella

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Zirconia-based prostheses are commonly used for aesthetic crown and fixed restorations, although follow-up data are limited, especially for implant-supported crowns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the three-year clinical results of the installation of 463 zirconia core crowns by a general dental private practice. METHODS: This study followed 142 patients (69 men and 73 women; aged 28-82 years) who had received 248 single crowns (202 tooth-supported, 36 implant-supported) and 225 multiple units of up to six elements (81 tooth-supported, 144 implant-supported). Clinical events, including fracture and loss of retention, secondary caries, and marginal integrity, were recorded. The overall failure rate was computed for the fractured and lost prostheses. Aesthetic, functional, and biological properties were rated, and patient satisfaction was investigated. RESULTS: During the three-year follow-up period, four patients were lost from the study (18 crowns, 4% of the total crowns). Three of the zirconia prostheses suffered fractures in more than three units (11 crowns; one- vs. three-year follow-up, p<0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test), and the cumulative prosthesis survival rate was 98.2%. Twelve units lost retention and were re-cemented, and no secondary caries of the abutment teeth were reported. The aesthetic, functional, and biological properties were generally well-rated, and there were no differences between tooth- and implant-supported crowns. The lowest scores were given regarding the anatomical form of the crowns, as some minor chipping was reported. Relatively low scores were also given for the periodontal response and the adjacent mucosa. Overall, patient satisfaction was high. CONCLUSIONS: At the three-year follow-up, the zirconia-core crowns appeared to be an effective clinical solution as they had favorable aesthetic and functional properties. Only the marginal fit of the prostheses should be improved upon. PMID:22189731

  18. Restoration of Endodontically Treated Molars Using All Ceramic Endocrowns

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Roopak Bose; Thomas Nainan, Mohan; Pradhan, Shamina; Roshni Sharma; Benjamin, Shiny; Rose, Rajani

    2013-01-01

    Clinical success of endodontically treated posterior teeth is determined by the postendodontic restoration. Several options have been proposed to restore endodontically treated teeth. Endocrowns represent a conservative and esthetic restorative alternative to full coverage crowns. The preparation consists of a circular equigingival butt-joint margin and central retention cavity into the entire pulp chamber constructing both the crown and the core as a single unit. The case reports discussed here are moderately damaged endodontically treated molars restored using all ceramic endocrowns fabricated using two different systems, namely, CAD/CAM and pressed ceramic. PMID:24455318

  19. Clinical fit of all-ceramic three-unit fixed partial dentures, generated with three different CAD/CAM systems.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Wichmann, Manfred; Nkenke, Emeka; Proeschel, Peter

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the hypothesis was tested that the marginal and internal fit of CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPDs) can be as good as in metal-ceramic FPDs. Twenty-four all-ceramic FPDs were fabricated and randomly subdivided into three equally sized groups. Eight frameworks were fabricated using the Digident CAD/CAM system (DIGI), another eight frameworks using the Cerec Inlab system (INLA). Vita Inceram Zirkonia blanks were used for both groups. In a third group frameworks were milled from yttrium-stabilized Zirconium blanks using the Lava system (LAVA). All frameworks were layered with ceramic veneering material. In addition, six three-unit metal-ceramic FPDs served as control group. All FPDs were evaluated using a replica technique with a light body silicone stabilized with a heavy body material. The replica samples were examined under microscope. The medians of marginal gaps were 75 microm for DIGI, 65 microm for LAVA and INLA and 54 microm for the conventional FPDs. Only the DIGI data differed significantly from those of the conventional FPDs. Within the limits of this study, the results suggest that the accuracy of CAD/CAM generated three-unit FPDs is satisfactory for clinical use.

  20. In vitro chipping behaviour of all-ceramic crowns with a zirconia framework and feldspathic veneering: comparison of CAD/CAM-produced veneer with manually layered veneer.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, M; Mueller, D; Rues, S

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the breaking load of zirconia-based crowns veneered with either CAD/CAM-produced or manually layered feldspathic ceramic. Thirty-two identical zirconia frameworks (Sirona inCoris ZI, mono L F1), 0·6 mm thick with an anatomically shaped occlusal area, were constructed (Sirona inLab 3.80). Sixteen of the crowns were then veneered by the use of CAD/CAM-fabricated feldspathic ceramic (CEREC Bloc, Sirona) and 16 by the use of hand-layered ceramic. The CAD/CAM-manufactured veneer was attached to the frameworks by the use of Panavia 2.0 (Kuraray). Half of the specimens were loaded until failure without artificial ageing; the other half of the specimens underwent thermal cycling and cyclic loading (1·2 million chewing cycles, force magnitude F(max) = 108 N) before the assessment of the ultimate load. To investigate the new technique further, finite element (FE) computations were conducted on the basis of the original geometry. Statistical assessment was made by the use of non-parametric tests. Initial breaking load was significantly higher in the hand-layered group than in the CAD/CAM group (mean: 1165·86 N versus 395·45 N). During chewing simulation, however, 87·5% (7/8) of the crowns in the hand-layered group failed, whereas no crown in the CAD/CAM group failed. The CAD/CAM-produced veneer was significantly less sensitive to ageing than the hand-layered veneer.

  1. Thermal/mechanical simulation and laboratory fatigue testing of an alternative yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal core-veneer all-ceramic layered crown design.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Rafferty, Brian; Zavanelli, Ricardo A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Rekow, Elizabeth D; Thompson, Van P; Coelho, Paulo G

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the stress levels at the core layer and the veneer layer of zirconia crowns (comprising an alternative core design vs. a standard core design) under mechanical/thermal simulation, and subjected simulated models to laboratory mouth-motion fatigue. The dimensions of a mandibular first molar were imported into computer-aided design (CAD) software and a tooth preparation was modeled. A crown was designed using the space between the original tooth and the prepared tooth. The alternative core presented an additional lingual shoulder that lowered the veneer bulk of the cusps. Finite element analyses evaluated the residual maximum principal stresses fields at the core and veneer of both designs under loading and when cooled from 900 degrees C to 25 degrees C. Crowns were fabricated and mouth-motion fatigued, generating master Weibull curves and reliability data. Thermal modeling showed low residual stress fields throughout the bulk of the cusps for both groups. Mechanical simulation depicted a shift in stress levels to the core of the alternative design compared with the standard design. Significantly higher reliability was found for the alternative core. Regardless of the alternative configuration, thermal and mechanical computer simulations showed stress in the alternative core design comparable and higher to that of the standard configuration, respectively. Such a mechanical scenario probably led to the higher reliability of the alternative design under fatigue.

  2. Alternative crown systems. Is the metal-ceramic crown always the restoration of choice?

    PubMed

    Wall, J G; Cipra, D L

    1992-07-01

    The metal-ceramic crown system still is selected the most frequently because of its strength and versatility. The ability to select metals for color or strength for single units or fixed partial dentures gives great flexibility, but when esthetics of the anterior region are a prime concern, the all-ceramic crown is still an excellent choice. Choice of which all-ceramic system to use is dependent on the strength demands, esthetic needs, amount of tooth structure that can be preserved, and laboratory support available. Where good tooth structure remains but some color, contour, or incisal length changes are desired, the porcelain laminate veneer is an outstanding esthetic and restorative choice. When good labial tooth structure remains but lingual structure is inadequate, a partial veneer gold crown can be an excellent esthetic choice. If moderate tooth structure is lost or moderate staining is present, the Dicor crown is a superb choice. In those instances in which heavy staining is present, a foil or core system should be considered to completely block out the background colors. As the occlusal forces become more of a factor, selection of a restorative system will depend more on strength than esthetic demands. The aluminous porcelain jacket crown still offers great strength and esthetics at a reasonable price. When most of the color is on the surface of the teeth, or when there is a high translucency to the teeth, Dicor can provide very esthetic results, and the Dicor Plus crown offers the opportunity to develop intrinsic shading. When greater strength is required, selection of a foil and core system is suggested, as might be a system that provides a stronger core material, like Alceram or Inceram. These stronger core materials will render improved flexural and compressive strengths, but some increases in brightness may occur with the increased alumina content of the cores. The future in ceramic restorative dentistry may be in the computer-generated crown if ways

  3. Conservative restorative treatment using a single-visit, all-ceramic CAD/CAM system.

    PubMed

    Benk, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) continues to radically change the way in which the dental team plans, prepares, and fabricates a patient's restoration. This advancing technology offers the clinician the ability to scan the patient's failing dentition and then designs a long-lasting, reliable restoration based on this data. CAD/CAM systems also permit efficient, single-visit placement of the restoration while preserving much of the natural tooth structure. This article discusses how a chairside CAD/CAM system can be used to provide such a restoration in the posterior region in a single-visit.

  4. Contemporary all-ceramic materials, part-1.

    PubMed

    Pilathadka, Shriharsha; Vahalova, Dagmar

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 35 years, multiple types of all-ceramic materials have been introduced as an ideal alternative for metal-fused to ceramic. This review covers state-of-the-art development of all-ceramic systems in terms of history, material composition, fabrication technologies, and structural and strength properties. These materials are proved to be ideal in terms of mechanical properties and biocompatibility, making metal-free ceramic restorations a realistic clinical alternative for conventional metal-fused-to ceramic.

  5. Marginal integrity of turkom-cera compared to other all-ceramic materials: effect of finish line.

    PubMed

    Al-Makramani, Bandar M A; Razak, Abdul A A; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I; Sulaiman, Eshamsul; Loon, Lui Joo; Yahya, Noor Azlin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic crowns compared to In-Ceram and Procera AllCeram systems. The influence of finish line design (chamfer or shoulder) on the marginal adaptation of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic crowns was also investigated. Thirty human premolars were prepared with chamfer margins and assigned to either the Turkom-Cera, In-Ceram, or Procera system group. In addition, 10 premolars were prepared with rounded shoulder finish lines and assigned to an additional Turkom-Cera group. Ceramic copings (0.6-mm thick) were fabricated for each group following the manufacturers' instructions. The copings were seated on abutments using a special holding device that facilitated uniform loading, and marginal adaptation was assessed using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, the Tukey HSD post hoc test, and an independent samples t test. There was a statistically significant difference regarding marginal adaptation among the three all-ceramic systems (P < .05). There were no significant differences in the mean marginal discrepancies of Turkom-Cera crowns among chamfer and shoulder finish line groups (P > .05). Within the limitations of this study, the marginal discrepancies were all within the clinically acceptable standard. Int J Prosthodont 2011;24:379-381.

  6. CAD/CAM systems available for the fabrication of crown and bridge restorations.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, T; Hotta, Y

    2011-06-01

    Dental biomaterials are widely used in all areas of routine dental practice. There are mainly two methods for their application. Firstly, dental biomaterials are placed into living tissues, such as teeth, to fill the space. Secondly, dental devices such as crown and bridge restorations and dentures are fabricated using various materials to restore the morphology and function of the dentition. Crown and bridge restorations are one of the main treatment methods used by general practitioners to achieve lifelike restoration of form and function. The recent introduction of osseointegrated implants has expanded the application of crown and bridge restorations for partially edentulous patients. Mechanical durability and precision fit are mandatory requirements for crowns and bridges. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically 'safe' materials has led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. There is also a growing demand to provide all-ceramic restorations more routinely. New materials such as highly sintered glass, polycrystalline alumina, zirconia based materials and adhesive monomers, will assist dentists to meet this demand. In addition, new fabrication systems combined with computer-assisted fabrication systems (dental CAD/CAM) and various networks are now available. Dental technology was centred on lost-wax casting technology but we now face a revolution in crown and bridge fabrication. This article reviews the history and recent status of dental CAD/CAM, the application of CAD/CAM fabricated tooth-coloured glass ceramic crowns, and the application of all-ceramic crowns and bridges using CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia based frameworks.

  7. Spectrophotometric evaluation of shade reproduction of pressable all-ceramic system on un-stained and stained tooth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Neelam; Kolarkar, Maithili S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the shade reproduction of a pressable all-ceramic system placed on unstained and stained extracted maxillary central incisor using a color measurement spectrophotometer. In addition, to compare shade reproduction of this material with low translucency and medium opacity on unstained tooth and medium and high opacity on stained tooth. Materials and Methods: Total 45 discs, with difference in the opacity of core, were used. After spectrophotometric evaluation, shade reproduction of the discs was compared and calculated by formula: Δ E* = ([Δ L*]2+ [Δ a*]2+ [Δ b*]2)1/2. Results: Student's t-test showed that in a sample of 15, the values of Δ E* for Group I - LT (Us.T.) lie between 0 and l, for Group II - MO (for Us. as well as S.T.) between l and 2, for Group III - HO (S.T.) are all above 5. Comparison among groups after t-test showed that mean Δ E* values of Group I - LT is less than Group II - MO for the unstained tooth, Δ E* for Group II - MO is less than average Δ E* value of Group III - HO for stained tooth. Conclusion: All-ceramic with low translucency can be used for the fabrication of restoration on the unstained tooth as it gives the best shade reproduction. The medium opacity material may be used on the unstained as well as on stained tooth. However, the clinical implication of high opacity is limited when applied over the stained tooth as it is giving a shade reproduction, which is not within acceptable limits. PMID:27134430

  8. Fracture Rates and Lifetime Estimations of CAD/CAM All-ceramic Restorations.

    PubMed

    Belli, R; Petschelt, A; Hofner, B; Hajtó, J; Scherrer, S S; Lohbauer, U

    2016-01-01

    The gathering of clinical data on fractures of dental restorations through prospective clinical trials is a labor- and time-consuming enterprise. Here, we propose an unconventional approach for collecting large datasets, from which clinical information on indirect restorations can be retrospectively analyzed. The authors accessed the database of an industry-scale machining center in Germany and obtained information on 34,911 computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) all-ceramic posterior restorations. The fractures of bridges, crowns, onlays, and inlays fabricated from different all-ceramic systems over a period of 3.5 y were reported by dentists and entered in the database. Survival analyses and estimations of future life revealed differences in performance among ZrO2-based restorations and lithium disilicate and leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics.

  9. In vitro failure of crowns produced by two CAD/CAM systems.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Thomas J; Burke, F J Trevor

    2011-09-01

    Previous laboratory studies have demonstrated satisfactory fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns placed using a resin-composite luting material and a dentine bonding system. This study investigated the fracture resistance of teeth restored using CAD/CAM technology, namely, Zirconia Based crowns and Cerec produced feldspathic porcelain crowns, both luted with a self adhesive resin luting material (RelyX Unicem Clicker 3M ESPE). Standardized preparations were carried out on two groups often sound, unrestored, maxillary premolar teeth. Ceramic crowns were constructed to have a thickness of 2mm at their midline fissure. Compressive fracture resistance was determined for each group using a Universal Testing Machine. The failure modes were also examined visually and interpreted according to a chosen scale. Mean Compressive fracture resistance of 746 (147)N and 1630 (175)N were recorded for the Cerec and Lava groups respectively; differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The fracture resistance of teeth restored with Lava crowns is significantly greater than a similar group of teeth restored with Cerec crowns.

  10. Anterior all-ceramic superstructures: chance or risk?

    PubMed

    Rinke, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The use of zirconia abutments for single-tooth restorations is well documented and supported by clinical studies with observational periods of up to 5 years. However, data for fixed partial dentures (FPDs) on all-ceramic abutments are lacking. Therefore, this indication cannot yet be generally recommended. Based on the available clinical studies, it can be assumed that the treatment results for anterior restorations can be improved by using all-ceramic abutments, especially in situations with a reduced thickness of the peri-implant soft tissues (< 2 mm). Zirconia abutments for single-tooth restorations can be restored with glass-ceramic crowns on a lithium-disilicate base or crowns with oxide-ceramic structures (alumina or zirconia). If the restorations are cemented adhesively, then all of the cement residues must be carefully removed. Superstructures based on zirconia ceramics can be removed to a certain degree if they are cemented temporarily or screwfixed with directly veneered abutments. However, prior to providing a general recommendation for temporary cementation or screw-fixation of all-ceramic superstructures, additional clinical data are needed.

  11. Influence of the supporting die structures on the fracture strength of all-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Munir Tolga; Yondem, Isa; Aykent, Filiz; Eraslan, Oğuz

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the elastic modulus of supporting dies on the fracture strengths of all-ceramic materials used in dental crowns. Four different types of supporting die materials (dentin, epoxy resin, brass, and stainless steel) (24 per group) were prepared using a milling machine to simulate a mandibular molar all-ceramic core preparation. A total number of 96 zirconia cores were fabricated using a CAD/CAM system. The specimens were divided into two groups. In the first group, cores were cemented to substructures using a dual-cure resin cement. In the second group, cores were not cemented to the supporting dies. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The geometric models of cores and supporting die materials were developed using finite element method to obtain the stress distribution of the forces. Cemented groups showed statistically higher fracture strength values than non-cemented groups. While ceramic cores on stainless steel dies showed the highest fracture strength values, ceramic cores on dentin dies showed the lowest fracture strength values among the groups. The elastic modulus of the supporting die structure is a significant factor in determining the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns. Using supporting die structures that have a low elastic modulus may be suitable for fracture strength tests, in order to accurately reflect clinical conditions.

  12. Recent Advances in Materials for All-Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The past three years of research on materials for all-ceramic veneers, inlays, onlays, single-unit crowns, and multi-unit restorations are reviewed. The primary changes in the field were the proliferation of zirconia-based frameworks and computer-aided fabrication of prostheses, as well as, a trend toward more clinically relevant in vitro test methods. This report includes an overview of ceramic fabrication methods, suggestions for critical assessment of material property data, and a summary of clinical longevity for prostheses constructed of various materials. PMID:17586152

  13. Recent advances in materials for all-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Jason A

    2007-07-01

    The past 3 years of research on materials for all-ceramic veneers, inlays, onlays, single-unit crowns, and multi-unit restorations are reviewed in this article. The primary changes in the field were the proliferation of zirconia-based frameworks and computer-aided fabrication of prostheses, and a trend toward more clinically relevant in vitro test methods. This article includes an overview of ceramic fabrication methods, suggestions for critical assessment of material property data, and a summary of clinical longevity for prostheses constructed of various materials.

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Core Thickness and Fabrication Stages on the Marginal Accuracy of an All-Ceramic System

    PubMed Central

    Farid, F.; Hajimiragha, H.; Jelodar, R.; Mostafavi, A. S.; Nokhbatolfoghahaie, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of core thickness and fabrication stages on the marginal accuracy of IPS e.max Press crowns. Materials and Methods: Twenty IPS e.max Press crowns, 1.5mm thick, were fabricated on metal dies. The crowns had two different core thicknesses, 0.8mm for group A and 1mm for group B, ten for each group. Marginal gap was measured after each stage of core fabrication, veneering and glaze firing. The specimens were not cemented and the measurements were made at four points on metal dies using a stereomicroscope (×120). Data were analyzed by SPSS software and independent t-test. Results: Mean marginal gaps measured after each stage for group A were 13.5 (±1.4) μm, 33.9 (±2.3) μm and 40.5(±1.7) μm, and for group B these figures were 14.9(±2.0) μm, 35.5(±2.2) μm and 41.3(±2.0) μm. There were no statistically significant differences in marginal gap values between the two groups (p>0.1). Significant increase in gap was observed after the veneering stage in both groups (p<0.05). After glazing, no significant increase in gap was detected. Conclusion: IPS e.max Press crowns have an acceptable marginal fit. Increasing thickness of core does not increase marginal fitness. PMID:23119127

  15. Marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of 2 zirconia crown systems luted with glass ionomer and MDP-based cements.

    PubMed

    Sener, Isil; Turker, Begum; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and phosphate monomer-containing resin cement (MDP-RC) under 2 zirconia crown systems (Cercon and DC-Zirkon). Forty human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic zirconia crowns with a 1 mm circumferential finish line and a 1.5 mm occlusal reduction. The crowns (n = 10 per group) from each zirconia system were randomly divided into 2 groups and cemented either with GIC (Vivaglass CEM) or MDP-RC (Panavia F 2.0) cement. The cemented crowns were thermocycled 5000 times (5°-55°C). The crowns were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Specimens were examined under optical microscope (100X). Data were analyzed using Student t-test and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Mean marginal gap values for Cercon (85 ± 11.4 μm) were significantly higher than for DC-Zircon (75.3 ± 13.2 μm) (P = 0.018). The mean cement thickness values of GIC (81.7 ± 13.9 μm) and MDP-RC (78.5 ± 12.5 μm) were not significantly different (P = 0.447). Microleakage scores did not demonstrate significant difference between GIC (P = 0.385) and MDP-RC (P = 0.631) under Cercon or DC-Zircon. Considering the cement thickness values and microleakage scores obtained, both zirconia crown systems could be cemented in combination with either GIC or MDP-RC.

  16. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also duplicated from the original prepared tooth for fracture testing. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture strength of the crowns. RESULTS The mean fracture strengths were as follows: 54.9 ± 15.6 N for the Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and 87.0 ± 16.0 N for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. The difference between the mean fracture strengths of the Lava and Digident crowns was statistically significant (P<.001). Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed a complete fracture of both the veneering porcelain and the core whereas the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed fracture only of the veneering porcelain. CONCLUSION The fracture strengths of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns differ depending on the compatibility of the core material and the veneering porcelain. PMID:23755332

  17. All-ceramic prosthetic rehabilitation of a worn dentition: Use of a distal cantilever. Two-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chekhani, Usama N.; Mikeli, Aikaterini A.; Huettig, Fabian K.P.

    2013-01-01

    The rehabilitation of heavily abraded occlusion in patients with parafunctional habits is a restorative challenge to the dentist. Use of all-ceramic systems in such cases is widely considered, but uncertainty over their resistance hinders their broad use. The authors would like to illustrate a possible approach by mixing two all-ceramic systems based on zirconium dioxide and lithium disilicate. A 48-year-old female patient attended with reduced vertical dimension in a full dentition. She suffered from craniomandibular (CMD) pain and desired an esthetic rehabilitation. Prosthodontic treatment was started in a pain-free condition, after correction of the vertical dimension with an occlusal splint, over four months. Determination of the treatment was based on the clinical findings: IPS e.max® ZirCAD frameworks veneered with IPS e.max® Ceram were used for discolored retainers or subgingival finishing lines. All the rest received IPS e.max® Press crowns. A zirconia-based, single-tooth-retained distal cantilever reconstruction was used to replace a missing second molar. No technical or biological complication was observed 24 months after treatment. The patient was highly satisfied and pain-free. PMID:23878577

  18. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 3. Experimental approach for validating the finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M C; Field, C J; Swain, M V

    2012-03-01

    In a previous study, the authors used a finite element analysis (FEA) to evaluate the stresses developed during the loading of an all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture and compared it with the more traditional full crown supported prosthesis. To date there has been little research into correlating the responses of the numerical model against physical mechanical tests; such validation analysis is crucial if the results from the FEA are to be confidently relied upon. This study reports on the experimental methods used to compare with the FEA and thereby to validate the predictive fracture behaviour of the numerical model. This study also outlines the methods for manufacture and testing of the ceramic structure along with observations of the fracture tests. In addition the procedure used for developing the FEA model for the test system is outlined.

  19. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 2. Fixed partial denture design: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M C; Field, C J; Swain, M V

    2011-09-01

    The clinical use of all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures has seen widespread adoption over the past few years due to their increasing durability and longevity. However, the application of inlays as an abutment design has not been as readily embraced because of their relatively high failure rates. With the use of an idealized inlay preparation design and prosthesis form which better distributes the tensile stresses, it is possible to utilize the inlay as support for an all-ceramic fixed partial denture. Utilizing a three-dimensional finite element analysis, a direct comparison of the inlay supported all-ceramic bridge against the traditional full crown supported all-ceramic bridge is made. The results demonstrate that peak stresses in the inlay bridge are around 20% higher than in the full crown supported bridge with von Mises peaking at about 730 MPa when subjected to theoretical average maximum bite force in the molar region of 700 N, which is similar to the ultimate tensile strengths of current zirconia based ceramics.

  20. Telescopically retained removable partial dentures on CAD/CAM generated all-ceramic primary telescopes.

    PubMed

    Bär, C; Reich, S

    2008-01-01

    The provision of patients with removable partial dentures on all-ceramic primary crowns with electroplated gold secondary parts is described as an alternative worthy of consideration in dental journals, lectures and in further training courses. The mode of operation is based on a precise, frictionless, passive fit between female and male components. To guarantee this even over large spans, intraoral joining of the individual components is necessary. However, this requires a different sequence of the treatment steps. The different procedures (conventional, procedure by Weigl, modified concept) are described in the following article. Clinical considerations, design principles, and special characteristics involved in producing the partial denture are explained.

  1. Fitting accuracy and fracture resistance of crowns using a hybrid zirconia frame made of both porous and dense zirconia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Sugano, Tsuyoshi; Usami, Hirofumi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Sekino, Tohru; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fitting accuracy and fracture resistance of crowns using a hybrid zirconia frame made of both porous and dense zirconia. Commercial semi-sintered zirconia, sintered dense zirconia and sintered hybrid zirconia were used. Sintered zirconia was milled using the CAD/CAM system, and semi-sintered zirconia was milled and sintered to fabricate molar crown frames. Completed frames were veneered with tooth-colored porcelain. The marginal and internal gaps between frames/crowns and abutments were measured. Each crown specimen was subjected to a fracture test. There were no significant differences in marginal and internal gap among all the frames and crowns. The crown with the hybrid zirconia frame had a 31-35% greater fracture load than that with the commercial or dense zirconia frame (p<0.01). This suggests that the all-ceramic crowns with a hybrid zirconia frame have a high fracture resistance.

  2. Addition of a pontic to all-ceramic Turkom-Cera fixed partial denture restorations

    PubMed Central

    Uludag, Bulent; Tokar, Emre; Polat, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    High-strength all-ceramic materials are commonly used in dentistry. When complications occur in an all-ceramic restoration, the restoration is usually replaced. This article describes the time-saving ability and cost-effectiveness of this novel technique for the addition of a pontic in two complicated clinical cases. Turkom-Cera™ [Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn. Bhd.] with aluminum oxide (99.98%) is an all-ceramic system that offers the option of addition of a new pontic to the sintered framework. The new pontic was cut off from an alumina blank [Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn. Bhd.], moistened, and attached to the framework using alumina gel [Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn. Bhd.]. The framework was veneered with veneering porcelain (Vita VM 7; VITA Zahnfabrik). The two cases presented here involving the addition of a pontic to sintered framework were followed up for at least 1 year. No complication was detected or reported by the patients. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics are particularly suitable for for all-ceramic restorations in high-stress bearing areas. However, replacement of a failed all-ceramic restoration is not the most practical solution, considering both cost and tooth-related factors. This attractive feature of the Turkom-Cera allows the repair of a fractured ceramic coping or the addition of a new pontic to restorations. PMID:24883033

  3. Study of an NC system of machining crown gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Huaqing; Yan, Jian; Gao, Shenyou

    2005-12-01

    Crown gear couplings are usually used in metallurgy and steel rolling equipments, which is manufactured by duplicating processing in common. The method makes the manipulator work hard, and the efficiency is low. The machining precision is limited to the shape of the mold and it is difficult to control the movement of machines table. This work stated an NC system to use hobbing machine. It consists of an industrial control computer, grating sensor, servo- motor and its driver source, servo driver card and other I/O equipments of inputting and outputting. The grating sensor was installed in the axial direction to trace the instantaneous position of gob rest. The radial movement of the machine table was controlled by a servomotor. When the computer captures the axial signal, this system controls the machine table by moving ahead or backwards according to the calculated value of interpolation theory. Thus, two dimensions (axial and radial) associated movement was realized while the crown gear was processed. The feature of the system is that a grating sensor used in the axial direction replaces the servomotor. By making a little change in the mechanism of the machine, NC can be implement and its redesign cost is very low. The design software has an interpolation function for a circular arc and line. The system has been used on a Y1380 gear hobbing machine, and the correlative software of machining crown gear has been designed as well. Satisfactory results have been obtained, showing facility and reliability in practical operation.

  4. Evaluation of the color reproducibility of all-ceramic restorations fabricated by the digital veneering method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical acceptability of all-ceramic crowns fabricated by the digital veneering method vis-à-vis the traditional method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia specimens manufactures by two different manufacturing method, conventional vs digital veneering, with three different thickness (0.3 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.7 mm) were prepared for analysis. Color measurement was performed using a spectrophotometer for the prepared specimens. The differences in shade in relation to the build-up method were calculated by quantifying ΔE* (mean color difference), with the use of color difference equations representing the distance from the measured values L*, a*, and b*, to the three-dimensional space of two colors. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) combined with a Tukey multiple-range test was used to analyze the data (α=0.05). RESULTS In comparing means and standard deviations of L*, a*, and b* color values there was no significant difference by the manufacturing method and zirconia core thickness according to a two-way ANOVA. The color differences between two manufacturing methods were in a clinically acceptable range less than or equal to 3.7 in all the specimens. CONCLUSION Based on the results of this study, a carefully consideration is necessary while selecting upper porcelain materials, even if it is performed on a small scale. However, because the color reproducibility of the digital veneering system was within the clinically acceptable range when comparing with conventional layering system, it was possible to estimate the possibility of successful aesthetic prostheses in the latest technology. PMID:24843390

  5. Wear of double crown systems - electroplated vs. casted female part

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Stefan; KRAUS, Dominik; KEILIG, Ludger; GÖLZ, Lina; STARK, Helmut; ENKLING, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The wear of telescopic crowns is a common problem often reducing the patient's satisfaction with the denture and resulting in a renewal of the denture. The study aims to compare the wear behavior of conical crowns using electroplated copings (group E) with standard telescopic crowns with cast female parts (group C). Material and Methods 10 conical crowns were milled for each group of a cast gold alloy. The specimen of group E had a conicity of 2º. The cast secondary crowns of group C had a 0º design. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. An apparatus accomplishing 10,000 wear cycles performed the wear test. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured. The wear test was separated in a start phase, an initial wear phase and the long term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.33 mm of each cycle were calculated. Results The retentive forces were significantly higher for group E and the integrals were significantly lower for this group except the integral at cycle 10,000. The changes of retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in all phases. The change of the integrals as well as the integral at the particular cycles showed higher interquartile distances for group C. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. The values reached a range comparable to retentive elements tested in recent literature. The values of group C showed higher ranges. The force measured for group E was significantly higher than for group C but the integrals showed an opposite tendency. The results indicate that an exclusive analysis of the force is not sufficient as the integral is not equivalent to the force although it describes the retentive property of the system in a better way than the force over a distance is described. Both systems

  6. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically “safe” materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  7. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. RESULTS The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (P<.05). Both fabrication systems and finish line configurations significantly influenced the absolute marginal discrepancy (P<.05). CONCLUSION The lithium disilicate glass ceramic crown (IPS e.max®press) had significantly smaller marginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins. PMID:26330973

  8. The Importance of the Lifelike Esthetic Appearance of All-Ceramic Restorations on Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Moreno, Amália; Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Laurindo Júnior, Murilo César Bento; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2015-01-01

    The success of rehabilitation will not depend on just clinical procedures. A proper dental technique (ceramist) is required as well as the respect for some biomimetic principles to obtain the desired final result. This study has the purpose of describing a prosthetic rehabilitation with laminate veneers and all-ceramic crowns of a patient unsatisfied with a previous esthetic treatment because of the negligence of some biomimetic principles. A 45-year-old female patient was admitted to the dental clinic complaining about the lifelike appearance of her all-ceramic restorations. Before the fabrication of new restorations, a mock-up was conducted to verify the patient's satisfaction. A ceramist conducted all the fabrication process so that surface characterizations could be visually verified and the lifelike appearance of natural tooth could be reproduced. After the cementation procedure, the patient reported being satisfied with the lifelike appearance of the new restorations. Based on the clinical findings of the present case report, it can be concluded that the reproduction of the lifelike esthetic appearance of natural teeth and the visualization of the final results before definitive procedures are essential to obtain the clinical success. PMID:25705525

  9. Fracture strength of all-ceramic restorations after fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladhandayutham, Balasudha

    Fracture strength of monolithic and bilayered LAVA and e. max lower molar crowns after load cycling was measured and compared. The study included three groups (n = 8) from LAVA zirconia and three groups from e. max lithium disilicate to compare influences of different layers, thicknesses and manufacturing techniques. Prefabricated anatomically designed crowns were cemented to dies made from Z 100 composite resin using Rely X Luting Plus resin modified glass ionomer cement. Cemented crowns were stored at 37° C for 24 hours then cyclic loaded to test fatigue properties. The crowns were loaded to 200,000 cycles at 25N at a rate of 40 cycles / minute to simulate oral function. Subsequently, fracture properties for each group were measured using an Instron Universal Testing machine. Microscopic evaluation of the surface of fatigued samples did not reveal micro-cracks at the end of 50,000 cycles but minor wear facets were observed at the site of contact from the steatite ball antagonist. Crowns from LAVA bilayered groups showed step by step fractures while crowns from all other groups fractured as a single event as observed by the high speed camera. Zirconia bilayered crowns showed the highest loads to fracture while lithium disilicate monolithic crowns showed the lowest, within the limitations of the study. The study also showed that monolithic zirconia crowns of 0.6mm thickness resulted in relatively high magnitude for forces at fracture.

  10. Release and systemic accumulation of heavy metals from preformed crowns used in restoration of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Hiroe; Ohno, Kohachiro; Fukase, Naoko; Kuroda, Midori; Adachi, Shiki; Kikuchi, Motohiro; Asada, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Preformed crowns for restoration of primary teeth are used in various treatments and are essential for restoring the crowns of primary molars. However, there are concerns that mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimulation may cause release of components of such crowns. We examined systemic accumulation of heavy metals associated with preformed crowns (3M Stainless Steel Primary Molar Crowns) used in primary tooth restoration. The participants were 37 children who had visited the Pediatric Dental Clinic of Tsurumi University Dental Hospital. They were divided into two groups: 22 participants without a history of being fitted with a preformed crown for primary tooth restoration (controls), and 15 participants with preformed crowns for primary tooth restoration. Analysis of hair samples showed a significant difference in the level of the trace element Cr - an important component of the preformed crowns - between children with and without preformed crowns, but no significant differences in Fe or Ni levels. Levels of the trace elements Ni, Cr, and Fe were within allowable ranges, indicating that these minerals were not likely to be harmful.

  11. Topological design of all-ceramic dental bridges for enhancing fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Chen, Junning; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Layered all-ceramic systems have been increasingly adopted in major dental prostheses. However, ceramics are inherently brittle, and they often subject to premature failure under high occlusion forces especially in the posterior region. This study aimed to develop mechanically sound novel topological designs for all-ceramic dental bridges by minimizing the fracture incidence under given loading conditions. A bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique is implemented within the extended finite element method (XFEM) framework. Extended finite element method allows modeling crack initiation and propagation inside all-ceramic restoration systems. Following this, BESO searches the optimum distribution of two different ceramic materials, namely porcelain and zirconia, for minimizing fracture incidence. A performance index, as per a ratio of peak tensile stress to material strength, is used as a design objective. In this study, the novel XFEM based BESO topology optimization significantly improved structural strength by minimizing performance index for suppressing fracture incidence in the structures. As expected, the fracture resistance and factor of safety of fixed partial dentures structure increased upon redistributing zirconia and porcelain in the optimal topological configuration. Dental CAD/CAM systems and the emerging 3D printing technology were commercially available to facilitate implementation of such a computational design, exhibiting considerable potential for clinical application in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  13. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  14. An interdisciplinary noninvasive all-ceramic treatment concept for nonsyndromic oligodontia in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Selz, Christian F; Jung, Britta A; Guess, Petra C

    2015-02-01

    Oligodontia has a substantial oral functional and psychosocial impact on the quality of life of children. The treatment of oligodontia in adolescence is an interdisciplinary approach which can include extraction of the primary teeth with orthodontic space closure, or prosthodontic rehabilitation. This case report describes a conservative approach for the rehabilitation of a 12-year-old patient with 19 ageneses (excluding third molars) of permanent teeth, infraocclusion of the persisting primary teeth, deep overbite, and reduced mesiodistal dimension of the maxillary incisors with a central diastema. The treatment plan to restore esthetics and function included an initial noninvasive prosthetic rehabilitation for deep bite correction with additive leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic onlays/veneers until definitive orthodontic and implant therapy are reevaluated and determined in adulthood. Esthetics, functional occlusion, and crown-to-root ratio remained stable over a follow-up period of 3 years. No signs of fractures within the all-ceramic restorations or symptoms of a temporomandibular disorder were evident.

  15. Optimizing the design of bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) layer in all-ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang; Sun, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Due to elastic modulus mismatch between the different layers in all-ceramic dental restorations, high tensile stress concentrates at the interface between the ceramic core and cement. In natural tooth structure, stress concentration is reduced by the functionally graded structure of dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) which interconnects enamel and dentin. Inspired by DEJ, the aim of this study was to explore the optimum design of a bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) layer in all-ceramic dental restorations to achieve excellent stress reduction and distribution. Three-dimensional finite element model of a multi-layer structure was developed, which comprised bilayered ceramic, bio-inspired FGM layer, cement, and dentin. Finite element method and first-order optimization technique were used to realize the optimal bio-inspired FGM layer design. The bio-inspired FGM layer significantly reduced stress concentration at the interface between the crown and cement, and stresses were evenly distributed in FGM layer. With the optimal design, an elastic modulus distribution similar to that in DEJ occurred in the FGM layer.

  16. A new design for all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Stefan; Kern, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    In a previous clinical study, all-ceramic resin-bonded 3-unit inlay-retained fixed partial dentures (IRFPDs) had a significantly worse outcome in the posterior region than did crown-retained 3-unit FPDs made from the same material. Debonding or fractures were causes of failure. To improve the clinical outcome of IRFPDs, a new framework design was developed: (1) The inlay retainers were made out of CAD/CAM-manufactured zirconia ceramic to improve fracture resistance, and additional veneering of the inlays was omitted. (2) The inlay retainers were completed with a shallow occlusal inlay (1-mm minimum thickness) and an oral retainer wing (0.6-mm minimum thickness). The wings were designed to reduce stress on the inlay retainer caused by torsion forces when the FPD is loaded nonaxially and to increase the enamel adhesive surface area. The pontic was circumferentially veneered with feldspathic porcelain. The clinical and laboratory procedures of this new treatment modality are described, and 2 exemplary clinical cases are presented. This new preparation and framework design might improve the clinical outcome of all-ceramic resin-bonded IRFPDs. However, adequate evidence of long-term safety and efficacy is required before this new design can be recommended for general clinical practice.

  17. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... off when the child loses the baby tooth. Metal crowns: Hold up to chewing and teeth grinding ... porcelain crowns: Wear down opposing teeth more than metal crowns Match the color of other teeth May ...

  18. Effect of the crown design and interface lute parameters on the stress-state of a machined crown-tooth system: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Shahrbaf, Shirin; vanNoort, Richard; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Martin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The effect of preparation design and the physical properties of the interface lute on the restored machined ceramic crown-tooth complex are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to determine, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) the effect of the tooth preparation design and the elastic modulus of the cement on the stress state of the cemented machined ceramic crown-tooth complex. The three-dimensional structure of human premolar teeth, restored with adhesively cemented machined ceramic crowns, was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of a restored tooth was created. Two preparation designs, with different occlusal morphologies, were modeled with cements of 3 different elastic moduli. Interactive medical image processing software (mimics and professional CAD modeling software) was used to create sophisticated digital models that included the supporting structures; periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The generated models were imported into an FEA software program (hypermesh version 10.0, Altair Engineering Inc.) with all degrees of freedom constrained at the outer surface of the supporting cortical bone of the crown-tooth complex. Five different elastic moduli values were given to the adhesive cement interface 1.8GPa, 4GPa, 8GPa, 18.3GPa and 40GPa; the four lower values are representative of currently used cementing lutes and 40GPa is set as an extreme high value. The stress distribution under simulated applied loads was determined. The preparation design demonstrated an effect on the stress state of the restored tooth system. The cement elastic modulus affected the stress state in the cement and dentin structures but not in the crown, the pulp, the periodontal ligament or the cancellous and cortical bone. The results of this study suggest that both the choice of the preparation design and the cement elastic modulus can affect the stress state within the restored crown

  19. Composite bonding to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding and single-bottle systems.

    PubMed

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alomari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  20. Predictable aesthetic replacement of a metal-ceramic crown using CAD/CAM technology: a case report.

    PubMed

    Poticny, Daniel; Conrad, Robert

    2005-08-01

    The currently available CAD/CAM technologies present clinicians with various clinical benefits that include durability, marginal adaptation, and precision aesthetics. The clinical and laboratory procedures associated with these CAD/CAM systems differ from one another, and practitioners must understand the indications for each. Office-based systems, as demonstrated in the following case presentation, allow excellent results to be achieved in a single patient visit and provide a viable alternative for today's practice. This case report describes the associated sequences for a posterior CAD/CAM restoration. Learning Objectives This article discusses a protocol for the use of CAD/CAM restorations in the aesthetic replacement of defective posterior crowns. Upon reading this article, the reader should have: * Greater understanding of the in-office CAD/CAM procedures used to fabricate single-visit crowns. * Improved awareness of the bonding protocol used for these all-ceramic crowns.

  1. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  2. Adaptation of all-ceramic fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Borba, Márcia; Cesar, Paulo F.; Griggs, Jason A.; Della Bona, Álvaro

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To measure the marginal and internal fit of three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPDs) using the micro-CT technique, testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the adaptation between the ceramic systems studied. Methods Stainless steel models of prepared abutments were fabricated to design the FPDs. Ten FPDs were produced from each framework ceramic (YZ - Vita In-Ceram YZ and IZ - Vita In-Ceram Zirconia) using CEREC inLab according to the manufacturer instructions. All FPDs were veneered using the recommended porcelain. Each FPD was seated on the original model and scanned using micro-CT. Files were processed using NRecon and CTAn software. Adobe Photoshop and Image J software were used to analyze the cross-sections images. Five measuring locations were used as follows: MG – marginal gap; CA - chamfer area; AW - axial wall; AOT - axio-occlusal transition area; OA - occlusal area. The horizontal marginal discrepancy (HMD) was evaluated in another set of images. Results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results The mean values for MG, CA, AW, OA and HMD were significantly different for all tested groups (p<0.05). IZ exhibited greater mean values than YZ for all measuring locations except for AW and AOT. OA showed the greatest mean gap values for both ceramic systems. MG and AW mean gap values were low for both systems. Significance The ceramic systems evaluated showed different levels of marginal and internal fit, rejecting the study hypothesis. Yet, both ceramic systems showed clinically acceptable marginal and internal fit. PMID:21920595

  3. All ceramic table tops analyzed using swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Eniko Tunde; Marcauteanu, Corina; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Topala, Florin; Duma, Virgil Florin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    Erosion is the progressive loss of tooth substance by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. The affected teeth can be restored by using IPS e.max Press "table tops", which replace the occlusal surfaces. In this study we applied a fast in-house Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography (SS OCT) system to analyze IPS e.max Press "table tops". 12 maxillary first premolars have been extracted and prepared for "table tops". These restorations were subjected to 3000 alternating cycles of thermo-cycling in a range from -10°C to +50°C mechanical occlusal loads of 200 N were also applied. Using SS OCT we analyze the marginal seal of these restorations, before and after applying the mechanical and thermal strain. The characteristics of the SS OCT system utilized are presented. Its depth resolution, measured in air is 10 μm. The system is able to acquire entire volumetric reconstructions in 2.5 s. From the dataset acquired high resolution en-face projections were also produced. Thus, the interfaces between all ceramic "table tops" and natural teeth were analyzed on the cross-sections (i.e., the B-scans) produced and also on the volumetric (tri-dimensional (3D)) reconstructions, several open interfaces being detected. The study therefore demonstrates the utility of SS OCT for the analysis of lithium disilicate glass ceramic "table tops".

  4. Influence of porcelain veneering on the marginal fit of Digident and Lava CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Marginal fit is a very important factor considering the restoration's long-term success. However, adding porcelain to copings can cause distortion and lead to an inadequate fit which exposes more luting material to the oral environment and causes secondary caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal fit of 2 different all-ceramic crown systems before and after porcelain veneering. This study was also intended to verify the marginal fit of crowns originated from green machining of partially sintered blocks of zirconia (Lava CAD/CAM system) and that of crowns obtained through machining of fully sintered blocks of zirconia (Digident CAD/CAM system). MATERIALS AND METHODS 20 crowns were made per each system and the marginal fit was evaluated through a light microscope with image processing (Accura 2000) at 50 points that were randomly selected. Each crown was measured twice: the first measurement was done after obtaining a 0.5 mm coping and the second measurement was done after porcelain veneering. The means and standard deviations were calculated and statistical inferences among the 2 groups were made using independent t-test and within the same group through paired t-test. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of the marginal fit were 61.52 ± 2.88 µm for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns before porcelain veneering and 83.15 ± 3.51 µm after porcelain veneering. Lava CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns showed means and standard deviations of 62.22 ± 1.78 µm before porcelain veneering and 82.03 ± 1.85 µm after porcelain veneering. Both groups showed significant differences when analyzing the marginal gaps before and after porcelain veneering within each group. However, no significant differences were found when comparing the marginal gaps of each group before porcelain veneering and after porcelain veneering as well. CONCLUSION The 2 all-ceramic crown systems showed marginal gaps that were within a reported clinically

  5. Crown Gall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown gall disease occurs on diverse dicotyledonous and gymnospermous plant species worldwide. Reports of crown gall on hop date back to at least 1929, and the disease has been reported from most countries where hop is or has been grown commercially. The epidemiology of the causal bacterium, Agrob...

  6. Design for minimizing fracture risk of all-ceramic cantilever dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Minimization of the peak stresses and fracture incidence induced by mastication function is considered critical in design of all-ceramic dental restorations, especially for cantilever fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The focus of this study is on developing a mechanically-sound optimal design for all-ceramic cantilever dental bridge in a posterior region. The topology optimization procedure in association with Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) is implemented here to search for the best possible distribution of porcelain and zirconia materials in the bridge structure. The designs with different volume fractions of zirconia are considered. The results show that this new methodology is capable of improving FPD design by minimizing incidence of crack in comparison with the initial design. Potentially, it provides dental technicians with a new design tool to develop mechanically sound cantilever fixed partial dentures for more complicated clinical situation.

  7. Evaluation of an all-ceramic tubesheet assembly for a hot gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bitner, J.L.; Mallett, R.H.; Eggerstedt, P.M.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    A 10-inch thick, all-ceramic tubesheet design is evaluated for differential pressure and thermal conditions. Primary stresses from differential pressure are well within a safe allowable. The calculated peak thermal stresses at local discontinuities approach the modules of rupture for the ceramic material. Kiln tests were performed to demonstrate differential temperatures between hot center and cooler rim do not cause failures or visible tensile cracks. There appear to be mitigating mechanisms and design features in the Industrial Filter and Pump (IF and P) Mfg. Co. all-ceramic tubesheet design concept that add forgiveness in accommodating differential pressure and thermal loading stresses. A material characterization program on the ceramic materials is recommended.

  8. Adhesion of oral streptococci to all-ceramics dental restorative materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Hauser-Gerspach, I; Lüthy, H; Meyer, J

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, patients have benefited from the development of better and more esthetic materials, including all-ceramics dental restorative materials. Dental plaque formation on teeth and restorative materials plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oral diseases. This study investigates initial adhesion of stationary phase streptococcal species to different all-ceramics dental restorative materials. The saliva-coated materials were incubated with the bacteria for 1 h in an in vitro flow chamber which mimics environmental conditions in the oral cavity. Number and vitality of adhering bacteria were determined microscopically after staining. Surface roughness and the composition of the materials had no distinctive influence on bacterial adhesion. However, S. mutans and S. sobrinus adhered about tenfold less numerous to all materials than the other streptococcal species. Further, there was a correlation between bacterial vitality and materials' glass content. The results showed that early plaque formation was influenced predominantly by the presence of the salivary pellicle rather than by material dependent parameters whereas the composition of the all-ceramics appeared to have influenced the percentage of viable cells during the adhesion process. This presented in vitro technique may provide a useful model to study the influence of different parameters on adherence of oral streptococcal species.

  9. Illuminating light-dependent color shifts in core and veneer layers of dental all-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Cha, Hyun-Suk; Yu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The color of an object is perceived differently depending on the ambient light conditions. Since dental all-ceramic restorations are fabricated by building up several layers to reproduce the tooth shade, the optical properties of each layer should be optimized for successful shade reproduction. This study aimed to determine the separate contributions of the color shifts in each of the core and veneer layers of all-ceramics by switching the illuminating lights on the color shifts of layered ceramics. Specimens of seven kinds of core ceramics and the corresponding veneer ceramics for each core were fabricated with a layered thickness of 1.5 mm. A sintering ceramic was used as a reference core material. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of core, veneer, and layered specimens were measured with a spectroradiometer under the CIE illuminant D65 (daylight), A (incandescent lamp), and F9 (fluorescent lamp) simulating lights. Color shifts of the layered specimens were primarily determined by the CIE a shifts (D65 to A switch) or by the CIE b shifts (D65 to F9 switch) of the veneer layer. The color coordinates shifts in the constituent layers differentially influenced those of the layered specimens by the kind of switched lights. Therefore, the optical properties of the constituent layers of all-ceramics should be controlled to reflect these findings.

  10. Evaluation of marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with two finish lines

    PubMed Central

    Subasi, Gulce; Ozturk, Nilgun; Inan, Ozgur; Bozogullari, Nalan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study investigated the marginal fit of two all-ceramic copings with 2 finish line designs. Methods: Forty machined stainless steel molar die models with two different margin designs (chamfer and rounded shoulder) were prepared. A total of 40 standardized copings were fabricated and divided into 4 groups (n=10 for each finish line-coping material). Coping materials tested were IPS e.max Press and Zirkonzahn; luting agent was Variolink II. Marginal fit was evaluated after cementation with a stereomicroscope (Leica MZ16). Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD test were performed to assess the influence of each finish line design and ceramic type on the marginal fit of 2 all-ceramic copings (α =.05). Results: Two-way analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant differences for marginal fit relative to finish lines (P=.362) and ceramic types (P=.065). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, both types of all-ceramic copings demonstrated that the mean marginal fit was considered acceptable for clinical application (⩽120 μm). PMID:22509119

  11. Prospective clinical split-mouth study of pressed and CAD/CAM all-ceramic partial-coverage restorations: 7-year results.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra C; Selz, Christian F; Steinhart, Yann-Niclas; Stampf, Susanne; Strub, Joerg R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical split-mouth study was to investigate the longterm performance of pressed and computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) all-ceramic partial-coverage restorations (PCRs). Twentyfive patients were restored with 40 lithium disilicate pressed PCRs (IPS e.max-Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and 40 leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic CAD/CAM PCRs (ProCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent). All restorations were placed in vital first or second molars. The 7-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 100% for pressed PCRs and 97% for CAD/ CAM PCRs. Both systems showed significant deterioration over time in all modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Increased surface roughness and impaired color match were significantly more prevalent with pressed PCRs. Based on the 7-year data, both all-ceramic systems can be considered reliable treatment options for posterior PCRs.

  12. All-Ceramic Body Flap Qualified for Space Flight on X38

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, H.; Peetz, K.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow design of high-temperature resistant, light and robust structures. CMC materials with silicon-carbide matrix reinforced by carbon fibers (C/SiC) show constant strength and damage-tolerant behavior up to very high temperatures. CMC thermal protection systems and hot structures have been developed in Europe over many years. MAN Technologie developed the necessary technologies to create the technological basis for CMC structures for future, more economical and reusable launch vehicles. Within the German space technology program TETRA (Technologies for Future Space Transportation Systems) body flaps were developed for X-38 by MAN Technologie. Key technologies like high strength oxidation protected CMC materials, manufacturing processes for large and complex structures, advanced high temperature lubricant coating combinations for bearings, joining with ceramic fasteners, metal-to-ceramic interfaces as well as dynamic seals are required for hot structures like control surfaces for re-entry vehicles. Because of the high heat and mechanical loads of a lifting body together with the low mass requirements the body flaps for NASA's X-38 re-entry vehicle V-201were selected to demonstrate as a first flight maturity of a large and complex ceramic structure. The flaps are designed as an all-ceramic, load-carrying hot structure, which needs no heavy metallic primary structure and no additional thermal protection tiles and subsequently offers considerable mass and volume savings. The X-38 body flaps are conceived as a revolutionary step forward. The twin flaps, each with the size of 1.6 m x 1.4 m (5.25 ft x 4.6 ft) and the low weight of 68 kg (150 lb) are all made of C/SiC material to operate up to temperatures of 1800 C (3.270 F) in oxidizing atmosphere while they are deflectable under high mechanical loads up to 50 kN (11.260 lbf) at the same time. The flaps are deflected about the hinge axis on two ceramic bearings and moved by an

  13. Post-fatigue fracture resistance of metal core crowns: press-on metal ceramic versus a conventional veneering system

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Campos-Estellés, Carlos; Labaig-Rueda, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the mechanical failure behavior and to analyze fracture characteristics of metal ceramic crowns with two veneering systems – press-on metal (PoM) ceramic versus a conventional veneering system – subjected to static compressive loading. Material and Methods Forty-six crowns were constructed and divided into two groups according to porcelain veneer manufacture. Group A: 23 metal copings with porcelain IPS-InLine veneering (conventional metal ceramic). Group B: 23 metal copings with IPS-InLine PoM veneering porcelain. After 120,000 fatigue cycles, the crowns were axially loaded to the moment of fracture with a universal testing machine. The fractured specimens were examined under optical stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscope. Results Fracture resistance values showed statistically significant differences (Student’s t-test) regarding the type of ceramic veneering technique (p=0.001): Group A (conventional metal ceramics) obtained a mean fracture resistance of 1933.17 N, and Group B 1325.74N (Press-on metal ceramics). The most common type of fracture was adhesive failure (with metal exposure) (p=0.000). Veneer porcelain fractured on the occlusal surface following a radial pattern. Conclusions Metal ceramic crowns made of IPS InLine or IPS InLine PoM ceramics with different laboratory techniques all achieved above-average values for clinical survival in the oral environment according to ISO 6872. Crowns made with IPS InLine by conventional technique resisted fracture an average of 45% more than IPS InLine PoM fabricated with the press-on technique. Key words:Mechanical failure, conventional feldspathic, pressable ceramic, chewing simulator, thermocycling, compressive testing, fracture types, scanning electron microscope. PMID:26155346

  14. Comparison of 3 polishing techniques for 2 all-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Saraç, Duygu; Turk, Tamer; Elekdag-Turk, Selma; Saraç, Y Sinaç

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the surface roughness produced by polishing 2 all-ceramic materials after surface conditioning. Air particle abrasion (APA) with 25-microm aluminum oxide, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HFA,) and APA + HFA were applied for ceramic surface conditioning. Subsequently, the ceramics were subjected to 3 polishing techniques: polishing kit, polishing paste, and polishing kit + polishing paste. Surface roughness (Ra) was evaluated profilometrically. The highest deltaRa values were obtained with the polishing kit and polishing kit + paste for the APA + HFA groups. No significant differences were observed among the polishing paste groups. Combining a polishing kit and polishing paste produced the smoothest ceramic surfaces.

  15. All-ceramic single-tooth implant reconstructions using modified zirconia abutments: a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial of the effect of pink veneering ceramic on the esthetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Büchi, Dominik L E; Sailer, Irena; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether veneering of the submucosal part of zirconia abutments using pink veneering ceramic positively influences the color of the peri-implant mucosa. Single-tooth implants were restored with either white zirconia abutments (control group) or pink-veneered zirconia abutments and all-ceramic crowns. Esthetic outcome measurements included a spectrophotometric evaluation of the peri-implant mucosal color. Test and control groups induced a visible discoloration of the peri-implant mucosa after the insertion of the abutments and following cementation of the crowns compared to natural teeth. The calculated color differences were above the clinically visible threshold value and were more favorable for the control group, although not statistically significant. It is concluded that veneering of zirconia abutments with pink veneering ceramic failed to positively influence the esthetic outcome, mostly due to a decrease of the brightness compared with the control group.

  16. Crown wart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown wart has been found widely distributed in Australia, New Zealand, and European countries. It has been recorded sporadically in India (Punjab), South Africa, South America (Ecuador, Chile, Peru), Panama, Mexico, and Canada (British Columbia). In the United States, it has been found more frequ...

  17. Design maps for failure of all-ceramic layer structures in concentrated cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Sanjit; Meléndez-Martínez, Juan José; Zhang, Yu; Lawn, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    A study is made of the competition between failure modes in ceramic-based bilayer structures joined to polymer-based substrates, in simulation of dental crown-like structures with a functional but weak “veneer” layer bonded onto a strong “core” layer. Cyclic contact fatigue tests are conducted in water on model flat systems consisting of glass plates joined to glass, sapphire, alumina or zirconia support layers glued onto polycarbonate bases. Critical numbers of cycles to take each crack mode to failure are plotted as a function of peak contact load on failure maps showing regions in which each fracture mode dominates. In low-cycle conditions, radial and outer cone cracks are competitive in specimens with alumina cores, and outer cone cracks prevail in specimens with zirconia cores; in high-cycle conditions, inner cone cracks prevail in all cases. The roles of other factors, e.g. substrate modulus, layer thickness, indenter radius and residual stresses from specimen preparation, are briefly considered. PMID:19562095

  18. Evaluation of the marginal fit of full ceramic crowns by the microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technique

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Necla; Ozturk, Atiye Nilgun; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the marginal gap (MG) and absolute marginal discrepancy (MD) of full ceramic crowns with two finish line designs, shoulder and chamfer, using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) before and after cementation. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were divided into two groups based on the finish line design: Group I: 90° shoulder and Group II: 135° chamfer. The specimens were further grouped based on the type of full ceramic crown they received: Group A: Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system, Group B: Cerec inLab aluminum oxide ceramic system and Group C: Lithium disilicate press ceramic system. Before cementation, five crowns from each group were scanned using micro-CT in two sections, sagittal and coronal, to determine the MG and MD values for four regions of the crown (sagittal buccal, sagittal lingual, coronal mesial and coronal distal). After cementation and thermal cycling, the scanning was repeated. Measurements were obtained from 10 points for each region, 80 points totally, to evaluate the MG and MD values. Files were processed using NRecon and CTAn software. Results were statistically analyzed using one- and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P = 0.05). Results: Full ceramic systems showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system generally presented the lowest variance, except in the MG values of the coronal mesial region. The MG and MD values of all ceramics increased significantly after cementation, except in the shoulder preparation design (sagittal buccal region) for MG and in the chamfer preparation design (sagittal lingual region) for MD values. Conclusions: Full-ceramic crowns showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system (Vitablocs Mark II) generally presented the lowest variance when compared with the other ceramics, except for the MG values on the mesial surface of the coronal section

  19. OCT evaluation of single ceramic crowns: comparison between conventional and chair-side CAD/CAM technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, A.; Jivanescu, A.; Zaharia, C.; Hategan, S.; Topala, F. I.; Levai, C. M.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Sinescu, C.; Duma, V.-F.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2016-03-01

    Digital impressions were introduced to overcome some of the obstacles due to traditional impression materials and techniques. The aim of this in vitro study is to compare the accuracy of all ceramic crowns obtained with digital impression and CAD-CAM technology with the accuracy of those obtained with conventional impression techniques. Two groups of 10 crowns each have been considered. The digital data obtained from Group 1 have been processed and the all-ceramic crowns were milled with a CAD/CAM technology (CEREC MCX, Sirona). The all ceramic crowns in Group 2 were obtained with the classical technique of pressing (emax, Ivoclar, Vivadent). The evaluation of the marginal adaptation was performed with Time Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD OCT), working at a wavelength of 1300 nm. Tri-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the selected areas were obtained. Based on the findings in this study, one may conclude that the marginal accuracy of all ceramic crowns fabricated with digital impression and the CAD/CAM technique is superior to the conventional impression technique.

  20. Influence of sodalite zeolite infiltration on the coefficient of thermal expansion and bond strength of all-ceramic dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Naji, Ghassan Abdul-Hamid; Omar, Ros Anita; Yahya, Rosiyah

    2017-03-01

    In all-ceramic systems, a high incidence of veneer chip-off has been reported in clinical studies. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) behaviour is one of the factors that may increase residual stress in the interface and influence the veneer/core bond strength. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of sodalite zeolite-infiltration on the CTE behaviour and bond strength of different all-ceramic prostheses. The case-study groups were synthesized sodalite zeolite-infiltrated alumina (IA-SOD) and synthesized sodalite zeolite-infiltrated zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) (IZ-SOD), while the control groups were glass-infiltrated alumina (IA-glass) and glass-infiltrated ZTA (IZ-glass). Forty cylindrical-shaped samples measuring 5 mm in diameter and 10 mm in height were tested for CTE using a thermo-mechanical analyser machine, and forty disc-shaped ceramic samples measuring 12 mm in diameter and 1.2 ± 0.2 mm in thickness were prepared using specially designed stainless steel split mould and veneered by cylinder-shaped (2 mm high × 2 mm diameter) low-fusing porcelain (Vita VM7). The veneer/core samples were sintered and tested for shear bond strength using a high precision universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscope, stereo microscope, atomic force microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to investigate the structural characteristics of samples at the fracture surface. The collected data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). IZ-SOD revealed highest CTE and shear bond strength values, while the IA-glass revealed the lowest values than the other groups. There was no significant difference in CTE and bond strength among IZ-SOD, IA-SOD and IZ-glass samples (p>0.05). The experimental SOD zeolite-infiltrated samples revealed higher CTE mismatch and bond strength along with a more favourable mode of failure than did the commercial glass-infiltrated samples. Sandblast technique is considered as effective

  1. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated premolars restored with lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns or onlays and luted with two luting agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiqiang; Guo, Kewu; Zhang, Baowei; Weng, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars restored using CAD/CAM onlays or crowns and luted with two types of resin cement. Forty all-ceramic crowns and twenty onlays were fabricated on maxillary premolars using the Cerec 3 system (n=10). The abutments were randomly subjected to two different procedures: Endodontic treatment was performed on forty teeth restored through a mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparation with composite resin fillings; twenty teeth without endodontic treatment served as control. In endodontically treated teeth restored using IPS e.max CAD crowns or onlays, the fracture loads were lower than those of the control. Endodontic treatment of teeth restored using CAD/CAM crowns does not impair the fracture load but shows more severe fractures than teeth restored using CAD/CAM onlays. This suggests that a CAD/CAM onlay might be an effective method for the restoration of endodontically treated premolars with MOD cavity defect.

  2. Load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic posterior inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Djamila; Wolfart, Stefan; Ludwig, Klaus; Kern, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the quasi-static load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic resin-bonded three-unit inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (IRFDPs) made from computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-manufactured yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) frameworks with two different connector dimensions, with and without fatigue loading. Twelve IRFDPs each were made with connector dimensions 3 x 3 mm(2) (width x height) (control group) and 3 x 2 mm(2) (test group). Inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses were adhesively cemented on identical metal-models using composite resin cement. Subgroups of six specimens each were fatigued with maximal 1,200,000 loading cycles in a chewing simulator with a weight load of 25 kg and a load frequency of 1.5 Hz. The load-bearing capacity was tested in a universal testing machine for IRFDPs without fatigue loading and for IRFDPs that had not already fractured during fatigue loading. During fatigue testing one IRFDP (17%) of the test group failed. Under both loading conditions, IRFDPs of the control group exhibited statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacities than the test group. Fatigue loading reduced the load-bearing capacity in both groups. Considering the maximum chewing forces in the molar region, it seems possible to use zirconia ceramic as a core material for IRFDPs with a minimum connector dimension of 9 mm(2). A further reduction of the connector dimensions to 6 mm(2) results in a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity.

  3. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with all-ceramic inlays and onlays: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Saridag, S; Sevimay, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Fracture resistance of inlays and onlays may be influenced by the quantity of the dental structure removed and the restorative materials used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of two different cavity preparation designs and all-ceramic restorative materials on the fracture resistance of the tooth-restoration complex. Fifty mandibular third molar teeth were randomly divided into the following five groups: group 1: intact teeth (control); group 2: inlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein); group 3: inlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon, Zirkonzahn SRL, Gais, Italy); group 4: onlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press); and group 5: onlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The inlay and onlay restorations were adhesively cemented with dual polymerizing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). After thermal cycling (5° to 55°C × 5000 cycles), specimens were subjected to a compressive load until fracture at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. The fracture strength values were significantly higher in the inlay group (2646.7 ± 360.4) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic than those of the onlay group (1673.6 ± 677) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic. The fracture strength values of teeth restored with inlays using zirconia ceramic (2849 ± 328) and onlays with zirconia ceramic (2796.3 ± 337.3) were similar to those of the intact teeth (2905.3 ± 398.8). In the IPS e.max Press groups, as the preparation amount was increased (from inlay to onlay preparation), the fracture resistance was decreased. In the ICE Zirkon ceramic groups, the preparation type did not affect the fracture resistance results.

  4. On the Structure and Evolution of a Polar Crown Prominence/Filament System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Schmit, D. J.; Tiwari, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Polar crown prominences, that partially circle the Sun's poles between 60° and 70° latitude, are made of chromospheric plasma. We aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of a polar crown prominence using high-cadence EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA at 304, 171, and 193 Å and the Ahead spacecraft of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A)/EUVI at 195 Å. Using time series across specific structures, we compare flows across the disk in 195 Å with the prominence dynamics seen on the limb. The densest prominence material forms vertical columns that are separated by many tens of Mm and connected by dynamic bridges of plasma that are clearly visible in 304/171 Å two-colour images. We also observe intermittent but repetitious flows with velocity 15 km s-1 in the prominence that appear to be associated with EUV bright points on the solar disk. The boundary between the prominence and the overlying cavity appears as a sharp edge. We discuss the structure of the coronal cavity seen both above and around the prominence. SDO/HMI and GONG magnetograms are used to infer the underlying magnetic topology. The evolution and structure of the prominence with respect to the magnetic field seems to agree with the filament-linkage model.

  5. Effect of software version and parameter settings on the marginal and internal adaptation of crowns fabricated with the CAD/CAM system

    PubMed Central

    SHIM, Ji Suk; Jin Sook, LEE; Jeong Yol, LEE; CHOI, Yeon Jo; SHIN, Sang Wan; Jae Jun, RYU

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the marginal and internal adaptation of individual dental crowns fabricated using a CAD/CAM system (Sirona’s BlueCam), also evaluating the effect of the software version used, and the specific parameter settings in the adaptation of crowns. Material and Methods Forty digital impressions of a master model previously prepared were acquired using an intraoral scanner and divided into four groups based on the software version and on the spacer settings used. The versions 3.8 and 4.2 of the software were used, and the spacer parameter was set at either 40 μm or 80 μm. The marginal and internal fit of the crowns were measured using the replica technique, which uses a low viscosity silicone material that simulates the thickness of the cement layer. The data were analyzed using a Friedman two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests with significance level set at p<0.05. Results The two-way ANOVA analysis showed the software version (p<0.05) and the spacer parameter (p<0.05) significantly affected the crown adaptation. The crowns designed with the version 4.2 of the software showed a better fit than those designed with the version 3.8, particularly in the axial wall and in the inner margin. The spacer parameter was more accurately represented in the version 4.2 of the software than in the version 3.8. In addition, the use of the version 4.2 of the software combined with the spacer parameter set at 80 μm showed the least variation. On the other hand, the outer margin was not affected by the variables. Conclusion Compared to the version 3.8 of the software, the version 4.2 can be recommended for the fabrication of well-fitting crown restorations, and for the appropriate regulation of the spacer parameter. PMID:26537722

  6. Micrometric precision of prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; de Almeida Prado Naves Carneiro, Thiago; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Zancopé, Karla; Davi, Letícia Resende; Mendonça, Gustavo; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-08-01

    The current study evaluated prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and a computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system using micro-computed tomography to compare the marginal fit. The virtual models were obtained with four different scanning surfaces: typodont (T), regular impressions (RI), master casts (MC), and powdered master casts (PMC). Five virtual models were obtained for each group. For each model, a crown was designed on the software and milled from feldspathic ceramic blocks. Micro-CT images were obtained for marginal gap measurements and the data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The mean vertical misfit was T = 62.6 ± 65.2 μm ; MC = 60.4 ± 38.4 μm; PMC = 58.1 ± 38.0 μm, and RI = 89.8 ± 62.8 μm. Considering a percentage of vertical marginal gap of up to 75 μm, the results were T = 71.5%, RI = 49.2%, MC = 69.6%, and PMC = 71.2%. The percentages of horizontal overextension were T = 8.5%, RI = 0%, MC = 0.8%, and PMC = 3.8%. Based on the results, virtual model acquisition by scanning the typodont (simulated mouth) or MC, with or without powder, showed acceptable values for the marginal gap. The higher result of marginal gap of the RI group suggests that it is preferable to scan this directly from the mouth or from MC.

  7. Micrometric precision of prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; de Almeida Prado Naves Carneiro, Thiago; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Zancopé, Karla; Davi, Letícia Resende; Mendonça, Gustavo; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-08-01

    The current study evaluated prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and a computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system using micro-computed tomography to compare the marginal fit. The virtual models were obtained with four different scanning surfaces: typodont (T), regular impressions (RI), master casts (MC), and powdered master casts (PMC). Five virtual models were obtained for each group. For each model, a crown was designed on the software and milled from feldspathic ceramic blocks. Micro-CT images were obtained for marginal gap measurements and the data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The mean vertical misfit was T=62.6±65.2 μm; MC=60.4±38.4 μm; PMC=58.1±38.0 μm, and RI=89.8±62.8 μm. Considering a percentage of vertical marginal gap of up to 75 μm, the results were T=71.5%, RI=49.2%, MC=69.6%, and PMC=71.2%. The percentages of horizontal overextension were T=8.5%, RI=0%, MC=0.8%, and PMC=3.8%. Based on the results, virtual model acquisition by scanning the typodont (simulated mouth) or MC, with or without powder, showed acceptable values for the marginal gap. The higher result of marginal gap of the RI group suggests that it is preferable to scan this directly from the mouth or from MC.

  8. Restoration of incisal half with edge-up technique using ceramic partial crown in turner's hypoplasia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shreya; Kundabala, M

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a rare treatment modality for Turner's hypoplasia done with a very conservative approach for the esthetic and functional problem of the defect. Diagnosis was made as Turner's hypoplasia of upper two central incisors with proximal caries. Treatment planning was done after considering many factors such as conservation of tooth structure, esthetics, occlusion and economy. Tooth preparation was done to receive Edge-up, all ceramic partial crowns for both the upper central incisors,using pressable all ceramic material and cemented with resin cement. PMID:24554869

  9. REE in skarn systems: A LA-ICP-MS study of garnets from the Crown Jewel gold deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, Miguel; Knaack, Charles; Meinert, Lawrence D.; Moretti, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Metamorphic and magmatic garnets are known to fractionate REE, with generally HREE-enriched patterns, and high Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd ratios, making them very useful as geochemical tracers and in geochronological studies. However, these garnets are typically Al-rich (pyrope, almandine, spessartine, and grossular) and little is known about garnets with a more andraditic (Fe 3+) composition, as frequently found in skarn systems. This paper presents LA-ICP-MS data for garnets from the Crown Jewel Au-skarn deposit (USA), discusses the factors controlling incorporation of REE into garnets, and strengthens the potential of garnet REE geochemistry as a tool to help understand the evolution of metasomatic fluids. Garnets from the Crown Jewel deposit range from Adr 30Grs 70 to almost pure andradite (Adr >99). Fe-rich garnets (Adr >90) are isotropic, whereas Al-rich garnets deviate from cubic symmetry and are anisotropic, often showing sectorial dodecahedral twinning. All garnets are extremely LILE-depleted, Ta, Hf, and Th and reveal a positive correlation of ΣREE 3+ with Al content. The Al-rich garnets are relatively enriched in Y, Zr, and Sc and show "typical" HREE-enriched and LREE-depleted patterns with small Eu anomalies. Fe-rich garnets (Adr >90) have much lower ΣREE and exhibit LREE-enriched and HREE-depleted patterns, with a strong positive Eu anomaly. Incorporation of REE into garnet is in part controlled by its crystal chemistry, with REE 3+ following a coupled, YAG-type substitution mechanism ([X]-1VIII[REE]+1VIII[Si]-1IV[Z]+1IV), whereas Eu 2+ substitutes for X 2+ cations. Thermodynamic data (e.g., Hmixing) in grossular-andradite mixtures suggest preferential incorporation of HREE in grossular and LREE in more andraditic compositions. Variations in textural and optical features and in garnet geochemistry are largely controlled by external factors, such as fluid composition, W/ R ratios, mineral growth kinetics, and metasomatism dynamics, suggesting an overall system

  10. Effect of preparation angles on the precision of zirconia crown copings fabricated by CAD/CAM system.

    PubMed

    Beuer, Florian; Edelhoff, Daniel; Gernet, Wolfgang; Naumann, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different preparation angles on the precision of fit of zirconia crown frameworks. Dies were fabricated with three different preparation angles: 4, 8, and 12 degrees total taper. Ten copings were fabricated for each angle by a laboratory and a milling-center CAD/CAM system. After cementation, cross-sections were obtained and cement gaps were measured. Preparation angle (ANOVA, p < 0.01) and measurement location (ANOVA, p < 0.01) exhibited statistically significant influence on the precision of fit. On the other hand, no statistically significant influences were detected between copings prepared using the laboratory and milling-center CAD/CAM systems (ANOVA, p = 0.92). All groups showed marginal openings ranging between 36.6 and 45.5 microm. In light of the results obtained in this study, a preparation angle of 12 degrees is hence recommended with the confidence that the marginal gap will be consistently less than 50 microm.

  11. Fracture strength of all-ceramic lithium disilicate and porcelain-fused-to-metal bridges for molar replacement after dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Chitmongkolsuk, Somsak; Heydecke, Guido; Stappert, Christian; Strub, Joerg R

    2002-03-01

    The replacement of missing posterior teeth using all-ceramic bridges remains a challenge. This study compares the fracture resistance of all-ceramic 3-unit bridges for the replacement of first molars to conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal bridges. Human premolars and molars were used to create two test groups and one control group of 16 specimens each. To simulate clinical parameters, the specimens were exposed to cyclic fatigue loading in an artificial mouth with simultaneous thermocycling. All samples were thereafter exposed to fracture strength testing. Porcelain-fused-to-metal bridges showed significantly higher fracture strengths than all-ceramic bridges. However, the fracture strength of the all-ceramic bridges was higher than peak physiological chewing forces.

  12. Longevity of Single-Tooth All-Ceramic CAD/CAM Restorations: A Meta-Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    12     system. The cost of this system is approximately $116,000. The iTero system incorporates both a laser and a light emitting diode (LED...Altschuler, B. (1977). Laser holography in dentistry . Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry , 38 (2), 216-225. Zimmer S, Gohlich O, Ruttermann S, Lang H, Raab W...A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Comprehensive Dentistry Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services

  13. Coordination effect-regulated CO2 capture with an alkali metal onium salts/crown ether system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen; Jiang, Deen; Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Brown, Suree; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; He, Liang-Nian; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A coordination effect was employed to realize equimolar CO2 absorption, adopting easily synthesized amino group containing absorbents (alkali metal onium salts). The essence of our strategy was to increase the steric hindrance of cations so as to enhance a carbamic acid pathway for CO2 capture. Our easily synthesized alkali metal amino acid salts or phenolates were coordinated with crown ethers, in which highly sterically hindered cations were obtained through a strong coordination effect of crown ethers with alkali metal cations. For example, a CO2 capacity of 0.99 was attained by potassium prolinate/18-crown-6, being characterized by NMR, FT-IR, and quantum chemistry calculations to go through a carbamic acid formation pathway. The captured CO2 can be stripped under very mild conditions (50 degrees C, N-2). Thus, this protocol offers an alternative for the development of technological innovation towards efficient and low energy processes for carbon capture and sequestration.

  14. Crown ethers in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; ...

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basicmore » structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.« less

  15. Crown ethers in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2014-11-13

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basic structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.

  16. ALL-CERAMIC AND PORCELAIN-FUSED-TO-METAL FIXED PARTIAL DENTURES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BY 2D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSES

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Andréia Barreira; Pereira, Luiz Carlos; da Cunha, Andréia R.C.C

    2007-01-01

    All-ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have an esthetic approach for oral rehabilitation. However, metal-ceramic FPDs are best indicated in the posterior area where the follow-up studies found a lower failure rate. This 2D finite element study compared the stress distribution on 3-unit all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FPDs and identified the areas of major risk of failure. Three FPD models were designed: (1) metal-ceramic FPD; (2) All-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain on the occlusal and cervical surface of the abutment tooth; (3) All-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain only on the occlusal surface. A 100 N load was applied in an area of 0.5 mm2 on the working cusps, following these simulations: (1) on the abutment teeth and the pontic; (2) only on the abutment teeth; and (3) only on the pontic. Relative to the maximum stress values found for the physiological load, all-ceramic FPD with only occlusal veneering porcelain produced the lowest stress value (220 MPa), followed by all-ceramic FPD with cervical veneering porcelain (322 MPa) and metal-ceramic FPD (387 MPa). The stress distribution of the load applied on the abutments was significantly better compared to the other two load simulations. The highest principal stress values were low and limited in a small area for the three types of models under this load. When the load was applied on the pontic, the highest stress values appeared on the connector areas between the abutments and pontic. In conclusion, the best stress values and distribution were found for the all-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain only on the occlusal surface. However, in under clinical conditions, fatigue conditions and restoration defects must be considered. PMID:19089168

  17. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Stainless Steel Crowns Using Two Mechanical Surface Treatments and Two Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Sara; Heidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to stainless steel crowns (SSC) using two mechanical surface treatments (MSTs) and two bonding systems. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SSCs were divided into six groups of 14; Group1: No MST+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (N+U), Group 2: Surface roughening by a diamond bur+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (R+U), Group 3: Sandblasting+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (S+U), Group 4: No MST+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (N+A), Group 5: Surface roughening by a diamond bur+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (R+A), Group 6: Sandblasting+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (S+A). After MST and bonding procedure, composite cylinders were bonded to the lingual surface of SSCs, then the SBS of composite to SSCs was measured using a universal testing machine following thermocycling. Results: The SBS of groups R+U and S+U was significantly higher than that of group N+U. No significant difference was noted in SBS of groups R+U and S+U. The SBS of group S+A was significantly higher than that of groups N+A and R+A. No significant difference was noted in the SBS of groups N+A and R+A (P>0.05). Conclusions: In Scotchbond Universal adhesive groups, sandblasting and surface roughening by diamond bur significantly increased the SBS of composite to SSCs compared to no MST. In Alloy Primer groups, sandblasting significantly increased the SBS of composite to SSC compared to surface roughening with diamond bur and no MST. PMID:27536330

  18. Techniques used to fabricate all-ceramic restorations in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Puri, Sameer

    2005-07-01

    Porcelain is an increasingly popular material to use for restorations. This article will discuss the 3 main ways to fabricate porcelain restorations. The first method involves waxing up the restoration to the proper form and casting it in molten porcelain similar to the lost wax technique for gold. The second technique requires the use of porcelain in a powder form to be stacked on top of a refractory die or a platinum foil and then fired in the oven. The third main technique is the use of a CAD/CAM system to mill the porcelain restoration from a solid block of porcelain. All 3 techniques are valid and the clinician should have a thorough understanding of which techniques are appropriate in various clinical situations.

  19. [All-ceramic restorations in the esthetic zone--the problem of choice].

    PubMed

    Devigus, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The restoration of anterior teeth even for the experienced practitioner remains a challenge. Although there are different full-ceramic materials available on the market, the reproduction of optical properties in natural teeth is not easy at all. In this article, the author presents a simplified classification of teeth to be restored, in relation to the optical properties of actual ceramic systems, which helps to make the natural reproduction more predictable. For the dentist it's important to know about the optical properties of the teeth to be restored and the ceramic material used. Without this, the clinical success of restorations in the anterior segment of may not be predictable at all. For implant retained-and bridge-work there are additional parameters that need to be taken into consideration which are not addressed in this article. Ceramic materials with a high light transmission allow, in combination with adhesive bonding, the fabrication of esthetic restorations. High strength ceramics block the light more and therefore are not indicated for this type of reconstruction. They may be used to mask discolored substructures. The communication between dentist and lab technician plays an important role to be clinically successful.

  20. All-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial bridge using a CAD-CAM produced Y-TZP framework and fluoroapatite veneering ceramic: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Ronaldo; Viotti, Ronaldo; Reis, Andre Figueiredo; de Andrade, Oswaldo Scopin

    2007-11-01

    All-ceramic materials have become an excellent option for both anterior and posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) due to advances in esthetic and mechanical properties. This clinical report describes the use of an all-ceramic inlay-retained three-unit FPD for replacement of a maxillary second premolar. Prosthetic restorative materials consisted of a CAD-CAM processed presintered yttrium stabilized zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) framework and a fluoroapatite veneering ceramic. The minimally invasive preparation technique and advantages of this highly esthetic and resistant treatment option are discussed.

  1. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces. PMID:28042280

  2. Effects of surface-conditioning methods on shear bond strength of brackets bonded to different all-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Saraç, Y Şinasi; Külünk, Tolga; Elekdağ-Türk, Selma; Saraç, Duygu; Türk, Tamer

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of two surface-conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded to three different all-ceramic materials, and to evaluate the mode of failure after debonding. Twenty feldspathic, 20 fluoro-apatite, and 20 leucite-reinforced ceramic specimens were examined following two surface-conditioning methods: air-particle abrasion (APA) with 25 μm Al(2)O(3) and silica coating with 30 μm Al(2)O(3) particles modified by silica. After silane application, metal brackets were bonded with light cure composite and then stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermocycled (×1000 at 5-55°C for 30 seconds). The SBS of the brackets was measured on a universal testing machine. The ceramic surfaces were examined with a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of composite resin remaining using the adhesive remnant index. Two-way analysis of variance, Tukey's multiple comparison test, and Weibull analysis were used for evaluation of SBS. The lowest SBS was with APA for the fluoro-apatite ceramic (11.82 MPa), which was not significantly different from APA for the feldspathic ceramic (13.58 MPa). The SBS for the fluoro-apatite ceramic was significantly lower than that of leucite-reinforced ceramic with APA (14.82 MPa). The highest SBS value was obtained with silica coating of the leucite-reinforced ceramic (24.17 MPa), but this was not significantly different from the SBS for feldspathic and fluoro-apatite ceramic (23.51 and 22.18 MPa, respectively). The SBS values with silica coating showed significant differences from those of APA. For all samples, the adhesive failures were between the ceramic and composite resin. No ceramic fractures or cracks were observed. Chairside tribochemical silica coating significantly increased the mean bond strength values.

  3. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A.; Shibli, Jamil A.; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:26609452

  4. Tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hmaidouch, Rim; Weigl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to assess tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region in vitro and in vivo. An electronic PubMed search was conducted to identify studies on tooth wear against ceramic crowns in posterior region. The selected studies were analyzed in regard to type of crowns, natural antagonist, measuring protocol and outcome. From a yield of 1 000 titles, 43 articles were selected for full-text analysis; finally, no in vitro and only five in vivo studies met the inclusion criteria. As there is heterogeneity in design, used measuring method, ceramics and analysis-form, a meta-analysis was not possible. Results of these studies are very controversial which makes a scientifically valid comparison impossible. This review indicated that some all-ceramic crowns are as wear friendly as metal-ceramic crowns. Up to now, it has been impossible to associate tooth wear with any specific causal agent. The role of ceramic surface treatment that might be responsible for the changing in rate of tooth wear seems undetermined as yet through clinical trials. The literature reveals that studies on this topic are subject to a substantial amount of bias. Therefore, additional clinical studies, properly designed to diminish bias, are warranted. PMID:24136675

  5. Comparison of the static loading capacity of all-ceramic bridge frameworks in posterior teeth using three hard core materials.

    PubMed

    Dornhofer, R; Arnetzl, G V; Koller, M; Arnetzl, G

    2007-10-01

    In this in vitro investigation, we studied the static strength of three-unit all-ceramic bridge frameworks with rigid positioning of the abutments. The materials used were Vita InCeram Alumina, Vita InCeram Zirkonia, and zirconium oxide (Vita InCeram (X YZ Cubes for Cerec). A finite element calculation was performed for numerical comparison of the load-bearing capacity of two main normal tensions. The purpose of the investigation was to design a framework made from hard core material, that offers the greatest possible resistance in static fracture loading tests. In a model, the 2nd maxillary right premolar and 2nd maxillary right molar served as bridge abutments and were provided with a chamfer preparation. On this base, two different bridge frameworks were constructed using CAD/CAM technology after an impression had been taken. One bridge connector was designed heart-shaped, with contact to the gingiva, while the other was designed as a "free-connector" at a distance of 1.2 mm from the gingiva. In this framework design, the radius in the cervical connector area is larger. We were uncertain as to whether it would be possible to further increase the strength of the ceramic material by the use of the differently designed pontic, independent of the hard core ceramic used. The least fracture strength was registered for the "heart-shaped connector" constructed from InCeram Alumina, with a mean fracture load of about 1089 Newton (N). The connector designed as a "free connector", made from the same material, was stronger by 10%. With the materials InCeram Zirkonia and zirconium dioxide as well, the "free-connector" design achieved a 10% higher breakage limit than the heart-shaped design. InCeram Zirkonia was 25% more stable in the static load tests than InCeram Alumina. Zirconium dioxide demonstrated a 2.3-fold greater strength than InCeram Alumina, while the free-connector design showed the greatest mean static loading capacity of 2808 N.

  6. Root Interactions in a Maize/Soybean Intercropping System Control Soybean Soil-Borne Disease, Red Crown Rot

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Man; Xu, Ruineng; Wang, Xiurong; Pan, Ruqian; Kim, Hye-Ji; Liao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Within-field multiple crop species intercropping is well documented and used for disease control, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. As roots are the primary organ for perceiving signals in the soil from neighboring plants, root behavior may play an important role in soil-borne disease control. Principal Findings In two years of field experiments, maize/soybean intercropping suppressed the occurrence of soybean red crown rot, a severe soil-borne disease caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum (C. parasiticum). The suppressive effects decreased with increasing distance between intercropped plants under both low P and high P supply, suggesting that root interactions play a significant role independent of nutrient status. Further detailed quantitative studies revealed that the diversity and intensity of root interactions altered the expression of important soybean PR genes, as well as, the activity of corresponding enzymes in both P treatments. Furthermore, 5 phenolic acids were detected in root exudates of maize/soybean intercropped plants. Among these phenolic acids, cinnamic acid was released in significantly greater concentrations when intercropped maize with soybean compared to either crop grown in monoculture, and this spike in cinnamic acid was found dramatically constrain C. parasiticum growth in vitro. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate that intercropping with maize can promote resistance in soybean to red crown rot in a root-dependent manner. This supports the point that intercropping may be an efficient ecological strategy to control soil-borne plant disease and should be incorporated in sustainable agricultural management practices. PMID:24810161

  7. The evolution of jumping in frogs: morphological evidence for the basal anuran locomotor condition and the radiation of locomotor systems in crown group anurans.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Stephen M; Jorgensen, Michael E

    2011-02-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of frog locomotion follows from the work of Emerson in which anurans are proposed to possess one of three different iliosacral configurations: 1) a lateral-bending system found in walking and hopping frogs; 2) a fore-aft sliding mechanism found in several locomotor modes; and 3) a sagittal-hinge-type pelvis posited to be related to long-distance jumping performance. The most basal living (Ascaphus) and fossil (Prosalirus) frogs are described as sagittal-hinge pelvic types, and it has been proposed that long-distance jumping with a sagittal-hinge pelvis arose early in frog evolution. We revisited osteological traits of the pelvic region to conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the relationships between pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Using two of Emerson's diagnostic traits from the sacrum and ilium and two new traits from the urostyle, we resampled the taxa originally studied by Emerson and key paleotaxa and conducted an analysis of ancestral-character state evolution in relation to locomotor mode. We present a new pattern for the evolution of pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Character analysis shows that the lateral-bender, walker/hopper condition is both basal and generally conserved across the Anura. Long-distance jumping frogs do not appear until well within the Neobatrachia. The sagittal-hinge morphology is correlated with long-distance jumping in terrestrial frogs; however, it evolved convergently multiple times in crown group anurans with the same four pelvic traits described herein. Arboreal jumping has appeared in multiple crown lineages as well, but with divergent patterns of evolution involving each of the three pelvic types. The fore-aft slider morph appears independently in three different locomotor modes and, thus, is a more complex system than previously thought. Finally, it appears that the advent of a bicondylar sacro-urostylic articulation was originally related to providing axial rigidity

  8. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-generated composite resin-based molar crowns.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akio; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Örtengren, Ulf; Niwano, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether different fabrication processes, such as the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system or the manual build-up technique, affect the fracture resistance of composite resin-based crowns. Lava Ultimate (LU), Estenia C&B (EC&B), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic IPS e.max press (EMP) were used. Four types of molar crowns were fabricated: CAD/CAM-generated composite resin-based crowns (LU crowns); manually built-up monolayer composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-monolayer crowns); manually built-up layered composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-layered crowns); and EMP crowns. Each type of crown was cemented to dies and the fracture resistance was tested. EC&B-layered crowns showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared with LU and EMP crowns, although there was no significant difference in flexural strength or fracture toughness between LU and EC&B materials. Micro-computed tomography and fractographic analysis showed that decreased strength probably resulted from internal voids in the EC&B-layered crowns introduced by the layering process. There was no significant difference in fracture resistance among LU, EC&B-monolayer, and EMP crowns. Both types of composite resin-based crowns showed fracture loads of >2000 N, which is higher than the molar bite force. Therefore, CAD/CAM-generated crowns, without internal defects, may be applied to molar regions with sufficient fracture resistance.

  9. Dental students' preferences and performance in crown design: conventional wax-added versus CAD.

    PubMed

    Douglas, R Duane; Hopp, Christa D; Augustin, Marcus A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental students' perceptions of traditional waxing vs. computer-aided crown design and to determine the effectiveness of either technique through comparative grading of the final products. On one of twoidentical tooth preparations, second-year students at one dental school fabricated a wax pattern for a full contour crown; on the second tooth preparation, the same students designed and fabricated an all-ceramic crown using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology. Projects were graded for occlusion and anatomic form by three faculty members. On completion of the projects, 100 percent of the students (n=50) completed an eight-question, five-point Likert scalesurvey, designed to assess their perceptions of and learning associated with the two design techniques. The average grades for the crown design projects were 78.3 (CAD) and 79.1 (wax design). The mean numbers of occlusal contacts were 3.8 (CAD) and 2.9(wax design), which was significantly higher for CAD (p=0.02). The survey results indicated that students enjoyed designing afull contour crown using CAD as compared to using conventional wax techniques and spent less time designing the crown using CAD. From a learning perspective, students felt that they learned more about position and the size/strength of occlusal contacts using CAD. However, students recognized that CAD technology has limits in terms of representing anatomic contours and excursive occlusion compared to conventional wax techniques. The results suggest that crown design using CAD could be considered as an adjunct to conventional wax-added techniques in preclinical fixed prosthodontic curricula.

  10. Aurora Australis, Red Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a spiked band of red airglow called a 'Red Crown' above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  11. Crown-shaped tungstogermanates as solvent-controlled dual systems in the formation of vesicle-like assemblies.

    PubMed

    Artetxe, Beñat; Reinoso, Santiago; San Felices, Leire; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan M; García, José A; Haso, Fadi; Liu, Tianbo; Vicent, Cristian

    2015-05-18

    Reaction of early lanthanides, GeO2 , and Na2 WO4 in a NaOAc buffer results in large crown-shaped polyoxometalates based on [Ln2 GeW10 O38 ](6-) subunits. By using Ni(2+) as a crystallizing agent, [Na⊂Ln12 Ge6 W60 O228 (H2 O)24 ](35-) (Na⊂Ln12 ) hexamers formed by alternating β(1,5)/β(1,8) subunits were obtained for Ln=Pr, Nd. The addition of K(+) led to a similar anion for Ln=Sm, namely, [K⊂Sm12 Ge6 W60 O228 (H2 O)22 ](35-) (K⊂Sm12 ) and [K⊂K7 Ln24 Ge12 W120 O444 (OH)12 (H2 O)64 ](52-) (K⊂Ln24 ) dodecamers that consist of a central core identical to K⊂Sm12 decorated with six external γ(3,4) subunits for Ln=Pr, Nd. These anions dissociate in water into hexameric cores and monomeric entities, as shown by ESI mass spectrometry. The former self-assemble into spherical, hollow, and single-layered blackberry-type structures with radii of approximately 75 nm, as monitored by laser light scattering (LLS) and TEM techniques. Analogous studies performed for K⊂Nd24 in water/acetone mixtures show that the dodecamers remain stable and form in turn their own type of blackberries with sizes that increase from approximately 20 to 50 nm with increasing acetone content. This control over both the composition and size of the vesicle-like assemblies is achieved for the first time by modifying the architecture of the species that undergoes supramolecular association through the solvent polarity.

  12. Fracture Strength of Zirconia and Alumina Ceramic Crowns Supported by Implants.

    PubMed

    Traini, Tonino; Sorrentino, Roberto; Gherlone, Enrico; Perfetti, Federico; Bollero, Patrizio; Zarone, Ferdinando

    2015-07-01

    Due to the brittleness and limited tensile strength of the veneering glass-ceramic materials, the methods that combine strong core material (as zirconia or alumina) are still under debate. The present study aims to evaluate the fracture strength and the mechanism of failure through fractographic analysis of single all-ceramic crowns supported by implants. Forty premolar cores were fabricated with CAD/CAM technology using alumina (n = 20) and zirconia (n = 20). The specimens were veneered with glass-ceramic, cemented on titanium abutments, and subjected to loading test until fracture. SEM fractographic analysis was also performed. The fracture load was 1165 (±509) N for alumina and 1638 (±662) N for zirconia with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.026). Fractographic analysis of alumina-glass-ceramic crowns, showed the presence of catastrophic cracks through the entire thickness of the alumina core; for the zirconia-glass-ceramic crowns, the cracks involved mainly the thickness of the ceramic veneering layer. The sandblast procedure of the zirconia core influenced crack path deflection. Few samples (n = 3) showed limited microcracks of the zirconia core. Zirconia showed a significantly higher fracture strength value in implant-supported restorations, indicating the role played by the high resistant cores for premolar crowns.

  13. Marginal and internal fit of heat pressed versus CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays after exposure to thermo-mechanical fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Petra C.; Vagopoulou, Thaleia; Zhang, Yu; Wolkewitz, Martin; Strub, Joerg R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of heat-pressed and CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays before and after luting as well as after thermo-mechanical fatigue. Materials and Methods Seventy-two caries-free, extracted human mandibular molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=24/group). All teeth received an onlay preparation with a mesio-occlusal-distal inlay cavity and an occlusal reduction of all cusps. Teeth were restored with heat-pressed IPS-e.max-Press* (IP, *Ivoclar-Vivadent) and Vita-PM9 (VP, Vita-Zahnfabrik) as well as CAD/CAM fabricated IPS-e.max-CAD* (IC, Cerec 3D/InLab/Sirona) all-ceramic materials. After cementation with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (VariolinkII*), all restorations were subjected to mouth-motion fatigue (98N, 1.2 million cycles; 5°C/55°C). Marginal fit discrepancies were examined on epoxy replicas before and after luting as well as after fatigue at 200x magnification. Internal fit was evaluated by multiple sectioning technique. For the statistical analysis, a linear model was fitted with accounting for repeated measurements. Results Adhesive cementation of onlays resulted in significantly increased marginal gap values in all groups, whereas thermo-mechanical fatigue had no effect. Marginal gap values of all test groups were equal after fatigue exposure. Internal discrepancies of CAD/CAM fabricated restorations were significantly higher than both press manufactured onlays. Conclusions Mean marginal gap values of the investigated onlays before and after luting as well as after fatigue were within the clinically acceptable range. Marginal fit was not affected by the investigated heat-press versus CAD/CAM fabrication technique. Press fabrication resulted in a superior internal fit of onlays as compared to the CAD/CAM technique. Clinical Relevance Clinical requirements of 100 μm for marginal fit were fulfilled by the heat-press as well as by the CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays

  14. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Kalaivani, S.; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P.; Sujatha, S.; Rajasekaran, S. A.; Karthikeyan, B.; Kalaiselvan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26538965

  15. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, S; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P; Sujatha, S; Rajasekaran, S A; Karthikeyan, B; Kalaiselvan, S

    2015-08-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta.

  16. INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF CAST TITANIUM CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Fonseca, Renata Garcia

    2007-01-01

    As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm). For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height) was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430°C, 515°C and 600°C. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3) for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X) and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm2). The data for each experimental condition (n=8) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05). The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD) of internal misfit were obtained for the 430°C/100%: (7.25 mm2 ±1.59) and 600°C/100% (8.8 mm2 ±2.25) groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit. PMID:19089139

  17. Influence of core thickness and artificial aging on the biaxial flexural strength of different all-ceramic materials: An in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Dikicier, Sibel; Ayyildiz, Simel; Ozen, Julide; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2017-02-11

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the flexural strength of all-ceramics with varying core thicknesses submitted to aging. In-Ceram Alumina (IC), IPS e.max Press (EM) and Katana (K) (n=40), were selected. Each group contained two core groups based on the core thickness as follows: IC/0.5, IC/0.8, EM/0.5, EM/0.8, K/0.5 and K/0.8 mm in thickness (n=20 each). Ten specimens from each group were subjected to aging and all specimens were tested for strength in a testing machine either with or without being subjected aging. The mean strength of the K were higher (873.05 MPa) than that of the IC (548.28 MPa) and EM (374.32 MPa) regardless of core thickness. Strength values increased with increasing core thickness for all IC, EM and K regardless of aging. Results of this study concluded that strength was not significantly affected by aging. Different core thicknesses affected strength of the all-ceramic materials tested (p<0.05).

  18. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-01-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  19. [Prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients: fixed - removable - combined? Metal - ceramics - all - ceramics? Implants? Anything goes! Part 1: two example cases of a combined fixed-removable restoration].

    PubMed

    Schnabl, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    After a careful diagnosis, treatment planning and pretreatment, two partially edentulous patients were restored partly by onlays, crowns and bridges, partly by removable prostheses. According to esthetic and functional demands all- and/or metal-ceramic restorations were used as well as cast frame prostheses with clasps or extracoronal attachments.

  20. A novel method for creating endodontic access preparations through all-ceramic restorations: air abrasion and its effect relative to diamond and carbide bur use.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Christopher R; Flinn, Brian D; Pitts, David L; Gatten, Timothy L; Johnson, James D

    2005-08-01

    Access through porcelain restorations is a technically delicate and stressful procedure. Although this is a common dilemma in endodontics, little research has explored alternatives in cutting through porcelain. The purpose of this study was to compare the use of a carbide bur plus water, diamond bur plus water, and air abrasion to access through porcelain. All-ceramic samples were accessed using the different techniques. Samples were evaluated using two transillumination methods, white light, and fluorescent liquid penetrant described by the American Society for Testing and Materials. Edge chipping, microcracking, and catastrophic fracture of porcelain caused by the techniques were statistically compared. Fluorescent liquid penetrant was a more sensitive method for microcrack detection. There were significant differences between the preparation techniques. Air abrasion was significantly less destructive, and caused no catastrophic fractures, edge chipping or microcracks. Preparation by air abrasion took longer to complete.

  1. Comparison of Marginal Fit and Fracture Strength of a CAD/CAM Zirconia Crown with Two Preparation Designs

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Hamid; Sadighpour, Leyla; Miri, Ali; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the marginal adaptation and fracture resistance of a zirconia-based all-ceramic restoration with two preparation designs. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four mandibular premolars were randomly divided into two groups (n=12); the conventional group received a peripheral shoulder preparation and the modified group received a buccal shoulder and proximal/lingual chamfer preparation. The marginal fit of the zirconia crowns (Cercon) was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. After cementation, load was applied to the crowns. The mean fracture load and the mean marginal gap for each group were analyzed using t-test (P=0.05). Results: The mean marginal gap was 71±16μm in the conventional group and 80±10μm in the modified group, with no significant difference (P=0.161). The mean fracture strength was 830±153N for the conventional group and 775±125N for the modified group, with no significant difference (P=0.396). All but one fracture occurred in the veneering ceramic. Conclusion: Less aggressive preparation of proximal and lingual finish lines for the preservation of tooth structure in all-ceramic restorations does not adversely affect the marginal adaptation or fracture strength of the final restoration. PMID:27559346

  2. Measuring residual stress in ceramic zirconia-porcelain dental crowns by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Allahkarami, M; Hanan, J C

    2012-02-01

    Residual stress plays a critical role in failure of ceramic dental crowns. The magnitude and distribution of residual stress in the crown system are largely unknown. Determining the residual stress quantitatively is challenging since the crown has such complex contours and shapes. This work explored the feasibility and validity of measuring residual stress of zirconia and porcelain in ceramic crowns by nanoindentation. Nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a crown for both porcelain and zirconia along four critical locations: the thickest, thinnest and medium porcelain thicknesses. Zirconia and porcelain pieces, chipped off from the crown and annealed at 400 °C, were used as reference samples. The residual stress was determined by comparing the measured hardness of the stressed sample with that of the reference sample. Nanoindentation impression images were acquired through a scanning probe microscope (SPM) equipped with a Hysitron Triboindenter. Zirconia showed large pile-up. Residual stress is determined along the thickness of crowns at the chosen locations for both porcelain and zirconia. The measured results were compared with the results from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and finite element modeling (FEM). Results show there are large amounts of residual stresses in the dental crown and their magnitude differs between locations due to the complex shape of the crown. The average residual stress readings were as high as -637 MPa and 323 MPa for zirconia and porcelain respectively.

  3. Full-mouth rehabilitation with monolithic CAD/CAM-fabricated hybrid and all-ceramic materials: A case report and 3-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Selz, Christian F; Vuck, Alexander; Guess, Petra C

    2016-02-01

    Esthetic full-mouth rehabilitation represents a great challenge for clinicians and dental technicians. Computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology and novel ceramic materials in combination with adhesive cementation provide a reliable, predictable, and economic workflow. Polychromatic feldspathic CAD/CAM ceramics that are specifically designed for anterior indications result in superior esthetics, whereas novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramics provide sufficient fracture resistance and adsorption of the occlusal load in posterior areas. Screw-retained monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns (ie, hybrid abutment crowns) represent a reliable and time- and cost-efficient prosthetic implant solution. This case report details a CAD/CAM approach to the full-arch rehabilitation of a 65-year-old patient with toothand implant-supported restorations and provides an overview of the applied CAD/CAM materials and the utilized chairside intraoral scanner. The esthetics, functional occlusion, and gingival and peri-implant tissues remained stable over a follow-up period of 3 years. No signs of fractures within the restorations were observed.

  4. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. RESULTS The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (P<.001), abutment shade (P<.001), and type of zirconia copings (P<.003) on the final shade of the zirconia restorations were significant. The average ΔE value of Lava specimens (1 mm) between the A2 composite resin and gold alloy abutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. CONCLUSION This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations. PMID:26576252

  5. In Vitro Effect of Porcelain Firing Cycle and Different Thicknesses of IPS E.max CAD Core on Marginal Accuracy of All-Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Jalalian, Ezatollah; Zarbakhsh, Arash; Mohtashamrad, Zahra; Nourbakhsh, Nazanin; Jafarpour, Esmat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Marginal adaptation is important for long-term success of full-coverage restorations. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of porcelain firing cycle and different thicknesses of IPS e.max core on marginal accuracy of all-ceramic restorations. Materials and Methods: A standard stainless steel die with 0.8 mm classic chamfer finish line and 10° taper was used in this in vitro study. An impression was taken from the stainless steel die to fabricate 20 epoxy resin dies, which were then scanned and IPS e.max CAD cores were fabricated using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique in two groups of 10 with 0.7 mm (group A) and 0.4mm (group B) core thickness. Copings were then placed on their respective dies and randomly numbered. The amount of marginal gap was measured in 10 points under a stereomicroscope (×90 magnification) before and after porcelain veneering. Results: The mean gap in 0.7mm and 0.4mm core thicknesses was 15.62±2.55μm and 19.68±3.09μm before porcelain firing and 32.01±3.19μm and 35.24±3.8μm after porcelain firing. The difference in marginal gap between the two thicknesses was significant before porcelain firing but not significant after veneering. Significant differences were also found in the marginal gap before and after porcelain veneering in each group. Conclusion: The porcelain firing cycle increases marginal gap in IPS e.max CAD restorations; 0.3 mm decrease in core thickness slightly increased marginal discrepancy, however it was not significant. PMID:27507992

  6. Assessment of crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancies in a South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Doodamani, Geeta Maruti; Khala, Anmol S; Manohar, Mala; Umashankar

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The aim of this study was to assess crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancy in a sample population from Davangere, South India. Materials and Methods: One hundred adults (50 male and 50 female) of age 18–30 years, with Angle's class I ideal occlusion and balanced profiles, were selected for the study. Study models were prepared and crown angulations and crown inclinations were measured using a customized protractor device. Bolton's analysis was used to measure the tooth size discrepancies. Results: Maxillary and mandibular teeth had less crown angulations. Maxillary and mandibular incisors and maxillary molars showed increased crown inclinations, whereas mandibular molars and premolars had less crown inclinations than the original Andrews sample. The mean maxillary and mandibular tooth size ratios, overall and anterior, were similar to Bolton's ratios. Conclusions: The finding of this study indicates that there are possible racial and ethnic factors contributing to variations in crown angulations and crown inclinations. PMID:22090760

  7. Crown angulation and inclination of Northern Thais with good occlusion.

    PubMed

    Jotikasthira, Dhirawat; Sheffield, Peter; Kalha, Anmol; Syed, Zameer

    2010-01-01

    When patients of differing ethnicities are treated with one bracket system, negative consequences for the occlusion can result. This study investigated the crown angulation and inclination on study casts of 60 Northern Thais (30 males and 30 females) with a good occlusion. In all study casts, each tooth (except the third molars) was evaluated with the orthodontic Torque Angulation Device (TAD) twice on the right side; this was also performed twice on the left side. The mean of the two evaluations was used for the statistical analysis. The means of the males and females were compared with the independent Student t test. The results were that the crown angulation of the mandibular first and second molars was significantly higher in females (P<.01) and that the crown inclination of all teeth did not differ between the two sexes.

  8. Preconcentration of thallium (I) by single drop microextraction with electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy detection using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 as extractant system.

    PubMed

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad Hossien; Darroudi, Abolfazl; Salehi, Thiery

    2009-08-15

    A simple single drop liquid-phase microextraction (SDME) technique, combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) is developed both to preconcentrate and determine thallium (I) ions in aqueous solutions. The ions were transferred from 10.0 ml of aqueous sample (donor phase) containing 0.5 ml of 1% picric acid as the ion-pair agent into a 3 microl microdrop of nitrobenzene (acceptor phase) containing dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 as the complexing agent. The latter will help to improve the extraction efficiency of the analyte. After the ions have been extracted, the acceptor drop was directly injected into a graphite furnace for thallium (I) determination. Several parameters such as the extracting solvent, extraction time, temperature, concentration of picric acid and crown ether, drop volume and stirring rate were examined. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the detection limit (L.O.D.) was 0.7 ng ml(-1). The relative standard deviation for five replicate analysis of 10 ng ml(-1) of thallium (I) was 5.1%. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 3-22 ng ml(-1). The results for determination of thallium in reference material, spiked tap water and seawater demonstrated the accuracy, recovery and applicability of the presented method. The enrichment factor was 50.

  9. [Sunrise gold foil jacket crown].

    PubMed

    Lecardonnel, A

    1989-09-01

    This technique permits the preparation of ceramic jacket crowns made on Sunrise laminated precious metal alloy. The Sunrise foil is gold-colored, made of 99% of precious metals and is 50 microns thick. The die is prepared in order to display a moderate and regular undercut beyond the cervical limit. The margin will be underlined with a red pencil. The Sunrise foil is cut according to predetermined templates. Then the foil is applied without burnishing, according to the technique of jacket crowns on platinum foil only by finger pressure. The double folding on closure is preferably done distally or mesially. Then, the metal base is disinserted, sandblasted with 100 microns aluminum oxide, replaced on its die, and placed in a rubber casing before being placed in the isostatic press, to be subjected to a pressure of 2,000 TSI (14 kg par cm2). Sunrise's orange color reinforces rather subtetly the overall color, making these reconstructions particularly esthetic. The color of the Sunrise metal does not require, therefore a too thick opaque. Any ceramic intended to be fired on a metal base, may be used in respecting its firing protocol. Sunrise, as any other technique of this type, require a careful preparation with a shoulder that has a rounded gingivoaxial line angle. Bridges may be built on the "thimbles" crowns, fitted on Sunrise cores, the pontics being made as a ceramo-metal framework.

  10. Material choice for restorative dentistry: inlays, onlays, crowns, and bridges.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2006-01-01

    New materials--specifically the new CAD/CAM zirconia-based systems--are available now for restorative dentistry. When esthetics are not a factor, gold remains the standard, particularly for intracoronal restorations and full posterior coverage. Tooth-colored crowns made with zirconia are new and offer great promise for the future, although more long-term in vivo studies are necessary.

  11. Modelling available crown fuel for Pinus pinaster Ait. stands in the "Cazorla, Segura and Las Villas Natural Park" (Spain).

    PubMed

    Molina, Juan Ramón; Rodríguez y Silva, Francisco; Mérida, Enrique; Herrera, Miguel Ángel

    2014-11-01

    One of the main limiting aspects in the application of crown fire models at landscape scale has been the uncertainty derived to describe canopy fuel stratum. Available crown fuel and canopy bulk density are essential in order to simulate crown fire behaviour and are of potential use in the evaluation of silvicultural treatments. Currently, the more accurate approach to estimate these parameters is to develop allometric models from common stand inventory data. In this sense, maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) trees were destructively sampled in the South of the Iberian Peninsula, covering natural and artificial stands. Crown fine fuel was separated into size classes and allometric equations that estimate crown fuel load by biomass fractions were developed. Available crown fuel was determined according to the fuel load differences between un-burned and burned trees with similar characteristics. Taking our destructive post-fire inventory into account, available crown fuel was estimated as the sum of needles biomass, 87.63% of the twigs biomass and 62.79% of the fine branches biomass. In spite of the differences between natural and artificial stands, generic models explained 82% (needles biomass), 89% (crown fuel), 92% (available crown fuel) and 94% (canopy bulk density) of the observed variation. Inclusion of the fitted models in fire management decision-making can provide a decision support system for assessing the potential crown fire of different silvicultural alternatives.

  12. [Artificial crowns influence upon edge parodontium status].

    PubMed

    Zhulev, E N; Serov, A B

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of prosthetic treatment efficacy increase study of edge parodontium tissue reaction upon different types of artificial crowns was done and methods of chronic localized parodontitis prevention were developed. Changes of the main gingival fluid characteristics (amount, acidity, interleukine-1beta concentration) and indicators of microcirculation in edge parodontium of the teeth under the artificial crowns influence were disclosed. There were developed methods of chronic localized parodontitis prevention produced by artificial crowns edge.

  13. The Interaction between Rice ERF3 and WOX11 Promotes Crown Root Development by Regulating Gene Expression Involved in Cytokinin Signaling[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yaling; Huang, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Crown roots are the main components of the fibrous root system in rice (Oryza sativa). WOX11, a WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene specifically expressed in the emerging crown root meristem, is a key regulator in crown root development. However, the nature of WOX11 function in crown root development has remained elusive. Here, we identified a rice AP2/ERF protein, ERF3, which interacts with WOX11 and was expressed in crown root initials and during crown root growth. Functional analysis revealed that ERF3 was essential for crown root development and acts in auxin- and cytokinin-responsive gene expression. Downregulation of ERF3 in wox11 mutants produced a more severe root phenotype. Also, increased expression of ERF3 could partially complement wox11, indicating that the two genes functioned cooperatively to regulate crown root development. ERF3 and WOX11 shared a common target, the cytokinin-responsive gene RR2. The expression of ERF3 and WOX11 only partially overlapped, underlining a spatio-temporal control of RR2 expression and crown root development. Furthermore, ERF3-regulated RR2 expression was involved in crown root initiation, while the ERF3/WOX11 interaction likely repressed RR2 during crown root elongation. These results define a mechanism regulating gene expression involved in cytokinin signaling during different stages of crown root development in rice. PMID:26307379

  14. Application of Replica Technique and SEM in Accuracy Measurement of Ceramic Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifkovic, B.; Budak, I.; Todorovic, A.; Hodolic, J.; Puskar, T.; Jevremovic, D.; Vukelic, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of the measuring values of the marginal gap related to the ceramic crowns made by dental CAD/CAM system using the replica technique and SEM. The study was conducted using three experimental groups, which consisted of ceramic crowns manufactured by the Cerec CAD/CAM system. The scanning procedure was carried out using three specialized dental 3D digitization systems from the Cerec family - two types of extraoral optical scanning systems and an intraoral optical scanner. Measurements of the marginal gap were carried out using the replica technique and SEM. The comparison of aggregate values of the marginal gap using the replica technique showed a statistically significant difference between the systems. The measured values of marginal gaps of ceramic crowns using the replica technique were significantly lower compared to those measured by SEM. The results indicate that the choice of technique for measuring the accuracy of ceramic crowns influences the final results of investigation.

  15. Durability of tungsten carbide burs for the fabrication of titanium crowns using dental CAD/CAM.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Takashi; Fujiwara, Toshihisa; Tomita, Shoko; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Sugai, Yasuhisa; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durability of tungsten carbide burs for the fabrication of titanium crowns using two dental CAD/CAM systems (DECSY, Digital Process, Japan and Cadim, Advance, Japan). A tungsten carbide bur in each system was examined and used without fracture to fabricate 51 titanium crowns. For both systems tiny chips were found on the bur blade at the 11th machining. These chips gradually enlarged as the number of machining times increased. At the first machining no significant difference in the average surface roughness was found on the crown between the two systems (1.6 microm for DECSY and 1.2 microm for Cadim). The cutting grooves became dull and the average surface roughness increased as the number of machining times increased. It is concluded that the tungsten carbide burs for both systems can be used to fabricate up to 51 titanium crowns.

  16. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    PubMed

    Alsadon, Omar; Patrick, David; Johnson, Anthony; Pollington, Sarah; Wood, Duncan

    2017-02-11

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create 3D crown models and evaluated using FEA. The zirconia/composite crowns subjected to static occlusal load showed comparable results to the zirconia/porcelain crowns. Zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress on the zirconia substructure at 63.6 and 50.9 MPa on the zirconia substructure veneered with porcelain. In conclusion, zirconia/composite crowns withstood high occlusal loads similar to zirconia/porcelain crowns with no significant difference. However, the zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress values than the zirconia/porcelain crowns at the zirconia substructure.

  17. Earliest known crown-group salamanders.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ke-Qin; Shubin, Neil H

    2003-03-27

    Salamanders are a model system for studying the rates and patterns of the evolution of new anatomical structures. Recent discoveries of abundant Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous salamanders are helping to address these issues. Here we report the discovery of well-preserved Middle Jurassic salamanders from China, which constitutes the earliest known record of crown-group urodeles (living salamanders and their closest relatives). The new specimens are from the volcanic deposits of the Jiulongshan Formation (Bathonian), Inner Mongolia, China, and represent basal members of the Cryptobranchidae, a family that includes the endangered Asian giant salamander (Andrias) and the North American hellbender (Cryptobranchus). These fossils document a Mesozoic record of the Cryptobranchidae, predating the previous record of the group by some 100 million years. This discovery provides evidence to support the hypothesis that the divergence of the Cryptobranchidae from the Hynobiidae had taken place in Asia before the Middle Jurassic period.

  18. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  19. Polymeric Electrolyte Containing 12-Crown-4 Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesa; Distefano, Salvador

    1992-01-01

    Experiments show incorporation of 12-crown-4 ether into solid electrolytes based on polyethylene oxide enhances their electrochemical properties. More specifically, 12-crown-4 ether increases Faradaic efficiency for Li+ ions in low-power secondary Li cells and enables operation of these cells at lower temperatures with higher efficiencies.

  20. Pipe weld crown removal device

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.; Sette, Primo J.

    1992-01-01

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  1. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1992-11-24

    A device is provided for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels. 2 figs.

  2. Pipe weld crown removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

  3. [Prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients: fixed - removable - combined? Metal - ceramics - all - ceramics? Implants? Anything goes! Part 2: two case studies represent the fixed, respectively the combined fixed-removable prosthetic restoration by utilization of implants].

    PubMed

    Schnabl, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    The prosthetic rehabilitation of two partially edentulous patients is presented: one Patient was restored by permanent crowns and bridges attached to natural teeth and to implants, the second was treated by crowns attached to natural teeth and removable implant- supported prostheses. Depending on esthetic requirements and the localization of preparation margins all- or metal-ceramics were used for single crowns, metal-ceramics was used for bridges. In general, a well coordinated cooperation of dentist, surgeon and dental technician in treatment planning and realization is required for a successful prosthetic rehabilitation.

  4. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  5. Improved method for estimating tree crown diameter using high-resolution airborne data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkina, Olga; Latypov, Iscander Sh.; Cienciala, Emil; Fabianek, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Automatic mapping of tree crown size (radius, diameter, or width) from remote sensing can provide a major benefit for practical and scientific purposes, but requires the development of accurate methods. This study presents an improved method for average tree crown diameter estimation at a forest plot level from high-resolution airborne data. The improved method consists of the combination of a window binarization procedure and a granulometric algorithm, and avoids the complicated crown delineation procedure that is currently used to estimate crown size. The systematic error in average crown diameter estimates is corrected with the improved method. The improved method is tested with coniferous, beech, and mixed-species forest plots based on airborne images of various spatial resolutions. The absolute (quantitative) accuracy of the improved crown diameter estimates is comparable or higher for both monospecies plots and mixed-species plots than the current methods. The ability of the improved method to produce good estimates for average crown diameters for monoculture and mixed species, to use remote sensing data of various spatial resolution and to operate in automatic mode promisingly suggests its applicability to a wide range of forest systems.

  6. Fracture resistance of porcelain veneered zirconia crowns with exposed lingual zirconia for anterior teeth after thermal cycling: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amir Rad, Fatemeh A.; Succaria, Faysal G.; Morgano, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem In some clinical conditions minimally invasive complete crown tooth preparations are indicated. This is especially true when gross removal of tooth structure would weaken the remaining tooth or violate the vitality of the dental pulp. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of (1) exposed lingual zirconia with veneered zirconia crowns, and (2) reduced lingual thickness of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns on the fracture resistance of the crowns after cyclic loading. Metal-ceramic crowns with exposed lingual metal served as controls. Materials and methods Twenty-four maxillary central incisor crowns were fabricated in identical shape on metal testing dies in 3 groups: metal-ceramic crowns (MC, n = 8), veneered zirconia crowns (VZ, n = 8), and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (MO, n = 8). A conservative preparation design with 0.75 mm lingual clearance was used for each crown system. All crowns were cemented to their corresponding crown preparations with self-adhesive resin cement (Multilink Automix). The crowns were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermal cycling, then cyclic loading of 111 N by means of a stainless steel ball, and 50,000 cycles of loading were applied for the fatigue test. Fatigue loading was followed by a continuously increasing compressive load, at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The compressive load (N) required to cause failure was recorded. Means were calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α = .05). Results There was a significant difference between MO vs. MC (P = .0001), MO vs. VZ (P = .0001), and VZ vs. MC (P = .012). Conclusions There was a significant difference in the mean fracture resistance of MC, VZ, and MO crowns in this in vitro study. The MC group recorded the highest mean fracture strength. PMID:26082571

  7. [Computer aided design and manufacture of the porcelain fused to metal crown].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Yu, Qing; Hao, Guodong; Sun, Quanping

    2009-04-01

    In order to satisfy the current demand for fast and high-quality prosthodontics, we have carried out a research in the fabrication process of the porcelain fused to metal crown on molar with CAD/CAM technology. Firstly, we get the data of the surface mesh on preparation teeth through a 3D-optical grating measuring system. Then, we reconstruct the 3D-model crown with the computer-aided design software which was developed by ourselves. Finally, with the 3D-model data, we produce a metallic crown on a high-speed CNC carving machine. The result has proved that the metallic crown can match the preparation teeth ideally. The fabrication process is reliable and efficient, and the restoration is precise and steady in quality.

  8. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... crown is a prefabricated device made of plastic or austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after...

  9. Induction of Crown Gall on Carrot Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, H.; Fox, K. D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the transfer of plasmid from a bacterium to a plant cell has received little attention. Presents an experiment for studying this type of genetic transformation using the causative agent of crown gall, a malignant plant tumor. (DDR)

  10. Success of Hall technique crowns questioned.

    PubMed

    Nainar, S M Hashim

    2012-01-01

    Hall technique is a method of providing stainless steel crowns for primary molars without tooth preparation and requires no local anesthesia. Literature review showed inconclusive evidence and therefore this technique should not be used in clinical practice.

  11. Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition (CROWN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0209 TITLE: Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer C. Rood, Ph.D...Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition (CROWN) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0209 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Collaborative Research to Optimize Warfighter Nutrition (CROWN) project supports communication and interaction between USARIEM and PBRC scientists

  12. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications. PMID:25101095

  13. The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst.

    PubMed

    Owen, Reuel

    2003-01-01

    The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst Appliance is evaluated and combined with Straight Wire Arch Fixed Orthodontics in treatment of Class II, Division I malocclusions. This article will evaluate a combined orthodontic approach of "straightening teeth" and an orthognathic approach of "moving jaws or making skeletal changes." Orthodontic treatment cannot be accomplished well without establishing a healthy temporomandibular joint. This is defined by Keller as a joint that is "noiseless, painless and has a normal range of motion without deviation and deflection." It is not prudent to separate orthodontic treatment as its own entity without being aware of the changes in the temporomandibular joint before, during and after treatment. In other words, "If you're doing orthodontics you're doing TMJ treatment." One should treat toward a healthy, beautiful face asking, "Will proposed treatment achieve this goal?" Treatment should be able to be carried out in an efficient manner, minimizing treatment time, be comfortable and affordable for the patient, and profitable for the dentist. The finished treatment should meet Andrews' Six Keys of Occlusion, or Loudon's Twelve Commandments. Above all, do no harm to the patient. We think that a specific treatment plan can embrace these tenets. The focus will be to show Class II treatment using a modified Herbst Appliance and fixed straight wire orthodontics.

  14. Influence of aza crown ethers on the electric percolation of AOT/isooctane/water (w/o) microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Dasilva-Carvalhal, J; Fernández-Gándara, D; García-Río, L; Mejuto, J C

    2006-09-15

    A study was carried out on the influence of different aza crown ethers on the electric percolation of AOT/isooctane/water microemulsions. A dual behavior of the aza crown ethers with regard to the percolative phenomenon was observed: low additive concentration causes an increase in the percolation temperature, whereas at high additive concentration a reduction in the percolation temperature of the system was observed. This dual behavior allowed us to define the compensation concentration, which corresponds the aza crown ether concentration at which there is no effect on the percolative phenomenon. We observed a correlation between the effect exerted by the aza crown ethers and the size of the cavity. This shows the importance of the capacity to complexate Na(+) and solubilize it in the interface and the continuous medium on the electric percolation. We also observed a correlation between the effect of the aza crown ethers on the percolation temperature and their external size. This shows the importance of their inclusion in the interface on the percolative phenomenon. Such an inclusion modifies the properties of the AOT film, facilitating the exchange of matter between droplets. A satisfactory multiparametric correlation between the compensation concentration, the distribution of the aza crown ether between water and 1-octanol, and the number of electron-donor atoms (O and N) in the crown ether was obtained. The effects have been compared with those corresponding to the crown ethers.

  15. Cost studies for commercial fuselage crown designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Smith, P. J.; Truslove, G.; Willden, K. S.; Metschan, S. L.; Pfahl, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the cost and weight potential of advanced composite design concepts in the crown region of a commercial transport. Two designs from each of three design families were developed using an integrated design-build team. A range of design concepts and manufacturing processes were included to allow isolation and comparison of cost centers. Detailed manufacturing/assembly plans were developed as the basis for cost estimates. Each of the six designs was found to have advantages over the 1995 aluminum benchmark in cost and weight trade studies. Large quadrant panels and cobonded frames were found to save significant assembly labor costs. Comparisons of high- and intermediate-performance fiber systems were made for skin and stringer applications. Advanced tow placement was found to be an efficient process for skin lay up. Further analysis revealed attractive processes for stringers and frames. Optimized designs were informally developed for each design family, combining the most attractive concepts and processes within that family. A single optimized design was selected as the most promising, and the potential for further optimization was estimated. Technical issues and barriers were identified.

  16. Crown cover chart for oak savannas. Forest Service technical brief

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.R.; Johnson, P.S.; Houf, G.

    1994-07-01

    Although oak savannas have been defined in many ways, they are characterized by scattered trees, largely comprised of oaks, and a sparse ground layer rich in grasses and forbs. The crown cover chart can be used to estimate the crown cover of trees as a percent of total area. Potential applications of the chart include monitoring changes in savanna crown cover, determining needed reductions in crown cover, and defining the savanna state. in restoring savannas that have grown into closed canopy stands, one can use the chart to estimate initial crown cover before restoration work is begun and again after crown cover has been reduced.

  17. Protonation of calix[4]arene-(2,3-naphthylene-crown-6,crown-6): Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíčalová, Magdalena; Makrlík, Emanuel; Böhm, Stanislav; Vaňura, Petr; Asfari, Zouhair

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the extraction constant corresponding to the equilibrium H3O+ (aq) + 1·Na+ (nb) ⇄1·H3O+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) occurring in the two-phase water-nitrobenzene system (1 = calix[4]arene-(2,3-naphthylene-crown-6,crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was determined as log Kex(H3O+,1·Na+) = -0.2 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the 1·H3O+ complex in nitrobenzene saturated with water was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C: log βnb(1·H3O+) = 5.9 ± 0.2. Finally, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the cationic complex species 1·H3O+ was derived. In the resulting complex, the "central" cation H3O+ is bound by three strong hydrogen bonds to two phenoxy oxygen atoms and to one ethereal oxygen from the crown-6 moiety of the parent ligand 1. The interaction energy, E(int), of the considered 1·H3O+ complex was found to be -416.0 kJ/mol, confirming the formation of this cationic species as well.

  18. Rapid Self-Assembly of Uranyl Polyhedra into Crown Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-22

    Clusters built from 32 uranyl peroxide polyhedra self-assemble and crystallize within 15 min after combining uranyl nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These novel crown-shaped clusters are remarkable in that they form so quickly, have extraordinarily low aqueous solubility, form with at least two distinct peroxide to hydroxyl ratios, and form in very high yield. The clusters, which have outer diameters of 23 Å, topologically consist of eight pentagons and four hexagons. Their rapid formation and low solubility in aqueous systems may be useful properties at various stages in an advanced nuclear energy system.

  19. [The method of esthetic crown restoration with composite resin jacket crown in primary molars].

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Shibui, N; Suda, M; Uehara, M; Karibe, H; Kondou, K

    1990-10-01

    The term "esthetics" has recently been also used in the dental field, and a field called esthetic dentistry is increasingly being noted. The number of not only adult but also pediatric patients who visit for treatment aiming at esthetic recovery is being increased. Inpedodontics, composite resin of the coronal color is generally used in the restoration of deciduous incisors. However, the method using metal crowns for the deciduous teeth is used for the deciduous molars at present. We applied a composite resin jacket crown to the deciduous molar in a way similar to that of esthetic crown restoration for the anterior teeth. The surgical procedure before crown preparation varied slightly according to the presence or absence of pulpal treatment of vital teeth and with non-vital teeth, but the application was performed as follows: 1) Desensitization of pulp, pulpal treatment and core construction. 2) Preparation of crown. 3) Selection, trial set and occlusal equilibration of a metal crown for the deciduous tooth. 4) Precision impression with a silicone impression material. 5) Removal of the metal crown for the deciduous tooth from the impression material. 6) Making of an under-cut to the abutment tooth on the buccal lingual side. 7) Filling of the impression with chemical polymerization resin. 8) Application of pressure in the oral cavity. 9) Adjustment of edge and crown forms. Thus, the preparation method for the composite resin jacket crown was relatively simple. Since this surgery, the patient has been followed up for 1 year and 6 months, and no specifically troublesome points have been observed clinically. The patient and her parents are satisfied with the results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. 28. Photocopy of Crown Roller Mill illustration; originally published in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of Crown Roller Mill illustration; originally published in The Crown Roller Mill, Northwestern Miller 9 (May 21, 1880): 321; SHOWING WEST SIDE, LOOKING EAST - Crown Roller Mill, 105 Fifth Avenue, South, West Side Milling District, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  1. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  2. Evaluation of wild juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A. tumefaciens is a soil-borne Gram-negative bacterium which causes crown gall on many dicotyledonous plant species including walnut. Crown gall symptoms on walnut are characterized by large tumors located near the crown of the tree but can occur near wounds caused by bleeding cuts or at the graft u...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  4. Aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroud, R.K.; Duncan, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    An unusual form of pulmonary aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) is described in this report. The major lesion is unique because it closely resembles a lesion referred to as an aspergilloma. An aspergilloma is a single large granulomatous lesion that resembles a tumor and is caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... device also may be intended for use as a functional restoration for a badly decayed deciduous...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed crown. 872.3330 Section 872.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... device also may be intended for use as a functional restoration for a badly decayed deciduous...

  7. PREFORMED METAL CROWNS FOR THE PERMANENT DENTITION.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynsey M; Cairns, Alison M; Fowler, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Preformed metal crowns have a range of uses in paediatric dentistry in both the primary and permanent dentition. This article provides an overview of their use in permanent teeth, including teeth that have been affected by molar incisor hypomineralisation, caries, developmental defects and tooth surface loss. The indications for use are described, along with the clinical technique for placement

  8. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal of, or breakage of, the natural crown (that portion of the tooth that normally protrudes above the...) tooth until the adult tooth erupts. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3330 - Preformed crown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... greater gold and metals of the platinum group intended to be affixed temporarily to a tooth after removal of, or breakage of, the natural crown (that portion of the tooth that normally protrudes above the...) tooth until the adult tooth erupts. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  10. Crowning achievement: a case of dental aspiration.

    PubMed

    Mark, Nicholas M; Lessing, Juan N; Çoruh, Başak

    2015-12-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies during dental procedures is a rare but potentially serious complication. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who aspirated a dental crown requiring flexible bronchoscopic retrieval. We discuss the risk factors for aspiration, the radiographic features of diagnosis, and the techniques for management and retrieval.

  11. Crowning achievement: a case of dental aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Nicholas M.; Lessing, Juan N.; Çoruh, Başak

    2015-01-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies during dental procedures is a rare but potentially serious complication. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who aspirated a dental crown requiring flexible bronchoscopic retrieval. We discuss the risk factors for aspiration, the radiographic features of diagnosis, and the techniques for management and retrieval. PMID:26649115

  12. Generation of a crowned pinion tooth surface by a plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The topology of a crowned spur pinion tooth surface that reduces the level of transmission errors due to misalignment is described. The geometry of the modified pinion tooth surface and of the regular involute gear tooth surface is discussed. The tooth contact analysis between the meshing surfaces is also described. Generating a modified pinion tooth surface by a plane whose motion is controlled by a 5-degree-of-freedom system is investigated. The numerical results included indicate that the transmission error remains low as the gears are misaligned.

  13. Crown Features Extraction from Low Altitude AVIRIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Roberts, D.; Ustin, S.

    2005-12-01

    Automated tree recognition and crown delineations are computer-assisted procedures for identifying individual trees and segmenting their crown boundaries on digital imagery. The success of the procedures is dependent on the quality of the image data and the physiognomy of the stand as evidence by previous studies, which have all used data with spatial resolution less than 1 m and average crown diameter to pixel size ratio greater than 4. In this study we explored the prospect of identifying individual tree species and extracting crown features from low altitude AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data with spatial resolution of 4 m. The test site is a Douglas-fir and Western hemlock dominated old-growth conifer forest in the Pacific Northwest with average crown diameter of 12 m, which translates to a crown diameter pixel ratio less than 4 m; the lowest value ever used in similar studies. The analysis was carried out using AVIRIS reflectance imagery in the NIR band centered at 885 nm wavelength. The analysis required spatial filtering of the reflectance imagery followed by application of a tree identification algorithm based on maximum filter technique. For every identified tree location a crown polygon was delineated by applying crown segmentation algorithm. Each polygon boundary was characterized by a loop connecting pixels that were geometrically determined to define the crown boundary. Crown features were extracted based on the area covered by the polygons, and they include crown diameters, average distance between crowns, species spectral, pixel brightness at the identified tree locations, average brightness of pixels enclosed by the crown boundary and within crown variation in pixel brightness. Comparison of the results with ground reference data showed a high correlation between the two datasets and highlights the potential of low altitude AVIRIS data to provide the means to improve forest management and practices and estimates of critical

  14. On the radiation stability of crown ethers in ionic liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I.; Marin, T.; Dietz, M.

    2011-04-14

    Crown ethers (CEs) are macrocyclic ionophores used for the separation of strontium-90 from acidic nuclear waste streams. Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are presently being considered as replacements for traditional molecular solvents employed in such separations. It is desirable that the extraction efficacy obtained with such solvents should not deteriorate in the strong radiation fields generated by decaying radionuclides. This deterioration will depend on the extent of radiation damage to both the IL solvent and the CE solute. While radiation damage to ILs has been extensively studied, the issue of the radiation stability of crown ethers, particularly in an IL matrix, has not been adequately addressed. With this in mind, we have employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study the formation of CE-related radicals in the radiolysis of selected CEs in ILs incorporating aromatic (imidazolium and pyridinium) cations. The crown ethers have been found to yield primarily hydrogen loss radicals, H atoms, and the formyl radical. In the low-dose regime, the relative yield of these radicals increases linearly with the mole fraction of the solute, suggesting negligible transfer of the excitation energy from the solvent to the solute; that is, the solvent has a 'radioprotective' effect. The damage to the CE in the loading region of practical interest is relatively low. Under such conditions, the main chemical pathway leading to decreased extraction performance is protonation of the macrocycle. At high radiation doses, sufficient to increase the acidity of the IL solvent significantly, such proton complexes compete with the solvent cations as electron traps. In this regime, the CEs will rapidly degrade as the result of H abstraction from the CE ring by the released H atoms. Thus, the radiation dose to which a CE/IL system is exposed must be maintained at a level sufficiently low to avoid this regime.

  15. Correlation between accuracy of crowns fabricated using CAD/CAM and elastic deformation of CAD/CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Yara, Atsushi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-12-01

    Full crowns were fabricated from three different materials (titanium, ceramic, and resin composite) at different rest diameters using a dental CAD/CAM system, and then their marginal discrepancy measured. The deflection of cylindrical specimens at 500 gf was measured using the same materials and diameters as for the accuracy measurement. Marginal discrepancy decreased as rest diameter increased, and at the same rest diameter the titanium crown had lower marginal discrepancy than ceramic and composite crowns. A significant correlation was found between marginal discrepancy of the crowns and deflection of the materials. This correlation was aptly expressed in the regression equation, MG = 4.54DF+53.9, where MG represented marginal discrepancy and DF represented deflection. This equation can be used as a good measure for new materials which have different modulus of elasticity.

  16. Evaluation of marginal fit and internal adaptation of zirconia copings fabricated by two CAD - CAM systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Balaji N; Jayaraman, Srinivasan; Kandhasamy, Baburajan; Rajakumaran, Ilangkumaran

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Three main factors which determine the success of an All-ceramic restoration are esthetic value, resistance to fracture and third being the marginal fit. Marginal fit and internal adaptation are crucial factors in increasing the longevity of the restoration. Newer and economical CAD CAM systems have been introduced claiming better marginal fit and adaptation of All ceramic crowns. CAD CAM systems involves scanning of the die or the tooth preparation and milling of the restoration, which may have variations among the systems available. Aim of the Study: Our study intended to check the marginal fit and internal adaptation of commonly used CAD CAM systems namely CERAMILL and CEREC -In Lab MC XL. Materials and Methods: Two groups of typodont teeth (n = 10) were prepared using a standardized protocol to receive All ceramic copings. 10 samples of Group A were used for fabrication of copings using CERAMILL system and 10 samples of Group B were used for fabrication of copings using CEREC -In Lab MC XL system. They were then luted with glass ionomer cement under mild finger pressure. Samples were embedded in resin and sliced longitudinally. They were then viewed under stereomicroscope and readings were measured along 15 points using ImageScope software. The P value was set at 0.05 at 95% confidence interval with 80% power. The data were checked for normality and unpaired t-test was used to evaluate the results of the two groups. Results: The overall internal adaptation was 61.5 ± 5.2 μm for CERAMILL and 56.9 ± 5.7 μm for CEREC -In Lab MC XL (P < 0.05). The marginal fit for CERAMILL was 83 μm and for CEREC -In Lab MC XL was 68 μm (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The marginal adaptation of CEREC -In Lab MC XL (68 μm) was found to be superior to CERAMILL (83 μm) (P < 0.05). Both the CEREC -In Lab MC XL and CERAMILL copings demonstrated internal adaptation and marginal fit within acceptable discrepancy range. When corroborating both the internal adaptation

  17. Treatment of crown fractures with pulp exposure.

    PubMed

    de Blanco, L P

    1996-11-01

    Thirty permanent incisors with vital pulps and complicated crown fractures were treated by a partial pulpotomy (Cvek technique). This consisted of amputation of 1 to 2 mm of the exposed pulp, placement of calcium hydroxide powder, and a temporary restoration. Clinical and radiographic assessment of the hard tissue barrier was done after 3 months and again after 1 to 8 years. The treatment was successful in all incisors. No differences were found in stage of root development, size of exposure, and length of time exposed. In conclusion, the partial pulpotomy technique is a successful and permanent treatment for crown fractures with pulp exposure regardless of the size of exposure, the maturity of the root, or the interval between accident and dental treatment.

  18. New nano-sized Al2O3-BN coating 3Y-TZP ceramic composites for CAD/CAM-produced all-ceramic dental restorations. Part I. Fabrication of powders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Se Fei; Yang, Li Qiang; Jin, Zhi Hao; Guo, Tian Wen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hong Chen

    2009-06-01

    Partially sintered 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2), zirconia) polycrystal (3Y-TZP) ceramics are used in dental posterior restorations with computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. High strength is acquired after sintering, but shape distortion of preshaped compacts during their sintering is inevitable. The aim of this study is to fabricate new machinable ceramic composites with strong mechanical properties that are fit for all-ceramic dental restorations. Aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3))-coated 3Y-TZP powders were first prepared by the heterogeneous precipitation method starting with 3Y-TZP, Al(NO(3))(3) . 9H(2)O, and ammonia, then amorphous boron nitride (BN) was produced and the as-received composite powders were coated via in situ reaction with boric acid and urea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze the status of Al(2)O(3)-BN on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles. TEM micrographs show an abundance of Al(2)O(3) particles and amorphous BN appearing uniformly on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles after the coating process. The size of the Al(2)O(3) particles is about 20 nm. The XRD pattern shows clearly the peak of amorphous BN among the peaks of ZrO(2).

  19. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  20. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Oing; McBreen, James

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  1. The use of stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Seale, N Sue

    2002-01-01

    The stainless steel crown (SSC) is an extremely durable restoration with several clear-cut indications for use in primary teeth including: following a pulpotomy/pulpectomy; for teeth with developmental defects or large carious lesions involving multiple surfaces where an amalgam is likely to fail; and for fractured teeth. In other situations, its use is less clear cut, and caries risk factors, restoration longevity and cost effectiveness are considerations in decisions to use the SSC. The literature on caries risk factors in young children indicates that children at high risk exhibiting anterior tooth decay and/or molar caries may benefit by treatment with stainless steel crowns to protect the remaining at-risk tooth surfaces. Studies evaluating restoration longevity, including the durability and lifespan of SSCs and Class II amalgams demonstrate the superiority of SSCs for both parameters. Children with extensive decay, large lesions or multiple surface lesions in primary molars should be treated with stainless steel crowns. Because of the protection from future decay provided by their feature of full coverage and their increased durability and longevity, strong consideration should be given to the use of SSCs in children who require general anesthesia. Finally, a strong argument for the use of the SSC restoration is its cost effectiveness based on its durability and longevity.

  2. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty beet accessions of either cultivated beet or sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris or Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) from the Beta collection of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot ...

  3. Effects of crown retrieval on implants and the surrounding bone: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Server Mutluay; Yurekli, Emel; Güven, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to observe stress concentration in the implant, the surrounding bone, and other components under the pull-out force during the crown removal. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two 3-dimensional models of implant-supported conventional metal ceramic crowns were digitally constructed. One model was designed as a vertically placed implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with a straight abutment, and the other model was designed as a 30-degree inclined implant (3.7 mm × 10 mm) with an angled abutment. A pull-out force of 40 N was applied to the crown. The stress values were calculated within the dental implant, the abutment, the abutment screw, and the surrounding bone. RESULTS The highest stress concentration was observed at the coronal portion of the straight implant (9.29 MPa). The stress concentrations at the cortical bone were lower than at the implants, and maximum stress concentration in bone structure was 1.73 MPa. At the abutment screws, the stress concentration levels were similiar (3.09 MPa and 3.44 MPa), but the localizations were different. The stress at the angled abutment was higher than the stress at the straight abutment. CONCLUSION The pull-out force, applied during a crown removal, did not show an evident effect in bone structure. The higher stress concentrations were mostly observed at the implant and the abutment collar. In addition, the abutment screw, which is the weakest part of an implant system, also showed stress concentrations. Implant angulation affected the stress concentration levels and localizations. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS These results will help clinicians understand the mechanical behavior of cement-retained implant-supported crowns during crown retrieval. PMID:27141257

  4. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation.

  5. Zirconia crowns - the new standard for single-visit dentistry?

    PubMed

    Wiedhahn, Klaus; Fritzsche, Günter; Wiedhahn, Claudine; Schenk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia crowns combine the advantages of metal restorations, such as minimally invasive tooth preparation and ease of cementation, with those of full ceramic crowns, such as low thermal conductivity and tooth color. With the introduction of a high-speed sintering procedure, it is possible to produce and cement zirconia crowns and small monolithic bridges in a Cerec Single Visit procedure. This new procedure is compared to established chairside methods.

  6. Characterization of Microsolvated Crown Ethers from Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie; Blanco, Susana; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Since they were first synthetized, crown ethers have been extensively used in organometallic chemistry due to their unparalleled binding selectivity with alkali metal cations. From a structural point of view, crown ethers are heterocycles containing oxygen and/or other heteroatoms, although the most common ones are formed from ethylene oxide unit. Crown ethers are conventionally seen as being hydrophilic inside and hydrophobic outside when the structures found for the metal cation complexes are considered. However, crown ethers are extremely flexible and in isolation may present a variety of stable conformations so that their structure may be easily adapted in presence of a strong ligand as an alkali metal cation minimize the energy of the resulting complex. Water can be considered a soft ligand which interacts with crown ethers through moderate hydrogen bonds. It is thus interesting to investigate which conformers are selected by water to form complexes, the preferred interaction sites and the possible conformational changes due to the presence of one or more water molecules. Previous studies identified microsolvated crown ethers but in all cases with a chromophore group attached to the structure. Here we present a broadband rotational spectroscopy study of microsolvated crown ethers produced in a pulsed molecular jet expansion. Several 1:1 and 1:2 crown ether:water aggregates are presented for 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6. Unambiguous identification of the structures has been achieved using isotopic substitution within the water unit. The subtle changes induced in the structures of the crown ether monomer upon complexation and the hydrogen-bonding network that hold them together will be also discussed. F. Gámez, B. Martínez-Haya, S. Blanco,J. C. López and J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 14 12912-12918 V. A. Shubert, C.W. Müller and T. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113 8067-8079

  7. Effect of different ferrule designs on the fracture resistance and failure pattern of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber posts and allceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    SHERFUDHIN, Haneef; HOBEICH, Joseph; CARVALHO, Carlos Augusto; N. ABOUSHELIB, Moustafa; SADIG, Walid; SALAMEH, Ziad

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effect of different ferrule heights on endodontically treated premolars. Materials and Methods Fifty sound mandibular first premolars were endodontically treated and then restored with 7-mm fiber post (FRC Postec Plus #1 Ivoclar-Vivadent) luted with self-polymerized resin cement (Multilink, Ivoclar Vivadent) while the coronal section was restored with hybrid composite core build-up material (Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar-Vivadent), which received all-ceramic crown. Different ferrule heights were investigated: 1-mm circumferential ferrule without post and core (group 1 used as control), a circumferential 1-mm ferrule (group 2), non-uniform ferrule 2-mm buccally and 1-mm lingually (group 3), non-uniform ferrule 3-mm buccally and 2-mm lingually (group 4), and finally no ferrule preparation (group 5). The fracture load and failure pattern of the tested groups were investigated by applying axial load to the ceramic crowns (n=10). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test was used for pair-wise comparisons (α=0.05). Results There were no significant differences among the failure load of all tested groups (P<0.780). The control group had the lowest fracture resistance (891.43±202.22 N) and the highest catastrophic failure rate (P<0.05). Compared to the control group, the use of fiber post reduced the percentage of catastrophic failure while increasing the ferrule height did not influence the fracture resistance of the restored specimens. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, increasing the ferrule length did not influence the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with glass ceramic crowns. Insertion of a fiber post could reduce the percentage of catastrophic failure of these restorations under function. PMID:21437466

  8. Quantitative characterization of clumping in Scots pine crowns

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Sievänen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Proper characterization of the clumped structure of forests is needed for calculation of the absorbed radiation and photosynthetic production by a canopy. This study examined the dependency of crown-level clumping on tree size and growth conditions in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and determined the ability of statistical canopy radiation models to quantify the degree of self-shading within crowns as a result of the clumping effect. Methods Twelve 3-D Scots pine trees were generated using an application of the LIGNUM model, and the crown-level clumping as quantified by the crown silhouette to total needle area ratio (STARcrown) was calculated. The results were compared with those produced by the stochastic approach of modelling tree crowns as geometric shapes filled with a random medium. Key Results Crown clumping was independent of tree height, needle area and growth conditions. The results supported the capability of the stochastic approach in characterizing clumping in crowns given that the outer shell of the tree crown is well represented. Conclusions Variation in the whole-stand clumping index is induced by differences in the spatial pattern of trees as a function of, for example, stand age rather than by changes in the degree of self-shading within individual crowns as they grow bigger. PMID:24431344

  9. Geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance modeling of the discrete crown vegetation canopy - Effect of crown shape and mutual shadowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Strahler, Alan H.

    1992-01-01

    Many natural vegetation covers can be regarded as assemblages of plant crowns, on a background, which interact with light as discrete objects. On this basis, geometric optics furnish an approach to the modeling of vegetation canopies that captures the most important features of such growths' bidirectional measurements. Attention is presently given to models which approximate these phenomena and relate the size, shape, and count density of plant crowns to viewing and illumination positions and to crown-background reflectance contrasts.

  10. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a unauthorized piece he created and placed

  11. Reliability of Reduced-thickness and Thinly Veneered Lithium Disilicate Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Silva, N.R.F.A.; Bonfante, E.A.; Martins, L.M.; Valverde, G.B.; Thompson, V.P.; Ferencz, J.L.; Coelho, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation hypothesized that the reliability of reduced-thickness monolithic lithium disilicate crowns is high relative to that of veneered zirconia (Y-TZP) and comparable with that of metal ceramic (MCR) systems. CAD/CAM first mandibular molar full-crown preparations were produced with uniform thicknesses of either 1.0-mm or 2.0-mm occlusal and axial reduction, then replicated in composite for standard crown dies. Monolithic 1.0-mm (MON) and 2.0-mm CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns, the latter with a buccal thin veneer (BTV) of 0.5 mm, were fabricated and then sliding-contact-fatigued (step-stress method) until failure or suspension (n = 18/group). Crack evolution was followed, and fractography of post mortem specimens was performed and compared with that of clinical specimens. Use level probability Weibull calculation (use load = 1,200 N) showed interval overlaps between MON and BTV. There was no significant difference between the Weibull characteristic failure loads of MON and BTV (1,535 N [90% CI 1,354–1,740] and 1,609 N [90% CI 1,512–1,712], respectively), which were significantly higher than that of Y-TZP (370 N [90% CI 322–427]) and comparable with that of MCR (1,304 N [90% CI 1,203–1,414]), validating the study hypothesis. PMID:22205635

  12. Radiolytic degradation of a crown ether for extractability of strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Noriaki; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Ema, Kimiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Nishizawa, Kazushige

    1999-11-01

    Dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6), dissolved in chloroform, 1-octanol, toluene or cyclohexane, was irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. Radiolytic destruction of DC18C6, measured by gas chromatography, decreased in the order: chloroform > cyclohexane > 1-octanol > toluene. Distribution coefficients in the solvent extraction of strontium from nitric acid solution were measured. These distribution coefficients were minimally affected by {gamma}-irradiation in toluene solution, but decreased with the absorbed dose in chloroform solution. It was suggested that the distribution coefficient for the liquid-liquid extraction system was influenced by radiolytic products. The effect of radiolytic products on the distribution coefficients was evaluated by considering DC18C6 remaining in the organic phase after irradiation. The distribution coefficient measured for the organic phase with radiolytic products was larger than that without radiolytic products. The radiolytic products were thus shown to contribute to the increase in the distribution coefficient.

  13. Marginal Fit of CEREC Crowns at Different Finish Line Curvatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    24 Figure 4: Master die abraded with Aluminium Oxide................................................. 24...measurement form the internal surface of the crown margin to the axial wall of the preparation is called the internal gap, and the same measurement at the...Fasbinder, 2010): the addition of a cylinder diamond, enabling the form -grinding of partial and full crowns (CEREC 2); the introduction of a two-bur

  14. Estimating canine tooth crown height in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V; Paulus, Faydre L

    2009-07-01

    Canine tooth size reduction and the associated reduction in canine dimorphism is a basal hominin character that also provides important evidence for models of behavioral evolution. Two specimens of Australopithecus anamensis (KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283) that do not preserve the canine crown, but do preserve the root or alveolus, appear to suggest that canine size variation and canine dimorphism in this species may have been greater than in other hominins. We evaluate canine root and crown dimensions in a series of extant hominoids, and estimate canine crown height in Australopithecus afarensis and A. anamensis. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to generate estimates of canine crown height from basal canine crown and root dimensions with a moderate degree of accuracy. Estimates of maxillary canine crown size for A. anamensis are slightly larger than those of A. afarensis, and are approximately the same size as canines of modern female chimpanzees. Estimated mandibular canine crown height is very similar in the two species. Variation within the A. anamensis sample of estimated canine crown heights is similar to that of modern humans, suggesting a low degree of sexual dimorphism. Inclusion of estimates for KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283 does not substantially increase either the estimate of overall canine size or variation for A. anamensis.

  15. Management of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot of subarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani and is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet in Minnesota and North Dakota. Rhizoctonia root and crown rot may reduce yield significantly, and diseased beets may cause problems in storage piles. Fields with...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin....

  17. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin....

  18. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin....

  19. Evaluation of wild Juglans species for crown gall resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paradox, the most widely used rootstock in CA walnut production, is highly susceptible to the causal agent of crown gall (CG) Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The bacterial pathogen induces the formation of large tumors around the crown of the tree resulting in a reduction in both vigor and yield. If left...

  20. Variation in the Use of Crowns and Their Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugars, Daniel A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the use and effectiveness of dental crowns and alternative treatments for posterior teeth, using data from insurance claims. Results show older patients more likely to receive crowns, with higher costs. Regional treatment differences were also found. Data raised questions about consistency of treatment recommendations among…

  1. Short clinical crowns (SCC) – treatment considerations and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, G. R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    When the clinical crowns of teeth are dimensionally inadequate, esthetically and biologically acceptable restoration of these dental units is difficult. Often an acceptable restoration cannot be accomplished without first surgically increasing the length of the existing clinical crowns; therefore, successful management requires an understanding of both the dental and periodontal parameters of treatment. The complications presented by teeth with short clinical crowns demand a comprehensive treatment plan and proper sequencing of therapy to ensure a satisfactory result. Visualization of the desired result is a prerequisite of successful therapy. This review examines the periodontal and restorative factors related to restoring teeth with short clinical crowns. Modes of therapy are usually combined to meet the biologic, restorative, and esthetic requirements imposed by short clinical crowns. In this study various methods for treating short clinical crowns are reviewed, the role that restoration margin location play in the maintenance of periodontal and dental symbiosis and the effects of violation of the supracrestal gingivae by improper full-coverage restorations has also been discussed. Key words:Short clinical crown, surgical crown lengthening, forced eruption, diagnostic wax up, alveoloplasty, gingivectomy. PMID:24558561

  2. Effect of framework design on crown failure.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Estevam A; da Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G; Bayardo-González, Daniel E; Thompson, Van P; Bonfante, Gerson

    2009-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of core-design modification on the characteristic strength and failure modes of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram) (ICA) compared with porcelain fused to metal (PFM). Premolar crowns of a standard design (PFMs and ICAs) or with a modified framework design (PFMm and ICAm) were fabricated, cemented on dies, and loaded until failure. The crowns were loaded at 0.5 mm min(-1) using a 6.25 mm tungsten-carbide ball at the central fossa. Fracture load values were recorded and fracture analysis of representative samples were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Probability Weibull curves with two-sided 90% confidence limits were calculated for each group and a contour plot of the characteristic strength was obtained. Design modification showed an increase in the characteristic strength of the PFMm and ICAm groups, with PFM groups showing higher characteristic strength than ICA groups. The PFMm group showed the highest characteristic strength among all groups. Fracture modes of PFMs and of PFMm frequently reached the core interface at the lingual cusp, whereas ICA exhibited bulk fracture through the alumina core. Core-design modification significantly improved the characteristic strength for PFM and for ICA. The PFM groups demonstrated higher characteristic strength than both ICA groups combined.

  3. Estimating forest crown area removed by selection cutting: a linked regression-GIS approach based on stump diameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.C.; Kupfer, J.A.; Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a model that could be used to provide a spatial representation of uneven-aged silvicultural treatments on forest crown area. We began by developing species-specific linear regression equations relating tree DBH to crown area for eight bottomland tree species at White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas, USA. The relationships were highly significant for all species, with coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.37 for Ulmus crassifolia to nearly 0.80 for Quercus nuttalliii and Taxodium distichum. We next located and measured the diameters of more than 4000 stumps from a single tree-group selection timber harvest. Stump locations were recorded with respect to an established gl id point system and entered into a Geographic Information System (ARC/INFO). The area occupied by the crown of each logged individual was then estimated by using the stump dimensions (adjusted to DBHs) and the regression equations relating tree DBH to crown area. Our model projected that the selection cuts removed roughly 300 m(2) of basal area from the logged sites resulting in the loss of approximate to 55 000 m(2) of crown area. The model developed in this research represents a tool that can be used in conjunction with remote sensing applications to assist in forest inventory and management, as well as to estimate the impacts of selective timber harvest on wildlife.

  4. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    PubMed

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  5. Crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Dung, S Z; Yang, Y H

    2000-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to characterize the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese; (2) to compare the differences in the deciduous crown diameters between different populations. The results might provide odontometric information in making preformed stainless steel crowns of the Chinese population. Study casts of 90 children (51 boys and 39 girls) of aged 3 to 6 years were used in this study. The maximum mesiodistal crown diameter (the greatest distance between the contact points of the approximal surfaces) and the buccolingual crown diameter (the greatest distance at a right angle to the mesiodistal measurement) were obtained by using an electronic digital caliper. Significant differences between antimeres were found in the mesiodistal diameters of maxillary canine and maxillary molars (p < 0.001) as well as in the buccolingual diameters of mandibular molars (p < 0.05). Excellent correlations between the antimeres of the corresponding teeth were found (r = 0.70 to 0.96). Boys generally had larger crown diameters than girls with the exception of mesiodistal diameters of maxillary and mandibular canines, and mandibular lateral incisor, whereas the statistically significant gender difference was only found in the buccolingual diameter of mandibular second molar (p < 0.05). The higher the percentage of sexual dimorphism, the larger the gender differences. The percentage of sexual dimorphism ranged from 0.09 to 1.94 for mesiodistal diameters and 0.04 to 2.86 for buccolingual diameters. The mandibular second molar was the most dimorphic tooth. Variations in the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth existed among and within different populations. Deciduous mesiodistal crown diameters of Taiwanese were, in general, smaller than those of Australian aborigines, Taiwan Chinese aborigines, and Hong Kong Chinese, but larger than those of American whites. When considering the buccolingual crown diameters, our data were significantly smaller than those

  6. Turner syndrome isochromosome karyotype correlates with decreased dental crown width.

    PubMed

    Rizell, S; Barrenäs, M-L; Andlin-Sobocki, A; Stecksén-Blicks, C; Kjellberg, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project was to study possible influences of Turner syndrome (TS) karyotype and the number of X chromosomes with intact short arm (p-arm) on dental crown width. Primary and permanent mesio-distal crown width was measured on plaster casts from 112 TS females. The influence on crown width of four karyotypes: 1. monosomy (45,X), 2. mosaic (45,X/46,XX), 3. isochromosome, and 4. other, and the number of intact X chromosomal p-arms were investigated. In comparisons between karyotypes, statistically significant differences were found for isochromosome karyotype maxillary second premolars, canines, laterals, mandibular first premolars, and canines, indicating that this karyotype was the most divergent as shown by the most reduced crown width. When each karyotype group were compared versus controls, all teeth in the isochromosome group were significantly smaller than controls (P < 0.01-0.001). The 45,X/46,XX karyotype expressed fewer and smaller differences from controls, while 45,X individuals seemed to display an intermediate tooth width compared with 45,X/46,XX and isochromosomes. No significant difference in crown width was found comparing the groups with one or two intact X chromosomal p-arms. Both primary and permanent teeth proved to have a significantly smaller crown width in the entire group of TS females compared to healthy females. We conclude that the isochromosome group deviates most from other karyotypes and controls, exhibiting the smallest dental crown width, while individuals with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism seemed to have a less affected crown width. An influence of the number of intact p-arms on crown width could not be demonstrated in this study.

  7. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified.

  8. Achieving optimal outcomes with all-zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Christensen, John Juel

    2014-01-01

    All-zirconia crowns are enjoying an unprecedented popularity. Dental laboratories are acquiring new equipment and adopting novel techniques, some of which require a learning curve. As a result, some crowns fabricated by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology may come back to the dentist with unsatisfactory features. Dentists should carefully examine each crown under magnification prior to delivery to the patient. The dentist and dental laboratory should establish a close partnership with clear communication to yield the most favorable outcome for the patient.

  9. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Crown Galls Host Distinct Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Faist, Hanna; Keller, Alexander; Hentschel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crown gall disease of grapevine is caused by virulent Agrobacterium strains and establishes a suitable habitat for agrobacteria and, potentially, other bacteria. The microbial community associated with grapevine plants has not been investigated with respect to this disease, which frequently results in monetary losses. This study compares the endophytic microbiota of organs from grapevine plants with or without crown gall disease and the surrounding vineyard soil over the growing seasons of 1 year. Amplicon-based community profiling revealed that the dominating factor causing differences between the grapevine microbiota is the sample site, not the crown gall disease. The soil showed the highest microbial diversity, which decreased with the distance from the soil over the root and the graft union of the trunk to the cane. Only the graft union microbiota was significantly affected by crown gall disease. The bacterial community of graft unions without a crown gall hosted transient microbiota, with the three most abundant bacterial species changing from season to season. In contrast, graft unions with a crown gall had a higher species richness, which in every season was dominated by the same three bacteria (Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacteriaceae sp., and Agrobacterium vitis). For in vitro-cultivated grapevine plantlets, A. vitis infection alone was sufficient to cause crown gall disease. Our data show that microbiota in crown galls is more stable over time than microbiota in healthy graft unions and that the microbial community is not essential for crown gall disease outbreak. IMPORTANCE The characterization of bacterial populations in animal and human diseases using high-throughput deep-sequencing technologies, such as 16S amplicon sequencing, will ideally result in the identification of disease-specific microbiota. We analyzed the microbiota of the crown gall disease of grapevine, which is caused by infection with the bacterial pathogen Agrobacterium vitis. All

  10. 78 FR 63559 - Order of Suspension of Trading; In The Matter of Crown Alliance Capital Limited

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Order of Suspension of Trading; In The Matter of Crown Alliance Capital Limited October 22, 2013... information concerning the securities of Crown Alliance Capital Limited (``Crown Alliance''), quoted under the ticker symbol CACL, because of questions regarding the accuracy of assertions in Crown Alliance's...

  11. Retention force of secondary crowns to copings after temporary cementation: the effect of crown material and luting agent.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Torsten; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Golecki, Gudrun; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner

    2010-12-01

    Tooth-implant supported restorations can be temporarily cemented if the natural abutments are protected by permanently cemented copings. This in vitro study investigated the retention forces of pure titanium crowns to milled titanium alloy copings and of cobalt-chromium crowns to copings made of electroplated gold after cementation with different luting agents. Five specimens per group were cemented with acrylic-urethane cement (inner crown surface preisolated with petroleum jelly) and provisional zinc oxide cement. The retention was measured using a universal testing machine and a dental device for crown removal. The differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance. The pull-off forces for the cobalt-chromium secondary crowns cemented on gold copings using zinc oxide cement were significantly higher (mean=144.5 N) than the other crown-cement combinations (32.2-54.4 N), which showed no significant differences in the retention force. The impulse number and magnitude of the dental device was usually low and showed no substantial differences between the crown-cement combinations. It can be concluded that the results of the clinical removal method for prostheses differ from the results of the pull-off test. The question which luting agent is the better choice for retrievable restorations remains unanswered without further clinical and laboratory studies.

  12. 6. BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTH FROM CROWN POINT STATE PARK SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTH FROM CROWN POINT STATE PARK SHOWING SURROUNDING DEVELOPMENT FROM CONSTRUCTION OF DAM - Columbia River Bridge at Grand Coulee Dam, Spanning Columbia River at State Route 155, Coulee Dam, Okanogan County, WA

  13. Newel post and balustrade (west passage), column (seminary), crown molding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Newel post and balustrade (west passage), column (seminary), crown molding (second floor), window sill (second floor), and baseboard (second floor). - Russian Bishop's House, 501 Lincoln Street, Sitka, Sitka Borough, AK

  14. Estimation of crown closure from AVIRIS data using regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Truchon, M.; Fritz, R.

    1993-01-01

    Crown closure is one of the input parameters used for forest growth and yield modelling. Preliminary work by Staenz et al. indicates that imaging spectrometer data acquired with sensors such as the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) have some potential for estimating crown closure on a stand level. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to establish a relationship between AVIRIS data and the crown closure derived from aerial photography of a forested test site within the Interior Douglas Fir biogeoclimatic zone in British Columbia, Canada; (2) to investigate the impact of atmospheric effects and the forest background on the correlation between AVIRIS data and crown closure estimates; and (3) to improve this relationship using multiple regression analysis.

  15. Indications and complications of crown halo vest placement: A review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis; Adeoye, Adeola L; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2017-02-10

    Crown halo vest placement remains an option for the treatment of a variety of upper and subaxial cervical spinal fractures. While the device remains a useful non-operative option for the treatment of these injuries, it has been associated with a variety of complications. This manuscript represents an up to date narrative review of the indications, complications, and complication avoidance for the placement of crown halo vests.

  16. Proton-Ionizable Crown Ethers. A Short Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-30

    identify by blocknumber) FIELD I GROUP SUB-GROUP 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if iecessary and identify by block number) A review of the synthesis of...Pederson reported the synthesis and cation-complexing characteristics of the crown .:hers in 19671-. there has been increasing interest in theze...to obtain the desired product. The synthesis of 15 is shovn in Erocedure B. Crown ether phenols 15-18 (Figure I, Table 1) were obtained according to

  17. Failure Probability of Three Designs of Zirconia Crowns.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gabriela Freitas; Monteiro, Evelyn Barbosa; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Zhang, Yu; Marques de Melo, Renata

    2015-01-01

    This study used a two-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of the lifespan of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. A sample of 60 first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs (n = 20): traditional (crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain), modified (crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain), and monolithic (full-contour zirconia crowns). All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100 N, 3 Hz) with a piston with a hemispherical tip (Ø = 6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2 × 10⁶ cycles. Every 500,000 cycles, the fatigue tests were interrupted and stereomicroscopy (10×) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. The authors performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. The types and numbers of failures according to the groups were: cracking (13 traditional, 6 modified) and chipping (4 traditional) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (1 traditional) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (2 monolithic) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (β, scale; η, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: traditional-1.25 and 0.9 × 10⁶ cycles; modified-0.58 and 11.7 × 10⁶ cycles; and monolithic-1.05 and 16.5 × 10⁶ cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The modified and monolithic groups presented less probability of failure after 2 × 10⁶ cycles.

  18. Failure probability of three designs of zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, G. Freitas; Monteiro, E. Barbosa Carmona; Bottino, M.A.; Zhang, Y.; de Melo, R. Marques

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study utilized a 2-parameter Weibull analysis for evaluation of lifetime of fully or partially porcelain-/glaze-veneered zirconia crowns after fatigue test. Methods Sixty first molars were selected and prepared for full-coverage crowns with three different designs(n = 20): Traditional –crowns with zirconia framework covered with feldspathic porcelain; Modified– crowns partially covered with veneering porcelain; and Monolithic–full-contour zirconia crowns. All specimens were treated with a glaze layer. Specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (100N, 3Hz) with a piston with hemispherical tip (Ø=6 mm) until the specimens failed or up to 2×106 cycles. Every 500,000 cycles intervals, the fatigue tests were interrupted, and stereomicroscopy (10 X) was used to inspect the specimens for damage. We performed Weibull analysis of interval data to calculate the number of failures in each interval. Results The types and number of failures according to the groups were: cracking (Traditional-13, Modified-6) and chipping (Traditional-4) of the feldspathic porcelain, followed by delamination (Traditional-1) at the veneer/core interface and debonding (Monollithic-2) at the cementation interface. Weibull parameters (beta, scale; and eta, shape), with a two-sided confidence interval of 95%, were: Traditional – 1.25 and 0.9 × 106cycles; Modified– 0.58 and 11.7 × 106 cycles; and Monolithic – 1.05 and 16.5 × 106 cycles. Traditional crowns showed greater susceptibility to fatigue, the Modified group presented higher propensity to early failures, and the Monolithic group showed no susceptibility to fatigue. The Modified and Monolithic groups presented the highest number of crowns with no failures after the fatigue test. Conclusions The three crown designs presented significantly different behaviors under fatigue. The Modified and the Monolithic groups presented less probability to failure after 2×106cycles. PMID:26509988

  19. The energetic characterization of pineapple crown leaves.

    PubMed

    Braga, R M; Queiroga, T S; Calixto, G Q; Almeida, H N; Melo, D M A; Melo, M A F; Freitas, J C O; Curbelo, F D S

    2015-12-01

    Energetic characterization of biomass allows for assessing its energy potential for application in different conversion processes into energy. The objective of this study is to physicochemically characterize pineapple crown leaves (PC) for their application in energy conversion processes. PC was characterized according to ASTM E871-82, E1755-01, and E873-82 for determination of moisture, ash, and volatile matter, respectively; the fixed carbon was calculated by difference. Higher heating value was determined by ASTM E711-87 and ash chemical composition was determined by XRF. The thermogravimetric and FTIR analyses were performed to evaluate the thermal decomposition and identify the main functional groups of biomass. PC has potential for application in thermochemical processes, showing high volatile matter (89.5%), bulk density (420.8 kg/m(3)), and higher heating value (18.9 MJ/kg). The results show its energy potential justifying application of this agricultural waste into energy conversion processes, implementing sustainability in the production, and reducing the environmental liabilities caused by its disposal.

  20. Large area mapping of southwestern forest crown cover, canopy height, and biomass using the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid canopy reflectance model inversion experiment was performed using multiangle reflectance data from the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) on the Earth Observing System Terra satellite, with the goal of obtaining measures of forest fractional crown cover, mean canopy height, a...

  1. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment.

  2. Tree crown structural characterization: A study using terrestrial laser scanning and three-dimensional radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Inian

    Spectroscopic observational data for vegetated environments, have been coupled with 3D physically-based radiative transfer models for retrievals of biochemical and biophysical indicators of vegetation health and condition. With the recent introduction of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) units, there now exists a means of rapidly measuring intricate structural details of vegetation canopies, which can also serve as input into 3D radiative transfer models. In this investigation, Intelligent Laser Ranging and Imaging System (ILRIS-3D) data was acquired of individual tree crowns in laboratory, and field-based experiments. The ILRIS-3D uses the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) principle to measure the distances of objects based on the time interval between laser pulse exitance and return, upon reflection from an object. At the laboratory-level, this exploratory study demonstrated and validated innovative approaches for retrieving crown-level estimates of Leaf Area Index (LAI) (r2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.26m2/m2), a critical biophysical parameter for vegetation monitoring and modeling. These methods were implemented and expanded in field experiments conducted in olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards in Cordoba, Spain, where ILRIS-3D observations for 24 structurally-variable trees were made. Robust methodologies were developed to characterize diagnostic architectural parameters, such as tree height (r2 = 0.97, rmse = 0.21m), crown width (r 2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.12m), crown height (r2 = 0.81, rmse = 0.11m), crown volume (r2 = 0.99, rmse = 2.6m3), and LAI (r2 = 0.76, rmse = 0.27m2/ m2). These parameters were subsequently used as direct inputs into the Forest LIGHT (FLIGHT) 3D ray tracing model for characterization of the spectral behavior of the olive crowns. Comparisons between FLIGHT-simulated spectra and measured data showed small differences in the visible (< 3%) and near infrared (< 10%) spectral ranges. These differences between model simulations and measurements were significantly correlated

  3. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages.

  4. Crown depth as a result of evolutionary games: decreasing solar angle should lead to shallower, not deeper crowns.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Peter Johannes

    2014-06-01

    There is a general notion in the literature that, with increasing latitude, trees have deeper crowns as a result of a lower solar elevation angle. However, these predictions are based on models that did not include the effects of competition for light between individuals. Here, I argue that there should be selection for trees to increase the height of the crown base, as this decreases shading by neighbouring trees, leading to an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Because the level of between-tree shading increases with decreasing solar angle, the predicted ESS will shift to higher crown base height. This argument is supported by a simulation model to check for the effects of crown shape and the change of light intensity that occurs with changing solar angle on model outcomes. So, the lower solar angle at higher latitudes would tend to select for shallower, and not deeper, crowns. This casts doubt on the common belief that a decreasing solar angle increases crown depth. More importantly, it shows that different assumptions about what should be optimized can lead to different predictions, not just for absolute trait values, but for the direction of selection itself.

  5. Composite crown-form crowns for severely decayed primary molars: a technique for restoring function and esthetics.

    PubMed

    Ram, D; Peretz, B

    2000-01-01

    Current developments in esthetic dentistry center around new techniques and materials that improve the ability of the clinician to provide esthetic services. This article describes a step-by-step method of placing composite crown-form crowns on severely decayed primary mandibular molars. The described technique allows for restoring, as close as possible, form and function lost to caries in an esthetic mode in cases of severely decayed primary molars that would have required stainless steel crowns had they been treated traditionally. Disadvantages of this treatment mode are that dryness may not be prevented in the proximal margins, especially where subgingival carious involvement is encountered and the margin areas may be contaminated with gingival fluid or blood. Although no long-term follow-up has been reported for the technique, when strong opposition by the parent or child to the stainless steel crown is encountered, and a desire for esthetic restoration is strongly expressed, the composite crown-form crowns may be considered as an alternative.

  6. Investigation of distortions around the cervical area of teeth restored with two kinds of crown materials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chikako; Miura, Hiroyuki; Okada, Daizo; Komada, Wataru; Miyasaka, Munenaga; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify crown materials to decrease the stress concentrated at the cervical area of endodontically treated teeth. To this end, 14 extracted human mandibular premolars were divided into two groups for this study: complete cast crowns versus polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns. Both complete cast crowns (MC) and polymer-based crown and bridge material crowns (HC) were cemented with a glycidyl methacrylate-based resin cement (RC) to composite resin cores with glass fiber posts. Static loading was applied and distortion was measured with four pieces of strain gages attached to the marginal area. Findings showed that there was a large difference in distortion between crown and root in MC. On the other hand, distortions at the cervical area of crown and root were similar in HC.

  7. Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking

    SciTech Connect

    Goelz, J.C.G.

    1996-08-01

    Equations were prepared to predict crown radius for eleven species of open-grown bottomland hardwood trees. Crown radius was predicted as a function of diameter at breast height (dbh) and as a function of dbh, total height, and crown ratio. Equations were prepared for individual species and species groups. Pecan has the largest crowns over a broad range of dbh. Eastern cottonwood has the smallest crowns for most levels of dbh. Sweetgum has relatively small crowns for trees of small dbh, but crown radius is comparable to most species at the largest dbh. The crown radius predictions may be used to calculate crown competition factor. B-lines of stocking may be calculated that represent a stand of one species as well as a mixed-species stand of any particular species proportion.

  8. Gap comparison between single crown and three-unit bridge zirconia substructures

    PubMed Central

    Charoenchitt, Masnisa; Asvanund, Chanavut

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare marginal and internal gaps of zirconia substructure of single crowns with those of three-unit fixed dental prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS Standardized Co-Cr alloy simulated second premolar and second molar abutments were fabricated and subsequently duplicated into type-III dental stone for working casts. After that, all zirconia substructures were made using Lava™ system. Marginal and internal gaps were measured in 2 planes (mesial-distal plane and buccal-palatal plane) at 5 locations: marginal opening (MO), chamfer area (CA), axial wall (AW), cusp tip (CT) and mid-occlusal (OA) using Replica technique. RESULTS There were significant differences between gaps at all locations. The mean ± SD of marginal gap in premolar was 43.6 ± 0.4 µm and 46.5 ± 0.5 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge substructure respectively. For molar substructure the mean ± SD of marginal gap was 48.5 ± 0.4 µm and 52.6 ± 0.4 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge respectively. The largest gaps were found at the occlusal area, which was 150.5 ± 0.5 µm and 154.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge premolar substructures respectively and 146.5 ± 0.4 µm and 211.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge molar substructure respectively. CONCLUSION Independent-samples t-test showed significant differences of gap in zirconia substructure between single crowns and three-unit bridge (P<.001). Therefore, the span length has the effect on the fit of zirconia substructure that is fabricated using CAD/CAM technique especially at the occlusal area. PMID:25177467

  9. Emergence of symmetry and chirality in crown ether complexes with alkali metal cations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Hurtado, Paola; Hortal, Ana R; Hamad, Said; Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos

    2010-07-08

    Crown ethers provide a valuable benchmark for the comprehension of molecular recognition mediated by inclusion complexes. One of the most relevant crown ethers, 18-crown-6 (18c6), features a flexible six-oxygen cyclic backbone that is well-known for its selective cation binding. This study employs infrared spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate the structure of the gas-phase complexes formed by the 18c6 ether with the alkali metal cations. It is shown that symmetric and chiral arrangements play a dominant role in the conformational landscape of the 18c6-alkali system. Most stable 18c6-M(+) conformers are found to have symmetries C(3v) and C(2) for Cs(+), D(3d) for K(+), C(1) and D(3d) for Na(+), and D(2) for Li(+). Remarkably, whereas the bare 18c6 ether is achiral, chirality emerges in the C(2) and D(2) 18c6-M(+) conformations, both of which involve pairs of stable atropoisomers capable of acting as enantiomeric selective substrates.

  10. Modelling fruit-temperature dynamics within apple tree crowns using virtual plants

    PubMed Central

    Saudreau, M.; Marquier, A.; Adam, B.; Sinoquet, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Fruit temperature results from a complex system involving the climate, the tree architecture, the fruit location within the tree crown and the fruit thermal properties. Despite much theoretical and experimental evidence for large differences (up to 10 °C in sunny conditions) between fruit temperature and air temperature, fruit temperature is never used in horticultural studies. A way of modelling fruit-temperature dynamics from climate data is addressed in this work. Methods The model is based upon three-dimensional virtual representation of apple trees and links three-dimensional virtual trees with a physical-based fruit-temperature dynamical model. The overall model was assessed by comparing model outputs to field measures of fruit-temperature dynamics. Key Results The model was able to simulate both the temperature dynamics at fruit scale, i.e. fruit-temperature gradients and departure from air temperature, and at the tree scale, i.e. the within-tree-crown variability in fruit temperature (average root mean square error value over fruits was 1·43 °C). Conclusions This study shows that linking virtual plants with the modelling of the physical plant environment offers a relevant framework to address the modelling of fruit-temperature dynamics within a tree canopy. The proposed model offers opportunities for modelling effects of the within-crown architecture on fruit thermal responses in horticultural studies. PMID:21474503

  11. Hellbender genome sequences shed light on genomic expansion at the base of crown salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2014-07-01

    Among animals, genome sizes range from 20 Mb to 130 Gb, with 380-fold variation across vertebrates. Most of the largest vertebrate genomes are found in salamanders, an amphibian clade of 660 species. Thus, salamanders are an important system for studying causes and consequences of genomic gigantism. Previously, we showed that plethodontid salamander genomes accumulate higher levels of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons than do other vertebrates, although the evolutionary origins of such sequences remained unexplored. We also showed that some salamanders in the family Plethodontidae have relatively slow rates of DNA loss through small insertions and deletions. Here, we present new data from Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, the hellbender. Cryptobranchus and Plethodontidae span the basal phylogenetic split within salamanders; thus, analyses incorporating these taxa can shed light on the genome of the ancestral crown salamander lineage, which underwent expansion. We show that high levels of LTR retrotransposons likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that disproportionate expansion of this transposable element (TE) class contributed to genomic expansion. Phylogenetic and age distribution analyses of salamander LTR retrotransposons indicate that salamanders' high TE levels reflect persistence and diversification of ancestral TEs rather than horizontal transfer events. Finally, we show that relatively slow DNA loss rates through small indels likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that a decreased DNA loss rate contributed to genomic expansion at the clade's base. Our identification of shared genomic features across phylogenetically distant salamanders is a first step toward identifying the evolutionary processes underlying accumulation and persistence of high levels of repetitive sequence in salamander genomes.

  12. Retention of esthetic veneers on primary stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Baker, L H; Moon, P; Mourino, A P

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the amount of shearing force necessary to fracture, dislodge or deform the esthetic veneer facings of four commercially available veneered primary incisor stainless steel crowns. The four types tested were: Cheng Crowns, [Peter Cheng Orthodontic Laboratory]; Whiter Biter Crown II, [White Bite Inc.]; Kinder Krowns, [Mayclin Dental Studio, Inc]; and NuSmile Primary Crowns, [Orthodontic Technologies, Inc]. The crowns (#4 right central incisor) from each manufacturer were obtained with the facings attached. The crowns were soaked for ninety days and thermocycled at 4 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 500 45-second cycles. The crowns were cemented to standardized chromium cobalt metal dies. Each die was placed in to a custom holder on the Instron Universal testing machine. A force was applied at the incisal edge of the veneer at 148 degrees, (the primary interincisal angle), with a crosshead speed of 0.05 inches/minute until the veneer either fractured, dislodged or deformed. The mean force (Ibs) required +/- SD to produce failure, in descending order, was as follows: Cheng (107.8 +/- 17.3); NuSmile (100.2 +/- 18.2); KinderKrown (91.3 +/- 27.4)d Whiter Biter (81.5 +/- 21.7). To test the hypothesis of no difference among the four manufacturers, an analysis of variance was performed using PROC GLM. The resultant F statistic was 2.79 (p < 0.0543), indicating a marginally statistically significant difference in the response variable "pressure" among the four groups. A posthoc test was then performed to ascertain where these differences occurred. These results, using Turkey's studentized range test for pairwise comparisons, suggested that the only difference was between the Cheng and Whiter Biter manufacturers.

  13. 3D statistical failure analysis of monolithic dental ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Sadia; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2016-07-05

    For adhesively retained ceramic crown of various types, it has been clinically observed that the most catastrophic failures initiate from the cement interface as a result of radial crack formation as opposed to Hertzian contact stresses originating on the occlusal surface. In this work, a 3D failure prognosis model is developed for interface initiated failures of monolithic ceramic crowns. The surface flaw distribution parameters determined by biaxial flexural tests on ceramic plates and point-to-point variations of multi-axial stress state at the intaglio surface are obtained by finite element stress analysis. They are combined on the basis of fracture mechanics based statistical failure probability model to predict failure probability of a monolithic crown subjected to single-cycle indentation load. The proposed method is verified by prior 2D axisymmetric model and experimental data. Under conditions where the crowns are completely bonded to the tooth substrate, both high flexural stress and high interfacial shear stress are shown to occur in the wall region where the crown thickness is relatively thin while high interfacial normal tensile stress distribution is observed at the margin region. Significant impact of reduced cement modulus on these stress states is shown. While the analyses are limited to single-cycle load-to-failure tests, high interfacial normal tensile stress or high interfacial shear stress may contribute to degradation of the cement bond between ceramic and dentin. In addition, the crown failure probability is shown to be controlled by high flexural stress concentrations over a small area, and the proposed method might be of some value to detect initial crown design errors.

  14. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-07

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  15. Effect of the Crystallization Process on the Marginal and Internal Gaps of Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Seunghan; Uhm, Soo-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of the crystallization process on lithium disilicate ceramic crowns fabricated using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and to determine whether the effect of crystallization is clinically acceptable by comparing values of fit before and after the crystallization process. The mandibular right first molar was selected as the abutment for the experiments. Fifteen working models were prepared. Lithium disilicate crowns appropriate for each abutment were prepared using a commercial CAD/CAM system. Gaps in the marginal area and 4 internal areas of each crown were measured twice—before and after crystallization—using the silicone replica technique. The mean values of fit before and after crystallization were analyzed using a paired t-test to examine whether the conversion that occurred during crystallization affected marginal and internal gaps (α = 0.05). Gaps increased in the marginal area and decreased in the internal areas after crystallization. There were statistically significant differences in all of the investigated areas (P < 0.05). None of the values for marginal and internal fit of lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns after crystallization exceeded 120 μm, which is the clinically acceptable threshold. PMID:27123453

  16. Implant-supported fixed dental prostheses with CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain crown and zirconia-based framework.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Masayuki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ishiura, Yuichi; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Recently, fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a hybrid structure of CAD/CAM porcelain crowns adhered to a CAD/CAM zirconia framework (PAZ) have been developed. The aim of this report was to describe the clinical application of a newly developed implant-supported FDP fabrication system, which uses PAZ, and to evaluate the outcome after a maximum application period of 36 months. Implants were placed in three patients with edentulous areas in either the maxilla or mandible. After the implant fixtures had successfully integrated with bone, gold-platinum alloy or zirconia custom abutments were first fabricated. Zirconia framework wax-up was performed on the custom abutments, and the CAD/CAM zirconia framework was prepared using the CAD/CAM system. Next, wax-up was performed on working models for porcelain crown fabrication, and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were fabricated. The CAD/CAM zirconia frameworks and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were bonded using adhesive resin cement, and the PAZ was cemented. Cementation of the implant superstructure improved the esthetics and masticatory efficiency in all patients. No undesirable outcomes, such as superstructure chipping, stomatognathic dysfunction, or periimplant bone resorption, were observed in any of the patients. PAZ may be a potential solution for ceramic-related clinical problems such as chipping and fracture and associated complicated repair procedures in implant-supported FDPs.

  17. 18-crown-6-sodium cholate complex: thermochemistry, structure, and stability.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Tea; Tomašić, Vlasta; Biliškov, Nikola

    2014-06-03

    18-Crown-6, one of the most relevant crown ethers, and sodium cholate, a steroidal surfactant classified as a natural bile salt, are components of a novel, synthesized coordination complex: 18-crown-6-sodium cholate (18C6·NaCh). Like crown ethers, bile salts act as building blocks in supramolecular chemistry to design new functionalized materials with a desired structure and properties. In order to obtain thermal behavior of this 1:1 coordination complex, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis were used, as well as microscopic observations and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature dependent infrared (IR) spectroscopy gave a detailed view into phase transitions. The structures during thermal treatment were observed with powder X-ray diffraction, and molecular models of the phases were made. Hard, glassy, colorless compound 18C6·NaCh goes through crystalline-crystalline polymorphic phase transitions at higher temperatures. The room temperature phase is indexed to a triclinic lattice, while in the high temperature phases molecules take randomly one of the two different configurations in the unit cell, resulting in the 2-fold symmetry. The formation of cholesteric liquid crystalline phase occurs simultaneously with partial decomposition, followed by the isotropization with simultaneous and complete decomposition at much higher temperature, as obtained by IR. The results provide valuable information about the relationship between molecular structure, thermal properties, and stability of the complex, indicating the importance of an appropriate choice of cation, amphiphilic, and crown ether unit in order to synthesize compounds with desired behavior.

  18. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the fracture load of the crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  19. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation.

  20. Chipping resistance of graded zirconia ceramics for dental crowns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Chai, H; Lee, J J-W; Lawn, B R

    2012-03-01

    A serious drawback of veneering porcelains is a pronounced susceptibility to chipping. Glass-infiltrated dense zirconia structures can now be produced with esthetic quality, making them an attractive alternative. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that such infiltrated structures are much more chip-resistant than conventional porcelains, and at least as chip-resistant as non-infiltrated zirconia. A sharp indenter was used to produce chips in flat and anatomically correct glass-infiltrated zirconia crown materials, and critical loads were measured as a function of distance from the specimen edge (flat) or side wall (crown). Control data were obtained on zirconia specimens without infiltration and on crowns veneered with porcelains. The results confirmed that the resistance to chipping in graded zirconia is more than 4 times higher than that of porcelain-veneered zirconia and is at least as high as that of non-veneered zirconia.

  1. Development history and bibliography of the US Forest Service crown-condition indicator for forest health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Randolph, KaDonna C

    2013-06-01

    Comprehensive assessment of individual-tree crown condition by the US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program has its origins in the concerns about widespread forest decline in Europe and North America that developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Programs such as the US National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, US National Vegetation Survey, Canadian Acid Rain National Early Warning System, and joint US-Canadian North American Sugar Maple Decline Project laid the groundwork for the development of the US Forest Service crown-condition indicator. The crown-condition assessment protocols were selected and refined through literature review, peer review, and field studies in several different forest types during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Between 1980 and 2011, 126 publications relating specifically to the crown-condition indicator were added to the literature. The majority of the articles were published by the US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service or other State or Federal government agency, and more than half were published after 2004.

  2. Equilibria and effect of diluent in the solvent extraction of lithium salts by highly alkylated 14-crown-4-ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Sun, Y.; Driver, J.L.; Chen, Z. Cavenaugh, K.L.; Carter, R.W.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    As shown by survey experiments, 14-crown-4 ethers bearing certain aliphatic substituents exhibit strong selectivity for lithium. Both selectivity and overall extraction efficiency depend markedly on type of ring substituents and on diluent properties. To understand such effects in greater detail, extraction of LiCl by the crown ether 2,2,3,3,6,9,9,10,10-nonamethyl-14-crown-4 (NM14C4) was subjected to equilibrium analysis. By use of the program SXLSQI (a solvent-extraction modeling program), the extraction behavior as determined by ion chromatography has been modeled quantitatively in terms of four equilibrium in 1-octanol. The following neutral and ionic organic-phase species have been considered: LiCl, Li+, Cl{sup {minus}}, LiCECl, and LiCE+ (CE = crown ether). Parallel measurements of the same system by {sup 7}Li NMR techniques agree with the ion-chromatography results. The NMR experiment affords the advantage of distinguishing between free and bound lithium and thus provides a check on the species indicated by the modeling. Extraction of LiCl by NM 14C4 correlates with diluent properties, including the Shmidt-Marcus diluent parameter and Reichardt`s E{sub T} parameter; as diluent polarity increases, LiCl extraction increases steeply.

  3. Uniform versus asymmetric shading mediates crown recession in conifers.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L; Lieffers, Victor J; Landhäusser, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca). We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1), complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2) light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4-1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3) heavy asymmetric shading as in (2) except with greater light reduction and (4) control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality--mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown.

  4. Uniform versus Asymmetric Shading Mediates Crown Recession in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Schoonmaker, Amanda L.; Lieffers, Victor J.; Landhäusser, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we explore the impact of asymmetrical vs. uniform crown shading on the mortality and growth of upper and lower branches within tree crowns, for two conifer species: shade intolerant lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and shade tolerant white spruce (Picea glauca). We also explore xylem hydraulics, foliar nutrition, and carbohydrate status as drivers for growth and expansion of the lower and upper branches in various types of shading. This study was conducted over a two-year period across 10 regenerating forest sites dominated by lodgepole pine and white spruce, in the lower foothills of Alberta, Canada. Trees were assigned to one of four shading treatments: (1), complete uniform shading of the entire tree, (2) light asymmetric shading where the lower 1/4–1/3 of the tree crown was shaded, (3) heavy asymmetric shading as in (2) except with greater light reduction and (4) control in which no artificial shading occurred and most of the entire crown was exposed to full light. Asymmetrical shading of only the lower crown had a larger negative impact on the bud expansion and growth than did uniform shading, and the effect was stronger in pine relative to spruce. In addition, lower branches in pine also had lower carbon reserves, and reduced xylem-area specific conductivity compared to spruce. For both species, but particularly the pine, the needles of lower branches tended to store less C than upper branches in the asymmetric shade, which could suggest a movement of reserves away from the lower branches. The implications of these findings correspond with the inherent shade tolerance and self-pruning behavior of these conifers and supports a carbon based mechanism for branch mortality – mediated by an asymmetry in light exposure of the crown. PMID:25136823

  5. Immediate esthetic crown with a facet of the extracted element

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, Giovanni de Almeida Prado; Magalhães, Amanda; Ajzen, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes a case of implant loading with an immediate temporary crown. The buccal crown surface was removed from the extracted tooth to obtain an aesthetically satisfactory result. After periodontal treatment, tooth 21 appeared proclined and showed Grade 3 mobility, indicating the need for its extraction. The remaining bone was imaged using computed tomography, and virtual surgical planning was performed using these results. The implant was immediately loaded postextraction into the fresh alveolus without a graft and flap procedure. The temporary tooth, which was manufactured using the extracted buccal surface, was a simple, fast, and low cost procedure that produced an excellent esthetic outcome. PMID:25202225

  6. Crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hanamura, H; Wakatsuki, E

    1994-03-01

    The crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis were measured, and the most common molar size sequence was M1 > M2 > M3. The M2 and M3 molars were smaller than the M1 in the mesiodistal crown diameters. With regard to the buccolingual diameters, the distal part of M1 and mesial part of M2 were relatively larger and less variable in size. This stable area corresponded to the inflection point of the maxillary arch curve. These results could be explained from a functional morphological standpoint.

  7. Macromolecular leakage benath full cast crowns. Part II: The diffusion of lipopolysaccharide and dextran.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen extracted molars were prepared for crowns. Crowns with access ports (one facial, one lingual) were cast in gold. Teeth and crowns luted with provisional cement with filters inserted into the ports were immersed in a solution of labeled macromolecules (FITC-dextran, TRITC-LPS) and evaluated for leakage. Filters were retrieved and analyzed by use of fluorescent microscopy. Leakage of LPS and dextran occurred as early as 2 weeks beneath crowns luted with a provisional cement (NoGenol).

  8. Preformed resin-veneered stainless steel crowns for restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    1996-05-01

    Stainless steel crown forms with bonded resin veneers for primary incisors are commercially available to dentists. This type of preveneered crown was developed to serve as a convenient, durable, reliable, and esthetic solution to the difficult challenge of restoring severely carious primary incisors. This article describes preveneered crowns, reviews their advantages and disadvantages, and details a technique for placement of such restorations.

  9. First report of Fusarium hostae causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown rot disease of wheat is caused by a complex of Fusarium species. To identify species associated with crown rot in Turkey, crowns and stems of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (T. durum Desf.) were collected from the Central and Southeast Anatolia, Black Sea, Aegean, Mediterr...

  10. 76 FR 40354 - Notice of Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Crowned Ridge Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project, Codington and Grant Counties, SD AGENCY: Western Area Power... 150-megawatt Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project (Project) in Codington and Grant counties, South... process for NextEra's proposed Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project with the publication of...

  11. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Buarque e Silva, Wilkens Aurélio; Andrade e Silva, Frederico; De Souza, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37 °C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  12. Automated individual tree crown delineation from LIDAR data using morphological techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, L.; Hu, B.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Noland, T.

    2014-03-01

    In current tree crown delineation from LiDAR data, treetops and 3D geometric shapes of tree crowns are frequently extracted from LiDAR-derived Crown Height Model (CHM) and used as references to localize and delineate crowns. However, it is difficult to detect deciduous treetops and delineate deciduous tree crowns. The 3D shape of a crown, which can be derived from CHM, may be taken as a half ellipsoid, and any horizontal slice of the ellipsoid contains the treetop and indicates not only the location but also the spatial extent of the crown. Based on such slices, a novel multi-scale method for individual tree crown delineation from CHM was proposed in this study. This method consists mainly of two steps: (1) morphologically open the CHM over the scale range of target tree crowns; and (2) take local maxima within each resulting opened CHM as the horizontal slices of target crowns at the corresponding scale level and integrate all the slices within the scale range together to represent the spatial distribution of target crowns. In an experiment on CHMs over two natural closed canopy forests in Ontario, Canada, the proposed method accurately delineated the majority of the tree crowns from closed canopy forests.

  13. Stars and Nebulae in the Southern Crown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    The R Coronae Australis complex of young stars and interstellar gas clouds is one of the nearest star-forming regions, at a distance of approx. 500 light-years from the Sun. It is seen in the southern constellation of that name (The "Southern Crown"). Images of this sky area were recently obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) , a 67-million pixel digital camera that is installed at the 2.2-m MPG/ESO Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory. Some of these exposures have been combined into a magnificent colour image, here reproduced as PR Photo 25a/00 . The field shown measures about 4.7 x 4.7 light-years 2. It displays the central part of the complex, its brightest stars, and the nebulosity that they illuminate. The interstellar clouds that are associated with the complex are visible all across this field and also beyond its borders (on other exposures), due to the obscuring effect of the dust particles that "dim" the light of stars behind these clouds. This effect is particularly noticeable in the lower left corner where very few stars are seen. R Coronae Australis , the bright star from which the entire complex is named, is located at the center of the field and illuminates the reddish nebula around it. The bright star in the lower part, illuminating a somewhat bluer nebula, is known as TY Coronae Australis . The brightness of these two stars and several others in the same field is variable. They belong to the so-called "T Tauri" class , a type that is quite common in star-forming regions. T Tauri stars are in the early stages of stellar evolution and display various observable characteristics of this phase, e.g. emission at visible and infrared wavelengths due to the accretion of matter left over from their formation, as well as X-ray emission. The nebulosity seen in this picture is mostly due to reflection of the stellar light by small dust particles. The stars in the R Coronae Australis complex do not emit sufficient ultraviolet light to ionize a substantial

  14. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  15. Restoration of decayed primary incisors using strip crowns.

    PubMed

    Pollard, M A; Curzon, J A; Fenlon, W L

    1991-05-01

    Caries of the primary incisors is a common problem that can be arrested if recognized early enough. However, the arrested decay is unsightly. Celluloid 'strip' crown forms, used with composite resin, now allow the restoration of even the most badly decayed primary incisors. The authors describe this quick and efficient technique.

  16. Towards an Optimized Method of Olive Tree Crown Volume Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Llorens, Jordi; Gamarra-Diezma, Juan L.; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A.; Gil, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Accurate crown characterization of large isolated olive trees is vital for adjusting spray doses in three-dimensional crop agriculture. Among the many methodologies available, laser sensors have proved to be the most reliable and accurate. However, their operation is time consuming and requires specialist knowledge and so a simpler crown characterization method is required. To this end, three methods were evaluated and compared with LiDAR measurements to determine their accuracy: Vertical Crown Projected Area method (VCPA), Ellipsoid Volume method (VE) and Tree Silhouette Volume method (VTS). Trials were performed in three different kinds of olive tree plantations: intensive, adapted one-trunked traditional and traditional. In total, 55 trees were characterized. Results show that all three methods are appropriate to estimate the crown volume, reaching high coefficients of determination: R2 = 0.783, 0.843 and 0.824 for VCPA, VE and VTS, respectively. However, discrepancies arise when evaluating tree plantations separately, especially for traditional trees. Here, correlations between LiDAR volume and other parameters showed that the Mean Vector calculated for VCPA method showed the highest correlation for traditional trees, thus its use in traditional plantations is highly recommended. PMID:25658396

  17. Evolution of the mandibular third premolar crown in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Delezene, Lucas K; Kimbel, William H

    2011-06-01

    The Pliocene hominins Australopithecus anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis likely represent ancestor-descendent taxa--possibly an anagenetic lineage--and capture significant change in the morphology of the canine and mandibular third premolar (P(3)) crowns, dental elements that form the canine honing complex in nonhuman catarrhines. This study focuses on the P(3) crown, highlighting plesiomorphic features in A. anamensis. The A. afarensis P(3) crown, in contrast, is variable in its expression of apomorphic features that are characteristic of geologically younger hominins. Temporal variation characterizes each taxon as well. The A. anamensis P(3) from Allia Bay, Kenya expresses apomorphic character states, shared with A. afarensis, which are not seen in the older sample of A. anamensis P(3)s from Kanapoi, Kenya, while spatiotemporal differences in shape exist within the A. afarensis hypodigm. The accumulation of derived features in A. afarensis results in an increased level of P(3) molarisation. P(3) molarisation did not evolve concurrent with postcanine megadontia and neither did the appearance of derived aspects of P(3) occlusal form coincide with the loss of canine honing in hominins, which is apparent prior to the origin of the genus Australopithecus. A. afarensis P(3) variation reveals the independence of shape, size, and occlusal form. The evolution of the P(3) crown in early Australopithecus bridges the wide morphological gap that exists between geologically younger hominins on the one hand and extant apes and Ardipithecus on the other.

  18. Media Tactics in New Zealand's Crown Health Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comrie, Margie

    1997-01-01

    States that New Zealand's public hospitals, converted into Crown Health Enterprises (CHEs) and required to operate within commercial restraints, were the target of attacks from politicians, medical organizations, community groups, and media. Examines press coverage of two similar CHEs over three months. Shows proactive media relations paid off in…

  19. Analysis of "Babar Loses His Crown." Technical Report No. 169.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, G. M.; And Others

    This report presents the text analysis of "Babar Loses His Crown," a story for beginning readers. (The techniques used in arriving at the analysis are presented in a Reading Center Technical Report, Number 168, "Problems and Techniques of Text Analysis.") Tables are given for a statistical lexical analysis and for a syntactic…

  20. Spatiotemporal characterization of Sclerotinia crown rot epidemics in pyrethrum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia crown rot, caused by Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum is a disease of pyrethrum in Australia that may cause substantial decline in plant density. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the disease were quantified in 14 fields spread across three growing seasons. Fitting the binary ...

  1. Novel Ordered Crown Ether-Containing Polyimides for Ion Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvin, Jennifer A.; Stasko, Daniel; Fallis, Stephen; Guenthner, Andrew J.; Webber, Cynthia; Blackwell, John; Chvalun, Sergei N.

    2003-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of thermally-stable polyimides for use as battery and fuel cell electrolyte membranes. Dianhydrides used were 1,4,5,8- naphthalenetetracarboxylic dianhydride and/or 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride. Diamines used were anti-4,4-diaminodibenzo-l8-crown-6, 4,4'- diaminodibenzo-24-crown-8, 2,2-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane, and/or 2,5- diaminobenzenesulfonic acid. The polymers were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. Polymers containing the hexafluoroisopropylidene (HFIP) group were soluble in common organic solvents, while polymers without the HFIP group were very poorly soluble. Sulfonation yields polymers that are sparingly soluble in aqueous base and/or methanol. Degree of sulfonation, determined by titration, was between one and three sulfonate groups per repeat unit. Proton conductivity was determined as a function of water content, with a maximum conductivity of l x 10(exp -2) per centimeter when fully hydrated. Crown ether-containing polymers exhibit a high degree of order that may be indicative of crown ether channel formation, which may facilitate Li(+) transport for use in battery membranes.

  2. 14. Photograph of sheet 2 (general plan; section @ crown, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photograph of sheet 2 (general plan; section @ crown, plan, and elevation) of the Indiana State Highway Commission repair plans of 1969 for the Cicott Street Bridge. Photograph of a 24' by 36' print made from microfilm in the archives of the Indiana Department of Transportation in Indianapolis. - Cicott Street Bridge, Spanning Wabash River at State Road 25, Logansport, Cass County, IN

  3. Laser pediatric crowns performed without anesthesia: a contemporary technique.

    PubMed

    Jacboson, B; Berger, J; Kravitz, R; Patel, P

    2003-01-01

    Extensive caries resulting in the need for a stainless steel crown in primary teeth may now be prepared with the use of the WaterlaseTM YSGG Laser, (Biolase) hard and soft-tissue laser. The use of the laser eliminates the need for local anesthesia, thereby providing optimal patient comfort and compliance.

  4. EVALUATION OF WILD JUGLANS SPECIES FOR CROWN GALL RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown Gall disease of walnut is caused by the ubiquitous soil-borne bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens which is able to transfer a specific piece of its own DNA into the genome of the plant host cell. The result of this genetic transformation is the autonomous undifferentiated massive growth of i...

  5. Evaluaton of Wild Juglans Species for Crown Gall Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown Gall disease of walnut is caused by the ubiquitous soil-borne bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which is able to transfer a specific piece of its own DNA into the genome of the plant host cell. The result of this genetic transformation is the autonomous undifferentiated massive growth of ...

  6. Secondary li battery incorporating 12-crown-4 ether

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasubramanian, G.; DiStefano, S.

    1992-05-05

    This patent describes a solid electrolyte, it comprises: a solid polyethylene oxide matrix; a dispersion of a lithium salt in the matrix, the ratio of oxygen to lithium in the polyethylene oxide matrix being from 1 to 1 to 10 to 1; and further including 12 Crown-4-ether in an amount effective to increase conductivity.

  7. Suppressors of oat crown rust resistance in interspecific oat crosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attempts to transfer disease resistance genes between related species may be hindered by suppression, or lack of expression, of the trait in the interspecific combination. In crosses of diploid oat Avena strigosa (Schreb.) accession CI6954SP with resistance to oat crown rust Puccinia coronata f. sp....

  8. Microcomputed tomography marginal fit evaluation of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing crowns with different methods of virtual model acquisition.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Flavio Domingues; do Prado, Celio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Carneiro, Thiago Almeida Prado Naves; Zancope, Karla; Davi, Leticia Resende; Mendonca, Gustavo; Cooper, Lyndon; Soares, Carlos Jose

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study used microcomputed tomography to evaluate the marginal fit of crowns fabricated using a chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system with different methods of virtual model acquisition. Crowns were fabricated to fit in a cast containing a single human premolar. Four methods of virtual model acquisition were used: Group 1 (control), digital impressioning of a typodont; Group 2, digital impressioning of a powdered typodont; Group 3, digital impressioning of a regular impression; and Group 4, digital impressioning of a master cast. Statistically significant differences were found between the marginal gap of Group 2 and the other groups (P < 0.05); no differences were found among Groups 1, 3, and 4. The results showed that crowns fabricated using the chairside CAD/CAM system exhibited significantly smaller vertical misfit when a thin layer of powder was applied over the typodont before digital impressioning.

  9. Brief communication: Molar development and crown areas in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando V; Wood, Bernard A; Bromage, Timothy G

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the hypodigms representing the two earliest Australopithecus (Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis) form an ancestor-descendant lineage. Understanding the details of this possible transition is important comparative evidence for assessing the likelihood of other examples of ancestor-descendant lineages within the hominin clade. To this end we have analyzed crown and cusp base areas of high resolution replicas of the mandibular molars of Au. anamensis (Allia Bay and Kanapoi sites) and those of Au. afarensis (Hadar, Laetoli, and Maka). We found no statistically significant differences in crown areas between these hypodigms although the mean of M(1) crowns was smaller in Au. anamensis, being the smallest of any Australopithecus species sampled to date. Intraspecies comparison of the areas of mesial cusps for each molar type using Wilcoxon signed rank test showed no differences for Au. anamensis. Significant differences were found between the protoconid and metaconid of Au. afarensis M(2)s and M(3)s. Furthermore, the area formed by the posterior cusps as a whole relative to the anterior cusps showed significant differences in Au. afarensis M(1)s and in Au. anamensis M(2)s but no differences were noted for M(3)s of either taxon. Developmental information derived from microstructural details in enamel shows that M(1) crown formation in Au. anamensis is similar to Pan and shorter than in H. sapiens. Taken together, these data suggests that the overall trend in the Au. anamensis-Au. afarensis transition may have involved a moderate increase in M(1) crown areas with relative expansion of distal cusps.

  10. Method and apparatus for controlling an earthworking implement to preserve a crown on a road surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staub, Michael D. (Inventor); Alster, Louis G. (Inventor); Lundquist, Steve D. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling an earthworking implement on an earthworking machine to preserve a crown on the surface of a road, including determining the position of the crown on the road surface, choosing a sloped grade on one side of the crown, positioning the earthworking implement on the sloped grade so that a first end of the earthworking implement is on the road surface. The processor determines a desired position of a second end of the earthworking implement so that the second end overlaps the crown and the earthworking implement does not cut the crown.

  11. Irradiance heterogeneity within crown affects photosynthetic capacity and nitrogen distribution of leaves in Cedrela sinensis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kenichi

    2010-05-01

    Because light conditions in the forest understory are highly heterogeneous, photosynthetic acclimation to spatially variable irradiance within a crown is important for crown-level carbon assimilation. The effect of variation in irradiance within the crown on leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic rate was examined for pinnate compound leaves in saplings of Cedrela sinensis, a pioneer deciduous tree. Five shading treatments, in which 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of leaves were shaded, were established by artificial heavy shading using shade screen umbrellas with 25% transmittance. Although the nitrogen content of leaves was constant regardless of shading treatment, ribulose 1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) content and light-saturated photosynthetic capacity were lower in shade leaves within partially shaded crowns than within fully shaded crowns. Shade leaves within partially shaded crowns contained higher amount of amino acids. Most shade leaves died in partially shaded crowns, whereas more than half of shade leaves survived in totally shaded crowns. Assumptions on photosynthetic acclimation to local light conditions cannot explain why shade leaves have different photosynthetic capacities and survival rates in between partially and totally shaded crowns. Irradiance heterogeneity within the crown causes a distinct variation in photosynthetic activity between sun and shaded leaves within the crown.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Crown Therapy in Young Individuals with Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Pousette Lundgren, G; Morling Vestlund, G I; Trulsson, M; Dahllöf, G

    2015-08-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a rare, genetically determined defect in enamel mineralization. Existing treatment recommendations suggest resin-composite restorations until adulthood, although such restorations have a limited longevity. New crown materials allow for minimal preparation techniques. The aim of this study was to compare the quality and longevity of 2 crown types-Procera and IPS e.max Press-in adolescents and young adults with AI. A secondary aim was to document adverse events. We included 27 patients (11 to 22 y of age) with AI in need of crown therapy in a randomized controlled trial using a split-mouth technique. After placing 119 Procera crowns and 108 IPS e.max Press crowns following randomization, we recorded longevity, quality, adverse events, and tooth sensitivity. After 2 y, 97% of the crowns in both crown groups had excellent or acceptable quality. We found no significant differences in quality between Procera and IPS e.max Press crowns. Tooth sensitivity was significantly reduced after crown therapy (P < 0.001). Endodontic complications occurred in 3% of crowns. The results show that it is possible to perform crown therapy with excellent results and without severe complications in young patients with AI. The study is registered at http://www.controlled-trials.com (ISRCTN70438627).

  13. Shading of ceramic crowns using digital tooth shade matching devices.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, A; Kaufmann-Jinoian, V

    2005-04-01

    In the 1990s, there was great optimism due to the development of devices for measuring tooth shade. The frequently not so simple, visual determination of the shade of a tooth was to be done with the aid of a device which recognizes the shade and describes it accurately by reference to a color chart. However, the skepticism towards such devices was also great. It is known that the color effect frequently differs strongly when comparing a tooth from the shade guide with a metal ceramic crown, despite identical shade designation. Anyone who considers visual shade determination to be inadequate and places his hopes in digital shade matching devices will be disappointed. It is the shade-generating structures of the metal ceramic and frequently of the veneer layers that turn out to be too thin which, despite correct shade selection, cause a different color perception. Such problems have been reduced decisively with the development of fracture-proof hard porcelain caps (Vita In-Ceram) with optical characteristics similar to teeth. In addition, the Vita System 3D-Master tooth shade system developed in 1998 by Vita in cooperation with Dr. Hall from Australia, leads the practitioner to a better understanding of the primary tooth shade characteristics of "brightness (value)", "color intensity (chroma)" and "color (wave length of the visible light, hue)". These two innovations allow a more accurate estimate of the basic shade of a natural tooth (reference tooth) and the imitation in the laboratory of its natural, shade-generating structures. If digital shade measurement supplements the visual shade estimate, then a further improvement can be expected--especially in the recognition of the basic shade. Qualitative descriptions of subjective shade measurement of a natural tooth and of its imitation in the dental laboratory by ceramics can be found frequently in professional journals and publications. With digital tooth shade matching devices, which apart from the color code of

  14. Effect of Crown Ethers on Structure, Stability, Activity, and Enantioselectivity of Subtilisin Carlsberg in Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Angélica M.; Vidal, Michael; Pacheco, Yamaris; Frontera, Joel; Báez, Carlos; Ornellas, Olivia; Barletta, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Colyophilization or codrying of subtilisin Carlsberg with the crown ethers 18-crown-6, 15-crown-5, and 12-crown-4 substantially improved enzyme activity in THF, acetonitrile, and 1,4-dioxane in the transesterification reactions of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethylester and 1-propanol and that of (±)-1-phenylethanol and vinylbutyrate. The acceleration of the initial rate, V0, ranged from less than 10-fold to more than 100-fold. All crown ethers activated subtilisin substantially, which excludes a specific macrocyclic effect from being responsible. The secondary structure of subtilisin was studied by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. 18-Crown-6 and 15-crown-5 led to a more nativelike structure of subtilisin in the organic solvents employed when compared with that of the dehydrated enzyme obtained from buffer alone. However, the high level of activation with 12-crown-4 where this effect was not observed excluded overall structural preservation from being the primary cause of the observed enzyme activation. The conformational mobility of subtilisin was investigated by performing thermal denaturation experiments in 1,4-dioxane. Although only a small effect of temperature on subtilisin structure was observed for the samples prepared with or without 12-crown-4, both 18-crown-6 and 15-crown-5 caused the enzyme to denature at quite low temperatures (38°C and 56°C, respectively). No relationship between this property and V0 was evident, but increased conformational mobility of the protein decreased its storage stability. The possibility of a “molecular imprinting” effect was also tested by removing 18-crown-6 from the subtilisin-18-crown-6 colyophilizate by washing. V0 was only halved as a result of this procedure, an effect insignificant compared with the ca. 80-fold rate enhancement observed prior to washing in THF. This suggests that molecular imprinting is likely the primary cause of sub-tilisin activation by crown ethers, as recently suggested. PMID

  15. Assessment of occlusion after placement of stainless steel crowns in children - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, S; O'Connell, B C; O'Connell, A C

    2014-10-01

    Many stainless steel crowns (SSCs) disrupt the occlusion in children, but stabilisation appears to occur within a short period post-placement. The extent and mechanism of these short-term occlusal changes in children are unknown. This study sought to determine whether placement of a SSC changes the maximum intercuspation position (MIP) in children, whether the MIP returns to normal within 4 weeks and whether local anaesthesia had an effect on the child's ability to achieve MIP. The T-Scan(®) III was used for the measurement of occlusal contacts. Reliability and reproducibility of the system was determined using a calibration exercise where MIP recordings were taken of eleven children not undergoing any dental treatment. For the main study, the percentage of total occlusal force on each tooth was recorded in 20 children preoperatively, after local anaesthesia, after SSC placement and 4 weeks postoperatively. There was no significant difference in MIP (P = 0·435) preoperatively and post-administration of local anaesthesia. There was a significant difference between the preoperative force on a tooth and the reading after crown placement (P = 0·0013, Wilcoxon test). By 4 weeks, there was no significant difference overall between post-SSC placement and the preoperative value for the tooth (P = 0·3). Administration of local anaesthesia did not affect the ability of a child to attain MIP. Maximum intercuspation position was disturbed by the placement of a SSC in seven of 20 cases. When MIP was disturbed, in most cases, it returned to preoperative status within 4 weeks of crown placement.

  16. Root type matters: measurements of water uptake by seminal, crown and lateral roots of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Roots play a key role in water acquisition and are a significant component of plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of root water uptake in mature maize. We used neutron radiography to image the spatial distribution of maize roots and trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers filled with a sandy soil that was kept homogeneously wet throughout the experiment. When the plants were five weeks-old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions. The transport of D2O was simulated using a diffusion-convection numerical model. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The model was initially developed and tested with two weeks-old maize (Ahmed et. al. 2015), for which we found that water was mainly taken up by lateral roots and the water uptake of the seminal roots was negligible. Here, we used this method to measure root water uptake in a mature maize root system. The root architecture of five weeks-old maize consisted of primary and seminal roots with long laterals and crown (nodal) roots that emerged from the above ground part of the plant two weeks after planting. The crown roots were thicker than the seminal roots and had fewer and shorter laterals. Surprisingly, we found that the water was mainly taken up by the crown roots and their laterals, while the lateral roots of seminal roots, which were the main location of water uptake of younger plants, stopped to take up water. Interestingly, we also found that in contrast to the seminal roots, the crown roots were able to take up water also from their distal segments. We conclude that for the two weeks

  17. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  18. Comparison of Primary Molar Crown Dimensions with Stainless Steel Crowns in a Sample of Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Kamali Sabeti, Arghavan; Shahrabi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Due to anatomic variation in tooth anatomy between populations, this study compared the buccolingual (BL) and mesiodistal (MD) dimensions of primary molars with those of stainless steel crowns (SSCs) in anIranian population. Materials and methods. Impressions were taken from both dental arches of children, and casts were poured. Teeth with caries, restoration, hypoplasia or other dental anomalies were excluded. 216 primary molars were selected and divided into 4 groups of 54 each (maxillary and mandibular first and second primary molars). MD/BL dimensions were measured using a digital caliper with 0.01 mm precision on casts and SCCs (3M brand). Data were assessed using paired t-test, post hoc test and ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The MD dimension of the lower first molar SSC and the BL dimension of the lower second molar SSC had the least difference with the corresponding values of the respective teeth. The MD dimension of the upper second molar SSC and the BL dimension of the upper first molar SSC had the greatest difference with the corresponding values in the respective teeth. Comparison of the two different brands of SSCs for the upper first molar revealed that both types had significant differences with the teeth in terms of both MD (P = 0.0) and BL (P = 0.0) dimensions. Conclusion. In the studied population, best adaptation was seen in second lower molars and the least adaptationswere seen in first and second upper molars. PMID:26236433

  19. Spectrophotometric analysis of crown discoloration induced by MTA- and ZnOE-based sealers

    PubMed Central

    IOANNIDIS, Konstantinos; MISTAKIDIS, Ilias; BELTES, Panagiotis; KARAGIANNIS, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Crown discoloration can be induced by root canal sealer remnants following root canal treatment. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate chromatic alterations in human tooth crowns induced by a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate-based sealer (MTA Fillapex® and a commonly used ZnOE-based sealer (Roth-811). The tested null hypothesis was that the application of the materials did not induce clinically perceptible crown discoloration (Ho: CIE color difference ΔE<3.7). Material and Methods: Forty five fully developed, intact, mandibular third molars were sectioned 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. The pulp chambers were chemomechanically debrided via the cervical access. The specimens were randomly assigned into three groups Group 1: MTA Fillapex, Group 2: Roth 811, Group 3: Negative control (unfilled) and immersed in individually marked vials containing distilled water up to the cervix (37±1º C). The spectral reflectance lines were recorded by utilizing a UV-VIS spectrophotometer equipped with integration sphere in the visual spectrum at baseline, 1 week, 1 and 3 months after material placement. Data were transformed into values of the CIE L*a*b* color system and the corresponding ΔE values were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way mixed ANOVA models, at p=0.05 level of significance. Results: A statistically significant increase in a* and b* chromatic parameters of the MTA Fillapex Group was measured. However, ΔE values did not exceed the human eye perceptibility threshold (set at ΔE<3.7) during the experimental period (ΔEt3=2.88). In Roth-811 Group, a statistically significant decrease in L* and a statistically significant increase in a* and b* chromatic parameters was measured, during all observation periods. Resultant ΔE values exceeded the human eye perceptibility threshold after 1 week (ΔEt1=5.65). Conclusions: Application of MTA Fillapex in tooth crowns resulted in minimal color alterations, while Roth 811 induced severe

  20. Effect of sandblasting on fracture load of titanium ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Moldi, Arvind I.; Bhandari, Kishor Singh; Nagral, Sharanbassapa; Deshpandey, Sumit; Kulkarni, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: It is difficult to achieve a reliable bond between the titanium and veneering porcelain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength between titanium ceramic crowns. Materials and Methods: The surfaces of titanium copings were divided in two groups. Group A sandblasted with 250 um (n = 10) and Group B without sandblasting (n = 10). Low-fusing porcelain was bonded over copings. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture load (N) of the crowns. All data were compared using Student's t-test. Results: There was a significant difference in fracture toughness between two groups (P = 0.05). The mean value of fracture strength for Group A was 721.66 N and for Group B was 396.39 N. Conclusions: Sandblasting improves the bond strength between titanium, and ceramic, mechanical bonding plays a crucial role in the bonding between titanium and ceramic. PMID:26929517

  1. In-cylinder flows of a motored four-stroke engine with flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Yang, H.S.; Yeh, C.-N.

    2008-04-15

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the in-cylinder flow structures and turbulence intensities in the symmetry and offset planes of a motored four-valve, four-stroke engine during the intake and compression strokes are diagnosed by using a particle image velocimeter. Two pistons of different crown shapes (flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons) are studied. The inception, establishment, and evolution of the tumbling vortical flow structures during the intake and compression strokes are clearly depicted. Quantitative strengths of the rotating vortical flow motions are presented by a dimensionless parameter, the tumble ratio, which can represent the mean angular velocity of the vortices in the target plane. The turbulence intensity of the in-cylinder flow is also calculated by using the measured time-varying velocity data. The results show that the flat-crown piston induces higher bulk-averaged tumble ratio and turbulence intensity than the slightly concave-crown piston does because the tumble ratio and turbulence generated by the flat-crown piston in the offset planes during the compression stroke are particularly large. The engine with the flat-crown piston also presents larger torque and power outputs and lower hydrocarbon emission than that with the slightly concave-crown piston. This might be caused by the enhanced combustion in the engine cylinder due to the stronger tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. (author)

  2. Bonded composite resin crowns for primary incisors: technique update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1990-02-01

    A technique for restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors with a hybrid visible light-curing composite resin and a dentinal bonding agent is described. Careful use of this technique and the new materials can provide a restoration that is esthetic and resistant to fracture and displacement. The technique requires careful preparation of the operative field and precise handling of the restorative materials. The method is illustrated by the placement of bonded composite resin crowns in a 3-year-old boy.

  3. Two crown-ether-coordinated caesium halogen salts.

    PubMed

    Well, Natalija van; Klein, Christian; Ritter, Franz; Assmus, Wolf; Krellner, Cornelius; Bolte, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The crystal structures of two crown-ether-coordinated caesium halogen salt hydrates, namely di-μ-bromido-bis[aqua(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane)caesium(I)] dihydrate, [Cs2Br2(C12H24O6)2(H2O)2]·2H2O, (I), and poly[[diaquadi-μ-chlorido-μ-(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane)dicaesium(I)] dihydrate], {[Cs2Cl2(C12H24O6)(H2O)2]·2H2O}n, (II), are reported. In (I), all atoms are located on general positions. In (II), the Cs(+) cation is located on a mirror plane perpendicular to the a axis, the chloride anion is located on a mirror plane perpendicular to the c axis and the crown-ether ring is located around a special position with site symmetry 2/m, with two opposite O atoms exactly on the mirror plane perpendicular to the a axis; of one water molecule, only the O atom is located on a mirror plane perpendicular on the a axis, while the other water molecule is completely located on a mirror plane perpendicular to the c axis. Whereas in (I), hydrogen bonds between bromide ligands and water molecules lead to one-dimensional chains running along the b axis, in (II) two-dimensional sheets of water molecules and chloride ligands are formed which combine with the polymeric caesium-crown polymer to give a three-dimensional network. Although both compounds have a similar composition, i.e. a Cs(+) cation with a halogen, an 18-crown-6 ether and a water ligand, the crystal structures are rather different. On the other hand, it is remarkable that (I) is isomorphous with the already published iodide compound.

  4. Supramolecular Complexation of Carbon Nanostructures by Crown Ethers.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luis; Illescas, Beatriz M; Martín, Nazario

    2017-04-07

    Since their discovery, crown ethers as well as the most recent carbon nanostructures, namely fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have received a lot of attention from the chemical community. Merging these singular chemical structures by noncovalent forces has provided a large number of unprecedented supramolecular assemblies with new geometric and electronic properties whose more representative examples are presented in this Synopsis organized according to the different nature of the carbon nanostructures.

  5. Secondary Li battery incorporating 12-Crown-4 ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium battery which utilizes a polyethylene oxide (PEO) solid polymeric electrolyte complexed with a lithium salt is disclosed. The conductivity is increased an order of magnitude and interfacial charge transfer resistance is substantially decreased by incorporating a minor amount of 12-Crown-4 ether in the PEO-lithium salt solid electrolyte film. Batteries containing the improved electrolyte permit operation at a lower temperature with improved efficiency.

  6. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of divalent europium-poly(methacrylate containing crown ether structure) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, N.; Nakamura, H.; Mishima, T.; Shiokawa, J.; Adachi, G. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on divalent europium complexes with poly(methacrylate containing crown ether structure)s, poly(crown ether)s, prepared and their fluorescence properties studied. The polymers used were poly(15-crown-5-methyl methacrylate) (PMA15C5), copoly(15- crown-5-methyl methacrylate-X) (copoly(MA15C5-X)); (X = MMA, EMA, BMA, 2-methoxyethyl methacrylate (MAGI) 3,6,9,12,15- pentaoxahexadecyl methacrylate (MAG5)), poly(18-crown-6- methyl methacrylate) (PMA18C6), and copoly(18-crown-6-methyl methacrylate-MMA) (copoly(MA18C6-MMA)), which were obtained by bulk polymerization. The fluorescence properties of Eu{sup 2+} polymers activated by complexing Eu{sup 2+} ions with crown ether groups were measured in powder form. The Eu{sup 2+}-poly (crown ether)s irradiated by UV light generally gave blue bright emission in the region of 420-465 nm. It was Eu{sup 2+}-copoly(Ma15C5-X); (X = MMA, EMA, and MAG1) that showed the largest emission intensity among the Eu{sup 2+} polymers, and its emission intensity was ca. 20% of that for CaWO{sub 4}:Pb (NBS1026) whose quantum efficiency is about 76%. The intensities of emission for the Eu{sup 2+} polymers containing 15-crown-5 were much larger than that for the ones containing 18-crown-6.

  7. Plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and crown gall development

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Jochen; Deeken, Rosalia

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease on various plant species by introducing its T-DNA into the genome. Therefore, Agrobacterium has been extensively studied both as a pathogen and an important biotechnological tool. The infection process involves the transfer of T-DNA and virulence proteins into the plant cell. At that time the gene expression patterns of host plants differ depending on the Agrobacterium strain, plant species and cell-type used. Later on, integration of the T-DNA into the plant host genome, expression of the encoded oncogenes, and increase in phytohormone levels induce a fundamental reprogramming of the transformed cells. This results in their proliferation and finally formation of plant tumors. The process of reprogramming is accompanied by altered gene expression, morphology and metabolism. In addition to changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, further genome-wide (“omic”) approaches have recently deepened our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic basis of crown gall tumor formation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about plant responses in the course of tumor development. Special emphasis is placed on the connection between epigenetic, transcriptomic, metabolomic, and morphological changes in the developing tumor. These changes not only result in abnormally proliferating host cells with a heterotrophic and transport-dependent metabolism, but also cause differentiation and serve as mechanisms to balance pathogen defense and adapt to abiotic stress conditions, thereby allowing the coexistence of the crown gall and host plant. PMID:24795740

  8. Slide crown lengthening procedure using wide surface incisions and cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Szymaitis, Dennis W

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the slide crown lengthening procedure (SCLP), which incorporates surgical design features to overcome present crown lengthening procedure (CLP) shortcomings. The result is a 75% decrease in required surgery on adjacent teeth and a corresponding 75% reduction in surgical time. Other advantages include a reduction in surgical morbidity, improvement in terminal esthetics, and fewer teeth subject to papillae removal and apically repositioned gingiva. The 20 to 30 degree incision forming the slide is the pivotal feature; it allows effortless flap positioning. This incision angle enables wide surface incisions to adhere flaps together by producing stronger fibrin clots, decreasing tissue retraction angles, and reforming disrupted fibrin clots as incision sides slide while maintaining contact. This enhanced fibrin clot eliminates the need for sutures. The slide produced by the 20 to 30 degree incision functions for crown lengthening on all sites (facial, lingual, or palatal). This versatile surgical design introduces a new healing dimension that adapts to and provides benefits for other dental surgeries, such as gingival grafts, endodontic surgery, implants, and extractions.

  9. Unicuspid and bicuspid tooth crown formation in squamates.

    PubMed

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2011-12-15

    The molecular and developmental factors that regulate tooth morphogenesis in nonmammalian species, such as snakes and lizards, have received relatively little attention compared to mammals. Here we describe the development of unicuspid and bicuspid teeth in squamate species. The simple, cone-shaped tooth crown of the bearded dragon and ball python is established at cap stage and fixed in shape by the differentiation of cells and the secretion of dental matrices. Enamel production, as demonstrated by amelogenin expression, occurs relatively earlier in squamate teeth than in mouse molars. We suggest that the early differentiation in squamate unicuspid teeth at cap stage correlates with a more rudimentary tooth crown shape. The leopard gecko can form a bicuspid tooth crown despite the early onset of differentiation. Cusp formation in the gecko does not occur by the folding of the inner enamel epithelium, as in the mouse molar, but by the differential secretion of enamel. Ameloblasts forming the enamel epithelial bulge, a central swelling of cells in the inner enamel epithelium, secrete amelogenin at cap stage, but cease to do so by bell stage. Meanwhile, other ameloblasts in the inner enamel epithelium continue to secrete enamel, forming cusp tips on either side of the bulge. Bulge cells specifically express the gene Bmp2, which we suggest serves as a pro-differentiation signal for cells of the gecko enamel organ. In this regard, the enamel epithelial bulge of the gecko may be more functionally analogous to the secondary enamel knot of mammals than the primary enamel knot.

  10. In vitro study of fracture strength of provisional crown materials

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Gulsum; Kara, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this report was to evaluate the effect of the fabrication method and material type on the fracture strength of provisional crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS A master model with one crown (maxillary left second premolar) was manufactured from Cr-Co alloy. The master model was scanned, and the data set was transferred to a CAD/CAM unit (Yenamak D50, Yenadent Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey) for the Cercon Base group. For the other groups, temporary crowns were produced by direct fabrication methods (Imident, Temdent, Structur Premium, Takilon, Systemp c&b II, and Acrytemp). The specimens were subjected to water storage at 37℃ for 24 hours, and then they were thermocycled (TC, 5000×, 5-55℃) (n=10). The maximum force at fracture (Fmax) was measured in a universal test machine at 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed by non-parametric statistics (α=.05). RESULTS Fmax values varied between 711.09-1392.1 N. In the PMMA groups, Takilon showed the lowest values (711.09 N), and Cercon Base showed the highest values (959.59 N). In the composite groups, Structur Premium showed the highest values (1392.1 N), and Acrytemp showed the lowest values (910.05 N). The composite groups showed significantly higher values than the PMMA groups (P=.01). CONCLUSION Composite-based materials showed significantly higher fracture strengths than PMMA-based materials. The CAD-CAM technique offers more advantages than the direct technique. PMID:25722834

  11. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Imidacloprid Within the Crown of Eastern Hemlock

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Richard M.; Lagalante, Anthony; Jones, Jonathan; Cook, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Billings, Anthony A.; Park, Yong-Lak

    2017-01-01

    Systemic imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an exotic pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriére in the United States. This study was conducted to 1) determine the effect of treatment timing (spring vs. fall) and application method (trunk injection vs. soil injection) on the spatial and temporal distribution of imidacloprid within the crown of A. tsugae-free eastern hemlock using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2) compare ELISA to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the detection of imidacloprid in xylem fluid, and 3) determine the concentration of imidacloprid in leaf tissue using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection methods. Xylem fluid concentrations of imidacloprid were found to be significantly higher for spring applications than for fall applications and for trunk injections than soil injections in the first year posttreatment. A total of 69% of samples analyzed by ELISA gave 1.8 times higher concentrations of imidacloprid than those found by GC/MS, leading to evidence of a matrix effect and overestimation of imidacloprid in xylem fluid by ELISA. A comparison of the presence of imidacloprid with xylem fluid and in leaf tissue on the same branch showed significant differences, suggesting that imidacloprid moved intermittently within the crown of eastern hemlock. PMID:28130463

  12. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Baker, John D.

    2007-11-06

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Imidacloprid Within the Crown of Eastern Hemlock.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Richard M; Lagalante, Anthony; Jones, Jonathan; Cook, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Billings, Anthony A; Park, Yong-Lak

    2017-01-01

    Systemic imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an exotic pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriére in the United States. This study was conducted to 1) determine the effect of treatment timing (spring vs. fall) and application method (trunk injection vs. soil injection) on the spatial and temporal distribution of imidacloprid within the crown of A. tsugae-free eastern hemlock using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2) compare ELISA to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the detection of imidacloprid in xylem fluid, and 3) determine the concentration of imidacloprid in leaf tissue using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection methods. Xylem fluid concentrations of imidacloprid were found to be significantly higher for spring applications than for fall applications and for trunk injections than soil injections in the first year posttreatment. A total of 69% of samples analyzed by ELISA gave 1.8 times higher concentrations of imidacloprid than those found by GC/MS, leading to evidence of a matrix effect and overestimation of imidacloprid in xylem fluid by ELISA. A comparison of the presence of imidacloprid with xylem fluid and in leaf tissue on the same branch showed significant differences, suggesting that imidacloprid moved intermittently within the crown of eastern hemlock.

  14. Proteins encoded by Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid DNA (T-DNA) in crown gall tumors

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Joan C.; Nester, Eugene W.; Gordon, Milton P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to detect proteins that may be produced in crown gall tumors as a result of expression of incorporated Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid DNA (T-DNA), we have isolated mRNA complementary to T-DNA and translated this in a protein-synthesizing system derived from wheat germ. mRNA prepared from cultured E1 tumor from Nicotiana tabacum hybridized with HindIII fragment 1 sequences of T-DNA immobilized on cellulose nitrate filters. Two proteins of 30,000 and 16,500 Mr were produced when this selected RNA was released and translated. Other tumor lines from N. tabacum were investigated, and a protein of slightly less than 30,000 Mr was encoded by HindIII fragment 1 sequences of 15955/01 tumor. No products were observed for 15955/1 tumor line, which differs from E1/B6-806 and 15955/01 in that it does not produce octopine. mRNA species of each of the tumor lines hybridized to Bst I fragment 8 sequences of T-DNA and produced a common protein of 15,000 Mr. Because this protein is derived from the region of the T-DNA that is conserved in octopine- and nopaline-type crown gall tumors, it may play a role in oncogenicity. Images PMID:16592819

  15. Global change research for protecting resources in the Crown of the continent Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Fagre, D.B. )

    1993-06-01

    A multi-faceted, long-term research program has been initiated by the National Park Service to evaluate the potential effects of climatic changes on natural resources of parks. Glacier National Park is centrally located in a mountainous wilderness complex along the continental divide which was described early in the century as the [open quotes]Crown of the Continent[close quotes]. A central component of the program is a regional ecosystem simulation system. This system acts as an interface for a number of ecological models which collectively provide spatially explicit, mechanistically-derived predictions of microclimate, hydrological output, and forest biophysical processes within the park. Validation of the system is being carried out over the next 5 years with associated studies on glacier dynamics, stream hydrology, lake chemistry, forest landscape classification, remote sensing, and others.

  16. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fit of complete crowns loaded at central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1993-07-01

    In dentistry, the defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry is applied to study the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different casting materials (Au, Pd-Ag, Ni-Cr, and PFM) were tested. The horizontal displacements of two points near the margin, measured by the method of multiple observations, could be as large as 15 micrometers under normal load (25 kgw). However, the marginal discrepancy of all four crowns estimated were quite small (< 0.2 micrometers ). This also indicates that the cementation between the crown and the tooth is quite good. Nevertheless, when the load was increased to 45 kgw, a defect of cementation was found on the Pd-Ag crown.

  17. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fits of complete crowns loaded at the central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1995-05-01

    In dentistry, a defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry was applied to evaluate the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different materials (Au alloy, Pd-Ag alloy, Ni-Cr alloy, and porcelain fused to metal) were tested. The out-of-plane displacements of the crown specimens were measured by the method of multiple observations. The displacements measured range from 6 to 10 micrometers under normal load (25 N). However, the marginal openings of all four crowns were estimated to be less than 0.2 micrometers . In addition the defect of the crown was examined.

  18. Fracture Resistance of Non-Metallic Molar Crowns Manufactured with CEREC 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Dalia A.

    Objectives. To compare fracture strength and fatigue resistance of ceramic (ProCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) (C) and resin composite (Paradigm MZ100, 3M/ ESPE) (R) crowns made with CEREC-3D. Methods. A prepared ivorine molar tooth was duplicated to produce 40 identical prepared specimens made of epoxy resin (Viade). Twenty (C) crowns and 20 (R) were cemented to their dies using resin cement. Ten of each group were subjected to compressive loading to fracture. The remaining 10 of each group were subjected to mechanical cyclic loading for 500,000 cycles. The survivors were subjected to compressive loading to fracture. Results. No significant difference in mean fracture load was found between the two materials. However, only 30% of the (C) crowns vs. 100% of the (R) crowns survived the cyclic loading test. Conclusions. (R) crowns demonstrated higher fatigue Resistance than (C) crowns in-vitro and might better resist cracking in-vivo.

  19. Forest Crown Cover Estimation in Northern Boreal and Temperate European Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirro, Laura; Hame, Tuomas; Ahola, Heikki; Lonnqvist, Anne

    2012-04-01

    A method for forest crown cover estimation using high resolution optical earth observation data was developed and tested at four study sites in Europe. Crown cover was estimated using the probability estimation method of VTT and Image2006 data. The accuracy of the crown cover predictions was assessed using reference data that were collected by visual interpretation of very high resolution aerial and space borne imagery. The average crown cover values in the reference data varied from 17 % to 86 % and in the predictions from 18 % to 80 %. The absolute root mean square error of the crown cover predictions varied between 14 % and 33 %. The results of the study showed that it is possible to map forest crown cover with twenty to thirty meter spatial resolution optical earth observation data using the single pixel values. However, understanding the variable results at different sites requires further investigation.

  20. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Jochen; Scholz, Claus-Juergen; Kneitz, Susanne; Weber, Dana; Fuchs, Joerg; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes regulate gene

  1. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Lameira, Deborah Pacheco; Silva, Wilkens Aurélio Buarque e; Silva, Frederico Andrade e; De Souza, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness) and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer) configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n = 10): Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM); Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM); Bi-layer crowns (BL). Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C), and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = .05) indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM = 3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM = 3561.5 N ± 991.6), which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6). There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength. PMID:26576423

  2. Failure modes and fracture origins of porcelain veneers on bilayer dental crowns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihong; Liu, Guanghua; Wang, Yong; Shen, James Zhijian; Feng, Hailan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the fracture origins and crack paths in the porcelain of clinically failed bilayer ceramic restorations and to reveal the correlation between the porcelain failures and material properties. Three clinically failed crowns of each material (bilayer zirconia crowns, galvano-ceramic crowns, and porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns) were collected and underwent failure analysis. The fractures found in porcelain veneers showed several characteristics including wear, Hertzian cone crack, chipping off, and delamination. The results indicated that the fracture origins and features of the porcelain in bilayer ceramic restorations might be affected by the rigidity of core materials and thickness of copings.

  3. A tree canopy height delineation method based on Morphological Reconstruction—Open Crown Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Jing, L.; Li, Y.; Tang, Y.; Li, H.; Lin, Q.

    2016-04-01

    For the purpose of forest management, high resolution LIDAR and optical remote sensing imageries are used for treetop detection, tree crown delineation, and classification. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-adjusted dominant scales calculation method and a new crown horizontal cutting method of tree canopy height model (CHM) to detect and delineate tree crowns from LIDAR, under the hypothesis that a treetop is radiometric or altitudinal maximum and tree crowns consist of multi-scale branches. The major concept of the method is to develop an automatic selecting strategy of feature scale on CHM, and a multi-scale morphological reconstruction-open crown decomposition (MRCD) to get morphological multi-scale features of CHM by: cutting CHM from treetop to the ground; analysing and refining the dominant multiple scales with differential horizontal profiles to get treetops; segmenting LiDAR CHM using watershed a segmentation approach marked with MRCD treetops. This method has solved the problems of false detection of CHM side-surface extracted by the traditional morphological opening canopy segment (MOCS) method. The novel MRCD delineates more accurate and quantitative multi-scale features of CHM, and enables more accurate detection and segmentation of treetops and crown. Besides, the MRCD method can also be extended to high optical remote sensing tree crown extraction. In an experiment on aerial LiDAR CHM of a forest of multi-scale tree crowns, the proposed method yielded high-quality tree crown maps.

  4. Accidental swallowing of a gold cast crown during orthodontic tooth separation.

    PubMed

    Kharbanda, O P; Varshney, P; Dutta, U

    1995-01-01

    Accidental swallowing of a gold cast crown that became loose after separation with brass wire for orthodontic band placement, is reported. The intervention to remove the ingested crown subsequent to its location in the GI tract on immediate radiographic examination of chest and abdomen included endoscopic examination. Since the crown had past distal to the duodenum it was decided to keep a watch on its movement by daily radiographic examination. The crown passed with excreta on the 5th day uneventfully. Literature on ingestion of foreign bodies of dental origin is reviewed. Possible emergencies and their management is discussed.

  5. Wear of posterior metal-free polymer crowns after 2 years.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, B; Trame, J-P; Dreyhaupt, J; Gabbert, O; Koob, A; Rammelsberg, P

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical wear behaviour of posterior, metal-free polymer crowns and to compare it with that of metal-ceramic crowns. After randomization, a total of 120 single crowns were set in posterior teeth. These 120 crowns were divided into three groups: 40 polymer crowns with a glass-fibre framework (group 1), 40 polymer crowns without framework stabilization (group 2) and 40 metal-ceramic crowns (control group). Wear was measured by use of gypsum replicas and a 3D laser scanner at baseline and after 2 years. Statistical analysis was performed by use of a mixed-effects regression model. The mean total wear of posterior single crowns was -19.0 mum (+/- 18.5 microm) in group 1, -24.3 microm (+/- 31.5 microm) in group 2 and -7.0 microm (+/- 8.8 microm) in the control group. Statistical analysis revealed the mean total wear of the polymer crowns in groups 1 (P < or = 0.01) and 2 (P < or = 0.01) was significantly greater than in the control group. No significant difference was detected between groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.58). Age, gender and opposing teeth had no significant effect on wear behaviour.

  6. Stress distribution difference between Lava Ultimate full crowns and IPS e.max CAD full crowns on a natural tooth and on tooth-shaped implant abutments.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Ivo; Daher, René

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this short communication is to present finite element analysis comparison of the stress distribution between CAD/CAM full crowns made of Lava Ultimate and of IPS e.max CAD, adhesively luted to natural teeth and to implant abutments with the shape of natural teeth. Six 3D models were prepared using a 3D content-creating software, based on a micro-CT scan of a human mandibular molar. The geometry of the full crown and of the abutment was the same for all models representing Lava Ultimate full crowns (L) and IPS e.max CAD full crowns (E) on three different abutments: prepared natural tooth (n), titanium abutment (t) and zirconia abutment (z). A static load of 400 N was applied on the vestibular and lingual cusps, and fixtures were applied to the base of the models. After running the static linear analysis, the post-processing data we analyzed. The stress values at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lt and Lz groups were significantly higher than the stress values at the same interface of all the other models. The high stress concentration in the adhesive at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lava Ultimate group on implants might be one of the factors contributing to the reported debondings of crowns.

  7. All-Ceramic SOFC Tolerant to Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Greg W. ); Hardy, John S. ); Meinhardt, Kerry D. ); Marina, Olga A. ); Simner, Steve P. )

    2002-11-21

    Novel strontium titanate-ceria composite solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials[1] were tested in single electrolyte-supported cells in the temperature range 600-900 degrees centigrade. Power densities of 420 to 350 mW/cm2 were generated in wet hydrogen at 0.7 Volt at 850 and 800 degrees centigrade, respectively. Moreover, ceramic anodes offered higher tolerance to oxidizing environments, sulfur-containing environments and hydrocarbons.

  8. Marginal Integrity of Glass Ionomer and All Ceramic Restorations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    irregular microstructure of the glass matrix infused with fillers, they do not possess fracture resistance comparable to natural teeth. This limited ACRs...content and lower glass content, these ceramics have greater fracture resistance. These improved ceramics can be used in areas with significant lateral...Reitz, 1999). The polycrystalline structure has a much 3 higher resistance to fracture than the less dense and irregular composition of glass

  9. Cooperativity of dynamics of 18-crown-6 molecule forming one-dimensional chain in Cs2(18-crown-6)3[Ni(dmit)2]2.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Satoaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takeda, Sadamu; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Sadafumi; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Saito, Kazuya

    2005-07-22

    Heat capacity of Cs2(18-crown-6)3[Ni(dmit)2]2 was measured by adiabatic calorimetry. A broad thermal anomaly was observed around 225 K. The entropy gain (about 52 J K(-1) mol(-1)) is much larger than that expected for twofold disordering of 18-crown-6 assumed in the previous structure analysis. The shape of thermal anomaly was qualitatively explained by a linear Ising model developed for cooperative disordering in polymers. The 18-crown-6 molecules forming a one-dimensional chain in the crystal are orientationally disordered with moderate cooperativity.

  10. Resin composite repair for implant-supported crowns.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Suzuki, Marcelo; Hirata, Ronaldo; Bonfante, Gerson; Fardin, Vinicius P; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-04-21

    This study evaluated the reliability of implant-supported crowns repaired with resin composites. Fifty-four titanium abutments were divided in three groups (n = 18 each) to support resin nanoceramic molar crowns, as follows: (LU) (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE); LU repaired with either a direct or an indirect resin composite. Samples were subjected to mouth-motion accelerated-life testing in water (n = 18). Cumulative damage with a use stress of 300 N was used to plot Weibull curves for group comparison. Reliability was calculated for a mission of 100,000 cycles at 400 N load. Beta values were 0.83 for LU, 0.31 and 0.27 for LU repaired with Filtek and Ceramage, respectively. Weibull modulus for LU was 9.5 and η = 1047 N, m = 6.85, and η = 1002 N for LU repaired with Ceramage, and m = 4.65 and η = 766 N for LU repaired with Filtek (p < 0.10 between LU and LU repaired with Filtek). Reliability at 400 N was 100% for both LU and LU repaired with Ceramage which were significantly higher than LU Filtek repair (32%). LU restored crowns failed cohesively. Fractures were confined within the restored material, and detailed fractography is presented. The performance of resin nanoceramic material repaired with an indirect composite was maintained after accelerated-life testing compared to unrepaired controls. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  11. Basal ganglia—thalamus and the “crowning enigma”

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Arbuthnott, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    When Hubel (1982) referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as “… a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come …” he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1), the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU) input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory (S1) cortex before focusing on motor cortex. PMID:26582979

  12. Crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness of mandibular second bicuspids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sérgio Augusto; Vellini-Ferreira, Flávio; Scavone-Junior, Helio; Ferreira, Rívea Inês

    2011-01-01

    To achieve proper recontouring of anterior and posterior teeth, to obtain optimal morphology during enamel stripping, it is important to be aware of dental anatomy. This study aimed at evaluating crown dimensions and proximal enamel thickness in a sample of 40 extracted sound, human, mandibular, second bicuspids (20 right and 20 left). Mesiodistal, cervico-occlusal and buccolingual crown dimensions were measured using a digital caliper, accurate to 0.01 mm. Teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axes through the proximal surfaces to obtain 0.7 mm-thick central sections. Enamel thickness on the cut sections was measured using a perfilometer. Comparative analyses were carried out using the Student's-t test (α= 5%). The mean mesiodistal crown widths for right and left teeth were 7.79 mm (± 0.47) and 7.70 mm (± 0.51), respectively. Mean cervico-occlusal heights ranged from 8.31 mm (± 0.75) on the right to 8.38 mm (± 0.85) on the left teeth. The mean values for the buccolingual dimension were 8.67 mm (± 0.70) on the right and 8.65 mm (± 0.54) on the left teeth. The mean enamel thickness on the mesial surfaces ranged from 1.35 mm (± 0.22) to 1.40 mm (± 0.17), on the left and right sides, respectively. On the distal surfaces, the corresponding values were 1.44 mm (± 0.21) and 1.46 mm (± 0.12). No significant differences were found between measurements for right and left teeth. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces, compared with the mesial surfaces.

  13. Basal ganglia-thalamus and the "crowning enigma".

    PubMed

    Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Arbuthnott, Gordon W

    2015-01-01

    When Hubel (1982) referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as "… a 'crowning mystery' to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come …" he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80's and 90's there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1), the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU) input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory (S1) cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  14. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components. PMID:23984113

  15. Intensive field phenotyping of maize (Zea mays L.) root crowns identifies phenes and phene integration associated with plant growth and nitrogen acquisition.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-09-01

    Root architecture is an important regulator of nitrogen (N) acquisition. Existing methods to phenotype the root architecture of cereal crops are generally limited to seedlings or to the outer roots of mature root crowns. The functional integration of root phenes is poorly understood. In this study, intensive phenotyping of mature root crowns of maize was conducted to discover phenes and phene modules related to N acquisition. Twelve maize genotypes were grown under replete and deficient N regimes in the field in South Africa and eight in the USA. An image was captured for every whorl of nodal roots in each crown. Custom software was used to measure root phenes including nodal occupancy, angle, diameter, distance to branching, lateral branching, and lateral length. Variation existed for all root phenes within maize root crowns. Size-related phenes such as diameter and number were substantially influenced by nodal position, while angle, lateral density, and distance to branching were not. Greater distance to branching, the length from the shoot to the emergence of laterals, is proposed to be a novel phene state that minimizes placing roots in already explored soil. Root phenes from both older and younger whorls of nodal roots contributed to variation in shoot mass and N uptake. The additive integration of root phenes accounted for 70% of the variation observed in shoot mass in low N soil. These results demonstrate the utility of intensive phenotyping of mature root systems, as well as the importance of phene integration in soil resource acquisition.

  16. Intensive field phenotyping of maize (Zea mays L.) root crowns identifies phenes and phene integration associated with plant growth and nitrogen acquisition

    PubMed Central

    York, Larry M.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Root architecture is an important regulator of nitrogen (N) acquisition. Existing methods to phenotype the root architecture of cereal crops are generally limited to seedlings or to the outer roots of mature root crowns. The functional integration of root phenes is poorly understood. In this study, intensive phenotyping of mature root crowns of maize was conducted to discover phenes and phene modules related to N acquisition. Twelve maize genotypes were grown under replete and deficient N regimes in the field in South Africa and eight in the USA. An image was captured for every whorl of nodal roots in each crown. Custom software was used to measure root phenes including nodal occupancy, angle, diameter, distance to branching, lateral branching, and lateral length. Variation existed for all root phenes within maize root crowns. Size-related phenes such as diameter and number were substantially influenced by nodal position, while angle, lateral density, and distance to branching were not. Greater distance to branching, the length from the shoot to the emergence of laterals, is proposed to be a novel phene state that minimizes placing roots in already explored soil. Root phenes from both older and younger whorls of nodal roots contributed to variation in shoot mass and N uptake. The additive integration of root phenes accounted for 70% of the variation observed in shoot mass in low N soil. These results demonstrate the utility of intensive phenotyping of mature root systems, as well as the importance of phene integration in soil resource acquisition. PMID:26041317

  17. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. PMID:26628518

  18. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots.

  19. Cholinesterase activity in black-crowned night-herons exposed to fenthion-treated water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fenthion, (O,O-Dimethyl O-(3-methyl-4-(methylthio)phenyl) phosphorothioate), a widely used mosquito control agent, has caused wildlife mortality. To simulate a shallow wetland environment, an exposure chamber was used containing water treated with fenthion at 1 and 10 times the field application rate of 112 g active ingredient (AI)/ha. This system permitted an evaluation of exposure routes and the effects of fenthion in a representative species of wading bird, the black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax). The results suggested that herons received only a dermal exposure, and that their brain acetylcholinesterase activity was not significantly inhibited. In contrast, however, plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity was inhibited, suggesting the herons were exposed to the insecticide. The application rates and types of exposures were not life-threatening in this species.

  20. Detection and Quantitation of Octopine in Normal Plant Tissue and in Crown Gall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roosevelt; Guderian, Ronald H.; Eden, Francine; Chilton, Mary-Dell; Gordon, Milton P.; Nester, Eugene W.

    1974-01-01

    Octopine has been detected in normal tobacco leaf and stem tissue, normal sunflower stem tissue, pinto bean leaves, and normal tobacco callus tissue in culture. Octopine was identified in extracts by means of electrophoresis and chromatography in several solvent systems. Tobacco and sunflower tumor lines induced by various strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were found to contain from 1 to 240 times as much octopine as the normal plant tissues examined. Several strains of A. tumefaciens produce undifferentiated tobacco tumors containing high levels of octopine, but produce undifferentiated sunflower tumors containing normal levels of octopine and high levels of arginine. Further, strain CGIC of A. tumefaciens produces in tobacco an undifferentiated tumor which contains high levels of octopine and a teratoma which contains normal levels of octopine. This evidence shows that there is no consistent relationship between the causative strain of A. tumefaciens and the octopine content of the resulting crown gall tumor. PMID:16592142

  1. Zirconia crowns--an esthetic and resistant restorative alternative for ECC affected primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Planells del Pozo, P; Fuks, A B

    2014-01-01

    The present report discusses briefly the problem of ECC in very young children and the recommended approaches for prevention and treatment. The esthetic restoration of the maxillary incisors with Zirconia Nu Smile crowns is described. It is also stressed that the luxation injury two months after placement did not damage the appearance nor the stability of the crowns.

  2. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta PI's from the USDA-ARS NPGS, 2009.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta vulgaris plant introductions (PI) were screened for Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. Inoculum of R. solani isolate R-9 (AG-2-2), colonized to dry barley and course ground, was applied to the crown of plants at a rate of 4.8 g/m. Beets were lifted...

  3. Evaluation of the occlusal contact of crowns fabricated with the bite impression method.

    PubMed

    Makino, Sachi; Okada, Daizo; Shin, Chiharu; Ogura, Reiko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-30

    In prosthodontic treatment, reconstruction of a proper occlusal contact relationship is very important as well as reconstruction of a proper interproximal relationship and marginal fitness. Unfortunately, occlusal relationships are sometimes lost in the process of occlusal adjustment of crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal contacts of single crown fabricated by two different types of impression techniques. Nine subjects, whose molars required treatment with crown restoration, were enrolled in this study. Full cast crowns were fabricated using two types of impression techniques: the conventional impression method (CIM) and the bite impression method (BIM). The occlusal contacts of crowns were precisely evaluated at the following stages: after occlusal adjustment on the articulator (Step 0), before occlusal adjustment in the mouth (Step 1), after occlusal adjustment at the intercuspal position (Step 2), and after occlusal adjustment during lateral and protrusive excursions (Step 3). The number of occlusal contacts of the crowns on the functional cusps fabricated with BIM was significantly greater than that with CIM after occlusal adjustment. For this reason, the crowns fabricated with BIM might have a more functionally desirable occlusal surface compared to the crowns fabricated with CIM.

  4. First report of Fusarium redolens causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium crown rot, caused by a complex of Fusarium spp., is a yield-limiting disease of wheat world-wide, especially in dry Mediterranean climates. In order to identify Fusarium species associated with crown rot of wheat, a survey was conducted in summer 2013 in the major wheat growing regions of T...

  5. Moving in Darkness: Back to the Future at Crown Woods College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarker, Patrick; Benn, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    At the end of July 2011 "The Guardian" reported on the recently opened Crown Woods College in Eltham, South-East London. The College had been rebuilt on the site of the previous Crown Woods School with 50 million pounds of funding via the Building Schools for the Future project. Its nine buildings include four "mini-schools",…

  6. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of crown rust resistance in common wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata var. hordei, primarily occurs on barley in the Great Plain regions of the United States. However, a few genotypes of common wheat were found to be susceptible to this pathogen among 750 wheat accessions evaluated. To investigate the genetics of crown ru...

  7. Tree Crown Foliage Loss: A Mapping Survey on the Cumbrian Coast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, D. D.; Pyatt, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    An undergraduate student mapping survey of tree crown foliage loss is presented. Results suggest that the pattern and intensity of crown foliage loss of certain trees and shrubs in the Whitehaven area are affected by strong, salt-laden winds and air pollution. (CS)

  8. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones.

  9. Transfer of crown rust resistance from diploid oat Avena strigosa into hexaploid cultivated oat A. sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New sources of resistance to crown rust, Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae (Eriks.), the major fungal disease of cultivated oat, Avena sativa L. (2n = 6x = 42), are constantly needed due to frequent, rapid shifts in the virulence pattern of the pathogen. Crown rust resistance identified in the diploid...

  10. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones. PMID:27225586

  11. Genetic covariance structure of incisor crown size in twins.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, P J; Townsend, G C; Martin, N G; Neale, M C

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies of tooth size in twins and their families have suggested a high degree of genetic control, although there have been difficulties separating the various genetic and environmental effects. A genetic analysis of variation in crown size of the permanent incisors of South Australian twins was carried out, with structural equation modeling used to determine the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors. Maximum mesiodistal crown dimensions of maxillary and mandibular permanent incisors were recorded from dental models of 298 pairs of twins, including 149 monozygous (MZ) and 149 dizygous (DZ) pairs. The analysis revealed that: (i) an adequate fit required additive genetic and unique environmental components; (ii) augmenting the model with non-additive genetic variation did not lead to a significant improvement in fit; (iii) there was evidence of shared environmental influences in the upper central incisors of males; (iv) the additive genetic component constituted a general factor loading on all eight teeth, with group factors loading on antimeric pairs of teeth; (v) unique environmental effects were mostly variable-specific; (vi) most factor loadings on antimeric tooth pairs could be constrained to be equal, indicating a symmetry of genetic and environmental influences between left and right sides; and (vii) estimated heritability of the incisor mesiodistal dimensions varied from 0.81 to 0.91.

  12. Metabolic changes in Avena sativa crowns recovering from freezing.

    PubMed

    Henson, Cynthia A; Duke, Stanley H; Livingston, David P

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recovery and growth such as would occur during spring. In this study, GC-MS was used to detect metabolic changes in the overwintering crown tissue of oat (Avena sativa L.) during a fourteen day time-course after freezing. Metabolomic analysis revealed increases in most amino acids, particularly proline, 5-oxoproline and arginine, which increased greatly in crowns that were frozen compared to controls and correlated very significantly with days after freezing. In contrast, sugar and sugar related metabolites were little changed by freezing, except sucrose and fructose which decreased dramatically. In frozen tissue all TCA cycle metabolites, especially citrate and malate, decreased in relation to unfrozen tissue. Alterations in some amino acid pools after freezing were similar to those observed in cold acclimation whereas most changes in sugar pools after freezing were not. These similarities and differences suggest that there are common as well as unique genetic mechanisms between these two environmental conditions that are crucial to the winter survival of plants.

  13. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Baker, John D.

    2009-04-28

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  14. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 percent and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA ACT program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. This paper summarizes the effect of each task and describes in detail the task associated with a design cost model. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these investigations. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  15. Crowning: a novel Escherichia coli colonizing behaviour generating a self-organized corona

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Encased in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composed of flagella, adhesins, amyloid fibers (curli), and exopolysaccharides (cellulose, β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine polymer-PGA-, colanic acid), the bacteria Escherichia coli is able to attach to and colonize different types of biotic and abiotic surfaces forming biofilms and colonies of intricate morphological architectures. Many of the biological aspects that underlie the generation and development of these E. coli’s formations are largely poorly understood. Results Here, we report the characterization of a novel E. coli sessile behaviour termed "crowning" due to the bacterial generation of a new 3-D architectural pattern: a corona. This bacterial pattern is formed by joining bush-like multilayered "coronal flares or spikes" arranged in a ring, which self-organize through the growth, self-clumping and massive self-aggregation of cells tightly interacting inside semisolid agar on plastic surfaces. Remarkably, the corona’s formation is developed independently of the adhesiveness of the major components of E. coli’s EPS matrix, the function of chemotaxis sensory system, type 1 pili and the biofilm master regulator CsgD, but its formation is suppressed by flagella-driven motility and glucose. Intriguingly, this glucose effect on the corona development is not mediated by the classical catabolic repression system, the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. Thus, corona formation departs from the canonical regulatory transcriptional core that controls biofilm formation in E. coli. Conclusions With this novel "crowning" activity, E. coli expands its repertoire of colonizing collective behaviours to explore, invade and exploit environments whose critical viscosities impede flagella driven-motility. PMID:24568619

  16. Zirconia crowns for rehabilitation of decayed primary incisors: an esthetic alternative.

    PubMed

    Ashima, G; Sarabjot, K Bhatia; Gauba, K; Mittal, H C

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic management of extensively decayed primary maxillary anterior teeth requiring full coronal coverage restoration is usually challenging to the pediatric dentists especially in very young children. Many esthetic options have been tried over the years each having its own advantages, disadvantages and associated technical, functional or esthetic limitations. Zirconia crowns have provided a treatment alternative to address the esthetic concerns and ease of placement of extra-coronal restorations on primary anterior teeth. The present article presents a case where grossly decayed maxillary primary incisors were restored esthetically and functionally with ready made zirconia crowns (ZIRKIZ, HASS Corp; Korea). After endodontic treatment the decayed teeth were restored with zirconia crowns. Over a 30 months period, the crowns have demonstrated good retention and esthetic results. Dealing with esthetic needs in children with extensive loss of tooth structure, using Zirconia crowns would be practical and successful. The treatment described is simple and effective and represents a promising alternative for rehabilitation of decayed primary teeth.

  17. Sorbents based on crown ethers: preparation and application for the sorption of strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezhin, N. A.; Dovhyi, I. I.

    2015-12-01

    The key approaches to the synthesis of crown ether-based sorbents, including immobilization both with and without covalent bonding, are reviewed. Examples of sorbent preparation using anodic oxidation, chemical modification of polymers, polycondensation reactions, chemical modification of inorganic supports and radiochemical synthesis for covalent bonding of crown ether moieties are considered. Immobilization methods without covalent bonding including support synthesis in the presence of crown ethers, impregnation of supports with a crown ether solution and the use of powdered crown ether as a sorbent are presented. The applications of sorbents for selective removal of strontium from solutions of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, for radiochemical analysis (determination of strontium in water, soil and biological materials) and for separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes are discussed. The bibliography includes 114 references.

  18. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction to a stainless steel crown: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Ozdemir, C E; Yilmaz, Y

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steel crowns are commonly used to restore primary or permanent teeth in pediatric restorative dentistry. Here, we describe a case of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which manifested itself as perioral skin eruptions, after restoring the decayed first permanent molar tooth of a 13-year-old Caucasian girl with a preformed stainless steel crown. The eruptions completely healed within one week after removal of the stainless steel crown. The decayed tooth was then restored with a bis-acryl crown and bridge. Since no perioral skin eruptions occurred during the six-month follow-up, we presume that the cause of the perioral skin eruptions was a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which was triggered by the nickel in the stainless steel crown.

  19. Mirror-image anterior crown fabrication with computer-aided design and rapid prototyping technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Chang, Won-Gun

    2013-02-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication of a maxillary central incisor single crown with rapid prototyping (RP) technology. A patient with a recently replaced metal ceramic crown had discomfort due to the nonanatomic lingual contour of the crown. With computer-aided design (CAD) software and rapid prototyping (RP) technology, the shape of the contralateral central incisor was duplicated and reproduced to make a mirror-image for a new crown. The prosthodontic planning and treatment approach are discussed.

  20. The importance of crown dimensions to improve tropical tree biomass estimates.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rosa C; Phillips, Oliver L; Baker, Timothy R

    2014-06-01

    Tropical forests play a vital role in the global carbon cycle, but the amount of carbon they contain and its spatial distribution remain uncertain. Recent studies suggest that once tree height is accounted for in biomass calculations, in addition to diameter and wood density, carbon stock estimates are reduced in many areas. However, it is possible that larger crown sizes might offset the reduction in biomass estimates in some forests where tree heights are lower because even comparatively short trees develop large, well-lit crowns in or above the forest canopy. While current allometric models and theory focus on diameter, wood density, and height, the influence of crown size and structure has not been well studied. To test the extent to which accounting for crown parameters can improve biomass estimates, we harvested and weighed 51 trees (11-169 cm diameter) in southwestern Amazonia where no direct biomass measurements have been made. The trees in our study had nearly half of total aboveground biomass in the branches (44% +/- 2% [mean +/- SE]), demonstrating the importance of accounting for tree crowns. Consistent with our predictions, key pantropical equations that include height, but do not account for crown dimensions, underestimated the sum total biomass of all 51 trees by 11% to 14%, primarily due to substantial underestimates of many of the largest trees. In our models, including crown radius greatly improves performance and reduces error, especially for the largest trees. In addition, over the full data set, crown radius explained more variation in aboveground biomass (10.5%) than height (6.0%). Crown form is also important: Trees with a monopodial architectural type are estimated to have 21-44% less mass than trees with other growth patterns. Our analysis suggests that accounting for crown allometry would substantially improve the accuracy of tropical estimates of tree biomass and its distribution in primary and degraded forests.

  1. Evaluation of biogeneric design techniques with CEREC CAD/CAM system

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate occlusal contacts generated by 3 different biogeneric design modes (individual (BI), copy (BC), reference (BR)) of CEREC software and to assess the designs subjectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten pairs of maxillary and mandibular casts were obtained from full dentate individuals. Gypsum cast contacts were quantified with articulating paper and digital impressions were taken. Then, all ceramic crown preparation was performed on the left first molar teeth and digital impressions of prepared teeth were made. BI, BC, and BR crowns were designed. Occlusal images of designs including occlusal contacts were superimposed on the gypsum cast images and corresponding contacts were determined. Three designs were evaluated by the students. RESULTS The results of the study revealed that there was significant difference among the number of contacts of gypsum cast and digital models (P<.05). The comparison of the percentage of virtual contacts of three crown designs which were identical to the contacts of original gypsum cast revealed that BI and BR designs showed significantly higher percentages of identical contacts compared with BC design (P<.05). Subjective assessment revealed that students generally found BI designs and BR designs natural regarding naturalness of fissure morphology and cusp shape and cusp tip position. For general occlusal morphology, student groups generally found BI design "too strong" or "perfect", BC design "too weak", and BR design "perfect". CONCLUSION On a prepared tooth, three different biogeneric design modes of a CAD/CAM software reveals different crown designs regarding occlusal contacts and morphology. PMID:26816572

  2. Effect of wheel traffic and green manure treatments on forage yield and crown rot in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvesting alfalfa (Medicago sativa) results in mechanical wheel traffic on plants, which may damage crowns and increase the opportunity for entry of pathogens causing crown rot. Developing resistance to crown rot is problematic due to the large number of pathogens involved. Incorporation of plant b...

  3. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtarpour, Hadi; Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Mahshid, Minoo; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). Results. The mean fracture load value for the group NH was 888.37 ± 228.92 N, which was the highest among the groups, with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). The fracture load values were 610.48 ± 125.02 N and 496.74 ± 104.10 Nin the HBS and HAS groups, respectively, with no significant differences (P = 0.44). Conclusion. Both techniques used for preparation of screw access holes in implant-supported zirconia-based crowns decreased the fracture load. PMID:27651885

  4. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarpour, Hadi; Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Mahshid, Minoo; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). Results. The mean fracture load value for the group NH was 888.37 ± 228.92 N, which was the highest among the groups, with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). The fracture load values were 610.48 ± 125.02 N and 496.74 ± 104.10 Nin the HBS and HAS groups, respectively, with no significant differences (P = 0.44). Conclusion. Both techniques used for preparation of screw access holes in implant-supported zirconia-based crowns decreased the fracture load.

  5. An update on crown lengthening. Part 1: Gingival tissue excess.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Harpoonam Jeet; Hussain, Zahra; Darbar, Ulpee

    2015-03-01

    This is the first article in a two-part series which aims to provide an overview of the different techniques used to increase clinical crown height. In the first paper, the focus will be on the management of patients who present with gingival tissue excess. The different aetiologies are discussed and illustrated with clinical cases, following which a range of procedures that may be employed in the management of these patients are presented. With an increasingly ageing population, more patients are taking regular medications prescribed from their general medical practitioner, and so having a working knowledge of the specific drugs that may cause gingival enlargement is essential. Clinical Relevance: When patients with gingival tissue excess present in primary or secondary care, a clinician must have a good knowledge of the possible causes of the condition, as well as an idea of how the patient may be managed.

  6. Octopine Accumulation Early in Crown Gall Development is Progressive 1

    PubMed Central

    Toothman, Penelope

    1982-01-01

    A purification of octopine from crown gall tissue was developed to quantitate conversion of precursor [3H]arginine into [3H]octopine. Plant wound tissue which was sterile or infected with an avirulent strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens did not accumulate detectable quantities of octopine, consistent with opine synthesis not being induced by wounding or infection. Octopine was only recovered from tissue infected with virulent tumor-inducing strains of A. tumefaciens. In every case tested, the morphological appearance of tumors preceded the accumulation of octopine by at least 1 week, and in some instances 3 weeks. Thus, what was necessary and sufficient for the expression of plant hormones (auxin and cytokinin) required for tumor growth was not sufficient for the accumulation of octopine. The possible nature of the temporal difference in the expression of hormone autotrophy and octopine synthesis is discussed. Images PMID:16662161

  7. Rehabilitation of complicated crown-root fracture by invisible approach

    PubMed Central

    Rani, V. Leela; Rajalingam, S.; Hemalatha, R.; Jananee, J.

    2016-01-01

    Dental trauma is one of the most common and significant problems met in all dental offices almost every day. In particular, injury to the anterior teeth is more vulnerable as it may affect the psychosocial behavior, severe emotional complications can occur leading to disturbances in their mental attitude. Cosmetic (lingual) orthodontics is the recent development in the field of dentistry in the last few decades. Patients are more concerned about their appearance during the treatment and are affected by psychosocial issues because of labially placed brackets, thus leading to the evolution of lingual orthodontic appliances. In this article, we are sharing our clinical experience treating a complicated crown-root fracture using the lingual orthodontic technique. PMID:27829773

  8. Stainless steel crown aspiration during sedation in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Adewumi, A; Kays, David W

    2008-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) causes death in more than 300 children every year in the United States. Morbidity and mortality are increased in children due to narrow airways and immature protective mechanisms. Factors to consider in pediatric dentistry are: (1) the patient's age and behavior; (2) presence and extent of disability; (3) local anesthesia; (4) body positioning; and (5) loose teeth. FBA requires prompt recognition and early treatment to minimize potentially serious and sometimes fatal consequences. The purpose of this case report was to describe the aspiration of a stainless steel crown in a 5-year-old boy during conscious sedation. It also discusses how a prompt and accurate diagnosis, early referral, and immediate treatment helped prevent serious complications.

  9. Predation on crown-of-thorns starfish larvae by damselfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Zara-Louise; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Caballes, Ciemon F.; Pratchett, Morgan S.

    2016-12-01

    Examining the functional response of predators can provide insight into the role of predation in structuring prey populations and ecological communities. This study explored feeding behaviour and functional responses of planktivorous damselfishes when offered captive reared larvae of crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster sp., with the aim of determining whether these predators could ever play a role in moderating outbreaks of Acanthaster sp. We examined predatory behaviour of 11 species of planktivorous damselfish, testing: (1) the relationship between predator size and predation rate, both within and among fish species; (2) consumption rates on larvae of Acanthaster sp. versus larvae of a common, co-occurring coral reef asteroid Linckia laevigata; (3) maximal feeding rates upon both Acanthaster sp. and L. laevigata; and (4) functional responses of planktivorous fishes to increasing densities of Acanthaster sp. Consumption rates of crown-of-thorns larvae by damselfishes were independent of predator size; however, there was a significant negative relationship between predator size and consumption rate of L. laevigata, when pooling across all predatory species. Some damselfishes, including Acanthochromis polyacanthus and Amblyglyphidodon curacao, consumed larval Acanthaster sp. at a greater rate than for L. laevigata. Most predatory species (all except A. curacao and Pomacentrus amboinensis) exhibited a Type II functional response whereby the increasing feeding rate decelerated with increasing prey density. In addition to revealing that a wide range of planktivorous fishes can prey upon larvae of Acanthaster sp., these data suggest that planktivorous damselfishes may have the capacity to buffer against population fluctuations of Acanthaster sp. Importantly, predators with Type II functional responses often contribute to stability of prey populations, though planktivorous fishes may be swamped by an abnormally high influx of larvae, potentially contributing to the

  10. 3D crown spike of free surface induced by two bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Yao, X. L.; Zhang, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    A specific physics called ‘crown phenomenon’ is discovered in the interaction between weak buoyancy bubbles and free surface. The ‘crown phenomenon’ is that a circle of the outer fluid appears to surround the middle spike of water after the jet impact of bubbles, and this kind of spike is defined as ‘crown spike’. In this study, the crown spike due to the coupling effect between two bubbles and free surface is studied both experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, copper wires in series connection are used to generate two inphase bubbles and the bubble and free surface shapes are recorded by high-speed photography. In the numerical study, a three-dimensional model is established to simulate the bubble-free- surface interaction with a boundary integral method and then the motion of free surface is further simulated without regard to the effect of bubbles after the jet impact. The computation also traces the ‘crown phenomenon’, which is considered as a second spike related to a large high-pressure region formed after the impact. The large high-pressure region leads to a thick column of water on the free surface and then the column of water gradually increases to surround the first spike. Both oblique jets and crown spike are observed in the experimental and numerical results, and the favorable agreements of bubbles and free surface shapes validate the present model. The effect of the inter-bubble distance on crown spike is also investigated.

  11. Identification of genes involved in the response of banana to crown rot disease.

    PubMed

    Lassois, Ludivine; Frettinger, Patrick; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Lepoivre, Philippe; Jijakli, Haissam

    2011-01-01

    Variations in banana susceptibility to crown rot disease have been observed but the molecular mechanisms underlying these quantitative host-pathogen relationships are still unknown. This study was designed to compare gene expression between crowns of banana fruit showing a high susceptibility (S(+)) and crowns showing a low susceptibility (S(-)) to the disease. Comparisons were performed at two situation times: i) between crowns (S(+) and S(-)) collected 1 h before inoculation and ii) between crowns (S+ and S-) collected 13 days after inoculation. Gene expression comparisons were performed with cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and results were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Among genes identified as differentially expressed between S(+) and S(-) crowns, two were involved in signal transduction, three in proteolytic machinery, two had similarity to pathogenesis-related protein 14, one to a CCR4-associated factor protein, and one to a cellulose synthase. Paradoxically, the overexpression of the cellulose synthase gene was associated with banana showing a high susceptibility in both pre- and post-inoculation situations. Finally, the cDNA-AFLP identified a gene that seems to be associated with the quantitative banana responses to crown rot disease; this gene encodes a dopamine-β-monooxygenase, which is involved in the catecholamine pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to address both pre- and post-infection gene expression with the same host-pathogen combination and distinct susceptibility levels.

  12. Basal area growth and crown closure in a loblolly pine spacing trial

    SciTech Connect

    Radtke, P.J. . Dept. of Forest Resources); Burkhart, H.E. . Dept. of Forestry)

    1999-02-01

    Data collected after each of the first 13 yr since planting of a loblolly pine spacing trial were used to study relationships between basal area growth and crown closure. Crown closure and crown competition factor at the inflection age of cumulative basal area growth were examined on 192 plots of varying initial density and rectangularity at four sites in the Piedmont and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Inflection age increased with initial growing space, but at a decreasing rate, presumably approaching some maximum value that would be realized in the absence of all competition. The inflection generally occurred earlier on study sites with the highest site index values, but exceptions to this trend were observed. The degree of crown closure at the inflection age increased with planting density, but did not depend in a meaningful way on the site index of the study sites. Crown competition factor at the inflection age increased with planting density, but also increased with site index. Rectangularity did not significantly affect the inflection age, but it did reduce the level of crown closure at that age. A test for the effect of rectangularity on crown competition factor was inconclusive.

  13. Ion selectivity of crown ethers investigated by UV and IR spectroscopy in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kusaka, Ryoji; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-04-26

    Electronic and vibrational spectra of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) and benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6) complexes with alkali metal ions, M(+)•B15C5 and M(+)•B18C6 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), are measured using UV photodissociation (UVPD) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. We determine the structure of conformers with the aid of density functional theory calculations. In the Na(+)•B15C5 and K(+)•B18C6 complexes, the crown ethers open the most and hold the metal ions at the center of the ether ring, demonstrating an optimum matching in size between the cavity of the crown ethers and the metal ions. For smaller ions, the crown ethers deform the ether ring to decrease the distance and increase the interaction between the metal ions and oxygen atoms; the metal ions are completely surrounded by the ether ring. In the case of larger ions, the metal ions are too large to enter the crown cavity and are positioned on it, leaving one of its sides open for further solvation. Thermochemistry data calculated on the basis of the stable conformers of the complexes suggest that the ion selectivity of crown ethers is controlled primarily by the enthalpy change for the complex formation in solution, which depends strongly on the complex structure.

  14. Marginal-internal adaptation and fracture resistance of CAD/CAM crown restorations.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Coşkun; Vanlioğlu, Burçin Akoglu; Evren, Buket; Uludamar, Altay; Ozkan, Yasemin Kulak

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the marginal adaptation and fracture resistance of CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia crowns luted using different luting agents. Twenty crown restorations were produced using IPS ZirCAD zirconium oxide blocks (IZC), and another 20 using Lava zirconium oxide blocks (L). Ten teeth were used as control. Luting agents used were an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Variolink II) and a self-etch adhesive (Multilink Automix). Internal and marginal adaptation was evaluated using silicone replica technique. Fracture resistance was evaluated using a compression test. Marginal discrepancy was 89.26 μm for L crowns and 88.84 μm for IZC crowns, and difference was statistically insignificant. However, L crowns showed significantly larger axial and occlusal gaps than IZC crowns (p<0.05). Fracture resistance of IZC-Multilink was higher than the other groups, although the difference was not significant. Results showed that CAD/CAM-fabricated crowns showed acceptable in vitro marginal discrepancies and fracture strengths.

  15. [Crown interception of apple trees in loess hilly and gully region, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Jing; Bai, Gang-Shuan

    2013-02-01

    Taking the apple trees at their full-fruit stage in the loess hilly and gully region of Shaanxi as test objects, a three-year consecutive monitoring was conducted on the precipitation outside the tree crown, the through fall of the crown, and the stem flow from 2008 to 2010, with the effects of different precipitation factors on the crown interception analyzed. In the study region, the stem flow rate and crown interception rate of the trees accounted for 0. 8% and 8.9% of the precipitation, respectively, the inter-plant interception was higher than the inter-row interception, and the interception increased with the decreasing distance to the stem. In rainy season, the crown interception was greater while the interception rate was smaller; in drought season, it was in adverse. The crown interception increased with increasing precipitation amount, precipitation intensity, precipitation duration, and precipitation interval, and the relationships followed power function or logarithmic function. The interception rate was negatively correlated with precipitation amount, precipitation intensity, and precipitation duration, but positively correlated with precipitation interval, and the relationships were in power function. Among the precipitation factors, precipitation amount had the greatest effects on the crown interception capability of the apple trees.

  16. Assessment of crown condition in eucalypt vegetation by remotely sensed optical indices.

    PubMed

    Coops, Nicholas C; Stone, Christine; Culvenor, Darius S; Chisholm, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    Leaf and crown damage and discoloration characteristics are important variables when defining the health of eucalypt tree species and have been used as key indicators of environmental quality. These indicators can vary significantly over a few hectares, especially in mixed-species forests, making field-based environmental surveillance of crown condition an extremely expensive and logistically impractical task. Reflectance in narrow spectral wavelengths obtained from a field-based spectroradiometer and a Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager 2 (CASI-2) were collected over eucalypt vegetation of varying condition in southeastern Australia and compared with leaf- and crown-based attributes including percent red foliage discoloration, percent leaf damage, and crown density and crown foliage condition. Of the leaf attributes sampled, percent leaf damage was well correlated with a red-green spectral index (r = 0.68, p < 0.01), and percent red discoloration was well correlated with the slope of the red-edge for selected species (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Within-tree crown density was well correlated with the slope of the red-edge (r = 0.77, p < 0.001) and a previously published index of plant stress with crown foliage condition (r = 0.88, p < 0.01) for selected species. Despite evidence of strong interspecific variability, a set of narrow spectral wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum have been identified that will be useful in the development of forest ecosystem environmental quality indicators.

  17. Unsupervised individual tree crown detection in high-resolution satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Skurikhin, Alexei N.; McDowell, Nate G.; Middleton, Richard S.

    2016-01-26

    Rapidly and accurately detecting individual tree crowns in satellite imagery is a critical need for monitoring and characterizing forest resources. We present a two-stage semiautomated approach for detecting individual tree crowns using high spatial resolution (0.6 m) satellite imagery. First, active contours are used to recognize tree canopy areas in a normalized difference vegetation index image. Given the image areas corresponding to tree canopies, we then identify individual tree crowns as local extrema points in the Laplacian of Gaussian scale-space pyramid. The approach simultaneously detects tree crown centers and estimates tree crown sizes, parameters critical to multiple ecosystem models. As a demonstration, we used a ground validated, 0.6 m resolution QuickBird image of a sparse forest site. The two-stage approach produced a tree count estimate with an accuracy of 78% for a naturally regenerating forest with irregularly spaced trees, a success rate equivalent to or better than existing approaches. In addition, our approach detects tree canopy areas and individual tree crowns in an unsupervised manner and helps identify overlapping crowns. Furthermore, the method also demonstrates significant potential for further improvement.

  18. Unsupervised individual tree crown detection in high-resolution satellite imagery

    DOE PAGES

    Skurikhin, Alexei N.; McDowell, Nate G.; Middleton, Richard S.

    2016-01-26

    Rapidly and accurately detecting individual tree crowns in satellite imagery is a critical need for monitoring and characterizing forest resources. We present a two-stage semiautomated approach for detecting individual tree crowns using high spatial resolution (0.6 m) satellite imagery. First, active contours are used to recognize tree canopy areas in a normalized difference vegetation index image. Given the image areas corresponding to tree canopies, we then identify individual tree crowns as local extrema points in the Laplacian of Gaussian scale-space pyramid. The approach simultaneously detects tree crown centers and estimates tree crown sizes, parameters critical to multiple ecosystem models. Asmore » a demonstration, we used a ground validated, 0.6 m resolution QuickBird image of a sparse forest site. The two-stage approach produced a tree count estimate with an accuracy of 78% for a naturally regenerating forest with irregularly spaced trees, a success rate equivalent to or better than existing approaches. In addition, our approach detects tree canopy areas and individual tree crowns in an unsupervised manner and helps identify overlapping crowns. Furthermore, the method also demonstrates significant potential for further improvement.« less

  19. Biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis of monolithic zirconia crown with different cement type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of various cement types on the stress distribution in monolithic zirconia crowns under maximum bite force using the finite element analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The models of the prepared #46 crown (deep chamfer margin) were scanned and solid models composed of the monolithic zirconia crown, cement layer, and prepared tooth were produced using the computer-aided design technology and were subsequently translated into 3-dimensional finite element models. Four models were prepared according to different cement types (zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and resin). A load of 700 N was applied vertically on the crowns (8 loading points). Maximum principal stress was determined. RESULTS Zinc phosphate cement had a greater stress concentration in the cement layer, while polycarboxylate cement had a greater stress concentration on the distal surface of the monolithic zirconia crown and abutment tooth. Resin cement and glass ionomer cement showed similar patterns, but resin cement showed a lower stress distribution on the lingual and mesial surface of the cement layer. CONCLUSION The test results indicate that the use of different luting agents that have various elastic moduli has an impact on the stress distribution of the monolithic zirconia crowns, cement layers, and abutment tooth. Resin cement is recommended for the luting agent of the monolithic zirconia crowns. PMID:26816578

  20. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies.

  1. Crown condition dynamics of oak in southern Sweden 1988-1999.

    PubMed

    Drobyshev, Igor; Anderson, Stefan; Sonesson, Kerstin

    2007-11-01

    Crown defoliation of oak (Quercus robur and Q. petraea) was analysed in 808 trees during three forest condition surveys (1988, 1993, and 1999) in the southern Sweden. From 1988 to 1999 crown defoliation increased by more than 20%. Changes in crown defoliation were related to the pH in the upper 20-30 cm of the mineral soils, which was closely connected to other measures of soil fertility (cation exchange capacity, CEC and C/N ratio). Trees growing on soils with a high pH (> or =4.00, in BaCl2 filtrate), high CEC and low C/N ratio had significantly lower crown defoliation than trees growing on more acid soils (pH <4.00), indicating that less favourable soil conditions may further enhance oak decline. Age did not differentiate trees with respect to crown defoliation, indicating that decline in crown condition was not due to an age-related increase in crown transparency. Considering only trees younger than 100 years, a significant interaction was observed between changes in crown defoliation and soil pH. Trees younger than 100 years old growing on more acidic soils had a greater increase in crown transparency than trees on more basic soils between 1988 and 1999. Trees > or =100 years old had significantly higher defoliation on more acidic than on more basic soils, however defoliation dynamics of these trees over 1988-99 was not related to soil acidity. Two biotic agents (insect and fungal leaf infections) evaluated in this study did not prove to be important drivers of defoliation dynamics.

  2. Evaluation of different sterilization and disinfection methods on commercially made preformed crowns.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Y; Guler, C

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by different sterilization or disinfection methods on the vestibular surface of four commercially made preformed crowns using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Preformed crowns (NuSmile Primary Anterior Crown (NSC), Kinder Krowns (KK), Pedo Pearls (PP) and polycarbonate crowns (PC)) were sterilized and/or disinfected by one of the following techniques: no sterilization or disinfection (G1 control group); steam autoclaving at 134 degrees C (30 psi) for 4 min (G2); steam autoclaving at 134 degrees C (30 psi) for 12 min (G3); steam autoclaving at 121 degrees C (15 psi) for 30 min (G4); and ultrasonication in a bath containing 4% Lysetol AF for 5 min at room temperature (chemical disinfection) (G5). Scanning electron micrographs of the crowns were taken before and after their sterilization or disinfection. The changes on the vestibular surface were then scored for the presence or absence of crazing, contour alteration, fracturing, and vestibular surface changes. The data were analyzed statistically using the chi-square test. No changes were observed before and after sterilization or disinfection in the stereomicroscopic evaluation of the vestibular surface of the crowns. However, all methods in which steam autoclaving was used to sterilize the crowns caused significant (P < 0.05) crazing and contour alterations of the vestibular surface of the crowns when they were examined by SEM. Chemical disinfection using an aldehyde-free disinfectant is the preferred method of disinfection for crowns that have been used previously in other dental patients.

  3. Early complications and performance of 327 heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns up to five years

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The prospective follow-up aimed to assess the performance of lithium disilicate crowns and clinical reasons of adverse events compromising survival and quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS 58 patients were treated with 375 heat-pressed monolithic crowns, which were bonded with resin cement. Annual recalls up to five years included a complete dental examination as well as quality assessment using CDA-criteria. Any need for clinical intervention led to higher complication rate and any failure compromised the survival rate. Kaplan-Meier-method was applied to all crowns and a dataset containing one randomly selected crown from each patient. RESULTS Due to drop-outs, 45 patients (31 females, 14 males) with the average age of 43 years (range = 17–73) who had 327 crowns (176 anterior, 151 posterior; 203 upper jaw, 124 lower jaw) were observed and evaluated for between 4 and 51 months (median = 28). Observation revealed 4 chippings, 3 losses of retention, 3 fractures, 3 secondary caries, 1 endodontic problem, and 1 tooth fracture. Four crowns had to be removed. Survival and complication rate was estimated 98.2% and 5.4% at 24 months, and 96.8% and 7.1% at 48 months. The complication rate was significantly higher for root canal treated teeth (12%, P<.01) at 24 months. At the last observation, over 90% of all crowns showed excellent ratings (CDA-rating Alfa) for color, marginal fit, and caries. CONCLUSION Heat pressed lithium disilicate crowns showed an excellent performance. Besides a careful luting, dentists should be aware of patients' biological prerequisites (grade of caries, oral hygiene) to reach full success with these crowns. PMID:27350853

  4. An esthetic technique for veneering anterior stainless steel crowns with composite resin.

    PubMed

    Wiedenfeld, K R; Draughn, R A; Welford, J B

    1994-01-01

    The restoration of primary anterior teeth presents complicated esthetic and retention problems to the clinician. A technique is described for the chairside veneering of composite resin to stainless steel crowns, which results in well contoured restorations with superior durability and esthetics. A trimmed and fitted stainless steel crown can be veneered in three to five minutes. This provides the adaptability and gingival contour benefits of the stainless steel crown in conjunction with the cosmetics of the composite facings. The technique described produced composite veneers with a mean sheer bond strength of 3520 PSI (24.4 Mpa).

  5. Partial Pulpotomy with BioAggregate in Complicated Crown Fractures: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Tuloglu, Nuray; Bayrak, Sule

    2016-01-01

    This report describes three cases of complicated crown fractures treated with partial pulpotomy using BioAggregate. Three maxillary permanent central incisors with complicated crown fracture were treated by partial pulpotomy using BioAggregate and reviewed clinically and radiographically for 24 months. Throughout this period, there was no spontaneous pain, periapical radiolucency, and coronal discoloration; the pulp was observed to be vital. Based on these findings, it was concluded that BioAggregate can be used in partial pulpotomy treatment of complicated crown fracture.

  6. Large tree crowns in closed forest canopies: Measuring structure and estimating light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolosin, Michael Stephen

    Trees compete for light. Crown traits are the result of an evolutionary history dominated by this fact, and species exhibit a range of strategies including characteristic shapes and light-foraging abilities in response to this competition. Shape plasticity and crown asymmetry result from the growth and death of branches over long time scales. It is impossible to track every branch in stand-scale forest models, and there are no good approaches that accurately capture the emergent tree-level properties of this branch-scale process. Most forest models therefore ignore tree shape and asymmetry. Models of tree size and shape are important in both scientific research and in evaluating policy questions. Light absorption in large canopy trees determines their own demographic rates and sets the template of light levels that drives understory growth and mortality, driving both community and ecosystem processes. Models that ignore crown shape and asymmetry could lead to faulty inferences and predictions. Our work attempts to overcome some of the difficulties in both measuring and modeling large crown shape and light availability. We develop a new approach to extracting three-dimensional crown structural information from high resolution digital stereo imagery to accurately measure crown structure of over nine hundred well-studied large canopy trees. We also present a statistical model that integrates multiple data sources into estimates of the "true" but unmeasurable light available to individual trees. Third, we develop two crown models for forest simulations that capture their space-filling nature with minimum detail, and we parameterize these models from data; one models crown shape, the other crown location. Fourth, we investigate the relationship between light availability and growth. We extract extensive fine-scale structural detail from the imagery, and generate detailed crown envelopes. We find that light availability predicts the growth rates of large trees primarily

  7. Model-based conifer crown surface reconstruction from multi-ocular high-resolution aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei

    2000-12-01

    Tree crown parameters such as width, height, shape and crown closure are desirable in forestry and ecological studies, but they are time-consuming and labor intensive to measure in the field. The stereoscopic capability of high-resolution aerial imagery provides a way to crown surface reconstruction. Existing photogrammetric algorithms designed to map terrain surfaces, however, cannot adequately extract crown surfaces, especially for steep conifer crowns. Considering crown surface reconstruction in a broader context of tree characterization from aerial images, we develop a rigorous perspective tree image formation model to bridge image-based tree extraction and crown surface reconstruction, and an integrated model-based approach to conifer crown surface reconstruction. Based on the fact that most conifer crowns are in a solid geometric form, conifer crowns are modeled as a generalized hemi-ellipsoid. Both the automatic and semi-automatic approaches are investigated to optimal tree model development from multi-ocular images. The semi-automatic 3D tree interpreter developed in this thesis is able to efficiently extract reliable tree parameters and tree models in complicated tree stands. This thesis starts with a sophisticated stereo matching algorithm, and incorporates tree models to guide stereo matching. The following critical problems are addressed in the model-based surface reconstruction process: (1) the problem of surface model composition from tree models, (2) the occlusion problem in disparity prediction from tree models, (3) the problem of integrating the predicted disparities into image matching, (4) the tree model edge effect reduction on the disparity map, (5) the occlusion problem in orthophoto production, and (6) the foreshortening problem in image matching, which is very serious for conifer crown surfaces. Solutions to the above problems are necessary for successful crown surface reconstruction. The model-based approach was applied to recover the

  8. A biological approach to crown fracture: Fracture reattachment: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaprabha, K.; Marwah, Nikhil; Dutta, Samir

    2012-01-01

    The development of adhesive dentistry has allowed dentists to use the patient's own fragment to restore the fractured tooth, which is considered to be the most conservative method of treatment of crown fracture allowing restoration of original dental anatomy, thus rehabilitating function and esthetics in a short time by preserving dental tissues. The tooth fragment reattachment is preferred over full coverage crowns or composite resin restoration because it conserves sound tooth structure, and is more esthetic, maintaining the original anatomy and translucency, and the rate of incisal wear also matches that of original tooth structure. Presented here is a report of two cases of crown fracture managed by reattachment procedures. PMID:23230362

  9. Effect of climate on the distribution of Fusarium species causing crown rot of wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium crown rot is one of the most widespread root and crown diseases of wheat in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. Fusarium crown rot occurrence and distribution has been associated with temperature and precipitation. Our objectives were to characterize crown rot severity and distributio...

  10. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  11. An investigation of the surface chemistry of crown ethers: the adsorption and reaction of 12-crown-4 on palladium ( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, S.; Laack, B.; Tysoe, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of 12-crown-4 on Pd(1 1 1) is investigated using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. Analysis of the infrared spectrum of 12-crown-4 suggests that it adsorbs in a flat-lying geometry with C 4v symmetry with a saturation coverage of 0.073±0.008 monolayers. This implies that the crown ether bonds to the surface via the lone pair orbitals on the ether oxygen atoms. Estimating the saturation coverage for this geometry using Van der Waals' radii yields a value of 0.088 monolayers in good agreement with the measured value. 12-crown-4 thermally decomposes to leave predominantly CO and ethylidyne species on the surface where the desorbing CO removes three of the four crown ether oxygen atoms, the fourth remaining on the surface. Small amounts of ethylene are also found to desorb along with a high molecular weight product which is tentatively assigned to the formation of C 2H 5OCH 2CHO.

  12. [An automatic extraction algorithm for individual tree crown projection area and volume based on 3D point cloud data].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Heng; Feng, Zhong-Ke; Su, Zhi-Fang; Xu, Hui; Jiao, You-Quan; Deng, Ou

    2014-02-01

    Tree crown projection area and crown volume are the important parameters for the estimation of biomass, tridimensional green biomass and other forestry science applications. Using conventional measurements of tree crown projection area and crown volume will produce a large area of errors in the view of practical situations referring to complicated tree crown structures or different morphological characteristics. However, it is difficult to measure and validate their accuracy through conventional measurement methods. In view of practical problems which include complicated tree crown structure, different morphological characteristics, so as to implement the objective that tree crown projection and crown volume can be extracted by computer program automatically. This paper proposes an automatic untouched measurement based on terrestrial three-dimensional laser scanner named FARO Photon120 using plane scattered data point convex hull algorithm and slice segmentation and accumulation algorithm to calculate the tree crown projection area. It is exploited on VC+6.0 and Matlab7.0. The experiments are exploited on 22 common tree species of Beijing, China. The results show that the correlation coefficient of the crown projection between Av calculated by new method and conventional method A4 reaches 0.964 (p<0.01); and the correlation coefficient of tree crown volume between V(VC) derived from new method and V(C) by the formula of a regular body is 0.960 (p<0.001). The results also show that the average of V(C) is smaller than that of V(VC) at the rate of 8.03%, and the average of A4 is larger than that of A(V) at the rate of 25.5%. Assumed Av and V(VC) as ture values, the deviations of the new method could be attributed to irregularity of the crowns' silhouettes. Different morphological characteristics of tree crown led to measurement error in forest simple plot survey. Based on the results, the paper proposes that: (1) the use of eight-point or sixteen-point projection with

  13. Portable diagnosis method of hyperkalemia using potassium-recognizable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-15-crown-5-acrylamide) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Rong; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Bao; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2013-07-02

    A novel, simple, portable, and low-cost method for diagnosis of hyperkalemia by using K(+)-recognizable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-15-crown-5-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-co-B15C5Am)] linear copolymer as indicator is presented in this work. The pendent 15-crown-5 units in the linear copolymers can selectively and specifically recognize K(+) to form stable 2:1 "sandwich" host-guest complexes, which cause the copolymer chains to change from the hydrophilic state to the hydrophobic state isothermally, whereas other tested metal ions (e.g., Li(+), Na(+), Cs(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Cr(3+)) cannot be recognized. With increasing the 15-crown-5 content or the K(+) concentration, the poly(NIPAM-co-B15C5Am) linear copolymers exhibit higher sensitivity to K(+). The hyperkalemia can be simply diagnosed by observing the K(+)-induced optical transmittance change of human blood samples with poly(NIPAM-co-B15C5Am) linear copolymer as an indicator. Normal blood samples with low potassium level containing the poly(NIPAM-co-B15C5Am) linear copolymer are almost transparent since the copolymer is hydrophilic and soluble at the operating temperature. However, severe hyperkalemia samples with high potassium level become completely cloudy since the copolymer is hydrophobic and insoluble at this temperature. The presented diagnosis method with poly(NIPAM-co-B15C5Am) linear copolymer as indicator is quite simple and low-cost, and it would bring a new candidate material to design simple and portable tools for diagnosis of hyperkalemia in the general population. Moreover, the results in this work provide valuable guidance for building novel poly(NIPAM-co-B15C5Am)-based artificial K(+)-recognizable "smart" or "intelligent" systems in various application fields.

  14. Evaluation of the risk of a stripping perforation with Gates-Glidden drills: serial versus crown-down sequences.

    PubMed

    Coutinho-Filho, Tauby; De-Deus, Gustavo; Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Rocha-Lima, Ana Carolina; Dias, Katia Regina Cervantes; Barbosa, Carlos Augusto

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the remaining dentine/cementum thickness using Gates-Glidden burs in serial and crown-down sequences and to observe which of the two sequences is the safest for preparing mesial roots of molars. Thirty-six left and right human mandibular first molars were selected. Standard access cavities were made and initially explored with Flexofiles sizes 10 and 15 until the tip was visible at the apex. The teeth were embedded in a muffle specially developed for this study using a PVC tube with two parallel metal rods in its lid. Each tooth-block was sectioned 3 mm apically to the furcation using a low-speed saw with a diamond disc. The tooth-block was examined under a microscope and an initial image was captured by a digital video system with 8 X and 12 X magnifications. Finally, the tooth-blocks were reassembled in the muffle so that the canals could be instrumented. After instrumentation the area of each mesial canal as well as the smallest distance to the root furcation were measured again. The mesio-buccal canals (crown-down order) and the mesio-lingual canals (serial sequence) presented an average area of 0.46 +/- 0.16 mm(2) and 0.88 +/- 0.27 mm(2) (P < 0.01), respectively. The mean values of the smallest distance to the furcation for the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual canals were 0.66 +/- 0.19 mm and 0.39 +/- 0.13 mm (P < 0.01), respectively. The remaining dentine/cementum thickness using Gates-Glidden burs was greater in the crown-down sequence than in the serial sequence.

  15. Crowned spur gears - Methods for generation and tooth contact analysis. I - Basic concepts, generation of the pinion tooth surface by a plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Handschuh, R. F.; Zhang, J.

    1988-01-01

    A topology of crowned spur pinion tooth surface that reduces the level of transmission errors due to misalignment is proposed. The geometry of the deviated pinion tooth surface and regular gear tooth surface, along with tooth contact analysis is discussed. Generation of the deviated pinion tooth surface by a plane whose motion is controlled by a five-degree-of-freedom system is proposed. Numerical results are included and indicate that transmission errors remain low as the gears are misaligned.

  16. [Investigation of castability and layered structure on margin of titanium cast crown].

    PubMed

    Ping, M W

    1997-12-01

    Previous studies on dental applications of pure titanium were mainly focused on its mechanical properties rather than its clinical aspects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the margin castability and mechanical properties of C. P. titanium for better understanding of its suitability for clinical application. To simulate the crown margins, flat wax patterns, which had two different margin thicknesses, i.e., 20 and 40 degrees sharp edges respectively, were used. These patterns were cast using two casting systems, centrifugal and pressure systems. There were statistically significant differences between the samples made from the two types of patterns in terms of cast deficiency at the margins observed with a light microscope and the increased length of the margins measured with a video micrometer, but not between the samples made with the two different systems. Both the thickness of layered structures measured by a metallurgical light microscope and the micro-hardness by a Dynamic Hardness Tester were lowest at the apex of the margins in all samples. These observations were more evident among 20 degree samples than 40 degree samples. The layered structures were different among the casting systems. In conclusion, pure titanium is suitable for clinical application as restorative material when used appropriately.

  17. A Case Report of Dilacerated Crown of a Permanent Mandibular Central Incisor.

    PubMed

    Bolhari, Behnam; Pirmoazen, Salma; Taftian, Ensieh; Dehghan, Somayeh

    2016-11-01

    Trauma to primary teeth can lead to devastating sequels in development of permanent successors. The disturbance may range from enamel hypoplasia and/or hypo-calcification to arrest of dental bud development. Crown dilaceration of permanent teeth is one of the consequences of trauma to deciduous teeth mainly due to intrusion or avulsion. This report presents a mandibular central incisor with dilacerated crown and yellowish discoloration with symptomatic apical abscess. History revealed avulsion of primary mandibular central incisors. The purpose of this report is to present: 1. Reasons of dilacerated crown, yellowish discoloration and necrotic pulp in this case, 2. Treatment options in different types of crown dilacerations and also in this case. The tooth was successfully managed by nonsurgical root canal therapy and restoration with composite resin to restore esthetics. We emphasize that trauma to deciduous teeth should not be understated, and regular follow up is essential.

  18. Interface corrosion in amalgam-to-amalgam and amalgam-to-nonprecious metal crown couplings.

    PubMed

    Schimelmitz, H; Bapna, M S; Punwani, I; Ashrafi, S H; Anderson, A W

    1986-02-01

    This study examined the contact surface area in the coupling of a class II amalgam restoration with another class II amalgam restoration or with a stainless steel or nickel-chrome crown in 1% NaCl solution. The characterization of interfaces was carried out by using SEM and EDX microanalysis. The results indicate that the coupling of an amalgam-stainless steel crown and an amalgam-inconel crown in NaCl solution forms a deposit on the crown surfaces. This deposit contains all the constituents of corrodible phases of amalgam, including Zn. If amalgam restorations in adjoining teeth are contemplated, non-Zn-containing amalgam alloys of the same composition should be considered.

  19. Improvement of chiral stationary phases based on cinchona alkaloids bonded to crown ethers by chiral modification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianchao; Wu, Haixia; Wang, Dongqiang; Wu, Haibo; Cheng, Lingping; Jin, Yu; Ke, Yanxiong; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-09-17

    To improve the chiral recognition capability of a cinchona alkaloid crown ether chiral stationary phase, the crown ether moiety was modified by the chiral group of (1S, 2S)-2-aminocyclohexyl phenylcarbamate. Both quinine and quinidine-based stationary phases were evaluated by chiral acids, chiral primary amines and amino acids. The quinine/quinidine and crown ether provided ion-exchange sites and complex interaction site for carboxyl group and primary amine group in amino acids, respectively, which were necessary for the chiral discrimination of amino acid enantiomers. The introduction of the chiral group greatly improved the chiral recognition for chiral primary amines. The structure of crown ether moiety was proved to play a dominant role in the chiral recognitions for chiral primary amines and amino acids.

  20. A Case Report of Dilacerated Crown of a Permanent Mandibular Central Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Bolhari, Behnam; Pirmoazen, Salma; Taftian, Ensieh

    2016-01-01

    Trauma to primary teeth can lead to devastating sequels in development of permanent successors. The disturbance may range from enamel hypoplasia and/or hypo-calcification to arrest of dental bud development. Crown dilaceration of permanent teeth is one of the consequences of trauma to deciduous teeth mainly due to intrusion or avulsion. This report presents a mandibular central incisor with dilacerated crown and yellowish discoloration with symptomatic apical abscess. History revealed avulsion of primary mandibular central incisors. The purpose of this report is to present: 1. Reasons of dilacerated crown, yellowish discoloration and necrotic pulp in this case, 2. Treatment options in different types of crown dilacerations and also in this case. The tooth was successfully managed by nonsurgical root canal therapy and restoration with composite resin to restore esthetics. We emphasize that trauma to deciduous teeth should not be understated, and regular follow up is essential. PMID:28243307

  1. Synthesis, characterization and cation-induced dimerization of new aza-crown ether-appended metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Mikhalitsyna, Elena A; Tyurin, Vladimir S; Zamylatskov, Ilia A; Khrustalev, Victor N; Beletskaya, Irina P

    2012-07-07

    New metalloporphyrins bearing one or two aryl-aza-crown ether moieties at meso-positions have been synthesized using a palladium catalyzed amination reaction and fully characterized by spectral techniques. X-Ray structural data have been presented for the zinc and copper complexes of mono-substituted aza-crown ether appended metalloporphyrins. UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies showed that addition of K(+) cations to a solution of monomeric aza-crowned porphyrins in CHCl(3)/MeOH led to cation-induced dimerization of these porphyrins, whereas addition of Na(+) cations yielded a monomeric complex. Axial coordination of the exobidentate ligand (DABCO) to zinc complexes of aza-crowned porphyrins and following binding metal ions led to formation of sandwich complexes with high stability constants.

  2. Catalytically active designer crown-jewel Pd-based nanostructures encapsulated in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyu; Huang, Weihao; Wang, Xiujun; Chen, Zhijie; Yang, Xianfeng; Luque, Rafael; Li, Yingwei

    2017-01-17

    A series of crown-jewel Pd-based bimetallic nanostructures with tunable composition are fabricated inside the pores of an MOF via a hydride-induced-reduction strategy, exhibiting high activity and stability in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene.

  3. To Evaluate & Compare Retention of Complete Cast Crown in Natural Teeth Using Different Auxiliary Retentive Features with Two Different Crown Heights - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Vinaya, Kundapur; Rakshith, Hegde; Prasad D., Krishna; Manoj, Shetty; Sunil, Mankar; Naresh, Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: To evaluate the retention of complete cast crowns in teeth with adequate and inadequate crown height and to evaluate the effects of auxiliary retentive features on retention form complete cast crowns. Materials and methods: Sixty freshly extracted human premolars. They were divided into 2 major groups depending upon the height of the teeth after the preparation. Group1 (H1): prepared teeth with constant height of 3.5 mm and Group 2 (H2): prepared teeth with constant height of 2.5 mm. Each group is further subdivided into 3 subgroups, depending upon the retentive features incorporated. First sub group were prepared conventionally, second sub group with proximal grooves and third subgroups with proximal boxes preparation. Castings produced in Nickel chromium alloy were cemented with glass ionomer cement and the cemented castings were subjected to tensional forces required to dislodge each cemented casting from its preparation and used for comparison of retentive quality. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using Oneway ANOVA test. Results: The results showed there was statistically significant difference between adequate (H1) and inadequate (H2) group and increase in retention when there was incorporation of retentive features compared to conventional preparations. Incorporation of retentive grooves was statistically significant compared to retention obtained by boxes. Results also showed there was no statistically significant difference between long conventional and short groove. Conclusion: Complete cast crowns on teeth with adequate crown height exhibited greater retention than with inadequate crown height. Proximal grooves provided greater amount of retention when compared with proximal boxes. PMID:26199584

  4. Rapid Crown Root Development Confers Tolerance to Zinc Deficiency in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Amrit K.; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is one of the leading nutrient disorders in rice (Oryza sativa). Many studies have identified Zn-efficient rice genotypes, but causal mechanisms for Zn deficiency tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we report a detailed study of the impact of Zn deficiency on crown root development of rice genotypes, differing in their tolerance to this stress. Zn deficiency delayed crown root development and plant biomass accumulation in both Zn-efficient and inefficient genotypes, with the effects being much stronger in the latter. Zn-efficient genotypes had developed new crown roots as early as 3 days after transplanting (DAT) to a Zn deficient field and that was followed by a significant increase in total biomass by 7 DAT. Zn-inefficient genotypes developed few new crown roots and did not increase biomass during the first 7 days following transplanting. This correlated with Zn-efficient genotypes retranslocating a higher proportion of shoot-Zn to their roots, compared to Zn-inefficient genotypes. These latter genotypes were furthermore not efficient in utilizing the limited Zn for root development. Histological analyses indicated no anomalies in crown tissue of Zn-efficient or inefficient genotypes that would have suggested crown root emergence was impeded. We therefore conclude that the rate of crown root initiation was differentially affected by Zn deficiency between genotypes. Rapid crown root development, following transplanting, was identified as a main causative trait for tolerance to Zn deficiency and better Zn retranslocation from shoot to root was a key attribute of Zn-efficient genotypes. PMID:27066060

  5. Absorption spectroscopic study of synergistic extraction of praseodymium with benzoyl acetone in presence of crown ether.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shrabanti; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Basu, Sukalyan

    2005-04-01

    The extraction behaviour of Pr(III) from aqueous nitric acid medium employing benzoylacetone has been studied in presence of two crown ethers, viz., 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5 in chloroform medium using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The binary equilibrium constant (logk(ex)) for the complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))2(H(2)O)] in organic phase was found to be 1.170. The overall equilibrium constants (logK) for the ternary species [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] were estimated to be 4.01 and 4.41 for 15-crown-5 and benzo-15-crown-5, respectively. The trend in the equilibrium constant values were very much in accordance with the nature of substitution of the donor moiety. The extraction of Pr(III) by the benzoylacetone-crown ether combination was maximum at pH 3.0 and extraction decreases with increase in pH. It has been found that the extent of extraction of Pr(III) in organic phase as the binary as well as ternary complex [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(NO3(-))(2)(H(2)O)] and [Pr(benzoylacetonate)(crown ether)(NO3(-))(2)] increases with increase in concentration of the ligand. Similar trend is observed in the extraction by only donors. Enthalpies and entropies of formation for the ternary extraction process have been estimated. In addition, the effect of NaNO(3) as foreign salt was also studied and it was observed that with increase in ionic strength, percentage extraction increases.

  6. Predicting crown weight and bole volume of five western hardwoods. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, J.A.K.; Little, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    Regression equations are presented for estimating biomass of five western hardwoods: red alder (Alnus rubra), giant chinkapin (Castanopsis chrysophylla), big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), Pacific madrone (Arbutus memziesii), and tan oak (Lithocarpus densiflorus). Estimators are given for total crown biomass, cumulative proportions for separating crown weight into foliage and four timelag fuel diameter classes, bark weight, and bole volume (inside bark) to any specified top diameter. With one exception, the equation uses diameter at breast height as the only independent variable.

  7. 76 FR 62016 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Red-Crowned Parrot

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 12-month finding on a petition to list the red-crowned parrot (Amazona viridigenalis) as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). After review of all available scientific and commercial information, we find that listing the red-crowned parrot as endangered or threatened is warranted.......

  8. Stacking resistance to crown gall and nematodes in walnut rootstocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crown gall (CG) (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and the root lesion nematodes (RLNs) (Pratylenchus vulnus) are major challenges faced by the California walnut industry, reducing productivity and increasing the cost of establishing and maintaining orchards. Current nematode control strategies include nematicides, crop rotation, and tolerant cultivars, but these methods have limits. Developing genetic resistance through novel approaches like RNA interference (RNAi) can address these problems. RNAi-mediated silencing of CG disease in walnut (Juglans regia L.) has been achieved previously. We sought to place both CG and nematode resistance into a single walnut rootstock genotype using co-transformation to stack the resistance genes. A. tumefaciens, carrying self-complimentary iaaM and ipt transgenes, and Agrobacterium rhizogenes, carrying a self-complimentary Pv010 gene from P. vulnus, were used as co-transformation vectors. RolABC genes were introduced by the resident T-DNA in the A. rhizogenes Ri-plasmid used as a vector for plant transformation. Pv010 and Pv194 (transgenic control) genes were also transferred separately using A. tumefaciens. To test for resistance, transformed walnut roots were challenged with P. vulnus and microshoots were challenged with a virulent strain of A. tumefaciens. Results Combining the two bacterial strains at a 1:1 rather than 1:3 ratio increased the co-transformation efficiency. Although complete immunity to nematode infection was not observed, transgenic lines yielded up to 79% fewer nematodes per root following in vitro co-culture than untransformed controls. Transgenic line 33-3-1 exhibited complete crown gall control and 32% fewer nematodes. The transgenic plants had thicker, longer roots than untransformed controls possibly due to insertion of rolABC genes. When the Pv010 gene was present in roots with or without rolABC genes there was partial or complete control of RLNs. Transformation using only one vector showed 100

  9. Differential Self-Assembly of Novel Redox Crown Ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merithew, Andrew William

    Retinal prosthesis relies on the stimulation of living nerve tissue behind the rods and cones of the eye. The current state of the art relies on electrodes controlled by cameras which directly stimulate the nerve tissue to elicit a response to an image. These types of retinal implants have allowed for short-term crude vision in patients but have had limited long term success due to external battery packs and electroplating of the implanted electrodes. Ionic stimulation is one of the principle mechanisms that sensory neurons utilize in the generation of an action potential. In a complex transduction pathway, ionic gradients are constantly altered inside the neuron by voltage sensors or mechanically controlled gates embedded in the neuronal cell membrane; responsible for the open and close state of these ion channels. It has been demonstrated that local concentration increases of K + by direct injection proximal to the nerve can elicit nerve firing at a concentration of 15-20 mM (3-4X normal concentration) increase in K + concentration. As part of a larger concept of integrating biotechnology with nanofabrication, the materials for the development of potassium selective sequestration/storage and delivery were developed in the form of a redox-gated K+ selective crown ether. The structure of the anthraquinone-based crown was deduced by computational simulation and stoichiometry of the complex confirmed by mass spec. along with 2D diffusion NMR techniques. In this instance, the stoichiometry could be controlled by the addition of different salts to give a 1:1 complex with large, aromatic anions and a 2:1 complex with smaller anions such as triflate. The synthesis of the molecule was optimized by computational modeling and simulations of transport through an artificial membrane. The selectivity of the architecture developed was specific for K+ over Na+, the other major ionic species present in the blood. The mechanism influencing the self-assembly of this class of

  10. Effects of intensity and frequency of crown damage on resprouting of Erica arborea L. (Ericaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, Miquel

    1998-02-01

    A clipping experiment was conducted to analyse the effects of intensity and frequency of crown damage on compensatory responses by resprouting in the shrub species Erica arborea. Increased sprout removal (crown damage intensity) promoted recruitment and increased the total dry weight of new sprout cohorts. Mean size (diameter) of new sprout cohorts was greater under increased intensity of crown damage, although no differences in size variability (CV) were obtained. Increased crown damage events stimulated recruitment of new sprouts, but had no effect on their total dry weight and reduced their mean size. Increased intensity and frequency of crown damage also promoted growth (RGR) of uncut sprouts according to local position on the lignotuber. The results show that qualitatively different compensatory responses can be obtained depending on the modular structure of the genet and the frequency and intensity of crown damage. They also suggest that competition for underground resources might be important for explaining the interactions among sprouts within the genet. Modular behavior in resprouting species under extreme disturbance regimes (e.g. heavy grazing after fire) is also expected to have a negative effect on overall genet growth and reproduction.

  11. Investigating the Dynamics of Wandoo Crown Decline with Time Series Landsat Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunic, K.; Behn, G.; van Dongen, R.

    2012-08-01

    In the forests of south west Western Australia dramatic declines in tree health have been observed in recent years. The species Eucalyptus wando has exhibited loss of crown foliage in increasing stages of severity; this condition is referred to as wandoo crown decline and can lead to death. Determining the extent and timing of these declines is difficult on the ground due to the large distribution of E. wandoo and the observation of tree declines at a range of locations and dates over the last 40 years. Understanding the distribution, severity and timing of these declines is essential to the identification of the causes of these impacts. Investigation of time series Landsat imagery can inform on locations of crown foliage loss and the time periods these losses occurred in. Applying a vegetation index to a 20 year sequence of imagery enabled periods of decline to be identified. Employment of trend analysis of four date time series demonstrated the dynamics of wandoo crown cover. Comparisons of periods of decline with the variations of cover density over the entire image sequence facilitated the identification of possible locations and timing of wandoo crown decline impacts. Changes in crown cover observed by the imagery analysis were compared to field surveys.

  12. Temporal matching among diurnal photosynthetic patterns within the crown of the evergreen sclerophyll Olea europaea L.

    PubMed

    Granado-Yela, C; García-Verdugo, C; Carrillo, K; Rubio DE Casas, R; Kleczkowski, L A; Balaguer, L

    2011-05-01

    Trees are modular organisms that adjust their within-crown morphology and physiology in response to within-crown light gradients. However, whether within-plant variation represents a strategy for optimizing light absorption has not been formally tested. We investigated the arrangement of the photosynthetic surface throughout one day and its effects on the photosynthetic process, at the most exposed and most sheltered crown layers of a wild olive tree (Olea europaea L.). Similar measurements were made for cuttings taken from this individual and grown in a greenhouse at contrasted irradiance-levels (100 and 20% full sunlight). Diurnal variations in light interception, carbon fixation and carbohydrate accumulation in sun leaves were negatively correlated with those in shade leaves under field conditions when light intensity was not limiting. Despite genetic identity, these complementary patterns were not found in plants grown in the greenhouse. The temporal disparity among crown positions derived from specialization of the photosynthetic behaviour at different functional and spatial scales: architectural structure (crown level) and carbon budget (leaf level). Our results suggest that the profitability of producing a new module may not only respond to construction costs or light availability, but also rely on its spatio-temporal integration within the productive processes at the whole-crown level.

  13. Evaluation of polymer inclusion membranes containing crown ethers for selective cesium separation from nuclear waste solution.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, P K; Lakshmi, D S; Bhattacharyya, A; Manchanda, V K

    2009-09-30

    Transport behaviour of (137)Cs from nitric acid feed was investigated using cellulose triacetate plasticized polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing several crown ether carriers viz. di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6), di-benzo-21-crown-7 (DB21C7) and di-tert-butylbenzo-18-crown-6 (DTBB18C6). The PIM was prepared from cellulose triacetate (CTA) with various crown ethers and plasticizers. DTBB18C6 and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) were found to give higher transport rate for (137)Cs as compared to other carriers and plasticizers. Effect of crown ether concentration, nitric acid concentration, plasticizer and CTA concentration on the transport rate of Cs was also studied. The Cs selectivity with respect to various fission products obtained from an irradiated natural uranium target was found to be heavily dependent on the nature of the plasticizer. The present work shows that by choosing a proper plasticizer, one can get either good transport efficiency or selectivity. Though TBP plasticized membranes showed good transport efficiency, it displayed poor selectivities. On the other hand, an entirely opposite separation behaviour was observed with 2-nitrophenyloctylether (NPOE) plasticized membranes suggesting the possible application of the later membranes for the removal of bulk (137)Cs from the nuclear waste. The stability of the membrane was tested by carrying out transport runs for nearly 25 days.

  14. Contact fracture of full-ceramic crowns subjected to occlusal loads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Lu, Chenglin; Zhang, Xiuyin; Mao, Shuangshuang; Arola, Dwayne

    2008-10-20

    The mechanisms contributing to failure of full dental ceramic crowns under occlusal loads were studied using a unique optical approach. Model specimens comprising triple-layered crowns (veneer, core and substrate) were developed with both flat and curved occlusal surfaces and then subjected to simulated quasi-static occlusal loading using a spherical indenter. Deformation within the specimens during loading was analyzed by means of digital image correlation (DIC). Finite element models were also developed and used to examine the mechanics of contact. Results of the experiments with flat dental crowns indicated three typical modes of failure, i.e. cone cracks, plastic yielding and radial cracks. Fracture of the specimens with curved dental crowns was complicated by contributions from competing and multiple modes of failure. Both experimental and numerical results conclude that the dominant fracture mode in the full-ceramic crowns was radial cracking in the core beneath the contact area. However, displacement fields obtained using DIC showed that debonding developed near the shoulder of the crown, particularly during off-axis loading, and initiated under substantially lower occlusal loads than those required for crack initiation.

  15. Influence of the preparation design and artificial aging on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    PubMed Central

    Anastassova-Yoshida, Yana; Nothdurft, Frank Phillip; von See, Constantin; Pospiech, Peter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and fracture behavior of monolithic zirconia crowns in accordance with the preparation design and aging simulation method. MATERIALS AND METHODS An upper first molar was prepared sequentially with three different preparation designs: shoulderless preparation, 0.4 mm chamfer and 0.8 mm chamfer preparation. For each preparation design, 30 monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated. After cementation on Cr-Co alloy dies, the following artificial aging procedures were performed: (1) thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML): 5000 cycles of thermal cycling 5℃–55℃ and chewing simulation (1,200,000 cycles, 50 N); (2) Low Temperature Degradation simulation (LTD): autoclave treatment at 137℃, 2 bar for 3 hours and chewing simulation; and (3) no pre-treatment (control group). After artificial aging, the crowns were loaded until fracture. RESULTS The mean values of fracture resistance varied between 3414 N (LTD; 0.8 mm chamfer preparation) and 5712 N (control group; shoulderless preparation). Two-way ANOVA analysis showed a significantly higher fracture loads for the shoulderless preparation, whereas no difference was found between the chamfer preparations. In contrast to TCML, after LTD simulation the fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns decreased significantly. CONCLUSION The monolithic crowns tested in this study showed generally high fracture load values. Preparation design and LTD simulation had a significant influence on the fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns. PMID:26949485

  16. A novel approach to internal crown characterization for coniferous tree species classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, A.; Bovolo, F.; Bruzzone, L.

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge about individual trees in forest is highly beneficial in forest management. High density small foot- print multi-return airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data can provide a very accurate information about the structural properties of individual trees in forests. Every tree species has a unique set of crown structural characteristics that can be used for tree species classification. In this paper, we use both the internal and external crown structural information of a conifer tree crown, derived from a high density small foot-print multi-return LiDAR data acquisition for species classification. Considering the fact that branches are the major building blocks of a conifer tree crown, we obtain the internal crown structural information using a branch level analysis. The structure of each conifer branch is represented using clusters in the LiDAR point cloud. We propose the joint use of the k-means clustering and geometric shape fitting, on the LiDAR data projected onto a novel 3-dimensional space, to identify branch clusters. After mapping the identified clusters back to the original space, six internal geometric features are estimated using a branch-level analysis. The external crown characteristics are modeled by using six least correlated features based on cone fitting and convex hull. Species classification is performed using a sparse Support Vector Machines (sparse SVM) classifier.

  17. Utilization of stainless steel crowns by general dentists and pediatric dental specialists in Indiana.

    PubMed

    Kowolik, Joan; Kozlowski, Diana; Jones, James E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate utilization of the stainless steel crown by both the general and pediatric dentists in Indiana. Although reports indicate that there has been a dramatic reduction in dental caries in the US, almost 20 percent of children have dental decay by age four, with almost 80 percent having a cavity by 17 years of age. After reviewing the literature, Seale has recommended that the stainless steel crown is the most successful restoration for children with a rate of high caries. All dental schools in North America teach the value of using stainless steel crowns and the method of tooth preparation. We hypothesized that greater use of the stainless steel crowns would be made by specialists than by general dentists. In this study, of the 200 questionnaires distributed, 62.5 percent were returned and analyzed. The results imply that stainless steel crowns are being significantly underutilized in general dental practice. It is interesting, and perhaps of concern, that the general dentists are not interested in continuing education courses about this subject. Over the next few years, with the aging of the pediatric dental community in Indiana, general (not specialty) dentists will treat most of the children. Because of this, pre-doctoral education needs to place more emphasis on preparation and utilization of the stainless steel crown.

  18. Manufacturing scale-up of composite fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis; Gessel, M.; Grant, Carroll G.; Brown, T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Boeing effort under the NASA ACT program is to reduce manufacturing costs of composite fuselage structure. Materials, fabrication of complex subcomponents and assembly issues are expected to drive the costs of composite fuselage structure. Several manufacturing concepts for the crown section of the fuselage were evaluated through the efforts of a Design Build Team (DBT). A skin-stringer-frame intricate bond design that required no fasteners for the panel assembly was selected for further manufacturing demonstrations. The manufacturing processes selected for the intricate bond design include Advanced Tow Placement (ATP) for multiple skin fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM) of fuselage frames, innovative cure tooling, and utilization of low-cost material forms. Optimization of these processes for final design/manufacturing configuration was evaluated through the fabrication of several intricate bond panels. Panels up to 7 ft. by 10 ft. in size were fabricated to simulate half scale production parts. The qualitative and quantitative results of these manufacturing demonstrations were used to assess manufacturing risks and technology readiness for production.

  19. Eocene diversification of crown group rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae).

    PubMed

    García-R, Juan C; Gibb, Gillian C; Trewick, Steve A

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves.

  20. Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

  1. Molar crown inner structural organization in Javanese Homo erectus.

    PubMed

    Zanolli, Clément

    2015-01-01

    This contribution investigates the inner organizational pattern (tooth tissue proportions and enamel-dentine junction morphology) of seven Homo erectus permanent molar crowns from the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation of the Sangiran Dome (Central Java, Indonesia). The previous study of their external characteristics confirmed the degree of time-related structural reduction occurred in Javanese H. erectus, and also revealed a combination of nonmetric features which are rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene dental record, but more frequently found in recent humans. In accordance with their outer occlusal morphology, the specimens exhibit a set of derived internal features, such as thick to hyperthick enamel, an incomplete expression of the crest patterns at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) level, a sharp EDJ topography. As a whole, these features differ from those expressed in some penecontemporaneous specimens/samples representing African H. erectus/ergaster and H. heidelbergensis, as well as in Neanderthals, but occur in recent human populations. Further research in virtual dental paleoanthropology to be developed at macroregional scale would clarify the polarity and intensity of the intermittent exchanges between continental and insular Southeast Asia around the Lower to Middle Pleistocene boundary, as well as should shed light on the still poorly understood longitudinal evolutionary dynamics across continental Asia.

  2. Semi-supervised SVM for individual tree crown species classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalponte, Michele; Ene, Liviu Theodor; Marconcini, Mattia; Gobakken, Terje; Næsset, Erik

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel semi-supervised SVM classifier is presented, specifically developed for tree species classification at individual tree crown (ITC) level. In ITC tree species classification, all the pixels belonging to an ITC should have the same label. This assumption is used in the learning of the proposed semi-supervised SVM classifier (ITC-S3VM). This method exploits the information contained in the unlabeled ITC samples in order to improve the classification accuracy of a standard SVM. The ITC-S3VM method can be easily implemented using freely available software libraries. The datasets used in this study include hyperspectral imagery and laser scanning data acquired over two boreal forest areas characterized by the presence of three information classes (Pine, Spruce, and Broadleaves). The experimental results quantify the effectiveness of the proposed approach, which provides classification accuracies significantly higher (from 2% to above 27%) than those obtained by the standard supervised SVM and by a state-of-the-art semi-supervised SVM (S3VM). Particularly, by reducing the number of training samples (i.e. from 100% to 25%, and from 100% to 5% for the two datasets, respectively) the proposed method still exhibits results comparable to the ones of a supervised SVM trained with the full available training set. This property of the method makes it particularly suitable for practical forest inventory applications in which collection of in situ information can be very expensive both in terms of cost and time.

  3. Strong Rotation of an Erupting Quiescent Polar Crown Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    On 5-6 June 2007, a large quiescent polar crown prominence was observed to erupt by the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This eruption was particularly visible in the 304 A channel of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) telescopes. A detailed analysis of the fine structures in the images allows the three-dimensional structure of the erupting prominence to be derived. The prominence is seen to undergo substantial rotation of at least 90 along the radial axis as it rises, with indications that additional rotation occurred before the prominence rose into the STEREO fields of view. Two temporary structures ("spurs") are seen to form at an angle to the main spine of the prominence, and are interpreted as signs of reconnection. These reconnection events contribute to the overall rotation of the prominence. A significant fraction of the prominence material is drained through new field lines caused by one of the reconnection events, resulting in only a weak coronal mass ejection event observed by the STEREO and SOHO coronagraphs. The eruption is interpreted as being initiated by the helical kink instability, with subsequent modification by the reconnection events.

  4. Crystal and molecular structure of a series of 15-crown-5-containing styryl heterocycles and their dimethoxy substituted analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'mina, L. G. Fedorova, O. A.; Andryukhina, E. N.; Mashura, M. M.; Gromov, S. P.; Alfimov, M. V.

    2006-05-15

    A comparative study of the molecular geometry and crystal packing of crown-containing styryl heterocycles and their dimethoxy substituted analogues is performed. It is established that all the compounds exhibit an identical type of distortions of the geometry of the central styryl fragment. These are the localization of the {pi}-electron density at the ethylene bond and the bond alternation in a half of the phenyl ring due to the conjugation of lone electron pairs of the oxygen substituents with the chromophore system of the molecule. A comparative analysis of the crystal packings of the compounds reveals extended separate hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The hydrophilic regions are built of crown ether fragments, and the hydrophobic regions consist of {pi}-conjugated and aromatic molecular fragments. The hydrophobic regions are characterized by a wide variety of packing motifs, among which stacking packing is absent. For two compounds, the formation of sandwich dimers that are preorganized to enter into the photochemical [2 + 2]cycloaddition reaction is observed.

  5. Deep-sequencing transcriptome analysis of field-grown Medicago sativa L. crown buds acclimated to freezing stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Yue; Shu, Yongjun; Bai, Yan; Guo, Changhong

    2016-09-01

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) 'Zhaodong' is an important forage legume that can safely survive in northern China where winter temperatures reach as low as -30 °C. Survival of alfalfa following freezing stress depends on the amount and revival ability of crown buds. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of frost tolerance in alfalfa, we used transcriptome sequencing technology and bioinformatics strategies to analyze crown buds of field-grown alfalfa during winter. We statistically identified a total of 5605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in freezing stress including 1900 upregulated and 3705 downregulated DEGs. We validated 36 candidate DEGs using qPCR to confirm the accuracy of the RNA-seq data. Unlike other recent studies, this study employed alfalfa plants grown in the natural environment. Our results indicate that not only the CBF orthologs but also membrane proteins, hormone signal transduction pathways, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathways indicate the presence of a special freezing adaptation mechanism in alfalfa. The antioxidant defense system may rapidly confer freezing tolerance to alfalfa. Importantly, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and phenylalanine metabolism, which is of potential importance in coordinating freezing tolerance with growth and development, were downregulated in subzero temperatures. The adaptive mechanism for frost tolerance is a complex multigenic process that is not well understood. This systematic analysis provided an in-depth view of stress tolerance mechanisms in alfalfa.

  6. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Background or Statement of Problem: As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. Aims and Objectives: To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Methodology: Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P < 0.05 the

  7. Squalyl Crown Ether Self-Assembled Conjugates: An Example of Highly Selective Artificial K(+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhanhu; Gilles, Arnaud; Kocsis, Istvan; Legrand, Yves-Marie; Petit, Eddy; Barboiu, Mihail

    2016-02-01

    The natural KcsA K(+) channel, one of the best-characterized biological pore structures, conducts K(+) cations at high rates while excluding Na(+) cations. The KcsA K(+) channel is of primordial inspiration for the design of artificial channels. Important progress in improving conduction activity and K(+) /Na(+) selectivity has been achieved with artificial ion-channel systems. However, simple artificial systems exhibiting K(+) /Na(+) selectivity and mimicking the biofunctions of the KcsA K(+) channel are unknown. Herein, an artificial ion channel formed by H-bonded stacks of squalyl crown ethers, in which K(+) conduction is highly preferred to Na(+) conduction, is reported. The K(+) -channel behavior is interpreted as arising from discreet stacks of dimers resulting in the formation of oligomeric channels, in which transport of cations occurs through macrocycles mixed with dimeric carriers undergoing dynamic exchange within the bilayer membrane. The present highly K(+) -selective macrocyclic channel can be regarded as a biomimetic alternative to the KcsA channel.

  8. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the maize primary, crown and seminal root in response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maolin; Kong, Xiangpei; Xu, Xiangbo; Li, Cuiling; Tian, Huiyu; Ding, Zhaojun

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to crop growth and yield. The primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana are known to respond differentially to a number of environmental stresses, including salinity. Although the maize root system as a whole is known to be sensitive to salinity, whether or not different structural root systems show differential growth responses to salinity stress has not yet been investigated. The maize primary root (PR) was more tolerant of salinity stress than either the crown root (CR) or the seminal root (SR). To understand the molecular mechanism of these differential growth responses, RNA-Seq analysis was conducted on cDNA prepared from the PR, CR and SR of plants either non-stressed or exposed to 100 mM NaCl for 24 h. A set of 444 genes were shown to be regulated by salinity stress, and the transcription pattern of a number of genes associated with the plant salinity stress response differed markedly between the various types of root. The pattern of transcription of the salinity-regulated genes was shown to be very diverse in the various root types. The differential transcription of these genes such as transcription factors, and the accumulation of compatible solutes such as soluble sugars probably underlie the differential growth responses to salinity stress of the three types of roots in maize.

  9. AN EVALUATION OF TWO GROUND-BASED CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES COMPARED TO CROWN CLOSURE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ground-based canopy closure estimation techniques, the Spherical Densitometer (SD) and the Vertical Tube (VT), were compared for the effect of deciduous understory on dominant/co-dominant crown closure estimates in even-aged loblolly (Pinus taeda) pine stands located in the N...

  10. Dependence of the optical absorption and Na+ binding energies of coumarin-crown ethers on the size and attachment position of ether ring: density functional investigation.

    PubMed

    Kasapbasi, Esra; Yurtsever, Mine

    2013-01-01

    The crowned coumarin complexes are well known compounds for their ion recognition abilities. They undergo photophysical changes upon cation binding. On the basis of density functional theory calculations, we examined the sodium cation (Na+) binding energies of coumarin-crown ethers based on 15-Crown-5 (15 C5) and 18-Crown-6 (18 C6) as well as the optical absorptions of coumarin-crown ethers based on 12-Crown-4 (12 C4), 15 C5 and 18 C6. We explored why the attachment of crown ether ring to coumarin affects the Na+ binding energies of coumarin-crown ethers and also why the optical absorption of coumarin is modified by the crown ethers. Our study reveals that the Na+ ion binding energies of coumarin-crown ethers depend strongly on the size of the crown ether ring and also on the attachment position of the ether ring on coumarin. These factors affect the intramolecular charge transfer and overall stability of the complexes. The absorptions of the coumarin and ether ring parts of coumarin-crown ether are red shifted from those of isolated coumarin and crown ether, respectively. The red-shift of the coumarin ester group absorption is much stronger depending on the attachment position of the ether ring to coumarin. The absorption intensity of the coumarin part in coumarin-crown ethers is reduced for the benzene group absorption, but is enhanced for the ester group absorption.

  11. Kinetics of the hydroxyethylation of n-octyl alcohol in the presence of the macrocyclic ether dibenzo-18-crown-6

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, A.K.; Zolotarskii, V.A.; Makarov, M.G.; Shvets, V.F.

    1988-02-01

    A study has been made of the kinetics of the reaction of ethylene oxide with n-octyl alcohol catalyzed by potassium octylate in the presence of the macrocyclic ether dibenzo-18-crown-6. A kinetic model has been proposed, which satisfactorily represents the effect of dibenzo-18-crown-6 on the rate of hydroxyethylation over a wide range of molar ratios of dibenzo-18-crown-6:potassium octylate and initial alcohol concentrations.

  12. Ion-induced manipulation of photochemical pathways in crown ether compounds based on fluorinated oligophenylenevinylenes: the border between ultrafast photoswitches and photoproduced nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, B; Henbest, K B; Sarker, A M; Malpert, J H; Chen, D Y; Rodgers, M A; Neckers, D C

    2001-03-01

    The photochemical and photophysical properties of the crown ethers trans,trans-1,4-bis[2-(3',4'-benzo 15-crown 5)ethenyl]-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzene (1) and trans,trans-1,4-bis[2-(3',4'-benzo 18-crown 6) ethenyl]-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzene (2) were investigated in the absence and presence of groups I and II metal ions. The photophysical methods used include steady state flurescence, uv spectroscopy, and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Both compounds showed solvatochromic behavior, due to intramolecular charge transfer state formation, and efficient fluorescence in polar solvents. Photophysical behavior was dependent on the metal ion. The addition of metal ions that completely fit into the crown ether cavity resulted in significant blue shifts in the fluorescence emission spectra (chemosensing properties). Partially fitting ions changed the fluorescence spectra slightly. Transient absorption measurements revealed fast and slow decay components with time constants of 10-20 and 500-600 ps for all fitting ions, respectively. The latter is assigned to a trans-cis photoisomerization process, which decreased in efficiency in the presence of partially fitting ions, i.e., increasing ion size. Steady state irradiation showed clear evidence of a change in the absorption spectra. Trans-cis photoisomerization and [2 + 2] photocycloaddition were found to compete with fluorescence. The ions Li+, Na+, and Ca2+, which fit into the cavity, direct the photoisomerization. Larger ions (K+, Rb+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) that partially fit the cavity cause photocycloaddition. Quantum yields of the photoreaction are between 0.1 and 0.3. Analysis of the photo-product obtained for the 1-Sr2+ system revealed a compound with a molecular weight of nanosize dimension, which was equivalent to seven mass units of 1. The higher molecular weight product was formed due to alternately stacked supramolecular assemblies.

  13. Sexual dimorphism in deciduous crown traits of a European derived Australian sample.

    PubMed

    Adler, C J; Donlon, D

    2010-06-15

    Sex determination of juvenile skeletal remains is a problematic area affecting physical anthropology, forensic science and archaeology. Sexual dimorphism in the morphometric crown traits of the deciduous dentition may be used to help resolve this issue. Dental stone casts from a European derived Australian sample (n=151) were used to investigate variation within crown traits of the deciduous canine and molars. The metric traits investigated were crown size, trigonid size and talonid size. The morphological features included Carabelli's trait and molar cusp number. Metric crown traits were significantly larger in males (p<0.05). The morphological crown traits were not significantly different between the sexes. The largest degree of sexual dimorphism was 11.11% in the trigonid mesiodistal diameter of the first deciduous molar. This is the first recording of the measurement in a European derived sample. Two multivariate statistics, linear functional discriminant analysis and binary logistic regression, were used to determine the success rate of sex classification from the crown traits. The most suitable was linear functional discriminant analysis, however similar results were found when using binary logistic regression. When using all variables investigated in this study, sex could be classified with accuracy of 70.2% from linear functional discriminant analysis (cross validated). The mandibular teeth had greater sexual dimorphism, classifying sex correctly 74.8% of the time compared to maxillary variables that had a success rate of 55.6%. Our results have shown that morphometric crown traits in the deciduous dentition can be used to classify sex of juvenile skeletons (11 months to 12 years) of European descent from linear functional discriminant analysis with accuracy between 70.2% and 74.8%.

  14. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Patil, Veena Ashok; John, Jiji

    2012-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20) patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening) and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI) & (GI), Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS), Probing depth (PD), and Biologic Width (BW). Statistical Analysis Used. Student "t" Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group) and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group) and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  15. Effect of Cervical Collar Removal on the Fracture Load of Anterior Zirconia Crowns.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fernanda; Cardoso, Mayra; de Melo, Renata Marques; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Souza, Rodrigo Oa

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of the extension of collar and fatigue cycling on the fracture load of anterior zirconia crowns. A total of 60 anterior full-crown preparations (central incisor) were machined in glass fiber-filled epoxy resin. Zirconia copings were designed and milled using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (thickness: buccal = 0.62 mm, lingual = 0.65 mm, incisal = 0.72 mm). The cervical collars (occlusogingival height = 0.8 mm, buccolingual width = 1.0 mm) were totally or partially (buccal face) removed for modified copings. They were randomly allocated to six groups according to the type of cervical collar design and the presence (or not) of fatigue cycling (n = 10). The veneering ceramic layer was pressed, and the crowns were cemented with resin cement. The samples were tested until fracture in a universal testing machine and analyzed by stereomicroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (5%). Removal of the cervical collar significantly affected the fracture strength of zirconia crowns (P = .000), whereas fatigue cycling did not (P = .428). The mean failure load was lower in the groups with no collar. The most frequent failure modes were cracking of the veneer porcelain in collarless crowns and catastrophic failure in the others. The authors concluded that removal of the vestibular collar of zirconia copings in anterior crowns does not reduce the fracture load of the crowns. However, removal of the entire collar reduces the fracture load and cannot be recommended.

  16. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the CAD/CAM group and the cast group (P > 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions. PMID:28018914

  17. Clinical Acceptability of the Internal Gap of CAD/CAM PD-AG Crowns Using Intraoral Digital Impressions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Gyung; Kim, Sungtae; Choi, Hyunmin; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Moon, Hong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the internal gap between CAD/CAM palladium-silver crowns and cast gold crowns generated from intraoral digital versus conventional impressions and to determine the clinical acceptability. Nickel-chrome master dies were made from the prepared resin tooth with the conventional impression method (n = 40). For ICC (Intraoral, CAD/CAM) group, 10 intraoral digital impressions were made, and 10 CAD/CAM crowns of a PD-AG (palladium-silver) machinable alloy were generated. For IC (Intraoral, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were cast from ten intraoral digital impressions. For CCC (Conventional, CAD/CAM) group, 10 CAD/CAM PD-AG crowns were made using the conventional impression method. For CC (Conventional, Cast) group, 10 gold crowns were fabricated from 10 conventional impressions. One hundred magnifications of the internal gaps of each crown were measured at 50 points with an optical microscope and these values were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The internal gap of the intraoral digital impression group was significantly larger than in the conventional impression group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the CAD/CAM group and the cast group (P > 0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, crowns from intraoral digital impressions showed larger internal gap values than crowns from conventional impressions.

  18. Reliability Estimation for Single-unit Ceramic Crown Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Lekesiz, H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a survival prediction method for the assessment of ceramic dental restorations. For this purpose, fast-fracture and fatigue reliabilities for 2 bilayer (metal ceramic alloy core veneered with fluorapatite leucite glass-ceramic, d.Sign/d.Sign-67, by Ivoclar; glass-infiltrated alumina core veneered with feldspathic porcelain, VM7/In-Ceram Alumina, by Vita) and 3 monolithic (leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, Empress, and ProCAD, by Ivoclar; lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic, Empress 2, by Ivoclar) single posterior crown restorations were predicted, and fatigue predictions were compared with the long-term clinical data presented in the literature. Both perfectly bonded and completely debonded cases were analyzed for evaluation of the influence of the adhesive/restoration bonding quality on estimations. Material constants and stress distributions required for predictions were calculated from biaxial tests and finite element analysis, respectively. Based on the predictions, In-Ceram Alumina presents the best fast-fracture resistance, and ProCAD presents a comparable resistance for perfect bonding; however, ProCAD shows a significant reduction of resistance in case of complete debonding. Nevertheless, it is still better than Empress and comparable with Empress 2. In-Ceram Alumina and d.Sign have the highest long-term reliability, with almost 100% survivability even after 10 years. When compared with clinical failure rates reported in the literature, predictions show a promising match with clinical data, and this indicates the soundness of the settings used in the proposed predictions. PMID:25048249

  19. Reliability estimation for single-unit ceramic crown restorations.

    PubMed

    Lekesiz, H

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a survival prediction method for the assessment of ceramic dental restorations. For this purpose, fast-fracture and fatigue reliabilities for 2 bilayer (metal ceramic alloy core veneered with fluorapatite leucite glass-ceramic, d.Sign/d.Sign-67, by Ivoclar; glass-infiltrated alumina core veneered with feldspathic porcelain, VM7/In-Ceram Alumina, by Vita) and 3 monolithic (leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, Empress, and ProCAD, by Ivoclar; lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic, Empress 2, by Ivoclar) single posterior crown restorations were predicted, and fatigue predictions were compared with the long-term clinical data presented in the literature. Both perfectly bonded and completely debonded cases were analyzed for evaluation of the influence of the adhesive/restoration bonding quality on estimations. Material constants and stress distributions required for predictions were calculated from biaxial tests and finite element analysis, respectively. Based on the predictions, In-Ceram Alumina presents the best fast-fracture resistance, and ProCAD presents a comparable resistance for perfect bonding; however, ProCAD shows a significant reduction of resistance in case of complete debonding. Nevertheless, it is still better than Empress and comparable with Empress 2. In-Ceram Alumina and d.Sign have the highest long-term reliability, with almost 100% survivability even after 10 years. When compared with clinical failure rates reported in the literature, predictions show a promising match with clinical data, and this indicates the soundness of the settings used in the proposed predictions.

  20. Dramatic orientation shift of white-crowned sparrows displaced across longitudes in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Susanne; Morin, Jens; Muheim, Rachel; Ottosson, Ulf

    2005-09-06

    Advanced spatial-learning adaptations have been shown for migratory songbirds, but it is not well known how the simple genetic program encoding migratory distance and direction in young birds translates to a navigation mechanism used by adults. A number of convenient cues are available to define latitude on the basis of geomagnetic and celestial information, but very few are useful to defining longitude. To investigate the effects of displacements across longitudes on orientation, we recorded orientation of adult and juvenile migratory white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, after passive longitudinal displacements, by ship, of 266-2862 km across high-arctic North America. After eastward displacement to the magnetic North Pole and then across the 0 degrees declination line, adults and juveniles abruptly shifted their orientation from the migratory direction to a direction that would lead back to the breeding area or to the normal migratory route, suggesting that the birds began compensating for the displacement by using geomagnetic cues alone or together with solar cues. In contrast to predictions by a simple genetic migration program, our experiments suggest that both adults and juveniles possess a navigation system based on a combination of celestial and geomagnetic information, possibly declination, to correct for eastward longitudinal displacements.

  1. Separation of calcium-48 isotope by crown ether chromatography using ethanol/hydrochloric acid mixed solvent.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Shin; Umehara, Saori; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Masao; Kaneshiki, Toshitaka; Ozawa, Masaki; Kishimoto, Tadafumi

    2015-10-09

    Benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin embedded in porous silica beads was synthesized and used as the packing material for chromatographic separation of (48)Ca isotope. The aim of the present work is to develop efficient isotope enrichment process for double β decay nuclide (48)Ca. To this end, ethanol/HCl mixed solvent was selected as the medium for the chromatographic separation. Adsorption of calcium on the resin was studied at different HCl concentrations and different ethanol mixing ratios in batch-wise experiments. A very interesting phenomenon was observed; Ca adsorption is controlled not by the overall HCl concentration of the mixed solvent, but by the initial concentration of added HCl solution. Calcium break-through chromatography experiments were conducted by using 75v/v% ethanol/25v/v% 8M HCl mixed solvent at different flow rates. The isotope separation coefficient between (48)Ca and (40)Ca was determined as 3.8×10(-3), which is larger than that of pure HCl solution system. Discussion is extended to the chromatographic HETP, height equivalent to a theoretical plate.

  2. Multidisciplinary Approach to the Management of Complicated Crown-Root Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Pavan; Chordiya, Rashmi; Rudagi, Kavitarani; Patil, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Oblique crown-root fracture in the cervical third of the root is a common event following trauma to the anterior region of the mouth. As a result, sound tooth structure coronal to the attachment apparatus may not be available for restorative needs. Invasion of biological width by fracture line presents a clinical challenge in restorative planning. Placing a restoration margin on sound tooth structure within the dentogingival biological width might result in violation of biological width and should be considered a restorative failure. Maintaining a healthy periodontal attachment apparatus is crucial for long term prognosis and esthetics of the restored tooth. Surgical crown lengthening, surgical extrusion or orthodontic extrusions are the few alternative modalities to expose the fracture line. This case presentation demonstrates a predictable solution in overcoming an oblique crown-root fracture caused by trauma during a road accident. Orthodontic extrusion was used to elevate the fractured tooth from within the alveolar socket to allow the placement of crown margins on sound tooth structure without harming the biologic width. Combining fiberotomy with the extrusion procedure in this case eliminated the need for the surgical procedure. This allowed proper fabrication of post and core and the placement of the crown on sound tooth structure, fulfilling the biological and mechanical principles including obligatory ferrule effect. PMID:25954080

  3. Experiments on the breakup of drop-impact crowns by Marangoni holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljedaani, Abdulrahman; Wang, C. L.; Jetly, A.; Li, E. Q.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2016-11-01

    High-speed video experiments investigate the crown break up due to Marangoni instability when a highly viscous drop impacts on a thin layer of lower-viscosity liquid, which also has lower surface tension than the drop liquid. The presence of this low-viscosity film modifies the boundary conditions, giving effective slip to the drop, which forms a regular bowl-shaped crown, which rises vertically away from the solid and subsequently breaks up through the formation of a multitude of holes. Previous experiments have proposed that the breakup of the crown results from a spray of fine droplets ejected from the thin film. These droplets can hit the inner side of the crown forming spots with lower surface tension, which drive the hole formation. We test the validity of this assumption by doing close-up imaging to identify individual spray droplets, to show how they hit the crown and influence the hole formation. For all the impact experiments, the release height was kept constant at H =5.4 m, leading to an impact velocity of U =9.5 m/s on the thin liquid film.

  4. Mortality rates associated with crown health for eastern forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Morin, Randall S; Randolph, KaDonna C; Steinman, Jim

    2015-03-01

    The condition of tree crowns is an important indicator of tree and forest health. Crown conditions have been evaluated during inventories of the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program since 1999. In this study, remeasured data from 55,013 trees on 2616 FIA plots in the eastern USA were used to assess the probability of survival among various tree species using the suite of FIA crown condition variables. Logistic regression procedures were employed to develop models for predicting tree survival. Results of the regression analyses indicated that crown dieback was the most important crown condition variable for predicting tree survival for all species combined and for many of the 15 individual species in the study. The logistic models were generally successful in representing recent tree mortality responses to multiyear infestations of beech bark disease and hemlock woolly adelgid. Although our models are only applicable to trees growing in a forest setting, the utility of models that predict impending tree mortality goes beyond forest inventory or traditional forestry growth and yield models and includes any application where managers need to assess tree health or predict tree mortality including urban forest, recreation, wildlife, and pest management.

  5. Growth rates of great egret, snowy egret and black-crowned night-heron chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Growth rates of Great Erget (Casmerodius albus), Snowy Erget (Egretta thula), and Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) chicks to 18 days-of-age were estimated from repeated measurements of chicks in broods of three young. Weight gain (g/day) or increase in length (mm/day) of forearm, tarsus, or culmen did not between Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks at a colony in Rhode Island and a colony in Texas (USA). In Black-crowned night-Herons and Great Egrets, the last chick (C-chick) to hatch had lower growth rates than the first (A-) or second (B-) hatched chick. Black-crowned Night-Heron and Great Egret A-chicks gained weight faster than Snowy Egret A-chicks; however growth rates of the forearm, tarsus, or culmen each were not different among the three species. Equations based on the growth rate of culmen, forearm, or tarsus for repeatedly measured A-chicks estimated age of Great Egret, Snowy Egret, and Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks collected elsewhere to within two days of known age.

  6. Essential role of Osterix for tooth root but not crown dentin formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chunlin; Liu, Ying; Ho, Sunita P.; Feng, Jian Q.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth is made of crown and root. It is widely believed that dentin formation in crown and root uses the same regulatory mechanism. However, identification of NFIC’s unique function in determining root but not crown dentin formation challenges the old thought. In searching for the target molecules downstream of NFIC, we unexpectedly found a sharp reduction of OSX (osterix), the key transcription factor in skeleton formation, in the Nfic knockout (KO) tooth root. We then demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of Osx in the odontoblast cell line due to a transient transfection of Nfic expression plasmid. Studies of global and conditional Osx KO mice revealed no apparent changes in the crown dentin tubules and dentin matrix. However, the OSX conditional KO mice (crossed to the 2.3 kb Col 1-Cre) displayed an increase in cell proliferation but great decreases in expressions of root dentin matrix proteins (DMP1 and DSPP), leading to an inhibition in odontoblast differentiation, and short thin root dentin with few dentin tubules. Compared to the Nfic KO tooth, which contains essentially no dentin tubules and remains in a “root-less” status at adult stages, the Osx cKO root phenotype had partially improved at the late stage, indicating that other factors can compensate for OSX function. Thus, we conclude that OSX, one of the key downstream molecules of NFIC, plays a critical role in root, but not crown, formation. PMID:25349111

  7. Genetic analysis of seedling resistance to crown rust in five diploid oat (Avena strigosa) accessions.

    PubMed

    Cabral, A L; Park, R F

    2016-02-01

    Crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks., is a serious menace in oats, for which resistance is an effective means of control. Wild diploid oat accessions are a source of novel resistances that first need to be characterised prior to introgression into locally adapted oat cultivars. A genetic analysis of resistance to crown rust was carried out in three diverse diploid oat accessions (CIav6956, CIav9020, PI292226) and two cultivars (Saia and Glabrota) of A. strigosa. A single major gene conditioning resistance to Australian crown rust pathotype (Pt) 0000-2 was identified in each of the three accessions. Allelism tests suggested that these genes are either the same, allelic, or tightly linked with less than 1 % recombination. Similarly, a single gene was identified in Glabrota, and possibly two genes in Saia; both cultivars previously reported to carry two and three crown rust resistance genes, respectively. The identified seedling resistance genes could be deployed in combination with other resistance gene(s) to enhance durability of resistance to crown rust in hexaploid oat. Current diploid and hexaploid linkage maps and molecular anchor markers (simple sequence repeat [SSR] and diversity array technology [DArT] markers) should facilitate their mapping and introgression into hexaploid oat.

  8. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  9. The use of definitive implant abutments for the fabrication of provisional crowns: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Mumcu, Emre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The anterior region is a challenge for most clinicians to achieve optimal esthetics with dental implants. The provisional crown is a key factor in the success of obtaining pink esthetics around restorations with single implants, by soft tissue and inter-proximal papilla shaping. Provisional abutments bring additional costs and make the treatment more expensive. Since one of the aims of the clinician is to reduce costs and find more economic ways to raise patient satisfaction, this paper describes a practical method for chair-side fabrication of non-occlusal loaded provisional crowns used by the authors for several years successfully. Methods Twenty two patients (9 males, 13 females; mean age, 36,72 years) with one missing anterior tooth were treated by using the presented method. Metal definitive abutments instead of provisional abutments were used and provisional crowns were fabricated on the definitive abutments for all of the patients. The marginal fit was finished on a laboratory analogue and temporarily cemented to the abutments. The marginal adaptation of the crowns was evaluated radiographically. Results The patients were all satisfied with the final appearance and no complications occurred until the implants were loaded with permanent restorations. Conclusions The use of the definitive abutments for provisional crowns instead of provisional abutments reduces the costs and the same results can be obtained. PMID:22087416

  10. Allergic contact gingivostomatitis from a temporary crown made of methacrylates and epoxy diacrylates.

    PubMed

    Kanerva, L; Alanko, K; Estlander, T

    1999-12-01

    Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by (meth)acrylates is common in dental personnel, whereas dental acrylic fillings and crowns have rarely been reported to cause problems in dental patients. Here we report on a 48-year-old woman who developed gingivitis, stomatitis, and perioral dermatitis after a temporary crown made of restorative, two-component material had been inserted. The manufacturer stated that the temporary crown base paste and catalyst contained three (meth)acrylates, namely, a proacrylate, which is a modification of 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (BIS-GMA); a tricyclate, which is a saturated, aliphatic, tricyclic methacrylate; and urethane methacrylate. The manufacturer refused to give more exact information on the (meth)acrylates. Patch testing revealed that the patient was highly allergic to BIS-GMA, other epoxy diacrylates, and (meth)acrylates, as well as to the base paste and catalyst of the temporary crown. Accordingly, it was concluded that the allergic reaction was caused by BIS-GMA, or a cross-reacting (meth)acrylate, or other (meth)acrylates in the temporary crown.

  11. [Effects of drip irrigation methods on the regulation between root and crown function of 'Cabernet Sauvignon' seedlings].

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun; Yu, Song-lin; Liu, Huai-feng; Zhao, Bao-long; Wang, Wen-jing

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of three irrigation methods, i.e., subsurface drip irrigation with a tank system (SDI) , plastic film mulched-drip irrigation (MDI), and conventional drip irrigation (DI) on the regulation between root and crown function of Vitis vinifera 'Cabernet Sauvignon' seedlings. The results showed that both the SDI and MDI systems promoted the growth of the grape seedlings compared with DI, with the SDI system promoting the root growth, and MDI system promoting the aboveground growth. Root area, root volume, and root activity and SOD enzyme activity in the SDI treatment were greater than those of MDI or DI treatment in the 20-60 cm soil layer. SDI treatment increased root penetration and physiological activity. Symptoms of drought stress appeared earlier in DI treatment than in either MDI or SDI treatment in the same watering schedule. Net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) of leaves were higher in SDI and MDI treatments than in DI treatment. ΦPS II and qP at 12:00-14:00 were lower in the MDI treatment than in SDI treatment at 7 d after irrigation, suggesting that the degree of photoinhibition in the fluorescence process in MDI treatment was more than that in SDI treatment. The high biomass and physiological activity of roots in the 20-40 cm depth could increase both of total plant biomass and aboveground biomass. The regulation between root and crown function was better in SDI treatment than in MDI and DI treatments. Therefore, SDI could be used as an alternative technique of water-saving irrigation practices.

  12. Treatment of extended anterior crown fractures using Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Magne, Michel

    2005-05-01

    Novel-design bonded porcelain restorations, the so-called Type IIIA BPRs, represent a reliable and effective procedure when restoring large parts of the coronal volume and length in the anterior dentition. While traditional treatment approaches involve the removal of large amounts of sound tooth substance (with adverse effects on the pulp, gingivae and crown biomechanics, as well as serious financial consequences), the use of adhesive technology instead can provide maximum preservation of tissues and limited costs. Considerable advantages, such as the economical and noninvasive treatment of crown-fractured teeth, are inherent to Type IIIA bonded porcelain restorations, reducing the need for preprosthetic interventions (e.g., root canal therapy and crown-lengthening) and the use of intraradicular posts. This article, illustrated with cases with up to eight and 10 years' follow-up, sets the scientific foundations of this concept, as well as important considerations about function, strength, tooth preparation, laboratory technique, and bonding optimization.

  13. Chairside veneering of composite resin to anterior stainless steel crowns: another look.

    PubMed

    Wiedenfeld, K R; Draughn, R A; Goltra, S E

    1995-01-01

    The chairside veneering of stainless steel crowns using the technique described in our original article (J Dent Child, 61: 321-326 September-December 1994) has proven to be a very dependable and successful technique for restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth. In this article an advancement in the technique is described using new light-cured materials that simplify the veneering process and produce thinner veneers. The resulting veneers maintain the adaptability, strength, and gingival contour benefits of the stainless steel crown in conjunction with the cosmetics of composite facings. The chairside technique can be quickly mastered by a dental auxiliary and results in veneered crowns with very high shear and bond strengths.

  14. A simplified isolation technique for preparation and placement of resin composite strip crowns.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Gregory L; Kupietzky, Ari

    2008-01-01

    Resin composite strip crowns (SCs) have been utilized for over 2 decodes to restore carious primary teeth. While SCs are the most esthetic anterior crowns, they also are the most technique sensitive. Restoration of a severely decoyed primary anterior tooth with a SC restoration is often complicated by hemorrhage in the operative site. Inflamed, bleeding gingiva may interfere with proper curing of the restorations, resulting in discolored crowns due to excessive bleeding during the curing process. Proper isolation and hemostasis is crucial for successfully completing the SC restoration. Traditionally, the routine use of ligature ties to deflect gingival tissue and retain the rubber dam in place has been recommended to address this problem. The purpose of this report was to describe a simple, relatively inexpensive, alternative technique for placing SCs by utilizing orthodontic elastomers.

  15. Prevalence of crown trauma in free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; Kashivakura, Cyntia Kayo; Ferro, Claudia; Jácomo, Anah Tereza de Almeida; Silveira, Leandro; Astete, Samuel; Lopes, Fernanda Maria

    2007-12-01

    Nineteen free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) were captured in central Brazil from April through November 2003. Oral cavity examination revealed 34 teeth with crown trauma in twelve animals. Canine teeth were most commonly affected (44.2%), followed by premolar (29.4%) and incisor teeth (26.5%). Trauma to maxillary teeth (67.7%) was more frequent compared with mandibular teeth (32.3 %). The majority of dental fractures were located at the cuspid portion of the crown (56.0%). Slab fractures were the most frequent type (37.0%), followed by horizontal (24.0%), oblique (24.0%) and longitudinal fractures (15.0%). Complicated crown fracture (pulp exposure) was diagnosed in 13 (38.2%) of these teeth while pulpitis noted by tooth discoloration was diagnosed in 8 (23.5%) teeth.

  16. Bimolecular gas-phase exchange of alkali metals between cationized biomolecules and neutral crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M.; Dearden, D.V.; Hofstadler, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electrospray ionization of polypeptides and nucleic acids often yields ions containing sodium or potassium charge carriers. These alkali adducts are frequently the residue of ionic buffers used to preserve protein conformation in solution or artifacts of a natural matrix such as blood plasma. Measures taken in solution to desalinate these samples are hindered by the desire to maintain native conformation. The authors here show that ion-molecule chemistry is an alternate means of removing alkali metal ions from multiply-charged biomolecules. Ion-molecule reactions of multiply charged polypeptides with crown ethers result in adduction of the crown if protons are the only charge bearing species, or desalting if alkali metals are among the charge carriers. Both product ions, the desalted peptide and the crown/alkali metal complex, are observed in the latter case.

  17. A new arboreal haramiyid shows the diversity of crown mammals in the Jurassic period.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoting; Bi, Shundong; Wang, Xiaoli; Meng, Jin

    2013-08-08

    A major unsolved problem in mammalian evolution is the origin of Allotheria, including Multituberculata and Haramiyida. Multituberculates are the most diverse and best known Mesozoic era mammals and ecologically resemble rodents, but haramiyids are known mainly from isolated teeth, hampering our search for their phylogenetic relationships. Here we report a new haramiyid from the Jurassic period of China, which is, to our knowledge the largest reported so far. It has a novel dentition, a mandible resembling advanced multituberculates and postcranial features adapted for arboreal life. Our phylogenetic analysis places Haramiyida within crown Mammalia, suggesting the origin of crown Mammalia in the Late Triassic period and diversification in the Jurassic, which contrasts other estimated divergence times of crown Mammalia. The new haramiyid reveals additional mammalian features of the group, helps to identify other haramiyids represented by isolated teeth, and shows again that, regardless of various phylogenetic scenarios, a complex pattern of evolution involving many convergences and/or reversals existed in Mesozoic mammals.

  18. Three-dimensional structure measurement of diamond crowns based on stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiguo; Cai, Lilong

    2009-11-01

    We present an effective method for reconstructing and measuring the three-dimensional (3D) structures of diamond crowns based on stereo vision. To reach high measurement accuracy, the influences of 3D measurement errors are analyzed in detail. Then, a method to accurately extract the linear features of diamond edges based on virtual motion control is described. Depending on the obtained linear features, the 3D structure of a diamond crown can be reconstructed with least squares error. The validity of the proposed method is verified by experiments. The results show that the proposed method can be used to measure the 3D structures of diamond crowns with satisfactory accuracy and efficiency, and it also can be used to extract linear features and measure other similar artificial objects that can be represented by line segments.

  19. Effect of preparation taper and height on strength and retention of zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Ersu, Bahadir; Narin, Duygu; Aktas, Guliz; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Canay, Senay

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of the taper and height of tooth preparations on the fracture strength and retention of zirconia crowns. Sixty-four dies were designed to simulate a crown preparation. Dies were machined with a height of either 4 mm (n = 16) or 7 mm (n = 16) and a taper of either 6 degrees (n = 16) or 20 degrees (n = 16). Copings were created from Lava zirconia blanks. Retention tests were performed using a universal testing machine. Copings were recemented on the dies, thermocycled, and tested for fracture strength. Data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance. Retention was greater in the taller and less-tapered preparation designs. Taller preparations showed superior fracture strength. Preparing posterior teeth with higher axial walls and less taper is recommended to achieve increased retention and strength for zirconia crowns.

  20. The effect of laser irradiation on retention of full cast crowns.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, W M; Palamara, J E; Almohammed, S N

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect on the retention force of full cast crowns cemented on short tooth preparations after preparation of dentine with an erbium, chromium: yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr:YSGG) laser at different sub-ablative power settings. Thirty teeth were prepared for full cast crowns using a milling machine. The surface area for all preparations was measured. The surfaces of the preparations were irradiated with 0 (control), 0.25 and 0.75 W laser. The crowns were cemented with self-cure resin cement and tested for retention on a Hounsfield Tensometer machine. The 0.75 W power setting produced the highest failure load value (346.2 +/- 86.1 N) and was significantly higher than the other groups. There were no significant differences between the 0.25 W and 0 W control groups

  1. Management of a complicated crown-root fracture in a young permanent incisor using intentional replantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyan; Heffernan, Michelle; Vann, William F

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this case presentation is to review the rationale for and illustrate the clinical procedures involved in intentional replantation of a maxillary central incisor following a complicated crown-root fracture. The treatment of complicated crown-root fractures in children often is compromised by a fracture below the gingival margin and/or bone. This makes isolation difficult and comprises the hermetic seal that is critical for a successful endodontic treatment. Orthodontic or surgical extrusion with gingivectomy has been suggested; however, these approaches can be expensive, time-consuming, esthetically compromising, and unsatisfactory when the fracture line is deep below the gingiva. Our presentation will discuss the treatment options for such cases and introduce the concept of intentional replantation as an option to manage complicated crown-root fractures in young permanent anterior teeth.

  2. Multidisciplinary management of subgingival crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Zahedpasha, Samir; Safarcherati, Hengameh; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr; Mehrani-Sabet, Javad

    2012-05-01

    This case report describes the multidisciplinary management of subgingival horizontal crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. After removal of the fractured fragment, pulpotomy was performed within 48 h from the injury to promote apexogenesis. The tooth was orthodontically extruded until the fracture line was located above the alveolar bone level. Frenectomy, supracrestal fiberotomy, and crown lengthening were performed after adequate stabilization of the extruded tooth for 5 months. Finally, the tooth was restored with composite resin by using the acid etch technique. This report highlights that a multidisciplinary treatment approach with strict cooperation among specialists to manage a complicated crown-root fracture can save and restore a traumatized immature permanent tooth.

  3. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Final report, January 1, 1988--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the report period a variety of new lipophilic ionizable crown ethers with pendent proton-ionizable groups has been synthesized. The ligands possess one or more ionizable group (carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, para-nitrophenol, phosphonic acid) attached to crown ether, monoazacrown ether or diazacrown ether frameworks. These novel chelating agents have either pendent or inward-facing proton-ionizable groups. Such lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ethers are designed for use in multiphase metal ion separations (solvent extraction, liquid membrane transport). In addition a series of proton-ionizable crown ethers without lipophilic groups was prepared to study how structural variations within the ligand influence metal ion complexation in homogeneous media as assessed by NMR spectroscopy or titration calorimetry. A third class of new metal ion-complexing agents is a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids. Competitive solvent extractions of alkali metal and alkaline earth cations and of the mixed species have been conducted to reveal the influence of ring size, nature and attachment site of the lipophilic group, sidearm length, and proton-ionizable group identity and location upon the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. In addition to such studies of structural variation within the lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ether, the effect of changing the organic solvent and variation of the stripping conditions have been assessed. The influence of structural variations within lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids upon competitive solvent extraction of alkaline earth cations has been probed. Also a new chromogenic, di-ionizable crown ether with extremely high selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} has been discovered.

  4. Segmenting tree crowns from terrestrial and mobile LiDAR data by exploring ecological theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Shengli; Wu, Fangfang; Guo, Qinghua; Wang, Yongcai; Li, Wenkai; Xue, Baolin; Hu, Xueyang; Li, Peng; Tian, Di; Li, Chao; Yao, Hui; Li, Yumei; Xu, Guangcai; Fang, Jingyun

    2015-12-01

    The rapid development of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) techniques is advancing ecological and forest research. During the last decade, numerous single tree segmentation techniques have been developed using airborne LiDAR data. However, accurate crown segmentation using terrestrial or mobile LiDAR data, which is an essential prerequisite for extracting branch level forest characteristics, is still challenging mainly because of the difficulties posed by tree crown intersection and irregular crown shape. In the current work, we developed a comparative shortest-path algorithm (CSP) for segmenting tree crowns scanned using terrestrial (T)-LiDAR and mobile LiDAR. The algorithm consists of two steps, namely trunk detection and subsequent crown segmentation, with the latter inspired by the well-proved metabolic ecology theory and the ecological fact that vascular plants tend to minimize the transferring distance to the root. We tested the algorithm on mobile-LiDAR-scanned roadside trees and T-LiDAR-scanned broadleaved and coniferous forests in China. Point-level quantitative assessments of the segmentation results showed that for mobile-LiDAR-scanned roadside trees, all the points were classified to their corresponding trees correctly, and for T-LiDAR-scanned broadleaved and coniferous forests, kappa coefficients ranging from 0.83 to 0.93 were obtained. We believe that our algorithm will make a contribution to solving the problem of crown segmentation in T-LiDAR scanned-forests, and might be of interest to researchers in LiDAR data processing and to forest ecologists. In addition, our research highlights the advantages of using ecological theories as guidelines for processing LiDAR data.

  5. Design and synthesis of the next generation of crown ethers for waste separations: An interlaboratory comprehensive proposal. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Dietz, M.L.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Hay, B.P.

    1997-09-01

    'The purpose of this task is to undertake the design, synthesis, and characterization of the next generation of crown ethers for metal-ion separations applicable to the US Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) environmental needs. The general target problem is the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal contaminants from certain environmental and waste streams. Although not a radioactivity hazard, Li{sup +} ions leaching from burial sites containing more than 12 metric tons of lithium compounds contaminate the groundwater at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and have raised noncompliance concerns because of the resultant toxicity to aquatic biota. A more highly visible problem has been treatment of high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and especially the Hanford Site. The fission products {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs have been explicitly targeted for removal by the following DOE programs: the Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Science and Technology, the Tank Waste Remediation System, the Tanks Focus Area, and the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program. These seemingly ubiquitous fission products also appear in soil and groundwater at numerous DOE sites. In addition, radium has recently been named as a target contaminant at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. Unfortunately, the separations technologies needed to address these problems either do not exist or exhibit substantial deficiencies. Established techniques such as solvent extraction and ion exchange certainly have a strong role to play, especially as enhanced with the use of the new highly selective metal-ion hosts such as crown ethers and calixarenes. Recently applied results in the United States, France, Russia, and elsewhere have demonstrated the effective performance of crown ethers under realistic or actual process conditions for the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions

  6. Comparative studies of various run buffers for chiral capillary electrophoresis using chiral crown ether as a chiral selector.

    PubMed

    Jang, J; Cho, S I; Chung, D S

    2001-12-01

    In the capillary electrophoretic separation of primary amine enantiomers using (+)-(18-crown-6)-tetracarboxylic acid (18C6H4) as a chiral selector, the presence of run buffer constituents such as tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) or Na+ competing with analytes for 18C6H4, diminishes the effectiveness of 18C6H4. In order to determine appropriate buffer systems for 18C6H4, various run buffer cationic components including Tris, 1,3-bis[tris(hydroxymethyl)methylamino]propane, bis(2-hydroxyethyl)iminotris(hydroxymethyl)methane, triethanolamine, tetramethylammonium, and Na+ were compared. Quantitative studies of the effects of the competitive constituents were carried out by measuring the electrophoretic mobilities of histidine as a function of the 18C6H4 concentration. We also derived a simple equation to estimate the optimal chiral selector concentration for a maximum mobility difference in the presence of a competitive inhibitor.

  7. Materials based on cellulose fabric and PVC with porous structures formed by jointed aza- and oxa-aza-crown macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. Ya.; Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Petukhova, G. A.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Novikov, A. K.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    A material with porous structures formed by jointed aza- and oxa-aza-crowns with peripheral OHgroups is synthesized on the basis of cellulose fabric and PVC transformed into hydroxyethylcyclam. Mesopores are mainly observed on the fiber surface. The specific surface of the material is 6 m2/g; the volume of free space is 0.112 cm3/g. Assuming the internal pores have a disk-like shape, their width is estimated at 2 nm. The material sorbs vapors of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, amides, nitriles, and sulfoxides. It also swells to a limited degree in organic solvents. When sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide is sorbed in the pores, compounds of them with H+- and OH--conducting systems of hydrogen bonds are formed.

  8. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria.

  9. Ring-size and substituent effects in the solvent extraction of alkali metal nitrates by crown ethers in 1,2-dichloroethane and 1-octanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, R.A.; Deng, Y.; Bailey, D.R.; Moyer, B.A.

    1996-11-01

    The extraction of alkali metal nitrate salts by solutions of crown ethers in each of the two diluents 1,2-dichloroethane and 1-octanol has been surveyed. The crown ethers include 18-crown-6, 21-crown-7, and 24-crown-8 ethers bearing cyclohexano, benzo, t-alkylbenzo, and/or furano substituents. The extraction efficiencies of the different crown ethers are examined in terms of ring-size, substituent, and solvent effects. Partition ratios for the crown ethers between water and either 1,2-dichloroethane or 1-octanol are discussed. The extraction selectivities, expressed as the separation factor for cesium over sodium, are examined in relation to crown ether structure. 62 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Retrofitting a crown to a sleep apnea device by using computer-aided design and computer-aided milling technology.

    PubMed

    Biethman, Rick; Land, Martin F; Hruskocy, Heather; Colgin, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    Retrofitting a new crown to an existing dental device is challenging. The continued evolution of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) significantly simplifies the process. This article demonstrates retrofitting a gold crown to an existing sleep apnea device.

  11. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to Fusarium crown rot (Fusarium pseudograminearum) in two spring wheat populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR), caused by F. pseudograminearum and F. culmorum, reduces wheat yields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. by as much as 35%. Currently there is no consistent durable resistance to FCR in PNW wheat cultivars. Significant QTL for crown rot resistance have been documente...

  12. Improvement of Thiolate/Disulfide Mediated Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells through Supramolecular Lithium Cation Assembling of Crown Ether

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linfeng; Li, Xiong; Chen, Jiangzhao; Rong, Yaoguang; Ku, Zhiliang; Han, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    A supramolecular lithium cation assemblies of crown ether, [Li⊂12-crown-4]+, has been used to replace conventional tetraalkylammonium counterion in thiolate/disulfide (ET−/BET) mediated dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), which exhibit high stability and efficiency of 6.61% under 100 mW·cm−2 simulated sunlight illumination. PMID:23933601

  13. Feeding behavior and diet of free ranging black crowned night herons on a catfish aquaculture facility in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impacts of many species of piscivorous birds on aquaculture are well documented in the southeastern United States; however, specific studies of black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) in these areas are lacking. It was observed that black-crowned night herons opportunistically exploit ...

  14. 77 FR 48582 - In the Matter of Ameriwest Energy Corp., Clyvia, Inc., and Crown Oil & Gas, Inc.; Order of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of Ameriwest Energy Corp., Clyvia, Inc., and Crown Oil & Gas, Inc.; Order of... information concerning the securities of Crown Oil & Gas, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic...

  15. Indirect composite resin crowns as an esthetic approach to treating ectodermal dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R K; Donly, K J; Wild, T W

    1992-11-01

    This article presents a case report describing the indirect fabrication of composite resin crowns for the restoration of primary anterior teeth. A 3-year-old with a confirmed diagnosis of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was provided with composite resin crowns that were both esthetic and functional. The indirect method decreases clinical time, provides a durable restoration, and allows treatment of patients who lack the cooperative ability to endure prolonged direct bonding appointments. The indirect technique may be feasible for the restoration of carious teeth as well as the presented case.

  16. Synergistic extraction studies of trivalent actinides and lanthanides using crabs, crowns, and crypts

    SciTech Connect

    Ensor, D.D.; Shah, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    This report will describe the investigations of the synergistic characteristics of the novel neutral oxygen donors 1,13-bis-(quinolyl)-1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxotridecane (K-5), a crab; 4-tert-butylcyclohexo-15crown-5(15-C-5), a crown; and 5,6,14,15-dibenzo-4,7,13,16,21,24-hexaoxo-1,10-diazabicyclo(8,8,8)-hexacosane (222BB), a cryptate, for trivalent lanthanides and actinides in combination with HTTA. 3 references, 2 tables.

  17. Functionalized bio-artifact fabricated via selective slurry extrusion. Part 2: Fabrication of ceramic dental crown.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D B; Liang, J P; Qu, Y X; Duan, G L

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized ceramic dental crown was successfully fabricated through selective slurry extrusion (SSE) based technique of solid freeform fabrication (also known as rapid prototyping). After sintering, the decomposed tourmaline powders were embedded in ZrO2 matrix. The far infrared emission properties of the ceramic dental crown were improved due to the increase of the numbers of infrared active bonds from tourmaline. This new dental restoration process presents potential to provide dental patients with functionalized artificial teeth, which benefits the body health by the way of emitting far infrared rays in ambient temperatures.

  18. Management of Complicated Crown Fracture with Miniature Pulpotomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2014-01-01

    Crown fractures account for the majority of dental traumas. If handled properly, prognosis of the pulp following a traumatic crown fracture can be favorable. The present case report focuses on the treatment of a traumatized mature permanent incisor with exposed pulp that was treated with the novel technique of miniature pulpotomy using calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. One-year follow-up revealed that the tooth was responsive to vitality tests and radiographic assessment showed the presence of a thick dentinal bridge beneath the CEM layer. PMID:25031601

  19. Bis-15-crown-5-ether-pillar[5]arene K(+)-Responsive Channels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei-Xu; Sun, Zhanhu; Zhang, Yan; Legrand, Yves-Marie; Petit, Eddy; Su, Cheng-Yong; Barboiu, Mihail

    2017-03-17

    An artificial selective K(+) channel is formed from the supramolecular organization on bis(benzo-15-crown-5- ether-ureido)-pillar[5]arene compound. This channel achieves a selectivity of SK(+)/Na(+) = 5 for an initial transport rate of kK(+) = 3.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The cation-file diffusion occurs via selective macrocyclic-filters anchored on inactive supporting pillar[5]arene relays. The sandwich-type binding geometry of the K(+) cation by two 15-crown-5 moieties sites is a key feature influencing channel efficiency.

  20. Extraction of protactinium-233 and separation from thermal neutron-irradiated thorium-232 using crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Jalhoom, Moayyed G.; Mohammed, Dawood A.; Khalaf, Jumah S.

    2008-07-01

    A new method was developed for the extraction and separation of {sup 233}Pa from thermal neutron-irradiated {sup 232}Th. Solutions of Pa{sup 233} were prepared in LiCI-HCl solutions from which appreciable extraction was obtained using dibenzo-18-crown-6 in 1,2-dichloroethane. The effects of cavity size, substitutions on the crown ring, type of the organic solvent, and temperature on extraction are discussed. Very high separation factors were obtained for the pairs {sup 233}Pa/{sup 232}Th (>105), {sup 233}Pa/{sup 233}U (> 1000), and {sup 232}U/{sup 232}Th (>60). (authors)

  1. Photochemical switching of ionic conductivity in composite films containing a crowned spirobenzopyran

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiichi; Yamashita, Takashi; Yokoyama, Masaaki

    1992-06-25

    Photochemical switching of ionic conductivity in vinyl chloride films with LiClO{sub 4} and a crowned spirobenzopyran revealed isomerization of the crowned spirobenzopyran to its merocyanine form proceeding under UV-irradiated or dark conditions to decrease the the film`s Li{sup +} ionic conductivity in this paper. Visible-light irradiation caused isomerization back to the spiropyran form and restoration of ionic conductivity to its original value; switching the visible light on and off caused 20-fold changes. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Generation of a crowned pinion tooth surface by a surface of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    A method of generating crowned pinion tooth surfaces using a surface of revolution is developed. The crowned pinion meshes with a regular involute gear and has a prescribed parabolic type of transmission errors when the gears operate in the aligned mode. When the gears are misaligned the transmission error remains parabolic with the maximum level still remaining very small (less than 0.34 arc sec for the numerical examples). Tooth contact analysis (TCA) is used to simulate the conditions of meshing, determine the transmission error, and determine the bearing contact.

  3. A Simple Technique for Fabricating a Screw-Retained/Cemented Implant-Supported Crown.

    PubMed

    Helvey, Gregg A

    2017-03-01

    Many factors figure into the long-term success of an implant-supported restoration. While some are uncontrollable, others are manageable. The cement-retained implant-supported restoration is easier to fabricate, while the screw-retained implant-supported restoration involves more complicated, timeconsuming laboratory procedures. Most research has found the screw-retained restoration has had more minimal complications than the cement-retained counterpart. This article describes a simple, low-cost technique of converting a cement-retained implant crown to a screw-retained implant crown, which allows for easy retrievability and eliminates a number of laboratory steps and costs.

  4. A Highly Effective Strategy for Encapsulating Potassium Cations in Small Crown Ether Rings on a Dinuclear Palladium Complex.

    PubMed

    Lucio-Martínez, Fátima; Bermúdez, Brais; Ortigueira, Juan M; Adams, Harry; Fernández, Alberto; Pereira, M Teresa; Vila, José M

    2017-03-16

    The potential of 15-crown-5 ethers to link large cations, such as potassium, is limited by the quasi-parallel arrangement of two oxygen donor moieties upon appropriate orientation of the corresponding ether-ring-containing molecules. Substrates bearing the two crown ethers that are capable of achieving such coordination are hitherto unknown. The synthesis and isolation of a tailor-made dinuclear palladacycle bearing 15-crown-5 ether rings on the metallated phenyls offers such a possibility, providing the adequate environment for the formation of the sandwiched [K(metallacycle-15-crown-5)2 ] moiety. This synthetic strategy also culminates in the isolation of the first palladacycle able to entrap a potassium cation through bonding to two 15-crown-5 ether rings in a single molecule.

  5. The effect of incomplete crown ferrules on fracture resistance and failure modes of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with quartz fiber post, composite core, and crowns

    PubMed Central

    Muangamphan, Panorjit; Sattapan, Boonrat; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Thammasitboon, Kewalin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the fracture resistance of restored endodontically treated teeth (RETT) with fiber posts, cores, and crowns with limited ferrules. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically treated and decoronated 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction, and then divided into 6 groups of 10 teeth each; Group circumferential ferrule (2FR), Group ferrule in the labial, mesial, and palatal region (2FR-LaMPa), Group ferrule in the labial, and palatal region (2FR-LaPa), Group 2FR-Pa and 2FR-La respectively, and Group 0FR (no ferrule). All 60 prepared teeth were then restored with quartz fiber posts, resin composite cores, and metal crowns. The specimens were subjected to load until failure occurred. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The mode of failure was determined under a stereoscope. Results: A statistical significant difference was found among groups 2FR-LaMPa, 2FR-Pa, 2FR-LaPa, and 2FR from the group 2FR-La, and from the group 0FR (P < 0.01). The predominant mode of failure was an oblique palatal to labial root fracture for the groups with remaining ferrules. Conclusion: For RETT that have incomplete crown ferrules, the location of the ferrules may affect their fracture resistance. PMID:26069401

  6. Individual tree crown delineation using localized contour tree method and airborne LiDAR data in coniferous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Yu, Bailang; Wu, Qiusheng; Huang, Yan; Chen, Zuoqi; Wu, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    Individual tree crown delineation is of great importance for forest inventory and management. The increasing availability of high-resolution airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data makes it possible to delineate the crown structure of individual trees and deduce their geometric properties with high accuracy. In this study, we developed an automated segmentation method that is able to fully utilize high-resolution LiDAR data for detecting, extracting, and characterizing individual tree crowns with a multitude of geometric and topological properties. The proposed approach captures topological structure of forest and quantifies topological relationships of tree crowns by using a graph theory-based localized contour tree method, and finally segments individual tree crowns by analogy of recognizing hills from a topographic map. This approach consists of five key technical components: (1) derivation of canopy height model from airborne LiDAR data; (2) generation of contours based on the canopy height model; (3) extraction of hierarchical structures of tree crowns using the localized contour tree method; (4) delineation of individual tree crowns by segmenting hierarchical crown structure; and (5) calculation of geometric and topological properties of individual trees. We applied our new method to the Medicine Bow National Forest in the southwest of Laramie, Wyoming and the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in the central portion of the Cascade Range of Oregon, U.S. The results reveal that the overall accuracy of individual tree crown delineation for the two study areas achieved 94.21% and 75.07%, respectively. Our method holds great potential for segmenting individual tree crowns under various forest conditions. Furthermore, the geometric and topological attributes derived from our method provide comprehensive and essential information for forest management.

  7. Five-year results of a prospective randomised controlled clinical trial of posterior computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Passia, N; Stampf, S; Strub, J R

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical outcome of shrinkage-free ZrSiO4 -ceramic full-coverage crowns on premolars and molars in comparison with conventional gold crowns over a 5-year period. Two hundred and twenty-three patients were included and randomly divided into two treatment groups. One hundred and twenty-three patients were restored with 123 ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns, and 100 patients received 100 gold crowns, which served as the control. All crowns were conventionally cemented with glass-ionomer cement. After an observation period of 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months, the survival probability (Kaplan-Meier) for the shrinkage-free ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns was 98·3%, 92·0%, 84·7%, 79% and 73·2% and for the gold crowns, 99%, 97·9%, 95·7%, 94·6% and 92·3%, respectively. The difference between the test and control group was statistically significant (P = 0·0027). The gold crowns showed a better marginal integrity with less marginal discoloration than the ceramic crowns. The most common failure in the ceramic crown group was fracture of the crown. The 60-month results of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial suggest that the use of these shrinkage-free ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns in posterior tooth restorations cannot be recommended.

  8. Effects of Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology on Precision of Clinical Metal-Free Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki-Hong; Yeo, In-Sung; Wu, Benjamin M.; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kwon, Taek-Ka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the marginal fit of metal-free crowns made by three different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems. Materials and Methods. The maxillary left first premolar of a dentiform was prepared for all-ceramic crown restoration. Thirty all-ceramic premolar crowns were made, ten each manufactured by the Lava system, Cercon, and Cerec. Ten metal ceramic gold (MCG) crowns served as control. The marginal gap of each sample was measured under a stereoscopic microscope at 75x magnification after cementation. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan's post hoc test were used for data analysis at the significance level of 0.05. Results. The mean (standard deviation) marginal gaps were 70.5 (34.4) μm for the MCG crowns, 87.2 (22.8) μm for Lava, 58.5 (17.6) μm for Cercon, and 72.3 (30.8) μm for Cerec. There were no significant differences in the marginal fit among the groups except that the Cercon crowns had significantly smaller marginal gaps than the Lava crowns (P < 0.001).  Conclusions. Within the limitation of this study, all the metal-free restorations made by the digital CAD/CAM systems had clinically acceptable marginal accuracy. PMID:26557681

  9. Bauhaus, Crown Hall, FAU: A Comparative Investigation of the Curriculum Design in Schools of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulrooney, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    One of the central themes addressed by this paper is the design of the curriculum for architectural education using three schools of architecture: the Bauhaus in Dessau, Crown Hall in Chicago and the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism (FAU) in Sao Paulo. It also reflects on the practices in other schools such as Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin…

  10. Temperature, Moisture, and Fungicide Effects in Managing Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugar Beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugar beet. To assess the capacity at which other anastomosis groups (AGs) are able to infect sugar beet, 15 AGs and subgroups were tested for pathogenicity on resistant (FC708 CMS) and susceptible (Monohikari) seedl...

  11. Rainforest air-conditioning: the moderating influence of epiphytes on the microclimate in tropical tree crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuntz, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Zotz, Gerhard

    2002-05-01

    Epiphytes are often assumed to influence the microclimatic conditions of the tree crowns that they inhabit. In order to quantify this notion, we measured the parameters "temperature" (of the substrate surface and the boundary layer of air above it), "evaporative drying rate" and "evapotranspiration" at various locations within tree crowns with differing epiphyte assemblages. The host tree species was Annona glabra, which was either populated by one of three epiphyte species ( Dimerandra emarginata, Tillandsia fasciculata, or Vriesea sanguinolenta) or was epiphyte-free. We found that during the hottest and driest time of day, microsites in the immediate proximity of epiphytes had significantly lower temperatures than epiphyte-bare locations within the same tree crown, even though the latter were also shaded by host tree foliage or branches. Moreover, water loss through evaporative drying at microsites adjacent to epiphytes was almost 20% lower than at exposed microsites. We also found that, over the course of several weeks, the evapotranspiration in tree crowns bearing epiphytes was significantly lower than in trees without epiphytes. Although the influence of epiphytes on temperature extremes and evaporation rates is relatively subtle, their mitigating effect could be of importance for small animals like arthropods inhabiting an environment as harsh and extreme as the tropical forest canopy.

  12. Mycoleptodiscus Crown and Root Rot of Alfalfa: An Emerging Problem in Minnesota and Wisconsin?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoleptodiscus crown and root rot was observed on alfalfa plants from southeastern MN and southwestern WI during the summer of 2009. The disease was observed in new plantings and established stands. Although the disease has been known since the 1950's, it has not caused severe problems in alfalfa p...

  13. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  14. Sugar Beet Resistance to Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot: Where does it fit in?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), Rhizoctonia root- or crown-rot is caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG-2-2). Seedling damping-off in sugar beet is caused by R. solani of both anastomosis groups, AG-2-2 and AG-4. Rhizoctonia solani subgroup AG-2-2 IV had been considered to be the primary cause of Rhi...

  15. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  16. Postharvet losses associated with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot of sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the prevalence of Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) increases, more diseased sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots are destined for storage piles. To investigate the effect of RCRR on storage properties, roots with similar symptoms were grouped and extractable sucrose, invert sugar, and respirat...

  17. Assessment of inoculation methods to identify resistance to Fusarium crown rot in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown rot, caused by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium pseudograminearum, is one of the most pervasive diseases of wheat throughout the world. F. culmorum is the most prevalent causal agent in Turkey while F. pseudograminearum is the most predominant in the US. Consistent and reliable screening methods...

  18. Crop damage from Sclerotinia crown rot and risk factors in pyrethrum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia crown rot, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. minor, is a prevalent disease in pyrethrum fields in Australia. Management involves the application of fungicides during the rosette stage of plant development during autumn to early spring in fields approaching first-harvest, althoug...

  19. Dizincation of a 2-substituted thiophene: constructing a cage with a [16]crown-4 zincocyclic core.

    PubMed

    Balloch, Liam; Garden, Jennifer A; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E; Rantanen, Toni; Robertson, Stuart D; Snieckus, Victor

    2012-07-09

    Metal detector: a bowl-shaped nanomolecule (see picture; S yellow, C gray, Zn blue) containing an unprecedented 16-atom [ZnC(3)](4) "anti-crown" ring has been unearthed by isolating a dizincated 2-substituted thiophene intermediate that would normally be hidden in tandem functionalization methodology.

  20. 30 CFR 250.404 - What are the requirements for the crown block?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.404 What are the requirements for the crown block... block. You must check the device for proper operation at least once per week and after each...