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Sample records for all-inside meniscal repair

  1. Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyoung Ho

    2014-01-01

    The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well. PMID:24944971

  2. All-inside arthroscopic suturing technique for meniscal ruptures.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Nikica; Dovzak-Bajs, Ivana; Bilić, Vide; Darabos, Anela; Popović, Iva; Cengić, Tomislav

    2012-03-01

    The most frequent indication for surgical treatment of the knee is lesion of the meniscus. The "all inside" arthroscopic technique with bioresorptive material for meniscus lesion is becoming the most popular treatment. This prospective study included 10 patients with posterior meniscal horn lesion operatively treated at Sports Traumatology Department. The "all inside" technique was performed by intra-articular application of bioresorptive pins-Darts sticks or Meniscus Viper and bioresorptive string. Patients were followed up for 2-6 months postoperatively and graded according to the IKDC 2000 scale. All surgical treatments showed satisfactory results. Young patients with acute longitudinal peripheral lesion-posterior horn lesions, in the red-red or red-white meniscal zone, 1-2 centimeters long are most appropriate for this type of treatment. In these patients, this technique proved to be superior and free from the risk of neurovascular damage. For better authentication of this conclusion, additional prospective randomized studies should be performed. PMID:22920001

  3. Editorial Commentary: All-Inside or Inside-Out Meniscal Repair for the Posterior Thirds in Meniscus Allograft Transplantation? Which to Choose and What Difference It Makes.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Performing an all-inside repair or inside-out fixation for the posterior third in meniscus allograft transplantation is discussed. Less invasiveness is always important when the results are the same, and surgeons' personal experience may be a determining factor for this procedure. PMID:26814392

  4. The Results of All-Inside Meniscus Repair Using the Viper Repair System Simultaneously with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Kwang Mee; Cho, Hang Hwan; Espinosa, Johnsel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Meniscus tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. It is essential to repair meniscal tears as much as possible to prevent early osteoarthritis and to gain additional stability in the knee joint. We evaluated the results of arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System (Arthrex) on meniscus tears simultaneously with ACL reconstruction. Methods Nineteen out of 22 patients who were treated with arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair System for meniscus tear associated with ACL rupture were evaluated. ACL reconstructions were performed at the same period. The mean follow-up period was 16.5 months (range, 12 to 24 months). The clinical results of the meniscus repair were evaluated by symptoms (such as catching or locking), tenderness, effusion, range of motion limitation, and the McMurray test. Clinical success was defined by negative results in all five categories. The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was evaluated. Objective results were evaluated with secondary look arthroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results were categorized as completely repaired, incompletely repaired, and failure by Henning's classification. The results of second-look arthroscopy were evaluated with the criteria of meniscal healing. Results The clinical success rate was 95.4% and the HSS scores were 93.9 ± 5.4 at the final follow-up. According to Henning's classification, 15 out of 18 cases showed complete healing (83.3%) and two cases (11.1%) showed incomplete healing. Seventeen out of 18 cases that underwent second-look arthroscopy showed complete healing (94.4%) according to the criteria of meniscal healing. Only one case showed failure and the failure was due to a re-rupture at the sutured area. Complications of ACL reconstruction or meniscus repair were not present. Conclusions The results demonstrate that arthroscopic all-inside repair using the Meniscal Viper Repair

  5. An All-Inside Repair for Full Radial Posterior Lateral Meniscus Tears.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Tabuchi, Kousuke; Noguchi, Kouji; Inoue, Takashi; Katouda, Michihiro; Murakami, Hidetaka; Horibe, Shuji

    2016-02-01

    There is controversy about the treatment for unstable full radial posterior lateral meniscus tears, particularly that involving the posterior root. Some surgeons have advocated repairing these types of meniscus tears using various techniques, but their methods are somewhat technical. We developed the technique for an all-inside repair for full radial posterior lateral meniscus tears using the Meniscal Viper (Arthrex, Naples, FL). A doubled thread is passed through 1 edge of the radial tear by the Meniscal Viper and is kept in place without tying the knot. The Meniscal Viper is used again to set a new thread, repeating the same procedure to another edge of the tear. At this step, 2 doubled threads are passed through each stump of the tear, and both a loop end and 2 free ends of each thread are located outside of the joint. Then, 2 doubled threads pass the third thread into its own loop, pulling it out. Finally, the third thread becomes the mattress suture over the radial tear site and is fastened by sliding knot techniques. This procedure makes it easy to strictly, smoothly, and less invasively shorten the gap by drawing each stump of the meniscus in the direction of the circumference. PMID:27274444

  6. Repairing Posteromedial Meniscocapsular Separation: A Technique Using Inside-Out Meniscal Repair Needles

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anant; Usman, Sajeer; Sabnis, Bhushan; Kini, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Posteromedial meniscocapsular separation of the knee has received renewed interest, with many articles describing a high incidence in association with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Various techniques have been described to address these lesions using all-inside meniscal repair sutures or using rotator cuff repair instruments through the posteromedial portal. Most orthopaedic surgeons are accustomed to using the “inside-out” meniscal repair technique with a double-armed suture. This technique is cost-effective and, in our opinion, more efficient in repairing such tears. We present our technique of repairing peripheral meniscocapsular lesions using an inside-out meniscal repair system. We believe that this technique is easily reproducible, is less time-consuming, and ensures a good “bite” of the capsular tissue, producing a robust repair. PMID:27073773

  7. Meniscal repair using the Polysorb Meniscal Stapler XLS.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Michael A; Chisar, Michael A

    2005-09-01

    We present our technique of repair of meniscal tears in 11 patients using a newly designed stapler, the Polysorb Meniscal Stapler XLS (USS Sports Medicine, Norwalk, CT), to increase the effectiveness and ease of repair of tears in the vascular zone while limiting potential complications. The low-profile stapler comes with a reloadable pistol grip device and a disposable straight or 15 degrees upcurved shaft with a single preloaded 10-mm staple. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals were used, along with a superomedial portal for inflow. The portal was enlarged slightly to facilitate introduction of the cannula or the stapler directly into the knee. The nose of the stapler was applied to the superior surface of the inner edge of the meniscal tear. The sharp points on the tip of the nose were used to manipulate the inner edge and coapt the tear site. Firm pressure was applied to the meniscal tissue, and the nose of the stapler was embedded in the inner edge of the meniscus no more than 2 to 3 mm from the tear (as measured along the meniscal surface). The handle was pulled slowly as the staple engaged the meniscal tissue. This step was repeated every 3 to 4 mm to ensure ideal tear stabilization. PMID:16171646

  8. Arthroscopic meniscal repair and needle aspiration for meniscal tear with meniscal cyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ko-Hsiu

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with meniscal cysts of the meniscus usually requires surgery. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the involved torn meniscus with intra-articular cyst drainage has become the accepted intervention. However, if the meniscal tear is peripheral, a lot of healthy meniscal tissue is needlessly sacrificed with subtotal meniscectomy. Moreover, the meniscal cyst is not a true cyst, so it may be treated more conservatively after the underlying disease has been corrected. We report a case of a meniscal cyst arising from the anterior segment of the lateral torn meniscus that was arthroscopically repaired with an outside-in technique. With the use of a 19-gauge long needle to penetrate the peripheral rim inframeniscally, a nonabsorbable No. 3-0 nylon suture was passed into the joint and brought out suprameniscally to loop the meniscal fragment. The second suture was passed and was used to secure the meniscal rim and fragment by the same means approximately 8 to 10 mm from the first one. Then the cyst was aspirated. A good result was obtained, and no recurrence of the cyst or mechanical problems occurred after a follow-up of 14 months. PMID:17157745

  9. Meniscal Root Tears: Identification and Repair.

    PubMed

    Doherty, David B; Lowe, Walter R

    2016-01-01

    Intact menisci are capable of converting the axial load of tibiofemoral contact into hoop stress that protects the knee joint. Total meniscectomy leads to rapid degeneration of the knee. Strong clinical and biomechanical data show meniscal root tears and avulsions are the functional equivalent of total meniscectomy. Lateral root tears commonly occur with knee ligament sprains and tears. Medial root tears are generally more chronic, and can be caused by preexisting knee arthritis. Meniscal root repair is indicated when there is identification of a meniscal root tear in a knee with minimal to no arthritis. Chronic root tears in the setting of osteoarthritis are treated conservatively. Meniscal root tears can acutely occur with cruciate ligament tears, can exaggerate symptoms of instability, and will have negative ramifications on outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction if not addressed concomitantly. In this review, we describe the importance of the menisci for knee joint longevity through anatomy and biomechanics, the diagnostic workup, and ultimately a transosseous technique for repair of meniscal root tears and avulsions. PMID:27004274

  10. Repair of avascular meniscal injuries using juvenile meniscal fragments: an in vitro organ culture study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhu; Li, Kanghua; Chen, Zhiwei; Liao, Ying; Yang, Lezhong; Liu, Chunlei; Ding, Wenjun

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether the implantation of juvenile allograft and minced meniscal fragments could improve the healing of avascular meniscal injuries, which cannot heal spontaneously. Concentric cylindrical explants were excised from the inner two-thirds of swine medial menisci. The inner cylinder consisted of a "sandwich" structure, with minced juvenile meniscal fragments, juvenile meniscal columns, minced mature meniscal fragments, or mature meniscal columns implanted in the middle. The explants were cultured in vitro for 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Interfacial meniscal repair was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry, biomechanical testing, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Histology and confocal microscopy results revealed that tissue repair and cell accumulation at the interface were best at all time points in the juvenile meniscal fragments group, followed by the juvenile columns, minced mature fragments, and mature columns groups, respectively. At 6 weeks, the implantation of juvenile allograft and minced meniscal fragments increased the shear strength, peak force, and energy to failure in the peripheral interface. Picosirius red/polarized light microscopy and immunohistochemistry results showed concurrent expression of type I and II collagen in the interfacial repair tissue. In conclusion, implantation of juvenile allograft and minced meniscal fragments could increase the healing of avascular meniscal injury in vitro. PMID:23813750

  11. The Optimal Placement of Sutures in All-inside Repair of Meniscocapsular Separation

    PubMed Central

    Tiftikci, Uğur; Serbest, Sancar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to show the effects on the meniscus of repair applied from the femoral, the femoral-tibial and the tibial surfaces. Methods: In the treatment of meniscocapsular separation, although the accepted gold standard technique in the past was the inside-out suture technique, the current treatment method is all-inside repair methods. The all-inside techniques include the hook method and applications with a meniscus suture device. The hook method is difficult with a steep learning curve. In meniscus repair applied with the all-inside meniscus devices, the application of the suture can change the anatomic structure and position of the meniscus. Results: The suturing method applied from the tibial section of the meniscus does not disrupt the anatomic position of the meniscus in meniscocapsular separation. Thus, the optimum conditions are provided for restoration of the functions of the meniscus. Conclusion: The optimal repair in meniscocapsular separations can be considered to be that made with sutures from the tibial section of the meniscus. This technique may be helpful in obtaining better clinical results. PMID:27347236

  12. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Meniscal Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Lauren; Moulton, Samuel G.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare subjective clinical outcomes in patients requiring arthroscopic transtibial pullout repair for posterior meniscus root tears of the medial and lateral menisci. We hypothesized that improvement in function and activity level would be similar among patients undergoing lateral and medial meniscal root repairs. Methods: This study was IRB approved. All patients who underwent posterior meniscal root repair by a single orthopaedic surgeon were included in this study. Detailed operative data were documented at surgery. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire, including Lysholm score, Tegner activity scale, WOMAC, SF-12 and patient satisfaction with outcome, which were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of two years postoperatively. Failure was defined as any patient who underwent revision meniscal root repair or partial meniscectomy following the index surgery. Results: There were 50 patients (16 females, 34 males) with a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16.6-65.7) and a mean BMI of 27.3 (range, 20.5-49.2) included in this study. Fifteen patients underwent lateral meniscus root repair and 35 patients underwent medial meniscus root repair. Three patients who underwent lateral meniscus root repair required revision meniscus root repair surgery, while no patients who underwent medial meniscus root repair required revision surgery (p=0.26). There was a significant difference in preoperative and postoperative Lysholm score (53 vs. 78) (p<0.001), Tegner activity scale (2.0 vs. 4.0) (p=0.03), SF-12 physical component subscale (38 vs. 50) (p=0.001) and WOMAC (36 vs. 8) (p<0.001) for the total population. Median patient satisfaction with outcome was 9 (range, 1-10). There was no significant difference in mean age between lateral and medial root repair groups (32 vs. 40) (p=0.12) or gender (p=0.19). There was no significant difference in gender between lateral and medial root repair groups (p=0.95). There was a

  13. Effects of medial meniscal posterior horn avulsion and repair on meniscal displacement.

    PubMed

    Hein, Christopher N; Deperio, Jennifer Gurske; Ehrensberger, Mark T; Marzo, John M

    2011-06-01

    Medial meniscal posterior root avulsion (MMRA) leads to deleterious alteration of medial joint compartment loading profiles and increased risk of medial degenerative changes. Surgical repair restores more normal biomechanics to the knee. Our hypothesis is that MMRA will cause medial meniscal (MM) extrusion and gap formation between the root attachment site and MM. Meniscal root repair will restore the ability of the meniscus to resist extrusion, and reduce gap formation at the defect. Seven fresh frozen human cadaveric knees were dissected and mechanically loaded using a servo-hydraulic load frame (MTS ®) with 0 and 1800 N. The knees were tested under three conditions: native, avulsed, and repaired. Four measurements were obtained: meniscal displacement anteriorly, medially, posteriorly, and gap distance between the root attachment site and MM after transection and repair. The medial displacement of the avulsed MM (3.28 mm) was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the native knee (1.60mm) and repaired knee (1.46 mm). Gap formation is significantly larger in the avulsed compared to repaired state at 0 (p < 0.02) and 1800N (p < 0.02) and also larger with loading in both avulsed (p < 0.05) and repaired (p < 0.02) conditions. Therefore, MMRA results in MM extrusion from the joint and gap formation between the MM root and the MM. Subsequent surgical repair reduces meniscal displacement and gap formation at the defect. PMID:20684881

  14. Meniscal Root Tear Repair: Why, When and How?

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Pellegrino, Pietro; D’Amelio, Andrea; Cottino, Umberto; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of the meniscal root insertions is fundamental to preserve correct knee kinematics and avoid degenerative changes of the knee. Injuries to the meniscal attachments can lead to meniscal extrusion, decreased contact surface, increased cartilage stress, and ultimately articular degeneration. Recent and well designed studies have clarified the anatomy and biomechanics of the medial and lateral meniscal roots. Although the treatment of meniscal root tears is still controversial, many different techniques have been described for root repair. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding meniscal root tears, including anatomy, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common surgical techniques, together with the clinical outcomes, are described. PMID:26330993

  15. New meniscus repair by an all-inside knot suture technique.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazumasa; Okano, Tatsumasa; Negishi, Shinichi; Horaguchi, Takashi; Sato, Kenji; Saito, Akiyoshi; Ryu, Junnosuke

    2005-06-01

    The indications for the all-inside knot suture technique include tears in the red-red zone or red-white zone in the meniscus, and a horizontal tear, a vertical tear, and a peripheral tear. First, find an appropriate place for a suture insertion site with a Kateran needle or a spinal needle. Make sure it exits beyond the tear in the meniscus. Once the insertion site is chosen, a suture is passed into and through the joint. The suture is slowly pulled back. You should be able to feel the tip of the suture come out of the joint capsule. If you want to make a vertical suture to suture the tear, move the suture vertically apex. Then insert the suture back into the joint through the capsule. Make sure the suture stays inside the joint. Find and grab the suture with a punch inserted from the clear cannula. Pull the suture out of the joint through the clear cannula with the punch. Tighten the knot with a knot pusher. Then confirm the stability of the sutured site with the probe. Our all-inside knot suture technique can be performed arthroscopically, allowing reliable repair of the torn meniscus. PMID:15944646

  16. Meniscal injury: II. Management.

    PubMed

    Greis, Patrick E; Holmstrom, Michael C; Bardana, Davide D; Burks, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    Meniscal repair is a viable alternative to resection in many clinical situations. Repair techniques traditionally have utilized a variety of suture methods, including inside-out and outside-in techniques. Bioabsorbable implants permit all-inside arthroscopic repairs. The success of meniscal repair depends on appropriate meniscal bed preparation and surgical technique and is also influenced by biologic factors such as tear rim width and associated ligamentous injury. Successful repair in >80% of cases has been reported in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Success rates are lower for isolated repairs. Complications related to repair include neurologic injury, postoperative loss of motion, recurrence of the tear, and infection. Meniscal allograft transplantation may provide a treatment option when meniscus salvage is not possible or when a previous total meniscectomy has been done. PMID:12041939

  17. Arthroscopic Saucerization and Repair of Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tear.

    PubMed

    Fields, Logan K; Caldwell, Paul E

    2015-04-01

    Meniscal tears are among the most commonly diagnosed knee injuries and often require surgical intervention. Understanding the types of meniscal tears and treatment options is paramount to caring for the young athlete. Sports medicine and arthroscopic physicians now recognize that meniscal preservation in the young athlete is essential to the long-term health and function of the knee. Although uncommon, the discoid lateral meniscus is more prone to injury because of its increased thickness and lack of blood supply. Because of the abnormal development, the peripheral attachments are frequently absent and instability often persists after a partial meniscectomy. If the instability is unrecognized during the initial treatment, a recurrence of pain and mechanical symptoms is likely and a subsequent subtotal meniscectomy may be the only treatment option. With increased awareness, arthroscopic saucerization accompanied by arthroscopically assisted inside-out meniscal repair is a preferable treatment option with an excellent outcome. PMID:26052498

  18. Arthroscopic Saucerization and Repair of Discoid Lateral Meniscal Tear

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Logan K.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are among the most commonly diagnosed knee injuries and often require surgical intervention. Understanding the types of meniscal tears and treatment options is paramount to caring for the young athlete. Sports medicine and arthroscopic physicians now recognize that meniscal preservation in the young athlete is essential to the long-term health and function of the knee. Although uncommon, the discoid lateral meniscus is more prone to injury because of its increased thickness and lack of blood supply. Because of the abnormal development, the peripheral attachments are frequently absent and instability often persists after a partial meniscectomy. If the instability is unrecognized during the initial treatment, a recurrence of pain and mechanical symptoms is likely and a subsequent subtotal meniscectomy may be the only treatment option. With increased awareness, arthroscopic saucerization accompanied by arthroscopically assisted inside-out meniscal repair is a preferable treatment option with an excellent outcome. PMID:26052498

  19. Outcome of repaired unstable meniscal tears in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unstable meniscal tears are rare injuries in skeletally immature patients. Loss of a meniscus increases the risk of subsequent development of degenerative changes in the knee. This study deals with the outcome of intraarticular meniscal repair and factors that affect healing. Parameters of interest were type and location of the tear and also the influence of simultaneous reconstruction of a ruptured ACL. Methods We investigated the outcome of 25 patients (29 menisci) aged 15 (4–17) years who underwent surgery for full thickness meniscal tears, either as isolated lesions or in combination with ACL ruptures. Intraoperative documentation followed the IKDC 2000 standard. Outcome measurements were the Tegner score (pre- and postoperatively) and the Lysholm score (postoperatively) after an average follow-up period of 2.3 years, with postoperative arthroscopy and MRT in some cases. Results 24 of the 29 meniscal lesions healed (defined as giving an asymptomatic patient) regardless of location or type. 4 patients re-ruptured their menisci (all in the pars intermedia) at an average of 15 months after surgery following a new injury. Mean Lysholm score at follow-up was 95, the Tegner score deteriorated, mean preoperative score: 7.8 (4–10); mean postoperative score: 7.2 (4–10). Patients with simultaneous ACL reconstruction had a better outcome. Interpretation All meniscal tears in the skeletally immature patient are amenable to repair. All recurrent meniscal tears in our patients were located in the pars intermedia; the poorer blood supply in this region may give a higher risk of re-rupture. Simultaneous ACL reconstruction appears to benefit the results of meniscal repair. PMID:22616744

  20. Results of meniscectomy and meniscal repair in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; COTTINO, UMBERTO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A deficient medial meniscus results in knee instability and could lead to higher stress forces on the ACL reconstruction. Comparison of results in meniscectomy and meniscal repairs revealed worse clinical outcomes in meniscectomy, but higher re-operation rates in meniscal repairs. Our aim was to review the results of ACL reconstruction associated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. PMID:26889472

  1. Time Interval between Trauma and Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair Has No Influence on Clinical Survival.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Robert J P; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the gold standard for longitudinal peripheral meniscal tears. The time interval between trauma and meniscal repair remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate failure rates and clinical outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in relation to chronicity of injury. A total of 238 meniscal repairs were performed in 234 patients. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was reconstructed in almost all ACL-deficient knees (130 out of 133). Time interval between injury and repair was divided into acute (< 2 weeks), subacute (> 2 to < 12 weeks), and chronic (> 12 weeks). Patients completed postal questionnaires to evaluate clinical outcome and failure rates. Study instruments included Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Tegner scoring systems. At a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range [IQR], 34-53 months) 55 medial and 10 lateral meniscal repairs failed (overall failure rate, 27%). There was a significant higher failure rate for medial meniscal repair (p < 0.05) and ACL-deficient knees without ACL reconstruction. Functional outcome scores showed only significant differences on the KOOS subscale "function in daily living" (95% confidence interval, 1.05-15.27, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for any interval between trauma and repair. The interval between trauma and arthroscopic meniscal repair has no influence on the failure rate. Differences in survival rate of meniscal repair are more dependent on location of the lesion and ACL status, rather than chronicity of injury. PMID:26516071

  2. Meniscal repair following meniscectomy: mechanism and protective effect. Experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Berjon, J J; Munuera, L; Calvo, M

    1990-01-01

    Meniscal repair was studied to evaluate the mechanism and its potential protective effects on the articular cartilage in an experimental model consisting of 68 knees of adult dogs on which five different types of medial meniscectomy were performed. The results were assessed by macroscopic, microangiographic, and histological methods, after a sequential follow-up period of 10-450 days. Two different mechanisms of meniscal repair were observed, depending on whether meniscal section had been performed in vascular (total meniscectomy) or avascular (subtotal or partial meniscectomy) zones. It was also observed that the repaired meniscal tissue does not prevent articular cartilage degeneration. This is more closely related to the size of the meniscal fragment preserved at meniscectomy. Due to the biomechanical importance of the meniscus and the lack of functional relevance of the repaired meniscal tissue, the most conservative approach possible to meniscectomy is recommended. PMID:1703666

  3. FUNCTIONAL EVOLUTION OF MENISCAL REPAIR USING ABSORBABLE IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Waldo Lino

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the functional evolution of knees after repair of longitudinal meniscal rupture with absorbable arrow implant. Methods: Between June 1997 and February 2001, 23 patients with a mean age of 26.3 years were evaluated. The mean follow-up time was 72.87 months (45-96). We performed 19 medial and 4 lateral meniscal repairs. The patients were pre and postoperatively evaluated regarding joint function according to the Lysholm scale, and, postoperatively, according to IKDC. Results: For better understanding, the 23 treated cases were divided into three groups. Twenty one had ACL injuries, eleven of whom were submitted to ligament reconstruction (Group I). All these 11 cases were regarded as satisfactory. The remaining 10 cases of the 21 with ACL lesion were not submitted to ligament reconstruction (Group II). Of these, 5 evolved satisfactorily, not requiring ligament reconstruction. The remaining five evolved with complaint of ligament instability, being all submitted to reconstruction. Four of these had an integral meniscus and one presented a failure of the medial meniscus. The remaining two cases who did not present ACL injury (Group III), one patient evolved satisfactorily and one developed a failure of the lateral meniscus. According to the Lysholm scale, preoperative mean score was 57.53 and the postoperative mean score was 86.95, evidencing a statistically significant improvement (Wilcoxon p < 0.01). The non-parametric ANOVA was employed for ordinal data with repeated measurements to assess pre- and postoperative measurements, considering Groups I and II. We assessed knee stabilization and found no statistically significant difference between Groups I and II (p = 0.648). Even if there were differences between the two groups, both had the same behavior. On postoperative assessment with IKDC, 4 patients were grade A, 13 were grade B, and 6 were grade C. Two C results were caused by a meniscal rupture. Conclusion: Of the 23 patients, only two presented known

  4. Meniscal Repair of Degenerative Horizontal Cleavage Tears Using Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Tamiko; Kimura, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presently, the treatment options available for patients with horizontal degenerative cleavage tears of the meniscus are limited. These tears are considered an indication for partial or subtotal meniscectomy because when the tear is located within an avascular area, it is difficult to induce healing. However, meniscectomy is not ideal because it disrupts the normal anatomical structure and function of the meniscus. Purpose: To examine the clinical and arthroscopic outcomes following meniscal repair of degenerative horizontal cleavage tears using fibrin clots. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Vertical sutures were placed in the meniscal tear, and the cleft was filled with fibrin clots before the sutures were tightened. We repaired 18 menisci in 18 consecutive eligible patients using a previously described technique. Three patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury who underwent simultaneous ACL reconstruction and 5 patients who did not undergo follow-up arthroscopy within 12 months were excluded. The remaining 10 menisci in 10 patients were evaluated in this study. The mean age of the patients was 35.8 ± 16.5 years, and the mean postoperative follow-up time was 40.8 ± 5.4 months. Pre- and postoperative Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores, and Tegner activity levels were compared. The arthroscopy findings were evaluated at a mean postoperative time of 6.7 ± 2.9 months. Results: The mean Lysholm score improved significantly from 69.3 ± 16.3 points preoperatively to 95.4 ± 3.6 points postoperatively (P < .005). The mean IKDC subjective score also improved significantly from 26.5% ± 19.0% preoperatively to 87.8% ± 7.5% postoperatively (P < .001). The Tegner activity level recovered to the preinjury level in 6 patients and to 1 level below the preinjury level in 4 patients. The follow-up arthroscopies showed complete healing in 7 patients (70%) and incomplete healing in

  5. In Vitro Repair of Meniscal Radial Tear Using Aligned Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Bean, Allison C; Lin, Hang; Nakamura, Norimasa; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-07-01

    Radial tears of the meniscus represent one of the most common injuries of the knee, and result in loss of biomechanical meniscal function. However, there have been no established, effective treatments for radial meniscal tears. Nanofibrous materials produced by electrospinning have shown high promise in the engineering of soft musculoskeletal tissues. The goal of our study is to apply these technologies to develop a functional cell-seeded scaffold as a potential, new surgical method to enhance meniscal radial repair. Cylinder-shaped explants were excised from the inner avascular region of bovine meniscus and a radial tear was created in the center of the explant. The torn site was wrapped with either nanofibrous scaffold alone or scaffold seeded with meniscal fibrochondrocytes (MFC). A control group was prepared as explants without scaffolds or cells. The composite constructs in each group were cultured in vitro for 4 and 8 weeks, and these were then assessed histologically and mechanically. Histological analysis showed partial repair of the radial tear was observed with adherence between scaffold and native meniscal tissue in either the scaffold alone or cell-seeded scaffold group. Only the cell-seeded scaffold exhibited significant positive Picrosirius red staining and Safranin O staining. Mechanical testing of the repaired meniscus showed that the load-to-failure and stiffness values were significantly improved in the cell-seeded group. These results demonstrated the applicability of the MFC-seeded nanofibrous scaffold for meniscal radial tear repair based on both histological and mechanical analyses. In particular, the highly adhesive property of the cell-seeded scaffold to the meniscal tissue should be beneficial in helping to preserve the meniscal function by stabilizing meniscal fibers. PMID:25813386

  6. In Vitro Repair of Meniscal Radial Tear Using Aligned Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Bean, Allison C.; Lin, Hang; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    Radial tears of the meniscus represent one of the most common injuries of the knee, and result in loss of biomechanical meniscal function. However, there have been no established, effective treatments for radial meniscal tears. Nanofibrous materials produced by electrospinning have shown high promise in the engineering of soft musculoskeletal tissues. The goal of our study is to apply these technologies to develop a functional cell-seeded scaffold as a potential, new surgical method to enhance meniscal radial repair. Cylinder-shaped explants were excised from the inner avascular region of bovine meniscus and a radial tear was created in the center of the explant. The torn site was wrapped with either nanofibrous scaffold alone or scaffold seeded with meniscal fibrochondrocytes (MFC). A control group was prepared as explants without scaffolds or cells. The composite constructs in each group were cultured in vitro for 4 and 8 weeks, and these were then assessed histologically and mechanically. Histological analysis showed partial repair of the radial tear was observed with adherence between scaffold and native meniscal tissue in either the scaffold alone or cell-seeded scaffold group. Only the cell-seeded scaffold exhibited significant positive Picrosirius red staining and Safranin O staining. Mechanical testing of the repaired meniscus showed that the load-to-failure and stiffness values were significantly improved in the cell-seeded group. These results demonstrated the applicability of the MFC-seeded nanofibrous scaffold for meniscal radial tear repair based on both histological and mechanical analyses. In particular, the highly adhesive property of the cell-seeded scaffold to the meniscal tissue should be beneficial in helping to preserve the meniscal function by stabilizing meniscal fibers. PMID:25813386

  7. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  8. The Effect of Perioperative Ketorolac on the Clinical Failure Rate of Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Nielson, Jason H.; Zurakowski, David; Micheli, Lyle J.; Curtis, Christine; Murray, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been recent interest in the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications on musculoskeletal healing. No studies have yet addressed the effect of these medications on meniscal healing. Hypothesis: The administration of ketorolac in the perioperative period will result in higher rates of meniscal repair clinical failure. Study design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 110 consecutive patients underwent meniscal repair at our institution between August 1998 and July 2001. Three patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 107 (mean age, 15.9 ± 4.4 years) had a minimum 5-year follow-up (mean follow-up, 5.5 years). Thirty-two patients (30%) received ketorolac perioperatively. The primary outcome measure was reoperation for continued symptoms of meniscal pathology. Asymptomatic patients were evaluated by the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form, Short Form–36 (SF-36) Health Survey, and Knee Outcome Osteoarthritis Score (KOOS). Results: Kaplan-Meier survivorship revealed no difference in reoperation rates with and without the administration of perioperative ketorolac (P = .95). There was an overall failure rate of 35% (37/107 patients), with a 34% failure rate in patients receiving ketorolac (11/32 patients). Multivariable Cox regression confirmed that age, duration of symptoms, meniscal tear type, fixation technique, concurrent anterior cruciate ligament repair, and ketorolac usage did not have an impact on the rate of failure (P > .05 for all; ketorolac use, P > .50). Female sex (P = .04) and medial location (P = .01) were predictive of an increased risk for reoperation. Conclusion: Failure of meniscal repair was not altered with the administration of perioperative ketorolac. Further work studying the effects of longer term anti-inflammatory use after meniscal repair is necessary before stating that this class of medications has no effect on meniscal healing. Clinical

  9. Transosseous Medial Meniscal Root Repair Using a Modified Mason-Allen Suture Configuration.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Caldwell, Paul E; Pearson, Sara E

    2015-12-01

    Medial meniscal tears are among the most common injuries to the knee joint. Loss of the meniscus has been linked to increased contact pressures on the adjacent articular cartilage and progression of degenerative changes in the knee. A subset of tears known as "root tears" involves the insertion of the posterior horn of the meniscus to the bone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for root tears led to undesirable outcomes, which prompted surgeons to explore restorative procedures. Multiple repair techniques have been presented with an emphasis placed on initial secure fixation and stimulation of potential healing. We present an arthroscopic-assisted technique for medial meniscal root repair with these goals in mind. PMID:27284511

  10. The Use of Blood Vessel–Derived Stem Cells for Meniscal Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    OSAWA, AKI; HARNER, CHRISTOPHER D.; GHARAIBEH, BURHAN; MATSUMOTO, TOMOYUKI; MIFUNE, YUTAKA; KOPF, SEBASTIAN; INGHAM, SHEILA J. M.; SCHREIBER, VERENA; USAS, ARVYDAS; HUARD, JOHNNY

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgical repairs of tears in the vascular region of the meniscus usually heal better than repairs performed in the avascular region; thus, we hypothesized that this region might possess a richer supply of vascular-derived stem cells than the avascular region. Methods In this study, we analyzed 6 menisci extracted from aborted human fetuses and 12 human lateral menisci extracted from adult human subjects undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Menisci were immunostained for CD34 (a stem cell marker) and CD146 (a pericyte marker) in situ, whereas other menisci were dissected into two regions (peripheral and inner) and used to isolate meniscus-derived cells by flow cytometry. Cell populations expressing CD34 and CD146 were tested for their multi-lineage differentiation potentials, including chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic lineages. Fetal peripheral meniscus cells were transplanted by intracapsular injection into the knee joints of an athymic rat meniscal tear model. Rat menisci were extracted and histologically evaluated after 4 wk posttransplantation. Results Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometric analyses demonstrated that a higher number of CD34- and CD146-positive cells were found in the peripheral region compared with the inner region. The CD34- and CD146-positive cells isolated from the vascular region of both fetal and adult menisci demonstrated multilineage differentiation capacities and were more potent than cells isolated from the inner (avascular) region. Fetal CD34- and CD146-positive cells transplanted into the athymic rat knee joint were recruited into the meniscal tear sites and contributed to meniscus repair. Conclusions The vascularized region of the meniscus contains more stem cells than the avascular region. These meniscal-derived stem cells were multi-potent and contributed to meniscal regeneration. PMID:23247715

  11. Repair of articular cartilage and meniscal tears by photoactive dyes: in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1996-12-01

    We describe healing results of our 6 month study of a repair procedure which evokes the healing response in meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Welds of incisional flaps in adult sheep meniscus and femoral articular cartilage were made using the dye MBM Gold 012011012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9nm Argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes with approximately 1 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Gross appearance of tissues in all welded knees appeared normal. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections disclosed close bonding of welded areas and continuing healing response as cellular recruitment.

  12. Meniscal repair using a flap of synovium. An experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Kobuna, Y; Shirakura, K; Niijima, M

    1995-01-01

    The healing process of longitudinal lesions in the avascular region of the meniscus was investigated in 42 menisci from 21 dogs. A longitudinal incision was made in the avascular portion of the medial menisci of 21 dogs. In one knee, a flap of synovium was sutured into the wound, and in the other, the wound was sutured as a control. Animals were killed after 1 to 12 weeks, and the menisci were removed and examined by gross inspection, light microscopy, and microangiography. In the control knees, no healing had occurred. In 19 of 21 knees in which a synovial pedicle was used, the suture site did not open at any of the postoperative weeks. The longitudinal lesion was repaired with fibrovascular tissue at 6 weeks, and the vessels over the femoral surface of the menisci and an inner portion of the menisci had reached the suture site. The healing of meniscal lesion occurred due to the use of the vascularized synovial pedicle flap and the neovascularization from the parameniscal area. PMID:7634014

  13. Easy and Safe All-Inside Suture Technique for Posterior Horn Tears of Lateral Meniscus Using Standard Anteromedial and Anterolateral Portals.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Gennaro; de Caro, Francesca; Cepparulo, Riccardo; Guardoli, Alberto; Berni, Luca; Delcogliano, Marco; Ritali, Alice; Guardoli, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the lateral meniscus in weight bearing, distribution of force, shock absorption, articular cartilage protection, proprioception, stabilization of the joint, and joint lubrication is well known. Surgeons currently agree on the importance of preserving the menisci. Different suture techniques have been standardized. These include outside-in, inside-out, and all-inside techniques. The all-inside technique can be used to repair lesions of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. However, this technique presents important disadvantages, such as the necessity for an accessory portal and a high risk of neurovascular damage. For these reasons, we have developed a technique in which a suture hook and a shuttle relay are used to pass the suture wire through the meniscal lesion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus with an all-inside technique, without the use of accessory portals and cannulas, with a standard 30° arthroscopic camera. PMID:24400182

  14. Meniscal ossification.

    PubMed

    Mine, Takatomo; Taguchi, Tosihiko; Ihara, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Moriwaki, Tohru; Kawai, Shinya

    2003-02-01

    Meniscal ossicles are rare in the human knee. We present one case. A 57-year-old taxi driver complained of right knee pain and swelling with radiographic findings of a meniscal ossicle. Arthroscopic inspection showed a degenerative and horizontal tear and calcium deposit at the middle and posterior thirds of lateral discoid meniscus. His lateral discoid meniscus, containing the ossicle, was removed. He was asymptomatic at a 3-year follow-up. PMID:12579140

  15. Effectiveness and biocompatibility of a novel biological adhesive application for repair of meniscal tear on the avascular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takahito; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Imade, Shinji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Uchio, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness and safety of a newly developed biological adhesive for repair of meniscal tear. The adhesive was composed of disuccinimidyl tartrate (DST) as a crosslinker and human serum albumin (HSA) as a hardener. To determine adequate concentration, bonding strength was measured using a tensiometer 5 min after applying the adhesive on the avascular zone tear of porcine meniscus; it was compared with the strengths of commercially available cyanoacrylate-based and fibrin-based adhesives. In vivo examination was performed using Japanese white rabbits, creating longitudinal tears on the avascular zone of meniscus and applying DST-HSA adhesive. Three months after operation the rabbits were sacrificed and tension test and histological evaluation were performed. Bonding strength was measured in three porcine meniscus groups: (i) only suturing, (ii) suturing after applying the adhesive on surface and (iii) suturing using an adhesive-soaked suture. The optimum concentrations were 0.1 mmol of DST and 42 w/v% of HAS. Bonding strength was greatest with cyanoacrylate-based adhesive, followed by DST-HSA adhesive, and fibrin-based adhesive. No inflammation was observed in the synovium or surrounding tissues 3 months after using the DST-HSA adhesive. Bonding strength was greatest with DST-HSA adhesive-soaked suturing group (77 ± 6 N), followed by suturing only group (61 ± 5 N) and surface adhesive application group (60 ± 8 N). The newly developed DST-HSA adhesive is considered safe and may be effective in enforcement of bonding of avascular zone tear of the meniscus.

  16. Arthroscopic all-inside lateral meniscus suture using posterolateral portal.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Oh, Irvin

    2006-05-01

    A new arthroscopic all-inside suture for lateral meniscus posterior horn tear using a single posterolateral portal is described. A lateral meniscus posterior horn peripheral longitudinal tear is often seen with anterior cruciate ligament injury or discoid lateral meniscus tear. Conventional repair methods, such as arthroscopic inside-out, outside-in, or all-inside sutures, can be cumbersome and technically demanding. Our all-inside suture using the posterolateral portal allows thorough visualization of the posterolateral structures, excellent coaptation of torn meniscus, strong knot tightening, and avoidance of inadvertent cartilage injury. The arthroscope is inserted through the anteromedial portal and reaches the posterolateral compartment by a transcondylar approach. A suture hook is introduced into the posterolateral portal without a cannula, penetrates posterior peripheral rim, crosses the tear, and passes through mobile torn fragment. A large amount of No. 0 PDS is passed, so that it curls up inside the joint. After the suture hook is removed, a suture retriever is inserted through the posterolateral portal to pull out 2 ends of the PDS at the same time. The retrieved suture ends are passed through a knot pusher and a 5.5-mm cannula is introduced over the retrieved suture materials for the SMC knot to be tied. A longitudinal tear of lateral meniscus posterior horn is repaired with 2 to 3 sutures. PMID:16651176

  17. Meniscal injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Zedde, Pietro; Mela, Federico; Del Prete, Fabio; Masia, Francesco; Manunta, Andrea F

    2014-01-01

    Basketball is a highly competitive sport in which the knee joint is constantly subject to physical stresses. Basketball-related traumatic injuries are the result of specific technical movements. Even though basketball is not considered a contact sport, injuries in basketball players are due both to athletes' handling of the ball and to their intense physical interaction during games. Nowadays, traumatic meniscal injuries are constantly on the increase, especially in young athletes, and they are generally the result of compressive forces together with knee flexion rotation. Recognition of the great importance of meniscal biomechanics and of the functional role of the meniscus has resulted in the adoption of an increasingly preserving approach, also in the light of the effects, in terms of articular degeneration, of removing meniscal tissue. Even though recent decades have seen considerable developments in arthroscopic meniscectomy techniques, geared at preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible, basketball players undergoing this treatment often present, in the long run, clinical symptomatology severe enough to compromise their participation in competitive sport. Hence the treatment of meniscal injuries in athletes has become more and more preserving in recent years, through recourse to surgical techniques such as meniscal repair, biological replacement implantation and donor meniscus implantation, which allow pain relief, return to competitive activities and stable long-term results, slowing down arthritic progression. Therefore, considering the increasing number of meniscal injuries in basketball players, which can jeopardize their sporting careers, great importance is now attached to early diagnosis and to the correct choice of meniscal injury treatment in these athletes. PMID:25750909

  18. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A.; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  19. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  20. Cranial cruciate ligament repair in dogs with and without meniscal lesions treated by different minimally invasive methods.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, J; Fehr, M

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate different minimally invasive surgical options as therapy for cranial cruciate ligament rupture and resulting meniscal injuries. In this study, 81 stifle joints of dogs with complete or partial rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament were treated with minimally invasive surgery at the Small Animal Clinic of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. The patients were divided into three groups depending on intraoperative diagnosis and the surgical technique applied. The dogs in group I (n = 26) had an isolated rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCLR), while those in groups II (n = 26) and III (n = 29) also had an injury of the medial meniscus. Resection of the damaged meniscal part was performed by arthroscopically guided partial meniscectomy (AGPM) on the dogs in group II, while minimally invasive medial arthrotomy (MIMA) was used on the dogs of group III. All of the stifles were stabilized with a modified lateral imbrication technique using a braided, synthetic, absorbable suture material (Panacryl). Six months after surgery 76.5% of all patients were examined clinically and 74.1% radiographically for evaluation of the success of the different treatment techniques. At this examination, there were no signs of lameness in 42.1% of group I (CCLR), 65.0% of group II (AGPM) and 87.0% of group III (MIMA). Upon palpation, 75.8% of these stifle joints were found to be stable. Radiographic evaluations did not show any indication of progression of gonarthrosis in 73.3% of all stifle joints examined here. PMID:19151866

  1. Lateral Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Trough Technique.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Olivetto, Javier; Dean, Chase S; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The lateral meniscus plays a critical role in the stability and health of the knee. Treating patients who have undergone a total lateral meniscectomy or functional equivalent is challenging, especially young and active patients. Current literature regarding meniscal tears supports that repair should be the first surgical option. Moreover, it is recommended to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible. In cases in which a total or functional meniscectomy is a pre-existing condition, a lateral meniscal allograft transplantation is a possible option. The purpose of this surgical technique description was to detail the method of lateral meniscal allograft transplantation using a bone trough. PMID:27462536

  2. Medial Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Plug Technique.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Olivetto, Javier; Chahla, Jorge; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The medial meniscus is crucial for knee homeostasis. Treating patients who have undergone a subtotal or total meniscectomy, or equivalent irreparable tear pattern, can be extremely challenging, especially in young, active patients. The importance of meniscal preservation has been reported by several authors. Meniscal repair is now widely accepted as the first surgical option for treating medial meniscal tears. Moreover, current guidelines recommend preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible. Treating a symptomatic medial meniscectomized knee is challenging because of limited surgical options. In this context, medial meniscal allograft transplantation arises as the preferred procedure. The purpose of this article was to detail the arthroscopic medial meniscal allograft transplantation technique with the use of 2 bone plugs. PMID:27330948

  3. Arthroscopic revisions in failed meniscal surgery.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Gunter

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to classify meniscal tear forms as found in 195 revision arthroscopies. Interval between primary arthroscopy and revision was 7.8+/-5.6 month. All patients were available for control after 1 year. In 174 knees the lesion was located in the medial meniscus and in 21 knees in the lateral meniscus. In the medial meniscus an unstable posterior meniscal horn was seen in 93 knees followed by incomplete horizontal tear and meniscal destruction in 37. Flap tear, circumferential tear, and failed meniscal repair were also seen. In the lateral meniscus destruction of a discoid meniscus, instability near the popliteal hiatus, and various tear forms were seen with nearly equal frequency. Postoperatively Lysholm score increased significantly in both groups. Most meniscal tears, found in revision arthroscopy, are caused by an insufficient primary operation. A diligent analysis of the tear form is absolutely necessary. An adequate radical resection technique to establish a smooth meniscal crest is indispensable. PMID:12904905

  4. Effect of Microfracture on Meniscal Tear Healing in a Goat (Capra hircus) Model.

    PubMed

    Howarth, William R; Brochard, Kevin; Campbell, Scot E; Grogan, Brian F

    2016-03-01

    Meniscal injuries are an extremely common cause of knee pain. Meniscal repairs performed with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction appear to heal at a higher rate than meniscal repairs performed in isolation. This may be due in part to the release of marrow elements into the knee and the time of meniscal repair. In cases of isolated meniscal repair, some orthopedic surgeons use microfracture to release marrow elements into the joint as an adjunct to enhance meniscal healing. This study evaluated rates of meniscal tear healing with or without the performance of microfracture in a goat (Capra hircus) model. Forty castrated young adult male goats underwent either a horizontal or a longitudinal 1.0-cm meniscal tear with or without microfracture. All procedures were performed open, in a bloodless field. Meniscal tears were created in the peripheral half of the body of the medial meniscus. The goats were euthanized at 6 months, and meniscal tears were analyzed and classified as complete healing, partial healing, or no healing by direct visualization. A probe was used as an aid to evaluate and classify the meniscal tears. Twenty (87%) of 23 goat meniscal tears showed at least partial healing when performed with concomitant microfracture. Only 5 (29%) of 17 menisci showed any healing in goats that did not receive microfracture. This difference in healing rates was statistically significant (P<.001). Fifteen (65%) meniscal tears accomplished with microfracture were completely healed, whereas only 2 (12%) menisci showed complete healing without microfracture (P<.001). The results of this study suggest that the release of bone marrow elements into the knee by microfracture improves meniscal healing rates. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):105-110.]. PMID:26811956

  5. Meniscal allograft transplantation: rationale for treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, N A; Costa, M L; Spalding, T

    2015-05-01

    The anatomy and microstructure of the menisci allow the effective distribution of load across the knee. Meniscectomy alters the biomechanical environment and is a potent risk factor for osteoarthritis. Despite a trend towards meniscus-preserving surgery, many tears are irreparable, and many repairs fail. Meniscal allograft transplantation has principally been carried out for pain in patients who have had a meniscectomy. Numerous case series have reported a significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes after surgery, but randomised controlled trials have not been undertaken. It is scientifically plausible that meniscal allograft transplantation is protective of cartilage, but this has not been established clinically to date. PMID:25922450

  6. Rehabilitation of meniscal injury and surgery.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, John T

    2014-12-01

    Meniscal cartilage plays an essential role in the function and biomechanics of the knee joint. The meniscus functions in load bearing, load transmission, shock absorption, joint stability, joint lubrication, and joint congruity. Individuals today are increasingly more active in later decades of life. Although the incidence of meniscal pathology is difficult to estimate, this increased exposure to athletic activity increases the risk of injury to these structures. Hede and coworkers reported the mean annual incidence of meniscus tears as 9.0 in males and 4.2 in females per 10,000 inhabitants. Tears were found to be more common in the third, fourth, and fifth decades of life. It has become clearer in recent decades that meniscal excision leads to articular cartilage degeneration. Degenerative changes have been found to be directly proportional to the amount of meniscus removed. Therefore, it has been generally recognized that the amount of meniscal tissue removed should be minimized, repaired, or replaced. Whether a meniscal lesion is treated conservatively or surgically, the rehabilitation program will play an important role in the functional outcome. This article will discuss these programs and the various treatment strategies employed. PMID:25390473

  7. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  8. Treatment of meniscal tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Mordecai, Simon C; Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Ware, Howard E; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for meniscal tears fall into three broad categories; non-operative, meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Selecting the most appropriate treatment for a given patient involves both patient factors (e.g., age, co-morbidities and compliance) and tear characteristics (e.g., location of tear/age/reducibility of tear). There is evidence suggesting that degenerative tears in older patients without mechanical symptoms can be effectively treated non-operatively with a structured physical therapy programme as a first line. Even if these patients later require meniscectomy they will still achieve similar functional outcomes than if they had initially been treated surgically. Partial meniscectomy is suitable for symptomatic tears not amenable to repair, and can still preserve meniscal function especially when the peripheral meniscal rim is intact. Meniscal repair shows 80% success at 2 years and is more suitable in younger patients with reducible tears that are peripheral (e.g., nearer the capsular attachment) and horizontal or longitudinal in nature. However, careful patient selection and repair technique is required with good compliance to post-operative rehabilitation, which often consists of bracing and non-weight bearing for 4-6 wk. PMID:25035825

  9. The potential of optical coherence tomography in meniscal tear characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hang-yin; Guo, Shuguang; Thieman, Kelley M.; Wise, Brent T.; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2009-02-01

    Meniscal tear is one of the most common knee injuries leading to pain and discomfort. Partial and total meniscectomies have been widely used to treat the avascular meniscal injuries in which tears do not heal spontaneously. However, the meniscectomies would cause an alteration of the tibiofemoral contact mechanics resulting in progressive osteoarthritis (OA). To mitigate the progression of OA, maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is recommended. The clinical challenge is deciding which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and which part of damaged tissues should be removed. Current diagnosis techniques such as arthroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging can provide macrostructural information of menisci, but the microstructural changes that occur prior to the observable meniscal tears cannot be identified by these techniques. Serving as a nondestructive optical biopsy, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a newly developed imaging modality, can provide high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissues and has been shown its capabilty in arthroscopic evaulation of articular cartilage. Our research was to demonstrate the potential of using OCT for nondestructive characterization of the histopathology of different types of meniscal tears from clinical cases in dogs, providing a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of meniscal tears. First, cross-sectional images of torn canine menisci obtained from the OCT and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were be compared. By studying the organization of collegan fibrils in torn menisci from the SEM images, the feasibility of using OCT to characterize the organization of collegan fibrils was elucidated. Moreover, the crack size of meniscal tears was quantatitively measured from the OCT images. Changes in the crack size of the tear may be useful for understanding the failure mechanism of meniscal tears.

  10. The use of PRP in ligament and meniscal healing.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hillary J; Wasterlain, Amy S; Dragoo, Jason L

    2013-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has become a popular treatment for acute and chronic soft tissue injuries. Although the majority of research has focused on its use in tendinopathy, PRP may have potential in meniscus and ligament healing. Some level II studies support a possible benefit for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft maturation, and preliminary animal studies point to a potential role for PRP in primary ACL repair. However, randomized controlled trials have not demonstrated a benefit of PRP for ACL tendon allograft-tunnel integration. To date, 2 studies document the use of PRP for meniscal applications, but this field is largely unexplored. With respect to ligament and meniscal applications, the current literature suggests PRP may be promising for primary ACL repair in skeletally immature patients, ACL graft maturation, and repair of meniscal tears in the avascular zone. PMID:24212368

  11. Advances in Meniscal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Forriol, Francisco; Romeo, Giovanni; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injuries and have a poor ability of healing. In the last few decades, several techniques have been increasingly used to optimize meniscal healing. Current research efforts of tissue engineering try to combine cell-based therapy, growth factors, gene therapy, and reabsorbable scaffolds to promote healing of meniscal defects. Preliminary studies did not allow to draw definitive conclusions on the use of these techniques for routine management of meniscal lesions. We performed a review of the available literature on current techniques of tissue engineering for the management of meniscal tears. PMID:25098366

  12. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  13. The Relationship between Meniscal Tears and Meniscal Position

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Deborah M.; Li, Ling; Crema, Michel D.; Marra, Monica D.; Guermazi, Ali; Wyman, Brad T.; Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio; Englund, Martin; Brandt, Kenneth D.; Hunter, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how different types of meniscal tears predispose to different patterns of meniscal position in subjects with and without symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 161 women participating in an observational study to evaluate knee OA progression was performed using baseline MRI data. Meniscal morphologic features were scored in three separate locations. Meniscal position measures were determined for extrusion and proportion of coverage. Analysis was performed using multiple linear regression models treating each tear type as an individual variable with a binary response. Results: Complex tears, cysts and maceration of the medial meniscus were associated with more medial (p=0.0004, p=0.004, p <0.0001, respectively) and anterior extrusion (p =0.03, p=0.03, p<0.0001, respectively) than normal menisci. Horizontal tears of the lateral meniscus had more lateral (p=0.005) and anterior extrusion (p<0.0001) than normal menisci. Anterior and body tears of the medial meniscus were associated with more anterior extrusion (p=0.0006, p=0.01, respectively), whereas meniscal body tears alone had more medial extrusion than normal menisci (p= 0.0002). Meniscal body tears of the lateral meniscus had more lateral extrusion than normal menisci (p=0.01). Conclusion: Anterior horn and meniscal body tears and the more severe macerated and complex tear types predisposed to more medial meniscal extrusion. Laterally, only meniscal body and horizontal tears significantly affected extrusion, potentially reflecting a lower overall prevalence of lateral meniscal tears. These results may have important implications in identifying tear types associated with more meniscal dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of identifying those at greatest risk for knee OA progression. PMID:22870457

  14. Meniscal tears and discoid meniscus in children: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Dennis E; Micheli, Lyle J

    2009-11-01

    The incidence of traumatic meniscal tears in children is on the rise, likely because of increased sports participation and more accurate diagnostic modalities. The increased vascularity of the developing meniscus is believed to enable greater healing potential. Meniscal tears in children are often amenable to repair, and excellent clinical results have been reported. Knee size must be considered when determining the optimal method of repair. Discoid menisci represent a spectrum of morphologic abnormalities and instability of the lateral meniscus. Highly unstable variants often present with the classic "snapping knee syndrome," whereas stable variants may remain asymptomatic until a tear develops. Asymptomatic discoid menisci should be observed, whereas symptomatic discoid menisci are best treated with saucerization and repair. Early to midterm reports on saucerization and repair of discoid lateral meniscus in children are promising. PMID:19880680

  15. Association Between Previous Meniscal Surgery and the Incidence of Chondral Lesions at Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; David, Tal S.; McCormack, Robert G.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Steger-May, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction typically have more intra-articular injuries than do knees undergoing primary reconstruction. Hypothesis Previous partial meniscectomy (PM) is associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, whereas previous meniscal repair (MR) is not associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, compared with knees undergoing revision ACL with no previous meniscal surgery. Study design Cohort study (Prevalence); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Data from a multicenter cohort was reviewed to determine the history of prior meniscal surgery (PM/MR) and the presence of grade II/III/IV chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction. The association between previous meniscal surgery and the incidence of chondral lesions was examined. Patient age was included as a covariate to determine if surgery type contributes predictive information independent of patient age. Results The cohort included 725 ACL revision surgeries. Chondrosis was associated with patient age (P < .0001) and previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). After adjusting for patient age, knees with previous PM were more likely to have chondrosis than knees with previous MR (P = .003) or no previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). There was no difference between knees without previous meniscal surgery and knees with previous MR (P = .7). Previous partial meniscectomy was associated with a higher rate of chondrosis in the same compartment compared with knees without previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001) and knees with previous MR (P ≤ .03). Conclusion The status of articular cartilage at the time of revision ACL reconstruction relates to previous meniscal surgery independent of the effect of patient age. Previous partial meniscectomy is associated with a higher incidence of articular cartilage lesions, whereas previous meniscal repair is not. Although this association may

  16. The "all inside" arthroscopic Broström procedure: a prospective study of 40 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Rigby, Ryan B

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are the most common injury in sports. Nonoperative therapy is recommended initially, including functional rehabilitation. Surgery might be an option for those patients in whom nonoperative attempts fail. Various surgical approaches have been described in published studies for treating chronic lateral ankle instability. The procedures are typically grouped into 2 main categories: anatomic and nonanatomic repair of the lateral ligament complex. The open modified Broström-Gould anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. In the present study, we used an arthroscopic approach to treat chronic anterior talofibular ligament tears without the extensive open incisions common in the traditional modified Broström-Gould procedure. Our hypothesis was that the use of an all-inside arthroscopic Broström procedure would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. We also wished to explore the complication rates and interval to return to weightbearing activity. A total of 40 ankles in 40 consecutive patients were included in the cohort. PMID:23669003

  17. The effect of axial and abaxial release on meniscal displacement in the dog.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, S C; Dunning, D; Bischoff, M G; Kuriashkin, I V; Pijanowski, G J; Schaeffer, D J

    2005-01-01

    The meniscal release (MR) is used to minimize meniscal pathology after Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) surgery. The purposes of this study were: (i) to describe meniscal orientation in a unaltered cadaveric canine stifle, a cruciate deficient stifle, TPLO repaired stifle with and without the MR using magnetic resonance imaging; (ii) to determine if the abaxial release is equivalent to the axial release in its ability to affect caudal pole displacement in a TPLO repaired stifle and (iii) to evaluate with MRI the effect of MR on the femorotibiol articular cartilage contact area in a TPLO repaired stifle. Briefly, cadaver limbs were placed into a jig designed to mimic a weight-bearing stance at 140 degrees and 90 degrees at the stifle. The limbs were sequentially evaluated from the unaltered state; after cranial cruciate ligament transection; after TPLO stabilization; and finally after a meniscal release. No significant difference was found between the intrameniscal area (IMA) of the abaxial and axial meniscal releases although there was an increase in the IMA after the meniscal release compared to the IMA in the normal, cranial cruciate ligament deficient stifle, and TPLO stabilized stifle. In the abaxial release, a meniscal remnant remained in situ and provided a space effect between the femur and the tibial plateau. This is in contrast to the axial meniscal release, where the entire caudal pole of the medial meniscus relocated caudolaterally and consequently permitted more direct femorotibial contact. Overall, however, there was evidence of caudal pole compression of the medial meniscus throughout the MRI series which was ameliorated by either of the MR procedures. PMID:16594391

  18. MR imaging of the postoperative meniscus: repair, resection, and replacement.

    PubMed

    Gopez, Angela G; Kavanagh, Eoin C

    2006-09-01

    Meniscal surgery is one of the most common orthopedic procedures performed in clinical practice today. Increasing awareness of the importance of the meniscus in knee function and stability has resulted in abandonment of the once common complete meniscectomy in favor of meniscus-preserving surgeries and, in some circumstances, meniscal replacement. Although the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of meniscal tears is well established, imaging of the postoperative meniscus has proved more challenging, with debate about the optimal imaging technique. This article discusses normal meniscal anatomy and biomechanics to serve as the background for understanding meniscal pathology and treatment. This is followed by a review of meniscal surgery, with emphasis placed on meniscal repair, partial meniscectomy, and meniscal transplantation. Finally, imaging modalities utilized in the assessment of the postoperative meniscus are reviewed, including their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:17195131

  19. Stable Meniscal Tears Left In Situ at the Time of Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rothermich, Marcus A; Cohen, Jared A; Wright, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Meniscal tears can be incidentally encountered at the time of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In these cases, the surgeon has several treatment options that include benign neglect, debridement, trephination, and repair. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature studying the various treatment options for meniscal tears discovered at the time of ACL reconstruction. This systematic review included eight articles that had relevant data regarding benign neglect compared with debridement, trephination, or repair of incidentally encountered meniscal tears. Combined data from these studies resulted in a total of 646 meniscal tears treated with benign neglect with follow-up information available. Importantly, there were differences in reoperation rates between medial and lateral meniscal tears left in situ. However, stable medial and lateral meniscal tears treated with benign neglect did not have different subjective or objective outcomes than those treated with surgical intervention. This systematic review concludes that when stable meniscal tears are encountered at the time of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, benign neglect can be used for a successful outcome. PMID:25927355

  20. A new hydrogel for the conservative treatment of meniscal lesions: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    ZORZI, CLAUDIO; RIGOTTI, STEFANO; SCREPIS, DANIELE; GIORDAN, NICOLA; PIOVAN, GIANLUCA

    2015-01-01

    Purpose this study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) administration of a hydrogel formulation obtained from a hyaluronic acid (HA) derivative (HYADD4®) in the management of meniscal tears and in meniscal tear repair. Methods fifty subjects with degenerative meniscal tears were enrolled into this single-site, observer-blind, parallel-group study. Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline and after 14, 30 and 60 days. Clinical outcomes included: pain reduction (Visual Analog Scale), improvement of knee functionality (WOMAC questionnaire), reduction in length and depth of the meniscal lesion (MRI-confirmed) and SF-36 questionnaire scores. Local tolerability and safety were also investigated. Results a significant reduction in VAS pain (p< 0.001) in favor of HYADD4® was recorded at day 14 and maintained at all the follow-up assessments. Data on knee functionality were in line with the VAS pain assessment results. A significant reduction in length and depth of the meniscal lesion, assessed using MRI, was found in the HYADD4® group compared to the control group (p<0.001). Conclusions the results of this study may indicate a new treatment option in the conservative management of patients complaining of pain due to meniscal tears. The MRI data suggest that the hydrogel formulation of HA used in this study may also play a role in the healing process of the lesion. Level of evidence Level I, prospective randomized clinical trial. PMID:26889470

  1. Comparison of meniscal fibrochondrocyte and synoviocyte bioscaffolds toward meniscal tissue engineering in the dog.

    PubMed

    Ballard, George A; Warnock, Jennifer J; Bobe, Gerd; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Baker, Lindsay; Baltzer, Wendy I; Ott, Jesse

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising field of study toward curing the meniscal deficient stifle; however the ideal cell type for this task is not known. We describe here the extraction of synoviocytes and meniscal fibrochondrocytes from arthroscopic debris from six dogs, which were cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds to synthesize meniscal-like fibrocartilage sheets. Despite the diseased status of the original tissues, synoviocytes and meniscal fibrochondrocytes had high viability at the time of removal from the joint. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen content of bioscaffolds did not differ. Meniscal fibrochondrocyte bioscaffolds contained more type II collagen, but collagen deposition was disorganized, with only 30-40% of cells viable. The collagen of synoviocyte bioscaffolds was organized into sheets and bands and 80-90% of cells were viable. Autologous, diseased meniscal fibrochondrocytes and synoviocytes are plausible cell sources for future meniscal tissue engineering research, however cell viability of meniscal fibrochondrocytes in the tensioned bioscaffolds was low. PMID:24856453

  2. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation A Comprehensive Historical and Current Review.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Michael G; Ryan, Michael K; Strauss, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    Throughout the history of orthopaedics, our understanding of the function and necessity of the meniscus has significantly evolved, and with it, our techniques of treating, repairing, preserving, and replacing it have progressed in parallel. Currently, it is known that a meniscus deficiency is a predisposing factor to the development of degenerative changes of the knee. Thus, it is incumbent upon the surgeon to preserve the meniscus to the extent that biology will allow. Unfortunately, circumstances arise when the meniscus cannot be preserved, and young patients afflicted by irreparable meniscus deficiency may be potential candidates for a meniscus transplant. Though its indications are limited and its execution technically complex, meniscal allograft transplant has been shown to provide good subjective outcomes and is a potentially joint preserving surgery. This paper provides a comprehensive and historical review of the meniscus, a brief review of meniscus anatomy and biomechanics, and commentary on the role of meniscal allograft transplant for the treatment of meniscal deficiency, including patient selection, graft selection and sizing, surgical technique, and outcomes. PMID:26517162

  3. [THE EVOLUTION IN TREATING MENISCAL TEARS--FROM RESECTION TO SUTURING].

    PubMed

    Stahl, Ido; Shapira, Jackob; Peskin, Bezalel; Hous, Nir; Norman, Doron; Falah, Mazen

    2016-05-01

    The meniscus has an important biomechanical role in the normal function of the knee including load bearing, shock absorption and joint stability. Tears of the meniscus are one of the common sports injuries. The knowledge that total meniscectomy causes early development of degenerative changes has raised the prevalence of meniscal tear repair in order to preserve as much as possible of the meniscal tissue. The type of tear (degenerative of traumatic), shape and location have a critical effect on healing ability after suture of the tear and thus will determine the treatment plan. PMID:27526563

  4. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Trentacosta, Natasha; Graham, William C; Gersoff, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation has evolved over the years to provide a state-of-the-art technique for the sports medicine surgeon to utilize in preserving contact mechanics and function of the knee in irreparable meniscal pathology. However, this procedure continues to spark considerable debate on proper tissue processing techniques, acceptable indications, methods of implantation, and potential long-term outcomes. PMID:27135295

  5. Potential Market for New Meniscus Repair Strategies: Evaluation of the MOON Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fetzer, Gary B.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Amendola, Annunziato; Andrish, Jack T.; Bergfeld, John A.; Dunn, Warren R.; Flanigan, David C.; Jones, Morgan; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; McCarty, Eric C.; Parker, Richard D.; Wolcott, Michelle; Vidal, Armando; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2013-01-01

    Background An estimated 200,000 ACL reconstructions are performed each year in the United States. The presence of concomitant meniscus tears and subsequent treatment at the time of ACL reconstruction may determine long-term outcomes of these knees. The authors contend that a substantial number of these meniscal tears are treated in a fashion that reduces meniscal function and that new technologies are needed to treat meniscal tears in a fashion that preserves function. A large cohort of patients with meniscal tears is needed to demonstrate this need. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of meniscal tears, describe tear morphology, and selected treatment in the MOON prospective longitudinal cohort of ACL reconstruction. We also will demonstrate based on national statistics the large potential market that exists for future tissue engineering aimed at preserving meniscal function. Methods A multicenter cohort of 1014 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction between January 2002 and December 2003 were evaluated. All procedures were performed by nine fellowship trained sports medicine orthopaedic surgeons. Data on patient demographics, presence of a meniscus tear at time of ACL reconstruction, tear morphology, and meniscal treatment were collected prospectively. Meniscal tears were categorized into three potential tissue engineering treatment strategies: all-biologic repair, advanced repair, and scaffold replacement. Results 1014 ACL reconstructions were performed over the two year period. The median age at the time of surgery was 24 years. Thirty-six percent of the knees had medial meniscal tears and 44% of the knees had lateral meniscal tears. Longitudinal tears were the most common tear morphology. The most frequent treatment modality was partial meniscectomy (60%). Thirty percent of medial meniscal tears and 10% of lateral meniscal tears could be treated with all-biologic repair, 32% of medial meniscal tears and 28% of lateral meniscal tears could

  6. Meniscal injury: I. Basic science and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Greis, Patrick E; Bardana, Davide D; Holmstrom, Michael C; Burks, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    The patient with meniscal injury may present with pain, swelling, or mechanical symptoms and often requires surgical intervention for symptom resolution. Treatment of such injuries relies on understanding the gross and microanatomic features of the meniscus that are important in maintaining meniscal function. The ability of the meniscus to participate in load bearing, shock absorption, joint lubrication, and joint stability depends on the maintenance of its structural integrity. The diagnosis of meniscal injury often can be made by clinical evaluation utilizing the history, physical examination, and plain radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in confirming the diagnosis when clinical findings are inconclusive. Treatment depends on tear pattern, vascularity, and an assessment of tissue quality. Surgical decision making for the treatment of meniscal injury is based on patient factors and understanding of the meniscal structure, function, and pathology. PMID:12041938

  7. Review of Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Focusing on Long-term Results and Evaluation Methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum-Sik; Kim, Jong-Min; Sohn, Dong-Wook; Bin, Seong-Il

    2013-03-01

    With recognition of the biomechanical role of the meniscus, such as load distribution and joint stability in the knee joint, there has been a shift in the treatment of meniscal tears from open total meniscectomy to preservation of the meniscal functions as much as possible with symptomatic relief. Recently, technical development of meniscal surgery, with advanced arthroscopic equipment and instruments, enables biological reconstruction of load bearing functions in the meniscus deficient knee through allograft tissue transplantation as well as repair of torn menisci. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has been considered as one of the few viable treatment options for the young meniscectomized knees based on various animal experiments and clinical studies. Still, there is insufficient evidence for the long-term chondroprotective effect of human MAT. Some long-term follow-up studies showed that the technique resulted in graft degeneration, deformation, and tear, and structural changes in the remodeling process in early MAT cases, disrupting functional restoration of the original meniscus. Nevertheless, advanced outcomes are documented in some recent studies. The purpose of this article is to review the mid- and long-term follow-up results of MAT and to improve understanding of MAT with evaluation methods of meniscal transplants using magnetic resonance imaging or second-look arthroscopy. PMID:23508067

  8. Radiofrequency stimulation for potential healing of meniscal injuries in the avascular zone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Tasto, James P; Healey, Robert M; Sano, Sakae; Amiel, David

    2014-12-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency (RF) stimulation with suture repair on the healing of tears in the meniscal white-white zone. Fifty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgically induced meniscal injuries within the white-white region. RF was applied using a 0.8-mm TOPAZ MicroDebrider RF wand (ArthroCare) at level 4 for 500 milliseconds. Rabbits were sacrificed at 28 and 84 days for gross and histologic analysis by 3 blinded observers and at 9, 28, and 84 days for biochemical examination. Biochemical analyses included evaluation of cell proliferation (3H-thymidine), as well as mitogenic (IGF-1, bFGF) and angiogenic (VEGF, αV) factors. Of specimens repaired with RF combined with suture, 19 (58%) showed a degree of gross morphologic and histologic healing. No significant healing was seen in specimens with either no repair or repair with suture alone. We observed a 40% increase in cellular proliferation when RF supplementation was used (P<.05). With regards to mitogenic and angiogenic markers (IGF-1, bFGF, VEGF, and αV), there was a significant increase in groups treated with RF at 9 and 28 days (P>0.05). RF supplementation of avascular zone meniscal repairs may lead to an increased healing response. PMID:25490015

  9. Evaluation of three approaches to meniscal release.

    PubMed

    Austin, B; Montgomery, R D; Wright, J; Bellah, J R; Tonks, C

    2007-01-01

    Three approaches to medial meniscal release (MMR) were compared using 48 canine cadaver stifles. The approaches included a caudomedial arthrotomy approach, a blind stab incision based on anatomic landmarks, and an arthroscopic guided approach. The cranial cruciate ligament was intact in all specimens. The time required to perform the meniscal release and joint capsule closure was recorded, as well as completeness and location of the meniscal transection. Damage to the caudal cruciate ligament, femoral cartilage, and medial collateral ligament were recorded. The mini-arthrotomy was 81% successful in accomplishment of MMR with a 4% rate of iatrogenic damage. The blind technique was 56% successful in the accomplishment of MMR with a 4% rate of iatrogenic damage. The arthroscopic guided approach was 62.5% successful in accomplishment of MMR, with a 10% rate of iatrogenic damage. Accomplishment and iatrogenic damage rates were not significantly different among procedures (p > 0.05). Significantly less time was required to perform the blind technique, and significantly greater time was required to perform the arthroscopic guided technique (p > 0.05). Significant differences were not noted among the procedures regarding the ability to accomplish the meniscal release or damage surrounding structures. None of the evaluated approaches for meniscal release resulted in a complete and accurate meniscal release for over 81% of the time. PMID:17546208

  10. Clinical evaluation of meniscus repair with a bioabsorbable arrow: a 2- to 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ellermann, A; Siebold, R; Buelow, J U; Sobau, C

    2002-09-01

    In a clinical study with the bioabsorbable Bionx Meniscus Arrow we prospectively evaluated 113 consecutive patients (113 menisci) after all-inside meniscus repair. Repairs were performed in either the medial (80.5%) or lateral (19.5%) posterior horn in the red-red or red-white meniscal zone; 66% of patients underwent concomitant ACL reconstruction. Assessment was based on history, clinical examination, and Lysholm [37] and Cincinnati Knee Scores. After a mean follow-up was 33 months (range 24-43; n=105) 21 (20%) patients showed signs and symptoms consistent with a meniscus tear (16 medial, 5 lateral) and underwent partial meniscectomy. In 11 (52%) of the revised patients concomitant ACL reconstruction was performed; 4 (19%) of revised patients were older than 35 years. In the nonrevised the average Lysholm Score was 92.5 and the average Cincinnati Score 90.4. Two patients showed a distinct femoral cartilage damage. Patient's age did not significantly affect the revision rate. Meniscus repair with the bioabsorbable arrow leads to clinical results comparable to those of traditional suture techniques. When stabilized, patients with concomitant ACL reconstruction showed comparable results to patients without ACL rupture. The simple and time saving all-inside insertion obviates the need for additional incisions and avoids knot tying. A proper tear selection and arrow positioning is necessary and should avoid cartilage damage. PMID:12355303

  11. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Matthew R.; Stuart, Michael J.; King, Alexander H.; Sousa, Paul L.; Levy, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  12. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique.

    PubMed

    Prince, Matthew R; Stuart, Michael J; King, Alexander H; Sousa, Paul L; Levy, Bruce A

    2015-10-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  13. Experimental study on thermal welding for the knee meniscal white zone.

    PubMed

    Imakiire, Naoaki; Kotani, Akihiro; Ishii, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    It is difficult to repair tears of the meniscus at the white zone by suturing. We considered that there might be an optimal tissue welding temperature when thermally welding the meniscal white zone, so we conducted a thermal welding experiment using bovine and human menisci. The samples prepared after thermal welding were investigated by measuring the tensile strength, analyzing the histological findings of the welded portion and the meniscal parenchyma, and conducting biochemical analyses. In the experiment using human menisci, histological findings were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As the findings on the welded tissue in the white zone of the bovine meniscus indicated positive results at 63 degrees C and 69 degrees C, the experiments using human meniscal white zone were conducted at these two temperatures. The highest tensile strength after thermal welding of the human meniscal white zone was 101.4 +/- 2.6 g/cm(2) at 63 degrees C. Although there were no significant differences in the amount of pyridinoline per unit collagen weight [Pyr/Hpr (%)] in the human meniscus after thermal welding between the control group and various temperature groups (55 degrees C, 63 degrees C, 69 degrees C, 75 degrees C), the amount of pyridinoline per unit of collagen weight tended to decline as the welding temperature increased. According to the TEM findings, the internal structure of the nuclei of the cells was preserved in the 63 degrees C group, whereas cells were denatured inside the nuclei in the 69 degrees C group. They exhibited necrosis, making cell regeneration difficult. Therefore, it seems feasible that thermal welding at 63 degrees C can repair tears in the human meniscal white zone. PMID:14557935

  14. Meniscal mineralisation in little spotted cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the stifle joints of little spotted cats in captivity using radiographic and CT studies. The hypothesis was that these animals would have meniscal mineralisation that could be detectable by imaging studies. Twelve intact little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus), 2 females and 10 males, aged from 1.5 to 11.11 years old and weighing 1.9–3.05 kg were studied. These animals, which were living in the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoo, had no symptoms or known disease processes at the time of the study. The plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans of both stifle joints were performed under general anaesthesia. Sequential transverse images were acquired on a spiral scanner. Results No signs of articular disease were observed in any of the animals. Radiographically, the meniscal mineralisation was detected as an oval radiopacity in the cranial compartment on the mediolateral projection, located within the area of the medial meniscus. On craniocaudal projection, the mineralisation was more difficult to visualise. In one of the animals, it was not possible to identify the meniscal mineralisation in either of the stifle joints. Using CT, meniscal mineralisation was best identified in the transverse plane images. Conclusions Meniscal mineralisation appears to be a normal anatomic feature in little spotted cats. PMID:23506083

  15. Meniscal allograft transplantation in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Liana M; Del Carlo, Ricardo J; Melo Filho, Edson V; Favarato, Lukiya S C; Duarte, Tatiana S; Pontes, Kelly C S; Cunha, Daise N Q

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the technique for meniscal allograft transplantation using allografts preserved in glycerin 98% in rabbits. Euthanasia was performed at 70 days to compare the transplanted (TM1 to TM16) versus the contralateral meniscus (OM1 to OM16). Sixteen menisci, 8 transplanted and 8 contralateral, were submitted to gross examination, histomorphometric analysis for identification and quantification of cellular type, and for quantification and distribution of collagen fibers. A revascularization study was conducted in all of the other samples. Lengths of the OM varied from 0.9 to 1.0 cm and two TM were smaller. All TM were completely attached to the synovial membrane, except for one case that presented partial fixation. Both, TM and OM had similar amounts of chondrocytes, fibroblasts and fibrocytes, and at the horns, chondrocytes were predominant. The collagen fibers in TM were well organized throughout the body, and disorganized at the horns. These fibers in OM were organized. The amounts of collagen type I and III, and the vascularization of the perimeniscal tissue and of the edge were similar in OM and TM. These results demonstrated graft integration and thus this transplantation technique and preservation method may be recommended. PMID:26648544

  16. High resolution MRI evaluation of meniscal volume and anthropometric correlations.

    PubMed

    Narvy, Steven J; Asami, Danny K; Solomon, Thomas C; Burke, Wendy S; Colletti, Patrick M; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to digitally determine meniscal volumes, and compare them with linear and surface area anthropometric measurements to evaluate these measurements for meniscal allograft sizing. Eighteen subjects (10 male and 8 female; mean age 37.5 years) underwent 3.0 T knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the dominant leg. The following morphometric measurements were evaluated: medial meniscal volume (MMV), lateral meniscal volume (LMV), tibial plateau width (TPW), width of the femoral condyles (WFC), and tibial plateau surface area (TPSA). MMV and LMV were compared to TPW, WFC, and TPSA. Meniscal volume and TPW were correlated to height and body-mass index (BMI) and stratified by gender. Statistical analysis included coefficient of determination (r(2)) between MRI-based MMV, LMV, TPW, TPSA, WFC, height, BMI, and gender. Significance was set at the P = 0.05 level. The mean MMV was 2275 mm(3) and the mean LMV was 2102 mm(3). TPW correlated well with meniscal volumes (r(2) > 0.62). WFC and TPSA correlated with meniscal volumes in the range of 0.40 < r(2) < 0.61. Height, BMI, and gender correlated poorly with total meniscal volume and TPW with values of r(2) < 0.44. Medial and lateral menisci have statistically similar volumes. TPW had the greatest utility for volumetric meniscal sizing. MRI-based TPW can be considered as a statistically accurate measurement for determining meniscal volumes and meniscal size. PMID:26118625

  17. Meniscal injuries: Detection using MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Reicher, M.A.; Hartzman, S.; Duckwiler, G.R.; Bassett, L.W.; Anderson, L.J.; Gold, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Both retrospective and blinded analyses of thin-section, high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee joint, produced using a sole-noid surface coil, indicate that MR imaging is an effective technique for evaluating meniscal injuries. Images of 49 patients were evaluated, and the results were correlated with those of subsequent arthroscopy. A grading scale was developed to rate the index of suspicion of a meniscal tear based on the MR images. Overall, approximately 80% of menisci rated grade 4 (definite tear) or 3 (probable tear) were found to have corresponding tears at arthroscopy. In many other patients with a grade 4 or 3 meniscus in whom a corresponding tear was not found arthroscopically, meniscal tears at other sites or other abnormalities were correctly diagnosed using MR. A majority of the false-positive MR images involved the posterior horns of the menisci, the sites of most false-negative arthroscopic diagnoses. The predictive value of a negative MR image was almost 100%. Even in patients with moderate-to-large effusions, the menisci were accurately evaluated. The results imply that MR imaging is useful in the preoperative evaluation of suspected meniscal tears.

  18. [Meniscal transplantation with a synovial pedicle--an animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, K

    1993-12-01

    The effect of a meniscal transplantation with a synovial pedicle in the avascular portion of the meniscus was investigated in an animal model. An inner (free edge side) half of the middle segment of the medial meniscus, about 6 mm in length, of an adult dog was resected, and a half thickness of the remaining outer (peripheral) meniscus was advanced with a synovial pedicle to fill in the resected portion and sutured with 6-0 interrupted Nylon sutures. As a control, the same procedure without the synovial pedicle was performed for comparison. Twenty-four dogs were treated with synovial pedicle and 13 without. The treated meniscus was excised every four weeks postoperatively up to 32 weeks for gross observation and histological examination. The histological findings at the junction between the advanced meniscus and the remaining meniscus in the group with the synovial pedicle were as follows: 1) At eight to 20 weeks, vascular proliferation and fibroblasts formation were present. 2) At 24 weeks, the vascularity decreased and the junction was filled with collagen fibers. 3) At 32 weeks, the junction was almost completely repaired with chondrocytes. In contrast, in the group without the synovial pedicle, the junction was connected with fibrous tissue, but with no chondrocytes even at 32 weeks. This enhancement of the meniscus repair with the synovial pedicle was considered to be due to reparative ability of the synovial cells, neovascularization through the synovium and viability of the advanced meniscus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508485

  19. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision. PMID:26726987

  20. Meniscal allograft transplant in a 16-year-old male soccer player: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Menta, Roger; Howitt, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is a relatively new procedure that has gained popularity in the last couple of decades as a possible alternative to a meniscectomy to provide significant pain relief, improve function, and prevent the early onset of degenerative joint disease (DJD). As of present, evidence is limited and conflicting on the success of such procedures. In this case, a 16-year old male athlete underwent numerous surgical procedures to correct a left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture with associated medial and lateral meniscal damage that occurred as a result of a non-contact mechanism of injury. Following multiple procedures, including repair of both menisci and follow-up partial meniscectomy of the lateral meniscus, the patient continued to experience symptoms on the left lateral knee, making him a candidate for MAT. This case is used to highlight what a MAT is, what makes someone a candidate for this type of procedure, the current evidence surrounding the success of this intervention, and some rehabilitation considerations following surgery. The role of chiropractors and primary clinicians is to ensure that young athletes undergo early intervention to offset any degenerative changes that would be associated with sustained meniscal lesions. PMID:25550669

  1. Meniscal allograft transplant in a 16-year-old male soccer player: A case report.

    PubMed

    Menta, Roger; Howitt, Scott

    2014-12-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is a relatively new procedure that has gained popularity in the last couple of decades as a possible alternative to a meniscectomy to provide significant pain relief, improve function, and prevent the early onset of degenerative joint disease (DJD). As of present, evidence is limited and conflicting on the success of such procedures. In this case, a 16-year old male athlete underwent numerous surgical procedures to correct a left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture with associated medial and lateral meniscal damage that occurred as a result of a non-contact mechanism of injury. Following multiple procedures, including repair of both menisci and follow-up partial meniscectomy of the lateral meniscus, the patient continued to experience symptoms on the left lateral knee, making him a candidate for MAT. This case is used to highlight what a MAT is, what makes someone a candidate for this type of procedure, the current evidence surrounding the success of this intervention, and some rehabilitation considerations following surgery. The role of chiropractors and primary clinicians is to ensure that young athletes undergo early intervention to offset any degenerative changes that would be associated with sustained meniscal lesions. PMID:25550669

  2. The effect of cast immobilization on meniscal healing. An experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, P A; Miniaci, A; Arnoczky, S P; Fowler, P J; Boughner, D R

    1995-01-01

    A 1.5-cm longitudinal, full-thickness incision was made in the vascularized portion of the medial meniscus in 20 adult dogs and anatomically repaired. Postoperatively, the animals were either placed in a long leg cast (N = 9) or mobilized immediately (N = 11). The animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks (6 dogs), 4 weeks (6 dogs), or 10 weeks (8 dogs). Five medial menisci from the nonoperated side were used as controls. Collagen content was measured using a digital image analysis system, and the collagen percentage in the repair tissue in each postoperative treatment group was compared. In the 2-week and 4-week groups, there was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of collagen between those animals immobilized versus those that had early mobilization. The animals in the 10-week group that were mobilized had a significantly greater collagen percentage in the healing meniscal incision than those that were cast immobilized (44.6% +/- 10% versus 27.0% +/- 11%, P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the collagen percentages between the mobilized 10-week group and the contralateral control menisci group. All other menisci had a decreased collagen percentage compared with the controls. Prolonged immobilization decreases collagen formation in healing menisci. Thus, our results suggest that patients undergoing isolated meniscal repair either be immediately mobilized after surgery or immobilized for short periods only. PMID:8600741

  3. BIORESORBABLE POLYMERIC MENISCAL PROSTHESIS: STUDY IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Tulio Pereira; de Rezende Duek, Eliana Aparecida; Amatuzzi, Marco Martins; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To induce growth of a neomeniscus into the pores of a prosthesis in order to protect the knee joint cartilage. Methods: 70 knees of 35 New Zealand rabbits were operated. The rabbits were five to seven months old, weighed 2 to 3.8 kilograms, and 22 were male and 13 were female. Each animal underwent medial meniscectomy in both knees during a single operation. A bioabsorbable polymeric meniscal prosthesis composed of 70% polydioxanone and 30% L-lactic acid polymer was implanted in one side. The animals were sacrificed after different postoperative time intervals. The femoral condyles and neomeniscus were subjected to histological analysis. Histograms were used to measure the degradation and absorption of the prosthesis, the growth of meniscal tissue in the prosthesis and the degree of degradation of the femoral condyle joint cartilage. Results: The data obtained showed that tissue growth histologically resembling a normal meniscus occurred, with gradual absorption of the prosthesis, and the percentages of chondrocytes on the control side and prosthesis side. Conclusion: Tissue growth into the prosthesis pores that histologically resembled the normal rabbit meniscus was observed. The joint cartilage of the femoral condyles on the prosthesis side presented greater numbers of chondrocytes in all its layers. PMID:27022549

  4. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  5. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears. PMID:26842062

  6. Factors Predicting Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nicholas; Asplin, Laura; Thompson, Peter; Spalding, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is performed to improve symptoms and function in patients with a meniscal-deficient compartment of the knee. Numerous studies have shown a consistent improvement in patient-reported outcomes, but high failure rates have been reported by some studies. The typical patients undergoing MAT often have multiple other pathologies that require treatment at the time of surgery. The factors that predict failure of a meniscal allograft within this complex patient group are not clearly defined. Purpose: To determine predictors of MAT failure in a large series to refine the indications for surgery and better inform future patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All patients undergoing MAT at a single institution between May 2005 and May 2014 with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were prospectively evaluated and included in this study. Failure was defined as removal of the allograft, revision transplantation, or conversion to a joint replacement. Patients were grouped according to the articular cartilage status at the time of the index surgery: group 1, intact or partial-thickness chondral loss; group 2, full-thickness chondral loss 1 condyle; and group 3, full-thickness chondral loss both condyles. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine significant predictors of failure, independently of other factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were produced for overall survival and significant predictors of failure in the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: There were 125 consecutive MATs performed, with 1 patient lost to follow-up. The median follow-up was 3 years (range, 1-10 years). The 5-year graft survival for the entire cohort was 82% (group 1, 97%; group 2, 82%; group 3, 62%). The probability of failure in group 1 was 85% lower (95% CI, 13%-97%) than in group 3 at any time. The probability of failure with lateral allografts was 76% lower (95% CI, 16%-89%) than medial allografts at

  7. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness. PMID:16810354

  8. Macroscopic and Histological Evaluations of Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Using Gamma Irradiated Meniscus: A Comparative in Vivo Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Song, Guan-Yang; Chen, Xing-Zuo; Li, Yue; Li, Xu; Zhou, Jun-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many studies suggest that the gamma irradiation decreases allograft strength in a dose-dependent manner. However, no study has demonstrated that this decrease in strength translates into higher failure rate in meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on macroscopic and histological alterations of transplanted meniscal tissue and joint cartilage after MAT. Methods: Medial total meniscectomies were performed on the right knees of 60 New Zealand white rabbits. All meniscal allografts were divided into three groups (20 in each group) and then sterilized with 0 Mrad, 1.5 Mrad, or 2.5 Mrad of gamma irradiation. For each group, 5 menisci were randomly chosen for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis and the remaining 15 were prepared for MAT surgeries. Forty-five right knees received MAT surgeries (0 Mrad group, 1.5 Mrad group, 2.5 Mrad group, 15 in each group), whereas the remaining 15 only received medial meniscectomy (Meni group). The left knees of the Meni group were chosen as the Sham group (n = 15). All the rabbits were sacrificed at week 24 postoperatively. Cartilage of the medial compartment of each group was evaluated macroscopically using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score and then histologically using the Mankin score based on the Masson Trichrome staining. Results: The SEM analysis confirmed that the meniscal collagen fibers would be significantly damaged as the dose of gamma irradiation increased. At week 24, the overall scores of macroscopic evaluations of the transplanted meniscal tissue showed no significant differences among the three groups receiving MAT surgeries, except for 2 in the 2.5 Mrad group presented partial radial tears at midbody. The ICRS scores and the Mankin scores showed the lowest in the Sham group and the highest in the Meni group (P < 0.05). For the three groups receiving MAT surgeries, the 2.5 Mrad group showed significant

  9. The Role of Cells in Meniscal Guided Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jülke, Henriette; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Jakob, Roland P.; Brehm, Walter; Schäfer, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Successful repair of defects in the avascular zone of meniscus remains a challenge in orthopedics. This proof of concept study aimed to investigate a guided tissue regeneration approach for treatment of tears in meniscus avascular zone in a goat model. Design: Full-depth longitudinal tear was created in the avascular zone of the meniscus and sutured. In the two treatment groups, porcine collagen membrane was wrapped around the tear without (CM) or with injection of expanded autologous chondrocytes (CM+cells), whereas in the control group the tear remained only sutured. Gait recovery was evaluated during the entire follow-up period. On explantation at 3 and 6 months, macroscopic gross inspection assessed healing of tears, degradation of collagen membrane, potential signs of inflammation, and osteoarthritic changes. Microscopic histology scoring criteria were developed to evaluate healing of tears, the cellular response, and the inflammatory response. Results: Gait recovery suggested protective effect of collagen membrane and was supported by macroscopical evaluation where improved tear healing was noted in both treated groups. Histology scoring in CM compared to suture group revealed an increase in tear margins contact, newly formed connective tissue between margins, and cell formations surrounded with new matrix after 3 months yet not maintained after 6 months. In contrast, in the CM+cells group these features were observed after 3 and 6 months. Conclusions: A transient, short-term guided tissue regeneration of avascular meniscal tears occurred upon application of collagen membrane, whereas addition of expanded autologous chondrocytes supported more sustainable longer term tear healing. PMID:26069707

  10. Bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears of the knee: A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Hasan Basri; Arikan, Yavuz; Armagan, Raffi; Eren, Osman Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Meniscal tears may cause knee pain and functional impairment. Bilateral bucket-handle meniscal tears is an uncommon condition. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report presents the case of a 35-year-old male patient with bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears that occurred nonsimultaneously. The lesions were treated arthroscopically with partial resection in one knee and meniscal suture in the other. DISCUSSION Bucket handle meniscal tear of meniscus without underlying meniscal, ligamentous pathology or lower limb deformity is a rare condition. CONCLUSION To our knowledge, bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears without underlying meniscal anomalies have been reported in only two cases before, and our case is the third one. PMID:24012575

  11. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29-2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  12. Characterization of Meniscal Pathology Using Molecular and Proteomic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Roller, Brandon L; Monibi, Farrah; Stoker, Aaron M; Bal, B Sonny; Stannard, James P; Cook, James L

    2015-12-01

    The meniscus is a complex tissue and is integral to knee joint health and function. Although the meniscus has been studied for years, a relatively large amount of basic science data on meniscal health and disease are unavailable. Genomic and proteomic analyses of meniscal pathology could greatly improve our understanding of etiopathogenesis and the progression of meniscal disease, yet these analyses are lacking in the current literature. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use microarray and proteomic analyses to compare aged-normal and pathologic meniscal tissues. Meniscal tissue was collected from the knees of five patient groups (n = 3/group). Cohorts included patients undergoing meniscectomy with or without articular cartilage pathology, patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty with mild or moderate-severe osteoarthritis, and aged-normal controls from organ donors. Tissue sections were collected from the white/white and white/red zones of posterior medial menisci. Expression levels were compared between pathologic and control menisci to identify genes of interest (at least a ×1.5 fold change in expression levels between two or more groups) using microarray analysis. Proteomics analysis was performed using mass spectrometry to identify proteins of interest (those with possible trends identified between the aged-normal and pathologic groups). The microarray identified 157 genes of interest. Genes were categorized into the following subgroups: (1) synthesis, (2) vascularity, (3) degradation and antidegradation, and (4) signaling pathways. Mass spectrometry identified 173 proteins of interest. Proteins were further divided into the following categories: (1) extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; (2) proteins associated with vascularity; (3) degradation and antidegradation proteins; (4) cytoskeleton proteins; (5) glycolysis pathway proteins; and (6) signaling proteins. These data provide novel molecular and biochemical information for the

  13. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  14. Meniscal fixation with an absorbable staple. An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Koukoubis, T D; Glisson, R R; Feagin, J A; Seaber, A V; Schenkman, D; Korompilias, A V; Stahl, D L

    1997-01-01

    An absorbable staple for meniscal fixation was developed and evaluated in an in vivo canine study. The staple consisted of two rigid barbed legs, made of a copolymer of polyglycolic acid and polylactic acid, connected by a flexible suture made of the same absorbable material. The staple was developed for arthroscopic use, eliminating the risk of nerve or vascular injuries associated with suture fixation. Eighty-two mongrel dogs underwent meniscal repair in this study, which was performed in two sequential parts. An incision was made in the medial meniscus at the peripheral third and was fixed with either the staple or with a single 3-0 PDS suture. The animals from the first part of the study, in which the biocompatibility of a prototype staple design, was evaluated were sacrificed at 3 days, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 9 months. Those from the second part of the study, in which an improved staple design of the same material, was evaluated were sacrificed at 6 weeks, 4 months, and 1 year. The operated menisci were either examined histologically or were mechanically tested for tensile strength. Absorption of the staple began by 3 months and was almost complete by 1 year. Mechanically, the staple provided greater tensile strength augmentation of the meniscus than suture fixation for up to 4 months. In the long term, there was no difference between the staple and suture in enhancement of healing. PMID:9127849

  15. Wrisberg variant of the discoid lateral meniscus with flipped meniscal fragments simulating bucket-handle tear: MRI and arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Brian W; Gupta, Anil K; Moorman, Claude T; Garrett, William E; Helms, Clyde A

    2011-08-01

    An MRI diagnosis of the Wrisberg variant discoid lateral meniscus should be considered in patients presenting with an anteriorly flipped posterior horn fragment without a definable peripheral rim. We present four cases discovered on arthroscopy that were thought to resemble bucket-handle tears on preoperative MRI. Posterior hypermobility poses a surgical challenge as excessive debridement without careful attention to underlying meniscal morphology may lead to further instability. Although this diagnosis can be difficult to make on MRI, alerting the orthopedic surgeon preoperatively may influence repair technique and meniscus conservation. PMID:21340450

  16. The arthroscopic anatomy of symptomatic meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Dandy, D J

    1990-07-01

    The anatomy of 1000 symptomatic meniscus lesions is described and related to the age of the patients. All symptomatic lesions found during the study period were treated by arthroscopic surgery. Meniscal lesions were commoner in the right knee (56.5%) and 81% of the patients were men. Of the medial meniscus tears, 75% were vertical and 23% horizontal. Vertical tears of the medial meniscus occurred most often in the fourth decade and horizontal tears in the fifth. There were 22% type I, 37% type II and 31% type III vertical tears; 62% of type I tears and 23% of type II tears had locked fragments. Superior flaps were six times more common than inferior flaps. Of all medial meniscus fragments, 6% were inverted; 51% of these were flaps and the rest ruptured bucket-handle fragments. Of the lateral meniscus lesions 54% were vertical tears, 15% oblique, 15% myxoid, 4% were inverted and 5% were lesions of discoid menisci. The commonest pattern of tear in the lateral compartment (27%) was a vertical tear involving half the length and half the width of the meniscus. PMID:2380218

  17. Free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Faik; Korucu, Ismail Hakkı; Sever, Cem; Demirayak, Mehmet; Goncü, Gani; Toker, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The bucket-handle meniscal tear is a specific type of meniscal injuries which has specific signs on MRI. An attached fragment displaced away from the meniscus with any type of tear causes bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for meniscal injuries. We present a case of free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI. The presence of "fragment within the intercondylar notch sign" and "the absence of the bow tie sign" may be an indication of a free meniscal fragment. This should be considered during diagnosis. PMID:25002980

  18. Advances and Prospects in Tissue-Engineered Meniscal Scaffolds for Meniscus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weimin; Liu, Shuyun; Zhu, Yun; Yu, Changlong; Lu, Shibi; Yuan, Mei; Gao, Yue; Huang, Jingxiang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Jifeng; Zhang, Li; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus plays a crucial role in maintaining knee joint homoeostasis. Meniscal lesions are relatively common in the knee joint and are typically categorized into various types. However, it is difficult for inner avascular meniscal lesions to self-heal. Untreated meniscal lesions lead to meniscal extrusions in the long-term and gradually trigger the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA is complex. Partial meniscectomy, which is the primary method to treat a meniscal injury, only relieves short-term pain; however, it does not prevent the development of knee OA. Similarly, other current therapeutic strategies have intrinsic limitations in clinical practice. Tissue engineering technology will probably address this challenge by reconstructing a meniscus possessing an integrated configuration with competent biomechanical capacity. This review describes normal structure and biomechanical characteristics of the meniscus, discusses the relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA, and summarizes the classifications and corresponding treatment strategies for meniscal lesions to understand meniscal regeneration from physiological and pathological perspectives. Last, we present current advances in meniscal scaffolds and provide a number of prospects that will potentially benefit the development of meniscal regeneration methods. PMID:26199629

  19. Meniscal tears in the ACL-deficient knee: correlation between meniscal tears and the timing of ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Mikalef, Petros; Ziogas, Evangelos; Voulgaropoulos, Harilaos

    2007-12-01

    Despite the fact that anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is a common procedure, no clear guideline regarding the timing of reconstruction has been established. We hypothesized that there is a point in post injury period, after which significant increase in meniscal tears occurs. The purpose of this study was to derive a guideline in order to reduce the rate of secondary meniscal tears in the ACL-deficient knee. A total of 451 patients were retrospectively studied and divided into six groups according to the time from injury to ACLR: (a) 105 patients had undergone ACLR within 1.5 months post injury, (b) 93 patients within 1.5-3 months, (c) 72 patients within fourth to sixth month, (d) 56 patients within seventh to twelfth month, (e) 45 patients within the second year and (f) 80 patients within the third to fifth year. The presence of meniscal tears was noted at the time of ACL reconstruction and then recorded and statistically analysed. Fifty-three (50.5%) patients from group a, 46 (49.5%) from group b, 39 (54.2%) from group c, 31 (68.9%) from group d, 28 (62.2%) from group e and 54 (67.5%) from group f had meniscal tear requiring treatment. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the earliest point of significantly higher incidence of meniscal tears was in patients undergoing ACLR more than 3 months post injury. Therefore, ACLR should be carried out within the first 3 months post injury in order to minimise the risk of secondary meniscal tears. PMID:17899001

  20. Regeneration of meniscal cartilage with use of a collagen scaffold. Analysis of preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Stone, K R; Steadman, J R; Rodkey, W G; Li, S T

    1997-12-01

    A collagen scaffold was designed for use as a template for the regeneration of meniscal cartilage and was tested in ten patients in an initial, Food and Drug Administration-approved, clinical feasibility trial. The goal of the study was to evaluate the implantability and safety of the scaffold as well as its ability to support tissue ingrowth. The study was based on the findings of in vitro and in vivo investigations in dogs that had demonstrated cellular ingrowth and tissue regeneration through the scaffold. Nine patients remained in the study for at least thirty-six months, and one patient voluntarily withdrew after three months for personal reasons. The collagen scaffold was found to be implantable and to be safe over the three-year period. Histologically, it supported regeneration of tissue in meniscal defects of various sizes. No adverse immunological reactions were noted on sequential serological testing. On second-look arthroscopy, performed either three or six months after implantation, gross and histological evaluation revealed newly formed tissue replacing the implant as it was resorbed. At thirty-six months, the nine patients reported a decrease in the symptoms. According to a scale that assigned 1 point for strenuous activity and 5 points for an inability to perform sports activity, the average score was 1.5 points before the injury, 3.0 points after the injury and before the operation, and 2.4 points at six months postoperatively, 2.2 points at twelve months, 2.0 points at twenty-four months, and 1.9 points at thirty-six months. According to a scale that assigned 0 points for no pain and 3 points for severe pain, the average pain score was 2.2 points preoperatively and 0.6 point thirty-six months postoperatively. One patient, who had had a repair of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus and augmentation with the collagen scaffold, had retearing of the cartilage nineteen months after implantation. Another patient had debridement because of an

  1. Animal models for meniscus repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deponti, Daniela; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Scotti, Celeste; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Martin, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in knee function and mechanics. Meniscal lesions, however, are common phenomena and this tissue is not able to achieve spontaneous successful repair, particularly in the inner avascular zone. Several animal models have been studied and proposed for testing different reparative approaches, as well as for studying regenerative methods aiming to restore the original shape and function of this structure. This review summarizes the gross anatomy, function, ultrastructure and biochemical composition of the knee meniscus in several animal models in comparison with the human meniscus. The relevance of the models is discussed from the point of view of basic research as well as of clinical translation for meniscal repair, substitution and regeneration. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of each model for various research directions are critically discussed. PMID:23712959

  2. Lateral meniscus allograft transplantation: an arthroscopically-assisted single-incision technique using all-inside sutures with a suture hook.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Chan; Chang, Woo-Hyuk; Park, Seung-Jun; Kim, Tae-Ho; Sung, Byung-Yoon

    2014-02-01

    We present an arthroscopically-assisted single-incision technique using all-inside sutures with a suture hook in the lateral meniscus allograft transplantation. Although this technique is technically demanding, it provides vertically oriented and secure sutures with good tissue approximation without the accessory skin incision. PMID:23328984

  3. Automatic CAD of meniscal tears on MR imaging: a morphology-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Liu, Weimin; Safdar, Nabile; Siddiqui, Khan; Kim, Woojin; Juluru, Krishna; Chang, Chein-I.; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    Knee-related injuries, including meniscal tears, are common in young athletes and require accurate diagnosis and appropriate surgical intervention. Although with proper technique and skill, confidence in the detection of meniscal tears should be high, this task continues to be a challenge for many inexperienced radiologists. The purpose of our study was to automate detection of meniscal tears of the knee using a computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithm. Automated segmentation of the sagittal T1-weighted MR imaging sequences of the knee in 28 patients with diagnoses of meniscal tears was performed using morphologic image processing in a 3-step process including cropping, thresholding, and application of morphological constraints. After meniscal segmentation, abnormal linear meniscal signal was extracted through a second thresholding process. The results of this process were validated by comparison with the interpretations of 2 board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists. The automated meniscal extraction algorithm process was able to successfully perform region of interest selection, thresholding, and object shape constraint tasks to produce a convex image isolating the menisci in more than 69% of the 28 cases. A high correlation was also noted between the CAD algorithm and human observer results in identification of complex meniscal tears. Our initial investigation indicates considerable promise for automatic detection of simple and complex meniscal tears of the knee using the CAD algorithm. This observation poses interesting possibilities for increasing radiologist productivity and confidence, improving patient outcomes, and applying more sophisticated CAD algorithms to orthopedic imaging tasks.

  4. Chondromatosis within a meniscal cyst of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Ishimura, M; Tamai, S; Fujisawa, Y

    1995-02-01

    A 32-year-old man complained of left gonalgia for 2 years and noticed a soft part tumor on the lateral side of his left knee. Roentgenograms showed some small calcified shadows at the same site of the tumor. Arthroscopy revealed a lateral meniscus to be an incomplete discoid with degenerative tears. At the operation, a multilocular soft part tumor was noticed in continuity with the lateral meniscus macroscopically. Small, loose bodies and gelatinous fluid were found in the cavity of the tumor. Histologically loose bodies were chondroma and the soft part tumor was meniscal cyst. The meniscal cyst wall contained hyaline cartilagenous tissue. Therefore it was thought that chondroma originated from the cyst wall. PMID:7727004

  5. Osteochondral and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation in the Football (Soccer) Player

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Riley J.; Gersoff, Wayne K.; Bugbee, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Knee injuries are common in football, frequently involving damage to the meniscus and articular cartilage. These injuries can cause significant disability, result in loss of playing time, and predispose players to osteoarthritis. Osteochondral allografting is an increasingly popular treatment option for osteoarticular lesions in athletes. Osteochondral allografts provide mature, orthotopic hyaline cartilage on an osseous scaffold that serves as an attachment vehicle, which is rapidly replaced via creeping substitution, leading to reliable graft integration that allows for simplified rehabilitation and accelerated return to sport. The indications for meniscal replacement in football players are currently still evolving. Meniscus allografts offer potential functional, analgesic, and chondroprotective benefits in the meniscectomized knee. In the player at the end of his or her professional/competitive career, meniscal allografts can play a role in averting progression of chondropenia and facilitating knee function and an active lifestyle. This article is intended to present a concise overview of the limited published results for osteochondral and meniscal allografting in the athletic population and to provide a practical treatment algorithm that is of relevance to the clinician as well as the patient/football player, based on current consensus of opinion. PMID:26069605

  6. Induction of meniscal regeneration in dogs using a novel biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Kreeger, J M; Cook, C R

    1999-01-01

    A unique biomaterial, porcine small intestinal submucosa, was used to construct grafts for implantation into surgically created medial meniscal defects in dogs. Five dogs received grafts and two were left untreated as controls. All dogs were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks by means of lameness scoring, force plate analysis, and ultrasonography. Twelve weeks after implantation the dogs were sacrificed and the replacement tissue was evaluated for gross and histologic appearance, amount, glycosaminoglycan content, and type II collagen immunoreactivity. Four weeks after instrumentation, both groups had lameness scores that were significantly higher than preoperative scores, but at the 8- and 12-week evaluations, scores for the grafted dogs were not different from preoperative values. The ultrasonographic appearance of replacement tissue in grafted defects resembled normal meniscus. In the untreated defects, only unorganized tissue was present. In control dogs, replacement tissue resembled fibrous tissue and cartilage erosions were visible on the medial femoral condyles. In four of the five grafted dogs, replacement tissue was grossly indistinguishable from normal meniscus. The amount of tissue in the defect was significantly greater for the grafted dogs. Histologically, replacement tissue in control dogs was composed of vascularized connective tissue with no evidence of chondroid differentiation. Replacement tissue in grafted dogs closely resembled normal meniscal tissue with respect to chondroid differentiation, collagen content, and zonal architecture. Porcine small intestinal submucosa appeared to have beneficial effects on meniscal regeneration. PMID:10496586

  7. Meniscal allograft transplantation: preoperative assessment, surgical considerations, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Yanke, Adam B; Frank, Rachel M; Butty, Davietta C; Cole, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to characterize the preoperative assessment of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) candidates, to detail MAT surgical techniques, and to evaluate current clinical outcome data on MAT. The MAT candidate is typically less than 50 years old and has a history of knee injury, previous meniscus surgery, and persistent pain. Physical exam generally reveals knee pain with joint line tenderness with normal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating the postmeniscectomized state. There are several common surgical techniques used for transplantation, with fixation achieved through sutures, bony fixation, or a combination of the two. Concomitant procedures such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, osteotomy, and other cartilage procedures are commonly performed. The available short- and long-term studies of clinical outcomes of MAT are variable and difficult to effectively compare due to heterogeneity of the study population and available treatment techniques. In addition, there are no published randomized controlled trials. However, recent reviews and cohort studies of clinical outcomes following MAT have shown that whether performed in isolation or performed with concomitant articular cartilage, realignment, or soft tissue reconstruction procedures MAT outcomes have been acceptable with the majority of studies reporting improved clinical outcomes regardless of the scoring system employed. MAT has proven to be a safe and effective technique in reducing knee pain and improving function in the symptomatic meniscal deficient knee. Evaluation of long-term clinical outcomes is necessary as is evaluation of meniscal replacement alternatives. PMID:24951950

  8. Meniscal Transplantation and its Effect on Osteoarthritis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Smith, N. A.; Achten, J.; Parsons, N.; Wright, D.; Parkinson, B.; Thompson, P.; Hutchinson, C. E.; Spalding, T.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Subtotal or total meniscectomy in the medial or lateral compartment of the knee results in a high risk of future osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been performed for over thirty years with the scientifically plausible hypothesis that it functions in a similar way to a native meniscus. It is thought that a meniscal allograft transplant has a chondroprotective effect, reducing symptoms and the long-term risk of osteoarthritis. However, this hypothesis has never been tested in a high-quality study on human participants. This study aims to address this shortfall by performing a pilot randomised controlled trial within the context of a comprehensive cohort study design. Methods Patients will be randomised to receive either meniscal transplant or a non-operative, personalised knee therapy program. MRIs will be performed every four months for one year. The primary endpoint is the mean change in cartilage volume in the weight-bearing area of the knee at one year post intervention. Secondary outcome measures include the mean change in cartilage thickness, T2 maps, patient-reported outcome measures, health economics assessment and complications. Results This study is expected to report its findings in 2016. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:93–8 PMID:26036203

  9. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR DIAGNOSING MENISCAL INJURIES: CORRELATION WITH SURGICAL FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Ricardo da Rocha; Rangel, Victor de Oliveira; Karam, Francisco Consoli; Pires, Luiz Antônio Simões

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A set of five maneuvers for meniscal injuries (McMurray, Apley, Childress and Steinmann 1 and 2) was evaluated and their sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and likelihood were calculated. The same methods were applied to each test individually. Methods: One hundred and fifty-two patients of both sexes who were going to undergo videoarthroscopy on the knee were examined blindly by one of five residents at this hospital, without knowledge of the clinical data and why the patient was going to undergo an operation. This examination was conducted immediately before the videoarthroscopy and its results were recorded in an electronic spreadsheet. The set of maneuvers was considered positive when one was positive. In the individual analysis, it was enough for the test to be positive. Results: The analysis showed that the set of five meniscal tests presented sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 42%, accuracy of 75%, positive likelihood of 1.53 and negative likelihood of 0.26. Individually, the tests presented accuracy of between 48% and 53%. Conclusion: The set of maneuvers for meniscal injuries presented a good accuracy and significant value, especially for ruling out injury. Individually, the tests had less diagnostic value, although the Apley test had better specificity. PMID:27047833

  10. Assessment of regeneration in meniscal lesions by use of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Maria L; Pérez-Castrillo, Saúl; Sánchez-Lázaro, Jaime A; Prieto-Fernández, Julio G; López-González, Maria E; Lobato-Pérez, Sandra; Colaço, Bruno J; Olivera, Elías R; Villar-Suárez, Vega

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the ability to regenerate an equine meniscus by use of a collagen repair patch (scaffold) seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue (AT). SAMPLE 6 female Hispano-Breton horses between 4 and 7 years of age; MSCs from BM and AT were obtained for the in vitro experiment, and the horses were subsequently used for the in vivo experiment. PROCEDURES Similarities and differences between MSCs derived from BM or AT were investigated in vitro by use of cell culture. In vivo assessment involved use of a meniscus defect and implantation on a scaffold. Horses were allocated into 2 groups. In one group, defects in the medial meniscus were treated with MSCs derived from BM, whereas in the other group, defects were treated with MSCs derived from AT. Defects were created in the contralateral stifle joint but were not treated (control samples). RESULTS Both types of MSCs had universal stem cell characteristics. For in vivo testing, at 12 months after treatment, treated defects were regenerated with fibrocartilaginous tissue, whereas untreated defects were partially repaired or not repaired. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that MSCs derived from AT could be a good alternative to MSCs derived from BM for use in regenerative treatments. Results also were promising for a stem cell-based implant for use in regeneration in meniscal lesions. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Because of similarities in joint disease between horses and humans, these results could have applications in humans. PMID:27347833

  11. Medical meniscus repairs. An experimental and morphologic study.

    PubMed

    Cabaud, H E; Rodkey, W G; Fitzwater, J E

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to determine the healing potential of medial meniscus tears, 20 canine and 12 rhesus knee joints were subjected to transverse medial meniscus laceration and repair with a single Dexon suture (Davis & Geck, Pearl River, NY). At four months, 12 out of 32 (38%) had healed completely with restoration of the inner meniscal rim and 18 (56%) showed partial healing sufficient to protect the underlying articular cartilage. Only 2 (6%) of the menisci failed to heal. Histologic evaluation showed that the scar tissue present in the menisci was composed of unorganized collagen without common ground substance components. As a result of these studies, we believe that certain meniscal tears, particularly those involving the vascular periphery, can heal and may be repaired rather than treated by meniscectomy. PMID:6894516

  12. Bilateral atraumatic medial meniscal tears in a 17-year-old rower.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Taryn Lise; Frankovich, Renata; Rumball, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Meniscal injury produces disability in a large portion of the population, and sports injuries are a common cause. Atraumatic meniscal tears may occur after repetitive low-energy loading. Rowing is a highly technical sport and very demanding on an athlete's body. There are numerous reports on patellofemoral and iliotibial band friction syndrome in rowers but there is an extremely low incidence of meniscal tears reported in these athletes. This is a unique case report of a young adolescent athlete who suffered bilateral medical meniscal tears during sporting activity. Rowing is a low impact sport making this an unusual occurrence, especially in a young individual. This case report highlights the importance of considering all training activities when trying to isolate the mechanism of injury in an athlete. PMID:21686387

  13. Applying Electrospun Gelatin/Poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) Bilayered Nanofibers to Fabrication of Meniscal Tissue Engineering Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Weiguo; Yu, Hongquan; Zheng, Lianjie; Yang, Liang; Liu, Gang; Sheng, Chenchen; Gui, Haoran; Ni, Shuo; Li, Pengsheng; Shi, Feng

    2016-05-01

    The menisci are fibrocartilaginous tissues composed primarily of an interlacing network of collagen fibers with nanoscale diameter. Electrospinning is a suitable process of producing nanoscale fibers that mimic collagen fibers. In this study, a bilayered scaffold (group B), which consists of a gelatin nanofiber mesh and a PLGA nanofiber mesh, has been fabricated through an electrospinning method. At the same time, we electrospun pure PLGA fibrous mesh (group A) and gelatin/PLGA composite fibrous mesh (group C) as control groups. In order to compare all scaffold morphologies, the scaffolds were imaged by SEM and some parameters were measured and analyzed as following: Diameters of fibrils are from the smallest of less than average 0.14 μm for group C to the biggest of nearly average 0.38 μm for group B. The scaffolds pore diameters are from average 4.9 μm for group A to average 11.2 μm for group B. Porosity rates show that the group B has the highest porosity rate at about 91%. The scaffolds' properties were compared and analyzed, including hydrophilicity property (water contact angle) and mechanical properties (tensile strength). The results of water contact angle showed the group B is the most hydrophil among the groups. The results of tensile strength showed the tensile strength of group C is the weakest among the groups. All the results showed significant differences between the groups. Finally, in vitro, the meniscal cells derived from New Zealand white rabbits menisci were seeded in the scaffolds. We observed the cells proliferation behavior in the scaffolds. All above demonstrates that a bi-layered gelatin/PLGA scaffold reveals not only concurrent effects of mechanics and cytocompatibility in a fibrous context, but also a promising scaffold for future meniscal repair strategies. PMID:27483813

  14. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Khodamorad; Yahyazadeh, Hooman; Bagherifard, Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma. PMID:26550597

  15. In vitro synthesis of tensioned synoviocyte bioscaffolds for meniscal fibrocartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meniscal injury is a common cause of lameness in the dog. Tissue engineered bioscaffolds may be a treatment option for meniscal incompetency, and ideally would possess meniscus- like extracellular matrix (ECM) and withstand meniscal tensile hoop strains. Synovium may be a useful cell source for meniscal tissue engineering because of its natural role in meniscal deficiency and its in vitro chondrogenic potential. The objective of this study is to compare meniscal -like extracellular matrix content of hyperconfluent synoviocyte cell sheets (“HCS”) and hyperconfluent synoviocyte sheets which have been tensioned over wire hoops (tensioned synoviocyte bioscaffolds, “TSB”) and cultured for 1 month. Results Long term culture with tension resulted in higher GAG concentration, higher chondrogenic index, higher collagen concentration, and type II collagen immunoreactivity in TSB versus HCS. Both HCS and TSB were immunoreactive for type I collagen, however, HCS had mild, patchy intracellular immunoreactivity while TSB had diffuse moderate immunoreactivity over the entire bisocaffold. The tissue architecture was markedly different between TSB and HCS, with TSB containing collagen organized in bands and sheets. Both HCS and TSB expressed alpha smooth muscle actin and displayed active contractile behavior. Double stranded DNA content was not different between TSB and HCS, while cell viability decreased in TSB. Conclusions Long term culture of synoviocytes with tension improved meniscal- like extra cellular matrix components, specifically, the total collagen content, including type I and II collagen, and increased GAG content relative to HCS. Future research is warranted to investigate the potential of TSB for meniscal tissue engineering. PMID:24299420

  16. NANOINDENTATION OF THE INSERTIONAL ZONES OF HUMAN MENISCAL ATTACHMENTS INTO UNDERLYING BONE

    PubMed Central

    Hauch, K.N.; Oyen, M.L.; Odegard, G.M.; Haut Donahue, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The fibrocartilagenous knee menisci are situated between the femoral condyles and tibia plateau and are primarily anchored to the tibia by means of four attachments at the anterior and posterior horns. Strong fixation of meniscal attachments to the tibial plateau provide resistance to extruding forces of the meniscal body, allowing the menisci to assist in load transmission from the femur to the tibia. Clinically, tears and ruptures of the meniscal attachments and insertion to bone are rare. While it has been suggested that the success of a meniscal replacement is dependent on several factors, one of which is the secure fixation and firm attachment of the replacement to the tibial plateau, little is known about the material properties of meniscal attachments and the transition in material properties from the meniscus to subchondral bone. The objective of this study was to use nanoindentation to investigate the transition from meniscal attachment into underlying subchondral bone through uncalcified and calcified fibrocartilage. Nanoindentation tests were performed on both the anterior and posterior meniscal insertions to measure the instantaneous elastic modulus and elastic modulus at infinite time. The elastic moduli were found to increase in a bi-linear fashion from the external ligamentous attachment to the subchondral bone. The elastic moduli for the anterior attachments were consistently larger than those for the matching posterior attachments at similar indentation locations. These results show that there is a gradient of stiffness from the superficial zones of the insertion close to the ligamentous attachment into the deeper zones of the bone. This information will be useful in the continued development of successful meniscal replacements and understanding of fixation of the replacements to the tibial plateau. PMID:19627840

  17. Targeted transplantation of iron oxide-labeled, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in promoting meniscus regeneration following a rabbit massive meniscal defect

    PubMed Central

    QI, YIYING; YANG, ZHIGAO; DING, QIANHAI; ZHAO, TENGFEI; HUANG, ZHONGMING; FENG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Repair of a massive meniscal defect remains a challenge in the clinic. However, targeted magnetic cell delivery, an emerging technique, may be useful in its treatment. The present study aimed to determine the effect of targeted intra-articular injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) in a rabbit model of a massive meniscal defect. ASCs may be directly labeled and almost 100% of the ASCs were labeled with SPIO after 24 h; these SPIO-labeled ASCs may be orientated by magnet. The centrifuged SPIO-labeled ASCs precipitations may be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anterior half of the medial meniscus of 18 New Zealand Rabbits was excised. After 7 days, the rabbits were randomized to injections of 2×106 SPIO-labeled ASCs, 2×106 unlabeled ASCs or saline. Permanent magnets were fixed to the outside of the operated joints for one day, and after 6 and 12 weeks, the knee joints were examined using MRI, gross and histological observation, and Prussian blue staining. Marked hypointense artifacts caused by SPIO-positive cells in the meniscus were detected using MRI. Histological observation revealed that the anterior portion of the meniscus was similar to the native tissue, demonstrating typical fibrochondrocytes surrounded by richer extracellular matrix in the SPIO-ASCs group. Collagen-rich matrix bridging the interface and the neo-meniscus integrated well with its host meniscus. Furthermore, degenerative changes occurred in all groups, but intra-articular injection of SPIO-ASCs or ASCs alleviated these degenerative changes. Prussian blue staining indicated that the implanted ASCs were directly associated with the regenerated tissue. Overall, targeted intra-articular delivery of SPIO-ASCs promoted meniscal regeneration whilst providing protective effects from osteoarthritic damage. PMID:26893631

  18. Percutaneous injections of Platelet rich plasma for treatment of intrasubstance meniscal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Fabian; Vavken, Patrick; Haenle, Maximilian; von Wehren, Lutz; Pagenstert, Geert; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction management of intrasubstance meniscal lesions is still controversial. Intrasubstance meniscal lesions can lead to reduced sports activity and meniscal rupture. Physical therapy is often not satisfactory. Therefore new treatment methods are requested. Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has the ability to regenerate tissue; this was proved in several experimental studies. Whether percutaneous injections of PRP are effective in intrasubstance meniscal lesions is unknown. We hypothesize that percutaneous PRP injections lead to pain relief and halt of progression on MRI over 6 months in patients with grade 2 meniscal lesions. Materials and methods ten recreational athletes with intrasubstance meniscal lesions (grade II according to Reicher) proven by MR-Imaging (MRI) were treated by percutaneous injections of PRP in the affected meniscal area. Three sequential injections in seven day intervals were performed in every patient. All injections were performed with image converter. Follow-up MRI was done six months after last injection in every patient. Level of sports activity and amount of pain at athletic loads according to numeric rating scale (NRS-11) were noted in each patient before injections and at the time of follow up MRI after six months. The t-test was used to determine statistical differences. Results four of ten patients (40%) showed decrease of meniscal lesion in follow up MRI after six months. Nine of ten patients (90%) complained about short episodes of heavy pain after the injections with average NRS-Score of 7.9 at daily loads after the last injection. Six of ten patients (60%) showed Improvement of NRS-Score at final follow up. Average NRS-Score improved significantly (p=0.027) from 6.9 before injections to 4.5 six month after treatment. Six of ten patients (60%) reported increase of sports activity compared to the situation before injections. In four patients (40%) additional surgical treatment was necessary because of persistent knee pain

  19. Meniscal Scaffolds - Preclinical Evidence to Support their Use: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Perdisa, Francesco; Gostynska, Natalia; Kon, Elizaveta; Filardo, Giuseppe; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal treatment is the most common procedure performed in the orthopedic practice. Current management of meniscal pathology relies on different therapeutic options, ranging from selective meniscectomy, suturing, and to meniscal replacement by using either allografts or scaffolds. The progresses made in the field of regenerative medicine and biomaterials allowed to develop several meniscal substitutes, some of those currently used in the clinical practice. Before reaching the clinical application, these devices necessarily undergo accurate testing in the animal model: the aim of the present manuscript is to systematically review the scientific evidence derived by animal model results for the use of meniscal scaffolds, in order to understand the current state of research in this particular field and to identify the trends at preclinical level that may influence in the near future the clinical practice. Thirty-four papers were included in the present analysis. In 12 cases the meniscal scaffolds were used with cells to further stimulate tissue regeneration. With the exception of some negative reports regarding dacron-based scaffolds, the majority of the trials highlighted that biomaterials and bio-engineered scaffolds are safe and could play a beneficial role in stimulating meniscal healing and in chondral protection. With regard to the benefits of cell augmentation, the evidence is limited to a small number of studies and no conclusive evidence is available. However, preclinical evidence seems to suggest that cells could enhance tissue regeneration with respect to the use of biomaterials alone, and further research should confirm the translational potential of cell-based approach. PMID:26157531

  20. Meniscal Scaffolds - Preclinical Evidence to Support their Use: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Perdisa, Francesco; Gostynska, Natalia; Kon, Elizaveta; Filardo, Giuseppe; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal treatment is the most common procedure performed in the orthopedic practice. Current management of meniscal pathology relies on different therapeutic options, ranging from selective meniscectomy, suturing, and to meniscal replacement by using either allografts or scaffolds. The progresses made in the field of regenerative medicine and biomaterials allowed to develop several meniscal substitutes, some of those currently used in the clinical practice. Before reaching the clinical application, these devices necessarily undergo accurate testing in the animal model: the aim of the present manuscript is to systematically review the scientific evidence derived by animal model results for the use of meniscal scaffolds, in order to understand the current state of research in this particular field and to identify the trends at preclinical level that may influence in the near future the clinical practice. Thirty-four papers were included in the present analysis. In 12 cases the meniscal scaffolds were used with cells to further stimulate tissue regeneration. With the exception of some negative reports regarding dacron-based scaffolds, the majority of the trials highlighted that biomaterials and bio-engineered scaffolds are safe and could play a beneficial role in stimulating meniscal healing and in chondral protection. With regard to the benefits of cell augmentation, the evidence is limited to a small number of studies and no conclusive evidence is available. However, preclinical evidence seems to suggest that cells could enhance tissue regeneration with respect to the use of biomaterials alone, and further research should confirm the translational potential of cell-based approach. PMID:26157531

  1. Medial Posterior Meniscal Root Tears Are Associated with Development or Worsening of Medial Tibiofemoral Cartilage Damage: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuqing; Niu, Jingbo; Crema, Michel D.; Englund, Martin; Lynch, John A.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Torner, James C.; Lewis, Cora E.; Felson, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of meniscal root tear with the development or worsening of tibiofemoral cartilage damage. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all subjects were obtained. A total of 596 knees with radiographically depicted osteoarthritis were randomly selected from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis study cohort. Cartilage damage was semiquantitatively assessed by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) system (grades 0–6). Subjects were separated into three groups: root tear only, meniscal tear without root tear, and neither meniscal nor root tear. A log-binomial regression model was used to calculate the relative risks for knees to develop incident or progressing cartilage damage in the root tear group and the meniscal tear group, with the no tear group serving as a reference. Results: In the medial tibiofemoral joint, there were 37 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 294 with meniscal tear without root tear, and 264 without meniscal or root tear. There were only two lateral posterior root tears, and no anterior root tears were found. Thus, the focus was on the medial posterior root tear. The frequency of severe cartilage damage (WORMS ≥5) was higher in the group with root tear than in the group without root or meniscal tear (76.7% vs 19.7%, P < .0001) but not in the group with meniscal but no root tear (76.7% vs 65.2%, P = .055). Longitudinal analyses included 33 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 270 with meniscal tear, and 245 with no tear. Adjusted relative risk of cartilage loss was 2.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18, 3.48) for the root tear group and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.58) for the meniscal tear group. Conclusion: Isolated medial posterior meniscal root tear is associated with incident and progressive medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23696679

  2. Role of computer aided detection (CAD) integration: case study with meniscal and articular cartilage CAD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdar, Nabile; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Saiprasad, Ganesh; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    Knee-related injuries involving the meniscal or articular cartilage are common and require accurate diagnosis and surgical intervention when appropriate. With proper techniques and experience, confidence in detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage abnormalities can be quite high. However, for radiologists without musculoskeletal training, diagnosis of such abnormalities can be challenging. In this paper, the potential of improving diagnosis through integration of computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms for automatic detection of meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries of the knees is studied. An integrated approach in which the results of algorithms evaluating either meniscal tears or articular cartilage injuries provide feedback to each other is believed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the individual CAD algorithms due to the known association between abnormalities in these distinct anatomic structures. The correlation between meniscal tears and articular cartilage injuries is exploited to improve the final diagnostic results of the individual algorithms. Preliminary results from the integrated application are encouraging and more comprehensive tests are being planned.

  3. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL. PMID:26270763

  4. Lateral meniscal variant with absence of the posterior coronary ligament.

    PubMed

    Neuschwander, D C; Drez, D; Finney, T P

    1992-09-01

    We reviewed the cases of 3468 patients who had had arthroscopy of the knee between January 1976 and December 1988. Twenty-six patients (0.8 per cent) had a partial or a complete discoid lateral meniscus, and seven (0.2 per cent) had the Wrisberg-variant-type lateral meniscus. Of the seven patients, six had operative stabilization of the meniscus and one had a partial lateral meniscectomy because of an irreparable complex tear. Subjective, objective, and radiographic evaluations were performed on the patients who had had stabilization of the meniscus. According to the scale of Tegner and Lysholm, the result was excellent in four patients, good in one, and fair in one. None of the six patients had a tear of the sutured meniscus after an average follow-up of thirty-two months (range, twenty-four to forty months). Two patients had progressive symptoms attributable to osteoarthrosis, but the changes in the articular cartilage had been present at the time of the index procedure. None of the seven Wrisberg-variant-type menisci demonstrated a true discoid shape of the meniscus. We therefore classified this lesion as a lateral meniscal variant with absence of the posterior coronary ligament. PMID:1400547

  5. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts: mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Wisnewski, P J; Powers, D L; Kennedy, J M

    1988-01-01

    Removal of a severely damaged medial meniscus has been shown to lead to degradation of the articular cartilage and formation of degenerative arthritis. To counter this degenerative effect, meniscal prostheses, including glutaraldehyde-cross-linked allografts, have been evaluated in dogs. The purpose of this research was to quantify the mechanical properties of both fresh and glutaraldehyde-cross-linked canine medial menisci. Mechanical properties quantified were tensile strength, tensile modulus, and compressive stiffness. In addition, water content of compressive test samples was measured. Analysis of variance showed significantly lower tensile strength and tensile modulus and significantly higher compressive stiffness for the glutaraldehyde-cross-linked menisci, as compared to fresh specimens. Measurement of the weight percentage of water in fresh and cross-linked samples revealed no significant differences in water content. When implanted into a joint, the increased compressive stiffness could increase the peripheral tensile load. Due to the decreased tensile strength in this region, the prosthetic meniscus could be susceptible to peripheral tears. PMID:3155295

  6. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Abhishek; Brar, Rahat; Rana, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Disproportional posterior horn and flipped meniscus signs represent asymmetrically thickened horns of the menisci due to overlying displaced meniscal fragments. We report a case wherein MRI of the knee showed tear and displacement of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and vastus medialis complex, medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) mimicking these signs. To our knowledge, internally displaced MPFL and MCLs have not been described as mimics for displaced meniscal fragments. PMID:25114394

  7. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... a medical team with experience in children with spina bifida. Your baby will likely have an MRI (magnetic ...

  8. Large lateral meniscal ganglion cyst extending into the intercondylar fossa of the knee.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Alwin; Eberhardt, Christian; Hailer, Nils P

    2004-07-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old, otherwise healthy man with a large intra-articular meniscal ganglion cyst (27.7 x 13.5 mm) originating from the dorsal horn of the lateral meniscus. Clinically, the patient presented with knee pain in a squatting position. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large intra-articular cyst in the posterior compartment. At arthroscopic surgery, the ganglion cyst was found in the intercondylar space posteriorly to the posterior cruciate ligament. After removal of the ganglion cyst, a horizontal tear in the dorsal horn of the lateral meniscus was revealed and treated by partial meniscectomy. To our knowledge, a meniscal ganglion cyst originating from the lateral meniscus and extending into the joint is an extremely rare event, with only two previous reported cases. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis, distribution, and treatment of meniscal ganglion cysts. PMID:15243414

  9. Clinical and arthroscopic features of meniscal tears and a search for the role of infection in histologically confirmed meniscal mucoid degeneration.

    PubMed

    Boya, Hakan; Pinar, Halit; Gülay, Zeynep; Oktay, Gülgün; Ozer, Erdener

    2004-07-01

    Mucoid degeneration (MD) of the meniscus has received little attention. The pathology deserves special interest as it may lead to loss of the meniscus even in very young individuals. The cause of MD and the clinical features of meniscal tears due to that pathology have not been understood. This study analyzed the age profile and the role of trauma in patients with torn menisci with MD, examined meniscal tear patterns and clinical features, and investigated the role of bacterial infection in causing MD. Meniscal samples obtained from 27 consecutive patients during arthroscopic resection of torn menisci considered to be due to MD (typical yellow color) underwent pathological investigation. The samples were scored according to the light microscopic criteria of Copenhaver; 24 menisci (23 patients) with stage 2-3 MD comprised the study group. Magnetic resonance imaging obtained in 11 patients typically revealed increased intrasubstance signal intensity that extended to at least one of the meniscal surfaces. Pieces of resected meniscal tissue were also subject to PCR investigation to search for presence of bacteria. Of the 24 knees 21 (87%) had no history of trauma. Mean Tegner activity level was 4 (1 and 7). Mean duration of symptoms was 11.6 months (1-36). Pain was the most frequent symptom ( n=22). Joint line tenderness and McMurray's test (pain and/or clicking) were present in 22 and 16 knees, respectively. Medial meniscus was affected in 16 and lateral meniscus in 8. Meniscal cyst and incomplete discoid meniscus was present in 5 and 2 of the lateral menisci. All of the torn menisci were degenerated and yellow in color. The most common tear patterns were radial and/or flap, and longitudinal-horizontal tears. PCR study revealed no bacteria. Mucoid degeneration of the meniscus does not seem to be related to the aging process. Clinical findings of torn such menisci are insidious compared to traumatic tears. Lack of history of trauma may delay the diagnosis. Bacterial

  10. Kinetic study of the replacement of porcine small intestinal submucosa grafts and the regeneration of meniscal-like tissue in large avascular meniscal defects in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Arnoczky, S P; Fox, D B; Reeves Cook, C; Kreeger, J M

    2001-06-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was used to replace large, avascular defects in the medial menisci of dogs. Twelve dogs received SIS grafts and 3 dogs were left untreated as controls. Dogs were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks by means of lameness scoring and ultrasonography. Dogs were sacrificed at 1, 6, or 12 weeks after implantation, and the tissue at the site of meniscal resection was evaluated for gross and histologic appearance, cross-sectional and surface area, and collagen types I and II. The femoral and tibial condyles were assessed for articular cartilage damage. Control dogs were significantly more lame than grafted dogs 8 and 12 weeks after instrumentation. Grafted dogs' replacement tissue appeared meniscal-like when evaluated grossly and ultrasonographically 12 weeks after instrumentation. The amount of replacement tissue was significantly greater in both cross-sectional and surface area for grafted dogs than for controls at all time points. Histologically, the SIS biomaterial could be identified in all grafted dogs at 1 week post-implantation, but in none at 6 weeks post-implantation. Subjectively, grafted dogs' replacement tissue was histologically superior to that of controls with respect to tissue type, organization, and architecture. Collagen types I and II immunoreactivity in grafted menisci were similar to that of normal menisci. Control dogs had significantly more articular cartilage damage than grafted dogs. SIS appears to induce regeneration of meniscal-like tissue in large, avascular meniscal defects in dogs, resulting in superior clinical function and articular cartilage protection compared to ungrafted controls. PMID:11429152

  11. Evaluation of small intestinal submucosa grafts for meniscal regeneration in a clinically relevant posterior meniscectomy model in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L; Fox, Derek B; Malaviya, Prasanna; Tomlinson, James L; Farr, Jack; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi Reeves

    2006-07-01

    Large meniscal defects are a common problem for which treatment options are limited. Successful meniscal regeneration has been achieved by using grafts of small intestinal submucosa in posterior, vascular meniscal defects in a dog model. This study investigates the long-term effects of a tibial tunnel fixation technique and a clinically based meniscectomy defect on meniscal regeneration using this model. Eight mongrel dogs underwent medial arthrotomy and partial meniscectomy. The dogs were divided into groups based on defect treatment: small intestinal submucosa (n = 4) or meniscectomy (n = 4). Dogs were scored for lameness by subjective scoring postoperatively, sacrificed at 6 months, and assessed for articular cartilage damage, gross and histologic appearance of the operated meniscus, amount of new tissue in the defect, and relative compressive stiffness of articular cartilage. Dogs in the meniscectomy group were significantly (P = .002) more lame than dogs treated with small intestinal submucosa. Small intestinal submucosa-treated joints had significantly (P = .01) less articular cartilage damage than meniscectomy joints. Small intestinal submucosa meniscal implants resulted in production of meniscal-like replacement tissue, which was consistently superior to meniscectomy in amount, type, and integration of new tissue, chondroprotection, and limb function during the study period. Small intestinal submucosa implants may be useful for treatment of large posterior vascular meniscal defects in humans. The tibial tunnel technique used for fixation may have clinical advantages and therefore warrants further investigation. PMID:16893153

  12. Axial alignment of the lower limb in patients with isolated meniscal tear.

    PubMed

    Habata, T; Ishimura, M; Ohgushi, H; Tamai, S; Fujisawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    Meniscal tears do not always result from trauma. To elucidate other factors responsible for meniscal tears, we evaluated the axial alignment of the lower limb in 385 patients (385 menisci) with isolated meniscal tear who were examined between 1972 and 1994. The patients were aged 50 years or less and had no ulceration or defect of articular cartilage of the knee when examined arthroscopically. Of the 385 menisci, 90 were lateral complete discoid; 110, lateral incomplete discoid; 68, lateral semilunar; and 117, medial semilunar. Patients in each of these four groups were divided into four subgroups according to sex and whether there was an obvious history of trauma. The so-called Mikulicz's mechanical axis of the affected side was utilized to evaluate the alignment. The axial alignment of the lower limb was normal in the patients with isolated tears of lateral complete discoid meniscus, lateral incomplete discoid, or lateral semilunar. It appeared that the axial alignment of the lower limb did not have a relationship with the occurrence of these tears. Patients with isolated tears of medial semilunar meniscus without obvious trauma, showed varus deformity of the knee. This deformity appeared to be closely related to the presence of medial meniscal tear. PMID:9654560

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in assessment of Meniscal and ACL tear: Correlation with arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Jamal; Alam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Khalid, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in injuries related to anterior cruciate ligament and menisci and compare its effectiveness with that of arthroscopy. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Radiology & Medical Imaging of Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from September 2012 to March 2014. Fifty four patients (including 30 men and 24 women) with internal derangement of knee referred from the orthopedic consulting clinics underwent MR imaging followed by arthroscopic evaluation. The presence of meniscal and ligamentous abnormality on the imaging was documented by two trained radiologist. Findings were later compared with arthroscopic findings. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR imaging for menisci and ACL injury were calculated: 100% sensitivity, 88.4% specificity, 90% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 94.4% accuracy were noted for medial meniscal injury. Similarly, MR had sensitivity of 85.7%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 85.7%, negative predictive value of 95%, and accuracy of 92.5% for lateral meniscal injuries. Likewise, anterior cruciate ligament had 91.6% sensitivity, 95.2% specificity, 84.6% positive predictive value, 97.5% negative predictive value, and 94.4% accuracy. Conclusion: MRI is extremely helpful in identifying meniscal and anterior cruciate ligaments tears. MR imaging has high negative predictive value making it better choice as screening tool compared to diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation in most patients with soft tissue trauma to knee. PMID:26101472

  14. An arthroscopic analysis of lateral meniscal variants and a comparison with MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Goo; Ihn, Joo-Chul; Park, Seong-Ki; Kyung, Hee-Soo

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed 164 consecutive cases (158 patients) of arthroscopic examinations for lateral meniscal variants during the last 10 years. We classified lateral meniscal variants into four types by arthroscopic appearance, into six tear patterns by modifying O'Connor's classification, and compared magnetic resonance images (MRI) with arthroscopic findings. Regarding the four types, 131 cases were complete, 25 cases were incomplete, 4 cases were Wrisberg, and 4 cases were ring-shaped meniscus. The six tear patterns were as follows: 33 simple horizontal, 21 combined horizontal, 37 longitudinal, 27 central, 14 complex, and 12 radial tear. Among the 31 knees with a central tear or ring-shaped meniscus, we reviewed 25 MR images. Fifteen (60%) MRI findings were interpreted to represent a bucket-handle (displaced) tear of the normal C-shaped meniscus; 7(28%) MRI findings, a discoid meniscal tear; and the remaining 3(12%) MRI findings, a simple meniscal tear. Moreover, all ring-shaped menisci were interpreted as a displaced lateral meniscal tear on the MRI findings. Twelve patients (13 knees, 7.9%) had osteochondritis dissecans: Nine patients (10 knees) of them had a central tear, two patients (2 knees) of them had a simple horizontal tear of the discoid meniscus, and one patient (1 knee) had a ring-shaped meniscus. Twenty three patients (92.6%) with a central tear of the discoid meniscus did not have any traumatic events. For the differential diagnosis of a central tear or a ring-shaped meniscus from a bucket-handle tear of the normal C-shaped meniscus, we should take a careful history, in particular any traumatic events, we should also consider the possibility of misinterpreting the MR images though these images can provide additional information about associated abnormalities and probe carefully in the arthroscopic operations. PMID:15905996

  15. Amino acid racemization reveals differential protein turnover in osteoarthritic articular and meniscal cartilages

    PubMed Central

    Stabler, Thomas V; Byers, Samuel S; Zura, Robert D; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Certain amino acids within proteins have been reported to change from the L form to the D form over time. This process is known as racemization and is most likely to occur in long-lived low-turnover tissues such as normal cartilage. We hypothesized that diseased tissue, as found in an osteoarthritic (OA) joint, would have increased turnover reflected by a decrease in the racemized amino acid content. Methods Using high-performance liquid chromatography methods, we quantified the L and D forms of amino acids reported to racemize in vivo on a biological timescale: alanine, aspartate (Asp), asparagine (Asn), glutamate, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine (Leu), and serine (Ser). Furthermore, using a metabolically inactive control material (tooth dentin) and a control material with normal metabolism (normal articular cartilage), we developed an age adjustment in order to make inferences about the state of protein turnover in cartilage and meniscus. Results In the metabolically inactive control material (n = 25, ages 13 to 80 years) and the normal metabolizing control material (n = 19, ages 17 to 83 years), only Asp + Asn (Asx), Ser, and Leu showed a significant change (increase) in racemization with age (P < 0.01). The age-adjusted proportions of racemized to total amino acid (D/D+L expressed as a percentage of the control material) for Asx, Ser, and Leu when compared with the normal articular cartilage control were 97%, 74%, and 73% in OA meniscal cartilage and 97%, 70%, and 78% in OA articular cartilage. We also observed lower amino acid content in OA articular and meniscal cartilages compared with normal articular cartilage as well as a loss of total amino acids with age in the OA meniscal but not the OA articular cartilage. Conclusions These data demonstrate comparable anabolic responses for non-lesioned OA articular cartilage and OA meniscal cartilage but an excess of catabolism over anabolism for the meniscal cartilage. PMID:19267899

  16. Tissue adhesives for meniscus tear repair: an overview of current advances and prospects for future clinical solutions.

    PubMed

    Bochyńska, A I; Hannink, G; Grijpma, D W; Buma, P

    2016-05-01

    Menisci are crucial structures in the knee joint as they play important functions in load transfer, maintaining joint stability and in homeostasis of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, ones of the most frequently occurring knee injuries are meniscal tears. Particularly tears in the avascular zone of the meniscus usually do not heal spontaneously and lead to pain, swelling and locking of the knee joint. Eventually, after a (partial) meniscectomy, they will lead to osteoarthritis. Current treatment modalities to repair tears and by that restore the integrity of the native meniscus still carry their drawbacks and a new robust solution is desired. A strong tissue adhesive could provide such a solution and could potentially improve on sutures, which are the current gold standard. Moreover, a glue could serve as a carrier for biological compounds known to enhance tissue healing. Only few tissue adhesives, e.g., Dermabond(®) and fibrin glue, are already successfully used in clinical practice for other applications, but are not considered suitable for gluing meniscus tissue due to their sub-optimal mechanical properties or toxicity. There is a growing interest and research field focusing on the development of novel polymer-based tissue adhesives, but up to now, there is no material specially designed for the repair of meniscal tears. In this review, we discuss the current clinical gold standard treatment of meniscal tears and present an overview of new developments in this field. Moreover, we discuss the properties of different tissue adhesives for their potential use in meniscal tear repair. Finally, we formulate recommendations regarding the design criteria of material properties and adhesive strength for clinically applicable glues for meniscal tears. PMID:26970767

  17. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  18. ISAKOS classification of meniscal tears-illustration on 2D and 3D isotropic spin echo MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Omar, Hythem; Coyner, Katherine; Khazzam, Michael; Robertson, William; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is modality of choice for the non-invasive evaluation of meniscal tears. Accurate and uniform documentation of meniscal pathology is necessary for optimal multi-disciplinary communication, to guide treatment options and for validation of patient outcomes studies. The increasingly used ISAKOS arthroscopic meniscus tear classification system has been shown to provide sufficient interobserver reliability among the surgeons. However, the terminology is not in common use in the radiology world. In this article, the authors discuss the MR imaging appearances of meniscal tears based on ISAKOS classification on 2D and multiplanar 3D isotropic spin echo imaging techniques and illustrate the correlations of various meniscal pathologies with relevant arthroscopic images. PMID:26724644

  19. Multiple injections of leukoreduced platelet rich plasma reduce pain and functional impairment in a canine model of ACL and meniscal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L; Smith, Patrick A; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Stoker, Aaron M; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-04-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is used to treat many musculoskeletal disorders. We used a canine model to determine the effects of multiple intra-articular injections of leukoreduced PRP (ACP) on anterior cruciate ligament healing, meniscal healing, and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). With Animal Care and Use Committee (ACUC) approval, 12 dogs underwent partial ACL transection and meniscal release in one knee. At weeks 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 after insult, dogs were treated with intra-articular injections (2 ml) of either ACP (n = 6) or saline (n = 6). Dogs were assessed over 6 months to determine comfortable range of motion (CROM), lameness, pain, effusion, kinetics, and radiographic and arthroscopic assessments. At 6-month endpoint, dogs were assessed for ACL material properties and histopathology. Saline-treated dogs had significantly (p < 0.04) more CROM loss, significantly (p < 0.01) more pain, significantly (p < 0.05) more severe lameness, significantly (p < 0.05) lower function, and significantly (p < 0.05) lower %Total Pressure Index in affected hindlimbs compared to ACP-treated dogs. Radiographic OA increased significantly (p < 0.01) over time within each group. Arthroscopically, saline-treated knees showed moderate to severe synovitis, further ACL disruption, and medial compartment cartilage loss, and ACP-treated knees showed evidence of ACL repair and less severe synovitis. ACL material properties in ACP-treated knees were closer to normal than in saline-treated knees, however, the differences were not statistically significant. ACL histopathology was significantly (p< 0.05) less severe in ACP-treated knees compared to saline-treated knees. Five intra-articular injections of leukoreduced PRP had beneficial effects for ACL healing, improved range of motion, decreased pain, and improved limb function for up to 6 months in this model. PMID:26403590

  20. Large regional differences in incidence of arthroscopic meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Vinther, Jesper Høeg; Lohmander, L Stefan; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent study reported a large increase in the number of meniscal procedures from 2000 to 2011 in Denmark. We examined the nation-wide distribution of meniscal procedures performed in the private and public sector in Denmark since different incentives may be present and the use of these procedures may differ from region to region. Setting We included data on all patients who underwent an arthroscopic meniscal procedure performed in the public or private sector in Denmark. Participants Data were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register on patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscus surgery as a primary or secondary procedure in the years 2000 to 2011. Hospital identification codes enabled linkage of performed procedures to specific hospitals. Primary and secondary outcome measures Yearly incidence of meniscal procedures per 100 000 inhabitants was calculated with 95% CIs for public and private procedures for each region. Results Incidence of meniscal procedures increased at private and at public hospitals. The private sector accounted for the largest relative and absolute increase, rising from an incidence of 1 in 2000 to 98 in 2011. In 2011, the incidence of meniscal procedures was three times higher in the Capital Region than in Region Zealand. Conclusions Our study identified a large increase in the use of meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark. The increase was particularly conspicuous in the private sector as its proportion of procedures performed increased from 1% to 32%. Substantial regional differences were present in the incidence and trend over time of meniscal procedures. PMID:25712820

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for meniscal tears in dogs affected with naturally occuring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Blond, Laurent; Thrall, Donald E; Roe, Simon C; Chailleux, Nadege; Robertson, Ian D

    2008-01-01

    A stifle magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol was developed based on the appearance of the cruciate ligaments and menisci in normal dogs. Proton density images were subjectively considered to have the highest likelihood of detecting a meniscal lesion. Following this initial evaluation, the accuracy of high-field MR imaging to detect meniscal tears in dogs was evaluated in 11 dogs suffering from naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Dogs underwent MR imaging of the affected stifle before surgery. MR imaging and surgical findings were assessed independently, and then compared. Five tears of the medial meniscus were correctly diagnosed with MR imaging and 19 normal menisci were accurately characterized as such, based on MR images. In one medial meniscus, changes consistent with meniscal degeneration were seen on MR images but this was not seen at surgery. With regard to the lateral meniscus, one false positive diagnosis of a tear was made and this likely represented a normal variation. One other lateral meniscus had changes consistent with meniscal degeneration but, as with the similar lesion seen in the medial meniscus, this was not confirmed surgically. The global sensitivity of MR imaging for the diagnosis of a meniscal tear was 100% and the specificity was 94%. High-field MR imaging is a reliable method to diagnose meniscal tears preoperatively and this may be useful in selecting the surgical approach to clinically abnormal joints and may decrease the need for arthrotomy. PMID:18833948

  2. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial. PMID:24692441

  3. Relevance of history of injury to the diagnosis of meniscal tears.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, R.; Allum, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    A consecutive series of 217 arthroscopic meniscectomies has been reviewed in order to investigate the incidence of significant meniscal lesions without obvious precipitating injury. There were 10 bucket handle tears out of 117 (9%) with a mean age of 32 years with no significant injury; 18 flap tears out of 69 (26%) with a mean age of 40 years; and 7 out of 19 (37%) radial tears with a mean age of 36 years also had no significant injury. This study indicates that the absence of a history of injury in the young patient with a symptomatic knee does not exclude significant meniscal tears, such as a bucket handle, and therefore has implications for history taking and diagnosis. PMID:8379621

  4. An unusual case of vascular abnormality mimicking a lateral meniscal cyst.

    PubMed

    Vergis, A; Maletius, W; Messner, K

    1995-10-01

    An unusual case of a vascular abnormality mimicking a lateral meniscal cyst is reported. The patient was a 31-year-old active sportsman who presented with intermittent pain over the lateral aspect of the left knee joint line, occurring only during activities involving twisting motions such as playing soccer. He did not experience local tenderness or swelling, clicking, locking, or giving way. The magnetic resonance imaging, which was done after a diagnostic arthroscopy with normal intra-articular findings, showed a cyst formation of approximately 4-mm diameter adjacent to the lateral meniscus periphery, but no meniscal tissue degeneration. Exactly at the preoperatively marked site of most intensive pain sensation during twisting motions, surgical exposure showed a venous-aneurysm-like tumor, which was removed. The operation resulted in complete relief of symptoms and undisturbed sporting activities including soccer. PMID:8534307

  5. The role of meniscal tissue in joint protection in early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Rene; Madry, Henning; Shabshin, Nogah; Dirisamer, Florian; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Pujol, Nicolas; Spalding, Tim; Verdonk, Peter; Seil, Romain; Condello, Vincenzo; Di Matteo, Berardo; Zellner, Johannes; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that partial meniscectomy leads to early onset of osteoarthritis (OA). A strong correlation exists between the amount and location of the resected meniscus and the development of degenerative changes in the knee. On the other hand, osteoarthritic changes of the joint alter the structural and functional integrity of meniscal tissue. These alterations might additionally compromise the limited healing capacity of the meniscus. In young, active patients without cartilage damage, meniscus therapy including partial meniscectomy, meniscus suture, and meniscus replacement has proven beneficial effects in long-term studies. Even in an early osteoarthritic milieu, there is a relevant regenerative potential of the meniscus and the surrounding cartilage. This potential should be taken into account, and meniscal surgery can be performed with the correct timing and the proper indication even in the presence of early OA. PMID:27085362

  6. Diagnosing Snapping Sartorius Tendon Secondary to a Meniscal Cyst Using Dynamic Ultrasound Avoids Incorrect Surgical Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Robert J.; Martin, David

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of painful snapping in the medial aspect of the knee of a 40-year-old man, following a knee hyperflexion injury. Dynamic real-time ultrasonography determined that the snapping was due to the distal tendon of sartorius passing over a medial meniscal cyst. The patient subsequently underwent arthroscopic decompression of the cyst instead of an inappropriate hamstring tendon harvest procedure, with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:24198995

  7. Double Meniscal Ossicle, the First Description: CT and MRI Findings—Different Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Puneeth; Dey, Amit Kumar; Mittal, Kartik; Sharma, Rajaram; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 2 ossicles in the medial meniscus with emphasis on MRI and CT findings. Meniscal ossicle is a rare entity and is quite uncommon on the medial side. By showing the typical signal characteristics and intrameniscal location, MRI can be helpful in distinguishing this from other more clinically significant abnormalities. It should be kept as differential from synovial chondromatosis or sesamoid bones like fabella as management is different for all of these entities. PMID:26788396

  8. Double Meniscal Ossicle, the First Description: CT and MRI Findings-Different Etiologies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneeth; Dey, Amit Kumar; Mittal, Kartik; Sharma, Rajaram; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 2 ossicles in the medial meniscus with emphasis on MRI and CT findings. Meniscal ossicle is a rare entity and is quite uncommon on the medial side. By showing the typical signal characteristics and intrameniscal location, MRI can be helpful in distinguishing this from other more clinically significant abnormalities. It should be kept as differential from synovial chondromatosis or sesamoid bones like fabella as management is different for all of these entities. PMID:26788396

  9. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  10. Cellular repopulation of deep-frozen meniscal autografts: an experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Arnoczky, S P; DiCarlo, E F; O'Brien, S J; Warren, R F

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the cellular repopulation of deep-frozen meniscal autografts. Medial menisci of adult dogs were excised, deep-frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) for 10 min, and orthotopically reimplanted into the joint. Deep-freezing was found to effectively kill all the cells within the meniscus as determined by the absence of Na(2)35SO4 incorporation. Following orthotopic replacement within the knee joint, menisci were repopulated with cells that seemed to originate from the adjacent synovium. These cells migrated over the surface of the meniscus and began to invade the deeper layers of the tissue. However, even after 6 months, the central core of the meniscus remained acellular. While the new cells appeared to modulate into cells that are similar in appearance to meniscal fibrochondrocytes, the exact phenotypic expression of these newly differentiated cells has yet to be determined. Histological alterations, as manifested by a loss of normal orientation of the collagen architecture of the superficial layers of the meniscus; was evident at 6 months and suggests that a remodeling phenomenon may be associated with the cellular repopulation. While biomaterial studies have not been carried out on these specimens, the morphologic alterations observed in the collagen orientation would suggest a possible alteration in the material properties of the repopulated meniscus. The clinical implication of this study is that the structural remodeling associated with the cellular repopulation of deep-frozen meniscal allografts may make the transplanted meniscus more susceptible to injury. PMID:1466700

  11. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries. PMID:23949935

  12. Physicians’ accuracy and interrator reliability for the diagnosis of unstable meniscal tears in patients having osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Dervin, Geoffrey F.; Stiell, Ian G.; Wells, George A.; Rody, Kelly; Grabowski, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine clinicians’ accuracy and reliability for the clinical diagnosis of unstable meniscus tears in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting A single tertiary care centre. Patients One hundred and fifty-two patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee refractory to conservative medical treatment were selected for prospective evaluation of arthroscopic débridement. Intervention Arthroscopic débridement of the knee, including meniscal tear and chondral flap resection, without abrasion arthroplasty. Outcome measures A standardized assessment protocol was administered to each patient by 2 independent observers. Arthroscopic determination of unstable meniscal tears was recorded by 1 observer who reviewed a video recording and was blinded to preoperative data. Those variables that had the highest interobserver agreement and the strongest association with meniscal tear by univariate methods were entered into logistic regression to model the best prediction of resectable tears. Results There were 92 meniscal tears (77 medial, 15 lateral). Interobserver agreement between clinical fellows and treating surgeons was poor to fair (κ < 0.4) for all clinical variables except radiographic measures, which were good. Fellows and surgeons predicted unstable meniscal tear preoperatively with equivalent accuracy of 60%. Logistic regression modelling revealed that a history of swelling and a ballottable effusion were negative predictors. A positive McMurray test was the only positive predictor of unstable meniscal tear. “Mechanical” symptoms were not reliable predictors in this prospective study. The model was 69% accurate for all patients and 76% for those with advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis defined by a joint space height of 2 mm or less. Conclusions This study underscored the difficulty in using clinical variables to predict unstable medial meniscal tears in patients with pre

  13. Interleukin-1alpha treatment of meniscal explants stimulates the production and release of aggrecanase-generated, GAG-substituted aggrecan products and also the release of pre-formed, aggrecanase-generated G1 and m-calpain-generated G1-G2.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Angelika K; Sandy, John D; Voigt, Henning; Dreier, Rita; Lee, Jennifer H; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Mentlein, Rolf; Fay, Jakob; Schünke, Michael; Kurz, Bodo

    2010-04-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines induce meniscal matrix degradation and inhibition of endogenous repair mechanisms, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this are mostly unknown. Therefore, we investigated details of interleukin-1 (IL-1alpha)-induced aggrecan turnover in mature meniscal tissue explants. Fibro-cartilagenous disks (3 mm diameter x 1 mm thickness) were isolated from the central, weight-bearing region of menisci from 2-year-old cattle. After 3 or 6 days of IL-1alpha-treatment, GAG loss (DMMB assay), biosynthetic activity ([(35)SO(4)]-sulfate and [(3)H]-proline incorporation), gene expression (quantitative RT-PCR) and the abundance (zymography, Western blot) of matrix-degrading enzymes and specific aggrecan products were determined. Meniscal fibrocartilage had a 4-fold lower GAG content (per wet weight) than adjacent articular cartilage, and expressed MMPs-1, -2, -3 and ADAMTS4 constitutively, whereas ADAMTS5 m-RNA was essentially undetectable. Significant IL-1 effects were a decrease in biosynthetic activity, an increase in GAG release and in the expression/abundance of MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAMTS4. Fresh tissue contained aggrecan core protein products similar to those previously described for bovine articular cartilage of this age. IL-1 induced the release of aggrecanase-generated CS-substituted products including both high (>250 kDa) and low molecular weight (about 75 kDa) species. TIMP-3 (but not TIMP-1 and -2 or a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor) inhibited IL-1-dependent GAG loss. In addition, IL-1 induced the release of preformed pools of three known G1-bearing products. We conclude that aggrecanases are responsible for IL-1-stimulated GAG release from meniscal explants, and that IL-1 also stimulates release of G1-bearing products, by a process possibly involving hyaluronan fragmentation. PMID:20217136

  14. Clubfoot repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; Tibialis anterior tendon transfer Images Clubfoot repair - series References Kelly DM. Congenital Anomalies ... provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  15. Automated discovery of meniscal tears on MR imaging: a novel high-performance computer-aided detection application for radiologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Safdar, Nabile; Siddiqui, Khan; Kim, Woojin; Liu, Weimin; Saiprasad, Ganesh; Chang, Chein-I.; Siegel, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    Knee-related injuries including meniscal tears are common in both young athletes and the aging population and require accurate diagnosis and surgical intervention when appropriate. With proper techniques and radiologists' experienced skills, confidence in detection of meniscal tears can be quite high. However, for radiologists without musculoskeletal training, diagnosis of meniscal tears can be challenging. This paper develops a novel computer-aided detection (CAD) diagnostic system for automatic detection of meniscal tears in the knee. Evaluation of this CAD system using an archived database of images from 40 individuals with suspected knee injuries indicates that the sensitivity and specificity of the proposed CAD system are 83.87% and 75.19%, respectively, compared to the mean sensitivity and specificity of 77.41% and 81.39%, respectively obtained by experienced radiologists in routine diagnosis without using the CAD. The experimental results suggest that the developed CAD system has great potential and promise in automatic detection of both simple and complex meniscal tears of knees.

  16. Low-field Mri and arthroscopy of meniscal lesions in ten dogs with experimentally induced cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Martig, Sandra; Konar, Martin; Schmökel, Hugo G; Rytz, Ueli; Spreng, David; Scheidegger, Jürg; Höhl, Birgit; Kircher, Patrick R; Boisclair, Julie; Lang, Johann

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of canine meniscal lesions. The aim of this study is to describe the MR appearance of meniscal lesions in dogs with experimentally induced cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) deficiency. The pilot study revealed dogs weighing approximately 10 kg to be too small for meniscal evaluation on low-field MRI. In the main study, dogs weighing approximately 35 kg were used. The left CCL was transected and low-field MRI was performed regularly until 13 months post-surgery. Normal menisci were defined as grade 0. Intrameniscal lesions not reaching any surface corresponded to grade 1 if focal and to grade 2 if linear or diffuse. Grade 3 lesions consisted in linear tears penetrating a meniscal surface. Grade 4 lesions included complex signal changes or meniscal distortion. Between 2 and 13 months post-surgery, all dogs developed grade 4 lesions in the medial meniscus. Most of them corresponded to longitudinal or bucket handle tears on arthroscopy and necropsy. Two dogs showed grade 3 lesions reaching the tibial surface of the lateral meniscus on MRI but not in arthroscopy. Such tears are difficult to evaluate arthroscopically; MRI provides more accurate information about the tibial meniscal surface. Grades 1 and 2 lesions could not be differentiated from presumably normal menisci with our imaging technique. An MRI grading system better adapted to canine lesions has yet to be developed. MRI is a helpful tool for the diagnosis of complete tears in the canine meniscus, especially in larger dogs. PMID:17153058

  17. Effects of observer on the diagnostic accuracy of low-field MRI for detecting canine meniscal tears.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Peter; Armbrust, Laura; Blond, Laurent; Brühschwein, Andreas; Gavin, Patrick R; Gielen, Ingrid; Hecht, Silke; Jurina, Konrad; Kneissl, Sibylle; Konar, Martin; Pujol, Esteban; Robinson, Andrew; Schaefer, Susan L; Theyse, Lars F H; Wigger, Antje; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    Low-field MRI (lfMRI) has become increasingly accepted as a method for diagnosing canine meniscal tears in clinical practice. However, observer effects on diagnostic accuracy have not been previously reported. In this study, 50 consecutive stifle joints with clinical and radiologic evidence of cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency were investigated by lfMRI and arthroscopy. Fifteen observers who had varying levels of experience and who were unaware of arthroscopic findings independently reviewed lfMRI studies and recorded whether lateral and medial meniscal tears were present. Diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV)) was determined for each observer and median values were calculated for all observers, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Interrater agreement was determined based on intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Observer level of experience was compared with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity using correlation analysis. Based on pooled data for all observers, median sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for lfMRI diagnosis of lateral meniscal tears were 0.00, 0.94, 0.05, and 0.94, respectively. Median sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for medial meniscal tears were 0.74, 0.89, 0.83, and 0.79, respectively. Interrater agreement for all menisci was fair (0.51). Menisci were less consistently scored as having no tears (ICC = 0.13) than those scored as having tears (ICC = 0.50). No significant correlations between observer experience and diagnostic sensitivity/specificity were identified. Findings indicated that the accuracy of lfMRI for diagnosing canine meniscal tears was poor to fair and observer-dependent. Future studies are needed to develop standardized and widely accepted lfMRI criteria for diagnosing meniscal tears. PMID:22897385

  18. Growth factor treated tensioned synoviocyte neotissues: towards meniscal bioscaffold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Warnock, J J; Bobe, G; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, K F; Spina, J; Ott, J; Baltzer, W I; Bay, B K

    2014-04-01

    Meniscal injury is a common cause of osteoarthritis, pain, and disability in dogs and humans, but tissue-engineered bioscaffolds could be a treatment option for meniscal deficiency. The objective of this study was to compare meniscus-like matrix histology, composition, and biomechanical properties of autologous tensioned synoviocyte neotissues (TSN) treated with fetal bovine serum (TSNfbs) or three chondrogenic growth factors (TSNgf). Fourth passage canine synoviocytes from 10 dogs were grown in hyperconfluent monolayer culture, formed into TSN, and then cultured for 3 weeks with 17.7% FBS or three human recombinant TSNgf (bFGF, TGF-β1, and IGF-1). Cell viability was determined with laser microscopy. Histological architecture and the composition of fibrocartilage matrix were evaluated in TSN by staining tissues for glycosaminoglycan (GAG), α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen 1 and 2; quantifying the content of GAG, DNA, and hydroxyproline; and measuring the gene expression of collagens type 1α and 2α, the GAG aggrecan, and transcription factor Sry-type Homeobox Protein-9 (SOX9). Biomechanical properties were determined by materials testing force-deformation curves. The TSN contained components and histological features of mensical fibrocartilage extracellular matrix. Growth factor-treated TSN had higher DNA content but lower cell viability than TSNfbs. TSNgf had greater fibrocartilage-like matrix content (collagen 2 and GAG content with increased collagen 2α and SOX9 gene expression). Additionally, TSNgf collagen was more organized histologically and so had greater tensile biomechanical properties. The results indicate the potential of TSN when cultured with growth factors as implantable bioscaffolds for the treatment of canine meniscal deficiency. PMID:24559744

  19. A history of meniscal surgery: from ancient times to the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, B; Moran, C J; Tarabella, V; Viganò, A; Tomba, P; Marcacci, M; Verdonk, R

    2016-05-01

    The science and surgery of the meniscus have evolved significantly over time. Surgeons and scientists always enjoy looking forward to novel therapies. However, as part of the ongoing effort at optimizing interventions and outcomes, it may also be useful to reflect on important milestones from the past. The aim of the present manuscript was to explore the history of meniscal surgery across the ages, from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Herein, some of the investigations of the pioneers in orthopaedics are described, to underline how their work has influenced the management of the injured meniscus in modern times. Level of evidence V. PMID:26231150

  20. Timing of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Incidence of Meniscal and Chondral Injury within the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad; Salehi, Shahin; Dadgostar, Haleh; Cherati, Afsaneh Safar; Moghaddam, Ahmad Bagheri; Tabatabaiand, Seyyed Mehdi; Dodaran, Masoud Solaymani

    2013-01-01

    Background: To review a single-surgeon series of 616 athletic patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in order to evaluate the relationship between the timing of the reconstruction and the incidence of meniscal and chondral injuries. Methods: Six group of patients were categorized based on the time interval from their injury to surgery in the following manner: <3 months, 3-6 months, 6-9 months, 9-18 months, 18-36 months, and >36 months. The presence of meniscal tears was documented and chondral pathology was scored based on the Outerbridge classification. Results: Incidence of medial meniscus tear was significantly higher in patients undergoing reconstruction after 3 months from their injury (P = 0.032). The opportunity of patients with chondral pathology was recorded to be significantly higher in the groups operated on after 6 months from their injuries time (P = 0.008). Conclusions: Considering the effect of time on the rate of having meniscus injury and chondral pathology, reducing the time between the injury and surgery could improve the long-term health outcomes in this population. PMID:23717779

  1. Chondropathy after meniscal tear or partial meniscectomy in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Wyland, Douglas J; Guilak, Farshid; Elliott, Dawn M; Setton, Lori A; Vail, Thomas P

    2002-09-01

    A primary goal in considering treatment for meniscal injuries is the preservation of the health of the articular cartilage. However, the chondroprotective effects of various techniques for meniscal injury treatments are unknown. We used a canine model to quantify articular cartilage degeneration in the medial compartment of the canine knee, resulting from a surgically created tear or a partial meniscectomy (PM) of the posterior region of the medial meniscus (each group, n = 10). After sacrifice at 12 weeks, the development of gross chondropathy and the changes in cartilage tensile stiffness were quantified, and correlations between these measurements were examined. Both treatment surgical treatment groups caused significantly greater gross chondropathy as compared to the unoperated contralateral controls. Cartilage tensile stiffness was significantly lower than unoperated controls by nearly 28% in both experimental groups. However, there were no significant differences observed between the gross chondropathy or the cartilage mechanical property changes between the experimental groups. Importantly, the severity of gross chondropathy was found to significantly correlate with the decrement in tensile stiffness properties of the articular cartilage. These findings indicate that significant degeneration of canine articular cartilage develops to a similar degree in the presence of a partially healed meniscus tear or a PM of the knee. PMID:12382965

  2. The clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of meniscal disorders.

    PubMed

    Raunest, J; Oberle, K; Loehnert, J; Hoetzinger, H

    1991-01-01

    This prospective double-blind study was designed to evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging to serve as a diagnostic tool in patients who have a clinically suspected disorder of the meniscus. The imaging studies provided a diagnostic accuracy of 72 per cent, a sensitivity of 88 per cent, and a specificity of 57 per cent. The positive and negative predictive values were 66 and 83 per cent. The diagnostic sensitivity was 94 per cent for lesions of the medial meniscus; this value differed significantly from that of 78 per cent for lesions of the lateral meniscus (p less than 0.05). The 37 per cent specificity for lesions of the medial meniscus was extremely low compared with the rate of 69 per cent for lesions of the lateral meniscus (p less than 0.01). In the intermediate part of the meniscus, the diagnostic sensitivity was 37 per cent on the medial side and 23 per cent on the lateral side; these values were significantly less than the average of 74 per cent for the other meniscal segments (p less than 0.001). The imaging studies provided an over-all accuracy of 67 per cent in the detection of degeneration of the meniscus, 78 per cent in the identification of meniscal tears, and 82 per cent in the delineation of postoperative lesions. PMID:1985979

  3. Using a statistically calibrated biphasic finite element model of the human knee joint to identify robust designs for a meniscal substitute.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, Erin R; Guo, Hongqiang; Gilbert, Susannah L; Hutchinson, Ian D; Maher, Suzanne A; Santner, Thomas J

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a methodology for selecting a set of biomechanical engineering design variables to optimize the performance of an engineered meniscal substitute when implanted in a population of subjects whose characteristics can be specified stochastically. For the meniscal design problem where engineering variables include aspects of meniscal geometry and meniscal material properties, this method shows that meniscal designs having simultaneously large radial modulus and large circumferential modulus provide both low mean peak contact stress and small variability in peak contact stress when used in the specified subject population. The method also shows that the mean peak contact stress is relatively insensitive to meniscal permeability, so the permeability used in the manufacture of a meniscal substitute can be selected on the basis of manufacturing ease or cost. This is a multiple objective problem with the mean peak contact stress over the population of subjects and its variability both desired to be small. The problem is solved by using a predictor of the mean peak contact stress across the tibial plateau that was developed from experimentally measured peak contact stresses from two modalities. The first experimental modality provided computed peak contact stresses using a finite element computational simulator of the dynamic tibial contact stress during axial dynamic loading. A small number of meniscal designs with specified subject environmental inputs were selected to make computational runs and to provide training data for the predictor developed below. The second experimental modality consisted of measured peak contact stress from a set of cadaver knees. The cadaver measurements were used to bias-correct and calibrate the simulator output. Because the finite element simulator is expensive to evaluate, a rapidly computable (calibrated) Kriging predictor was used to explore extensively the contact stresses for a wide range of meniscal engineering

  4. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. Patients and methods We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. Results In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 105 person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 105 person-years in 1997 to 97 per 105 person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. Interpretation The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries. PMID:26122621

  5. Bovine meniscal tissue exhibits age- and interleukin-1 dose-dependent degradation patterns and composition-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Ling, Carrie H-Y; Lai, Janice H; Wong, Ivan J; Levenston, Marc E

    2016-05-01

    Despite increasing evidence that meniscal degeneration is an early event in the development of knee osteoarthritis, relatively little is known regarding the sequence or functional implications of cytokine-induced meniscal degradation or how degradation varies with age. This study examined dose-dependent patterns of interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced matrix degradation in explants from the radially middle regions of juvenile and adult bovine menisci. Tissue explants were cultured for 10 days in the presence of 0, 1.25, 5, or 20 ng/ml recombinant human IL-1α. Juvenile explants exhibited immediate and extensive sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) loss and subsequent collagen release beginning after 4-6 days, with relatively little IL-1 dose-dependence. Adult explants exhibited a more graded response to IL-1, with dose-dependent sGAG release and a lower fraction of sGAG released (but greater absolute release) than juvenile explants. In contrast to juvenile explants, adult explants exhibited minimal collagen release over the 10-day culture. Compressive and shear moduli reflected the changes in explant composition, with substantial decreases for both ages but a greater relative decrease in juvenile tissue. Dynamic moduli exhibited stronger dependence on explant sGAG content for juvenile tissue, likely reflecting concomitant changes to both proteoglycan and collagen tissue components. The patterns of tissue degradation suggest that, like in articular cartilage, meniscal proteoglycans may partially protect collagen from cell-mediated degeneration. A more detailed view of functional changes in meniscal tissue mechanics with degeneration will help to establish the relevance of in vitro culture models and will advance understanding of how meniscal degeneration contributes to overall joint changes in early stage osteoarthritis. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:801-811, 2016. PMID:26519862

  6. Gastroschisis repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... and surgery in general are: Allergic reactions to medicines Breathing problems Bleeding Infection Risks for gastroschisis repair are: Breathing problems if the baby's belly area (abdominal space) is smaller than normal. The baby may need ...

  7. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... is excellent. However, another hydrocele may form over time, or if there was also a hernia present. Alternative Names Hydrocelectomy Images Hydrocele repair - series References Aiken JJ, Oldham KT. Inguinal hernias. In: ...

  8. Suturing property of tough double network hydrogels for bio-repair materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yang Ho; Oh, Hwa Yeon; Ahn, Young Ju; Han, Youngbae

    2015-02-01

    Cartilage and meniscal lesions have limited potential for spontaneous repair. Consequently, much effort has been made to develop methods for repairing such lesions. Double-network (DN) gels are new candidate-materials for repairing such lesions. They exhibit exceptional mechanical strength and toughness in spite of their high water content. In this study, we prepared highly tough DN hydrogels and investigated the mechanical properties related to clinical implant use. The mechanical properties such as Young's modulus and suture tear-out strength were measured for the artificial replacement. The results suggest that the suture property of DN hydrogels can be adjusted by controlling the crosslinking density and monomer concentration. Finite element method was also applied to these DN hydrogels in order to check whether the fracture strength of the material is enough to meet a medical purpose.

  9. Transplantation of Achilles Tendon Treated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Promotes Meniscus Regeneration in a Rat Model of Massive Meniscal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Okuno, Makiko; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to examine whether bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) induces ectopic cartilage formation in the rat tendon, and whether transplantation of tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscal regeneration. Additionally, we analyzed the relative contributions of host and donor cells on the healing process after tendon transplantation in a rat model. Methods BMP-7 was injected in situ into the Achilles tendon of rats, and the histologic findings and gene profile were evaluated. Achilles tendon injected with 1 μg of BMP-7 was transplanted into a meniscal defect in rats. The regenerated meniscus and articular cartilage were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Achilles tendon from LacZ-transgenic rats was transplanted into the meniscal defect in wild-type rats, and vice versa. Results Injection of BMP-7 into the rat Achilles tendon induced the fibrochondrocyte differentiation of tendon cells and changed the collagen gene profile of tendon tissue to more closely approximate meniscal tissue. Transplantation of the rat Achilles tendon into a meniscal defect increased meniscal size. The rats that received the tendon treated with BMP-7 had a meniscus matrix that exhibited increased Safranin O and type II collagen staining, and showed a delay in articular cartilage degradation. Using LacZ-transgenic rats, we determined that the regeneration of the meniscus resulted from contribution from both donor and host cells. Conclusion Our findings indicate that BMP-7 induces ectopic cartilage formation in rat tendons. Transplantation of Achilles tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscus regeneration and prevents cartilage degeneration in a rat model of massive meniscal defect. Native cells in the rat Achilles tendon contribute to meniscal regeneration. PMID:23897174

  10. Fast presurgical magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal tears and concurrent subchondral bone marrow lesions. Study of dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Olive, J; d'Anjou, M-A; Cabassu, J; Chailleux, N; Blond, L

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears and subchondral bone marrow lesions have both been described in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture, but their possible concurrence has not been evaluated. In a population of 14 dogs exhibiting signs of stifle pain with surgically confirmed cranial cruciate ligament rupture, a short presurgical 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol including dorsal proton density, dorsal T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, and sagittal fat-saturated dual echo sequences was tested to further investigate these features and illustrate meniscal tears. Interobserver agreement for detection of medial meniscal tears (k=0.83) and bone marrow lesions (k=0.87) was excellent. Consensus MR reading allowed detection of nine out of 12 surgically confirmed medial meniscal tears and there was no false positive. All dogs had cruciate ligament enthesis-related bone marrow lesions in the tibia, femur or both bones. Additionally, among the 12 dogs with confirmed medial meniscal tears, subchondral bone marrow lesions were present in the caudomedial (9 dogs) and caudoaxial (11 dogs) regions of the tibial plateau, resulting in odds ratios (13.6, p=0.12, and 38.3, p=0.04, respectively) that had large confidence intervals due to the small group size of this study. The other two dogs had neither tibial bone marrow lesions in these locations nor medial meniscal tears. These encouraging preliminary results warrant further investigation using this clinically realistic preoperative MR protocol. As direct diagnosis of meniscal tears remained challenging in dogs even with high-field MR, identification of associated signs such as subchondral bone marrow lesions might indirectly allow suspicion of an otherwise unrecognized meniscal tear. PMID:24226972

  11. Meniscal replacement using a cryopreserved allograft. An experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Arnoczky, S P; Warren, R F; McDevitt, C A

    1990-03-01

    The medial menisci of 14 adult dogs were replaced using a cryopreserved meniscal allograft. The morphology and metabolic activity of the transplanted allografts were then evaluated using routine histology, a vascular-injection (Spalteholz) technique, and autoroentgenography (Na2(35)SO4 incorporation) at various intervals, from two weeks to six months postoperatively. After transplantation, the allografts retained their normal gross appearance and healed to the capsular tissues of the host by fibrovascular scar tissue. Histologically, the grafts demonstrated a decrease in the number of metabolically active cells after transplantation but had a normal cellular distribution and Na2(35)SO4 uptake by three months. The allografts appeared to function normally after transplantation. Although some degenerative changes were noted in the tibial articular cartilage not covered by the meniscus, the cartilage beneath the allograft appeared normal. PMID:2302876

  12. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  13. The effects of lasers and electrosurgical devices on human meniscal tissue.

    PubMed

    Sherk, H H; Black, J D; Prodoehl, J A; Diven, J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various laser wavelengths on human meniscal tissue in vitro and to compare them with the effects of electrosurgical devices. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser produced the best cutting and ablating effects among the infrared lasers, although the contact neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)lasers were nearly as satisfactory, offering the additional advantage of fiberoptic capability and the ability to be used in saline. The free-beam Nd:YAG laser and coagulation mode electrosurgical device produced unacceptably severe thermal changes. The excimer laser at 308 nm produced the best tissue effect and caused no detectable adjacent thermal change in the tissue. PMID:7641430

  14. Assessment of tibial rotation and meniscal movement using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aimed to assess tibial rotations, meniscal movements, and morphological changes during knee flexion and extension using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Thirty volunteers with healthy knees were examined using kinematic MRI. The knees were imaged in the transverse plane with flexion and extension angles from 0° to 40° and 40° to 0°, respectively. The tibial interior and exterior rotation angles were measured, and the meniscal movement range, height change, and side movements were detected. Results The tibia rotated internally (11.55° ± 3.20°) during knee flexion and rotated externally (11.40° ± 3.0°) during knee extension. No significant differences were observed between the internal and external tibial rotation angles (P > 0.05), between males and females (P > 0.05), or between the left and right knee joints (P > 0.05). The tibial rotation angle with a flexion angle of 0° to 24° differed significantly from that with a flexion angle of 24° to 40° (P < 0.01). With knee flexion, the medial and lateral menisci moved backward and the height of the meniscus increased. The movement range was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn and greater in the lateral meniscus than in the medial meniscus (P < 0.01). During backward movements of the menisci, the distance between the anterior and posterior horns decreased, with the decrease more apparent in the lateral meniscus (P < 0.01). The side movements of the medial and lateral menisci were not obvious, and a smaller movement range was found than that of the forward and backward movements. Conclusion Knee flexion and extension facilitated internal and external tibial rotations, which may be related to the ligament and joint capsule structure and femoral condyle geometry. PMID:25142267

  15. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  16. Quantitative differences in the histology of the attachment zones of the meniscal horns in the knee joint of man.

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M; Evans, E J; Rao, R D; Findlay, J A; Pemberton, D J

    1991-01-01

    The attachment zones of the meniscal horns of 7 dissecting room cadavers were examined by routine histology. All the knees were devoid of gross pathological change and no discoid menisci were included. Significant differences are reported in the thickness of the zones of uncalcified fibrocartilage and cortical calcified tissue (calcified fibrocartilage and underlying lamellar bone) and in the percentage of bone:bone marrow. There was a thicker zone of uncalcified fibrocartilage and a greater quantity of calcified tissue at the horns of the lateral than the medial meniscus. The differences in uncalcified fibrocartilage were largely attributable to the posterior horns, but the variations in calcified tissue mainly reflected differences between the anterior horns. It is suggested that the greater mobility of the lateral meniscus and the blending of its anterior horn with the anterior cruciate ligament are important factors accounting for the quantitative differences in the meniscal attachment zones. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1769887

  17. The place of arthrography in the diagnosis and management of meniscal injuries--a 6-year review.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S E; Chandy, J; Aldridge, M J

    1991-01-01

    Four hundred and eighty-seven consecutive knee arthrograms, performed over a 6-year period, are reviewed. Their accuracy is compared with arthroscopy and, where appropriate, with arthrotomy. The increasing accuracy of arthrography has resulted in the acceptance of this method of imaging as a useful and accurate means of examining meniscal injuries in the knee. This has led to far fewer surgical procedures and an overall saving of resources. PMID:2013891

  18. Meniscal regeneration with copolymeric collagen scaffolds. In vitro and in vivo studies evaluated clinically, histologically, and biochemically.

    PubMed

    Stone, K R; Rodkey, W G; Webber, R; McKinney, L; Steadman, J R

    1992-01-01

    We sought to create a regeneration template for the meniscal cartilage of the knee to induce complete meniscal regeneration, and to develop the technique for implanting the prosthetic appliance in vivo. We designed a resorbable collagen-based scaffold and conducted in vitro and in vivo studies. In vivo, the scaffold was implanted in the knees of immature swine and mature canines and evaluated clinically, histologically, and biochemically. Because the canine stifle joint meniscus is more clinically relevant to the human meniscus, this paper emphasizes those results. We studied 24 mixed breed dogs (14 males and 10 females) with an average weight of 25.5 kg (range, 20 to 35) that were obtained from a USDA-licensed supplier. The dogs were deemed clinically and radiographically skeletally mature. None of the dogs had a preexisting knee joint abnormality. All dogs underwent an 80% subtotal resection of the medial meniscus bilaterally. A collagen template was implanted in one stifle (N = 24). The contralateral side served as a control: 12 dogs had a total resection alone and the other 12 dogs had an immediate replantation of the autologous meniscus. Results were tabulated at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At final evaluation, before the animals were euthanized, the results were submitted for statistical analysis as well as histologic and biochemical analyses. The results demonstrated that a copolymeric collagen-based scaffold can be constructed that is compatible with meniscal fibrochondrocyte growth in vitro and in vivo, that does not inhibit meniscal regeneration in an immature pig, and that may induce regeneration of the meniscus in the mature dog.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1558234

  19. Joint degeneration following meniscal allograft transplantation in a canine model: mechanical properties and semiquantitative histology of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dawn M; Jones, Relief; Setton, Lori A; Scully, Sean P; Vail, T Parker; Guilak, Farshid

    2002-03-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that meniscal allograft transplantation serves a "chondroprotective" role and prevents the histological and biomechanical changes of the articular cartilage following meniscectomy. Skeletally mature mongrel dogs underwent total medial meniscectomy and received either a fresh meniscal allograft ( n=10) or no further treatment ( n=10). Semiquantitative histology and biomechanical analysis of the femoral articular cartilage was used to assess cartilage pathology 12 weeks following surgery. Histological analysis showed significant changes in cartilage structure that did not differ between the meniscectomy and allograft transplantation groups. Similarly, the tensile modulus of the surface zone cartilage was significantly lower than that in unoperated controls following either meniscectomy or allograft transplantation. A significant correlation was observed between the biomechanical and histological changes, suggesting that degenerative changes in cartilage structure and mechanical function are interrelated. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that meniscal allograft transplantation provides chondroprotection of the femoral condyle and also suggest that it does not lead to increased degenerative changes. PMID:11914769

  20. Fibrochondrogenic potential of synoviocytes from osteoarthritic and normal joints cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds for meniscal tissue engineering in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Gerd; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F.

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears are a common cause of stifle lameness in dogs. Use of autologous synoviocytes from the affected stifle is an attractive cell source for tissue engineering replacement fibrocartilage. However, the diseased state of these cells may impede in vitro fibrocartilage formation. Synoviocytes from 12 osteoarthritic (“oaTSB”) and 6 normal joints (“nTSB”) were cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds and compared for their ability to synthesize fibrocartilage sheets. Gene expression of collagens type I and II were higher and expression of interleukin-6 was lower in oaTSB versus nTSB. Compared with nTSB, oaTSB had more glycosaminoglycan and alpha smooth muscle staining and less collagen I and II staining on histologic analysis, whereas collagen and glycosaminoglycan quantities were similar. In conclusion, osteoarthritic joint—origin synoviocytes can produce extracellular matrix components of meniscal fibrocartilage at similar levels to normal joint—origin synoviocytes, which makes them a potential cell source for canine meniscal tissue engineering. PMID:25289180

  1. Outboard Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack

    This consortium-developed instructor's manual for small engine repair (with focus on outboard motors) consists of the following nine instructional units: electrical remote control assembly, mechanical remote control assembly, tilt assemblies, exhaust housing, propeller and trim tabs, cooling system, mechanical gearcase, electrical gearcase, and…

  2. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  3. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  4. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... small surgical cut in the fold of the groin, and then drains the fluid. The sac (hydrocele) holding the fluid may be removed. The surgeon strengthens the muscle wall with stitches. This is called a hernia repair. Sometimes the surgeon uses a laparoscope to do ...

  5. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... in boys and is often linked to other birth defects. Surgery is necessary to: Allow the child to ...

  6. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  7. Cell, matrix changes and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in repair of the canine meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kambic, H E; Futani, H; McDevitt, C A

    2000-01-01

    Processes in the repair of a crevice in the knee joint meniscus were investigated in 10 dogs. Two 2-mm cylindrical plugs from each medial meniscus were removed, rendered acellular by freezing and thawing, and then reinserted into the meniscus. Dogs were euthanized at intervals of 3-52 weeks after surgery. The crevice between the plug and meniscus at 3 weeks after surgery was filled with a tissue containing alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. One year after surgery, the plug had remodeled and was populated with spindle-shaped and fibrochondrocyte-like cells. The plug had an appearance intermediate between that of hyaline and fibrocartilage at this time, with a seamless integration in sites between the remodeled plug and the surrounding meniscus. alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells were concentrated at the interface of the remodeled plug and adjacent meniscus and at the surface of the plug. Therefore, remodeling of both the plug and meniscal tissue and the participation of alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells appear essential for integration of the plug into the adjacent meniscal tissue. Cells in the superficial zone of the meniscus seem to be active in the repair process. A change in both the phenotype of the cells and the quality of the matrix toward a more hyaline state appears to be an integral part of the remodeling process in the meniscus. PMID:11208183

  8. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Byttebier, Paul; Eeckhoudt, Annelies; Victor, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA) after meniscectomy. We investigated (1) the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2) most important factors affecting survivorship and (3) OA progression. Methods From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA) or total removal of the MAT. Results Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15–57); 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2–24.3years), 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%), 186 MAT were in situ (56.5%) whilst 90 (27.4%) had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%). Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9–16.3) at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1%) compared to ≥35 years (8.0%) (p = 0.017). In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0%) compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6%) (p = 0.003). Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years) (p = 0.010). 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1–11) for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001). Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs). Conclusions MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship

  9. The Optimal Suture Site for the Repair of Posterior Horn Root Tears: Biomechanical Evaluation of Pullout Strength in Porcine Menisci

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Noh, Chang-Kyun; Park, Il-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There are few studies on biomechanical evaluation of suture points in repair of root tears. The purpose of this study was to determine the point of greatest pullout strength for root tear repair. Materials and Methods A total of 120 fresh porcine medial menisci were obtained. The red-red and red-white zones of the meniscus were divided by two lines designated as lines A and B (groups A and B). Groups A and B were further divided into three groups each by dividing lines A and B into three points: 3, 5, and 7 mm from the meniscal ligament root insertion. Vertical meniscal repair was performed on each point. The pullout failure strength was tested using a biaxial servohydraulic testing machine. Results The average maximal load at failure was significantly greater in group A than group B (87.65 vs. 62.93; p<0.001) The average length at maximal load failure was greater in group A than group B (4.35 vs. 3.2; p<0.001). Among the subgroups of 3, 5, and 7 mm in both groups A and B, 7 mm showed the greatest maximal load (p<0.001). Conclusions The pullout strength was statistically significantly greater in group A than group B and in the 7 mm subgroup than the 3 and 5 mm subgroups. Thus, the 7 mm subgroup in group A showed the greatest pullout strength. PMID:27274472

  10. Biomedical-grade, high mannuronic acid content (BioMVM) alginate enhances the proteoglycan production of primary human meniscal fibrochondrocytes in a 3-D microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Klich, Angelique; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Alginates are important hydrogels for meniscus tissue engineering as they support the meniscal fibrochondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan production, the extracellular matrix (ECM) component chiefly responsible for its viscoelastic properties. Here, we systematically evaluated four biomedical- and two nonbiomedical-grade alginates for their capacity to provide the best three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment and to support proteoglycan synthesis of encapsulated human meniscal fibrochondrocytes in vitro. Biomedical-grade, high mannuronic acid alginate spheres (BioLVM, BioMVM) were the most uniform in size, indicating an effect of the purity of alginate on the shape of the spheres. Interestingly, the purity of alginates did not affect cell viability. Of note, only fibrochondrocytes encapsulated in BioMVM alginate produced and retained significant amounts of proteoglycans. Following transplantation in an explant culture model, the alginate spheres containing fibrochondrocytes remained in close proximity with the meniscal tissue adjacent to the defect. The results reveal a promising role of BioMVM alginate to enhance the proteoglycan production of primary human meniscal fibrochondrocytes in a 3-D hydrogel microenvironment. These findings have significant implications for cell-based translational studies aiming at restoring lost meniscal tissue in regions containing high amounts of proteoglycans. PMID:27302206

  11. The knee meniscus: structure-function, pathophysiology, current repair techniques, and prospects for regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Hadidi, Pasha; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive scientific investigations in recent decades have established the anatomical, biomechanical, and functional importance that the meniscus holds within the knee joint. As a vital part of the joint, it acts to prevent the deterioration and degeneration of articular cartilage, and the onset and development of osteoarthritis. For this reason, research into meniscus repair has been the recipient of particular interest from the orthopedic and bioengineering communities. Current repair techniques are only effective in treating lesions located in the peripheral vascularized region of the meniscus. Healing lesions found in the inner avascular region, which functions under a highly demanding mechanical environment, is considered to be a significant challenge. An adequate treatment approach has yet to be established, though many attempts have been undertaken. The current primary method for treatment is partial meniscectomy, which commonly results in the progressive development of osteoarthritis. This drawback has shifted research interest towards the fields of biomaterials and bioengineering, where it is hoped that meniscal deterioration can be tackled with the help of tissue engineering. So far, different approaches and strategies have contributed to the in vitro generation of meniscus constructs, which are capable of restoring meniscal lesions to some extent, both functionally as well as anatomically. The selection of the appropriate cell source (autologous, allogeneic, or xenogeneic cells, or stem cells) is undoubtedly regarded as key to successful meniscal tissue engineering. Furthermore, a large variation of scaffolds for tissue engineering have been proposed and produced in experimental and clinical studies, although a few problems with these (e.g., byproducts of degradation, stress shielding) have shifted research interest towards new strategies (e.g., scaffoldless approaches, self-assembly). A large number of different chemical (e.g., TGF-β1, C-ABC) and

  12. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF MENISCAL PATHOLOGIES: A CASE SERIES ANALYSIS OF THE MULLIGAN CONCEPT “SQUEEZE” TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Amy; Sanchez, Belinda; Stevenson, Valerie; Baker, Russell T.; May, James; Nasypany, Alan; Reordan, Don

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Partial meniscectomy does not consistently produce the desired positive outcomes intended for meniscal tears lesions; therefore, a need exists for research into alternatives for treating symptoms of meniscal tears. The purpose of this case series was to examine the effect of the Mulligan Concept (MC) “Squeeze” technique in physically active participants who presented with clinical symptoms of meniscal tears. Description of Cases The MC “Squeeze” technique was applied in five cases of clinically diagnosed meniscal tears in a physically active population. The Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS), the Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), the Disability in the Physically Active (DPA) Scale, and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS) were administered to assess participant pain level and function. Outcomes Statistically significant improvements were found on cumulative NRS (p ≤ 0.001), current NRS (p ≤ 0.002), PSFS (p ≤ 0.003), DPA (p ≤ 0.019), and KOOS (p ≤ 0.002) scores across all five participants. All participants exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) on the first treatment and reported an NRS score and current pain score of one point or less at discharge. The MC “Squeeze” technique produced statistically and clinically significant changes across all outcome measures in all five participants. Discussion The use of the MC “Squeeze” technique in this case series indicated positive outcomes in five participants who presented with meniscal tear symptoms. Of importance to the athletic population, each of the participants continued to engage in sport activity as tolerated unless otherwise required during the treatment period. The outcomes reported in this case series exceed those reported when using traditional conservative therapy and the return to play timelines for meniscal tears treated with partial meniscectomies. Levels of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27525181

  13. Structured three-dimensional co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells with meniscus cells promotes meniscal phenotype without hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Lotz, Martin; D'Lima, Darryl

    2012-09-01

    Menisci play a crucial role in weight distribution, load bearing, shock absorption, lubrication, and nutrition of articular cartilage within the knee joint. Damage to the meniscus typically does not heal spontaneously due to its partial avascular nature. Partial or complete meniscectomy is a common clinical treatment of the defective meniscus. However, this procedure ultimately leads to osteoarthritis due to increased mechanical stress to the articular cartilage. Meniscus tissue engineering offers a promising solution for partial or complete meniscus deficiency. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into meniscal fibrochondrocyte as well as deliver trophic effects to the differentiated cells. This study tested the feasibility of using MSC co-cultured with mature meniscal cells (MC) for meniscus tissue engineering. Structured cell pellets were created using MC and MSC at varying ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100) and cultured with or without transforming growth factor-beta 3 supplemented chondrogenic media for 21 days. The meniscal and hypertrophic gene expression, gross appearance and structure of the pellets, meniscus extracellular matrix (ECM), histology and immunohistochemistry of proteoglycan and collagen were evaluated. Co-culture of MC with MSC at 75:25 demonstrated highest levels of collagen type I and glycosaminoglycans (GAG) production, as well as the lowest levels of hypertrophic genes, such as COL10A1 and MMP13. All co-culture conditions showed better meniscus ECM production and hypertrophic inhibition as compared to MSC culture alone. The collagen fiber bundles observed in the co-cultures are important to produce heterogenic ECM structure of meniscus. In conclusion, co-culturing MC and MSC is a feasible and efficient approach to engineer meniscus tissue with enhanced ECM production without hypertrophy. PMID:22422555

  14. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  15. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  16. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  17. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  18. Intra-articular Patterns of Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears and Its Relation to Reducibility

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong Chul; Bae, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Taik-Sun; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Sung-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the intra-articular patterns in the rotational deformities of bucket handle meniscal tears (BHMTs) based on arthroscopic findings and their clinical relevance. Methods From 2004 to 2009, 42 patients with a BHMT diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging underwent arthroscopic surgery. The arthroscopic data (all procedures were recorded) were evaluated retrospectively, and BHMTs were classified according to the rotational directions of centrally displaced fragments. To assess the reliability of the agreement in this classification, 2 orthopedic surgeons re-classified BHMTs, 1 week after first trial. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities were assessed using kappa statistics. In addition, we address specific tear patterns, associated anterior cruciate ligament injury, medio-lateral difference, reducibility, chronicity, and reparability. Results Most of the tears could be categorized into one of 3 morphologic patterns. Of the tears, 4.8% could not be categorized. BHMTs were classified, based on the rotational directions of centrally displaced fragments, as follows; the upward rotation group (type 1), the downward rotation group (type 2) and the reverse group (type 3). The most common intra-articular pattern was type 1 (29 patients, 69%). The occurrence of the other patterns was: type 2 in 7 patients (16.7%), type 3 in 4 patients (9.5%); we were not able to make a classification of type in 2 patients (4.8%). Intra-observer reliability was 0.86 in terms of kappa statistics, which implies almost perfect agreement. Mean interobserver reliability (0.73) showed substantial agreement. Type 1 and 2 tears were easily reduced, whereas all type 3 tears (4/4) needed additional procedures to achieve reduction. Conclusions Based on arthroscopic findings, we describe a comprehensive BHMT classification scheme that encompasses 95.2% of all tears. Tear type was correlated with reducibility. PMID:22662298

  19. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts: clinical, gross, and histological results.

    PubMed

    Powers, D L; Davenport, M E; Wisnewski, P J

    1988-01-01

    Osteoarthritic changes in the knee are often a late result of total meniscectomy. In cases of total resection, availability of a prosthetic meniscus might limit development of these changes. The objective of this research was to evaluate a glutaraldehyde-cross-linked medial meniscus as a morphologically and biologically compatible prosthesis in a canine model. Medial and lateral menisci were harvested from donor dogs, frozen in saline, and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Five host animals were selected and matched with donors. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked medial menisci were implanted bilaterally in the stifle joints and one glutaraldehyde cross-linked lateral meniscus was implanted subcutaneously. Clinical results showed asymptomatic limb and joint usage during the 12 postoperative weeks. Gross and histological evaluations indicated acceptable biocompatibility. The subcutaneous implants were encapsulated with a thin fibrous tissue capsule that was only mildly inflamed. Within the joints, the anterior attachment and periphery were maintained in position by their sutures; however, there was dehiscence of the posterior suture in all cases. The articulating surfaces of the implants were intact. There was an initial loss in the quantity of proteoglycans following glutaraldehyde treatment, with significant recovery after implantation into the joints. There were significant degenerative changes (loss of proteoglycans and fibrillation) in the articular cartilage on the femoral condyle and tibial plateau most likely a result of the posterior attachment failure. It was concluded that glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts showed an acceptable degree of histocompatibility. However, failure of the posterior attachment interfered with testing the efficacy of the prosthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3155294

  20. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2003-05-01

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

  1. The effect of hip joint muscle exercise on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after meniscal injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Ja; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Ha Roo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hip muscle strengthening on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after a meniscal injury. [Subjects and Methods] This randomized control study enrolled 24 patients who had undergone arthroscopic treatment after a meniscal injury and began a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into 2 groups of 12 subjects each: gluteus medius resistance exercise group and control group. This study investigated muscle strength and balance in the knee joint flexor, extensor, and abductor during an 8-week period. [Results] Measurements of knee extensor muscle strength revealed no significant difference between the control group and the experimental group. Measurements of abductor muscle strength, however, identified a significant difference between the 2 groups. The groups did not differ significantly with regard to balance measurements. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that this subject should be approached in light of the correlation between the hip abductor and injury to the lower extremities. PMID:27190461

  2. The effect of hip joint muscle exercise on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after meniscal injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Ja; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Ha Roo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hip muscle strengthening on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after a meniscal injury. [Subjects and Methods] This randomized control study enrolled 24 patients who had undergone arthroscopic treatment after a meniscal injury and began a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into 2 groups of 12 subjects each: gluteus medius resistance exercise group and control group. This study investigated muscle strength and balance in the knee joint flexor, extensor, and abductor during an 8-week period. [Results] Measurements of knee extensor muscle strength revealed no significant difference between the control group and the experimental group. Measurements of abductor muscle strength, however, identified a significant difference between the 2 groups. The groups did not differ significantly with regard to balance measurements. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that this subject should be approached in light of the correlation between the hip abductor and injury to the lower extremities. PMID:27190461

  3. A novel hypothesis: the application of platelet-rich plasma can promote the clinical healing of white-white meniscal tears.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Cheng; Gao, Shu-Guang; Xu, Mai; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Jian; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2012-08-01

    The white-white tears (meniscus lesion completely in the avascular zone) are without blood supply and theoretically cannot heal. Basal research has demonstrated that menisci are unquestionably important in load bearing, load redistribution, shock absorption, joint lubrication and the stabilization of the knee joint. It has been proven that partial or all-meniscusectomy results in an accelerated degeneration of cartilage and an increased rate of early osteoarthritis. Knee surgeons must face the difficult decision of removing or, if possible, retaining the meniscus; if it is possible to retain the meniscus, surgeons must address the difficulties of meniscal healing. Some preliminary approaches have progressed to improve meniscal healing. However, the problem of promoting meniscal healing in the avascular area has not yet been resolved. The demanding nature of the approach as well as its low utility and efficacy has impeded the progress of these enhancement techniques. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a platelet concentration derived from autologous blood. In recent years, PRP has been used widely in preclinical and clinical applications for bone regeneration and wound healing. Therefore, we hypothesize that the application of platelet-rich plasma for white-white meniscal tears will be a simple and novel technique of high utility in knee surgery. PMID:22847210

  4. A Porcine Animal Model for Early Meniscal Degeneration – Analysis of Histology, Gene Expression and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Six Months after Resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kreinest, Michael; Reisig, Gregor; Ströbel, Philipp; Dinter, Dietmar; Attenberger, Ulrike; Lipp, Peter; Schwarz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective The menisci of the mammalian knee joint balance the incongruence between femoral condyle and tibial plateau and thus menisci absorb and distribute high loads. Degeneration processes of the menisci lead to pain syndromes in the knee joint. The origin of such degenerative processes on meniscal tissue is rarely understood and may be described best as an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic metabolism. A standardized animal model of meniscal degeneration is needed for further studies. The aim of the current study was to develop a porcine animal model with early meniscal degeneration. Material and Methods Resection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLR) was performed on the left knee joints of eight Göttingen minipigs. A sham operation was carried out on the right knee joint. The grade of degeneration was determined 26 weeks after the operation using histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, the expression of 14 genes which code for extracellular matrix proteins, catabolic matrix metalloproteinases and inflammation mediators were analyzed. Results Degenerative changes were detected by a histological analysis of the medial meniscus after ACLR. These changes were not detected by MRI. In terms of their gene expression profile, these degenerated medial menisci showed a significantly increased expression of COL1A1. Conclusion This paper describes a new animal model for early secondary meniscal degeneration in the Göttingen minipig. Histopathological evidence of the degenerative changes could be described. This early degenerative changes could not be seen by NMR imaging. PMID:27434644

  5. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  6. Development and Characterization of UHMWPE Fiber-Reinforced Hydrogels For Meniscal Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Julianne Leigh

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body. The current treatment of choice, however, is a partial meniscectomy that leads to osteoarthritis proportional to the amount of tissue removed. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring the biomechanical contact stress distribution to the knee after meniscectomy and preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. In this work, a fiber-reinforced hydrogel-based synthetic meniscus was developed that allows for tailoring of the mechanical properties and molding of the implant to match the size, shape, and property distribution of the native tissue. Physically cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers and characterized in compression (0.1-0.8 MPa) and tension (0.1-250 MPa) showing fine control over mechanical properties within the range of the human meniscus. Morphology and crystallinity analysis of PVA hydrogels showed increases in crystallinity and PVA densification, or phase separation, with freeze-thaw cycles. A comparison of freeze-thawed and aged, physically cross-linked hydrogels provided insight on both crystallinity and phase separation as mechanisms for PVA gelation. Results indicated both mechanisms independently contributed to hydrogel modulus for freeze-thawed hydrogels. In vitro swelling studies were performed using osmotic solutions to replicate the swelling pressure present in the knee. Minimal swelling was observed for hydrogels with a PVA concentration of 30-35 wt%, independently of hydrogel freeze-thaw cycles. This allows for independent tailoring of hydrogel modulus and pore structure using freeze-thaw cycles and swelling behavior using polymer concentration to match a wide range of properties needed for various soft tissue applications. The UHMWPE-PVA interface was identified as a significant weakness. To improve interfacial adhesion, a novel

  7. Diagnosis of ligamentous and meniscal pathologies in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic findings

    PubMed Central

    Sayampanathan, Andrew Arjun; Koh, Thean-Howe Bryan; Tan, Hwee-Chye Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used to diagnose or support clinical diagnoses for meniscal or ligamentous injuries prior to offering patients arthroscopic treatment. However, the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of meniscal injury is not yet 100%. Sportsmen have occasionally returned to play with undiagnosed meniscal lesions on the basis of a normal MRI examination. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic parameters of MRI in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Methods MRI and arthroscopic findings of 320 patients with acute ACL injury were included in this retrospective review. Patients belonged to a single surgeon from a high volume tertiary healthcare institution. All patients had either a MRI or an arthroscopic diagnosis of an acute ACL injury of one knee or both. All patients underwent therapeutic arthroscopy by the senior author routinely as part of arthroscopy-aided ACL reconstruction. Arthroscopic findings were the diagnostic reference based on which the positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity, specificity and concordance strength of association of MRI were calculated for ACL, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus (MM) and lateral meniscus (LM) injuries. Results MRI was most accurate in diagnosing cruciate ligament injuries with a PPV approaching 100%. The PPV of MRI in diagnosing meniscal injuries was approximately 60%. MRI was almost 100% sensitive and specific in diagnosing ACL injuries and 82% sensitive and 100% specific in diagnosing PCL injuries. Conversely, MRI was 77% sensitive and 90% specific in diagnosing MM injuries; and 57% sensitive and 95% specific in diagnosing LM injuries. Conclusions MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosing soft tissue injuries of the knee. However, there is a false positive rate ranging from 6% to 11% for meniscal tears. PMID:26605289

  8. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  9. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  10. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  11. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  12. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Umbilical hernia repair is surgery to repair an umbilical hernia . An umbilical hernia is a sac (pouch) formed from the ... the hole or weak spot caused by the umbilical hernia. Your surgeon may also lay a piece ...

  13. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair can be done with ... end of the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparascopic surgery: The surgeon makes three to ...

  14. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  15. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000236.htm Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge ...

  16. ‘Not Always a Baker’s Cyst’ – An Unusual Presentation of a Central Voluminous Postero-Medial Meniscal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sivasubramanian, Harish; Ee, Gerard; Srinivasaiah, Manjunatha Ganiga; De, Shamal Das; Sing, AM

    2012-01-01

    Meniscal cysts are rare and often are a result of extrusion of synovial fluid through a tear of the meniscus, resulting in a one-way valve effect of the tear. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the meniscus with intra-articular cyst drainage has become the standard of care. We report a case of an unusually large symptomatic medial meniscal cyst, situated postero-medially and pressing on the posterior cruciate ligament, which was initially clinically misdiagnosed as a Baker’s cyst. The patient had difficulty and pain on squatting. He was successfully treated with arthroscopic debridement and needle decompression; a rarity in literature for such a voluminous perilabral cyst tenting the posterior cruciate ligament. This procedure has the advantage of being able to obtain the cystic fluid for histological and cytological analysis before debridement. This case also highlights the importance of the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to accurately diagnose a central, posterior knee swelling. PMID:23066435

  17. Study of the Clinical Outcome between Traumatic and Degenerative (non-traumatic) Meniscal Tears after Arthroscopic Surgery: A 4-Years Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Nietiayurk Aminake; Wei, Ji-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The meniscus is a biconcave fibrocartilage in the knee joint interpose between the femoral condyles and tibial plateau; the meniscus has functions in load bearing, load transmission, shock absorption joint stability, joint lubrication, and joint congruity. Aim The aim of this study is to provide orthopeadic surgeon a base of reference in the choice of the optimal course of management for meniscal tears. Materials and Methods One hundred and seventeen patients met the criteria of inclusion for the present study. Patients were divided in two groups T and NT according to the presence of distinct previous traumatic events to the knees. Two subgroups were formed in each groups T and NT respectively at a mean follow up of 1 and 4 years. Postoperative clinical outcome were assessed using Lysholm scores and Rand SF-36 survey. Results One hundred and seventeen patients were included in the present study with 60(51.28%) patients in the traumatic group and 57(48.71%) in the degenerative group. 95(81.19%) patients in total were satisfied with their health status at end of follow up. The mean value of Lysholm scores at 1 year were respectively 85.25±8.78 for traumatic group and 86.38±12.14 for non-traumatic group and at 4 years were respectively 92.63±7.31 for traumatic group and 72.90±20.77 for non-traumatic group. According to Rand SF-36 health, traumatic group showed better improvements compare to non-traumatic group between 1 and 4 years after arthroscopic meniscus surgery. Conclusion A total of 95(81.19%) patients in total were satisfied with their health status at follow up, however, we found that arthroscopy as a treatment for meniscal tear have a relatively better mid-term clinical outcome for traumatic meniscal tears compare to non-traumatic/degenerative meniscal tears. PMID:27190905

  18. Free synovium promotes meniscal healing. Synovium, muscle and synthetic mesh compared in dogs.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, K; Niijima, M; Kobuna, Y; Kizuki, S

    1997-02-01

    We studied the effect of free synovium on the healing of tears in the avascular portion of the menisci in dogs. A longitudinal incision was made in the medial meniscus. In 35 dogs, a free graft of synovium was inserted into the tear and sutured. In 10 dogs, a free graft of quadriceps muscle was used. In 10 dogs, a Dacron mesh was inserted. In the contralateral knee, the tear was sutured without implantation as a control. 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks after the operation, the menisci were dissected. 11 of the 35 with free synovium were healed. The menisci with muscle grafts, those with Dacron mesh and those in the control group did not heal. Histology showed that tears were repaired with fibrous tissue. Microangiography showed that capillaries grew from the periphery, but they did not reach the tear. PMID:9057568

  19. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  20. Mechanical evaluation of poly(vinyl alcohol)-based fibrous composites as biomaterials for meniscal tissue replacement.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Julianne L; Lowman, Anthony M; Palmese, Giuseppe R

    2010-12-01

    In this study, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and PP fibers and evaluated as potential nondegradable meniscal replacements. An investigation of hydrogel and composite mechanical properties indicates that fiber-reinforced PVA hydrogels could replicate the unique anisotropic modulus distribution present in the native meniscus; the most commonly damaged orthopedic tissue. More specifically, fibrous reinforcement successfully increased the tensile modulus of the biomaterial from 0.23±0.02MPa without any reinforcement to 258.1±40.1MPa at 29vol.% UHMWPE. Additionally, the molecular weight between cross-links, bound water and the microstructure of the PVA hydrogels were evaluated as a function of freeze-thaw cycles and polymer concentration to lend insight into the processes occurring during synthesis. These results suggest the presence of multiple mechanisms as causes for increasing hydrogel modulus with freeze-thaw cycling, including hydrogen bonding between amorphous and/or crystalline regions, and the formation of highly concentrated regions of mostly amorphous PVA chains. It is possible that the formation of regions with highly concentrated amounts of PVA increases the load-bearing ability of the hydrogels. PMID:20601243

  1. CT Arthrography and Virtual Arthroscopy in the Diagnosis of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Meniscal Abnormalities of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whal; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Seok Jung; Kim, Hyung Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kang, Heung Sik; Choi, Ja-Young

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients who underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. Results The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3-96.7%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. Conclusion CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities. PMID:15064559

  2. Repairs of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  3. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  4. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  5. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  6. The sensitivity of cartilage contact pressures in the knee joint to the size and shape of an anatomically shaped meniscal implant.

    PubMed

    Khoshgoftar, M; Vrancken, A C T; van Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Janssen, D; Verdonschot, N

    2015-06-01

    Since meniscal geometry affects the cartilage contact pressures, it is essential to carefully define the geometry of the synthetic meniscal implant that we developed. Recently, six independent modes of size- and shape-related geometry variation were identified through 3D statistical shape modeling (SSM) of the medial meniscus. However, this model did not provide information on the functional importance of these geometry characteristics. Therefore, in this study finite element simulations were performed to determine the influence of anatomically-based meniscal implant size and shape variations on knee cartilage contact pressures. Finite element simulations of the knee joint were performed for a total medial meniscectomy, an allograft, the average implant geometry, six implant sizes and ten shape variations. The geometries of the allograft and all implant variations were based on the meniscus SSM. Cartilage contact pressures and implant tensile strains were evaluated in full extension under 1200N of axial compression. The average implant induced cartilage peak pressures intermediate between the allograft and meniscectomy and also reduced the cartilage area subjected to pressures >5MPa compared to the meniscectomy. The smaller implant sizes resulted in lower cartilage peak pressures and compressive strains than the allograft, yet high implant tensile strains were observed. Shape modes 2, 3 and 6 affected the cartilage contact stresses but to a lesser extent than the size variations. Shape modes 4 and 5 did not result in changes of the cartilage stress levels. The present study indicates that cartilage contact mechanics are more sensitive to implant size than to implant shape. Down-sizing the implant resulted in more favorable contact mechanics, but caused excessive material strains. Further evaluations are necessary to balance cartilage contact pressures and material strains to ensure cartilage protection and longevity of the implant. PMID:25766390

  7. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners

  8. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  9. Culture of equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes on synthetic tissue scaffolds towards meniscal tissue engineering: a preliminary cell-seeding study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Derek B.; Stoker, Aaron M.; Beatty, Mark; Cockrell, Mary; Janicek, John C.; Cook, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Tissue engineering is a new methodology for addressing meniscal injury or loss. Synovium may be an ideal source of cells for in vitro meniscal fibrocartilage formation, however, favorable in vitro culture conditions for synovium must be established in order to achieve this goal. The objective of this study was to determine cellularity, cell distribution, and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation of equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) cultured on synthetic scaffolds, for potential application in synovium-based meniscal tissue engineering. Scaffolds included open-cell poly-L-lactic acid (OPLA) sponges and polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds cultured in static and dynamic culture conditions, and PGA scaffolds coated in poly-L-lactic (PLLA) in dynamic culture conditions. Materials and Methods. Equine FLS were seeded on OPLA and PGA scaffolds, and cultured in a static environment or in a rotating bioreactor for 12 days. Equine FLS were also seeded on PGA scaffolds coated in 2% or 4% PLLA and cultured in a rotating bioreactor for 14 and 21 days. Three scaffolds from each group were fixed, sectioned and stained with Masson’s Trichrome, Safranin-O, and Hematoxylin and Eosin, and cell numbers and distribution were analyzed using computer image analysis. Three PGA and OPLA scaffolds from each culture condition were also analyzed for extracellular matrix (ECM) production via dimethylmethylene blue (sulfated glycosaminoglycan) assay and hydroxyproline (collagen) assay. PLLA coated PGA scaffolds were analyzed using double stranded DNA quantification as areflection of cellularity and confocal laser microscopy in a fluorescent cell viability assay. Results. The highest cellularity occurred in PGA constructs cultured in a rotating bioreactor, which also had a mean sulfated glycosaminoglycan content of 22.3 µg per scaffold. PGA constructs cultured in static conditions had the lowest cellularity. Cells had difficulty adhering to OPLA and the PLLA coating of PGA

  10. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  11. Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma Composition on Anabolic and Catabolic Activities in Equine Cartilage and Meniscal Explants

    PubMed Central

    McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Rodkey, William G.; Frisbie, David D.; Steadman, J.Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of single- and double-spin preparations of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on anabolic and catabolic activities of cartilage and meniscal explants in vitro. Methods: Single- and double-spin PRP was prepared using laboratory processing or commercial kits. The cellular contents were quantified, and each PRP was mixed in equal quantities with cell culture medium and added to cartilage or meniscus explant cultures, with or without interleukin 1 β (IL-1β). Extracellular matrix synthesis was quantified over 24 hours via 35S-sulfate and 3H-proline incorporation, while gene expression of catabolic enzymes was evaluated using real-time PCR. Results: The platelet concentration in single-spin laboratory PRP was 59% higher than blood. Platelet and white blood cell concentrations in single-spin laboratory and kit PRP were not significantly different, while the double-spin kit resulted in approximately 2.5-fold higher platelet and approximately 400-fold higher white blood cell concentrations. In cartilage cultures without IL-1β, radiolabel incorporation in single-spin PRP cultures was significantly higher than in double-spin cultures. Similar results were obtained for 35S-sulfate incorporation in meniscus cultures without IL-1β. In IL-1β, radiolabel incorporation was largely similar among all PRPs. After 24 hours of culture, ADAMTS-4 gene expression in cartilage was lowest for single-spin PRP, while expression in the double-spin kit was not significantly different from double-spin laboratory PRP in which platelets were concentrated 6-fold. Conclusions This study suggests that single-spin PRP preparations may be the most advantageous for intra-articular applications and that double-spin systems should be considered with caution. PMID:26069637

  12. Dynamic Alterations in Microarchitecture, Mineralization and Mechanical Property of Subchondral Bone in Rat Medial Meniscal Tear Model of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, De-Gang; Nie, Shao-Bo; Liu, Feng-Xiang; Wu, Chuan-Long; Tian, Bo; Wang, Wen-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Zhen-An; Mao, Yuan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: The properties of subchondral bone influence the integrity of articular cartilage in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). However, the characteristics of subchondral bone alterations remain unresolved. The present study aimed to observe the dynamic alterations in the microarchitecture, mineralization, and mechanical properties of subchondral bone during the progression of OA. Methods: A medial meniscal tear (MMT) operation was performed in 128 adult Sprague Dawley rats to induce OA. At 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks following the MMT operation, cartilage degeneration was evaluated using toluidine blue O staining, whereas changes in the microarchitecture indices and tissue mineral density (TMD), mineral-to-collagen ratio, and intrinsic mechanical properties of subchondral bone plates (BPs) and trabecular bones (Tbs) were measured using micro-computed tomography scanning, confocal Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation testing, respectively. Results: Cartilage degeneration occurred and worsened progressively from 2 to 12 weeks after OA induction. Microarchitecture analysis revealed that the subchondral bone shifted from bone resorption early (reduced trabecular BV/TV, trabecular number, connectivity density and trabecular thickness [Tb.Th], and increased trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp) at 2 and 4 weeks) to bone accretion late (increased BV/TV, Tb.Th and thickness of subchondral bone plate, and reduced Tb.Sp at 8 and 12 weeks). The TMD of both the BP and Tb displayed no significant changes at 2 and 4 weeks but decreased at 8 and 12 weeks. The mineral-to-collagen ratio showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks for the Tb and from 8 weeks for the BP after OA induction. Both the elastic modulus and hardness of the Tb showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks after OA induction. The BP showed a significant decrease in its elastic modulus from 8 weeks and its hardness from 4 weeks. Conclusion: The microarchitecture, mineralization and mechanical properties of

  13. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  14. Planning Maintenance and Repairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of school facility design as an aid to efficiently repairing and maintaining facility systems. Also presents details on facility design's influence in properly maintaining mechanical and electrical systems. (GR)

  15. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the likelihood of a hernia including persistent coughing, difficulty with bowel movements or urination, or frequent need for straining. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair? Keep reading... Page 1 of 2 1 2 » Brought to ...

  16. Easily repairable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a simple class of distribution networks which withstand damage by being repairable instead of redundant. Instead of asking how hard it is to disconnect nodes through damage, we ask how easy it is to reconnect nodes after damage. We prove that optimal networks on regular lattices have an expected cost of reconnection proportional to the lattice length, and that such networks have exactly three levels of structural hierarchy. We extend our results to networks subject to repeated attacks, in which the repairs themselves must be repairable. We find that, in exchange for a modest increase in repair cost, such networks are able to withstand any number of attacks. We acknowledge support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, BCG and EU FP7 (Growthcom).

  17. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  18. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to

  19. Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100103.htm Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series To use the sharing features on ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Esophagus Disorders Fistulas Tracheal Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  20. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series To use the sharing features on ... to slide 4 out of 4 Indications Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  1. Pectus excavatum repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to repair this condition -- open surgery and closed (minimally invasive) surgery. Either surgery is done while ... At the end of surgery, the incision is closed. The metal struts are removed in 6 to ...

  2. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystocele Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series References Lentz GM. Anatomic defects of the ... 72. Read More Anterior Inflatable artificial sphincter Stress urinary incontinence Urinary catheters Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - ...

  3. Imperforate anus repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100030.htm Imperforate anus repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... of 4 Overview In individuals with a normal anatomy, the large intestine (colon) empties into a pouch- ...

  4. Meningocele repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100128.htm Meningocele repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles and Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Review provided ...

  5. Robotic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Escobar Dominguez, Jose E; Gonzalez, Anthony; Donkor, Charan

    2015-09-01

    Inguinal hernias have been described throughout the history of medicine with many efforts to achieve the cure. Currently, with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery, new questions arise: what is going to be the best approach for inguinal hernia repair? Is there a real benefit with the robotic approach? Should minimally invasive hernia surgery be the standard of care? In this report we address these questions by describing our experience with robotic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26153353

  6. Repairing Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, J.; Buras, D.

    1986-01-01

    Large holes in polyurethane foam insulation repaired reliably by simple method. Little skill needed to apply method, used for overhead repairs as well as for those in other orientations. Plug positioned in hole to be filled and held in place with mounting fixture. Fresh liquid foam injected through plug to bond it in place. As foam cures and expands, it displaces plug outward. Protrusion later removed.

  7. Editorial Commentary: Book? … Book Report? … or Just a New Chapter in an Ongoing Story?: Knee Partial Meniscectomy Has Limited Benefit for "Nonobstructive" Meniscal Tears, but We Need to Know if Patients Have Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Knee partial meniscectomy has limited benefit for "nonobstructive" meniscal tears, but we need to know if included patients have osteoarthritis. Research on outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus nonsurgical treatment must consider not only signs and symptoms but also imaging findings, to determine the indications for surgical versus nonsurgical in a selected patient. PMID:27594333

  8. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  9. Defining the Value of Future Research to Identify the Preferred Treatment of Meniscal Tear in the Presence of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Losina, Elena; Dervan, Elizabeth E.; Paltiel, A. David; Dong, Yan; Wright, R. John; Spindler, Kurt P.; Mandl, Lisa A.; Jones, Morgan H.; Marx, Robert G.; Safran-Norton, Clare E.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) is extensively used to relieve pain in patients with symptomatic meniscal tear (MT) and knee osteoarthritis (OA). Recent studies have failed to show the superiority of APM compared to other treatments. We aim to examine whether existing evidence is sufficient to reject use of APM as a cost-effective treatment for MT+OA. Methods We built a patient-level microsimulation using Monte Carlo methods and evaluated three strategies: Physical therapy (‘PT’) alone; PT followed by APM if subjects continued to experience pain (‘Delayed APM’); and ‘Immediate APM’. Our subject population was US adults with symptomatic MT and knee OA over a 10 year time horizon. We assessed treatment outcomes using societal costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), incorporating productivity costs as a sensitivity analysis. We also conducted a value-of-information analysis using probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results Calculated ICERs were estimated to be $12,900/QALY for Delayed APM as compared to PT and $103,200/QALY for Immediate APM as compared to Delayed APM. In sensitivity analyses, inclusion of time costs made Delayed APM cost-saving as compared to PT. Improving efficacy of Delayed APM led to higher incremental costs and lower incremental effectiveness of Immediate APM in comparison to Delayed APM. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that PT had 3.0% probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $50,000/QALY. Delayed APM was cost effective 57.7% of the time at WTP = $50,000/QALY and 50.2% at WTP = $100,000/QALY. The probability of Immediate APM being cost-effective did not exceed 50% unless WTP exceeded $103,000/QALY. Conclusions We conclude that current cost-effectiveness evidence does not support unqualified rejection of either Immediate or Delayed APM for the treatment of MT+OA. The amount to which society would be

  10. Arthroscopic hip labral repair.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Faucet, Scott C; Briggs, Karen K

    2013-05-01

    Labral tears in the hip may cause painful clicking or locking of the hip, reduced range of motion, and disruption to sports and daily activities. The acetabular labrum aids stabilization of the hip joint, particularly during hip motion. The fibrocartilaginous structure extends the acetabular rim and provides a suction seal around the femoroacetabular interface. Treatment options for labral tears include debridement, repair, and reconstruction. Repair of the labrum has been shown to have better results than debridement. Labral refixation is achieved with sutures anchored into the acetabular rim. The acetabular rim is trimmed either to correct pincer impingement or to provide a bleeding bed to improve healing. Labral repair has shown excellent short-term to midterm outcomes and allows patients to return to activities and sports. Arthroscopic rim trimming and labral refixation comprise an effective treatment for labral tears with an underlying diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement and are supported by the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:23875153

  11. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  12. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, produce modified schedules, quickly, and exhibits 'anytime' behavior. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. We also show the anytime characteristics of the system. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  13. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, and produce modified schedules quickly. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  14. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje; Ranstam, Jonas; Engebretsen, Lars; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone. Main outcome measures Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months. Results No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval −4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial’s inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider

  15. The association of meniscal status, lower extremity alignment, and body mass index with chondrosis at the time of revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Nwosu, Sam K.; Wright, Rick W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) have a high prevalence of articular cartilage lesions. Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the prevalence of chondrosis at the time of rACLR is associated with meniscus status and lower extremity alignment. Study design Cross sectional study. Methods Data from the prospective Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) cohort was reviewed to identify patients with pre-operative lower extremity alignment films. Lower extremity alignment was defined by the weight bearing line (WBL) as a percentage of the tibial plateau width, while the chondral and meniscal status of each weight bearing compartment was recorded at the time of surgery. Multivariable proportional odds models were constructed and adjusted for relevant factors in order to examine which risk factors were independently associated with the degree of medial and lateral compartment chondrosis. Results The cohort included 246 patients with lower extremity alignment films at the time of rACLR. Average (SD) patient age was 26.9 (9.5) years with a BMI of 26.4 (4.6). The medial compartment had more chondrosis (Grade 2/3: 42%, Grade 4: 6.5%) than the lateral compartment (Grade 2/3: 26%, Grade 4: 6.5%). Disruption of the meniscus was noted in 35% of patients on the medial side and 16% in the lateral side. The average (SD) WBL was measured to be 0.43 (0.13). Medial compartment chondrosis was associated with BMI (p=0.025), alignment (p=0.002), and medial meniscus status (p=0.001). None of the knees with the WBL lateral to 0.625 had Grade 4 chondrosis in the medial compartment. Lateral compartment chondrosis was significantly associated with age (p=0.013) and lateral meniscus status (p<0.001). Subjects with ‘intact’ menisci were found to decrease their odds of having chondrosis by 64–84%. Conclusions The status of articular cartilage in the tibiofemoral compartments at the time of rACLR is related to meniscal status. Lower

  16. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... main treatment options for bone fractures are: Casting Open reduction, and internal fixation- this involves a surgery to repair the fracture-frequently, metal rods, screws or plates are used to repair the bone, and remain ...

  17. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  18. Getting Ready To Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stryker, Rick

    2002-01-01

    Successful camp repairs require careful planning. Prioritize projects by program needs first, then by cost. Determine the cause of deterioration and address it. Build goodwill with suppliers by knowing what you want and giving them ample time to prepare estimates. Include labor costs, even for staff labor. A cost-estimate table for a sample…

  19. Comprehensive Small Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the basic information needed to repair all two- and four-stroke cycle engines. The curriculum covers four areas, each consisting of one or more units of instruction that include performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and students, information sheets, assignment sheets, job sheets, visual aids,…

  20. Repairing cracked glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, D. D.; Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    Filing procedure consisting of machined lightweight fused-silica tiles coated with thin-layer of borosilicate glass produces homogeneous seal in thin glass. Procedure is useful in repairing glass envelopes, X-ray tub windows, Dewar flasks, and similar thin glass objects.

  1. Automotive Body Repair Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Armond, Jack; And Others

    Designed to provide a model curriculum and guidelines, this manual presents tasks that were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary auto body repair curriculum. The tasks are divided into ten major component areas of instruction: metalworking and fiberglass, painting, frame and suspension, glass and trim,…

  2. Patent urachus repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  3. Patent urachus repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair - series—Normal anatomy URL of this ...

  4. Repairing damaged platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.E.; Kwok, P.H.; Wang, S.S.

    1995-10-01

    This paper introduces a unique method for strengthening of platforms and replacing damaged members. Extending the life of existing infrastructure is approved means of decreasing cash expenditures for new platforms and facilities. Platforms can be affected by corrosion, overloading and fatigue. The renovation and repair of existing offshore installations is an important part of offshore engineering. The basis behind this paper is an April, 1993 incident in the Arabian Gulf. A vessel broke loose from its moorings in a severe storm and collided with a wellhead platform. The collision severely damaged the platform buckling seven major support members and cracking joints throughout the structure. In view of the significant damage, there was an urgent need to repair the structure to avoid any further damage from potentially sever winter storm conditions. Various means of repair and their associated costs were evaluated: traditional dry hyperbaric welding, adjacent platforms, grouted clamped connections, and mechanical pipe connectors. The repair was completed using an innovative combination of clamps and wet welding to attach external braces to the structure.

  5. Proteoglycans and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Fawcett, James W

    2004-02-01

    Proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of long, unbranched sugar chains attached to a protein core. In the mammalian central nervous system, they are a major component of the extracellular matrix and of the cellular surface. After a central nervous system injury, their expression in the lesion area changes strongly and contributes to the inhibition of axon regrowth and brain repair. PMID:14739401

  6. Targeting Nuclear Envelope Repair.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Migrating cancer cells undergo repeated rupture of the protective nuclear envelope as they squeeze through small spaces in the surrounding tissue, compromising genomic integrity. Inhibiting both general DNA repair and the mechanism that seals these tears may enhance cell death and curb metastasis. PMID:27130435

  7. Auto Repair Gets Technical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiger, Jim; Shoemaker, Byrl

    1989-01-01

    Rapid advances in automotive technology and the growth of the automotive service industry have created opportunities in car repair, parts supply, and body work. Certification is the best way for vocational educators to ensure that their programs prepare students for work in the automotive industry. (JOW)

  8. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R.; Peter, William H.

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  9. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007643.htm Achilles tendon repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your Achilles tendon joins your calf muscle to your heel. You can tear your Achilles tendon if you land hard on your heel during sports, from a ...

  10. Basic Book Repair Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Abraham A.

    This book addresses some common preservation techniques that invariably become necessary in library and archival collections of any size. The procedures are described in chronological sequence, and photographs show the techniques from the viewpoint of the person actually doing the work. The recommended repair methods can be accomplished using…

  11. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... bulges out of a weak spot in the groin. Usually this tissue is part of the intestine. ... Your surgeon makes a cut (incision) in your groin area. The hernia is ... wall. This repairs the weakness in the wall. At the end ...

  12. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  13. Lawn and Garden Equipment Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack; And Others

    This publication is designed to supplement the Comprehensive Small Engine Rapair guide by covering in detail all aspects of lawn and garden equipment repair not included in general engine repair or the repair of other small engines. It consists of instructional materials for both teachers and students, written in terms of student performance using…

  14. Cleft lip repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the middle of the upper lip. A cleft palate is an opening in the roof of the ... Cleft lip repair and cleft palate repair are indicated for: Repair of physical deformity Nursing, feeding, or speech problems resulting from cleft lip or palate

  15. Automotive Engine Maintenance and Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide students with an understanding of automotive engine maintenance and repair. The course contains six study units covering automotive engine maintenance and repair; design classification; engine malfunction, diagnosis, and repair; engine disassembly; engine…

  16. Probabilistic Approach for Determining the Material Properties of Meniscal Attachments In Vivo Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and a Finite Element Model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Son, Juhyun; Lee, Young Han; Chun, Heoung-Jae

    2015-12-01

    The material properties of in vivo meniscal attachments were evaluated using a probabilistic finite element (FE) model and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI scans of five subjects were collected at full extension and 30°, 60°, and 90° flexion. One subject with radiographic evidence of no knee injury and four subjects with Kellgren-Lawrence score of 1 or 2 (two each) were recruited. Isovoxel sagittal three-dimensional cube sequences of the knee were acquired in extension and flexion. Menisci movement in flexion was investigated using sensitivity analysis based on the Monte Carlo method in order to generate a subject-specific FE model to evaluate significant factors. The material properties of horn attachment in the five-subject FE model were optimized to minimize the differences between meniscal movements in the FE model and MR images in flexion. We found no significant difference between normal and patient knees in flexion with regard to movement of anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral menisci or changes in height morphology. At 90° flexion, menisci movement was primarily influenced by posterior horn stiffness, followed by anterior horn stiffness, the transverse ligament, and posterior cruciate ligament. The optimized material properties model predictions for menisci motion were more accurate than the initial material properties model. The results of this approach suggest that the material properties of horn attachment, which affects the mobile characteristics of menisci, could be determined in vivo. Thus, this study establishes a basis for a future design method of attachment for tissue-engineered replacement menisci. PMID:26402397

  17. Base Excision Repair and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Susan S.; Murphy, Drew L.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair is the system used from bacteria to man to remove the tens of thousands of endogenous DNA damages produced daily in each human cell. Base excision repair is required for normal mammalian development and defects have been associated with neurological disorders and cancer. In this paper we provide an overview of short patch base excision repair in humans and summarize current knowledge of defects in base excision repair in mouse models and functional studies on short patch base excision repair germ line polymorphisms and their relationship to cancer. The biallelic germ line mutations that result in MUTYH-associated colon cancer are also discussed. PMID:22252118

  18. Meniscal allograft transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the outside (lateral meniscus). When a meniscus is torn, it is commonly removed by knee arthroscopy . Some ... or nearly all of the meniscus cartilage is torn or has to be removed. The new meniscus ...

  19. Meniscal tears (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the shock-absorbing cartilage in the knee. The meniscus is a C-shaped fibrous cartilage that is ... joints forming a buffer between the bones. The meniscus also serves as a shock-absorption system, assists ...

  20. Meniscal allograft transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - cartilage; Arthroscopy - knee - meniscus transplant ... you are a good candidate for a meniscus transplant, x-rays of your knee are usually taken ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  2. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  3. Proteoglycans and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ouzzine, Mohamed; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Repair of damaged articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) is a clinical challenge. Because cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue, normal mechanisms of tissue repair through recruitment of cells to the site of tissue destruction are not feasible. Proteoglycan (PG) depletion induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β, a principal mediator in OA, is a major factor in the onset and progression of joint destruction. Current symptomatic treatments of OA by anti-inflammatory drugs do not alter the progression of the disease. Various therapeutic strategies have been developed to antagonize the effect of proinflammatory cytokines. However, relatively few studies were conducted to stimulate anabolic activity, in an attempt to enhance cartilage repair. To this aim, a nonviral gene transfer strategy of glycosyltransferases responsible for PG synthesis has been developed and tested for its capacity to promote cartilage PG synthesis and deposition. Transfection of chondrocytes or cartilage explants by the expression vector for the glycosyltransferase β-1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) enhanced PG synthesis and deposition in the ECM by promoting the synthesis of chondroitin sulfate GAG chains of the cartilage matrix. This indicates that therapy mediated through GT gene delivery may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of OA. PMID:22252645

  4. Intraoral repair of cosmetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Denehy, G; Bouschlicher, M; Vargas, M

    1998-10-01

    The longevity of porcelain and composite resin restorations can often be prolonged by using sound principles, up-to-date materials, and judicious attention to repair when fracture problems arise. Careful case selection and correct usage of surface treatment agents, followed by the use of a quality bonding system and restorative materials, can result in a repair that exhibits excellent retention and natural color blending. This article outlines procedures and materials to repair both resin composite and porcelain intraorally. PMID:9891653

  5. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  6. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  7. Surgical repair of myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, M W

    1993-12-01

    The birth of an infant with myelomeningocele provides a devastating experience for parents, a management dilemma for medical personnel, and an economic liability of immense proportions associated with the multiple disciplinary management program throughout the patient's life. Although undue delay in the onset of therapy is to be avoided, time can be taken for through assessment and appropriate discussion with the family without compromising the outcome. Once decisions are made to proceed with repair, early cover of the myelomeningocele defect is necessary to prevent progressive loss of neural tissue through exposure, desiccation, and sepsis. Many techniques of repair have been advocated. In principle, the ideal should be applicable to all sizes of defect, should be able to be executed in the neonatal age group with minimal morbidity, and should provide long-term, stable soft tissue cover without significant secondary scarring. A technique adhering to these principles is described and supported by results in a personal series of 84 patients during a 12-year period. PMID:8297082

  8. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  9. Thickness of the Meniscal Lamellar Layer: Correlation with Indentation Stiffness and Comparison of Normal and Abnormally Thick Layers by Using Multiparametric Ultrashort Echo Time MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ja-Young; Biswas, Reni; Bae, Won C; Healey, Robert; Im, Michael; Statum, Sheronda; Chang, Eric Y; Du, Jiang; Bydder, Graeme M; D'Lima, Darryl; Chung, Christine B

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between lamellar layer thickness on ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance (MR) images and indentation stiffness of human menisci and to compare quantitative MR imaging values between two groups with normal and abnormally thick lamellar layers. Materials and Methods This was a HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study. Nine meniscal pieces were obtained from seven donors without gross meniscal pathologic results (mean age, 57.4 years ± 14.5 [standard deviation]). UTE MR imaging and T2, UTE T2*, and UTE T1ρ mapping were performed. The presence of abnormal lamellar layer thickening was determined and thicknesses were measured. Indentation testing was performed. Correlation between the thickness and indentation stiffness was assessed, and mean quantitative MR imaging values were compared between the groups. Results Thirteen normal lamellar layers had mean thickness of 232 μm ± 85 and indentation peak force of 1.37 g ± 0.87. Four abnormally thick lamellar layers showed mean thickness of 353.14 μm ± 98.36 and peak force 0.72 g ± 0.31. In most cases, normal thicknesses showed highly positive correlation with the indentation peak force (r = 0.493-0.912; P < .001 to .05). However, the thickness in two abnormal lamellar layers showed highly negative correlation (r = -0.90, P < .001; and r = -0.23, P = .042) and no significant correlation in the others. T2, UTE T2*, and UTE T1ρ values in abnormally thick lamellar layers were increased compared with values in normal lamellar layers, although only the UTE T2* value showed significant difference (P = .010). Conclusion Variation of lamellar layer thickness in normal human menisci was evident on two-dimensional UTE images. In normal lamellar layers, thickness is highly and positively correlated with surface indentation stiffness. UTE T2* values may be used to differentiate between normal and abnormally thickened lamellar layers. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26829523

  10. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  11. Laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Virzí, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Virzí; Scaravilli, Francesco; Francesco, Scaravilli; Ragazzi, Salvatore; Salvatore, Ragazzi; Piazza, Diego; Diego, Piazza

    2007-12-01

    Paracolostomy hernia is a common occurrence, representing a late complication of stoma surgery. Different surgical techniques have been proposed to repair the wall defect, but the lowest recurrence rates are associated with the use of mesh. We present the case report of a patient in which laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair has been successfully performed. PMID:18097321

  12. Instructional Guide for Autobody Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    The curriculum guide was developed to serve as a statewide model for Virginia auto body repair programs. The guide is designed to 1,080 hours of instruction in eleven blocks: orientation, introduction, welding and cutting, techniques of shaping metal, body filler and fiberglass repairs, body and frame, removing and replacing damaged parts, basic…

  13. Cobbler's Technique for Iridodialysis Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pandav, Surinder Singh; Gupta, Parul Chawla; Singh, Rishi Raj; Das, Kalpita; Kaushik, Sushmita; Raj, Srishti; Ram, Jagat

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel “Cobbler's technique” for iridodialysis repair in the right eye of a patient aged 18 years, with a traumatic iridodialysis secondary to open globe injury with an iron rod. Our technique is simple with easy surgical maneuvers, that is, effective for repairing iridodialysis. The “Cobbler's technique” allows a maximally functional and cosmetic result for iridodialysis. PMID:26957855

  14. Pipe inspection and repair system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schempf, Hagen (Inventor); Mutschler, Edward (Inventor); Chemel, Brian (Inventor); Boehmke, Scott (Inventor); Crowley, William (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multi-module pipe inspection and repair device. The device includes a base module, a camera module, a sensor module, an MFL module, a brush module, a patch set/test module, and a marker module. Each of the modules may be interconnected to construct one of an inspection device, a preparation device, a marking device, and a repair device.

  15. Major Appliance Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smreker, Eugene; Calvert, King

    This module is a comprehensive text on basic appliance repair, designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in this growing field. Ensuring a firm grounding in electrical knowledge, the module contains 13 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) major appliance repair orientation; (2) safety and first aid; (3) fundamentals of…

  16. Membrane Repair: Mechanisms and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sandra T; McNeil, Paul L

    2015-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells have been confronted throughout their evolution with potentially lethal plasma membrane injuries, including those caused by osmotic stress, by infection from bacterial toxins and parasites, and by mechanical and ischemic stress. The wounded cell can survive if a rapid repair response is mounted that restores boundary integrity. Calcium has been identified as the key trigger to activate an effective membrane repair response that utilizes exocytosis and endocytosis to repair a membrane tear, or remove a membrane pore. We here review what is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of membrane repair, with particular emphasis on the relevance of repair as it relates to disease pathologies. Collective evidence reveals membrane repair employs primitive yet robust molecular machinery, such as vesicle fusion and contractile rings, processes evolutionarily honed for simplicity and success. Yet to be fully understood is whether core membrane repair machinery exists in all cells, or whether evolutionary adaptation has resulted in multiple compensatory repair pathways that specialize in different tissues and cells within our body. PMID:26336031

  17. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25596348

  18. Engineering skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mark; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-10-01

    Healthy skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity for regeneration. Even at a mature age, muscle tissue can undergo a robust rebuilding process that involves the formation of new muscle cells and extracellular matrix and the re-establishment of vascular and neural networks. Understanding and reverse-engineering components of this process is essential for our ability to restore loss of muscle mass and function in cases where the natural ability of muscle for self-repair is exhausted or impaired. In this article, we will describe current approaches to restore the function of diseased or injured muscle through combined use of myogenic stem cells, biomaterials, and functional tissue-engineered muscle. Furthermore, we will discuss possibilities for expanding the future use of human cell sources toward the development of cell-based clinical therapies and in vitro models of human muscle disease. PMID:23711735

  19. TPS Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Scott Parazynski provided a retrospective on the EVA tools and procedures efforts NASA went through in the aftermath of Columbia for the Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and repair. He describes his role as the lead astronaut on this effort, and covered all of the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL), KC 135 (reduced gravity aircraft), Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF), vacuum chamber and 1 G testing that was done in order to develop the tools and techniques that were flown. Parazynski also discusses how the EVA community worked together to resolve a huge safety issue, and how his work in the spacesuit was critical to overcoming a design limitation of the Space Shuttle.

  20. Wound repair in Pocillopora.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry Martin; Calderon-Aguilera, Luis Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals. PMID:27397755

  1. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  2. Defect repair performance using the nanomachining repair technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Yasutaka; Kokubo, Haruo; Nishiguchi, Masaharu; Hayashi, Naoya; White, Roy; Bozak, Ron; Terrill, Lee

    2003-08-01

    Nanomachining is a new technique for repairing photomask defects. The advantages of this technique are no substrate damage, precise edge placement position and Z height accuracy when compared with current Laser zapper or FIB GAE repair techniques. This technique can be applied to any type of opaque defects at any type of film materials and quartz bump defects on Alternating Aperture Phase Sifting Masks (AAPSM). Furthermore, these characteristics enable complex pattern repairs of most advanced photomasks for 193nm lithography and enables iterative repair to achieve improved printing performance when analyzed with an AIMS 193nm tool. Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. (DNP) has been producing AAPSMs in mass production for quite some time. The standard type of AAPSMs manufactured has been etched quartz, single trench with an undercut structure. On this structure, there is a potential for quartz defects underneath the chrome overhang based on the combination of dry and wet etching to create the undercut. For this study, we fabricated this kind of designed quartz defects and repaired them using the nanomachining system. These types of defects are particularly difficult to repair perfectly because they exist underneath the chrome overhang. We will show some options to achieve better printing results through the repair of these kinds of defects. In this report, we confirmed basic performance of this technique such as edge placement accuracy, Z height accuracy and AIMS printability. Additionally, we also tried to repair some complex defects such as quartz defects of AAPSM, quartz defects of CPL mask and oversized Serifs for application options. We will show these nanomachining repairs with evaluation results of printing performance simulated by the AIMS 193nm tool.

  3. Humeral Head Arthroplasty and Meniscal Allograft Resurfacing of the Glenoid: A Concise Follow-up of a Previous Report and Survivorship Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bois, Aaron J; Whitney, Ian J; Somerson, Jeremy S; Wirth, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    The two to five-year results of humeral head arthroplasty and lateral meniscal allograft resurfacing of the glenoid in patients fifty-five years of age or younger were previously reported by the senior author (M.A.W.). The purpose of the present study was to report the survival rate, clinical findings, and radiographic results of the original thirty shoulders (thirty patients) followed for a mean duration of 8.3 years (range, five to twelve years). The scores on the visual analog scale for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scoring system, and Simple Shoulder Test were significantly improved at the latest follow-up evaluation compared with the preoperative findings (p < 0.001). Radiographic indices of posterior subluxation did not significantly increase from the immediate postoperative imaging to the latest radiographs, while the glenohumeral joint space demonstrated a gradual decrease. Nine (30%) of thirty shoulders were known to have undergone a reoperation. The present study demonstrated that biological glenoid resurfacing combined with hemiarthroplasty can provide significant improvement in shoulder function and pain relief in young patients with glenohumeral arthritis; however, mid-term follow-up at a mean of over eight years demonstrated a high reoperation rate. PMID:26446964

  4. How to repair an episiotomy.

    PubMed

    Steen, Mary; Cummins, Bernie

    2016-02-17

    Rationale and key points Skilful repair of an episiotomy is an important aspect of maternal health care. It is essential that midwives and doctors have the knowledge and skills to undertake this procedure in a safe and effective manner. ▶ An episiotomy should be repaired promptly to reduce blood loss and prevent infection. ▶ Repair of an episiotomy is undertaken in three stages: repair of the vaginal mucosa, repair of the muscle layer and repair of the skin layer. ▶ Adequate pain relief should be provided before suturing. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Why a rectal examination is recommended before and following repair of an episiotomy. 2. What you would do to improve your suturing skills. 3. The factors that may prevent or delay an episiotomy from healing. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26884039

  5. DNA repair in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA repair is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all living beings. Genome size as well as the repertoire and abundance of DNA repair components may vary among prokaryotic species. The bacteria of the Mollicutes class feature a small genome size, absence of a cell wall, and a parasitic lifestyle. A small number of genes make Mollicutes a good model for a “minimal cell” concept. Results In this work we studied the DNA repair system of Mycoplasma gallisepticum on genomic, transcriptional, and proteomic levels. We detected 18 out of 22 members of the DNA repair system on a protein level. We found that abundance of the respective mRNAs is less than one per cell. We studied transcriptional response of DNA repair genes of M. gallisepticum at stress conditions including heat, osmotic, peroxide stresses, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin treatment, stationary phase and heat stress in stationary phase. Conclusions Based on comparative genomic study, we determined that the DNA repair system M. gallisepticum includes a sufficient set of proteins to provide a cell with functional nucleotide and base excision repair and mismatch repair. We identified SOS-response in M. gallisepticum on ciprofloxacin, which is a known SOS-inducer, tetracycline and heat stress in the absence of established regulators. Heat stress was found to be the strongest SOS-inducer. We found that upon transition to stationary phase of culture growth transcription of DNA repair genes decreases dramatically. Heat stress does not induce SOS-response in a stationary phase. PMID:24148612

  6. Scalp repair using tissue expanders.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, E Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Repair of scalp defects is often challenging, because without careful planning, excision of the defect may leave unsatisfactory cosmesis. Contemporary techniques in hair restoration surgery allow creation of natural and undetectable results, but these techniques are often unsuitable for repairing large scarred areas of hair loss. However, by using older techniques of scalp reduction and tissue expansion, excision of many large scarring defects can be accomplished. Combining older methods with modern hair restoration surgery permits the satisfactory treatment of many previously untreatable conditions. This article focuses on tissue expansion as an adjunct to repairing large scalp defects. PMID:24017990

  7. Repair of webbed fingers - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/presentations/100096.htm Repair of webbed fingers - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Finger Injuries and Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Cleft lip and palate repair

    MedlinePlus

    Orofacial cleft; Craniofacial birth defect repair; Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty ... A cleft lip is a birth defect: A cleft lip may be just a small notch in the lip. It may also be a complete split in the ...

  9. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  10. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  11. Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Explains the job of precision instrument and equipment repairers, who work on cameras, medical equipment, musical instruments, watches and clocks, and industrial measuring devices. Discusses duties, working conditions, employment and earnings, job outlook, and skills and training. (JOW)

  12. Anterior Repair with Processed Dermis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Anterior Repair with Axis® Tutoplast® Processed Dermis and Digitex® - Performed by Dr. Manish Patel Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  13. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  17. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  19. Mitral valve repair versus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Keshavamurthy, Suresh; Gillinov, A. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative, ischemic, rheumatic and infectious (endocarditis) processes are responsible for mitral valve disease in adults. Mitral valve repair has been widely regarded as the optimal surgical procedure to treat mitral valve dysfunction of all etiologies. The supporting evidence for repair over replacement is strongest in degenerative mitral regurgitation. The aim of the present review is to summarize the data in each category of mitral insufficiency and to provide recommendations based upon this data. PMID:26309824

  20. Large steam turbine repair: A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Lube, B. )

    1991-07-01

    This report covers a survey taken to document the current state-of-the-art in repairs to large steam turbines. One objective was to provide information to assist utilities in making repair or replacement decisions. The survey revealed that a large number of repairs have been successfully repaired involving both mechanical and welding repair techniques. Repair techniques have been improving in recent years and are being used more frequently. No guidelines or codes exist for the repair of steam turbine components so each repair is primarily controlled by agreement between the utility, contractor and insurer. Types of repairs are reviewed in this report and in addition, the capabilities of various contractors who are currently active in providing repair service. 40 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Repair Integrity and Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ariel A.; Mark, P.; DiVenere, Jessica Megan; Klinge, Stephen Austin; Arciero, Robert A.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the effect of early versus delayed motion on repair integrity on 6-month postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following rotator cuff repair, and to correlate repair integrity with clinical and functional outcomes. We hypothesized that repair integrity would differ between the early and delayed groups and that patients with repair failures would have worse clinical and functional outcomes. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, single blinded clinical trial comparing an early motion (post-op day 2-3) to a delayed motion (post-op day 28) rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic repair of isolated supraspinatus tears. All patients underwent MRI at 6 months post-operatively as part of the study protocol. A blinded board-certified and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon (not part of the surgical team) reviewed operative photos and video to confirm the presence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear and to ensure an adequate and consistent repair. The same surgeon along with a blinded sports medicine fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist independently reviewed all MRIs to determine whether the repair was intact at 6 months. Outcome measures were collected by independent evaluators who were also blinded to group assignment. These included the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) ratings, pain scores, sling use, and physical exam data. Enrolled patients were followed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Results: From October 2008 to April 2012, 73 patients met all inclusion criteria and were willing to participate. 36 patients were randomized to delayed motion and 37 were randomized to early motion. The final study group at 6 months consisted of 58 study participants. Postoperative MRIs were obtained on all of these patients at 6 months regardless of whether or not they were progressing as expected. These MRIs demonstrated an overall failure rate of

  2. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  3. Clinical results of meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow: a 4- to 8-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Papastergiou, Stergios; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Poulios, Georgios; Parisis, Konstantinos

    2007-02-01

    The short-term clinical results of meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow were promising. Unfavorable outcomes were reported in two studies, with longer follow-up, raising concerns about the efficacy of this device. We retrospectively reviewed 62 patients (mean age 23.7 years; range 14-37 years) that underwent all-inside meniscus repair, using the meniscus arrow. Seventeen patients had an isolated meniscus tear (ACL intact group) and 45 patients concomitant ACL rupture that was reconstructed at the same time with the meniscus repair (ACL reconstructed group). All patients followed a non-aggressive rehabilitation protocol. Follow-up was assessed by clinical examination, Lysholm and Tegner score, IKDC knee examination form and KT-2000 arthrometry for the anteroposterior laxity of the reconstructed knees. At an average follow-up of 73 months (range 49-96 months) there were three failures (4.8%), one from the ACL intact group and two from the ACL reconstructed group. One patient developed arthrofibrosis (ACL reconstructed group) that resolved conservatively. Soft tissue irritation at the repair site was noted in three patients. In two patients the symptoms were transient. In the third patient the arrow tip was cut off under local anaesthesia due to saphenous infrapatellar branch irritation and the symptoms resolved (inappropriate arrow size). KT-2000 arthrometry showed that sagittal knee laxity was less than 3 mm in all reconstructed knees. The mean Tegner activity score decreased from 6.7 (pretrauma) to 6.2 (postoperatively). The average Lysholm score was 96, with normal or nearly normal function of all success knees, according to the IKDC knee examination form. Our results show a high clinical success rate of meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow. We found this device both safe and effective. PMID:16858563

  4. Repair of the Ankle Syndesmosis

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Jonathan D.; Clanton, Thomas O.; Whitlow, Scott R.; Williams, Brady T.; Liechti, Daniel; Dornan, Grant J.; Saroki, Adriana; Turnbull, Travis Lee; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Significant debate exists regarding the optimal repair techniques for unstable syndesmosis injuries. Techniques range from one to multiple screw fixation, suture-button fixation devices, or a combination of the two. The purpose of the current investigation was to biomechanically compare three common syndesmotic repair techniques using a simulated weight-bearing protocol with internal and external rotation of the foot. Methods: Twenty-four, lower leg specimens with mean age 54.25 years (range, 38 to 68 years) were utilized for testing. Following the creation of a complete syndesmotic injury (AITFL, ITFL, PITFL, interosseous membrane) specimens were repaired using one of three randomly assigned repair techniques: (1) one 3.5 mm syndesmotic screw, (2) one suture-button construct, and (3) two divergent suture-button constructs. For testing, specimens were oriented in neutral plantar/dorsiflexion and neutral internal/external rotation with the respect to the vertical tibia. Repairs were then cycled for 500 cycles between 7.5 Nm of internal/external rotation torque under a constant 750 N axial compressive load. At 0, 10, 100, and 500 cycles, torsional cyclic loading was interrupted to assess torsional stiffness and resistance to rotation within a physiologic range of motion. While axially loaded to 750 N, the foot was externally rotated to 15° and then rotated to 10° of internal rotation. Torsional cyclic loading was then resumed. Torque (Nm) and rotational position (degrees) were recorded continuously throughout testing. Three-dimensional data was also collected throughout testing to characterize the relative spatial relationships of the tibiofibular articulation. Results: Biomechanically, there were no significant differences between techniques when repairs were compared to the intact syndesmosis. Three-dimensional analysis revealed significant differences between all repair techniques for sagittal fibular translation with external rotation of the foot

  5. Essentials of skin laceration repair.

    PubMed

    Forsch, Randall T

    2008-10-15

    Skin laceration repair is an important skill in family medicine. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Physicians should be familiar with various suturing techniques, including simple, running, and half-buried mattress (corner) sutures. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be more cost-effective. The tissue adhesive hair apposition technique also is effective in repairing scalp lacerations. The sting of local anesthesia injections can be lessened by using smaller gauge needles, administering the injection slowly, and warming or buffering the solution. Studies have shown that tap water is safe to use for irrigation, that white petrolatum ointment is as effective as antibiotic ointment in postprocedure care, and that wetting the wound as early as 12 hours after repair does not increase the risk of infection. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. PMID:18953970

  6. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  7. Imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Pardiwala, Dinshaw

    2014-01-01

    The rationale for cartilage repair is to prevent precocious osteoarthritis in untreated focal cartilage injuries in the young and middle-aged population. The gamut of surgical techniques, normal postoperative radiological appearances, and possible complications have been described. An objective method of recording the quality of repair tissue is with the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. This scoring system evaluates nine parameters that include the extent of defect filling, border zone integration, signal intensity, quality of structure and surface, subchondral bone, subchondral lamina, and records presence or absence of synovitis and adhesions. The five common techniques of cartilage repair currently offered include bone marrow stimulation (microfracture or drilling), mosaicplasty, synthetic resorbable scaffold grafts, osteochondral allograft transplants, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Complications of cartilage repair procedures that may be demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include plug loosening, graft protuberance, graft depression, and collapse in mosaicplasty, graft hypertrophy in ACI, and immune response leading to graft rejection, which is more common with synthetic grafts and cadaveric allografts. PMID:25114387

  8. Repairing Solar Max: The Solar Maximum Repair Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, T.; Neal, V.

    1984-01-01

    Technology and procedures designed for replacing a faulty attitude control module and scientific instruments on the only orbiting solar observatory are described. The rationale for the repair mission is given and the operations of the flight support system within the cargo bay of the space shuttle are discussed. The use of the manned maneuvering unit in capturing the satellite and of the remote manipulator arm in berthing it are discussed, as well as the space tools to be used for repair operations. The space crew and their responsibilities are identified.

  9. Nucleotide excision repair proteins and interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Although various schemes for interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair incorporate recombination, replication, and double-strand break intermediate steps, action of the NER system or some variation of it is a common feature of most models. In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the NER enzyme UvrABC can incise on either side of an ICL to unhook the crosslink, and repair can proceed via a subsequent recombination step. The relevance of NER to ICL repair in mammalian cells has been challenged. Of all NER mutants, it is clear that ERCC1 and XPF-defective cells show the most pronounced sensitivities to ICL-inducing agents, and defects in ICL repair. However, there is good evidence that cells defective in NER proteins including XPA and XPG are also more sensitive than normal to ICL-inducing agents. These results are summarized here, together with evidence for defective crosslink removal in NER-defective cells. Studies of incision at sites of ICL by cell extracts and purified proteins have been done, but these studies are not all consistent with one another and further research is required. PMID:20658645

  10. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Automotive Repair. Course: Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, C.; Osland, Walt

    One of twelve individualized courses included in an automotive repair curriculum, this course covers theory and construction, inspection diagnoses, and service and overhaul of automotive engines. The course is comprised of five units: (1) Fundamentals of Four-Cycle Engines, (2) Engine Construction, (3) Valve Train, (4) Lubricating Systems, and (5)…

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open - discharge ... You had open aortic aneurysm surgery to repair an aneurysm (a widened part) in your aorta, the large artery that carries blood to your ...

  12. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  13. Small Engine Repair Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeClouet, Fred

    Small engines as referred to here are engines used on lawn mowers, chain saws, power plants, outboards, and cycles. It does not include engines used on automobiles. The course outlined is intended to show how small two-cycle and four-cycle gas engines are constructed, how they operate, what goes wrong, and how to service and repair them. It is…

  14. URIC ACID AND TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; SKARE, Thelma L; TABUSHI, Fernando Issamu; CASTRO, Adham do Amaral e

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, a metabolic product of purines, may exert a role in tissue healing. In this review we will explore its role as an alarm initiating the inflammatory process that is necessary for tissue repair, as a scavenger of oxygen free radicals, as a mobilizer of progenitor endothelial cells and as supporter of adaptive immune system. PMID:26734804

  15. Computer Equipment Repair Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course to train students to repair computer equipment and perform related administrative and customer service tasks. Addressed in the individual units are the following topics (with selected subtopics in brackets): performing administrative functions (preparing service bills, maintaining accounts and labor…

  16. Anodization As A Repair Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Roy E.; Maloney, Robert D.; Reeser, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Thin, hard oxide layer added to aluminum part. Surfaces on aluminum part worn out of tolerance by no more than 0.004 in. often repaired by anodizing to build up aluminum oxide layers. Oxide layers very hard and grounded to desired final dimensions.

  17. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Willekes, C L; Edoga, J K; Frezza, E E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to describe the authors' technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias and the outcome in their series of patients. METHODS: Thirty patients underwent elective laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias. All were pure type II paraesophageal hernias as defined by upper gastrointestinal contrast studies. All operations were performed by a single surgeon (JKE) assisted by five different chief surgical residents. The authors have used various prototypes of a laparoscopic utility belt to reduce the physician requirement to the surgeon and a first assistant. The operative setup and specific techniques of the repair are described and illustrated. A concomitant anti-reflux procedure was performed in the last 23 patients. RESULTS: Satisfactory repair using video-laparoscopic techniques was achieved in all cases. There were no deaths. Complications occurred in 8 of 30 patients. Postoperative gastroesophageal reflux developed in three of the first seven patients in whom fundoplication was not performed. Three consecutive patients had left lower lobe atelectasis believed to be related to endotracheal tube displacement during the passage of the bougie. One patient had postoperative dysphagia. There was one case of major deep venous thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. Twenty-eight of 30 patients were discharged home by postoperative day 3. Twenty-four of 30 patients had returned to normal activity by the time of their first postoperative office visit 1 week after surgery. Images Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:8998118

  18. How the Brain Repairs Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kell, Christian A.; Neumann, Katrin; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Posenenske, Claudia; von Gudenberg, Alexander W.; Euler, Harald; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2009-01-01

    Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with left inferior frontal structural anomalies. While children often recover, stuttering may also spontaneously disappear much later after years of dysfluency. These rare cases of unassisted recovery in adulthood provide a model of optimal brain repair outside the classical windows of…

  19. Microwave Oven Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smreker, Eugene

    This competency-based curriculum guide for teachers addresses the skills a technician will need to service microwave ovens and to provide customer relations to help retain the customer's confidence in the product and trust in the service company that performs the repair. The guide begins with a task analysis, listing 20 cognitive tasks and 5…

  20. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  1. Fix-It Careers: Jobs in Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2010-01-01

    From auto mechanic to HVAC technicians, many occupations require repair skills. For jobseekers with the right skills, there are many advantages to a repair career. Repair work provides millions of jobs throughout the United States. Wages are often higher than average. And in many occupations, the employment outlook is bright. Plus, most repair…

  2. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired...) Repair requires replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has... repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery of the leak as specified in paragraphs (f)(4)(i) and...

  3. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  4. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  5. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  6. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  7. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  8. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  9. Welding/brazing for Space Station repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, David W.; Babel, H. W.; Conaway, H. R.; Hooper, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on welding/brazing for space station repair are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication and repair candidates; debris penetration of module panel; welded repair patch; mechanical assembly of utility fluid line; space station utility systems; Soviet aerospace fabrication - an overview; and processes under consideration.

  10. Standardized Curriculum for Small Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for small engine repair was developed by the state of Mississippi to standardize vocational education course titles and core contents. The objectives contained in this document are common to all small engine repair programs in the state. The guide contains objectives for small engine repair I and II courses. Units in course I…

  11. Standardized Curriculum for Shoe and Boot Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for shoe and boot repair was developed by the state of Mississippi to standardize vocational education course titles and core contents. The objectives contained in this document are common to all shoe and boot repair programs in the state. The guide contains objectives for shoe and boot repair I and II courses. Units in…

  12. Cartilage repair: 2013 Asian update.

    PubMed

    Hui, James H P; Goyal, Deepak; Nakamura, Norimasa; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2013-12-01

    Despite financial and regulatory hurdles, Asian scientists and clinicians have made important contributions in the area of cartilage repair. Because it is impossible to include observations on all the published articles in one review, our attempt is to highlight Asian progress in this area during recent years (2005 to the present), reviewing research development and clinical studies. In the former, our discussion of in vitro studies focuses on (1) potential sources of stem cells--such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from marrow, cord blood, synovium, and mobilized peripheral blood--which are capable of enhancing cartilage repair and (2) the use of growth factors and scaffolds with and without cells. Our discussion of animal studies attempts to summarize activities in evaluating surgical procedures and determining the route of cell administration, as well as studies on matrices and scaffolds. It ranges from the use of small animals such as rats and rabbits to larger animals like pigs and dogs. The local adherent technique, enhancement of microfracture with poly(l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold, adenovirus-mediated bone morphogenic protein (BMP) genes, and MSCs--whether they are magnetically labeled, suspended in hyaluronic acid, or immobilized with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)--have all been able to engineer a repair of the osteochondral defect. Although published Asian reports of clinical studies on cartilage repair are few, the findings of relevant trials are summarized in our discussion of these investigations. There has been a long history of use of laboratory-derived MSCs for cartilage repair. Recent progress has suggested the potential utility of cord blood and mobilized peripheral blood in this area, as well as more injectable bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells. Finally, we make a few suggestions on the direction of research and development activities and the need for collaborative approaches by regulatory agencies. PMID:24286798

  13. Laparoscopic Repair of Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Heniford, B Todd; Park, Adrian; Ramshaw, Bruce J.; Voeller, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias. Summary Background Data: The recurrence rate after standard repair of ventral hernias may be as high as 12-52%, and the wide surgical dissection required often results in wound complications. Use of a laparoscopic approach may decrease rates of complications and recurrence after ventral hernia repair. Methods: Data on all patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) performed by 4 surgeons using a standardized procedure between November 1993 and October 2002 were collected prospectively (85% of patients) or retrospectively. Results: LVHR was completed in 819 of the 850 patients (422 men; 428 women) in whom it was attempted. Thirty-four percent of completed LVHRs were for recurrent hernias. The patient mean body mass index was 32; the mean defect size was 118 cm2. Mesh, averaging 344 cm2, was used in all cases. Mean operating time was 120 min, mean estimated blood loss was 49 mL, and hospital stay averaged 2.3 days. There were 128 complications in 112 patients (13.2%). One patient died of a myocardial infarction. The most common complications were ileus (3%) and prolonged seroma (2.6%). During a mean follow-up time of 20.2 months (range, 1-94 months), the hernia recurrence rate was 4.7%. Recurrence was associated with large defects, obesity, previous open repairs, and perioperative complications. Conclusion: In this large series, LVHR had a low rate of conversion to open surgery, a short hospital stay, a moderate complication rate, and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:14501505

  14. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  15. Mid-term clinical results of medial meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow in the unstable knee.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Papastergiou, Stergios; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Poulios, Georgios; Parisis, Konstantinos

    2007-02-01

    The medial meniscus is a secondary stabilizer to anterior tibial translation and provides significant stability, especially in an ACL-deficient knee. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcome of medial meniscus repair in the unstable knee. Between 1997 and 2002, 11 patients, with a mean age of 25.8 years (range 15-39 years), underwent all-inside medial meniscus repair, using the Meniscus Arrow, for unstable medial meniscus tear in ACL-deficient knees. For various reasons none of these patients underwent ACL reconstruction. The average follow-up was 73 months (range 52-91 months). There were three failures (27.3%) defined as the need for reoperation and partial meniscectomy. The mean Tegner activity score decreased from 6.75 (pretrauma) to 4.5 (postoperatively). The average Lysholm and subjective IKDC scores were 83 and 77.4, respectively. Two patients were graded as B (nearly normal) and six as C (abnormal), according to the IKDC knee evaluation form. KT-2000 arthrometry demonstrated that sagittal knee laxity was more than 5 mm in all knees (side to side difference). MRI demonstrated grade three signal alterations at the repair site of meniscus in three patients and signs of cartilage damage in two patients. All patients were asymptomatic during daily activities but seven out of eight reported pain or effusion after sports. Medial meniscus repair in the ACL-deficient knee is not contraindicated. The need of reducing the level of physical activity is essential. PMID:16967201

  16. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  17. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  18. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  19. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  20. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  1. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  2. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  3. Shuttle orbiter TPS flight repair kit development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of a TPS repair kit is presented. The repair kit is designed for on orbit use by a crew member working in the manned maneuvering unit (MMU). The kit includes the necessary equipment and materials to accomplish the repair tasks which include the following: HRSI emittance coating repair, damaged tile repair, missing tile repair, and multiple tile repair. Two types of repair materials required to do the small area repair and the large area repair are described. The materials area cure in place, silicone base ablator for small damaged areas and precured ablator tile for repair of larger damaged areas is examined. The cure in place ablator is also used as an adhesive to bond the precured tiles in place. An applicator for the cure in place ablator, designed to contain a two-part silicon compound, mix the two components at correct ratio, and dispense the materials at rates compatible with mission timelines established for the EVA is described.

  4. Minimally disruptive schedule repair for MCM missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molineaux, Matthew; Auslander, Bryan; Moore, Philip G.; Gupta, Kalyan M.

    2015-05-01

    Mine countermeasures (MCM) missions entail planning and operations in very dynamic and uncertain operating environments, which pose considerable risk to personnel and equipment. Frequent schedule repairs are needed that consider the latest operating conditions to keep mission on target. Presently no decision support tools are available for the challenging task of MCM mission rescheduling. To address this capability gap, we have developed the CARPE system to assist operation planners. CARPE constantly monitors the operational environment for changes and recommends alternative repaired schedules in response. It includes a novel schedule repair algorithm called Case-Based Local Schedule Repair (CLOSR) that automatically repairs broken schedules while satisfying the requirement of minimal operational disruption. It uses a case-based approach to represent repair strategies and apply them to new situations. Evaluation of CLOSR on simulated MCM operations demonstrates the effectiveness of case-based strategy. Schedule repairs are generated rapidly, ensure the elimination of all mines, and achieve required levels of clearance.

  5. Methods of repairing a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  6. Laparoscopic Repair of Paraesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Borao, Frank; Squillaro, Anthony; Mansson, Jonas; Barker, William; Baker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has quickly become the standard surgical approach to repair paraesophageal hernias. Although many centers routinely perform this procedure, relatively high recurrence rates have led many surgeons to question this approach. We sought to evaluate outcomes in our cohort of patients with an emphasis on recurrence rates and symptom improvement and their correlation with true radiologic recurrence seen on contrast imaging. Methods: We retrospectively identified 126 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic repair of a large paraesophageal hernia between 2000 and 2010. Clinical outcomes were reviewed, and data were collected regarding operative details, perioperative and postoperative complications, symptoms, and follow-up imaging. Radiologic evidence of any size hiatal hernia was considered to indicate a recurrence. Results: There were 95 female and 31 male patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 71 ± 14 years. Laparoscopic repair was completed successfully in 120 of 126 patients, with 6 operations converted to open procedures. Crural reinforcement with mesh was performed in 79% of patients, and 11% underwent a Collis gastroplasty. Fundoplications were performed in 90% of patients: Nissen (112), Dor (1), and Toupet (1). Radiographic surveillance, obtained at a mean time interval of 23 months postoperatively, was available in 89 of 126 patients (71%). Radiographic evidence of a recurrence was present in 19 patients (21%). Reoperation was necessary in 6 patients (5%): 5 for symptomatic recurrence (4%) and 1 for dysphagia (1%). The median length of stay was 4 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair results in an excellent outcome with a short length of stay when performed at an experienced center. Radiologic recurrence is observed relatively frequently with routine surveillance; however, many of these recurrences are small, and few patients require correction of the recurrence. Furthermore, these

  7. Keeping It All inside: Shyness, Internalizing Coping Strategies and Socio-Emotional Adjustment in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Leanne C.; Coplan, Robert J.; Bowker, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Despite growing research results indicating that shyness is a risk factor for psychosocial maladjustment in childhood, less is known about the conceptual mechanisms that may underlie these associations. The purpose of the current study was to explore links between self-reported shyness, coping strategies and social functioning in middle childhood.…

  8. Animal models of cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. L.; Hung, C. T.; Kuroki, K.; Stoker, A. M.; Cook, C. R.; Pfeiffer, F. M.; Sherman, S. L.; Stannard, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage repair in terms of replacement, or regeneration of damaged or diseased articular cartilage with functional tissue, is the ‘holy grail’ of joint surgery. A wide spectrum of strategies for cartilage repair currently exists and several of these techniques have been reported to be associated with successful clinical outcomes for appropriately selected indications. However, based on respective advantages, disadvantages, and limitations, no single strategy, or even combination of strategies, provides surgeons with viable options for attaining successful long-term outcomes in the majority of patients. As such, development of novel techniques and optimisation of current techniques need to be, and are, the focus of a great deal of research from the basic science level to clinical trials. Translational research that bridges scientific discoveries to clinical application involves the use of animal models in order to assess safety and efficacy for regulatory approval for human use. This review article provides an overview of animal models for cartilage repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;4:89–94. PMID:24695750

  9. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  10. Outcome of pediatric hypospadias repair in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Chertin, Boris; Prat, Dan; Shenfeld, Ofer Z

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To review the evolution of the technique of hypospadias repair. Methods A search of Pubmed, Medline and the Journal of Pediatric Urology was performed, and papers dealing with surgical techniques for hypospadias repair were critally reviewed. Special emphasis was given to papers on the effects in the long term of hypospadias repair on voiding and sexual dysfunction. Results The techniques for hypospadias repair have evolved over the years. The most popular technique now is tubularized incised plate urethroplasty. Long-term results with the use of the new techniques of the hypospadias repair in terms of voiding and sexual problems should be addressed. Conclusion There is a need for valid studies on the outcomes of hypospadias repair in adults that were performed in childhood in terms of cosmetic appearance, voiding and sexual performance. PMID:24198614

  11. Efficacy of Different Rotator Cuff Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek Friedrich Petrus; Flipsen, Mark; Raven, Eric Ernest Joseph; van den Bekerom, Michel Pieter Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the currently used techniques for rotator cuff repair and after treatment. The literature was searched for the different surgical techniques and additional treatment including: [1] full arthroscopic and arthroscopic assisted rotator cuff repair, [2] acromioplasty as an additional treatment to rotator cuff repair, [3] the use of plasma rich platelets (PRP) after rotator cuff repair, [4] the single and double row fixation techniques, [5] long head of the biceps brachii tenotomy or tenodesis with rotator cuff repair, [6] scaffolds in rotator cuff surgery, and [7] early motion or immobilization after rotator cuff repair. The rationale, the results, and the scientific evidence were reported for the eligible procedures. PMID:26055023

  12. Laparoscopic repair for vesicouterine fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Rafael A.; Macedo, André R. S.; Garcia, André R. L.; de Almeida, Silvio H. M.; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Freitas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this video is to present the laparoscopic repair of a VUF in a 42-year-old woman, with gross hematuria, in the immediate postoperative phase following a cesarean delivery. The obstetric team implemented conservative management, including Foley catheter insertion, for 2 weeks. She subsequently developed intermittent hematuria and cystitis. The urology team was consulted 15 days after cesarean delivery. Cystoscopy indicated an ulcerated lesion in the bladder dome of approximately 1.0cm in size. Hysterosalpingography and a pelvic computed tomography scan indicated a fistula. Materials and Methods: Laparoscopic repair was performed 30 days after the cesarean delivery. The patient was placed in the lithotomy position while also in an extreme Trendelenburg position. Pneumoperitoneum was established using a Veress needle in the midline infra-umbilical region, and a primary 11-mm port was inserted. Another 11-mm port was inserted exactly between the left superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. Two other 5-mm ports were established under laparoscopic guidance in the iliac fossa on both sides. The omental adhesions in the pelvis were carefully released and the peritoneum between the bladder and uterus was incised via cautery. Limited cystotomy was performed, and the specific sites of the fistula and the ureteral meatus were identified; thereafter, the posterior bladder wall was adequately mobilized away from the uterus. The uterine rent was then closed using single 3/0Vicryl sutures and two-layer watertight closure of the urinary bladder was achieved by using 3/0Vicryl sutures. An omental flap was mobilized and inserted between the uterus and the urinary bladder, and was fixed using two 3/0Vicryl sutures, followed by tube drain insertion. Results: The operative time was 140 min, whereas the blood loss was 100ml. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery, and the catheter was removed 12 days after surgery. Discussion: Laparoscopy has

  13. Thermal protection system repair kit program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility and conceptual design aspects of repair materials and procedures for in orbit repair of the space shuttle orbiter TPS tiles are investigated. Material studies to investigate cure in place materials are described including catalyst and cure studies, ablation tests and evaluations, and support mixing and applicator design. The feasibility of the repair procedures, the storage of the TPS, dispensing, and cure problems are addressed.

  14. Cellular repair/misrepair track model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1991-01-01

    A repair/misrepair cell kinetics model is superimposed onto the track structure model of Katz to provide for a repair mechanism. The model is tested on the repair-dependent data of Yang et al. and provides an adequate description of that data. The misrepair rate determines the maximum relative biological effectiveness (RBE), but similar results could arise from indirect X-ray lethality not include in the present model.

  15. Biophysical modeling of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie

    2009-03-01

    Mismatch repair proteins play a vital role in the bology of cancer due to their dual functions as repair proteins and as sensors of DNA damage. Computational modeling of mismatch repair proteins in conjunction with biological experimentation has demonstrated the role of long-range communication in the functions of these proteins. Furthermore, different conformations have been shown to be associated with different cellular functions, and these differences are being exploited in drug discovery. The latest results in this modeling will be presented.

  16. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgwick, S.G. ); Chao Ho; Woodgate, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD{prime} fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD{prime} antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium u mu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umuDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention.

  17. Transcriptomic Approaches to Neural Repair

    PubMed Central

    Antunes-Martins, Ana; Chandran, Vijayendran; Costigan, Michael; Lerch, Jessica K.; Willis, Dianna E.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why adult CNS neurons fail to regenerate their axons following injury remains a central challenge of neuroscience research. A more complete appreciation of the biological mechanisms shaping the injured nervous system is a crucial prerequisite for the development of robust therapies to promote neural repair. Historically, the identification of regeneration associated signaling pathways has been impeded by the limitations of available genetic and molecular tools. As we progress into an era in which the high-throughput interrogation of gene expression is commonplace and our knowledge base of interactome data is rapidly expanding, we can now begin to assemble a more comprehensive view of the complex biology governing axon regeneration. Here, we highlight current and ongoing work featuring transcriptomic approaches toward the discovery of novel molecular mechanisms that can be manipulated to promote neural repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Transcriptional profiling is a powerful technique with broad applications in the field of neuroscience. Recent advances such as single-cell transcriptomics, CNS cell type-specific and developmental stage-specific expression libraries are rapidly enhancing the power of transcriptomics for neuroscience applications. However, extracting biologically meaningful information from large transcriptomic datasets remains a formidable challenge. This mini-symposium will highlight current work using transcriptomic approaches to identify regulatory networks in the injured nervous system. We will discuss analytical strategies for transcriptomics data, the significance of noncoding RNA networks, and the utility of multiomic data integration. Though the studies featured here specifically focus on neural repair, the approaches highlighted in this mini-symposium will be of broad interest and utility to neuroscientists working in diverse areas of the field. PMID:26468186

  18. Integrated Electrical Wire Insulation Repair System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Jolley, Scott; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steven

    2013-01-01

    An integrated system tool will allow a technician to easily and quickly repair damaged high-performance electrical wire insulation in the field. Low-melt polyimides have been developed that can be processed into thin films that work well in the repair of damaged polyimide or fluoropolymer insulated electrical wiring. Such thin films can be used in wire insulation repairs by affixing a film of this low-melt polyimide to the damaged wire, and heating the film to effect melting, flow, and cure of the film. The resulting repair is robust, lightweight, and small in volume. The heating of this repair film is accomplished with the use of a common electrical soldering tool that has been modified with a special head or tip that can accommodate the size of wire being repaired. This repair method can furthermore be simplified for the repair technician by providing replaceable or disposable soldering tool heads that have repair film already "loaded" and ready for use. The soldering tool heating device can also be equipped with a battery power supply that will allow its use in areas where plug-in current is not available

  19. The design of bonded structure repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper illustrates the problems of the repair engineer in the field when no stress analysis or structural repair manual is available. In this extreme situation he can only seek to restore the original strength of the damaged part whether or not all of that strength is actually required. Two major design factors are considered, i.e. overlap shear joints and core to skin bond strength. Back-up by rivets or bolts is discussed and also sealing the repair with a fabric overlay to prevent or minimize water ingress. The paper concludes with a practical example of a repair using the data provided.

  20. Scheduling and rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the GERRY scheduling and rescheduling system being applied to coordinate Space Shuttle Ground Processing. The system uses constraint-based iterative repair, a technique that starts with a complete but possibly flawed schedule and iteratively improves it by using constraint knowledge within repair heuristics. In this paper we explore the tradeoff between the informedness and the computational cost of several repair heuristics. We show empirically that some knowledge can greatly improve the convergence speed of a repair-based system, but that too much knowledge, such as the knowledge embodied within the MIN-CONFLICTS lookahead heuristic, can overwhelm a system and result in degraded performance.

  1. Preferential DNA repair in expressed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, P C

    1987-01-01

    Potentially deleterious alterations to DNA occur nonrandomly within the mammalian genome. These alterations include the adducts produced by many chemical carcinogens, but not the UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, which may be an exception. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers and certain other lesions is nonrandom in the mammalian genome, exhibiting a distinct preference for actively transcribed DNA sequences. An important consequence of this fact is that mutagenesis and carcinogenesis may be determined in part by the activities of the relevant genes. Repair may also be processive, and a model is proposed in which excision repair is coupled to transcription at the nuclear matrix. Similar but freely diffusing repair complexes may account for the lower overall repair efficiencies in the silent domains of the genome. Risk assessment in relation to chemical carcinogenesis requires assays that determine effective levels of DNA damage for producing malignancy. The existence of nonrandom repair in the genome casts into doubt the reliability of overall indicators of DNA binding and lesion repair for such determinations. Furthermore, some apparent differences between the intragenomic repair heterogeneity in rodent cells and that in human cells mandate a reevaluation of rodent test systems for human risk assessment. Tissue-specific and cell-specific differences in the coordinate regulation of gene expression and DNA repair may account for corresponding differences in the carcinogenic response. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 1. PMID:3447906

  2. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  3. 33 CFR 127.405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Maintenance § 127.405 Repairs. The operator shall ensure that—...

  4. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of...

  5. Photomask repair using low-energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Spies, P.; Luchs, T.; Schneider, H.; Auth, N.; Hermanns, Ch. F.; Waiblinger, M.

    2015-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. We will demonstrate in this paper that low energetic electron-beam (e-beam)-based mask repair is a commercially viable solution. Therefore we developed a new repair platform called MeRiT® neXT to address the technical challenges of this new technology. We will analyze the limits of the existing as well as lower energetic electron induced repair technologies theoretically and experimentally and show performance data on photomask reticles. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair technology.

  6. National results after ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The variations of repair techniques are multiple and outcome has been unacceptable. Despite the high volume, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient data to provide evidence for best practice. In order to monitor national surgical quality and provide the warranted high volume data, the first national ventral hernia register (The Danish Ventral Hernia Database) was established in 2007 in Denmark. The present study series show that data from a well-established database supported by clinical examinations, patient files, questionnaires, and administrative data makes it possible to obtain nationwide high volume data and to achieve evidence for better outcome in a complex surgical condition as ventral hernia. Due to the high volume and included variables on surgical technique, it is now possible to make analyses adjusting for a variety of surgical techniques and different hernia specifications. We documented high 30-day complications and recurrence rates for both primary and secondary ventral hernias in a nationwide cohort. Furthermore, recurrence found by clinical examination was shown to exceed the number of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrence by a factor 4-5. The nationwide adjusted analyses proved that open mesh and laparoscopic repair for umbilical and epigastric hernias does not differ in 30-day outcome or in risk of recurrence. There is a minor risk reduction in early complications after open sutured repairs. However, the risk for a later recurrence repair is significantly higher after sutured repairs compared with mesh repairs. The study series showed that large hernia defects and open re-pairs were independent predictors for 30-day complications after an incisional hernia repair. Open procedures and large hernia defects were independent risk factors for a later recurrence re-pair. However, patients with large defects (> 15 cm) seemed to benefit from an open mesh

  7. 24 CFR 206.47 - Property standards; repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Property standards; repair work... Property standards; repair work. (a) Need for repairs. Properties must meet the applicable property... insured mortgage. (b) Assurance that repairs are made. The mortgage may be closed before the repair...

  8. 24 CFR 206.47 - Property standards; repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Property standards; repair work... Property standards; repair work. (a) Need for repairs. Properties must meet the applicable property... insured mortgage. (b) Assurance that repairs are made. The mortgage may be closed before the repair...

  9. 24 CFR 206.47 - Property standards; repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Property standards; repair work... Property standards; repair work. (a) Need for repairs. Properties must meet the applicable property... insured mortgage. (b) Assurance that repairs are made. The mortgage may be closed before the repair...

  10. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  11. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  12. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  13. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  14. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  15. 14 CFR 145.207 - Repair station manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repair station manual. 145.207 Section 145...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.207 Repair station manual. (a) A certificated repair station must prepare and follow a repair station manual acceptable to...

  16. Complexities of the DNA Base Excision Repair Pathway for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sankar; Boldogh, Istvan; Izumi, Tadahide; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage represents the most significant insult to organisms because of continuous production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo. Oxidative damage in DNA, a critical target of ROS, is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway which appears to be the simplest among the three excision repair pathways. However, it is now evident that although BER can be carried with four or five enzymes in vitro, a large number of proteins, including some required for nucleotide excision repair (NER), are needed for in vivo repair of oxidative damage. Furthermore, BER in transcribed vs. nontranscribed DNA regions requires distinct sets of proteins, as in the case of NER. We propose an additional complexity in repair of replicating vs. nonreplicating DNA. Unlike DNA bulky adducts, the oxidized base lesions could be incorporated in the nascent DNA strand, repair of which may share components of the mismatch repair process. Distinct enzyme specificities are thus warranted for repair of lesions in the parental vs. nascent DNA strand. Repair synthesis may be carried out by DNA polymerase β or replicative polymerases δ and ε. Thus, multiple subpathways are needed for repairing oxidative DNA damage, and the pathway decision may require coordination of the successive steps in repair. Such coordination includes transfer of the product of a DNA glycosylase to AP-endonuclease, the next enzyme in the pathway. Interactions among proteins in the pathway may also reflect such coordination, characterization of which should help elucidate these subpathways and their in vivo regulation. PMID:11746753

  17. Starting System 2. Repair the Starter Rewind Spring. Student Manual. Small Engine Repair Series. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Pamela

    This student manual on repairing the starter rewind spring on a small gas engine is the third of three in an instructional package on the starting system in the Small Engine Repair Series for handicapped students. The stated purpose for the booklet is to help students learn what tools and equipment to use in repairing the starter rewind spring and…

  18. The Covert Repair Hypothesis: Prearticulatory Repair Processes in Normal and Stuttered Disfluencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postma, Albert; Kolk, Herman

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the speech monitoring process that underlies overt self-repairing of speech errors; the covert repair hypothesis, dealing particularly with explaining the variety of disfluency types from a restricted set of repair principles; quantitative and qualitative characteristics of disfluency in people who stutter; and the covert…

  19. Erosion of repaired exstrophy bladder by a large vesical calculus

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Abdul; Sinha, Arvind; Bisht, Mayank; Gola, Neelkamal

    2011-01-01

    Formation of stones in repaired exstrophy bladder is common; however, erosion of stone through the repaired bladder and anterior abdominal wall has never been reported. We report one such case of erosion after three years of repair. PMID:21897570

  20. 40 CFR 61.242-10 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... repair for valves will be allowed if: (1) The owner or operator demonstrates that emissions of purged... delay of repair, and (2) When repair procedures are effected, the purged material is collected...

  1. 40 CFR 60.482-9 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... purged material resulting from immediate repair are greater than the fugitive emissions likely to result from delay of repair, and (2) When repair procedures are effected, the purged material is collected...

  2. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  3. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATING PRESS IN EAST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATING PRESS IN EAST END OF MAIN WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  4. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREWFEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREW-FEED COAL HOPPER ON RIGHT SIDE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  5. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP OFFICE AND SOUTH WING. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  6. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP OFFICE AND SOUTH WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  7. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF SOUTH WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  8. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING WOOD EAVE AND STUCCO RAKEBOARD ON GABLE END. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  9. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREWFEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREW-FEED COAL HOPPER ON RIGHT SIDE, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  10. Lube rack of Automotive and Tractor Repair Shops with Warehousefield ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lube rack of Automotive and Tractor Repair Shops with Warehouse-field Equipment Repair Shop Building's wall to the right, looking from the south - Kekaha Sugar Company, Automotive and Tractor Repair Shops, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  11. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING WOOD EAVE AND STUCCO RAKEBOARD ON GABLE END, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  12. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF SOUTH WING. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  13. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has determined will provide... delayed” and the reason for the delay if a leak is not repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery...

  15. Robot Service and Repair. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburg State Univ., KS. Kansas Vocational Curriculum Dissemination Center.

    This document is a teacher's guide for teaching a course on robot service and repair. The guide is organized in four units covering the following topics: introduction to robots, power supply, robot control systems, and service and repair. Each unit contains several lesson plans on the unit topic. Lesson plans consist of objectives, tools and…

  16. Robot Service and Repair. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburg State Univ., KS. Kansas Vocational Curriculum Dissemination Center.

    This document is a student guide for a course on robot service and repair. It is organized in four units covering the following topics: introduction to robots, power supply, robot control systems, and service and repair. Each unit contains several lesson plans on the unit topic. Lesson plans consist of lesson objectives, lists of teaching aids and…

  17. Thermal protection system flight repair kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A thermal protection system (TPS) flight repair kit required for use on a flight of the Space Transportation System is defined. A means of making TPS repairs in orbit by the crew via extravehicular activity is discussed. A cure in place ablator, a precured ablator (large area application), and packaging design (containers for mixing and dispensing) for the TPS are investigated.

  18. Repairing high-temperature glazed tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C.

    1981-01-01

    Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) mixture fills chips and cracks in glazed tile surface. Filler is made by mixing hydrolyzed TEOS, silicon tetraboride powder, and pulverized tile material. Repaired tiles survived testing by intense acoustic emissions, arc jets, and intense heat radiation. Repair is reliable and rapid, performed in 1-1 1/2 hours with tile in any or orientation.

  19. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  2. Self repairing composites for drone air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to demonstrate the feasibility of impact-initiated delivery of repair chemicals through hollow fiber architectures embedded within graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites, representative of advanced drone aircraft component material systems. Self-repairing structures through coupon and elements were demonstrated, and evaluated.

  3. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers...

  5. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a...

  9. Self-repairing composites for airplane components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2008-03-01

    Durability and damage tolerance criteria drives the design of most composite structures. Those criteria could be altered by developing structure that repairs itself from impact damage. This is a technology for increasing damage tolerance for impact damage. Repaired damage would enable continued function and prevent further degradation to catastrophic failure in the case of an aircraft application. Further, repaired damage would enable applications to be utilized without reduction in performance due to impacts. Self repairing structures are designed to incorporate hollow fibers, which will release a repairing agent when the structure is impacted, so that the repairing agent will fill delaminations, voids and cracks in les than one minute, thus healing matrix voids. The intent is to modify the durability and damage tolerance criteria by incorporation of self-healing technologies to reduce overall weight: The structure will actually remain lighter than current conventional design procedures allow. Research objective(s) were: Prove that damage can be repaired to within 80-90% of original flexural strength in less than one minute, in laminates that are processed at 300-350F typical for aircraft composites. These were successfully met. The main focus was on testing of elements in compression after impact and a larger component in shear at Natural Process Design, Inc. Based on these results the advantages purposes are assessed. The results show potential; with self repairing composites, compressive strength is maintained sufficiently so that less material can be used as per durability and damage tolerance, yielding a lighter structure.

  10. Laparoscopic Versus Open Umbilical Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Mason, Edward; Duncan, Titus; Wilson, Russell

    2003-01-01

    Background: The use of prosthetic material for open umbilical hernia repair has been reported to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after laparoscopic versus open umbilical hernia repair. Methods: We reviewed all umbilical hernia repairs performed from November 1995 to October 2000. Demographic data, hernia characteristics, and outcomes were compared. Results: Of the 76 patients identified, 32 underwent laparoscopic repair (LR), 24 primary suture repairs (PSR), and 20 open repairs with mesh (ORWM). Preoperative characteristics were similar between groups. Hernia size was similar between LR and ORWM groups, and both were larger than that in the PSR group. ORWM compared with the other techniques resulted in longer operating time, more frequent use of drains, higher complication rates, and prolonged return to normal activities (RTNA). The length of stay (LOS) was longer in the ORWM than in the PSR group. When compared with ORWM, LR resulted in lower recurrence rates. LR resulted in fewer recurrences in patients with previous repairs and hernias larger than 3 cm than in both open techniques. Conclusions: LR results in faster RTNA, and lower complication and recurrence rates compared with those in ORWM. Patients with larger hernias and previous repairs benefit from LR. PMID:14626398

  11. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... temperature. First attempt at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  13. Railroad track repairs are complete at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Railroad track repairs have been completed at Kennedy Space Center. This section of track is located on KSC property, just north of the NASA Causeway in the KSC Industrial Area. The repairs were required following the minor derailment of two solid rocket booster segment cars on July 18.

  14. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  15. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk. PMID:27324272

  16. Repair Development for a Composite Cryotank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Danley, Susan E.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Cheshire, Brian C.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Taylor, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The Composite Cryotank Technologies and Demonstration Project is working to advance the technologies for composite cryogenic propellant tanks at diameters suitable for future heavy lift vehicles and other in-space applications. The main goals of the project are to reduce weight and cost. One aspect of this project has focused on damage evaluation and repair development. Test panels have been impacted, repaired, and tested. Several repair methods were used to compare their effectiveness at restoring the integrity of the composite. Panels were evaluated by nondestructive evaluations at several points during the process to assess the damage and repair. The testing performed and the results and conclusions from the nondestructive evaluations and the destructive testing will be discussed. These results will lead to further development of inspection techniques and repair methods.

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Strategies in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Pizzute, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage defects are normally concomitant with posttraumatic inflammation and pose a major challenge in cartilage repair. Due to the avascular nature of cartilage and its inability to surmount an inflammatory response, the cartilage is easily attacked by proinflammatory factors and oxidative stress; if left untreated, osteoarthritis may develop. Suppression of inflammation has always been a crux for cartilage repair. Pharmacological drugs have been successfully applied in cartilage repair; however, they cannot optimally work alone. This review article will summarize current pharmacological drugs and their application in cartilage repair. The development of extracellular matrix-based scaffolds and preconditioned tissue-specific stem cells will be emphasized because both of these tissue engineering components could contribute to an enhanced ability not only for cartilage regeneration but also for anti-inflammation. These strategies could be combined to boost cartilage repair under inflammatory conditions. PMID:24846478

  18. Functional characterization of dna repair proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D M III

    2000-02-16

    Genetic material (DNA) is susceptible to spontaneous decomposition, to attack by reactive chemicals produced naturally in cells, and to assault by environmental and food mutagens. DNA modifications can lead to permanent genetic changes that promote human disease. To combat the deleterious effects of DNA damage, organisms are equipped with DNA repair systems. The focus of our investigations has been to elucidate the details of mammalian DNA repair. These studies have provided important insights into the relationship of DNA repair to human disease and the genetic factors that contribute to individual susceptibility to the harmful effects of environmental mutagens (e.g. ionizing radiation), and have established a framework for designing more effective anti-cancer treatment schemes. To investigate questions related to DNA repair, its mechanism(s) and linkage to disease development, the authors are employing an array of molecular, cellular, biochemical and structural approaches. These complementary experimental techniques have permitted a detailed analysis into various processes of human DNA repair.

  19. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuh, Joseph; Mitchell, Brent; Locklear, Louis; Belson, Martin A.; Al-Shihabi, Mary Jo Y.; King, Nadean; Norena, Elkin; Hardin, Derek

    2010-01-01

    SMART is a uniform automated discrepancy analysis and repair-authoring platform that improves technical accuracy and timely delivery of repair procedures for a given discrepancy (see figure a). SMART will minimize data errors, create uniform repair processes, and enhance the existing knowledge base of engineering repair processes. This innovation is the first tool developed that links the hardware specification requirements with the actual repair methods, sequences, and required equipment. SMART is flexibly designed to be useable by multiple engineering groups requiring decision analysis, and by any work authorization and disposition platform (see figure b). The organizational logic creates the link between specification requirements of the hardware, and specific procedures required to repair discrepancies. The first segment in the SMART process uses a decision analysis tree to define all the permutations between component/ subcomponent/discrepancy/repair on the hardware. The second segment uses a repair matrix to define what the steps and sequences are for any repair defined in the decision tree. This segment also allows for the selection of specific steps from multivariable steps. SMART will also be able to interface with outside databases and to store information from them to be inserted into the repair-procedure document. Some of the steps will be identified as optional, and would only be used based on the location and the current configuration of the hardware. The output from this analysis would be sent to a work authoring system in the form of a predefined sequence of steps containing required actions, tools, parts, materials, certifications, and specific requirements controlling quality, functional requirements, and limitations.

  20. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES REVIEW & EVALUATION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE REPAIR TRIALS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-09-01

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is generally ineffective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressure for pipe repaired with carbon fiber-reinforced composite liner was greater than that of the un-repaired pipe section with damage, indicating that this type of liner is effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the next phase of this project.

  1. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  2. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  3. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  4. Shuttle Repair Tools Automate Vehicle Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Successfully building, flying, and maintaining the space shuttles was an immensely complex job that required a high level of detailed, precise engineering. After each shuttle landed, it entered a maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) phase. Each system was thoroughly checked and tested, and worn or damaged parts replaced, before the shuttle was rolled out for its next mission. During the MRO period, workers needed to record exactly what needed replacing and why, as well as follow precise guidelines and procedures in making their repairs. That meant traceability, and with it lots of paperwork. In 2007, the number of reports generated during electrical system repairs was getting out of hand-placing among the top three systems in terms of paperwork volume. Repair specialists at Kennedy Space Center were unhappy spending so much time at a desk and so little time actually working on the shuttle. "Engineers weren't spending their time doing technical work," says Joseph Schuh, an electrical engineer at Kennedy. "Instead, they were busy with repetitive, time-consuming processes that, while important in their own right, provided a low return on time invested." The strain of such inefficiency was bad enough that slow electrical repairs jeopardized rollout on several occasions. Knowing there had to be a way to streamline operations, Kennedy asked Martin Belson, a project manager with 30 years experience as an aerospace contractor, to co-lead a team in developing software that would reduce the effort required to document shuttle repairs. The result was System Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART) software. SMART is a tool for aggregating and applying information on every aspect of repairs, from procedures and instructions to a vehicle s troubleshooting history. Drawing on that data, SMART largely automates the processes of generating repair instructions and post-repair paperwork. In the case of the space shuttle, this meant that SMART had 30 years worth of operations

  5. Repair material properties for effective structural application

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, P.S.; Limbachiya, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    Strength and engineering properties of three generic repair materials which are likely to influence long-term performance of repaired concrete structures were studied. Measured properties include strength, stiffness, shrinkage and creep deformations, together with the complete compressive stress-strain characteristics including post-cracking behavior. The repair materials considered in this investigation are commercially available and widely used. These included a high performance non-shrinkable concrete, a mineral based cementitious material with no additives or coarse aggregate size particles, and a cementitious mortar containing styrene acrylic copolymer with fiber additives. Performance comparisons are also made between these materials and plain concrete mixes of similar strength and stiffness, suitable for repair applications. The results show that shrinkage of the repair materials was significantly greater than the shrinkage of normal concrete. Moreover, the shrinkage of those modified with a polymer admixture was found to be very sensitive to the relative humidity of the exposure compared to normal concrete. The post-peak strain capacity of the material modified with a polymer admixture was markedly improved leading to a more pronounced falling branch of stress-strain curve. The ultimate stress level (at a maximum load) of specially formulated repair materials varies significantly, the lowest ultimate stress being recorded for the porous mineral-based material. The inclusion of aggregates improves the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of repair materials.

  6. Failure of distal biceps repair by gapping

    PubMed Central

    Copas, David; Watts, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Background We describe the clinical, radiological and surgical findings of failed distal biceps repair by gapping and report the functional outcomes following revision repair. Methods A retrospective review of five consecutive patients was conducted. Patients presented with radial-sided forearm pain after their distal biceps fixation. All patients had less than 5 cm of retraction of the biceps muscle belly, a palpable tendon although the manoeuvre was painful with weakness on resisted supination. Flexed abducted supinated magnetic resonance imaging (FABS MRI) showed a gap between the distal end of the tendon and the footprint on the radial tuberosity. Results Mean FEA score at presentation was 44/100 (35 to 49). Mean time to re-operation was 18 months (range 4 months to 36 months). At revision, the distal end of the tendon was retracted and not making contact with the bone. All cases were revised to an in-bone endobutton repair. Mean postoperative Functional Elbow Assessment (FEA) scores undertaken at a mean of 14 months (range 5 months to 22 months) after revision improved to 95/100 (90 to 100). Conclusions Patients presenting with persistent radial sided forearm pain and weakness on provocative testing after distal biceps repair with a seemingly intact repair should be investigated with FABS MRI to look for evidence of failure of repair by gapping. Revision repair with an anatomic in-bone technique can lead to good results. PMID:27583018

  7. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  9. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  10. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  11. Hybrid Approaches for Complex Parastomal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Xie, Jia-Ming; Miao, Jian-Qing; Wu, Hao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the major complications of colostomy with high occurrence. From October 2011 to November 2014, a retrospective study was conducted by analyzing and following up data of 16 patients suffering from parastomal hernia who underwent a hybrid technique repair. The safety and efficacy of the hybrid technique for parastomal hernia repair was investigated in terms of complications. All cases were operated successfully and had no major immediate postoperative complications other than mild abdominal pain in 5 cases. No long-term postoperative complications were reported in the follow-up. The authors found hybrid technique to be safe and effective for parastomal hernia repair with fewer complications. PMID:26787038

  12. Repair of Electronics for Long Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettegrew, Richard D.; Easton, John; Struk, Peter

    2007-01-01

    To reduce mission risk, long duration spaceflight and exploration activities will require greater degrees of self-sufficiency with regards to repair capability than have ever been employed before in space exploration. The current repair paradigm of replacing Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) of malfunctioning avionics and electronic hardware will be impractical, since carrying all of the spares that could possibly be needed for a long duration mission would require upmass and volume at unprecedented and unacceptable levels. A strategy of component-level repair for electronics, however, could significantly reduce the mass and volume necessary for spares and enhance mission safety via a generic contingency capability. This approach is already used to varying degrees by the U.S. Navy, where vessels at sea experience some similar constraints such as the need for self sufficiency for moderately long time periods, and restrictions on volume of repair spares and infrastructure. The concept of conducting component-level repairs of electronics in spacecraft requires the development of design guidelines for future avionics (to enable repair), development of diagnostic techniques to allow an astronaut to pinpoint the faulty component aboard a vastly complex vehicle, and development of tools and methodologies for dealing with the physical processes of replacing the component. This physical process includes tasks such as conformal coating removal and replacement, component removal, replacement, and alignment--all in the difficulty of a reduced gravity environment. Further, the gravitational effects on the soldering process must be characterized and accounted for to ensure reliability of the newly repaired components. The Component-Level Electronics-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project under the NASA Supportability program was established to develop and demonstrate the practicality of this repair approach. CLEAR involves collaborative efforts between NASA s Glenn Research Center

  13. Navigating the Nucleotide Excision Repair Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liren; Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Pengbo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the primary DNA repair pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA strand damage induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation or chemical carcinogens to ensure genome integrity. While the core NER proteins that carry out damage recognition, excision and repair reactions have been identified and extensively characterized, and the NER pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, the regulatory pathways that govern the threshold levels of NER have not been fully elucidated. This mini-review focuses on recently discovered transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms that specify the capacity of NER, and suggests the potential implications of modulating NER activity in cancer prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:20458729

  14. Method of repairing discontinuity in fiberglass structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelb, L. L.; Helbert, W. B., Jr.; Enie, R. B.; Mulliken, R. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Damaged fiberglass structures are repaired by substantially filling the irregular surfaced damaged area with a liquid, self-curing resin, preferably an epoxy resin mixed with chopped fiberglass, and then applying to the resin surface the first of several woven fiberglass swatches which has stitching in a zig-zag pattern parallel to each of its edges and a fringe of warp and fill glass fibers about the edges outward of the stitching. The method is especially applicable to repair of fiberglass rocket engine casings and is particularly advantageous since it restores the repaired fiberglass structure to substantially its original strength without any significant changes in the geometry or mass of the structure.

  15. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  16. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Persky, M.S.; Rothstein, S.G.; Breda, S.D.; Cohen, N.L.; Cooper, P.; Ransohoff, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Nesselmann, Catharina; Ma, Nan; Bieback, Karen; Wagner, Wolfgang; Ho, Anthony; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Zhang, Hao; Hinescu, Mihail E; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence indicates that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cell types in the treatment of cardiac dysfunction. They may trigger production of reparative growth factors, replace damaged cells and create an environment that favours endogenous cardiac repair. However, identifying mechanisms which regulate the role of MSCs in cardiac repair is still at work. To achieve the maximal clinical benefits, ex vivo manipulation can further enhance MSC therapeutic potential. This review focuses on the mechanism of MSCs in cardiac repair, with emphasis on ex vivo manipulation. PMID:18684237

  18. Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Soper, Nathaniel J; Teitelbaum, Ezra N

    2013-10-01

    The advent of laparoscopy has significantly improved postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of a paraesophageal hernia. Although this minimally invasive approach considerably reduces postoperative pain and recovery times, and may improve physiologic outcomes, laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair remains a complex operation requiring advanced laparoscopic skills and experience with the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction and diaphragmatic hiatus. In this article, we describe our approach to patient selection, preoperative evaluation, operative technique, and postoperative management. Specific attention is paid to performing an adequate hiatal dissection and esophageal mobilization, the decision of whether to use a mesh to reinforce the crural repair, and construction of an adequate antireflux barrier (ie, fundoplication). PMID:24105282

  19. Imaging of postoperative tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    PubMed

    Vaujois, L; Gorincour, G; Alison, M; Déry, J; Poirier, N; Lapierre, C

    2016-05-01

    Over the last years, the surgical techniques used to repair Tetralogy of Fallot as well as the cross-sectional cardiac imaging techniques have substantially improved. Now, the survival rate after surgical repair is more than 90% at 40 years old. A follow-up is needed and the imaging evaluation should be guided by the surgical techniques used. This article reviews the most common surgical procedures for a complete repair, the associated anatomic and hemodynamic complications and the role of cardiac imaging, mainly magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26993966

  20. DNA Repair Pathways in Trypanosomatids: from DNA Repair to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Paquet, Eric R.; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Maity, Ranjan; Rodrigue, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY All living organisms are continuously faced with endogenous or exogenous stress conditions affecting genome stability. DNA repair pathways act as a defense mechanism, which is essential to maintain DNA integrity. There is much to learn about the regulation and functions of these mechanisms, not only in human cells but also equally in divergent organisms. In trypanosomatids, DNA repair pathways protect the genome against mutations but also act as an adaptive mechanism to promote drug resistance. In this review, we scrutinize the molecular mechanisms and DNA repair pathways which are conserved in trypanosomatids. The recent advances made by the genome consortiums reveal the complete genomic sequences of several pathogens. Therefore, using bioinformatics and genomic sequences, we analyze the conservation of DNA repair proteins and their key protein motifs in trypanosomatids. We thus present a comprehensive view of DNA repair processes in trypanosomatids at the crossroads of DNA repair and drug resistance. PMID:24600040

  1. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  2. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases. PMID:26861186

  3. Pipeline repair technique cuts downtime

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, G.; Jouanneau, J.F.; Quin, R.; Wiet, P.

    1985-02-11

    This article deals with a project that explored the cold-tapping technique for repairing or modifying sea gas lines. The technique allows work to be carried out on a section of pipeline without the need, as before, for the flooding of the line, and subsequent dewatering and drying of the line. Lost production time is greatly reduced. Cold-tapping is performed on a pipe depressurized at the same level as the sea-bed hydrostatic pressure. The system is designed to withstand an accidental depressurization of the pipe to the atmosphere pressure with a safety factor of one third. The technique is simple, allows for accurate positioning of the plugs, and offers a maximum reliability due to an efficient monitoring and a wide range of backup procedures. Keeping the line entirely free of extra pieces of equipment after the operation is also a major advantage. The entire operation described took 34 hours during which all the required tasks were performed flawlessly. Analysis of the data collected during the test program showed that cold-tapping required a maximum of four extra barge days. It was demonstrated that the method can save up to eight weeks of gas-pipeline shutdown time.

  4. Glaucoma and optic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2013-08-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide and causes progressive visual impairment attributable to the dysfunction and death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Progression of visual field damage is slow and typically painless. Thus, glaucoma is often diagnosed after a substantial percentage of RGCs has been damaged. To date, clinical interventions are mainly restricted to the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP), one of the major risk factors for this disease. However, the lowering of IOP is often insufficient to halt or reverse the progress of visual loss, underlining the need for the development of alternative treatment strategies. Several lines of evidence suggest that axonal damage of RGCs occurs primary at the optic nerve head, where axons appear to be most vulnerable. Axonal injury leads to the functional loss of RGCs and subsequently induces the death of the neurons. However, the detailed molecular mechanism(s) underlying IOP-induced optic nerve injury remain poorly understood. Moreover, whether glaucoma pathophysiology is primarily axonal, glial, or vascular remains unclear. Therefore, protective strategies to prevent further axonal and subsequent soma degeneration are of great importance to limit the progression of sight loss. In addition, strategies that stimulate injured RGCs to regenerate and reconnect axons with their central targets are necessary for functional restoration. The present review provides an overview of the context of glaucoma pathogenesis and surveys recent findings regarding potential strategies for axonal regeneration of RGCs and optic nerve repair, focusing on the role of cytokines and their downstream signaling pathways. PMID:23512141

  5. Biomaterials for orbital fractures repair

    PubMed Central

    Totir, M; Ciuluvica, R; Dinu, I; Careba, I; Gradinaru, S

    2014-01-01

    The unique and complex anatomy of the orbit requires significant contouring of the implants to restore the proper anatomy. Fractures of the orbital region have an incidence of 10-25% from total facial fractures and the most common age group was the third decade of life. The majority of cases require reconstruction of the orbital floor to support the globe position and restore the shape of the orbit. The reason for this is that the bony walls are comminuted and/or bone fragments are missing. Therefore, the reconstruction of missing bone is important rather than reducing bone fragments. This can be accomplished using various materials. There is hardly any anatomic region in the human body that is so controversial in terms of appropriate material used for fracture repair: nonresorbable versus resorbable, autogenous/allogenous/xenogenous versus alloplastic material, non-prebent versus preformed (anatomical) plates, standard versus custom-made plates, nonporous versus porous material, non-coated versus coated plates. Thus, the importance of material used for reconstruction becomes more challenging for the ophthalmologist and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. PMID:27057250

  6. Biomaterials for orbital fractures repair

    PubMed Central

    Totir, M; Ciuluvica, R; Dinu, I; Careba, I; Gradinaru, S

    2015-01-01

    The unique and complex anatomy of the orbit requires significant contouring of the implants to restore the proper anatomy. Fractures of the orbital region have an incidence of 10-25% from the total facial fractures and the most common age group was the third decade of life. The majority of cases required reconstruction of the orbital floor to support the globe position and restore the shape of the orbit. The reason for this was that the bony walls were comminuted and/ or bone fragments were missing. Therefore, the reconstruction of the missing bone was important rather than reducing the bone fragments. This could be accomplished by using various materials. There is hardly any anatomic region in the human body that is so controversial in terms of appropriate material used for fracture repair: non resorbable versus resorbable, autogenous/ allogeneic/ xenogenous versus alloplastic material, non-prebent versus preformed (anatomical) plates, standard versus custom-made plates, nonporous versus porous material, non-coated versus coated plates. Thus, the importance of the material used for reconstruction becomes more challenging for the ophthalmologist and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. PMID:25914737

  7. Skeletal myoblasts for cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Shazia; Konoplyannikov, Mikhail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Haider, Khawaja Husnain

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells provide an alternative curative intervention for the infarcted heart by compensating for the cardiomyocyte loss subsequent to myocardial injury. The presence of resident stem and progenitor cell populations in the heart, and nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells with genetic induction of pluripotency markers are the emerging new developments in stem cell-based regenerative medicine. However, until safety and feasibility of these cells are established by extensive experimentation in in vitro and in vivo experimental models, skeletal muscle-derived myoblasts, and bone marrow cells remain the most well-studied donor cell types for myocardial regeneration and repair. This article provides a critical review of skeletal myoblasts as donor cells for transplantation in the light of published experimental and clinical data, and indepth discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of skeletal myoblast-based therapeutic intervention for augmentation of myocardial function in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, strategies to overcome the problems of arrhythmogenicity and failure of the transplanted skeletal myoblasts to integrate with the host cardiomyocytes are discussed. PMID:21082891

  8. Conceptual Approaches to Lung Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Peter M.; Henson, Jan E.; Janssen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury and repair is a broad topic that includes many cell types and is relevant to the pathogenesis of most lung diseases. Here, we focus on injury and repair of the alveolus, the principal function of which is to achieve gas exchange. The many cell types and structures present in the alveolus are discussed, with emphasis on their interactions in both health and disease. We define injury as damage resulting in impaired gas exchange; physiologic repair, then, requires restoration of normal alveolar architecture and function. The role of inflammation in both injury and repair of structural alveolar cells, particularly epithelial cells, as well as mechanisms of resolution of inflammation will be addressed. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance of addressing quantitatively the dynamic and complex multidirectional interactions between the many alveolar cell types and structures in three dimensions over time and in relating such mechanistic studies to physiologic outcomes and human disease. PMID:25830855

  9. 26 CFR 1.162-4 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incidental repairs which neither materially add to the value of the property nor appreciably prolong its life... nature of replacements, to the extent that they arrest deterioration and appreciably prolong the life...

  10. 26 CFR 1.162-4 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... incidental repairs which neither materially add to the value of the property nor appreciably prolong its life... nature of replacements, to the extent that they arrest deterioration and appreciably prolong the life...

  11. Integrated tools for teleoperated satellite repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Fiorini, P.

    1993-01-01

    Tools and tool handling techniques designed for demonstrating the use of the Advanced Teleoperation System at JPL in satellite repair operations are described in this paper. Our model for the repair demonstration is the Main Electronics Box (MEB) replacement on the Solar Maximum Satellite Repair (SMSR) procedure developed by NASA and successfully performed by the crew of Space Shuttle STS-13 in 1984. A summary of the repair procedure consists of uncovering thermal protection blankets on the satellite, removing screws from the MEB panel, opening the panel and clamping it in place, then removing electrical connectors from their sockets, cutting cords that hold electrical cables to the MEB panel, replacing the panel, and finally reversing the previous procedures. Methods for handling tools used in our SMSR procedure, along with details of the tool designs are discussed in this paper.

  12. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  13. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  14. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  15. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  16. Conceptual approaches to lung injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Zemans, Rachel L; Henson, Peter M; Henson, Jan E; Janssen, William J

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury and repair is a broad topic that includes many cell types and is relevant to the pathogenesis of most lung diseases. Here, we focus on injury and repair of the alveolus, the principal function of which is to achieve gas exchange. The many cell types and structures present in the alveolus are discussed, with emphasis on their interactions in both health and disease. We define injury as damage resulting in impaired gas exchange; physiologic repair, then, requires restoration of normal alveolar architecture and function. The role of inflammation in both injury and repair of structural alveolar cells, particularly epithelial cells, as well as mechanisms of resolution of inflammation will be addressed. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance of addressing quantitatively the dynamic and complex multidirectional interactions between the many alveolar cell types and structures in three dimensions over time and in relating such mechanistic studies to physiologic outcomes and human disease. PMID:25830855

  17. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    SMART is an interactive decision analysis and refinement software system that uses evaluation criteria for discrepant conditions to automatically provide and populate a document/procedure with predefined steps necessary to repair a discrepancy safely, effectively, and efficiently. SMART can store the tacit (corporate) knowledge merging the hardware specification requirements with the actual "how to" repair methods, sequences, and required equipment, all within a user-friendly interface. Besides helping organizations retain repair knowledge in streamlined procedures and sequences, SMART can also help them in saving processing time and expense, increasing productivity, improving quality, and adhering more closely to safety and other guidelines. Though SMART was developed for Space Shuttle applications, its interface is easily adaptable to any hardware that can be broken down by component, subcomponent, discrepancy, and repair.

  18. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  19. Highway Repair: A New Silicosis Threat

    PubMed Central

    Valiante, David J.; Schill, Donald P.; Rosenman, Kenneth D.; Socie, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an emerging public health concern regarding silicosis in the fast-growing highway repair industry. Methods. We examined highway construction trends, silicosis surveillance case data, and environmental exposure data to evaluate the risk of silicosis among highway repair workers. We reviewed silicosis case data from the construction industry in 3 states that have silicosis registries, and we conducted environmental monitoring for silica at highway repair work sites. Results. Our findings indicate that a large population of highway workers is at risk of developing silicosis from exposure to crystalline silica. Conclusions. Exposure control methods, medical screenings, protective health standards, and safety-related contract language are necessary for preventing future occupational disease problems among highway repair workers. PMID:15117715

  20. Recombination and DNA Repair in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Dorer, Marion S.; Sessler, Tate H.; Salama, Nina R.

    2013-01-01

    All organisms have pathways that repair the genome, ensuring their survival and that of their progeny. But these pathways also serve to diversify the genome, causing changes on the level of nucleotide, whole gene, and genome structure. Sequencing of bacteria has revealed wide allelic diversity and differences in gene content within the same species, highlighting the importance of understanding pathways of recombination and DNA repair. The human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori is an excellent model system for studying these pathways. H. pylori harbors major recombination and repair pathways and is naturally competent, facilitating its ability to diversify its genome. Elucidation of DNA recombination, repair, and diversification programs in this pathogen will reveal connections between these pathways and their importance to infection. PMID:21682641

  1. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371... SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118 Changes—ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-87, Changes—Ship Repair, in all solicitations...

  2. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371... SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118 Changes—ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-87, Changes—Ship Repair, in all solicitations...

  3. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371... SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118 Changes—ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-87, Changes—Ship Repair, in all solicitations...

  4. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371... SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118 Changes—ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-87, Changes—Ship Repair, in all solicitations...

  5. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371... SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118 Changes—ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-87, Changes—Ship Repair, in all solicitations...

  6. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  7. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  8. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  9. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  10. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  11. 46 CFR 59.15-1 - Furnace repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Furnace repairs. 59.15-1 Section 59.15-1 Shipping COAST... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-1 Furnace repairs. (a) Where corrugated or plain furnaces or flues are distorted by 11/2 inches or more, they shall be repaired by either of...

  12. 46 CFR 59.15-1 - Furnace repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Furnace repairs. 59.15-1 Section 59.15-1 Shipping COAST... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-1 Furnace repairs. (a) Where corrugated or plain furnaces or flues are distorted by 11/2 inches or more, they shall be repaired by either of...

  13. 46 CFR 59.15-1 - Furnace repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Furnace repairs. 59.15-1 Section 59.15-1 Shipping COAST... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-1 Furnace repairs. (a) Where corrugated or plain furnaces or flues are distorted by 11/2 inches or more, they shall be repaired by either of...

  14. 46 CFR 59.15-1 - Furnace repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Furnace repairs. 59.15-1 Section 59.15-1 Shipping COAST... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-1 Furnace repairs. (a) Where corrugated or plain furnaces or flues are distorted by 11/2 inches or more, they shall be repaired by either of...

  15. 46 CFR 59.15-1 - Furnace repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Furnace repairs. 59.15-1 Section 59.15-1 Shipping COAST... VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-1 Furnace repairs. (a) Where corrugated or plain furnaces or flues are distorted by 11/2 inches or more, they shall be repaired by either of...

  16. 46 CFR 176.700 - Permission for repairs and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permission for repairs and alterations. 176.700 Section 176.700 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 176.700 Permission for repairs and alterations. (a) Repairs or...

  17. 48 CFR 252.247-7025 - Reflagging or repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reflagging or repair work... of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7025 Reflagging or repair work. As prescribed in 247.574(d), use the following clause: Reflagging or Repair Work (JUN 2005) (a) Definition. Reflagging or repair...

  18. 48 CFR 252.247-7025 - Reflagging or repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reflagging or repair work... of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7025 Reflagging or repair work. As prescribed in 247.574(d), use the following clause: Reflagging or Repair Work (JUN 2005) (a) Definition. Reflagging or repair...

  19. 48 CFR 252.247-7025 - Reflagging or repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reflagging or repair work... of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7025 Reflagging or repair work. As prescribed in 247.574(d), use the following clause: Reflagging or Repair Work (JUN 2005) (a) Definition. Reflagging or repair...

  20. Small Engines Care, Operation, Maintenance and Repair. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, J. Howard

    Developed by teacher educators and agricultural engineers, this teacher and student reference is for use in a course in small engine operation and maintenance. Content includes: (1) Principles of Good Workmanship, (2) Repairing Starters, (3) Maintaining and Repairing Ignition Systems, (4) Repairing Fuel Systems, (5) Repairing Governors, (6)…