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Sample records for all-optical three-dimensional integral

  1. All-optical dynamical Casimir effect in a three-dimensional terahertz photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmüller, David

    2016-06-01

    We identify an architecture for the observation of all-optical dynamical Casimir effect in realistic experimental conditions. We suggest that by integrating quantum wells in a three-dimensional (3D) photonic band-gap material made out of large-scale (˜200 -μ m ) germanium logs, it is possible to achieve ultrastrong light-matter coupling at terahertz frequencies for the cyclotron transition of a two-dimensional electron gas interacting with long-lived optical modes, in which vacuum Rabi splitting is comparable to the Landau level spacing. When a short, intense electromagnetic transient of duration ˜250 fs and carrying a peak magnetic field ˜5 T is applied to the structure, the cyclotron transition can be suddenly tuned on resonance with a desired photon mode, switching on the light-matter interaction and leading to a Casimir radiation emitted parallel to the quantum well plane. The radiation spectrum consists of sharp peaks with frequencies coinciding with engineered optical modes within the 3D photonic band gap, and its characteristics are extremely robust to the nonradiative damping which can be large in our system. Furthermore, the absence of continuum with associated low-energy excitations for both electromagnetic and electronic quantum states can prevent the rapid absorption of the photon flux which is likely to occur in other proposals for all-optical dynamical Casimir effect.

  2. Integrated Aeromechanics with Three-Dimensional Solid-Multibody Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    A full three-dimensional finite element-multibody structural dynamic solver is coupled to a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for the prediction of integrated aeromechanical stresses and strains on a rotor blade in forward flight. The objective is to lay the foundations of all major pieces of an integrated three-dimensional rotor dynamic analysis - from model construction to aeromechanical solution to stress/strain calculation. The primary focus is on the aeromechanical solution. Two types of three-dimensional CFD/CSD interfaces are constructed for this purpose with an emphasis on resolving errors from geometry mis-match so that initial-stage approximate structural geometries can also be effectively analyzed. A three-dimensional structural model is constructed as an approximation to a UH-60A-like fully articulated rotor. The aerodynamic model is identical to the UH-60A rotor. For preliminary validation measurements from a UH-60A high speed flight is used where CFD coupling is essential to capture the advancing side tip transonic effects. The key conclusion is that an integrated aeromechanical analysis is indeed possible with three-dimensional structural dynamics but requires a careful description of its geometry and discretization of its parts.

  3. All-optical modulation in gallium arsenide integrated optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    McWright, G.; Ross, B.; Guthreau, W.; Lafaw, D.; Lowry, M.; Tindall, W.

    1988-01-27

    We have investigated all-optical modulators in gallium arsenide integrated optical waveguides; these modulators use electron-hole pair generation to alter the propagation characteristics of a guided light beam. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Monolithically integrated nonlinear interferometers for all-optical switching

    SciTech Connect

    Jahn, E.; Agrawal, N.; Ehrke, H.J.; Pieper, W.; Franke, D.; Fuerst, W.; Weinert, C.M.

    1996-12-31

    All-optical switching devices are expected to play an important role in future optical communication networks. For example, nonlinear interferometer (NLI) arrangements consisting of one or two semiconductor laser amplifiers (SLA) are very attractive. Here, the cross-phase modulation due to the gain-saturation nonlinearity of SLAs could be used for switching in time, space, and wavelength domains. The first of such devices was configured as a nonlinear Sagnac interferometer (NSI) by using an SLA in a fiber loop mirror (SLALOM) for time domain switching. So far, these devices have been assembled using discrete SLA components. Other arrangements like Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with SLAs provide additional flexibility but require their realization as integrated devices for stable operation. In this paper the authors report on the development of monolithically integrated NLIs for all-optical signal processing in high bit-rate optical time division multiplexing systems. Both NSI and MZI configurations are considered.

  5. Three-Dimensional Integrated Survey for Building Investigations.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Domenica; Angelini, Maria Giuseppa

    2015-11-01

    The study shows the results of a survey aimed to represent a building collapse and the feasibility of the modellation as a support of structure analysis. An integrated survey using topographic, photogrammetric, and terrestrial laser techniques was carried out to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) model of the building, plans and prospects, and the particulars of the collapsed area. Authors acquired, by a photogrammetric survey, information about regular parties of the structure; while using laser scanner data they reconstructed a set of more interesting architectural details and areas with higher surface curvature. Specifically, the process of texture provided a detailed 3D structure of the areas under investigation. The analysis of the data acquired resulted to be very useful both in identifying the causes of the disaster and also in helping the reconstruction of the collapsed corner showing the contribution that the integrated surveys can give in preserving architectural and historic heritage.

  6. Electrothermal Analysis of Three-Dimensional Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Theodore Robert

    2011-12-01

    Transient electro-thermal simulation of a three dimensional integrated circuit (3DIC) is reported that uses a cell-based simulation to provide a selected transistor thermal profile while providing advantages of hierarchical simulation. Due to CPU and memory limitations, full transistor electro-thermal simulations on a useful scale are not possible. Standard cells are considered on a per-instance basis and modeled with electro-thermal macro-models developed in a multi-physics simulator. Simulations are compared favorably to measurements for a token-generating 3DIC clocking at a maximum of 1 GHz. The 3DIC, which is composed of 9 by 3 layers of repetitive frequency multipliers and dividers, was fabricated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MITLL) 3DIC process. Measurements indicated a linear rise in temperature of the active areas over a range of applied background ambient temperatures. An average of 7.5 K change in temperature was measured across dense areas of circuitry. For thermal simulation, the physical characteristics of the 3DIC were extracted from flattened OpenAccess layout files. Material parameters, connections, and geometries were considered in order to create a more physically accurate resistive thermal mesh. Physical thermal networks extracted with resolutions of 10 mum and 5 mum connect thermal terminals of the electrothermal macromodel cell elements to active layers yielding temporal and spatial simulated dynamic thermal results in three dimensions. Coupled with model-order reduction techniques, hierarchical dynamic electrothermal simulation of large 3DICs is shown to be tractable, yielding spatial and temporal selected transistor-level thermal profiles.

  7. Three-dimensional volumetric object reconstruction using computational integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Ju-Seog; Javidi, Bahram

    2004-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique that can sense a 3D scene and computationally reconstruct it as a 3D volumetric image. Sensing of the 3D scene is carried out by obtaining elemental images optically using a pickup microlens array and a detector array. Reconstruction of volume pixels of the scene is accomplished by computationally simulating optical reconstruction according to ray optics. The entire pixels of the recorded elemental images contribute to volumetric reconstruction of the 3D scene. Image display planes at arbitrary distances from the display microlens array are computed and reconstructed by back propagating the elemental images through a computer synthesized pinhole array based on ray optics. We present experimental results of 3D image sensing and volume pixel reconstruction to test and verify the performance of the algorithm and the imaging system. The volume pixel values can be used for 3D image surface reconstruction.

  8. Integrated all-optical infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, John; Bonakdar, Alireza; Gelfand, Ryan; Dey, Dibyendu; Nia, Iman Hassani; Fathipour, Vala; Memis, Omer Gokalp; Mohseni, Hooman

    2012-05-01

    We report a type of infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser, in which far field light in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 6.1 μm) is modulated by a near field interaction of light in the telecommunications wavelength (1.55 μm). To achieve this all-optical switch, we used cross-polarized bowtie antennas and a centrally located germanium nanoslab. The bowtie antenna squeezes the short wavelength light into the gap region, where the germanium is placed. The perturbation of refractive index of the germanium due to the free carrier absorption produced by short wavelength light changes the optical response of the antenna and the entire laser intensity at 6.1 μm significantly. This device shows a viable method to modulate the far field of a laser through a near field interaction.

  9. Hologram synthesis of three-dimensional real objects using portable integral imaging camera.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Keun; Hong, Sung-In; Kim, Yong-Soo; Lim, Hong-Gi; Jo, Na-Young; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2013-10-01

    We propose a portable hologram capture system based on integral imaging. An integral imaging camera with an integrated micro lens array captures spatio-angular light ray distribution of the three-dimensional scene under incoherent illumination. The captured light ray distribution is then processed to synthesize corresponding hologram. Experimental results show that the synthesized hologram is optically reconstructed successfully, demonstrating accommodation and motion parallax of the reconstructed three-dimensional scene.

  10. InP-based three-dimensional photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Diana; Zaytsev, Sergey; Pauchard, Alexandre; Hummel, Steve; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    Fast-growing internet traffic volumes require high data communication bandwidth over longer distances than short wavelength (850 nm) multi-mode fiber systems can provide. Access network bottlenecks put pressure on short-range (SR) telecommunication systems. To effectively address these datacom and telecom market needs, low cost, high-speed laser modules at 1310 and 1550 nm wavelengths are required. The great success of GaAs 850 nm VCSELs for Gb/s Ethernet has motivated efforts to extend VCSEL technology to longer wavelengths in the 1310 and 1550 nm regimes. However, the technological challenges associated with available intrinsic materials for long wavelength VCSELs are tremendous. Even with recent advances in this area, it is believed that significant additional development is necessary before long wavelength VCSELs that meet commercial specifications will be widely available. In addition, the more stringent OC192 and OC768 specifications for single-mode fiber (SMF) datacom may require more than just a long wavelength laser diode, VCSEL or not, to address numerous cost and performance issues. We believe that photonic integrated circuits, which compactly integrate surface-emitting lasers with additional active and passive optical components with extended functionality, will provide the best solutions to today's problems. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) have been investigated for more than a decade. However, they have produced limited commercial impact to date primarily because the highly complicated fabrication processes produce significant yield and device performance issues. In this presentation, we will discuss a new technology platform for fabricating InP-based photonic integrated circuits compatible with surface-emitting laser technology. Employing InP transparency at 1310 and 1550 nm wavelengths, we have created 3-D photonic integrated circuits (PICs) by utilizing light beams in both surface normal and in-plane directions within the InP-based structure

  11. An Exploration of Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment for Computational Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Baichang; Wang, Qiyun; Chen, Jie; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) is a fundamental skill for students, and assessment is a critical factor in education. However, there is a lack of effective approaches to CT assessment. Therefore, we designed the Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment (TDIA) framework in this article. The TDIA has two aims: one was to integrate three dimensions…

  12. Three-dimensional integration of passive and active polymer waveguide devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Sean Matthew

    This thesis presents the design, fabrication, and experimental results of three dimensionally integrated optics. This vertical and horizontal integration of polymer waveguide structures increases the integration density, reduces interconnection routing difficulties, and expands the functional diversity of adjacent devices. The devices discussed depend on the fabrication of vertical slopes using unconventional photolithography and reactive ion etching techniques. The slopes produced allow fully functional three dimensionally integrated optics that incorporate both passive and active waveguide elements. Passive structures such as vertical waveguide bends, power splitters, and polarization splitters enable three dimensional routing of the optical power among multiple vertical levels. Single mode vertical waveguide bends are demonstrated with polarization insensitive excess losses of 0.2dB. These waveguide structures incorporated bending angles up to 1.5°. Three dimensional 1 x 4 splitters, possess excess losses of 0.5dB and show the ability to fabricate complex waveguide structures in both the horizontal and vertical directions. These vertical power splitters showed controllable power splitting ratios in the output waveguides by controlling the spin cast film thickness within 0.5μM and the slope angle within 0.5°. The vertical polarization splitters incorporated birefringent polymer materials to create an adiabatic mode splitter. These possessed power extinction ratios of about 15dB for both input polarizations. The passive structures of vertical waveguide bends, power splitters, and polarization splitters enable practical three dimensional integrated optics by providing vertical routing capability of the optical signal analogous to those typically found in conventional two dimensional waveguide interconnects. Three dimensionally integrated active devices such as low-loss hybrid modulators and vertically integrated modulator designs create fully functional

  13. Cascaded all-optical operations in a hybrid integrated 80-Gb/s logic circuit.

    PubMed

    LeGrange, J D; Dinu, M; Sochor, T; Bollond, P; Kasper, A; Cabot, S; Johnson, G S; Kang, I; Grant, A; Kay, J; Jaques, J

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate logic functionalities in a high-speed all-optical logic circuit based on differential Mach-Zehnder interferometers with semiconductor optical amplifiers as the nonlinear optical elements. The circuit, implemented by hybrid integration of the semiconductor optical amplifiers on a planar lightwave circuit platform fabricated in silica glass, can be flexibly configured to realize a variety of Boolean logic gates. We present both simulations and experimental demonstrations of cascaded all-optical operations for 80-Gb/s on-off keyed data.

  14. Note: Design and development of an integrated three-dimensional scanner for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rashmi, T.; Dharsana, G.; Sriramshankar, R.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-11-15

    A compact scanning head for the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) greatly enhances the portability of AFM and facilitates easy integration with other tools. This paper reports the design and development of a three-dimensional (3D) scanner integrated into an AFM micro-probe. The scanner is realized by means of a novel design for the AFM probe along with a magnetic actuation system. The integrated scanner, the actuation system, and their associated mechanical mounts are fabricated and evaluated. The experimentally calibrated actuation ranges are shown to be over 1 μm along all the three axes.

  15. Photonic integrated circuit for all-optical millimeter-wave signal generation

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Mar, A.; Zolper, J.; Hietala, V.

    1997-03-01

    Generation of millimeter-wave electronic signals and power is required for high-frequency communication links, RADAR, remote sensing and other applications. However, in the 30 to 300 GHz mm-wave regime, signal sources are bulky and inefficient. All-optical generation of mm-wave signals promises to improve efficiency to as much as 30 to 50 percent with output power as high as 100 mW. All of this may be achieved while taking advantage of the benefits of monolithic integration to reduce the overall size to that of a single semiconductor chip only a fraction of a square centimeter in size. This report summarizes the development of the first monolithically integrated all-optical mm-wave signal generator ever built. The design integrates a mode-locked semiconductor ring diode laser with an optical amplifier and high-speed photodetector into a single optical integrated circuit. Frequency generation is demonstrated at 30, 60 and 90 Ghz.

  16. Three-dimensional multi-terminal superconductive integrated circuit inductance extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, Coenrad J.; Wetzstein, Olaf; Ortlepp, Thomas; Kunert, Jürgen

    2011-12-01

    Accurate inductance calculations are critical for the design of both digital and analogue superconductive integrated circuits, and three-dimensional calculations are gaining importance with the advent of inductive biasing, inductive coupling and sky plane shielding for RSFQ cells. InductEx, an extraction programme based on the three-dimensional calculation software FastHenry, was proposed earlier. InductEx uses segmentation techniques designed to accurately model the geometries of superconductive integrated circuit structures. Inductance extraction for complex multi-terminal three-dimensional structures from current distributions calculated by FastHenry is discussed. Results for both a reflection plane modelling an infinite ground plane and a finite segmented ground plane that allows inductive elements to extend over holes in the ground plane are shown. Several SQUIDs were designed for and fabricated with IPHT's 1 kA cm - 2 RSFQ1D niobium process. These SQUIDs implement a number of loop structures that span different layers, include vias, inductively coupled control lines and ground plane holes. We measured the loop inductance of these SQUIDs and show how the results are used to calibrate the layer parameters in InductEx and verify the extraction accuracy. We also show that, with proper modelling, FastHenry can be fast enough to be used for the extraction of typical RSFQ cell inductances.

  17. A three dimensional integral equation approach for fluids under confinement: Argon in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomba, Enrique; Bores, Cecilia; Sánchez-Gil, Vicente; Noya, Eva G.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we explore the ability of an inhomogeneous integral equation approach to provide a full three dimensional description of simple fluids under conditions of confinement in porous media. Explicitly, we will consider the case of argon adsorbed into silicalite-1, silicalite-2, and an all-silica analogue of faujasite, with a porous structure composed of linear (and zig-zag in the case of silicalite-1) channels of 5-8 Å diameter. The equation is based on the three dimensional Ornstein-Zernike approximation proposed by Beglov and Roux [J. Chem. Phys. 103, 360 (1995)] in combination with the use of an approximate fluid-fluid direct correlation function furnished by the replica Ornstein-Zernike equation with a hypernetted chain closure. Comparison with the results of grand canonical Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics simulations evidences that the theory provides an accurate description for the three dimensional density distribution of the adsorbed fluid, both at the level of density profiles and bidimensional density maps across representative sections of the porous material. In the case of very tight confinement (silicalite-1 and silicalite-2), solutions at low temperatures could not be found due to convergence difficulties, but for faujasite, which presents substantially larger channels, temperatures as low as 77 K are accessible to the integral equation. The overall results indicate that the theoretical approximation can be an excellent tool to characterize the microscopic adsorption behavior of porous materials.

  18. Depth-enhanced three-dimensional-two-dimensional convertible display based on modified integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Hak-Rin; Kim, Yunhee; Kim, Joohwan; Hong, Jisoo; Lee, Sin-Doo; Lee, Byoungho

    2004-12-01

    A depth-enhanced three-dimensional-two-dimensional convertible display that uses a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal based on the principle of integral imaging is proposed. In the proposed method, a lens array is located behind a transmission-type display panel to form an array of point-light sources, and a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal is electrically controlled to pass or to scatter light coming from these point-light sources. Therefore, three-dimensional-two-dimensional conversion is accomplished electrically without any mechanical movement. Moreover, the nonimaging structure of the proposed method increases the expressible depth range considerably. We explain the method of operation and present experimental results. PMID:15605488

  19. Three-dimensional integral imaging display system via off-axially distributed image sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yongri; Qu, Hongjia; Zhang, Miao; Cho, Myungjin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional integral imaging display system with a multiple recorded images using off-axially distributed image sensing. First, the depth map of the 3D objects is extracted from the off-axially recorded multi-perspective 2D images by using profilometry technique. Then, the elemental image array is computationally synthesized using the extracted depth map based on ray mapping model. Finally, the 3D images are optically displayed in integral imaging system. To show the feasibility of the proposed method, the optical experiments for 3D objects are carried out and presented in this paper.

  20. Integral three-dimensional television with video system using pixel-offset method.

    PubMed

    Arai, Jun; Kawakita, Masahiro; Yamashita, Takayuki; Sasaki, Hisayuki; Miura, Masato; Hiura, Hitoshi; Okui, Makoto; Okano, Fumio

    2013-02-11

    Integral three-dimensional (3D) television based on integral imaging requires huge amounts of information. Previously, we constructed an Integral 3D television using Super Hi-Vision (SHV) technology, with 7680 pixels horizontally and 4320 pixels vertically. We report on improved image quality through the development of video system with an equivalent of 8000 scan lines for use with Integral 3D television. We conducted experiments to evaluate the resolution of 3D images using an experimental setup and were able to show that by using the pixel-offset method we have eliminated aliasing produced by full-resolution SHV video equipment. We confirmed that the application of the pixel-offset method to integral 3D television is effective in increasing the resolution of reconstructed images. PMID:23481805

  1. Three-dimensional (3D) monolithically integrated photodetector and WDM receiver based on bulk silicon wafer.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Xianshu; Tu, Xiaoguang; Jia, Lianxi; Fang, Qing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2014-08-11

    We propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) monolithic optoelectronic integration platform. Such platform integrates both electrical and photonic devices in a bulk silicon wafer, which eliminates the high-cost silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is more suitable for process requirements of electronic and photonic integrated circuits (ICs). For proof-of-concept, we demonstrate a three-dimensional photodetector and WDM receiver system. The Ge is grown on a 8-inch bulk silicon wafer while the optical waveguide is defined in a SiN layer which is deposited on top of it, with ~4 µm oxide sandwiched in between. The light is directed to the Ge photodetector from the SiN waveguide vertically by using grating coupler with a Aluminum mirror on top of it. The measured photodetector responsivity is ~0.2 A/W and the 3-dB bandwidth is ~2 GHz. Using such vertical-coupled photodetector, we demonstrated an 8-channel receiver by integrating a 1 × 8 arrayed waveguide grating (AWG). High-quality optical signal detection with up to 10 Gbit/s data rate is demonstrated, suggesting a 80 Gbit/s throughput. Such receiver can be applied to on-chip optical interconnect, DRAM interface, and telecommunication systems.

  2. Multiple-viewing-zone integral imaging using a dynamic barrier array for three-dimensional displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heejin; Min, Sung-Wook; Jung, Sungyong; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Lee, Byoungho

    2003-04-01

    In spite of many advantages of integral imaging, the viewing zone in which an observer can see three-dimensional images is limited within a narrow range. Here, we propose a novel method to increase the number of viewing zones by using a dynamic barrier array. We prove our idea by fabricating and locating the dynamic barrier array between a lens array and a display panel. By tilting the barrier array, it is possible to distribute images for each viewing zone. Thus, the number of viewing zones can be increased with an increment of the states of the barrier array tilt.

  3. Chip-integrated all-optical 4-bit Gray code generation based on silicon microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-08-10

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 4-port passive encoder for 4-bit Gray code on pure silicon platform. The operation principle for this device is the thermo-optic (TO) effect in silicon microring resonator (MRR) whose transmission spectrum could be shifted by injecting strong light power. Therefore, the output powers of both the through-port and drop-port of the MRR could be controllable and switchable. Two threshold powers are defined to decide the port output code of bit "0" or "1". By combining two independent resonant wavelengths of two MRRs and adjusting their powers in a certain order, all-optical 4-bit Gray code generation has been successfully demonstrated. The proposed integrated device is competent in on-chip all-optical communication and optical interconnection systems with significant advantages, such as simple operation, compact size, economical fabrication process and great scalability.

  4. Development of Three-Dimensional Integration Technology for Highly Parallel Image-Processing Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Nakamura, Tomonori; Sakuma, Katsuyuki; Park, Ki Tae; Shimazutsu, Hiroaki; Miyakawa, Nobuaki; Kim, Ki Yoon; Kurino, Hiroyuki; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2000-04-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) integration technology for realizing a highly parallel image-processing chip has been developed. Several LSI wafers are vertically stacked and glued to each other after thinning them using this new technology. This technology can be considered as both 3D LSI technology and wafer-scale 3D chip-on-chip packaging technology. The effective packaging density can be significantly increased by stacking the chips in a vertical direction. Several key techniques for this 3D integration have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate the highly parallel image sensor chip with a 3D structure. The 3D image sensor test chip was fabricated using this new 3D integration technology and its basic performance was evaluated.

  5. Digital magnification of three-dimensional integral imaging using image interpolation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Díaz, Rodrigo; Song, Yong-Wook; Javidi, Bahram

    2005-11-01

    We can enlarge or reduce three-dimensional integral imaging images by using an optical multi-pickup method. We used the moving array- lenslet technique (MALT) to increase the spatial ray sampling rate of elemental images in the optical method. In this paper, we are proposing a digital magnification method to increase the spatial ray sampling rate without lens movement. The major drawback of the optical technique is the complexity due to the small lenslet movement. We used four popular two dimensional (2D) magnified interpolation methods, as: linear, cubic, spline and nearest. We compared the reconstructed integral imaging images using optical and digital magnification methods. When use the optical and digital magnification are used in a sequence, we can reduce the number of pickup procedures for the optical method to a forth while we can see almost the same resolution quality of the reconstructed integral imaging images.

  6. Characterization of a microflow cytometer with an integrated three-dimensional optofluidic lens system.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, M; Vellekoop, M J

    2010-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a standard analytical method in cell biology and clinical diagnostics and is widely distributed for the experimental investigation of microparticle characteristics. In this work, the design, realization, and measurement results of a novel planar optofluidic flow cytometric device with an integrated three-dimensional (3D) adjustable optofluidic lens system for forward-scattering∕extinction-based biochemical analysis fabricated by silicon micromachining are presented. To our knowledge, this is the first planar cytometric system with the ability to focus light three-dimensionally on cells∕particles by the application of fluidic lenses. The single layer microfluidic platform enables versatile 3D hydrodynamic sample focusing to an arbitrary position in the channel and incorporates integrated fiber grooves for the insertion of glass fibers. To confirm the fluid dynamics and raytracing simulations and to characterize the sensor, different cell lines and sets of microparticles were investigated by detecting the extinction (axial light loss) signal, demonstrating the high sensitivity and sample discrimination capability of this analysis system. The unique features of this planar microdevice enable new biotechnological analysis techniques due to the highly increased sensitivity.

  7. Characterization of a microflow cytometer with an integrated three-dimensional optofluidic lens system.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, M; Vellekoop, M J

    2010-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a standard analytical method in cell biology and clinical diagnostics and is widely distributed for the experimental investigation of microparticle characteristics. In this work, the design, realization, and measurement results of a novel planar optofluidic flow cytometric device with an integrated three-dimensional (3D) adjustable optofluidic lens system for forward-scattering∕extinction-based biochemical analysis fabricated by silicon micromachining are presented. To our knowledge, this is the first planar cytometric system with the ability to focus light three-dimensionally on cells∕particles by the application of fluidic lenses. The single layer microfluidic platform enables versatile 3D hydrodynamic sample focusing to an arbitrary position in the channel and incorporates integrated fiber grooves for the insertion of glass fibers. To confirm the fluid dynamics and raytracing simulations and to characterize the sensor, different cell lines and sets of microparticles were investigated by detecting the extinction (axial light loss) signal, demonstrating the high sensitivity and sample discrimination capability of this analysis system. The unique features of this planar microdevice enable new biotechnological analysis techniques due to the highly increased sensitivity. PMID:21267437

  8. Characterization of a microflow cytometer with an integrated three-dimensional optofluidic lens system

    PubMed Central

    Rosenauer, M.; Vellekoop, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a standard analytical method in cell biology and clinical diagnostics and is widely distributed for the experimental investigation of microparticle characteristics. In this work, the design, realization, and measurement results of a novel planar optofluidic flow cytometric device with an integrated three-dimensional (3D) adjustable optofluidic lens system for forward-scattering∕extinction-based biochemical analysis fabricated by silicon micromachining are presented. To our knowledge, this is the first planar cytometric system with the ability to focus light three-dimensionally on cells∕particles by the application of fluidic lenses. The single layer microfluidic platform enables versatile 3D hydrodynamic sample focusing to an arbitrary position in the channel and incorporates integrated fiber grooves for the insertion of glass fibers. To confirm the fluid dynamics and raytracing simulations and to characterize the sensor, different cell lines and sets of microparticles were investigated by detecting the extinction (axial light loss) signal, demonstrating the high sensitivity and sample discrimination capability of this analysis system. The unique features of this planar microdevice enable new biotechnological analysis techniques due to the highly increased sensitivity. PMID:21267437

  9. Integral three-dimensional television using a 2000-scanning-line video system.

    PubMed

    Arai, Jun; Okui, Makoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Okano, Fumio

    2006-03-10

    We have developed an integral three-dimensional (3-D) television that uses a 2000-scanning-line video system that can shoot and display 3-D color moving images in real time. We had previously developed an integral 3-D television that used a high-definition television system. The new system uses -6 times as many elemental images [160 (horizontal) x 118 (vertical) elemental images] arranged at -1.5 times the density to improve further the picture quality of the reconstructed image. Through comparison an image near the lens array can be reconstructed at -1.9 times the spatial frequency, and the viewing angle is -1.5 times as wide. PMID:16572684

  10. Element Library for Three-Dimensional Stress Analysis by the Integrated Force Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method, a recently developed method for analyzing structures, is extended in this paper to three-dimensional structural analysis. First, a general formulation is developed to generate the stress interpolation matrix in terms of complete polynomials of the required order. The formulation is based on definitions of the stress tensor components in term of stress functions. The stress functions are written as complete polynomials and substituted into expressions for stress components. Then elimination of the dependent coefficients leaves the stress components expressed as complete polynomials whose coefficients are defined as generalized independent forces. Such derived components of the stress tensor identically satisfy homogenous Navier equations of equilibrium. The resulting element matrices are invariant with respect to coordinate transformation and are free of spurious zero-energy modes. The formulation provides a rational way to calculate the exact number of independent forces necessary to arrive at an approximation of the required order for complete polynomials. The influence of reducing the number of independent forces on the accuracy of the response is also analyzed. The stress fields derived are used to develop a comprehensive finite element library for three-dimensional structural analysis by the Integrated Force Method. Both tetrahedral- and hexahedral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary geometric configurations are developed. A number of examples with known analytical solutions are solved by using the developments presented herein. The results are in good agreement with the analytical solutions. The responses obtained with the Integrated Force Method are also compared with those generated by the standard displacement method. In most cases, the performance of the Integrated Force Method is better overall.

  11. Advances in three-dimensional integration technologies in support of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple, D. S.; Vick, E. P.; Malta, D.; Lueck, M. R.; Skokan, M. R.; Masterjohn, C. M.; Muzilla, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Staring infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) require pixel-level, three-dimensional (3D) integration with silicon readout integrated circuits (ROICs) that provide detector bias, integrate detector current, and may further process the signals. There is an increased interest in ROIC technology as a result of two trends in the evolution of infrared FPAs. The first trend involves decreasing the FPA pixel size, which leads to the increased information content within the same FPA die size. The second trend involves the desire to enhance signal processing capability at the FPA level, which opens the door to the detector behaving like a smart peripheral rather than a passive component—with complex signal processing functions being executed on, rather than off, the FPA chip. In this paper, we review recent advances in 3D integration process technologies that support these key trends in the development of infrared FPAs. Specifically, we discuss approaches in which the infrared sensor is integrated with 3D ROIC stacks composed of multiple layers of silicon circuitry interconnected using metal-filled through-silicon vias. We describe the continued development of the 3D integration technology and summarize key demonstrations that show its viability for pixels as small as 5 microns.

  12. Three-dimensional electro-floating display system based on integral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-03-01

    New three-dimensional (3D) display system which combines two different display techniques is proposed. One of the techniques is integral imaging. The integral imaging display system consists of a lens array and a 2D display device, and the 3D reconstructed images are integrated from the elemental images by the lens array. The other technique is image floating, which uses a big convex lens or a concave mirror to exhibit the image of a real object to the observer. The electro-floating display system which does not use the real object needs the volumetric 3D display part because the floating display system cannot make the 3D image, but only carries the image closer to the observer. The integral imaging display system can be adopted in the electro-floating display system, because the integrated image has the characteristics of the volumetric image within the viewing angle. Moreover, many methods to enhance the viewing angle of the integral imaging display system can be used for the proposed system directly. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D TV.

  13. Spatiotemporally multiplexed integral imaging projector for large-scale high-resolution three-dimensional display.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ju-Seog; Oh, Yong-Seok; Javidi, Bahram

    2004-02-23

    We present a projection method in integral imaging for large-scale high-resolution three-dimensional display. In the proposed method, the entire set of high resolution elemental images with a large number of pixels is spatially divided into smaller image subsets. Then they are projected separately onto the corresponding lenslet array positions either simultaneously or in a sequence faster than the flicker fusion frequency of human eyes or both (i.e., spatiotemporal multiplexing). Thus display panels that do not have enough pixel numbers can be used to display the entire elemental images with a large number of pixels. Preliminary experiments were performed using a galvanometer-based optical scanner. PMID:19474856

  14. Integrated three-dimensional digital assessment of accuracy of anterior tooth movement using clear aligners

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Juan; He, Li; Tian, Jie; Bai, Yu-Xing; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy of anterior tooth movement using clear aligners in integrated three-dimensional digital models. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography was performed before and after treatment with clear aligners in 32 patients. Plaster casts were laser-scanned for virtual setup and aligner fabrication. Differences in predicted and achieved root and crown positions of anterior teeth were compared on superimposed maxillofacial digital images and virtual models and analyzed by Student's t-test. Results The mean discrepancies in maxillary and mandibular crown positions were 0.376 ± 0.041 mm and 0.398 ± 0.037 mm, respectively. Maxillary and mandibular root positions differed by 2.062 ± 0.128 mm and 1.941 ± 0.154 mm, respectively. Conclusions Crowns but not roots of anterior teeth can be moved to designated positions using clear aligners, because these appliances cause tooth movement by tilting motion. PMID:26629473

  15. Three-Dimensional Integration of Graphene via Swelling, Shrinking, and Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghyun; Kim, Hoe Joon; Wang, Michael Cai; Leem, Juyoung; King, William P; Nam, SungWoo

    2015-07-01

    The transfer of graphene from its growth substrate to a target substrate has been widely investigated for its decisive role in subsequent device integration and performance. Thus far, various reported methods of graphene transfer have been mostly limited to planar or curvilinear surfaces due to the challenges associated with fractures from local stress during transfer onto three-dimensional (3D) microstructured surfaces. Here, we report a robust approach to integrate graphene onto 3D microstructured surfaces while maintaining the structural integrity of graphene, where the out-of-plane dimensions of the 3D features vary from 3.5 to 50 μm. We utilized three sequential steps: (1) substrate swelling, (2) shrinking, and (3) adaptation, in order to achieve damage-free, large area integration of graphene on 3D microstructures. Detailed scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurement studies show that the amount of substrate swelling as well as the flexural rigidities of the transfer film affect the integration yield and quality of the integrated graphene. We also demonstrate the versatility of our approach by extension to a variety of 3D microstructured geometries. Lastly, we show the integration of hybrid structures of graphene decorated with gold nanoparticles onto 3D microstructure substrates, demonstrating the compatibility of our integration method with other hybrid nanomaterials. We believe that the versatile, damage-free integration method based on swelling, shrinking, and adaptation will pave the way for 3D integration of two-dimensional (2D) materials and expand potential applications of graphene and 2D materials in the future.

  16. Vertically integrated, three-dimensional nanowire complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits.

    PubMed

    Nam, SungWoo; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Qihua; Ham, Donhee; Lieber, Charles M

    2009-12-15

    Three-dimensional (3D), multi-transistor-layer, integrated circuits represent an important technological pursuit promising advantages in integration density, operation speed, and power consumption compared with 2D circuits. We report fully functional, 3D integrated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits based on separate interconnected layers of high-mobility n-type indium arsenide (n-InAs) and p-type germanium/silicon core/shell (p-Ge/Si) nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs). The DC voltage output (V(out)) versus input (V(in)) response of vertically interconnected CMOS inverters showed sharp switching at close to the ideal value of one-half the supply voltage and, moreover, exhibited substantial DC gain of approximately 45. The gain and the rail-to-rail output switching are consistent with the large noise margin and minimal static power consumption of CMOS. Vertically interconnected, three-stage CMOS ring oscillators were also fabricated by using layer-1 InAs NW n-FETs and layer-2 Ge/Si NW p-FETs. Significantly, measurements of these circuits demonstrated stable, self-sustained oscillations with a maximum frequency of 108 MHz, which represents the highest-frequency integrated circuit based on chemically synthesized nanoscale materials. These results highlight the flexibility of bottom-up assembly of distinct nanoscale materials and suggest substantial promise for 3D integrated circuits. PMID:19940239

  17. Vertically integrated, three-dimensional nanowire complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits

    PubMed Central

    Nam, SungWoo; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Qihua; Ham, Donhee; Lieber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D), multi-transistor-layer, integrated circuits represent an important technological pursuit promising advantages in integration density, operation speed, and power consumption compared with 2D circuits. We report fully functional, 3D integrated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits based on separate interconnected layers of high-mobility n-type indium arsenide (n-InAs) and p-type germanium/silicon core/shell (p-Ge/Si) nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs). The DC voltage output (Vout) versus input (Vin) response of vertically interconnected CMOS inverters showed sharp switching at close to the ideal value of one-half the supply voltage and, moreover, exhibited substantial DC gain of ≈45. The gain and the rail-to-rail output switching are consistent with the large noise margin and minimal static power consumption of CMOS. Vertically interconnected, three-stage CMOS ring oscillators were also fabricated by using layer-1 InAs NW n-FETs and layer-2 Ge/Si NW p-FETs. Significantly, measurements of these circuits demonstrated stable, self-sustained oscillations with a maximum frequency of 108 MHz, which represents the highest-frequency integrated circuit based on chemically synthesized nanoscale materials. These results highlight the flexibility of bottom-up assembly of distinct nanoscale materials and suggest substantial promise for 3D integrated circuits. PMID:19940239

  18. Multiport InP monolithically integrated all-optical wavelength router.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiu; Raz, Oded; Calabretta, Nicola; Zhao, Dan; Lu, Rongguo; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-15

    An indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated wavelength router is demonstrated in this Letter. The wavelength router has four input ports and four output ports, which integrate four wavelength converters and a 4×4 arrayed-waveguide grating router. Each wavelength converter is achieved based on cross-gain modulation and cross-phase modulation effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Error-free wavelength switching for a non-return-to-zero 231-1 ps eudorandom binary sequence at 40 Gb/s data rate is performed. Both 1×4 and 3×1 all-optical routing functions of this chip are demonstrated for the first time with power penalties as low as 3.2 dB. PMID:27519116

  19. Advances in three-dimensional integral imaging: sensing, display, and applications [Invited].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Javidi, Bahram; Martinez-Corral, Manuel; Stern, Adrian

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sensing and imaging technologies have been extensively researched for many applications in the fields of entertainment, medicine, robotics, manufacturing, industrial inspection, security, surveillance, and defense due to their diverse and significant benefits. Integral imaging is a passive multiperspective imaging technique, which records multiple two-dimensional images of a scene from different perspectives. Unlike holography, it can capture a scene such as outdoor events with incoherent or ambient light. Integral imaging can display a true 3D color image with full parallax and continuous viewing angles by incoherent light; thus it does not suffer from speckle degradation. Because of its unique properties, integral imaging has been revived over the past decade or so as a promising approach for massive 3D commercialization. A series of key articles on this topic have appeared in the OSA journals, including Applied Optics. Thus, it is fitting that this Commemorative Review presents an overview of literature on physical principles and applications of integral imaging. Several data capture configurations, reconstruction, and display methods are overviewed. In addition, applications including 3D underwater imaging, 3D imaging in photon-starved environments, 3D tracking of occluded objects, 3D optical microscopy, and 3D polarimetric imaging are reviewed. PMID:23385893

  20. Three-dimensional electro-floating display system using an integral imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Hahn, Minsoo; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-06-01

    A new-type of three-dimensional (3D) display system based on two different techniques, image floating and integral imaging, is proposed. The image floating is an antiquated 3D display technique, in which a large convex lens or a concave mirror is used to display the image of a real object to observer. The electro-floating system, which does not use a real object, requires a volumetric display part in order to present 3D moving pictures. Integral imaging is an autostereoscopic technique consisting of a lens array and a two-dimensional display device. The integral imaging method can be adapted for use in an electro-floating display system because the integrated image has volumetric characteristics within the viewing angle. The proposed system combines the merits of the two techniques such as an impressive feel of depth and the facility to assemble. In this paper, the viewing characteristics of the two techniques are defined and analyzed for the optimal design of the proposed system. The basic experiments for assembling the proposed system were performed and the results are presented. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D television.

  1. Three-dimensional electro-floating display system using an integral imaging method.

    PubMed

    Min, Sung-Wook; Hahn, Minsoo; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-06-13

    A new-type of three-dimensional (3D) display system based on two different techniques, image floating and integral imaging, is proposed. The image floating is an antiquated 3D display technique, in which a large convex lens or a concave mirror is used to display the image of a real object to observer. The electro-floating system, which does not use a real object, requires a volumetric display part in order to present 3D moving pictures. Integral imaging is an autostereoscopic technique consisting of a lens array and a two-dimensional display device. The integral imaging method can be adapted for use in an electro-floating display system because the integrated image has volumetric characteristics within the viewing angle. The proposed system combines the merits of the two techniques such as an impressive feel of depth and the facility to assemble. In this paper, the viewing characteristics of the two techniques are defined and analyzed for the optimal design of the proposed system. The basic experiments for assembling the proposed system were performed and the results are presented. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D television.

  2. Monolithically integrated self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical coupler for three-dimensional photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xin; Arbabi, Ehsan; Goddard, Lynford L.; Li, Xiuling; Chen, Xiaogang

    2015-07-20

    We demonstrate a self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical photonic coupler monolithically integrated on top of a ridge waveguide to achieve three-dimensional (3D) photonic integration. The fabrication process is fully compatible with standard planar silicon processing technology. Strong light coupling between the vertical coupler and the ridge waveguide was observed experimentally, which may provide an alternative route for 3D heterogeneous photonic integration. The highest extinction ratio observed in the transmission spectrum passing through the ridge waveguide was 23 dB.

  3. A three-dimensional integrated nanogenerator for effectively harvesting sound energy from the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinmei; Cui, Nuanyang; Gu, Long; Chen, Xiaobo; Bai, Suo; Zheng, Youbin; Hu, Caixia; Qin, Yong

    2016-02-01

    An integrated triboelectric nanogenerator (ITNG) with a three-dimensional structure benefiting sound propagation and adsorption is demonstrated to more effectively harvest sound energy with improved output performance. With different multifunctional integrated layers working harmonically, it could generate a short-circuit current up to 2.1 mA, an open-circuit voltage up to 232 V and the maximum charging rate can reach 453 μC s-1 for a 1 mF capacitor, which are 4.6 times, 2.6 times and 7.4 times the highest reported values, respectively. Further study shows that the ITNG works well under sound in a wide range of sound intensity levels (SILs) and frequencies, and its output is sensitive to the SIL and frequency of the sound, which reveals that the ITNG can act as a self-powered active sensor for real-time noise surveillance and health care. Moreover, this generator can be used to directly power the Fe(OH)3 sol electrophoresis and shows great potential as a wireless power supply in the electrochemical industry.An integrated triboelectric nanogenerator (ITNG) with a three-dimensional structure benefiting sound propagation and adsorption is demonstrated to more effectively harvest sound energy with improved output performance. With different multifunctional integrated layers working harmonically, it could generate a short-circuit current up to 2.1 mA, an open-circuit voltage up to 232 V and the maximum charging rate can reach 453 μC s-1 for a 1 mF capacitor, which are 4.6 times, 2.6 times and 7.4 times the highest reported values, respectively. Further study shows that the ITNG works well under sound in a wide range of sound intensity levels (SILs) and frequencies, and its output is sensitive to the SIL and frequency of the sound, which reveals that the ITNG can act as a self-powered active sensor for real-time noise surveillance and health care. Moreover, this generator can be used to directly power the Fe(OH)3 sol electrophoresis and shows great potential as a

  4. An Integrative Platform for Three-dimensional Quantitative Analysis of Spatially Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldner, Ian H.; Yang, Lin; Cowdrick, Kyle R.; Wang, Qingfei; Alvarez Barrios, Wendy V.; Zellmer, Victoria R.; Zhang, Yizhe; Host, Misha; Liu, Fang; Chen, Danny Z.; Zhang, Siyuan

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic microenvironments are spatially and compositionally heterogeneous. This seemingly stochastic heterogeneity provides researchers great challenges in elucidating factors that determine metastatic outgrowth. Herein, we develop and implement an integrative platform that will enable researchers to obtain novel insights from intricate metastatic landscapes. Our two-segment platform begins with whole tissue clearing, staining, and imaging to globally delineate metastatic landscape heterogeneity with spatial and molecular resolution. The second segment of our platform applies our custom-developed SMART 3D (Spatial filtering-based background removal and Multi-chAnnel forest classifiers-based 3D ReconsTruction), a multi-faceted image analysis pipeline, permitting quantitative interrogation of functional implications of heterogeneous metastatic landscape constituents, from subcellular features to multicellular structures, within our large three-dimensional (3D) image datasets. Coupling whole tissue imaging of brain metastasis animal models with SMART 3D, we demonstrate the capability of our integrative pipeline to reveal and quantify volumetric and spatial aspects of brain metastasis landscapes, including diverse tumor morphology, heterogeneous proliferative indices, metastasis-associated astrogliosis, and vasculature spatial distribution. Collectively, our study demonstrates the utility of our novel integrative platform to reveal and quantify the global spatial and volumetric characteristics of the 3D metastatic landscape with unparalleled accuracy, opening new opportunities for unbiased investigation of novel biological phenomena in situ.

  5. An Integrative Platform for Three-dimensional Quantitative Analysis of Spatially Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Guldner, Ian H.; Yang, Lin; Cowdrick, Kyle R.; Wang, Qingfei; Alvarez Barrios, Wendy V.; Zellmer, Victoria R.; Zhang, Yizhe; Host, Misha; Liu, Fang; Chen, Danny Z.; Zhang, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic microenvironments are spatially and compositionally heterogeneous. This seemingly stochastic heterogeneity provides researchers great challenges in elucidating factors that determine metastatic outgrowth. Herein, we develop and implement an integrative platform that will enable researchers to obtain novel insights from intricate metastatic landscapes. Our two-segment platform begins with whole tissue clearing, staining, and imaging to globally delineate metastatic landscape heterogeneity with spatial and molecular resolution. The second segment of our platform applies our custom-developed SMART 3D (Spatial filtering-based background removal and Multi-chAnnel forest classifiers-based 3D ReconsTruction), a multi-faceted image analysis pipeline, permitting quantitative interrogation of functional implications of heterogeneous metastatic landscape constituents, from subcellular features to multicellular structures, within our large three-dimensional (3D) image datasets. Coupling whole tissue imaging of brain metastasis animal models with SMART 3D, we demonstrate the capability of our integrative pipeline to reveal and quantify volumetric and spatial aspects of brain metastasis landscapes, including diverse tumor morphology, heterogeneous proliferative indices, metastasis-associated astrogliosis, and vasculature spatial distribution. Collectively, our study demonstrates the utility of our novel integrative platform to reveal and quantify the global spatial and volumetric characteristics of the 3D metastatic landscape with unparalleled accuracy, opening new opportunities for unbiased investigation of novel biological phenomena in situ. PMID:27068335

  6. A three-dimensional integrated nanogenerator for effectively harvesting sound energy from the environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinmei; Cui, Nuanyang; Gu, Long; Chen, Xiaobo; Bai, Suo; Zheng, Youbin; Hu, Caixia; Qin, Yong

    2016-03-01

    An integrated triboelectric nanogenerator (ITNG) with a three-dimensional structure benefiting sound propagation and adsorption is demonstrated to more effectively harvest sound energy with improved output performance. With different multifunctional integrated layers working harmonically, it could generate a short-circuit current up to 2.1 mA, an open-circuit voltage up to 232 V and the maximum charging rate can reach 453 μC s(-1) for a 1 mF capacitor, which are 4.6 times, 2.6 times and 7.4 times the highest reported values, respectively. Further study shows that the ITNG works well under sound in a wide range of sound intensity levels (SILs) and frequencies, and its output is sensitive to the SIL and frequency of the sound, which reveals that the ITNG can act as a self-powered active sensor for real-time noise surveillance and health care. Moreover, this generator can be used to directly power the Fe(OH)3 sol electrophoresis and shows great potential as a wireless power supply in the electrochemical industry.

  7. A three-dimensional integrated nanogenerator for effectively harvesting sound energy from the environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinmei; Cui, Nuanyang; Gu, Long; Chen, Xiaobo; Bai, Suo; Zheng, Youbin; Hu, Caixia; Qin, Yong

    2016-03-01

    An integrated triboelectric nanogenerator (ITNG) with a three-dimensional structure benefiting sound propagation and adsorption is demonstrated to more effectively harvest sound energy with improved output performance. With different multifunctional integrated layers working harmonically, it could generate a short-circuit current up to 2.1 mA, an open-circuit voltage up to 232 V and the maximum charging rate can reach 453 μC s(-1) for a 1 mF capacitor, which are 4.6 times, 2.6 times and 7.4 times the highest reported values, respectively. Further study shows that the ITNG works well under sound in a wide range of sound intensity levels (SILs) and frequencies, and its output is sensitive to the SIL and frequency of the sound, which reveals that the ITNG can act as a self-powered active sensor for real-time noise surveillance and health care. Moreover, this generator can be used to directly power the Fe(OH)3 sol electrophoresis and shows great potential as a wireless power supply in the electrochemical industry. PMID:26883097

  8. A facile method for integrating direct-write devices into three-dimensional printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yung-Hang; Wang, Kan; Wu, Changsheng; Chen, Yiwen; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2015-06-01

    Integrating direct-write (DW) devices into three-dimensional (3D) printed parts is key to continuing innovation in engineering applications such as smart material systems and structural health monitoring. However, this integration is challenging because: (1) most 3D printing techniques leave rough or porous surfaces if they are untreated; (2) the thermal sintering process required for most conductive inks could degrade the polymeric materials of 3D printed parts; and (3) the extensive pause needed for the DW process during layer-by-layer fabrication may cause weaker interlayer bonding and create structural weak points. These challenges are rather common during the insertion of conductive patterns inside 3D printed structures. As an avoidance tactic, we developed a simple ‘print-stick-peel’ method to transfer the DW device from the polytetrafluoroethylene or perfluoroalkoxy alkanes film onto any layer of a 3D printed object. This transfer can be achieved using the self-adhesion of 3D printing materials or applying additional adhesive. We demonstrated this method by transferring Aerosol Jet® printed strain sensors into parts fabricated by PolyJet™ printing. This report provides an investigation and discussion on the sensitivity, reliability, and influence embedding the sensor has on mechanical properties.

  9. Real-time in situ three-dimensional integral videography and surgical navigation using augmented reality: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Hoang Tran, Huy; Liao, Hongen; Masamune, Ken; Dohi, Takeyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a three-dimensional augmented reality system incorporating integral videography for imaging oral and maxillofacial regions, based on preoperative computed tomography data. Three-dimensional surface models of the jawbones, based on the computed tomography data, were used to create the integral videography images of a subject's maxillofacial area. The three-dimensional augmented reality system (integral videography display, computed tomography, a position tracker and a computer) was used to generate a three-dimensional overlay that was projected on the surgical site via a half-silvered mirror. Thereafter, a feasibility study was performed on a volunteer. The accuracy of this system was verified on a solid model while simulating bone resection. Positional registration was attained by identifying and tracking the patient/surgical instrument's position. Thus, integral videography images of jawbones, teeth and the surgical tool were superimposed in the correct position. Stereoscopic images viewed from various angles were accurately displayed. Change in the viewing angle did not negatively affect the surgeon's ability to simultaneously observe the three-dimensional images and the patient, without special glasses. The difference in three-dimensional position of each measuring point on the solid model and augmented reality navigation was almost negligible (<1 mm); this indicates that the system was highly accurate. This augmented reality system was highly accurate and effective for surgical navigation and for overlaying a three-dimensional computed tomography image on a patient's surgical area, enabling the surgeon to understand the positional relationship between the preoperative image and the actual surgical site, with the naked eye.

  10. Three-Dimensional Integrated Micro Solution Plasmas for Nano Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional solution chemistry, the solution plasma processing (SPP), which has been invented by Osamu Takai and Nagahiro Saito (Nagoya University), involves accelerated electrons which contribute to generate active chemical species, such as radicals, ions, UV photons and metastable excited atoms. Such active species are expected to enhance through-put of the solution chemistry and to promote the reactions which do not proceed without catalysts. In our previous work, we have successfully obtained glow discharges in water, and applied this technique to modify the surface of nano-materials. Since the previous solution plasma is ignited in a small volume between two stylus electrodes, actual treatment area or volume should be enlarged for practical industrial application. In the case of gas phase processes, large area processing is realized by producing large area plasmas. In the case of SPP, however, large volume plasma in liquid is meaningless, because the most important region is gas-liquid interface. Thus, preparation of large number of tiny plasmas (microplasmas) is rather important in the case of SPP. This can be named as ``integrated micro solution plasma.'' In order to realize the integrated micro-solution plasmas, we have recently utilized interfaces between a plane dielectric plate and porous dielectric material, and successfully obtained large area integrated micro solution plasmas in two dimensions. In this work, we report that three-dimensionally integrated plasmas can be obtained in a porous dielectric material, and demonstrate that Au nano-particles can be synthesized by using this technique. This work has been partly supported by the CREST/JST, the Knowledge Cluster Initiative Tokai Region Nanotechnology Manufacturing Cluster, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Frontier science of interactions between plasmas and nano-interfaces'' by the MEXT, and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) by the JSPS.

  11. Comparing precorrected-FFT and fast multipole algorithms for solving three-dimensional potential integral equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.; Phillips, J.R.; Korsmeyer, T.

    1994-12-31

    Mixed first- and second-kind surface integral equations with (1/r) and {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative} (1/r) kernels are generated by a variety of three-dimensional engineering problems. For such problems, Nystroem type algorithms can not be used directly, but an expansion for the unknown, rather than for the entire integrand, can be assumed and the product of the singular kernal and the unknown integrated analytically. Combining such an approach with a Galerkin or collocation scheme for computing the expansion coefficients is a general approach, but generates dense matrix problems. Recently developed fast algorithms for solving these dense matrix problems have been based on multipole-accelerated iterative methods, in which the fast multipole algorithm is used to rapidly compute the matrix-vector products in a Krylov-subspace based iterative method. Another approach to rapidly computing the dense matrix-vector products associated with discretized integral equations follows more along the lines of a multigrid algorithm, and involves projecting the surface unknowns onto a regular grid, then computing using the grid, and finally interpolating the results from the regular grid back to the surfaces. Here, the authors describe a precorrectted-FFT approach which can replace the fast multipole algorithm for accelerating the dense matrix-vector product associated with discretized potential integral equations. The precorrected-FFT method, described below, is an order n log(n) algorithm, and is asymptotically slower than the order n fast multipole algorithm. However, initial experimental results indicate the method may have a significant constant factor advantage for a variety of engineering problems.

  12. Structure of modes of a smoothly irregular integrated-optical four-layer three-dimensional waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, Alexander A; Sevast'yanov, L A

    2009-06-30

    The asymptotic method and the method of coupled waves used to study an integrated-optical multilayer three-dimensional waveguide satisfying the conditions of a continuously variable effective refractive index are considered. Three-dimensional fields of smoothly deforming modes of a four-layer integrated-optical waveguide are described analytically. Explicit dependences of the contributions of the first order of smallness to the electric and magnetic field amplitudes of quasi-waveguide modes are obtained. The canonical type of quasi-wave equations describing the structure of quasi-TE and quasi-TM modes in a smoothly irregular four-layer integrated-optical three-dimensional waveguide is presented for the asymptotic method. By using the perturbation theory, shifts of complex propagation constants are obtained in an explicit form for these modes. The elaborated theory can be used to analyse structures from dielectric, magnetic and metamaterials in a rather broad wavelength range of electromagnetic waves. (waveguides. optical fibres)

  13. Three-dimensional integrated microfluidic architectures enabled through electrically switchable nanocapillary array membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gatimu, E. N.; King, T. L.; Sweedler, J. V.; Bohn, P. W.

    2007-01-01

    The extension of microfluidic devices to three dimensions requires innovative methods to interface fluidic layers. Externally controllable interconnects employing nanocapillary array membranes (NCAMs) have been exploited to produce hybrid three-dimensional fluidic architectures capable of performing linked sequential chemical manipulations of great power and utility. Because the solution Debye length, κ−1, is of the order of the channel diameter, a, in the nanopores, fluidic transfer is controlled through applied bias, polarity and density of the immobile nanopore surface charge, solution ionic strength and the impedance of the nanopore relative to the microfluidic channels. Analyte transport between vertically separated microchannels can be saturated at two stable transfer levels, corresponding to reverse and forward bias. These NCAM-mediated integrated microfluidic architectures have been used to achieve highly reproducible and tunable injections down to attoliter volumes, sample stacking for preconcentration, preparative analyte band collection from an electrophoretic separation, and an actively-tunable size-dependent transport in hybrid structures with grafted polymers displaying thermally-regulated swelling behavior. The synthetic elaboration of the nanopore interior has also been used to great effect to realize molecular separations of high efficiency. All of these manipulations depend critically on the transport properties of individual nanocapillaries, and the study of transport in single nanopores has recently attracted significant attention. Both computation and experimental studies have utilized single nanopores as test beds to understand the fundamental chemical and physical properties of chemistry and fluid flow at nanometer length scales. PMID:19693375

  14. Formation of three-dimensionally integrated nanocrystalline silicon particles by dip-coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shotaro; Nakamine, Yoshifumi; Zheng, Ran; Kouge, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Usami, Koichi; Kodera, Tetsuo; Kawano, Yukio; Oda, Shunri

    2015-10-01

    Printable technologies using silicon nanoink, in which nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) quantum dots are dispersed in solvents, are promising for novel electron and photonic device applications. The dip-coating method is applied for the first time to fabricate three-dimensionally integrated structures of nc-Si quantum dots with a uniform size of 10 nm prepared by the very high frequency plasma decomposition of silane gas. We have clarified the major problem of the dip-coating method, which is the formation of stripe structures. To circumvent this problem, we have proposed two methods: coating onto line-and-space-patterned substrates and utilization of electrophoresis force. We have successfully demonstrated the control of the position and number of layers of nc-Si by using a line-and-space-patterned substrate, however, with a limited shape. We have clarified the conditions of the formation of stripe-free regions by varying applied voltage and nc-Si concentration in the electrophoresis method.

  15. Experimental analysis and numerical modeling of mollusk shells as a three dimensional integrated volume.

    PubMed

    Faghih Shojaei, M; Mohammadi, V; Rajabi, H; Darvizeh, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new numerical technique is presented to accurately model the geometrical and mechanical features of mollusk shells as a three dimensional (3D) integrated volume. For this purpose, the Newton method is used to solve the nonlinear equations of shell surfaces. The points of intersection on the shell surface are identified and the extra interior parts are removed. Meshing process is accomplished with respect to the coordinate of each point of intersection. The final 3D generated mesh models perfectly describe the spatial configuration of the mollusk shells. Moreover, the computational model perfectly matches with the actual interior geometry of the shells as well as their exterior architecture. The direct generation technique is employed to generate a 3D finite element (FE) model in ANSYS 11. X-ray images are taken to show the close similarity of the interior geometry of the models and the actual samples. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to provide information on the microstructure of the shells. In addition, a set of compression tests were performed on gastropod shell specimens to obtain their ultimate compressive strength. A close agreement between experimental data and the relevant numerical results is demonstrated. PMID:23137621

  16. All optical millimeter-wave electrical signal generation using an integrated mode-locked semiconductor ring laser and photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Mar, A.; Hietala, V.; Zolper, J.; Hohimer, J.

    1997-12-01

    The first monolithic photonic integrated circuit for all-optical generation of millimeter (mm)-wave electrical signals is reported. The design integrates a mode-locked semiconductor ring diode laser, an optical amplifier, and a high-speed photodetector into a single optical integrated circuit. Signal generation is demonstrated at frequencies of 30, 60, and 90 GHz.

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of Mount Vesuvius with sequential integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, Rosaria; de Franco, Roberto

    2003-05-01

    A new image of Mount Vesuvius and the surrounding area is recovered from the tomographic inversion of 693 first P wave arrivals recorded by 314 receivers deployed along five profiles which intersect the crater, and gravity data collected in 17,598 stations on land and offshore. The final three-dimensional (3-D) velocity model presented here is determined by interpolation of five 2-D velocity sections obtained from sequential integrated inversion (SII) of seismic and gravity data. The inversion procedure adopts the "maximum likelihood" scheme in order to jointly optimize seismic velocities and densities. In this way we recover velocity and density models both consistent with seismic and gravity data information. The model parameterization of these 2-D models is chosen in order to keep the diagonal elements of the seismic resolution matrix in the order of 0.2-0.8. The highest values of resolution are detected under the volcano edifice. The imaged 6-km-thick crustal volume underlies a 25 × 45 km2 area. The interpolation is performed by choosing the right grid for a smoothing algorithm which prepares optimum models for asymptotic ray theory methods. Hence this model can be used as a reference model for a 3-D tomographic inversion of seismic data. The 3-D gravity modeling is straightforward. The results of this study clearly image the continuous structure of the Mesozoic carbonate basement top and the connection of the volcano conduit structure to two shallow depressions, which in terms of hazard prevention are the regions through which magma may more easily flow toward the surface and cause possible eruptions.

  18. Integration of Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography in Radiosurgical Treatment Planning of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, Alfredo; Pontoriero, Antonio; Farago, Giuseppe; Midili, Federica; Siragusa, Carmelo; Granata, Francesca; Pitrone, Antonio; De Renzis, Costantino; Longo, Marcello; Tomasello, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Accuracy in delineating the target volume is a major issue for successful stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations. The aim of the present study was to describe a method to integrate three-dimensional (3D) rotational angiography ( (3DRA)) into CyberKnife treatment planning and to investigate its potential advantages compared with computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral arteriovenous malformation were included in the present study. All patients underwent multislice computed tomography and 3D-volumetric CTA, (3DRA), and 3D magnetic resonance angiography. The contouring of the target and critical volumes was done separately using CTA and thereafter directly using (3DRA). The composite, conjoint, and disjoint volumes were measured. Results: The use of CTA or (3DRA) resulted in significant differences in the target and critical volumes. The target volume averaged 3.49 {+-} 3.01 mL measured using CTA and 3.26 {+-} 2.93 mL measured using (3DRA), for a difference of 8% (p < .05). The conjoint and disjoint volume analysis showed an 88% volume overlap. The qualitative evaluation showed that the excess volume obtained using CTA was mostly tissue surrounding the nidus and venous structures. The mean contoured venous volume was 0.67 mL measured using CTA and 0.88 mL (range, 0.1-2.7) measured using (3DRA) (p < .05). Conclusions: (3DRA) is a volumetric angiographic study that can be integrated into computer-based treatment planning. Although whether (3DRA) provides superior accuracy has not yet been proved, its high spatial resolution is attractive and offers a superior 3D view. This allows a better 3D understanding of the target volume and distribution of the radiation doses within the volume. Additional technical efforts to improve the temporal resolution and the development of software tools aimed at improving the performance of 3D contouring

  19. Multigroup Three-Dimensional Direct Integration Method Radiation Transport Analysis Code System.

    1987-09-18

    Version 00 TRISTAN solves the three-dimensional, fixed-source, Boltzmann transport equation for neutrons or gamma rays in rectangular geometry. The code can solve an adjoint problem as well as a usual transport problem. TRISTAN is a suitable tool to analyze radiation shielding problems such as streaming and deep penetration problems.

  20. THREE DIMENSIONAL INTEGRATED CHARACTERIZATION AND ARCHIVING SYSTEM (3D-ICAS)

    SciTech Connect

    George Jarvis

    2001-06-18

    The overall objective of this project is to develop an integrated system that remotely characterizes, maps, and archives measurement data of hazardous decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) areas. The system will generate a detailed 3-dimensional topography of the area as well as real-time quantitative measurements of volatile organics and radionuclides. The system will analyze substrate materials consisting of concrete, asbestos, and transite. The system will permanently archive the data measurements for regulatory and data integrity documentation. Exposure limits, rest breaks, and donning and removal of protective garments generate waste in the form of contaminated protective garments and equipment. Survey times are increased and handling and transporting potentially hazardous materials incur additional costs. Off-site laboratory analysis is expensive and time-consuming, often necessitating delay of further activities until results are received. The Three Dimensional Integrated Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) has been developed to alleviate some of these problems. 3D-ICAS provides a flexible system for physical, chemical and nuclear measurements reduces costs and improves data quality. Operationally, 3D-ICAS performs real-time determinations of hazardous and toxic contamination. A prototype demonstration unit is available for use in early 2000. The tasks in this Phase included: (1) Mobility Platforms: Integrate hardware onto mobility platforms, upgrade surface sensors, develop unit operations and protocol. (2) System Developments: Evaluate metals detection capability using x-ray fluorescence technology. (3) IWOS Upgrades: Upgrade the IWOS software and hardware for compatibility with mobility platform. The system was modified, tested and debugged during 1999 and 2000. The 3D-ICAS was shipped on 11 May 2001 to FIU-HCET for demonstration and validation of the design modifications. These modifications included simplifying the design from a two

  1. Extreme ultraviolet lithography and three dimensional integrated circuit—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and three dimensional integrated circuit (3D IC) were thoroughly reviewed. Since proposed in 1988, EUVL obtained intensive studies globally and, after 2000, became the most promising next generation lithography method even though challenges were present in almost all aspects of EUVL technology. Commercial step-and-scan tools for preproduction are installed now with full field capability; however, EUV source power at intermediate focus (IF) has not yet met volume manufacturing requirements. Compared with the target of 200 W in-band power at IF, current tools can supply only approximately 40-55 W. EUVL resist has improved significantly in the last few years, with 13 nm line/space half-pitch resolution being produced with approximately 3-4 nm line width roughness (LWR), but LWR needs 2× improvement. Creating a defect-free EUVL mask is currently an obstacle. Actual adoption of EUVL for 22 nm and beyond technology nodes will depend on the extension of current optical lithography (193 nm immersion lithography, combined with multiple patterning techniques), as well as other methods such as 3D IC. Lithography has been the enabler for IC performance improvement by increasing device density, clock rate, and transistor rate. However, after the turn of the century, IC scaling resulted in short-channel effect, which decreases power efficiency dramatically, so clock frequency almost stopped increasing. Although further IC scaling by lithography reduces gate delay, interconnect delay and memory wall are dominant in determining the IC performance. 3D IC technology is a critical technology today because it offers a reasonable route to further improve IC performance. It increases device density, reduces the interconnect delay, and breaks memory wall with the application of 3D stacking using through silicon via. 3D IC also makes one chip package have more functional diversification than those enhanced only by shrinking the size of the features

  2. Integration of photonic nanojets and semiconductor nanoparticles for enhanced all-optical switching

    PubMed Central

    Born, Brandon; Krupa, Jeffrey D. A.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    All-optical switching is the foundation of emerging all-optical (terabit-per-second) networks and processors. All-optical switching has attracted considerable attention, but it must ultimately support operation with femtojoule switching energies and femtosecond switching times to be effective. Here we introduce an all-optical switch architecture in the form of a dielectric sphere that focuses a high-intensity photonic nanojet into a peripheral coating of semiconductor nanoparticles. Milli-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 200 and 100 fJ with switching times of 10 ps and 350 fs, respectively. Micro-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 1 pJ and 20 fJ with switching times of 2 ps and 270 fs, respectively. We show that femtojoule switching energies are enabled by localized photoinjection from the photonic nanojets and that femtosecond switching times are enabled by localized recombination within the semiconductor nanoparticles. PMID:26314911

  3. A finite element-boundary integral method for scattering and radiation by two- and three-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.; Collins, Jeffery D.

    1991-01-01

    A review of a hybrid finite element-boundary integral formulation for scattering and radiation by two- and three-dimensional composite structures is presented. In contrast to other hybrid techniques involving the finite element method, the proposed one is in principle exact and can be implemented using a low O(N) storage. This is of particular importance for large scale applications and is a characteristic of the boundary chosen to terminate the finite element mesh, usually as close to the structure as possible. A certain class of these boundaries lead to convolutional boundary integrals which can be evaluated via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) without a need to generate a matrix; thus, retaining the O(N) storage requirement. The paper begins with a general description of the method. A number of two- and three-dimensional applications are then given, including numerical computations which demonstrate the method's accuracy, efficiency, and capability.

  4. Compact 100Gb/s DP-QPSK integrated receiver module employing three-dimensional assembly technology.

    PubMed

    Tanobe, H; Kurata, Y; Nakanishi, Y; Fukuyama, H; Itoh, M; Yoshida, E

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate a compact 100 Gbit/s DP-QPSK receiver module that is only 18 mm (W) x 16 mm (D) x 2.8 mm (H). The module size is reduced by using a ball grid array (BGA) package with three-dimensional assembly technology and by applying a heterogeneous integrated PLC. Error-free DP-QPSK signal demodulation is successfully demonstrated.

  5. Development Of A Three-Dimensional Circuit Integration Technology And Computer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchells, R. D.; Grinberg, J.; Nudd, G. R.

    1981-12-01

    This paper is the first of a series 1,2,3 describing a range of efforts at Hughes Research Laboratories, which are collectively referred to as "Three-Dimensional Microelectronics." The technology being developed is a combination of a unique circuit fabrication/packaging technology and a novel processing architecture. The packaging technology greatly reduces the parasitic impedances associated with signal-routing in complex VLSI structures, while simultaneously allowing circuit densities orders of magnitude higher than the current state-of-the-art. When combined with the 3-D processor architecture, the resulting machine exhibits a one- to two-order of magnitude simultaneous improvement over current state-of-the-art machines in the three areas of processing speed, power consumption, and physical volume. The 3-D architecture is essentially that commonly referred to as a "cellular array", with the ultimate implementation having as many as 512 x 512 processors working in parallel. The three-dimensional nature of the assembled machine arises from the fact that the chips containing the active circuitry of the processor are stacked on top of each other. In this structure, electrical signals are passed vertically through the chips via thermomigrated aluminum feedthroughs. Signals are passed between adjacent chips by micro-interconnects. This discussion presents a broad view of the total effort, as well as a more detailed treatment of the fabrication and packaging technologies themselves. The results of performance simulations of the completed 3-D processor executing a variety of algorithms are also presented. Of particular pertinence to the interests of the focal-plane array community is the simulation of the UNICORNS nonuniformity correction algorithms as executed by the 3-D architecture.

  6. Development of three-dimensional integrated microchannel-electrode system to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Obara, H; Sapkota, A; Takei, M

    2016-03-01

    An optical transparent 3-D Integrated Microchannel-Electrode System (3-DIMES) has been developed to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics in the microchannel. In this system, 40 multilayered electrodes are embedded at the 2 opposite sides along the 5 square cross-sections of the microchannel by using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems technology in order to achieve the optical transparency at the other 2 opposite sides. The concept of the 3-DIMES is that the particles are driven by electrokinetic forces which are dielectrophoretic force, thermal buoyancy, electrothermal force, and electroosmotic force in a three-dimensional scope by selecting the excitation multilayered electrodes. As a first step to understand the particles' movement driven by electrokinetic forces in high conductive fluid (phosphate buffer saline (PBS)) with the 3-DIMES, the velocities of particles' movement with one pair of the electrodes are measured three dimensionally by Particle Image Velocimetry technique in PBS; meanwhile, low conductive fluid (deionized water) is used as a reference. Then, the particles' movement driven by the electrokinetic forces is discussed theoretically to estimate dominant forces exerting on the particles. Finally, from the theoretical estimation, the particles' movement mainly results from the dominant forces which are thermal buoyancy and electrothermal force, while the velocity vortex formed at the 2 edges of the electrodes is because of the electroosmotic force. The conclusions suggest that the 3-DIMES with PBS as high conductive fluid helps to understand the three-dimensional advantageous flow structures for cell manipulation in biomedical applications. PMID:27042247

  7. All optical active high decoder using integrated 2D square lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper introduces a novel all optical active high 2 × 4 decoder based on 2D photonic crystals (PhC) of silicon rods with permittivity of ε = 10.1 × 10-11 farad/m. The main structure of optical decoder is designed using a combination of five nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonator, set of T-type waveguide, and line defect of Y and T branch splitters. The proposed structure has two logic input ports, four output ports, and one bias input port. The total size of the proposed 2 × 4 decoder is equal to 40 μm × 38 μm. The PhC structure has a square lattice of silicon rod with refractive index of 3.39 in air. The overall design and the results are discussed through the realization and the numerically simulation to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  8. Efficient Integration of Synaptic Events by NMDA Receptors in Three-Dimensional Neuropil

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kaiyu; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Sustained activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) plays an important role in controlling activity of neural circuits in the brain. However, whether this activation reflects the ambient level of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in brain tissue or whether it depends mainly on local synaptic discharges remains poorly understood. To shed light on the underlying biophysics here we developed and explored a detailed Monte Carlo model of a realistic three-dimensional neuropil fragment containing 54 excitatory synapses. To trace individual molecules and their individual receptor interactions on this scale, we have designed and implemented a dedicated computer cluster and the appropriate software environment. Our simulations have suggested that sparse synaptic discharges are 20–30 times more efficient than nonsynaptic (stationary, leaky) supply of glutamate in controlling sustained NMDAR occupancy in the brain. This mechanism could explain how the brain circuits provide substantial background activation of NMDARs while maintaining a negligible ambient glutamate level in the extracellular space. Thus the background NMDAR occupancy, rather than the background glutamate level, is likely to reflect the ongoing activity in local excitatory networks. PMID:25992724

  9. Cancer Cell Stiffness: Integrated Roles of Three-Dimensional Matrix Stiffness and Transforming Potential

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin L.; Lu, Jing; Yu, Dihua; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2010-01-01

    While significant advances have been made toward revealing the molecular mechanisms that influence breast cancer progression, much less is known about the associated cellular mechanical properties. To this end, we use particle-tracking microrheology to investigate the interplay among intracellular mechanics, three-dimensional matrix stiffness, and transforming potential in a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) cancer progression series. We use a well-characterized model system where human-derived MCF10A MECs overexpress either ErbB2, 14-3-3ζ, or both ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ, with empty vector as a control. Our results show that MECs possessing ErbB2 transforming potential stiffen in response to elevated matrix stiffness, whereas non-transformed MECs or those overexpressing only 14-3-3ζ do no exhibit this response. We further observe that overexpression of ErbB2 alone is associated with the highest degree of intracellular sensitivity to matrix stiffness, and that the effect of transforming potential on intracellular stiffness is matrix-stiffness-dependent. Moreover, our intracellular stiffness measurements parallel cell migration behavior that has been previously reported for these MEC sublines. Given the current knowledge base of breast cancer mechanobiology, these findings suggest that there may be a positive relationship among intracellular stiffness sensitivity, cell motility, and perturbed mechanotransduction in breast cancer. PMID:20923638

  10. Cancer cell stiffness: integrated roles of three-dimensional matrix stiffness and transforming potential.

    PubMed

    Baker, Erin L; Lu, Jing; Yu, Dihua; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2010-10-01

    While significant advances have been made toward revealing the molecular mechanisms that influence breast cancer progression, much less is known about the associated cellular mechanical properties. To this end, we use particle-tracking microrheology to investigate the interplay among intracellular mechanics, three-dimensional matrix stiffness, and transforming potential in a mammary epithelial cell (MEC) cancer progression series. We use a well-characterized model system where human-derived MCF10A MECs overexpress either ErbB2, 14-3-3ζ, or both ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ, with empty vector as a control. Our results show that MECs possessing ErbB2 transforming potential stiffen in response to elevated matrix stiffness, whereas non-transformed MECs or those overexpressing only 14-3-3ζ do no exhibit this response. We further observe that overexpression of ErbB2 alone is associated with the highest degree of intracellular sensitivity to matrix stiffness, and that the effect of transforming potential on intracellular stiffness is matrix-stiffness-dependent. Moreover, our intracellular stiffness measurements parallel cell migration behavior that has been previously reported for these MEC sublines. Given the current knowledge base of breast cancer mechanobiology, these findings suggest that there may be a positive relationship among intracellular stiffness sensitivity, cell motility, and perturbed mechanotransduction in breast cancer.

  11. Direct laser writing of sub-50 nm nanofluidic channels buried in glass for three-dimensional micro-nanofluidic integration.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang; Cheng, Ya; Liu, Changning; Song, Jiangxin; He, Fei; Shen, Yinglong; Chen, Danping; Xu, Zhizhan; Fan, Zhichao; Wei, Xunbin; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-04-21

    We report on the fabrication of nanofluidic channels directly buried in silicate glass with transverse widths down to less than 50 nm using three-dimensional (3D) femtosecond laser direct writing. Using this technique, integrated micro-nanofluidic systems have been produced by simultaneously writing micro- and nanofluidic channels arranged into various 3D configurations in glass substrates. The fabricated micro- and nanofluidic systems have been used to demonstrate DNA analysis, e.g. stretching of DNA molecules. Our technique offers new opportunities to develop novel 3D micro-nanofluidic systems for a variety of lab-on-a-chip applications.

  12. A metro-access integrated network with all-optical virtual private network function using DPSK/ASK modulation format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yue; Leng, Lufeng; Su, Yikai

    2008-11-01

    All-optical virtual private network (VPN), which offers dedicated optical channels to connect users within a VPN group, is considered a promising approach to efficient internetworking with low latency and enhanced security implemented in the physical layer. On the other hand, time-division multiplexed (TDM) / wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) network architecture based on a feeder-ring with access-tree topology, is considered a pragmatic migration scenario from current TDM-PONs to future WDM-PONs and a potential convergence scheme for access and metropolitan networks, due to its efficiently shared hardware and bandwidth resources. All-optical VPN internetworking in such a metro-access integrated structure is expected to cover a wider service area and therefore is highly desirable. In this paper, we present a TDM/WDM metro-access integrated network supporting all-optical VPN internetworking among ONUs in different sub- PONs based on orthogonal differential-phase-shift keying (DPSK) / amplitude-shift keying (ASK) modulation format. In each ONU, no laser but a single Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) is needed for the upstream and VPN signal generation, which is cost-effective. Experiments and simulations are performed to verify its feasibility as a potential solution to the future access service.

  13. Generalization of Boundary-Layer Momentum-Integral Equations to Three-Dimensional Flows Including Those of Rotating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Arthur

    1952-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations of motion and the equation of continuity are transformed so as to apply to an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system rotating with a uniform angular velocity about an arbitrary axis in space. A usual simplification of these equations as consistent with the accepted boundary-layer theory and an integration of these equations through the boundary layer result in boundary-layer momentum-integral equations for three-dimensional flows that are applicable to either rotating or nonrotating fluid boundaries. These equations are simplified and an approximate solution in closed integral form is obtained for a generalized boundary-layer momentum-loss thickness and flow deflection at the wall in the turbulent case. A numerical evaluation of this solution carried out for data obtained in a curving nonrotating duct shows a fair quantitative agreement with the measures values. The form in which the equations are presented is readily adaptable to cases of steady, three-dimensional, incompressible boundary-layer flow like that over curved ducts or yawed wings; and it also may be used to describe the boundary-layer flow over various rotating surfaces, thus applying to turbomachinery, propellers, and helicopter blades.

  14. Nanoscale on-chip all-optical logic parity checker in integrated plasmonic circuits in optical communication range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifan; Gong, Zibo; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checker is an essential core component for optical computing systems and ultrahigh-speed ultrawide-band information processing chips. Unfortunately, little experimental progress has been made in development of these devices to date because of material bottleneck limitations and a lack of effective realization mechanisms. Here, we report a simple and efficient strategy for direct realization of nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checkers in integrated plasmonic circuits in the optical communication range. The proposed parity checker consists of two-level cascaded exclusive-OR (XOR) logic gates that are realized based on the linear interference of surface plasmon polaritons propagating in the plasmonic waveguides. The parity of the number of logic 1s in the incident four-bit logic signals is determined, and the output signal is given the logic state 0 for even parity (and 1 for odd parity). Compared with previous reports, the overall device feature size is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude, while ultralow energy consumption is maintained. This work raises the possibility of realization of large-scale integrated information processing chips based on integrated plasmonic circuits, and also provides a way to overcome the intrinsic limitations of serious surface plasmon polariton losses for on-chip integration applications.

  15. Nanoscale on-chip all-optical logic parity checker in integrated plasmonic circuits in optical communication range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifan; Gong, Zibo; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checker is an essential core component for optical computing systems and ultrahigh-speed ultrawide-band information processing chips. Unfortunately, little experimental progress has been made in development of these devices to date because of material bottleneck limitations and a lack of effective realization mechanisms. Here, we report a simple and efficient strategy for direct realization of nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checkers in integrated plasmonic circuits in the optical communication range. The proposed parity checker consists of two-level cascaded exclusive-OR (XOR) logic gates that are realized based on the linear interference of surface plasmon polaritons propagating in the plasmonic waveguides. The parity of the number of logic 1s in the incident four-bit logic signals is determined, and the output signal is given the logic state 0 for even parity (and 1 for odd parity). Compared with previous reports, the overall device feature size is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude, while ultralow energy consumption is maintained. This work raises the possibility of realization of large-scale integrated information processing chips based on integrated plasmonic circuits, and also provides a way to overcome the intrinsic limitations of serious surface plasmon polariton losses for on-chip integration applications. PMID:27073154

  16. Nanoscale on-chip all-optical logic parity checker in integrated plasmonic circuits in optical communication range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifan; Gong, Zibo; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checker is an essential core component for optical computing systems and ultrahigh-speed ultrawide-band information processing chips. Unfortunately, little experimental progress has been made in development of these devices to date because of material bottleneck limitations and a lack of effective realization mechanisms. Here, we report a simple and efficient strategy for direct realization of nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checkers in integrated plasmonic circuits in the optical communication range. The proposed parity checker consists of two-level cascaded exclusive-OR (XOR) logic gates that are realized based on the linear interference of surface plasmon polaritons propagating in the plasmonic waveguides. The parity of the number of logic 1s in the incident four-bit logic signals is determined, and the output signal is given the logic state 0 for even parity (and 1 for odd parity). Compared with previous reports, the overall device feature size is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude, while ultralow energy consumption is maintained. This work raises the possibility of realization of large-scale integrated information processing chips based on integrated plasmonic circuits, and also provides a way to overcome the intrinsic limitations of serious surface plasmon polariton losses for on-chip integration applications. PMID:27073154

  17. Coherent optical three-dimensional spectrum-correlation processing of wave signals based on space-time integration.

    PubMed

    Ezhov, Vasily

    2012-11-20

    The architectures of classical analog coherent optical (ACO) spectrum analyzers and correlators are not designed to process the wave signal as a whole, i.e., simultaneously in three dimensions. In this paper, the theory of ACO three-dimensional direct spectrum-correlation processing of spatial-temporal optical replicas (copies) of wave signals is discussed. In the single-stage and two-stage ACO systems, the spatial power spectrum and spatial correlation function of the wave signal (envelope) are obtained on the basis of space-time integration. The geometry of the final compressed signal in the output plane of either optical system allows one to evaluate the angle of wave arrival. The wave signal to be processed can theoretically have any form (due to autocorrelation properties of the systems) and an unlimited duration (due to time integration of wave energy and possibility of electronic subtraction of the intermediate bias terms of the time integration).

  18. Impact angle constrained three-dimensional integrated guidance and control for STT missile in the presence of input saturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Weihong; Xiong, Shaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Considering a class of skid-to-turn (STT) missile with fixed target and constrained terminal impact angles, a novel three-dimensional (3D) integrated guidance and control (IGC) scheme is proposed in this paper. Based on coriolis theorem, the fully nonlinear IGC model without the assumption that the missile flies heading to the target at initial time is established in the three-dimensional space. For this strict-feedback form of multi-variable system, dynamic surface control algorithm is implemented combining with extended observer (ESO) to complete the preliminary design. Then, in order to deal with the problems of the input constraints, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to approximate the saturation function and auxiliary system including a Nussbaum function established to compensate for the approximation error. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven based on Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations results show that the proposed integrated guidance and control algorithm can ensure the accuracy of target interception with initial alignment angle deviation and the input saturation is suppressed with smooth deflection curves.

  19. Impact angle constrained three-dimensional integrated guidance and control for STT missile in the presence of input saturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Weihong; Xiong, Shaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Considering a class of skid-to-turn (STT) missile with fixed target and constrained terminal impact angles, a novel three-dimensional (3D) integrated guidance and control (IGC) scheme is proposed in this paper. Based on coriolis theorem, the fully nonlinear IGC model without the assumption that the missile flies heading to the target at initial time is established in the three-dimensional space. For this strict-feedback form of multi-variable system, dynamic surface control algorithm is implemented combining with extended observer (ESO) to complete the preliminary design. Then, in order to deal with the problems of the input constraints, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to approximate the saturation function and auxiliary system including a Nussbaum function established to compensate for the approximation error. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven based on Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations results show that the proposed integrated guidance and control algorithm can ensure the accuracy of target interception with initial alignment angle deviation and the input saturation is suppressed with smooth deflection curves. PMID:27167987

  20. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  1. Integrating Substrateless Electrospinning with Textile Technology for Creating Biodegradable Three-Dimensional Structures.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2015-08-12

    The present study describes a unique way of integrating substrateless electrospinning process with textile technology. We developed a new collector design that provided a pressure-driven, localized cotton-wool structure in free space from which continuous high strength yarns were drawn. An advantage of this integration was that the textile could be drug/dye loaded and be developed into a core-sheath architecture with greater functionality. This method could produce potential nanotextiles for various biomedical applications.

  2. A finite-element-boundary integral formulation for scattering by three-dimensional cavity-backed apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical technique is proposed for the electromagnetic characterization of the scattering by a three-dimensional cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods to formulate a system of equations for the solution of the aperture fields and those inside the cavity. Specifically, the finite element method is used to formulate the fields in the cavity region and the boundary integral approach is used in conjunction with the equivalence principle to represent the fields above the ground plane. Unlike traditional approaches, the proposed technique does not require a knowledge of the cavity's Green's function and is, therefore, applicable to arbitrary shape depressions and material fillings. Furthermore, the proposed formulation leads to a system having a partly full and partly sparse as well as symmetric and banded matrix which can be solved efficiently using special algorithms.

  3. A finite element-boundary integral formulation for scattering by three-dimensional cavity-backed apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical technique is proposed for the electromagnetic characterization of the scattering by a three-dimensional cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods to formulate a system of equations for the solution of the aperture fields and those inside the cavity. Specifically, the finite element method is employed to formulate the fields in the cavity region and the boundary integral approach is used in conjunction with the equivalence principle to represent the fields above the ground plane. Unlike traditional approaches, the proposed technique does not require knowledge of the cavity's Green's function and is, therefore, applicable to arbitrary shape depressions and material fillings. Furthermore, the proposed formulation leads to a system having a partly full and partly sparse as well as symmetric and banded matrix which can be solved efficiently using special algorithms.

  4. Three-dimensional correction of conduction velocity in the embryonic heart using integrated optical mapping and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical mapping (OM) of cardiac electrical activity conventionally collects information from a three-dimensional (3-D) surface as a two-dimensional (2-D) projection map. When applied to measurements of the embryonic heart, this method ignores the substantial and complex curvature of the heart surface, resulting in significant errors when calculating conduction velocity, an important electrophysiological parameter. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of imaging the 3-D structure of the embryonic heart and accurately characterizing the surface topology. We demonstrate an integrated OCT/OM imaging system capable of simultaneous conduction mapping and 3-D structural imaging. From these multimodal data, we obtained 3-D activation maps and corrected conduction velocity maps of early embryonic quail hearts. 3-D correction eliminates underestimation bias in 2-D conduction velocity measurements, therefore enabling more accurate measurements with less experimental variability. The integrated system will also open the door to correlate the structure and electrophysiology, thereby improving our understanding of heart development.

  5. Three-Dimensional Architecture at Chip Level for Large-Scale-Integration of Superconducting Quantum Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göppl, Martin; Kurpiers, Philipp; Wallraff, Andreas

    We propose a novel way to realize three-dimensional circuit QED systems at chip level. System components such as qubits, transmission lines, capacitors, inductors or cross-overs can be implemented as suspended, electromagnetically shielded and optionally, as hermetically sealed structures. Compared to known state-of-the-art devices, volumes of dielectrics penetrated by electromagnetic fields can be drastically reduced. Our intention is to harness process technologies for very-large-scale-integration, reliably applied and improved over decades in micro-sensor- and semiconductor industry, for the realization of highly integrated circuit QED systems. Process capabilities are demonstrated by fabricating first exploratory devices using the back-end-of-line part of a commercial 180 nm CMOS foundry process in conjunction with HF vapor phase release etching.

  6. Three-dimensional analysis of chevron-notched specimens by boundary integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Ghosn, L.

    1983-01-01

    The chevron-notched short bar and short rod specimens was analyzed by the boundary integral equations method. This method makes use of boundary surface elements in obtaining the solution. The boundary integral models were composed of linear triangular and rectangular surface segments. Results were obtained for two specimens with width to thickness ratios of 1.45 and 2.00 and for different crack length to width ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Crack opening displacement and stress intensity factors determined from displacement calculations along the crack front and compliance calculations were compared with experimental values and with finite element analysis.

  7. Three-dimensional planar-integrated optics: a comparative view with free-space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Song, Seok Ho

    2000-04-01

    This paper reports on the viability, effectiveness, versatility, and the utility of the concept of the planar integrated optical interconnection scheme with respect to the concept of the free-space interconnection scheme in realizing multiple integration of various micro/nano- photonic devices and components for applications in optical interconnection, optical circuits, optical switching, optical communication and information processing. Several planar optics schemes to detect parallel optical packet addresses in WDM switching networks, to perform a space- variant processing such as fractional correlation, and to construct multistage interconnection networks, have been successfully demonstrated in the 3D glass blocks. Using a gradient-index (GRIN) substrate as a signal propagation medium in the planar optics is a unique advantage, when compared to the free-space optics. We have demonstrated the GRIN-substrate concept by using six 1/4-pitch GRIN rod lenses and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). The GRIN planar optics can be further extended to the use of 2D array of VCSEL microlasers and modulators in making massively parallel interconnects. A critical comparison between the planar integrated optics scheme and the free- space integrated scheme is given in terms of physics, engineering and technological concept.

  8. Steady and unsteady three-dimensional transonic flow computations by integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hong

    1994-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the research performed under the grant: NAG1-1170, from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The report consists of three parts. The first part presents the work on unsteady flows around a zero-thickness wing. The second part presents the work on steady flows around non-zero thickness wings. The third part presents the massively parallel processing implementation and performance analysis of integral equation computations. At the end of the report, publications resulting from this grant are listed and attached.

  9. Digital terrain model (DTM) integration and three-dimensional query spaces in geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Dieter; Schmidt, Dieter

    1994-08-01

    The integration of digital terrain models (DTM) in geographic information systems (GIS) implies automatically an extension of the GIS reference surface and its query space. It is trivial that a DTM is the natural boundary representation of the earth's surface. Man-made objects, for instance homes, streets, bridges, dams should be considered in a second step because these objects cannot be represented well by boundary surfaces. The link of these objects to DTM can be realized by keys and pointers. Therefore, an efficient DTM integration in GIS is the first task to be solved. The paper introduces DTM data structures represented by NIAM diagrams. Using the entity-relationship model these diagrams are very capable to describe the power of relations. Next a 3-D query space is defined keeping in mind 3-D coordinates and 2- D topological elements. Based on this query space spatial operators are derived which fit in standard SQL vocabulary. The implementation part of the paper uses the exodus storage manger to map the DTM of the Federal State Baden-Wurrtemberg in a spatial database system.

  10. Three-dimensional integration of vertically coupled microring resonator filters: fabrication and wavelength trimming technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubun, Yasuo

    2003-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a vertically coupled microring resonator filter as an Add/Drop wavelength filter. The ultra-compact ring resonantor can be realized by the ultra-high index contrast waveguide (=34%) consisting of glass core (n=1.80) and air cladding and the vertically coupled configuration, where a microring resonator with a few tens micron radius is stacked on the crossing point of cross-grid bus waveguides. The cross-grid topology of busline waveguides and very small ring radius enables a dense integration of filter circuit. To achieve the 3D integration, we developed a novel fabrication process of flat-top waveguide using a so-called lift-off process and the SOG (Spin-On-Glass), and successfully obtained a very smooth and flat surface of lower waveguide with a step height less than 0.01μm. In addition, to manipulate the center wavelength after fabrication, we developed two trimming methods; one is the use of UV-sensitive polymer for the over-cladding, and the other is the direct UV irradiation to the ring ocre made of Ta2O5-SiO2 compound glass. Utilizing the former method, the channel spacing of filter array was precisely controlled within 0.5nm, which can not be achieved by the control of ring radius.

  11. Three-dimensional integrated circuits for lab-on-chip dielectrophoresis of nanometer scale particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Samuel J.; Noyola, Arnaldo J.; Levitan, Steven P.; Chiarulli, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mixed-technology micro-system for electronically manipulating and optically detecting virusscale particles in fluids that is designed using 3D integrated circuit technology. During the 3D fabrication process, the top-most chip tier is assembled upside down and the substrate material is removed. This places the polysilicon layer, which is used to create geometries with the process' minimum feature size, in close proximity to a fluid channel etched into the top of the stack. By taking advantage of these processing features inherent to "3D chip-stacking" technology, we create electrode arrays that have a gap spacing of 270 nm. Using 3D CMOS technology also provides the ability to densely integrate analog and digital control circuitry for the electrodes by using the additional levels of the chip stack. We show simulations of the system with a physical model of a Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, which has a radius of approximately 125 nm, being dielectrophoretically arranged into striped patterns. We also discuss how these striped patterns of trapped nanometer scale particles create an effective diffraction grating which can then be sensed with macro-scale optical techniques.

  12. Three-Dimensional Integrated Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS). Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    3D-ICAS is being developed to support Decontamination and Decommissioning operations for DOE addressing Research Area 6 (characterization) of the Program Research and Development Announcement. 3D-ICAS provides in-situ 3-dimensional characterization of contaminated DOE facilities. Its multisensor probe contains a GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using noncontact infrared heating) sensor for organics, a molecular vibrational sensor for base material identification, and a radionuclide sensor for radioactive contaminants. It will provide real-time quantitative measurements of volatile organics and radionuclides on bare materials (concrete, asbestos, transite); it will provide 3-D display of the fusion of all measurements; and it will archive the measurements for regulatory documentation. It consists of two robotic mobile platforms that operate in hazardous environments linked to an integrated workstation in a safe environment.

  13. Integrated three-dimensional photonic nanostructures for achieving near-unity solar absorption and superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Ping; Hsieh, Mei-Li; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we proposed and realized 3D photonic nanostructures consisting of ultra-thin graded index antireflective coatings (ARCs) and woodpile photonic crystals. The use of the integrated ARC and photonic crystal structure can achieve broadband, broad-angle near unity solar absorption. The amorphous silicon based photonic nanostructure experimentally shows an average absorption of ˜95% for λ = 400-620 nm over a wide angular acceptance of θ = 0°-60°. Theoretical studies show that a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based structure can achieve an average absorption of >95% for λ = 400-870 nm. Furthermore, the use of the slanted SiO2 nanorod ARC surface layer by glancing angle deposition exhibits Cassie-Baxter state wetting, and superhydrophobic surface is obtained with highest water contact angle θCB ˜ 153°. These properties are fundamentally important for achieving maximum solar absorption and surface self-cleaning in thin film solar cell applications.

  14. Transient three-dimensional contact problems: mortar method. Mixed methods and conserving integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesch, Christian; Betsch, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The present work deals with the development of an energy-momentum conserving method to unilateral contact constraints and is a direct continuation of a previous work (Hesch and Betsch in Comput Mech 2011, doi: 10.1007/s00466-011-0597-2) dealing with the NTS method. In this work, we introduce the mortar method and a newly developed segmentation process for the consistent integration of the contact interface. For the application of the energy-momentum approach to mortar constraints, we extend an approach based on a mixed formulation to the segment definition of the mortar constraints. The enhanced numerical stability of the newly proposed discretization method will be shown in several examples.

  15. Three-dimensional lossless digital signature embedding for the integrity of volumetric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng; Huang, H. K.; Liu, B. J.

    2006-03-01

    Our previous study presented a lossless digital signature embedding (LDSE) method for assuring the integrity of 2D medical images in network transit or during archival. With the advent of multi-detector CT scanners and volume acquisition technologies, a PACS exam can now potentially generate hundreds, even thousands, of images. To perform the 2D LDSE method on each individual image in the volume would be extremely time consuming and inefficient. For this reason, a novel 3D LDSE method has been investigated for 3D image volumes. The method begins with generating a single digital signature (DS) of the entire volume. Embedding of the DS is performed by first identifying a bit stream from the image volume based on the correlation of 3D pixel values. The bit stream is compressed using lossless compression methods and the DS is concatenated with the compressed bit stream. This concatenated bit stream is then embedded within the original image volume. During the verification process, the embedded bit stream is extracted and utilized to recover the original bit stream and the original DS. The original bit stream can be used to restore the image volume which in turn can be used in the verification of the DS. In addition, to 3D LDSE embedding methodology for image volumes, a new procedure is developed to address clinical workflow for 3D image volumes. Experimental results demonstrated that the 3D LDSE method can assure the integrity of 3D image volume efficiently and effectively. In addition, a 3D clinical image workflow procedure was demonstrated.

  16. Reconstruction of three-dimensional occluded object using optical flow and triangular mesh reconstruction in integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Keehoon; Park, Gilbae; Chung, Indeok; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Lee, Byoungho

    2010-12-01

    We proposed a reconstruction method for the occluded region of three-dimensional (3D) object using the depth extraction based on the optical flow and triangular mesh reconstruction in integral imaging. The depth information of sub-images from the acquired elemental image set is extracted using the optical flow with sub-pixel accuracy, which alleviates the depth quantization problem. The extracted depth maps of sub-image array are segmented by the depth threshold from the histogram based segmentation, which is represented as the point clouds. The point clouds are projected to the viewpoint of center sub-image and reconstructed by the triangular mesh reconstruction. The experimental results support the validity of the proposed method with high accuracy of peak signal-to-noise ratio and normalized cross-correlation in 3D image recognition.

  17. Gradient-index lens-array method based on real-time integral photography for three-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Jun; Okano, Fumio; Hoshino, Haruo; Yuyama, Ichiro

    1998-04-01

    Because a three-dimensional (3-D) autostereoscopic image can be seen from a desired viewpoint without the aid of special viewing glasses, integral photography (IP) is an ideal way to create 3-D autostereoscopic images. We have already proposed a real-time IP method that offers 3-D autostereoscopic images of moving objects in real time by use of a microlens array and a high-definition television camera. But there are two problems yet to be resolved: One is pseudoscopic images that show a reversed depth representation. The other is interference between the element images that constitute a 3-D autostereoscopic image. We describe a new gradient-index lense-array method based on real-time IP to overcome these two problems. Experimental results indicating the advantages of this method are shown. These results suggest the possibility of using a gradient-index lens array for real-time IP.

  18. Performance analysis of three dimensional integral equation computations on a massively parallel computer. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Terry G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of the integral equation computations using numerical source field-panel method in a massively parallel processing (MPP) environment. A comparative study of computational performance of the MPP CM-5 computer and conventional Cray-YMP supercomputer for a three-dimensional flow problem is made. A serial FORTRAN code is converted into a parallel CM-FORTRAN code. Some performance results are obtained on CM-5 with 32, 62, 128 nodes along with those on Cray-YMP with a single processor. The comparison of the performance indicates that the parallel CM-FORTRAN code near or out-performs the equivalent serial FORTRAN code for some cases.

  19. Biomimetics of the Extracellular Matrix: An Integrated Three-Dimensional Fiber-Hydrogel Composite for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jeannine; Gibson, Matt; Bandalini, Pierre Alain; Laird, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Moroni, Lorenzo; Seliktar, Dror

    2012-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and has practical macroscale dimensions for clinically relevant tissue defects. In a model system of articular cartilage tissue engineering, the fiber-hydrogel composites enhanced the biological response of adult stem cells, with dynamic mechanical stimulation resulting in near native levels of extracellular matrix. This technology platform was expanded through structural and biochemical modification of the fibers including hydrophilic fibers containing chondroitin sulfate, a significant component of endogenous tissues, and hydrophobic fibers containing ECM microparticles. PMID:22287978

  20. Engineering three-dimensional hybrid supercapacitors and microsupercapacitors for high-performance integrated energy storage

    PubMed Central

    El-Kady, Maher F.; Ihns, Melanie; Li, Mengping; Hwang, Jee Youn; Mousavi, Mir F.; Chaney, Lindsay; Lech, Andrew T.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors now play an important role in the progress of hybrid and electric vehicles, consumer electronics, and military and space applications. There is a growing demand in developing hybrid supercapacitor systems to overcome the energy density limitations of the current generation of carbon-based supercapacitors. Here, we demonstrate 3D high-performance hybrid supercapacitors and microsupercapacitors based on graphene and MnO2 by rationally designing the electrode microstructure and combining active materials with electrolytes that operate at high voltages. This results in hybrid electrodes with ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of over 1,100 F/cm3. This corresponds to a specific capacitance of the constituent MnO2 of 1,145 F/g, which is close to the theoretical value of 1,380 F/g. The energy density of the full device varies between 22 and 42 Wh/l depending on the device configuration, which is superior to those of commercially available double-layer supercapacitors, pseudocapacitors, lithium-ion capacitors, and hybrid supercapacitors tested under the same conditions and is comparable to that of lead acid batteries. These hybrid supercapacitors use aqueous electrolytes and are assembled in air without the need for expensive “dry rooms” required for building today’s supercapacitors. Furthermore, we demonstrate a simple technique for the fabrication of supercapacitor arrays for high-voltage applications. These arrays can be integrated with solar cells for efficient energy harvesting and storage systems. PMID:25831542

  1. Engineering three-dimensional hybrid supercapacitors and microsupercapacitors for high-performance integrated energy storage.

    PubMed

    El-Kady, Maher F; Ihns, Melanie; Li, Mengping; Hwang, Jee Youn; Mousavi, Mir F; Chaney, Lindsay; Lech, Andrew T; Kaner, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Supercapacitors now play an important role in the progress of hybrid and electric vehicles, consumer electronics, and military and space applications. There is a growing demand in developing hybrid supercapacitor systems to overcome the energy density limitations of the current generation of carbon-based supercapacitors. Here, we demonstrate 3D high-performance hybrid supercapacitors and microsupercapacitors based on graphene and MnO2 by rationally designing the electrode microstructure and combining active materials with electrolytes that operate at high voltages. This results in hybrid electrodes with ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of over 1,100 F/cm(3). This corresponds to a specific capacitance of the constituent MnO2 of 1,145 F/g, which is close to the theoretical value of 1,380 F/g. The energy density of the full device varies between 22 and 42 Wh/l depending on the device configuration, which is superior to those of commercially available double-layer supercapacitors, pseudocapacitors, lithium-ion capacitors, and hybrid supercapacitors tested under the same conditions and is comparable to that of lead acid batteries. These hybrid supercapacitors use aqueous electrolytes and are assembled in air without the need for expensive "dry rooms" required for building today's supercapacitors. Furthermore, we demonstrate a simple technique for the fabrication of supercapacitor arrays for high-voltage applications. These arrays can be integrated with solar cells for efficient energy harvesting and storage systems.

  2. Integrated three-dimensional photonic nanostructures for achieving near-unity solar absorption and superhydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Ping; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hsieh, Mei-Li

    2015-06-07

    In this paper, we proposed and realized 3D photonic nanostructures consisting of ultra-thin graded index antireflective coatings (ARCs) and woodpile photonic crystals. The use of the integrated ARC and photonic crystal structure can achieve broadband, broad-angle near unity solar absorption. The amorphous silicon based photonic nanostructure experimentally shows an average absorption of ∼95% for λ = 400–620 nm over a wide angular acceptance of θ = 0°–60°. Theoretical studies show that a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based structure can achieve an average absorption of >95% for λ = 400–870 nm. Furthermore, the use of the slanted SiO{sub 2} nanorod ARC surface layer by glancing angle deposition exhibits Cassie-Baxter state wetting, and superhydrophobic surface is obtained with highest water contact angle θ{sub CB} ∼ 153°. These properties are fundamentally important for achieving maximum solar absorption and surface self-cleaning in thin film solar cell applications.

  3. A monolithically integrated dual-mode laser for photonic microwave generation and all-optical clock recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liqiang; Zhou, Daibing; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a monolithically integrated dual-mode laser (DML) with narrow-beat-linewidth and wide-beat-tunability. Using a monolithic DFB laser subjected to amplified feedback, photonic microwave generation of up to 45 GHz is obtained with higher than 15 GHz beat frequency tunability. Thanks to the high phase correlation of the two modes and the narrow mode linewidth, a RF linewidth of lower than 50 kHz is measured. Simulations are also carried out to illustrate the dual-mode beat characteristic. Furthermore, using the DML, an all-optical clock recovery for 40  Gbaud NRZ-QPSK signals is demonstrated. Timing jitter of lower than 363 fs (integrated within a frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 GHz) is obtained.

  4. Ultrafast, low-power, all-optical switching via birefringent phase-matched transverse mode conversion in integrated waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Tim; Epping, Jörn P; Schnack, Martin; Boller, Klaus-J; Fallnich, Carsten

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate the potential of birefringence-based, all-optical, ultrafast conversion between the transverse modes in integrated optical waveguides by modelling the conversion process by numerically solving the multi-mode coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. The observed conversion is induced by a control beam and due to the Kerr effect, resulting in a transient index grating which coherently scatters probe light from one transverse waveguide mode into another. We introduce birefringent phase matching to enable efficient all-optically induced mode conversion at different wavelengths of the control and probe beam. It is shown that tailoring the waveguide geometry can be exploited to explicitly minimize intermodal group delay as well as to maximize the nonlinear coefficient, under the constraint of a phase matching condition. The waveguide geometries investigated here, allow for mode conversion with over two orders of magnitude reduced control pulse energy compared to previous schemes and thereby promise nonlinear mode switching exceeding efficiencies of 90% at switching energies below 1 nJ. PMID:26367581

  5. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  6. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties.

  7. A high-order integral solver for scalar problems of diffraction by screens and apertures in three-dimensional space

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Oscar P. Lintner, Stéphane K.

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for the numerical solution of problems of diffraction by infinitely thin screens in three-dimensional space. Our approach relies on new integral formulations as well as associated high-order quadrature rules. The new integral formulations involve weighted versions of the classical integral operators related to the thin-screen Dirichlet and Neumann problems as well as a generalization to the open-surface problem of the classical Calderón formulae. The high-order quadrature rules we introduce for these operators, in turn, resolve the multiple Green function and edge singularities (which occur at arbitrarily close distances from each other, and which include weakly singular as well as hypersingular kernels) and thus give rise to super-algebraically fast convergence as the discretization sizes are increased. When used in conjunction with Krylov-subspace linear algebra solvers such as GMRES, the resulting solvers produce results of high accuracy in small numbers of iterations for low and high frequencies alike. We demonstrate our methodology with a variety of numerical results for screen and aperture problems at high frequencies—including simulation of classical experiments such as the diffraction by a circular disc (featuring in particular the famous Poisson spot), evaluation of interference fringes resulting from diffraction across two nearby circular apertures, as well as solution of problems of scattering by more complex geometries consisting of multiple scatterers and cavities.

  8. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties. PMID:27219851

  9. Path integration in a three-dimensional maze: ground distance estimation keeps desert ants Cataglyphis fortis on course.

    PubMed

    Grah, Gunnar; Wehner, Rüdiger; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the ability of desert ants to gauge the ground distances of sloped sections in a three-dimensional (3D) outbound path. Ground distance estimation, as opposed to a simple measurement of walking distances, is a necessary prerequisite for precise path integration in undulating terrain. We trained ants to visit a feeder along a path that included an angular turn as well as a 'hill', resulting in an outbound path with a distinct 3D structure. We then observed the ants' return path in a test field on level ground. From the angles of the ants' return path on the test field one can infer which property of the hill segment was fed into the ants' path integration module, the actual walking distance or the ground distance. The results show clearly that it is the ground distance that Cataglyphis fortis feeds into its path integrator, and suggest that the ants are able to keep an accurate home vector also in hilly terrain.

  10. Formulation of reduced surface integral equations for the electromagnetic wave scattering from three-dimensional layered dielectric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciric, I. R.

    2008-08-01

    A reduction procedure is developed for an arbitrarily shaped layered dielectric body using for each interface a single unknown function to which the classical surface electric and magnetic currents are related by some surface operators. These operators and single functions are determined recursively from one interface to the next. This allows us to derive the field everywhere from the solution of a surface integral equation in only one vector function relative to only the interface between the layered body and the source region. Since the reduction operators are independent of the structure of the outside region and of the given field source, and also invariant under translation and rotation, the analysis of the three-dimensional electromagnetic wave scattering and propagation for systems of multilayered or/and multiply nested dielectric bodies based on reduced single integral equations is substantially more efficient than that based on existing coupled integral equation formulations using electric and magnetic currents on all the interfaces, especially for configurations with identical such bodies arbitrarily located and oriented with respect to each other.

  11. Carbonization-assisted integration of silica nanowires to photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Zhang, Lei; Xi, Shuang; Li, Xiaoping; Lai, Wuxing

    2011-11-01

    We propose a novel technique of integrating silica nanowires to carbon microelectrode arrays on silicon substrates. The silica nanowires were grown on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode arrays during carbonization of patterned photoresist in a tube furnace at 1000 °C under a gaseous environment of N2 and H2 in the presence of Cu catalyst, sputtered initially as a thin layer on the structure surface. Carbonization-assisted nucleation and growth are proposed to extend the Cu-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism for the nanowire integration behaviour. The growth of silica nanowires exploits Si from the etched silicon substrate under the Cu particles. It is found that the thickness of the initial Cu coating layer plays an important role as catalyst on the morphology and on the amount of grown silica nanowires. These nanowires have lengths of up to 100 µm and diameters ranging from 50 to 200 nm, with 30 nm Cu film sputtered initially. The study also reveals that the nanowire-integrated microelectrodes significantly enhance the electrochemical performance compared to blank ones. A specific capacitance increase of over 13 times is demonstrated in the electrochemical experiment. The platform can be used to develop large-scale miniaturized devices and systems with increased efficiency for applications in electrochemical, biological and energy-related fields.

  12. The Coupling of Finite Element and Integral Equation Representations for Efficient Three-Dimensional Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Zuffada, Cinzia; Jamnejad, Vahraz

    1996-01-01

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurtely simulating scattered or radiated fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength.

  13. Three-dimensional integral imaging displays using a quick-response encoded elemental image array: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markman, A.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Quick-response (QR) codes are barcodes that can store information such as numeric data and hyperlinks. The QR code can be scanned using a QR code reader, such as those built into smartphone devices, revealing the information stored in the code. Moreover, the QR code is robust to noise, rotation, and illumination when scanning due to error correction built in the QR code design. Integral imaging is an imaging technique used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) scene by combining the information from two-dimensional (2D) elemental images (EIs) each with a different perspective of a scene. Transferring these 2D images in a secure manner can be difficult. In this work, we overview two methods to store and encrypt EIs in multiple QR codes. The first method uses run-length encoding with Huffman coding and the double-random-phase encryption (DRPE) to compress and encrypt an EI. This information is then stored in a QR code. An alternative compression scheme is to perform photon-counting on the EI prior to compression. Photon-counting is a non-linear transformation of data that creates redundant information thus improving image compression. The compressed data is encrypted using the DRPE. Once information is stored in the QR codes, it is scanned using a smartphone device. The information scanned is decompressed and decrypted and an EI is recovered. Once all EIs have been recovered, a 3D optical reconstruction is generated.

  14. Facile fabrication of Ag dendrite-integrated anodic aluminum oxide membrane as effective three-dimensional SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong-yun; Lu, Ya; Zhao, Bin; Hao, Yao-wu; Liu, Ya-qing

    2016-07-01

    A novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrate has been successfully developed, where Ag-dendrites are assembled on the surface and embedded in the channels of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane, via electrodeposition in AgNO3/PVP aqueous system. Reaction conditions were systematically investigated to attain the best Raman enhancement. The growth mechanism of Ag dendritic nanostructures has been proposed. The Ag dendrite-integrated AAO membrane with unique hierarchical structures exhibits high SERS activity for detecting rhodamine 6G with a detection limit as low as 1 × 10-11 M. Furthermore, the three-dimensional (3D) substrates display a good reproducibility with the average intensity variations at the major Raman peak less than 12%. Most importantly, the 3D SERS substrates without any surface modification show an outstanding SERS response for the molecules with weak affinity for noble metal surfaces. The potential application for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was evaluated with fluoranthene as Raman target molecule and a sensitive SERS detection with a limit down to 10-8 M was reached. The 3D SERS-active substrate shows promising potential for rapid detection of trace organic pollutants even weak affinity molecules in the environment.

  15. Assessment of chronic wounds by three-dimensional optical imaging based on integrating geometrical, chromatic, and thermal data.

    PubMed

    Barone, S; Paoli, A; Razionale, A V

    2011-02-01

    Chronic wounds represent a particular debilitating health care problem, mainly affecting elderly people. A full and correct diagnosis of tissue damage should be carried out considering both dimensional, chromatic, and thermal parameters. A great variety of methods have been proposed with the aim of producing objective assessment of skin lesions, but none of the existing technologies seem to be robust enough to work for all ulcer typologies. This paper describes an innovative and non-invasive system that allows the automatic measurement of non-healing chronic wounds. The methodology involves the integration of a three-dimensional (3D) optical scanner, based on a structured light approach, with a thermal imager. The system enables the acquisition of geometrical data, which are directly related to chromatic and temperature patterns through a mapping procedure. Damaged skin areas are detected by combining visible and thermal imaging. This approach allows for the automatic measurement of extension and depth of ulcers, even in the absence of significant and well-defined chromatic patterns. The proposed technology has been tested in the measurement of ulcers on human legs. Clinical tests have demonstrated the effectiveness of this methodology in supporting medical experts for the assessment of chronic wounds. PMID:21428152

  16. Novel integrative methodology for engineering large liver tissue equivalents based on three-dimensional scaffold fabrication and cellular aggregate assembly.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Horimoto, Y; Sutoko, S; Montagne, K; Shinohara, M; Mathiue, D; Komori, K; Anzai, M; Niino, T; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    A novel engineering methodology for organizing a large liver tissue equivalent was established by intergrating both 'top down' and 'bottom up' approaches. A three-dimensional (3D) scaffold was engineered comprising 43 culture chambers (volume: 11.63 cm(3)) assembled in a symmetrical pattern on 3 layers, a design which enables further scaling up of the device to a clinically significant size (volume: 500 cm(3)). In addition, an inter-connected flow channel network was designed and proved to homogenously deliver culture medium to each chamber with the same pressure drop. After fabrication using nylon-12 and a selective laser sintering process, co-cultured cellular aggregates of human hepatoma Hep G2 and TMNK-1 cells were loosely packed into the culture chambers with biodegradable poly-L-lactic acid fibre pieces for 9 days of perfusion culture. The device enabled increased hepatic function and well-maintained cell viability, demonstrating the importance of an independent medium flow supply for cell growth and function provided by the current 3D scaffold. This integrative methodology from the macro- to the micro-scale provides an efficient way of arranging engineered liver tissue with improved mass transfer, making it possible to further scale up to a construct with clinically relevant size while maintaining high per-volume-based physiological function in the near future. PMID:27579855

  17. Performance of double three-dimensional rigid barriers used to create an acoustic space—A normal derivative integral equationapproach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, J.; Tadeu, A.; Castro, I.

    2013-06-01

    This paper simulates the propagation of sound generated by point pressure sources in the vicinity of double three-dimensional (3D) barriers, placed so as to create an indoor acoustic space. The barriers are assumed to be very thin rigid elements. The problem is solved by developing and implementing a 3D Boundary Element Method formulation using a normal derivative integral equation (TBEM), thereby allowing the definition of models in which only the discretization of the barriers as single open surfaces is required. The TBEM is formulated in the frequency domain and the resulting hypersingular terms are computed analytically. After the verification of the model against two-and-a-half-dimensional (2.5D) BEM solutions, several numerical applications are described to illustrate the applicability and usefulness of the proposed approaches. Different barrier shape geometries and their relative position with respect to a lateral wall are analyzed to evaluate the performance of double 3D rigid barriers in the creation of an acoustic space.

  18. Integration of related sequences with protein three-dimensional structural families in an updated version of PALI database.

    PubMed

    Gowri, V S; Pandit, Shashi B; Karthik, P S; Srinivasan, N; Balaji, S

    2003-01-01

    The database of Phylogeny and ALIgnment of homologous protein structures (PALI) contains three-dimensional (3-D) structure-dependent sequence alignments as well as structure-based phylogenetic trees of protein domains in various families. The latest updated version (Release 2.1) comprises of 844 families of homologous proteins involving 3863 protein domain structures with each of these families having at least two members. Each member in a family has been structurally aligned with every other member in the same family using two proteins at a time. In addition, an alignment of multiple structures has also been performed using all the members in a family. Every family with at least three members is associated with two dendrograms, one based on a structural dissimilarity metric and the other based on similarity of topologically equivalenced residues for every pairwise alignment. Apart from these multi-member families, there are 817 single member families in the updated version of PALI. A new feature in the current release of PALI is the integration, with 3-D structural families, of sequences of homologues from the sequence databases. Alignments between homologous proteins of known 3-D structure and those without an experimentally derived structure are also provided for every family in the enhanced version of PALI. The database with several web interfaced utilities can be accessed at: http://pauling.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/~pali.

  19. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  20. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  1. Integrated all-optical logic and arithmetic operations with the help of a TOAD-based interferometer device--alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Roy, Jitendra; Gayen, Dilip Kumar

    2007-08-01

    Interferometric devices have drawn a great interest in all-optical signal processing for their high-speed photonic activity. The nonlinear optical loop mirror provides a major support to optical switching based all-optical logic and algebraic operations. The gate based on the terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) has added new momentum in this field. Optical tree architecture (OTA) plays a significant role in the optical interconnecting network. We have tried to exploit the advantages of both OTA- and TOAD-based switches. We have proposed a TOAD-based tree architecture, a new and alternative scheme, for integrated all-optical logic and arithmetic operations.

  2. In Situ Integration of Anisotropic SnO₂ Heterostructures inside Three-Dimensional Graphene Aerogel for Enhanced Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Guo, Guilue; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yang; Ang, Chung Yen; Luo, Zhong; Nguyen, Kim Truc; Li, Pei-Zhou; Yan, Qingyu; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogel (GA) has emerged as an outstanding support for metal oxides to enhance the overall energy-storage performance of the resulting hybrid materials. In the current stage of the studies, metals/metal oxides inside GA are in uncrafted geometries. Introducing structure-controlled metal oxides into GA may further push electrochemical properties of metal oxide-GA hybrids. Using rutile SnO2 as an example, we demonstrated here a facile hydrothermal strategy combined with a preconditioning technique named vacuum-assisted impregnation for in situ construction of controlled anisotropic SnO2 heterostructures inside GA. The obtained hybrid material was fully characterized in detail, and its formation mechanism was investigated by monitoring the phase-transformation process. Rational integration of the two advanced structures, anisotropic SnO2 and 3D GA, synergistically led to enhanced lithium-storage properties (1176 mAh/g for the first cycle and 872 mAh/g for the 50th cycle at 100 mA/g) as compared with its two counterparts, namely, rough nanoparticles@3D GA and anisotropic SnO2@2D graphene sheets (618 and 751 mAh/g for the 50th cycle at 100 mA/g, respectively). It was also well-demonstrated that this hybrid material was capable of delivering high specific capacity at rapid charge/discharge cycles (1044 mAh/g at 100 mA/g, 847 mAh/g at 200 mA/g, 698 mAh/g at 500 mA/g, and 584 mAh/g at 1000 mA/g). The in situ integration strategy along with vacuum-assisted impregnation technique presented here shows great potential as a versatile tool for accessing a variety of sophisticated smart structures in the form of anisotropic metals/metal oxides within 3D GA toward useful applications.

  3. Mosaic-skeleton method as applied to the numerical solution of three-dimensional Dirichlet problems for the Helmholtz equation in integral form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashirin, A. A.; Smagin, S. I.; Taltykina, M. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Interior and exterior three-dimensional Dirichlet problems for the Helmholtz equation are solved numerically. They are formulated as equivalent boundary Fredholm integral equations of the first kind and are approximated by systems of linear algebraic equations, which are then solved numerically by applying an iteration method. The mosaic-skeleton method is used to speed up the solution procedure.

  4. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  5. Vector theory of laser radiation scattering in an integrated optical waveguide with three-dimensional irregularities in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, Alexander A

    2004-08-31

    The vector theory of laser radiation scattering in an integrated optical waveguide with three-dimensional irregularities in the presence of noise is developed. The solution of the electrodynamic problem of laser radiation scattering in an irregular waveguide is obtained by the mode coupling technique using the perturbation theory. An approximate solution of the inhomogeneous three-dimensional wave equation is obtained by the method of Green's functions. The analytic formulas are derived for the radiation fields of propagating and evanescent modes. A physical interpretation is given for the obtained results. The role of noise as an independent depolarising factor (in addition to the classical one) during scattering of light is pointed out. (integrated optical waveguides and devices)

  6. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  7. NiCo2O4 nanosheets in-situ grown on three dimensional porous Ni film current collectors as integrated electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Ying; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Shuhui; Yang, Hai-Peng; Lu, Daniel; Fu, Xian-Zhu; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Three dimensional interconnected hierarchical porous Ni films are easily fabricated as effective current collectors through hydrogen bubble template electrochemical deposition. The binder-free integrated electrodes of spinel NiCo2O4 nanosheets directly coated the three dimensional porous Ni films are facilely obtained through successively electrochemical co-deposition of Ni/Co alloy layer then followed by subsequent annealing at 350 °C in air. Compared with NiCo2O4 nanosheets on smooth Ni foil or porous NiO/Ni film electrodes, the porous NiCo2O4/Ni integrated film electrodes for supercapacitors demonstrate remarkably higher area specific capacitance. The porous NiCo2O4/Ni film electrodes also exhibit excellent rate capability and cycling stability. The super electrochemical capacitive performances are attributed to the unique integrated architecture of NiCo2O4 nanosheets in-situ grown on three dimensional continuous hierarchical porous Ni collector collectors, which could provide large electrode-electrolyte interface area, high active sites, low contact resistance between current collector and active materials, fast electron conduction and ion/electrolyte diffusion.

  8. Long-Time Numerical Integration of the Three-Dimensional Wave Equation in the Vicinity of a Moving Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryabenkii, V. S.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Tsynkov, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a family of algorithms for solving numerically a Cauchy problem for the three-dimensional wave equation. The sources that drive the equation (i.e., the right-hand side) are compactly supported in space for any given time; they, however, may actually move in space with a subsonic speed. The solution is calculated inside a finite domain (e.g., sphere) that also moves with a subsonic speed and always contains the support of the right-hand side. The algorithms employ a standard consistent and stable explicit finite-difference scheme for the wave equation. They allow one to calculate tile solution for arbitrarily long time intervals without error accumulation and with the fixed non-growing amount of tile CPU time and memory required for advancing one time step. The algorithms are inherently three-dimensional; they rely on the presence of lacunae in the solutions of the wave equation in oddly dimensional spaces. The methodology presented in the paper is, in fact, a building block for constructing the nonlocal highly accurate unsteady artificial boundary conditions to be used for the numerical simulation of waves propagating with finite speed over unbounded domains.

  9. All-optical SR flip-flop based on SOA-MZI switches monolithically integrated on a generic InP platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, St.; Vagionas, Ch.; Kanellos, G. T.; Kisacik, R.; Tekin, T.; Broeke, R.; Pleros, N.

    2016-03-01

    At the dawning of the exaflop era, High Performance Computers are foreseen to exploit integrated all-optical elements, to overcome the speed limitations imposed by electronic counterparts. Drawing from the well-known Memory Wall limitation, imposing a performance gap between processor and memory speeds, research has focused on developing ultra-fast latching devices and all-optical memory elements capable of delivering buffering and switching functionalities at unprecedented bit-rates. Following the master-slave configuration of electronic Flip-Flops, coupled SOA-MZI based switches have been theoretically investigated to exceed 40 Gb/s operation, provided a short coupling waveguide. However, this flip-flop architecture has been only hybridly integrated with silica-on-silicon integration technology exhibiting a total footprint of 45x12 mm2 and intra-Flip-Flop coupling waveguide of 2.5cm, limited at 5 Gb/s operation. Monolithic integration offers the possibility to fabricate multiple active and passive photonic components on a single chip at a close proximity towards, bearing promises for fast all-optical memories. Here, we present for the first time a monolithically integrated all-optical SR Flip-Flop with coupled master-slave SOA-MZI switches. The photonic chip is integrated on a 6x2 mm2 die as a part of a multi-project wafer run using library based components of a generic InP platform, fiber-pigtailed and fully packaged on a temperature controlled ceramic submount module with electrical contacts. The intra Flip-Flop coupling waveguide is 5 mm long, reducing the total footprint by two orders of magnitude. Successful flip flop functionality is evaluated at 10 Gb/s with clear open eye diagram, achieving error free operation with a power penalty of 4dB.

  10. A novel approach for planning orthognathic surgery: the integration of dental casts into three-dimensional printed mandibular models.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, A F; Rehab, M; O'Neil, M; Khambay, B; Ju, X; Barbenel, J; Naudi, K

    2014-04-01

    A method of producing a composite model consisting of a three-dimensional printed mandible bearing plaster teeth is presented. Printed models were obtained from cone beam computed tomograms (CBCT) of dry human mandibles. The plaster casts of the teeth were obtained from impressions of the teeth of the dry mandibles. The distorted teeth of the printed models were removed and replaced by the plaster casts of the teeth using a simple transfer jig. The accuracy of the composite models obtained from six mandibles was assessed from laser scans. The scans of the dry mandibles and the composite models were superimposed and the magnitude of the discrepancies at six points on the dentition and six on the mandible were obtained. It was concluded that the errors of the method were small enough to be clinically significant. The use of the composite models is illustrated in two clinical cases.

  11. Integrated Biophysical and Biochemical Signals Augment Megakaryopoiesis and Thrombopoiesis in a Three-Dimensional Rotary Culture System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiqing; Liu, CuiCui; Lei, Xiaohua; Wang, Hongtao; Su, Pei; Ru, Yongxin; Ruan, Xinhua; Duan, Enkui; Feng, Sizhou; Han, Mingzhe; Xu, Yuanfu; Shi, Lihong; Jiang, Erlie; Zhou, Jiaxi

    2016-02-01

    Platelet transfusion has been widely used in patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy; however, the shortage of the platelet supply limits the care of patients. Although derivation of clinical-scale platelets in vitro could provide a new source for transfusion, the devices and procedures for deriving scalable platelets for clinical applications have not been established. In the present study, we found that a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) can potentiate megakaryopoiesis and significantly improve the efficiency of platelet generation. When used with chemical compounds and growth factors identified via small-scale screening, the RCCS improved platelet generation efficiency by as much as ∼3.7-fold compared with static conditions. Shear force, simulated microgravity, and better diffusion of nutrients and oxygen from the RCCS, altogether, might account for the improved efficient platelet generation. The cost-effective and highly controllable strategy and methodology represent an important step toward large-scale platelet production for future biomedical and clinical applications. Significance: Platelet transfusion has been widely used in patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy; however, the shortage of platelet supply limits the care of patients. Thus, derivation of clinical-scale platelets in vitro would provide a new source for transfusion. The present study evaluated a rotary suspension cell culture system that was able to potentiate megakaryopoiesis and significantly improved the efficiency of platelet generation. When used with chemical compounds and growth factors identified via small-scale screening, the three-dimensional system improved platelet generation efficiency compared with the static condition. The three-dimensional device and the strategy developed in the present study should markedly improve the generation of large-scale platelets for use in future biomedical and clinical settings. PMID:26702125

  12. [Comparative research on determination of water integrated organic pollution index with three dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy and traditional wet chemical methods].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-gang; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Li, Hong-bin; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Liu, Jian-guo; Sima, Wei-chang; Yang, Li-shu

    2007-12-01

    Three dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence spectra, chemical oxygen demanding (COD) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for water samples from Science Island, Chaohu Lake and Taihu Lake were determined. The COD values of the samples from Chaohu Lake were linearly correlated with the DOC values. Relationships of dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations determined by three dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence matrix (3DEEM), observed protein-like fluorescence intensity (Ipro-like) and humic-like fluorescence intensity (Ihum-like) to the chemical oxygen Demanding (COD) for all the samples from different sources were analyzed. Results indicated that DOM concentrations measured by 3DEEM and COD for the water samples from Science Island were well linearly related (r = 0.82172), and the linear relationships also existed between Ipro-like. and COD (r = 0.84651), as well as Ihum-like and COD (r = 0.83689). However, for the water samples from Chaohu Lake and Taihu Lake, no linear relationships existed. The cause of the above difference between the water samples from Science Island and those from Chaohu Lake and Taihu Lake, and the feasibility and the limits of the integrated organic pollution measurement using three dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy were further discussed.

  13. Dynamic three-dimensional echocardiographic imaging of congenital heart defects in infants and children by computer-controlled tomographic parallel slicing using a single integrated ultrasound instrument.

    PubMed

    Fulton, D R; Marx, G R; Pandian, N G; Romero, B A; Mumm, B; Krauss, M; Wollschläger, H; Ludomirsky, A; Cao, Q L

    1994-03-01

    Three-dimensional cardiac reconstruction generated from transesophageal interrogation can be performed using an integrated unit that captures, processes, and postprocesses tomographic parallel slices of the heart. This probe was used for infants and young children in the transthoracic position to evaluate the feasibility of producing three-dimensional cardiac images with capability for real-time dynamic display. Twenty-two infants and children (range 1 day-3.5 years) underwent image acquisition using a 16 mm 5 MHz 64 element probe placed over the precordium. Two infants were also imaged from the subcostal position. Data was obtained and stored over a single cardiac cycle after acceptable cardiac and respiratory gating intervals were met. The transducer was advanced in 0.5-1 mm increments over the cardiac structures using identical acquisition criteria. The images were reconstructed from the stored digital cubic format and could be oriented in any desired plane. In 9 of the 22 infants the images obtained were of optimal quality. The images obtained displayed normal cardiac structures emphasizing depth relationships as well as visualization of planes not generally demonstrated by two-dimensional imaging. Several lesions were also depicted in a unique fashion using this technique. Though the method employed was limited by movement artifact and reconstruction time, the quality of the three-dimensional display was excellent and enhanced by real-time demonstration. The transthoracic approach was successful in capturing sufficient data to create three-dimensional images, which may have further application in more accurate diagnosis of complex cardiac abnormalities and generation of planes of view which could duplicate surgical visualization of a lesion. Further assessment of the technique in infants with congenital heart disease is warranted. PMID:10146717

  14. Three-dimensional photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Bryan; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-02-01

    The concept of three-dimensional (3D) photovoltaics is explored computationally using a genetic algorithm to optimize the energy production in a day for arbitrarily shaped 3D solar cells confined to a given area footprint and total volume. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of 3D photovoltaic structures scales linearly with height, leading to volumetric energy conversion, and provides power fairly evenly throughout the day. Furthermore, we show that optimal 3D structures are not simple box-like shapes, and that design attributes such as reflectivity could be optimized using three-dimensionality.

  15. Three-dimensional photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Bryan; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-03-01

    The concept of three-dimensional (3D) photovoltaics is explored computationally using a genetic algorithm to optimize the energy production in a day for arbitrarily shaped 3D solar cells confined to a given area footprint and total volume. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of 3D photovoltaic structures scales linearly with height, leading to volumetric energy conversion, and provides power fairly evenly throughout the day. Furthermore, we show that optimal 3D shapes are not simple box-like shapes, and that design attributes such as reflectivity can be optimized in new ways using three-dimensionality.

  16. Reduction of signal reflection along through silicon via channel in high-speed three-dimensional integration circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Xian; Zhu, Zhang-Ming; Yang, Yin-Tang; Wang, Feng-Juan; Ding, Rui-Xue

    2014-03-01

    The through silicon via (TSV) technology has proven to be the critical enabler to realize a three-dimensional (3D) gigscale system with higher performance but shorter interconnect length. However, the received digital signal after transmission through a TSV channel, composed of redistribution layers (RDLs), TSVs, and bumps, is degraded at a high data-rate due to the non-idealities of the channel. We propose the Chebyshev multisection transformers to reduce the signal reflection of TSV channel when operating frequency goes up to 20 GHz, by which signal reflection coefficient (S11) and signal transmission coefficient (S21) are improved remarkably by 150% and 73.3%, respectively. Both the time delay and power dissipation are also reduced by 4% and 13.3%, respectively. The resistance-inductance-conductance-capacitance (RLGC) elements of the TSV channel are iterated from scattering (S)-parameters, and the proposed method of weakening the signal reflection is verified using high frequency simulator structure (HFSS) simulation software by Ansoft.

  17. All-optical repeater.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  18. High efficiency integration of three-dimensional functional microdevices inside a microfluidic chip by using femtosecond laser multifoci parallel microfabrication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Du, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jia-Wen; Hu, Yan-Lei; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Li, Guo-Qiang; Lao, Zhao-Xin; Ni, Jin-Cheng; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong; Liu, Su-Ling; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency fabrication and integration of three-dimension (3D) functional devices in Lab-on-a-chip systems are crucial for microfluidic applications. Here, a spatial light modulator (SLM)-based multifoci parallel femtosecond laser scanning technology was proposed to integrate microstructures inside a given 'Y' shape microchannel. The key novelty of our approach lies on rapidly integrating 3D microdevices inside a microchip for the first time, which significantly reduces the fabrication time. The high quality integration of various 2D-3D microstructures was ensured by quantitatively optimizing the experimental conditions including prebaking time, laser power and developing time. To verify the designable and versatile capability of this method for integrating functional 3D microdevices in microchannel, a series of microfilters with adjustable pore sizes from 12.2 μm to 6.7 μm were fabricated to demonstrate selective filtering of the polystyrene (PS) particles and cancer cells with different sizes. The filter can be cleaned by reversing the flow and reused for many times. This technology will advance the fabrication technique of 3D integrated microfluidic and optofluidic chips.

  19. High efficiency integration of three-dimensional functional microdevices inside a microfluidic chip by using femtosecond laser multifoci parallel microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Du, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jia-Wen; Hu, Yan-Lei; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Li, Guo-Qiang; Lao, Zhao-Xin; Ni, Jin-Cheng; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong; Liu, Su-Ling; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency fabrication and integration of three-dimension (3D) functional devices in Lab-on-a-chip systems are crucial for microfluidic applications. Here, a spatial light modulator (SLM)-based multifoci parallel femtosecond laser scanning technology was proposed to integrate microstructures inside a given ‘Y’ shape microchannel. The key novelty of our approach lies on rapidly integrating 3D microdevices inside a microchip for the first time, which significantly reduces the fabrication time. The high quality integration of various 2D-3D microstructures was ensured by quantitatively optimizing the experimental conditions including prebaking time, laser power and developing time. To verify the designable and versatile capability of this method for integrating functional 3D microdevices in microchannel, a series of microfilters with adjustable pore sizes from 12.2 μm to 6.7 μm were fabricated to demonstrate selective filtering of the polystyrene (PS) particles and cancer cells with different sizes. The filter can be cleaned by reversing the flow and reused for many times. This technology will advance the fabrication technique of 3D integrated microfluidic and optofluidic chips. PMID:26818119

  20. High efficiency integration of three-dimensional functional microdevices inside a microfluidic chip by using femtosecond laser multifoci parallel microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Du, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jia-Wen; Hu, Yan-Lei; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Li, Guo-Qiang; Lao, Zhao-Xin; Ni, Jin-Cheng; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong; Liu, Su-Ling; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency fabrication and integration of three-dimension (3D) functional devices in Lab-on-a-chip systems are crucial for microfluidic applications. Here, a spatial light modulator (SLM)-based multifoci parallel femtosecond laser scanning technology was proposed to integrate microstructures inside a given ‘Y’ shape microchannel. The key novelty of our approach lies on rapidly integrating 3D microdevices inside a microchip for the first time, which significantly reduces the fabrication time. The high quality integration of various 2D-3D microstructures was ensured by quantitatively optimizing the experimental conditions including prebaking time, laser power and developing time. To verify the designable and versatile capability of this method for integrating functional 3D microdevices in microchannel, a series of microfilters with adjustable pore sizes from 12.2 μm to 6.7 μm were fabricated to demonstrate selective filtering of the polystyrene (PS) particles and cancer cells with different sizes. The filter can be cleaned by reversing the flow and reused for many times. This technology will advance the fabrication technique of 3D integrated microfluidic and optofluidic chips.

  1. High efficiency integration of three-dimensional functional microdevices inside a microfluidic chip by using femtosecond laser multifoci parallel microfabrication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Du, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jia-Wen; Hu, Yan-Lei; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Li, Guo-Qiang; Lao, Zhao-Xin; Ni, Jin-Cheng; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong; Liu, Su-Ling; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency fabrication and integration of three-dimension (3D) functional devices in Lab-on-a-chip systems are crucial for microfluidic applications. Here, a spatial light modulator (SLM)-based multifoci parallel femtosecond laser scanning technology was proposed to integrate microstructures inside a given 'Y' shape microchannel. The key novelty of our approach lies on rapidly integrating 3D microdevices inside a microchip for the first time, which significantly reduces the fabrication time. The high quality integration of various 2D-3D microstructures was ensured by quantitatively optimizing the experimental conditions including prebaking time, laser power and developing time. To verify the designable and versatile capability of this method for integrating functional 3D microdevices in microchannel, a series of microfilters with adjustable pore sizes from 12.2 μm to 6.7 μm were fabricated to demonstrate selective filtering of the polystyrene (PS) particles and cancer cells with different sizes. The filter can be cleaned by reversing the flow and reused for many times. This technology will advance the fabrication technique of 3D integrated microfluidic and optofluidic chips. PMID:26818119

  2. Integrated Three-Dimensional Carbon Paper/Carbon Tubes/Cobalt-Sulfide Sheets as an Efficient Electrode for Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhong, Hai-xia; Wang, Zhong-li; Meng, Fan-lu; Zhang, Xin-bo

    2016-02-23

    The development of an efficient catalytic electrode toward both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of great significance for overall water splitting associated with the conversion and storage of clean and renewable energy. In this study, carbon paper/carbon tubes/cobalt-sulfide is introduced as an integrated three-dimensional (3D) array electrode for cost-effective and energy-efficient HER and OER in alkaline medium. Impressively, this electrode displays superior performance compared to non-noble metal catalysts reported previously, benefiting from the unique 3D array architecture with increased exposure and accessibility of active sites, improved vectorial electron transport capability, and enhanced release of gaseous products. Such an integrated and versatile electrode makes the overall water splitting proceed in a more direct and smooth manner, reducing the production cost of practical technological devices.

  3. [Establishment of three-dimensional integrated "serum pharmacochemistry-pharmacokinetics (pharmacodynamics)-systems biology" for research of traditional Chinese medicine prescription and its application in Yinchenhao Tang].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hua; Sun, Hui; Yan, Guang-Li; Han, Ying; Wang, Xi-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription is a valuable asset for clinical medication, has multi-component and multi-target characteristics. However, due to the complex ingredients of prescription, the unclear mechanism, the lack of scientific data to support the dose-response relationship, it has become the bottleneck for the in-depth study for the process of modernization and internationalization of TCM. It requires the integration of Chinese medicine theory, modern analysis and data mining technology to build new research model for characteristic of TCM prescription. This paper provides an overview of TCM serum pharmacochemistry, pharmacokinetics (pharmacodynamics) and systems biology theory and practice, to establish the integrated three-dimensional "serum pharmacochemistry-pharmacokinetics (pharmacodynamics)-systems biology" for the research of TCM prescription to reveal the pharma-material basis and action mechanism and the compatibility scientific connotation, with a prescription Yinchenhao Tang as a case study.

  4. [Establishment of three-dimensional integrated "serum pharmacochemistry-pharmacokinetics (pharmacodynamics)-systems biology" for research of traditional Chinese medicine prescription and its application in Yinchenhao Tang].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hua; Sun, Hui; Yan, Guang-Li; Han, Ying; Wang, Xi-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription is a valuable asset for clinical medication, has multi-component and multi-target characteristics. However, due to the complex ingredients of prescription, the unclear mechanism, the lack of scientific data to support the dose-response relationship, it has become the bottleneck for the in-depth study for the process of modernization and internationalization of TCM. It requires the integration of Chinese medicine theory, modern analysis and data mining technology to build new research model for characteristic of TCM prescription. This paper provides an overview of TCM serum pharmacochemistry, pharmacokinetics (pharmacodynamics) and systems biology theory and practice, to establish the integrated three-dimensional "serum pharmacochemistry-pharmacokinetics (pharmacodynamics)-systems biology" for the research of TCM prescription to reveal the pharma-material basis and action mechanism and the compatibility scientific connotation, with a prescription Yinchenhao Tang as a case study. PMID:24494574

  5. Integrated Three-Dimensional Carbon Paper/Carbon Tubes/Cobalt-Sulfide Sheets as an Efficient Electrode for Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhong, Hai-xia; Wang, Zhong-li; Meng, Fan-lu; Zhang, Xin-bo

    2016-02-23

    The development of an efficient catalytic electrode toward both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of great significance for overall water splitting associated with the conversion and storage of clean and renewable energy. In this study, carbon paper/carbon tubes/cobalt-sulfide is introduced as an integrated three-dimensional (3D) array electrode for cost-effective and energy-efficient HER and OER in alkaline medium. Impressively, this electrode displays superior performance compared to non-noble metal catalysts reported previously, benefiting from the unique 3D array architecture with increased exposure and accessibility of active sites, improved vectorial electron transport capability, and enhanced release of gaseous products. Such an integrated and versatile electrode makes the overall water splitting proceed in a more direct and smooth manner, reducing the production cost of practical technological devices. PMID:26783885

  6. A Parallel Discrete Surface Integral Equation Method For the Analysis of Three-Dimensional Microwave Circuit Devices with Planar Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Stephen D.; Lansing, Faiza

    1994-01-01

    It has been found that the Discrete Integral Equation (DSI)technique is a highly effective technique for the analysis of microwave circuits and devices [1,2]. The DSI is much more robust than the traditional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method in a number of ways.

  7. Three-dimensional metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce

    2012-06-12

    A fabrication method is capable of creating canonical metamaterial structures arrayed in a three-dimensional geometry. The method uses a membrane suspended over a cavity with predefined pattern as a directional evaporation mask. Metallic and/or dielectric material can be evaporated at high vacuum through the patterned membrane to deposit resonator structures on the interior walls of the cavity, thereby providing a unit cell of micron-scale dimension. The method can produce volumetric metamaterial structures comprising layers of such unit cells of resonator structures.

  8. An integrated model for three-dimensional cohesive sediment transport in storm event and its application on Lianyungang Harbor, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qinghe; Zhang, Jinfeng; Tan, Feng; Wu, Yuru; Zhang, Na; Yang, Hua; Pang, Qixiu

    2015-03-01

    Prediction of cohesive sediment transport in storm process is important for both navigation safety and environment of the coastal zone. The difficulties to simulate cohesive sediment transport for a small-scale area such as around a harbor during storm events mainly include the low spatial resolution of the present reanalysis atmosphere forcing, the complex hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes, and their interactions. In this paper, an integrated atmosphere-wave-3D hydrodynamic and cohesive sediment transport model with unstructured grid, which is comprised of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model, and Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), was developed to solve the abovementioned problems. For cohesive sediment, the flocculation and hindered settling were included, and a self-weight consolidation processes was introduced to the existing FVCOM. Interactions between components were considered by providing data fields to each other in an offline manner. The integrated model was applied to simulate cohesive sediment transport around Lianyungang Harbor, China, during Typhoon Wipha in 2007. Results identify that the atmosphere model WRF performed better in the simulation of wind field during typhoon process compared with QuikSCAT/National Centers for Environmental Prediction (QSCAT/NCEP) data. Simulation of wave model was directly affected by wind results as wave vector field driven by WRF wind field showed anticlockwise vortex while waves driven by QSCAT/NCEP wind field did not. The influence of water elevation and flow field on waves was great at the nearshore area. However, the effect of wave on current was not apparent, while the wind field played a more important role, especially on the current velocity. The cohesive sediment transport was greatly affected by wave due to the combined wave-current-induced shear stress. In general, simulation results of wind, wave, current, and sediment showed

  9. The all-optical warship: design and integration considerations for a future electro-optical sensor suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Holter, Koen P. A.; Scholte, Krispijn A.; Willekes MacDonald, Björn C.; Bolderheij, Fok

    2011-06-01

    Electro-optical sensor systems are fairly commonplace on naval vessels. However, these sensor systems are usually implemented as stand-alone systems or are minimally integrated in shipboard combat management systems, and are mostly used as secondary sensors. Therefore, it is difficult to include these systems in generic command and control concepts; on board they remain an operator aid at best. To facilitate integration in the future, this paper proposes a model of a warship with only EO sensors as its primary sensor suite. The question of whether such a ship is sufficiently capable in a modern naval theater is addressed, as well as specific sensor design challenges and the command and control concepts needed in order to maximize the performance of the proposed vessel.

  10. Multi-format all-optical processing based on a large-scale, hybridly integrated photonic circuit.

    PubMed

    Bougioukos, M; Kouloumentas, Ch; Spyropoulou, M; Giannoulis, G; Kalavrouziotis, D; Maziotis, A; Bakopoulos, P; Harmon, R; Rogers, D; Harrison, J; Poustie, A; Maxwell, G; Avramopoulos, H

    2011-06-01

    We investigate through numerical studies and experiments the performance of a large scale, silica-on-silicon photonic integrated circuit for multi-format regeneration and wavelength-conversion. The circuit encompasses a monolithically integrated array of four SOAs inside two parallel Mach-Zehnder structures, four delay interferometers and a large number of silica waveguides and couplers. Exploiting phase-incoherent techniques, the circuit is capable of processing OOK signals at variable bit rates, DPSK signals at 22 or 44 Gb/s and DQPSK signals at 44 Gbaud. Simulation studies reveal the wavelength-conversion potential of the circuit with enhanced regenerative capabilities for OOK and DPSK modulation formats and acceptable quality degradation for DQPSK format. Regeneration of 22 Gb/s OOK signals with amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise and DPSK data signals degraded with amplitude, phase and ASE noise is experimentally validated demonstrating a power penalty improvement up to 1.5 dB.

  11. Three Dimensional Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    2014-03-01

    Dirac points on the Fermi surface of two dimensional graphene are responsible for its unique electronic behavior. One can ask whether any three dimensional materials support similar pseudorelativistic physics in their bulk electronic spectra. This possibility has been investigated theoretically and is now supported by two successful experimental demonstrations reported during the last year. In this talk, I will summarize the various ways in which Dirac semimetals can be realized in three dimensions with primary focus on a specific theory developed on the basis of representations of crystal spacegroups. A three dimensional Dirac (Weyl) semimetal can appear in the presence (absence) of inversion symmetry by tuning parameters to the phase boundary separating a bulk insulating and a topological insulating phase. More generally, we find that specific rules governing crystal symmetry representations of electrons with spin lead to robust Dirac points at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. Combining these rules with microscopic considerations identifies six candidate Dirac semimetals. Another method towards engineering Dirac semimetals involves combining crystal symmetry and band inversion. Several candidate materials have been proposed utilizing this mechanism and one of the candidates has been successfully demonstrated as a Dirac semimetal in two independent experiments. Work carried out in collaboration with: Julia A. Steinberg, Steve M. Young, J.C.Y. Teo, C.L. Kane, E.J. Mele and Andrew M. Rappe.

  12. Efficient compression of rearranged time-multiplexed elemental image arrays in MALT-based three-dimensional integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Gook; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, an approach to efficiently compress the time-multiplexed EIAs picked up from the MALT-based integral imaging system is proposed. In this method, the time-multiplexed EIAs are rearranged by collecting the elemental images occupied at the same position in each EIA to enhance the similarity among the elemental images. Then, MPEG-4 is applied to these rearranged elemental images for compression. From the experimental results, it is shown that the average correlation quality ( ACQ) value representing a degree of similarity between the elemental images, and the resultant compression efficiency have been enhanced by 11.50% and 9.97%, respectively on the average for three kinds of test scenarios in the proposed method, compared to those of the conventional method. Good experimental results finally confirmed the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  13. An integrated process of three-dimensional biofilm-electrode with sulfur autotrophic denitrification (3DBER-SAD) for wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixia; Meng, Chengcheng; Li, Jianbing

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactor (3DBER) was integrated with sulfur autotrophic denitrification (SAD) to improve nitrogen removal performance for wastewater reclamation. The impacts of influent carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, electric current, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) were evaluated. The new process, abbreviated as 3DBER-SAD, achieved a more stable denitrification compared to the recently studied 3DBER in literature. Its nitrogen removal improved by about 45 % as compared to 3DBER, especially under low C/N ratio conditions. The results also revealed that the biofilm bacteria community of 3DBER-SAD contained 21.1 % of the genus Thauera, 19.3 % of the genus Thiobacillus and Sulfuricella, as well as 5.3 % of the genus Alicycliphilus, Pseudomonas, and Paracoccus. The synergy between these heterotrophic, sulfur autotrophic, and hydrogenotrophic denitrification bacteria was believed to cause the high and stable nitrogen removal performance under various operating conditions.

  14. Resolution-Enhanced Magnification of a Far Three-Dimensional Object Image by Using the Moving-Direct-Pixel-Mapping Method in Scalable Integral-Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yongri; Zhang, Miao; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an effective approach for resolution-enhanced magnification of a far three-dimensional (3D) object image by employing the moving-direct-pixel-mapping (MDPM) method in the scalable integral imaging system. In the proposed method, a set of elemental image arrays (EIAs) are picked up from a far 3D object with the moving-array-lenslet technique (MALT) and computationally transformed into a new set of EIAs by using the MDPM method, which looks like the EIAs virtually picked up from a close object. These newly transformed EIAs then are interlaced together to form an enlarged EIA, from which resolution-enhanced magnification of a far 3D object image can be achieved. Good experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. Numerical integration of gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects and its application to gravitational study of grand design spiral arm structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We present a method to integrate the gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects. By adopting the spherical polar coordinates centered at the evaluation point as the integration variables, we numerically compute the volume integral representation of the gravitational potential and of the acceleration vector. The variable transformation completely removes the algebraic singularities of the original integrals. The comparison with exact solutions reveals around 15 digits accuracy of the new method. Meanwhile, the 6 digit accuracy of the integrated gravitational field is realized by around 106 evaluations of the integrand per evaluation point, which costs at most a few seconds at a PC with Intel Core i7-4600U CPU running at 2.10 GHz clock. By using the new method, we show the gravitational field of a grand design spiral arm structure as an example. The computed gravitational field shows not only spiral shaped details but also a global feature composed of a thick oblate spheroid and a thin disc. The developed method is directly applicable to the electromagnetic field computation by means of Coulomb's law, the Biot-Savart law, and their retarded extensions. Sample FORTRAN 90 programs and test results are electronically available.

  16. Three-dimensional viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference seismic modelling using the staggered Adams-Bashforth time integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Wittkamp, Florian

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the performance of a higher order accurate staggered viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference method, in which the staggered Adams-Bashforth (ABS) third-order and fourth-order accurate time integrators are used for temporal discretization. ABS is a multistep method that uses previously calculated wavefields to increase the order of accuracy in time. The analysis shows that the numerical dispersion is much lower than that of the widely used second-order leapfrog method. Numerical dissipation is introduced by the ABS method which is significantly smaller for fourth-order than third-order accuracy. In 1-D and 3-D simulation experiments, we verify the convincing improvements of simulation accuracy of the fourth-order ABS method. In a realistic elastic 3-D scenario, the computing time reduces by a factor of approximately 2.4, whereas the memory requirements increase by approximately a factor of 2.2. The ABS method thus provides an alternative strategy to increase the simulation accuracy in time by investing computer memory instead of computing time.

  17. Reductant-Assisted Self-Assembly with Cu/Sn Microbump for Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuka; Fukushima, Takafumi; Lee, Kang-Wook; Choki, Koji; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2013-04-01

    To establish liquid-assisted assembly processes applicable to heterogeneous system integrations, we present flip-chip self-assembly of dies with Cu/Sn microbumps using the difference in droplet wetting between hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas. Flip-chip self-assembly is assisted by a water-soluble flux that has high surface tension comparable to that of pure water and contains an additive of a reducing agent for metal oxides. Control of the additive concentration in the flux provides high wettability contrast that enable spontaneous and precise alignment of chips to hydrophilic areas formed on substrates within 5 µm in alignment accuracy. In the subsequent chip bonding process, the reductant can eliminate the metal oxide layer and improve the solder wettability of Sn to the corresponding electrode pads formed on the chips. In addition, we confirm, through electrical characteristic evaluation after thermal compression bonding, that the resulting daisy chain formed between the substrates and self-assembled chips with the flux shows sufficiently low contact resistance of below 20 mΩ/bump without disconnection.

  18. Digital, Three-dimensional Average Shaped Atlas of the Heliothis Virescens Brain with Integrated Gustatory and Olfactory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kvello, Pål; Løfaldli, Bjarte Bye; Rybak, Jürgen; Menzel, Randolf; Mustaparta, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    We use the moth Heliothis virescens as model organism for studying the neural network involved in chemosensory coding and learning. The constituent neurons are characterised by intracellular recordings combined with staining, resulting in a single neuron identified in each brain preparation. In order to spatially relate the neurons of different preparations a common brain framework was required. We here present an average shaped atlas of the moth brain. It is based on 11 female brain preparations, each stained with a fluorescent synaptic marker and scanned in confocal laser-scanning microscope. Brain neuropils of each preparation were manually reconstructed in the computer software Amira, followed by generating the atlas using the Iterative Shape Average Procedure. To demonstrate the application of the atlas we have registered two olfactory and two gustatory interneurons, as well as the axonal projections of gustatory receptor neurons into the atlas, visualising their spatial relationships. The olfactory interneurons, showing the typical morphology of inner-tract antennal lobe projection neurons, projected in the calyces of the mushroom body and laterally in the protocerebral lobe. The two gustatory interneurons, responding to sucrose and quinine respectively, projected in different areas of the brain. The wide projections of the quinine responding neuron included a lateral area adjacent to the projections of the olfactory interneurons. The sucrose responding neuron was confined to the suboesophageal ganglion with dendritic arborisations overlapping the axonal projections of the gustatory receptor neurons on the proboscis. By serving as a tool for the integration of neurons, the atlas offers visual access to the spatial relationship between the neurons in three dimensions, and thus facilitates the study of neuronal networks in the Heliothis virescens brain. The moth standard brain is accessible at http://www.ntnu.no/biolog/english/neuroscience/brain PMID:19949481

  19. A novel integration of three-dimensional electro-Fenton and biological activated carbon and its application in the advanced treatment of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hou, Baolin; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Xu, Peng; Jia, Shengyong; Li, Kun

    2015-11-01

    A novel integrated process with three-dimensional electro-Fenton (3D EF) and biological activated carbon (BAC) was employed in advanced treatment of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. SAC-Fe (sludge deserved activated carbon from sewage and iron sludge) and SAC (sludge deserved activated carbon) were used in 3D EF as catalytic particle electrodes (CPEs) and in BAC as carriers respectively. Results indicated that 3D EF with SAC-Fe as CPEs represented excellent pollutants and COLOR removals as well as biodegradability improvement. The efficiency enhancement attributed to generating more H2O2 and OH. The integrated process exhibited efficient performance of COD, BOD5, total phenols, TOC, TN and COLOR removals at a much shorter retention time, with the corresponding concentrations in effluent of 31.18, 6.69, 4.29, 17.82, 13.88mg/L and <20 times, allowing discharge criteria to be met. The integrated system was efficient, cost-effective and ecological sustainable and could be a promising technology for engineering applications.

  20. Three dimensional ultrasonic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G. H.; Benson, S.; Crawford, S.

    1993-03-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques interrogate components with high frequency acoustic energy. A transducer generates the acoustic energy and converts acoustic energy to electrical signals. The acoustic energy is reflected by abrupt changes in modulus and/or density which can be caused by a defect. Thus defects reflect the ultrasonic energy which is converted into electrical signals. Ultrasonic evaluation typically provides a two dimensional image of internal defects. These images are either planar views (C-scans) or cross-sectional views (B-scans). The planar view is generated by raster scanning an ultrasonic transducer over the component and capturing the amplitude of internal reflections. Depth information is generally ignored. The cross-sectional view is generated by scanning the transducer along a single line and capturing the amplitude and time of flight for each internal reflection. The amplitude and time of flight information is converted into an image of the cross section of the component where the scan was performed. By fusing the C-scan information with the B-scan information a three dimension image of the internal structure of the component can be produced. The three dimensional image can be manipulated by rotating and slicing to produce the optimal view of the internal structure. The high frequency ultrasonic energy requires a liquid coupling media and thus applications for imaging in liquid environments are well suited to ultrasonic techniques. Examples of potential ultrasonic imaging applications are: Inside liquid filled tanks, inside the human body, and underwater.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas: Does IMRT increase the integral dose to normal brain?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanto, Ulrich; Frija, Erik K.; Lii, MingFwu J.; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. . E-mail: SYWoo@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment increases the total integral dose of nontarget tissue relative to the conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) technique for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with 3D-CRT for glioblastoma multiforme were selected for a comparative dosimetric evaluation with IMRT. Original target volumes, organs at risk (OAR), and dose-volume constraints were used for replanning with IMRT. Predicted isodose distributions, cumulative dose-volume histograms of target volumes and OAR, normal tissue integral dose, target coverage, dose conformity, and normal tissue sparing with 3D-CRT and IMRT planning were compared. Statistical analyses were performed to determine differences. Results: In all 20 patients, IMRT maintained equivalent target coverage, improved target conformity (conformity index [CI] 95% 1.52 vs. 1.38, p < 0.001), and enabled dose reductions of normal tissues, including brainstem (D{sub mean} by 19.8% and D{sub max} by 10.7%), optic chiasm (D{sub mean} by 25.3% and D{sub max} by 22.6%), right optic nerve (D{sub mean} by 37.3% and D{sub max} by 28.5%), and left optic nerve (D{sub mean} by 40.6% and D{sub max} by 36.7%), p {<=} 0.01. This was achieved without increasing the total nontarget integral dose by greater than 0.5%. Overall, total integral dose was reduced by 7-10% with IMRT, p < 0.001, without significantly increasing the 0.5-5 Gy low-dose volume. Conclusions: These results indicate that IMRT treatment for high-grade gliomas allows for improved target conformity, better critical tissue sparing, and importantly does so without increasing integral dose and the volume of normal tissue exposed to low doses of radiation.

  2. Formation of solid-solution Cu-to-Cu joints using Ga solder and Pt under bump metallurgy for three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-kang; Chang, Hao-miao; Cho, Cheng-liang; Liu, Yu-chen; Kuo, Yi-kai

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits (ICs) are the most important packaging technology for next-generation semiconductors. Cu-to-Cu throughsilicon via interconnections with micro-bumps are key components in the fabrication of 3D ICs. However, significant reliability concerns have been raised due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in the entire 3D IC joints. This study proposes a Ga-based Cu-to-Cu bonding technology with Pt under bump metallurgy (UBM). A systematic analysis of reactive wetting between Ga solders and polycrystalline, single-crystalline, and Ptcoated Cu substrates was conducted. Pt UBM as a wetting layer was identified to be a key component for Ga-based Cu-to-Cu bonding. Pt-coated Cu substrates were bonded using Ga solders with various Ga-to-Pt ratios ( n) at 300℃. When n ≥ 4, the Cu/Pt/Ga/Pt/Cu interface evolves to Cu/facecentered cubic (fcc)/γ1-Cu9Ga4/fcc/Cu, Cu/fcc/γ1-Cu9Ga4 + Ga7Pt3/fcc/Cu, and finally Cu/fcc + Ga7Pt3/Cu structures. The desired ductile solid solution joint formed with discrete Ga7Pt3 precipitates. When n ≤ 1, a Cu/Ga7Pt3/Cu joint formed without Cu actively participating in the reactions. The reaction mechanism and microstructure evolution were elaborated with the aid of CALPHAD thermodynamic modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Free energy calculation using molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. II. Thermodynamic integration along a spatial reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tatsuhiko; Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Fumio

    2011-01-28

    We propose the thermodynamic integration along a spatial reaction coordinate using the molecular dynamics simulation combined with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. This method provides a free energy calculation in solution along the reaction coordinate defined by the Cartesian coordinates of the solute atoms. The proposed method is based on the blue moon algorithm which can, in principle, handle any reaction coordinate as far as it is defined by the solute atom positions. In this article, we apply the present method to the complex formation process of the crown ether 18-Crown-6 (18C6) with the potassium ion in an aqueous solution. The separation between the geometric centers of these two molecules is taken to be the reaction coordinate for this system. The potential of mean force (PMF) becomes the maximum at the separation between the molecular centers being ∼4 Å, which can be identified as the free energy barrier in the process of the molecular recognition. In a separation further than the free energy barrier, the PMF is slightly reduced to exhibit a plateau. In the region closer than the free energy barrier, approach of the potassium ion to the center of 18C6 also decreases the PMF. When the potassium ion is accommodated at the center of 18C6, the free energy is lower by -5.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol than that at the above mentioned plateau or converged state. By comparing the results with those from the free energy calculation along the coupling parameters obtained in our previous paper [T. Miyata, Y. Ikuta, and F. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 044114 (2010)], it is found that the effective interaction in water between 18C6 and the potassium ion vanishes beyond the molecular-center-separation of 10 Å. Furthermore, the conformation of 18C6 is found to be significantly changed depending upon the 18C6-K(+) distance. A proper conformational sampling and an accurate solvent treatment are crucial for realizing the accurate PMF, and we believe

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL {integral} FIELD OBSERVATIONS OF 10 GALACTIC WINDS. I. EXTENDED PHASE ({approx}>10 Myr) OF MASS/ENERGY INJECTION BEFORE THE WIND BLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R. G.; Bland-Hawthorn, J. E-mail: jbh@physics.usyd.edu.a

    2010-03-10

    In recent years, we have come to recognize the widespread importance of large-scale winds in the life cycle of galaxies. The onset and evolution of a galactic wind is a highly complex process which must be understood if we are to understand how energy and metals are recycled throughout the galaxy and beyond. Here we present three-dimensional spectroscopic observations of a sample of 10 nearby galaxies with the AAOmega-SPIRAL {integral}-field spectrograph on the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope, the largest survey of its kind to date. The double-beam spectrograph provides spatial maps in a range of spectral diagnostics: [O III]5007, Hbeta, Mg b, Na D, [O I]6300, Halpha, [N II]6583, [S II]6717, 6731. We demonstrate that these flows can often separate into highly ordered structures through the use of ionization diagnostics and kinematics. All of the objects in our survey show extensive wind-driven filamentation along the minor axis, in addition to large-scale disk rotation. Our sample can be divided into either starburst galaxies or active galactic nuclei (AGNs), although some objects appear to be a combination of these. The total ionizing photon budget available to both classes of galaxies is sufficient to ionize all of the wind-blown filamentation out to large radius. We find, however, that while AGN photoionization always dominates in the wind filaments, this is not the case in starburst galaxies where shock ionization dominates. This clearly indicates that after the onset of star formation, there is a substantial delay ({approx}>10 Myr) before a starburst wind develops. We show why this behavior is expected by deriving 'ionization' and dynamical timescales for both AGNs and starbursts. We establish a sequence of events that lead to the onset of a galactic wind. The clear signature provided by the ionization timescale is arguably the strongest evidence yet that the starburst phenomenon is an impulsive event. A well-defined ionization timescale is not expected in

  5. Band edge tailoring of InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells for a monolithically integrated all-optical switch.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jijun; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Gozu, Shin-ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a compact all-optical Michelson interferometer (MI) gating switch with monolithic integration of two different bandgap energies. Based on the ion-induced intermixing in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells, the blueshift of the band edge can be tailored. Through phosphorus ion implantation with a dose of 5 × 10(14) cm(-2) and subsequent annealing at 720 °C for 60 s, an implanted sample can acquire a high transmittance compared with the as-grown one. Meanwhile, the cross-phase modulation (XPM) efficiency of a non-implanted sample undergoing the same annealing process decreases little. An implanted part for signal propagation and a non-implanted section for XPM are thus monolithically integrated for an MI switch by an area-selective manner. Full switching of a π-rad nonlinear phase shift is achieved with pump pulse energy of 5.6 pJ at a 10-GHz repetition rate.

  6. Three-dimensional laser microvision.

    PubMed

    Shimotahira, H; Iizuka, K; Chu, S C; Wah, C; Costen, F; Yoshikuni, Y

    2001-04-10

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 mum; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 mum. PMID:18357177

  7. All optical OFDM transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, June-Koo K.; Lim, Seong-Jin; Kserawi, Malaz

    2011-12-01

    All-optical OFDM data transmission opens up a new realm of advanced optical transmission at extreme data rates, as subcarriers are multiplexed and demultiplexed by all optical discrete Fourier transforms (DFT). This paper reviews the principles of all optical OFDM transmission and its system application techniques, providing the generic ideas and the practical implementation issues to achieve 100Gbps or higher data rates with a spectral efficiency of 1 bps/Hz or better. This paper also include discussions on all-optical OFDM implementation variants such as an AWG-based OFDM multiplexer and demultiplexer, a receiver design without optical sampling, a transmitter design with frequency-locked cw lasers, an OFDM cyclic prefix designs, and a chromatic dispersion mitigation technique.

  8. Three-dimensional silicon micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, S.; Song, J.; Dang, Z. Y.; Liang, H. D.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2012-11-01

    A process for fabricating arbitrary-shaped, two- and three-dimensional silicon and porous silicon components has been developed, based on high-energy ion irradiation, such as 250 keV to 1 MeV protons and helium. Irradiation alters the hole current flow during subsequent electrochemical anodization, allowing the anodization rate to be slowed or stopped for low/high fluences. For moderate fluences the anodization rate is selectively stopped only at depths corresponding to the high defect density at the end of ion range, allowing true three-dimensional silicon machining. The use of this process in fields including optics, photonics, holography and nanoscale depth machining is reviewed.

  9. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  10. The Three-Dimensional Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Dale A.; Powell, Harry D.

    1992-01-01

    Provides instructions for helping students construct a three-dimensional model of a constellation. Aluminum foil spheres with various diameters are used to represent stars with various apparent magnitudes. The positions of the stars in the model are determined from constellation maps and by converting actual star distances into millimeters. (PR)

  11. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  12. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  13. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  14. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  15. 3DNA: a versatile, integrated software system for the analysis, rebuilding, and visualization of three-dimensional nucleic-acid structures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a set of protocols showing how to use the 3DNA suite of programs to analyze, rebuild, and visualize three-dimensional nucleic-acid structures. The software determines a wide range of conformational parameters, including the identities and rigid-body parameters of interacting bases and base-pair steps, the nucleotides comprising helical fragments, the area of overlap of stacked bases, etc. The reconstruction of three-dimensional structure takes advantage of rigorously defined rigid-body parameters, producing rectangular block representations of the nucleic-acid bases and base pairs and all-atom models with approximate sugar-phosphate backbones. The visualization components create vector-based drawings and scenes that can be rendered as raster-graphics images, allowing for easy generation of publication-quality figures. The utility programs use geometric variables to control the view and scale of an object, for comparison of related structures. The commands run in seconds even for large structures. The software and related information are available at http://3dna.rutgers.edu/. PMID:18600227

  16. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  17. All-optical analog comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  18. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  19. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  20. An Automated Three-Dimensional Detection and Segmentation Method for Touching Cells by Integrating Concave Points Clustering and Random Walker Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hui; Chen, Shangbin; Zhang, Bin; Ding, Wenxiang; Luo, Qingming; Li, Anan

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing cytoarchitecture is crucial for understanding brain functions and neural diseases. In neuroanatomy, it is an important task to accurately extract cell populations' centroids and contours. Recent advances have permitted imaging at single cell resolution for an entire mouse brain using the Nissl staining method. However, it is difficult to precisely segment numerous cells, especially those cells touching each other. As presented herein, we have developed an automated three-dimensional detection and segmentation method applied to the Nissl staining data, with the following two key steps: 1) concave points clustering to determine the seed points of touching cells; and 2) random walker segmentation to obtain cell contours. Also, we have evaluated the performance of our proposed method with several mouse brain datasets, which were captured with the micro-optical sectioning tomography imaging system, and the datasets include closely touching cells. Comparing with traditional detection and segmentation methods, our approach shows promising detection accuracy and high robustness. PMID:25111442

  1. Three dimensional contact/impact methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of three-dimensional interface mechanics between reactor components and structures during static contact or dynamic impact is necessary to realistically evaluate their structural integrity to off-normal loads. In our studies of postulated core energy release events, we have found that significant structure-structure interactions occur in some reactor vessel head closure designs and that fluid-structure interactions occur within the reactor vessel. Other examples in which three-dimensional interface mechanics play an important role are: (1) impact response of shipping casks containing spent fuel, (2) whipping pipe impact on reinforced concrete panels or pipe-to-pipe impact after a pipe break, (3) aircraft crash on secondary containment structures, (4) missiles generated by turbine failures or tornados, and (5) drops of heavy components due to lifting accidents. The above is a partial list of reactor safety problems that require adequate treatment of interface mechanics and are discussed in this paper.

  2. All-optical reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  3. All-optical reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-01

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm which uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  4. Facial three-dimensional morphometry.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Serrao, G

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional facial morphometry was investigated in a sample of 40 men and 40 women, with a new noninvasive computerized method. Subjects ranged in age between 19 and 32 years, had sound dentitions, and no craniocervical disorders. For each subject, 16 cutaneous facial landmarks were automatically collected by a system consisting of two infrared camera coupled device (CCD) cameras, real time hardware for the recognition of markers, and software for the three-dimensional reconstruction of landmarks' x, y, z coordinates. From these landmarks, 15 linear and 10 angular measurements, and four linear distance ratios were computed and averaged for sex. For all angular values, both samples showed a narrow variability and no significant gender differences were demonstrated. Conversely, all the linear measurements were significantly higher in men than in women. The highest intersample variability was observed for the measurements of facial height (prevalent vertical dimension), and the lowest for the measurements of facial depth (prevalent horizontal dimension). The proportions of upper and lower face height relative to the anterior face height showed a significant sex difference. Mean values were in good agreement with literature data collected with traditional methods. The described method allowed the direct and noninvasive calculation of three-dimensional linear and angular measurements that would be usefully applied in clinics as a supplement to the classic x-ray cephalometric analyses. PMID:8540488

  5. Fast all-optical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Poliakov, Evgeni Y. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method wherein polarization rotation in alkali vapors or other mediums is used for all-optical switching and digital logic and where the rate of operation is proportional to the amplitude of the pump field. High rates of speed are accomplished by Rabi flopping of the atomic states using a continuously operating monochromatic atomic beam as the pump.

  6. Estimation of Geologic Storage Capacity of Carbon Dioxide in the Bukpyeong Basin, Korea Using Integrated Three-Dimensional Geologic Formation Modeling and Thermo-Hydrological Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kihm, J.; Park, S.; SNU CO2 GEO-SEQ TEAM

    2011-12-01

    A conventional method, which was suggested by NETL (2007), has been widely used for estimating the geologic storage capacity of carbon dioxide in sedimentary basins. Because of its simple procedure, it has been straightforwardly applied to even spatially very complicate sedimentary basins. Thus, the results from the conventional method are often not accurate and reliable because it can not consider spatial distributions of fluid conditions and carbon dioxide properties, which are not uniform but variable within sedimentary basins. To overcome this limit of the conventional method, a new method, which can consider such spatially variable distributions of fluid conditions and carbon dioxide properties within sedimentary basins, is suggested and applied in this study. In this new method, a three-dimensional geologic formation model of a target sedimentary basin is first established and discretized into volume elements. The fluid conditions (i.e., pressure, temperature, and salt concentration) within each element are then obtained by performing thermo-hydrological numerical modeling. The carbon dioxide properties (i.e., phase, density, dynamic viscosity, and solubility to groundwater) within each element are then calculated from thermodynamic database under corresponding fluid conditions. Finally, the geologic storage capacity of carbon dioxide with in each element is estimated using the corresponding carbon dioxide properties as well as porosity and element volume, and that within the whole sedimentary basin is determined by summation over all elements. This new method is applied to the Bukpyeong Basin, which is one of the prospective offshore sedimentary basins for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in Korea. A three-dimensional geologic formation model of the Bukpyeong Basin is first established considering the elevation data of the boundaries between the geologic formations obtained from seismic survey and geologic maps at the sea floor surface. This geologic

  7. Energy-efficient 0.26-Tb/s coherent-optical OFDM transmission using photonic-integrated all-optical discrete Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Kang, I; Liu, X; Chandrasekhar, S; Rasras, M; Jung, H; Cappuzzo, M; Gomez, L T; Chen, Y F; Buhl, L; Cabot, S; Jaques, J

    2012-01-16

    We propose a novel energy-efficient coherent-optical OFDM transmission scheme based on hybrid optical-electronic signal processing. We demonstrate transmission of a 0.26-Tb/s OFDM superchannel, consisting of 13 x 20-Gb/s polarization-multiplexed QPSK subcarrier channels, over 400-km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) with BER less than 6.3x10(-4) using all-optical Fourier transform processing and electronic 7-tap blind digital equalization per subchannel. We further explore long-haul transmission over up to 960 km SSMF and show that the electronic signal processing is capable of compensating chromatic dispersion up to 16,000 ps/nm using only 15 taps per subchannel, even in the presence of strong inter-carrier interference.

  8. Evolution of the Intermetallic Compounds in Ni/Sn-2.5Ag/Ni Microbumps for Three-Dimensional Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H. H.; Huang, Y. T.; Huang, S. Y.; Chang, T. C.; Wu, Albert T.

    2015-10-01

    Ni/Sn-2.5Ag/Ni samples were used to simulate the microbumps in three-dimensional (3D) packaging. The annealed test was adopted to observe the microstructure of intermetallic compound formation at 100°C, 125°C, and 150°C up to 1000 h. In the Ni/Sn-2.5Ag/Ni, predominant phases of layer-type Ni3Sn4 and Ag3Sn particles could be seen under the thermal treatment. The formation of Ni3Sn4 followed a parabolic rate law at each aging temperature. Due to the limited solder volume, the remaining solder of the microbump was completely exhausted after long-time annealing at 150°C. The activation energy for Ni3Sn4 formation in the Ni/Sn-2.5Ag/Ni microbump was 171.8 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the consumption of the Ni under bump metallization (UBM) was estimated based on the mass balance of Ni atoms during the interfacial reaction.

  9. Temporal and spatial dynamics of large lake hypoxia: Integrating statistical and three-dimensional dynamic models to enhance lake management criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocaniov, Serghei A.; Scavia, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia or low bottom water dissolved oxygen (DO) is a world-wide problem of management concern requiring an understanding and ability to monitor and predict its spatial and temporal dynamics. However, this is often made difficult in large lakes and coastal oceans because of limited spatial and temporal coverage of field observations. We used a calibrated and validated three-dimensional ecological model of Lake Erie to extend a statistical relationship between hypoxic extent and bottom water DO concentrations to explore implications of the broader temporal and spatial development and dissipation of hypoxia. We provide the first numerical demonstration that hypoxia initiates in the nearshore, not the deep portion of the basin, and that the threshold used to define hypoxia matters in both spatial and temporal dynamics and in its sensitivity to climate. We show that existing monitoring programs likely underestimate both maximum hypoxic extent and the importance of low oxygen in the nearshore, discuss implications for ecosystem and drinking water protection, and recommend how these results could be used to efficiently and economically extend monitoring programs.

  10. Three-Dimensional Lithium-Ion Battery Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.

    2008-05-01

    Nonuniform battery physics can cause unexpected performance and life degradations in lithium-ion batteries; a three-dimensional cell performance model was developed by integrating an electrode-scale submodel using a multiscale modeling scheme.

  11. Three-dimensional visual stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tsunehiro; Fukui, Yukio; Hashimoto, Keizo; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    1995-02-01

    We describe a newly developed three-dimensional visual stimulator (TVS) that can change independently the directions, distances, sizes, luminance, and varieties of two sets of targets for both eyes. It consists of liquid crystal projectors (LCP's) that generate the flexible images of targets, Badal otometers that change target distances without changing the visual angles, and relay-lens systems that change target directions. A special control program is developed for real-time control of six motors and two LCP's in the TVS together with a three-dimensional optometer III that simultaneously measures eye movement, accommodation, pupil diameter, and head movement. distance, 0 to -20 D; direction, 16 horizontally and 15 vertically; size, 0-2 deg visual angle; and luminance, 10-2-10 2 cd/m2. The target images are refreshed at 60 Hz and speeds with which the target makes a smooth change (ramp stimuli) are size, 10 deg/s. A simple application demonstrates the performance.

  12. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  13. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  14. Steady inviscid three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Chang, S.-C.

    1985-01-01

    The present analysis combines some of the theoretical concepts suggested by Hawthorne (1955) with a numerical integration procedure suggested by Martin (1978). The resulting algorithm is for inviscid subsonic flows. Thus, it is restricted to high Reynolds number flows. Chang and Adamczyk (1983) have provided a detailed derivation of the present algorithm along with a discussion of its stability bounds. The present paper represents a summary of this work. The integration of the continuity equation is considered along with an evaluation of the entropy, total temperature, and vorticity field. Attention is given to the shear-flow algorithm construction, and an application to a shear flow in a turning channel. A description of numerical results is also provided. The discussed algorithm represents a new procedure for solving inviscid subsonic three-dimensional rotational flows.

  15. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsusaka, Katsuhiko; Doi, Motonori; Oshiro, Osamu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2000-08-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging equipment for diagnosis requires much time to reconstruct 3D images or fix the view point for observing the 3D image. Thus, it is inconvenient for cardiac diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a new dynamic 3D echocardiography system. The system produces 3D images in real-time and permits changes in view point. This system consists of ultrasound diagnostic equipment, a digitizer and a computer. B-mode images are projected to a virtual 3D space by referring to the position of the probe of the ultrasound diagnosis equipment. The position is obtained by the digitizer to which the ultrasound probe is attached. The 3D cardiac image is constructed from B-mode images obtained simultaneously in the cardiac cycle. To obtain the same moment of heartbeat in the cardiac cycle, this system uses the electrocardiography derived from the diagnosis equipment. The 3D images, which show various scenes of the stage of heartbeat action, are displayed sequentially. The doctor can observe 3D images cut in any plane by pushing a button of the digitizer and zooming with the keyboard. We evaluated our prototype system by observation of a mitral valve in motion.

  16. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  17. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-22

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered 'quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  18. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the individual data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme which envisages a classical abacus with the beads operated by electron spins. It is inspired by the idea of second quantization, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantized' Hall voltage, representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This concept of `second quantization of memory' realizes the 3D memory architecture with superior reading and operation efficiency, thus is a promising approach for future nonvolatile magnetic random access memory.

  19. True three-dimensional camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornreich, Philipp; Farell, Bart

    2013-01-01

    An imager that can measure the distance from each pixel to the point on the object that is in focus at the pixel is described. This is accomplished by short photo-conducting lightguides at each pixel. In the eye the rods and cones are the fiber-like lightguides. The device uses ambient light that is only coherent in spherical shell-shaped light packets of thickness of one coherence length. Modern semiconductor technology permits the construction of lightguides shorter than a coherence length of ambient light. Each of the frequency components of the broad band light arriving at a pixel has a phase proportional to the distance from an object point to its image pixel. Light frequency components in the packet arriving at a pixel through a convex lens add constructively only if the light comes from the object point in focus at this pixel. The light in packets from all other object points cancels. Thus the pixel receives light from one object point only. The lightguide has contacts along its length. The lightguide charge carriers are generated by the light patterns. These light patterns, and thus the photocurrent, shift in response to the phase of the input signal. Thus, the photocurrent is a function of the distance from the pixel to its object point. Applications include autonomous vehicle navigation and robotic vision. Another application is a crude teleportation system consisting of a camera and a three-dimensional printer at a remote location.

  20. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  1. Three-Dimensional Schlieren Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Cochrane, Andrea

    2004-11-01

    Schlieren systems visualise disturbances that change the index of refraction of a fluid, for example due to temperature or salinity disturbances. `Synthetic schlieren' refers to a recent advance in which these disturbances are visualised with a digital camera and image-processing technology rather than the classical use of parabolic mirrors and a knife-edge. In a typical setup, light from an image of horizontal lines or dots passes almost horizontally through the test section of a fluid to a CCD camera. Refractive index disturbances distort the image and digital comparison of successive images reveals the plan-form structure and time evolution of the disturbances. If the disturbance is effectively two-dimensional, meaning that it is uniform across the line-of-sight of the camera, then its magnitude as well as its structure can measured through simple inversion of an algebraic equation. If the structure is axisymmetric with rotation-axis perpendicular to the line of sight, the magnitude of the disturbance can be measured through inversion of a non-singular square matrix. Here we report upon the extension of this work toward measuring the magnitude of a fully three-dimensional disturbance. This is done by analysing images from two perspectives through the test section and using inversion tomography techniques to reconstruct the disturbance field. The results are tested against theoretical predictions and experimental measurements.

  2. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  3. Three-dimensional (3D) coseismic deformation map produced by the 2014 South Napa Earthquake estimated and modeled by SAR and GPS data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, Marco; Albano, Matteo; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a 3D map of coseismic displacements due to the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake, California, obtained by integrating displacement information data from SAR Interferometry (InSAR), Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI), Pixel Offset Tracking (POT) and GPS data acquired by both permanent stations and campaigns sites. This seismic event produced significant surface deformation along the 3D components causing several damages to vineyards, roads and houses. The remote sensing results, i.e. InSAR, MAI and POT, were obtained from the pair of SAR images provided by the Sentinel-1 satellite, launched on April 3rd, 2014. They were acquired on August 7th and 31st along descending orbits with an incidence angle of about 23°. The GPS dataset includes measurements from 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network (BARDN), 301 continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives, and 13 additional campaign sites from Barnhart et al, 2014 [1]. These data constrain the horizontal and vertical displacement components proving to be helpful for the adopted integration method. We exploit the Bayes theory to search for the 3D coseismic displacement components. In particular, for each point, we construct an energy function and solve the problem to find a global minimum. Experimental results are consistent with a strike-slip fault mechanism with an approximately NW-SE fault plane. Indeed, the 3D displacement map shows a strong North-South (NS) component, peaking at about 15 cm, a few kilometers far from the epicenter. The East-West (EW) displacement component reaches its maximum (~10 cm) south of the city of Napa, whereas the vertical one (UP) is smaller, although a subsidence in the order of 8 cm on the east side of the fault can be observed. A source modelling was performed by inverting the estimated displacement components. The best fitting model is given by a ~N330° E-oriented and ~70° dipping fault with a prevailing

  4. Progress Toward an Integration of Process-Structure-Property-Performance Models for "Three-Dimensional (3-D) Printing" of Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Haden, C. V.; Ghamarian, I.; Hayes, B. J.; Ales, T.; Penso, G.; Dixit, V.; Harlow, G.

    2014-07-01

    Electron beam direct manufacturing, synonymously known as electron beam additive manufacturing, along with other additive "3-D printing" manufacturing processes, are receiving widespread attention as a means of producing net-shape (or near-net-shape) components, owing to potential manufacturing benefits. Yet, materials scientists know that differences in manufacturing processes often significantly influence the microstructure of even widely accepted materials and, thus, impact the properties and performance of a material in service. It is important to accelerate the understanding of the processing-structure-property relationship of materials being produced via these novel approaches in a framework that considers the performance in a statistically rigorous way. This article describes the development of a process model, the assessment of key microstructural features to be incorporated into a microstructure simulation model, a novel approach to extract a constitutive equation to predict tensile properties in Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64), and a probabilistic approach to measure the fidelity of the property model against real data. This integrated approach will provide designers a tool to vary process parameters and understand the influence on performance, enabling design and optimization for these highly visible manufacturing approaches.

  5. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include “tritter” and “quarter” as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics. PMID:23181189

  6. All-optical fast random number generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2010-09-13

    We propose a scheme of all-optical random number generator (RNG), which consists of an ultra-wide bandwidth (UWB) chaotic laser, an all-optical sampler and an all-optical comparator. Free from the electric-device bandwidth, it can generate 10Gbit/s random numbers in our simulation. The high-speed bit sequences can pass standard statistical tests for randomness after all-optical exclusive-or (XOR) operation.

  7. All-optical buffering for DPSK packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guodong; Wu, Chongqing; Liu, Lanlan; Wang, Fu; Mao, Yaya; Sun, Zhenchao

    2013-12-01

    Advanced modulation formats, such as DPSK, DQPSK, QAM, have become the mainstream technologies in the optical network over 40Gb/s, the DPSK format is the fundamental of all advanced modulation formats. Optical buffers, as a key element for temporarily storing packets in order to synchronization or contention resolution in optical nodes, must be adapted to this new requirement. Different from other current buffers to store the NRZ or RZ format, an all-optical buffer of storing DPSK packets based on nonlinear polarization rotation in SOA is proposed and demonstrated. In this buffer, a section of PMF is used as fiber delay line to maintain the polarization states unchanged, the driver current of SOA is optimized, and no amplifier is required in the fiber loop. A packet delay resolution of 400ns is obtained and storage for tens rounds is demonstrated without significant signal degradation. Using proposed the new tunable DPSK demodulator, bit error rate has been measured after buffering for tens rounds for 10Gb/s data payload. Configurations for First-in First-out (FIFO) buffer or First-in Last-out (FILO) buffer are proposed based on this buffer. The buffer is easy control and suitable for integration. The terminal contention caused by different clients can be mitigated by managing packets delays in future all-optical network, such as optical packet switching network and WDM switching network.

  8. All-optical signal processing using dynamic Brillouin gratings

    PubMed Central

    Santagiustina, Marco; Chin, Sanghoon; Primerov, Nicolay; Ursini, Leonora; Thévenaz, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The manipulation of dynamic Brillouin gratings in optical fibers is demonstrated to be an extremely flexible technique to achieve, with a single experimental setup, several all-optical signal processing functions. In particular, all-optical time differentiation, time integration and true time reversal are theoretically predicted, and then numerically and experimentally demonstrated. The technique can be exploited to process both photonic and ultra-wide band microwave signals, so enabling many applications in photonics and in radio science. PMID:23549159

  9. NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays grown on flexible nitrogen-doped carbon foams as three-dimensional binder-free integrated anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Li, Songmei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei

    2016-02-14

    Binary metal sulfides, especially NiCo2S4, hold great promise as anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries because of their excellent electronic conductivity and high capacity compared to mono-metal sulfides and oxides. Here, NiCo2S4 nanotube arrays are successfully grown on flexible nitrogen-doped carbon foam (NDCF) substrates with robust adhesion via a facile surfactant-assisted hydrothermal route and the subsequent sulfurization treatment. The obtained NiCo2S4/NDCF composites show unique three-dimensional architectures, in which NiCo2S4 nanotubes of ∼5 μm in length and 100 nm in width are uniformly grown on the NDCF skeletons to form arrays. When used directly as integrated anodes for lithium-ion batteries without any conductive additives and binders, the NiCo2S4/NDCF composites exhibit a high reversible capacity of 1721 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 500 mA g(-1), enhanced cycling performance with the capacity maintained at 1182 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles, and a remarkable rate capability. The excellent lithium storage performances of the composites could be attributed to the unique material composition, a rationally designed hollow nanostructure and an integrated smart architecture, which offer fast electron transport and ion diffusion, enhanced material/-electrolyte contact area and facile accommodation of strains during the lithium insertion and extraction process.

  10. 0.6-1.0 V operation set/reset voltage (3 V) generator for three-dimensional integrated resistive random access memory and NAND flash hybrid solid-state drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Hachiya, Shogo; Ishii, Tomoya; Ning, Sheyang; Tsurumi, Kota; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-04-01

    A 0.6-1.0 V, 25.9 mm2 boost converter is proposed to generate resistive random access memory (ReRAM) write (set/reset) voltage for three-dimensional (3D) integrated ReRAM and NAND flash hybrid solid-state drive (SSD). The proposed boost converter uses an integrated area-efficient V BUF generation circuit to obtain short ReRAM sector write time, small circuit size, and small energy consumption simultaneously. In specific, the proposed boost converter reduces ReRAM sector write time by 65% compared with a conventional one-stage boost converter (Conventional 1) which uses 1.0 V operating voltage. On the other hand, by using the same ReRAM sector write time, the proposed boost converter reduces 49% circuit area and 46% energy consumption compared with a conventional two-stage boost converter (Conventional 2). In addition, by using the proposed boost converter, the operating voltage, V DD, can be reduced to 0.6 V. The lowest 159 nJ energy consumption can be obtained when V DD is 0.7 V.

  11. Three Dimensional Illustrating--Three-Dimensional Vision and Deception of Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szállassy, Noémi; Gánóczy, Anita; Kriska, György

    2009-01-01

    The wide-spread digital photography and computer use gave the opportunity for everyone to make three-dimensional pictures and to make them public. The new opportunities with three-dimensional techniques give chance for the birth of new artistic photographs. We present in detail the biological roots of three-dimensional visualization, the phenomena…

  12. Three-dimensional laser window formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report discusses in detail the aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formation of these windows. Included in this discussion are the design criteria, bonding mediums, and evaluation testing for three-dimensional laser windows.

  13. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach.

    PubMed

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl(-) + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl(-)) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  14. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike self-consistent field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-07

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple S{sub N}2 reaction (Cl{sup −} + CH{sub 3}Cl → ClCH{sub 3} + Cl{sup −}) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  15. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  16. Three dimensional optic tissue culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Cardwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioreactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms normal, functional tissue organization and extracellular matrix.

  17. Three-Dimensional Icosahedral Phase Field Quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.; Archer, A. J.; Knobloch, E.; Rucklidge, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the formation and stability of icosahedral quasicrystalline structures using a dynamic phase field crystal model. Nonlinear interactions between density waves at two length scales stabilize three-dimensional quasicrystals. We determine the phase diagram and parameter values required for the quasicrystal to be the global minimum free energy state. We demonstrate that traits that promote the formation of two-dimensional quasicrystals are extant in three dimensions, and highlight the characteristics required for three-dimensional soft matter quasicrystal formation.

  18. The GALAXIE all-optical FEL project

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Arab, E.; Andonian, G.; Cahill, A.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukusawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Jovanovic, I.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Ovodenko, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Putterman, S.; Roberts, K.; Shumail, M.; and others

    2012-12-21

    We describe a comprehensive project, funded under the DARPA AXiS program, to develop an all-optical table-top X-ray FEL based on dielectric acceleration and electromagnetic undulators, yielding a compact source of coherent X-rays for medical and related applications. The compactness of this source demands that high field (>GV/m) acceleration and undulation-inducing fields be employed, thus giving rise to the project's acronym: GV/m AcceLerator And X-ray Integrated Experiment (GALAXIE). There are numerous physics and technical hurdles to surmount in this ambitious scenario, and the integrated solutions include: a biharmonic photonic TW structure, 200 micron wavelength electromagnetic undulators, 5 {mu}m laser development, ultra-high brightness magnetized/asymmetric emittance electron beam generation, and SASE FEL operation. We describe the overall design philosophy of the project, the innovative approaches to addressing the challenges presented by the design, and the significant progress towards realization of these approaches in the nine months since project initialization.

  19. Numerical investigation of high-contrast ultrafast all-optical switching in low-refractive-index polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zi-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Chen; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    With the development of micro- or nano-fabrication technologies, great interest has been aroused in exploiting photonic crystal nanobeam structures. In this article the design of high-quality-factor (Q) polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities suitable for realizing ultrafast all-optical switching is presented based on the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Adopting the pump-probe technique, the ultrafast dynamic response of the all-optical switching in a nanobeam microcavity with a quality factor of 1000 and modal volume of 1.22 (λ/n)3 is numerically studied and a switching time as fast as 3.6 picoseconds is obtained. Our results indicate the great promise of applying photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities to construct integrated ultrafast tunable photonic devices or circuits incorporating polymer materials with large Kerr nonlinearity and ultrafast response speed.

  20. Imaging Three Dimensional Two-Particle Correlations for Heavy-Ion Reaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Enokizono, A; Heffner, M; Soltz, R; Danielewicz, P; Pratt, S

    2005-06-27

    The authors report an extension of the source imaging method for analyzing three-dimensional sources from three-dimensional correlations. The technique consists of expanding the correlation data and the underlying source function in spherical harmonics and inverting the resulting system of one-dimensional integral equations. With this strategy, they can image the source function quickly, even with the extremely large data sets common in three-dimensional analyses.

  1. All optical switching in henna thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henari, Fryad Z.; Jasim, Khalil E.

    2013-08-01

    The optical nonlinearity in henna (Lawson (2- hydroxyl-1,4 naphthoquinone) film was utilized to demonstrate all optical switching. The nonlinear absorption of the henna film was calculated by measuring the transmission of the laser beam ( λ = 488 nm) as a function of incident light intensities. The observed nonlinear absorption is attributed to a two-photon absorption process. The pump and probe technique was used to demonstrate all optical switching. The switching characteristics can be utilized to generate all-optical logic gates such as simple inverter switches (NOT) NOR, AND NAND logic functions.

  2. A Comparison of Ellipse-Fitting Techniques for Two and Three-Dimensional Strain Analysis, and Their Implementation in an Integrated Computer Program Designed for Field-Based Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, F. W.

    2010-12-01

    A new computer program, EllipseFit 2, was developed to implement computational and graphical techniques for two and three-dimensional geological finite strain analysis. The program includes an integrated set of routines to derive three-dimensional strain from oriented digital photographs, with a graphical interface suitable for field-based structural studies. The intuitive interface and multi-platform deployment make it useful for structural geology teaching laboratories as well (the program is free). Images of oriented sections are digitized using center-point, five-point ellipse, or n-point polygon moment-equivalent ellipse fitting. The latter allows strain calculation from irregular polygons with sub-pixel accuracy (Steger, 1996; Mulchrone and Choudhury, 2004). Graphical strain ellipse techniques include center-to-center methods (Fry, 1979; Erslev, 1988; Erslev and Ge, 1990), with manual and automatic n-point ellipse-fitting. Graphical displays include axial length graphs, Rf/Φ graphs (Dunnet, 1969), logarithmic and hyperbolic polar graphs (Elliott, 1970; Wheeler, 1984) with automatic contouring, and strain maps. Best-fit ellipse calculations include harmonic and circular means, and eigenvalue (Shimamoto and Ikeda, 1976) and mean radial length (Mulchrone et al., 2003) shape-matrix calculations. Shape-matrix error analysis is done analytically (Mulchrone, 2005) and using bootstrap techniques (Efron, 1979). The initial data set can be unstrained to check variation in the calculated pre-strain fabric. Fitting of ellipse-section data to a best-fit ellipsoid (b*) is done using the shape-matrix technique of Shan (2008). Error analysis is done by calculating the section ellipses of b*, and comparing the misfits between calculated and observed section ellipses. Graphical displays of ellipsoid data include axial-ratio (Flinn, 1962) and octahedral strain magnitude (Hossack, 1968) graphs. Calculations were done to test and compare computational techniques. For two

  3. Vision in our three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of our perceptual experience are dominated by the fact that our two eyes point forward. Whilst the location of our eyes leaves the environment behind our head inaccessible to vision, co-ordinated use of our two eyes gives us direct access to the three-dimensional structure of the scene in front of us, through the mechanism of stereoscopic vision. Scientific understanding of the different brain regions involved in stereoscopic vision and three-dimensional spatial cognition is changing rapidly, with consequent influences on fields as diverse as clinical practice in ophthalmology and the technology of virtual reality devices. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269595

  4. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be constrained as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  5. Topology of three-dimensional separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Peake, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that patterns of skin-friction lines and external streamlines reflect the properties of continuous vector fields, topology rules define a small number of singular points (nodes, saddle points, and foci) that characterize the patterns on the surface and on particular projections of the flow (e.g., the crossflow plane). The restricted number of singular points and the rules that they obey are considered as an organizing principle whose finite number of elements can be combined in various ways to connect together the properties common to all steady three dimensional viscous flows. Introduction of a distinction between local and global properties of the flow resolves an ambiguity in the proper definition of a three dimensional separated flow. Adoption of the notions of topological structure, structural stability, and bifurcation provides a framework to describe how three dimensional separated flows originate and succeed each other as the relevant parameters of the problem are varied.

  6. Binocular three-dimensional measurement system using a Dammann grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Zhou, Changhe; Wei, Shengbin; Wang, Shaoqing; Li, Shubin; Li, Yanyang; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yancong

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a binocular three-dimensional measurement system using a Dammann grating. A laser diode and a Dammann grating are employed to generate a regular and square laser spot array. Dammann array illuminator is placed between two cameras and narrowband-pass filters are embedded in the project lens to eliminate the interference of background light. During the measurement, a series of laser spot arrays are projected toward the target object and captured by two cameras simultaneously. Similar to stereo vision of human eyes, stereo matching will be performed to search the homologous spot which is a pair of image points resulting from the same object point. At first, the sub-pixel coordinates of the laser spots are extracted from the stereo images. Then stereo matching is easily performed based on a fact that laser spots with the same diffraction order are homologous ones. Because the system has been calibrated before measurement, single frame three-dimensional point cloud can be obtained using the disparity of homologous points by triangulation methods. Finally, three-dimensional point clouds belong to different frame which represent different view of the object will be registered to build up an integral three-dimensional object using ICP algorithm. On one hand, this setup is small enough to meet the portable outdoor applications. On the other hand, measurement accuracy of this system is better than 0.3 mm which can meet the measurement accuracy requirements in most situations.

  7. Three-Dimensional Robotic Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thinh V.

    1989-01-01

    Stereoscopy and motion provide clues to outlines of objects. Digital image-processing system acts as "intelligent" automatic machine-vision system by processing views from stereoscopic television cameras into three-dimensional coordinates of moving object in view. Epipolar-line technique used to find corresponding points in stereoscopic views. Robotic vision system analyzes views from two television cameras to detect rigid three-dimensional objects and reconstruct numerically in terms of coordinates of corner points. Stereoscopy and effects of motion on two images complement each other in providing image-analyzing subsystem with clues to natures and locations of principal features.

  8. Three-Dimensional Extended Bargmann Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Rosseel, Jan

    2016-06-01

    We show that three-dimensional general relativity, augmented with two vector fields, allows for a nonrelativistic limit, different from the standard limit leading to Newtonian gravity, that results in a well-defined action which is of the Chern-Simons type. We show that this three-dimensional "extended Bargmann gravity," after coupling to matter, leads to equations of motion allowing a wider class of background geometries than the ones that one encounters in Newtonian gravity. We give the supersymmetric generalization of these results and point out an important application in the context of calculating partition functions of nonrelativistic field theories using localization techniques.

  9. Three-Dimensional Extended Bargmann Supergravity.

    PubMed

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Rosseel, Jan

    2016-06-24

    We show that three-dimensional general relativity, augmented with two vector fields, allows for a nonrelativistic limit, different from the standard limit leading to Newtonian gravity, that results in a well-defined action which is of the Chern-Simons type. We show that this three-dimensional "extended Bargmann gravity," after coupling to matter, leads to equations of motion allowing a wider class of background geometries than the ones that one encounters in Newtonian gravity. We give the supersymmetric generalization of these results and point out an important application in the context of calculating partition functions of nonrelativistic field theories using localization techniques. PMID:27391712

  10. Three-Dimensional Icosahedral Phase Field Quasicrystal.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, P; Archer, A J; Knobloch, E; Rucklidge, A M

    2016-08-12

    We investigate the formation and stability of icosahedral quasicrystalline structures using a dynamic phase field crystal model. Nonlinear interactions between density waves at two length scales stabilize three-dimensional quasicrystals. We determine the phase diagram and parameter values required for the quasicrystal to be the global minimum free energy state. We demonstrate that traits that promote the formation of two-dimensional quasicrystals are extant in three dimensions, and highlight the characteristics required for three-dimensional soft matter quasicrystal formation. PMID:27563973

  11. All-optical information processing in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    This thesis covers coherent and incoherent all-optical information processing using photonic bandgap nanostructures and microcavities. The first 3 chapters introduce all-optical bistable switching, transistor and memory elements with sub-micron scale dimensions. A strategy for large scale integration without optical isolators is also described. In chapters 4 and 5, dynamically modulated photonic crystal structures are introduced. It is shown that light pulses can be stopped and stored all-optically without requiring any coherent or resonant light-matter interaction. In chapter 6, it is shown that light pulses can be coherently time-reversed by using only index modulations and linear optics. In chapter 7, a supercomputer implementation of an object oriented finite difference time domain simulation is described to simulate photonic nanostructures with arbitrary material & geometric features.

  12. All-optical controlling based on nonlinear graphene plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Tao, Jin; Chen, Zan Hui; Huang, Xu Guang

    2016-09-19

    We give the effective refractive index of graphene plasmonic waveguides with both linear and nonlinear effects based on the nonlinear cross-phase modulation, and address the effects of photo-induced refractive index change and absorption change. A non-resonant all-optical nonlinear graphene plasmonic switch with an ultra-compact size of 0.25 μm2 is proposed and numerically analyzed based on the dynamics of the photo-induced absorption change. The results show that the all-optical graphene plasmonic switch can realize a broad bandwidth over 5 THz, a potentially very high switching speed and an extinction ratio of 18.14 dB with the electric amplitude of the pump light of 1.5 × 107 V/m at the signal frequency of 28 THz. Our study could provide a possibility for future all-optical highly integrated optical components. PMID:27661951

  13. Analysis of autostereoscopic three-dimensional images using multiview wavelets.

    PubMed

    Saveljev, Vladimir; Palchikova, Irina

    2016-08-10

    We propose that multiview wavelets can be used in processing multiview images. The reference functions for the synthesis/analysis of multiview images are described. The synthesized binary images were observed experimentally as three-dimensional visual images. The symmetric multiview B-spline wavelets are proposed. The locations recognized in the continuous wavelet transform correspond to the layout of the test objects. The proposed wavelets can be applied to the multiview, integral, and plenoptic images. PMID:27534470

  14. Three-dimensional models. [For orbital celestial mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. )

    1990-06-01

    The Schwarzschild (1979) approach to the analysis of three-dimensional galactic models is reviewed. An analysis of triaxial Staeckel models is discussed which shows that such models have a wide variety of possible distribution functions. The uniqueness that Schwarzschild first encountered in his discrete formulation of the problem of finding a three-integral distribution function for a triaxial density is real and not an artifact of the finite cell approximation. 27 refs.

  15. Three-Dimensional Printing Surgical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle F.; Butler, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional printing, a technology used for decades in the industrial field, gains a lot of attention in the medical field for its potential benefits. With advancement of desktop printers, this technology is accessible and a lot of research is going on in the medical field. Objective: To evaluate its application in surgical field, which may include but not limited to surgical planning, surgical education, implants, and prosthesis, which are the focus of this review. Methods: Research was conducted by searching PubMed, Web of science, and other reliable sources. We included original articles and excluded articles based on animals, those more than 10 years old, and those not in English. These articles were evaluated, and relevant studies were included in this review. Discussion: Three-dimensional printing shows a potential benefit in surgical application. Printed implants were used in patient in a few cases and show successful results; however, longer follow-up and more trials are needed. Surgical and medical education is believed to be more efficient with this technology than the current practice. Printed surgical instrument and surgical planning are also believed to improve with three-dimensional printing. Conclusion: Three-dimensional printing can be a very powerful tool in the near future, which can aid the medical field that is facing a lot of challenges and obstacles. However, despite the reported results, further research on larger samples and analytical measurements should be conducted to ensure this technology's impact on the practice. PMID:26301002

  16. Three Dimensional Display Of Meteorological Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotch, Stanley L.

    1988-01-01

    Even a cursory reading of any daily newspaper shows that we are in the midst of a dramatic revolution in computer graphics. Virtually every day some new piece of hardware or software is announced, adding to the tools available to the working scientist. Three dimensional graphics form a significant part of this revolution having become virtually commonplace in advertising and on television.

  17. Three-Dimensional Messages for Interstellar Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    One of the challenges facing independently evolved civilizations separated by interstellar distances is to communicate information unique to one civilization. One commonly proposed solution is to begin with two-dimensional pictorial representations of mathematical concepts and physical objects, in the hope that this will provide a foundation for overcoming linguistic barriers. However, significant aspects of such representations are highly conventional, and may not be readily intelligible to a civilization with different conventions. The process of teaching conventions of representation may be facilitated by the use of three-dimensional representations redundantly encoded in multiple formats (e.g., as both vectors and as rasters). After having illustrated specific conventions for representing mathematical objects in a three-dimensional space, this method can be used to describe a physical environment shared by transmitter and receiver: a three-dimensional space defined by the transmitter--receiver axis, and containing stars within that space. This method can be extended to show three-dimensional representations varying over time. Having clarified conventions for representing objects potentially familiar to both sender and receiver, novel objects can subsequently be depicted. This is illustrated through sequences showing interactions between human beings, which provide information about human behavior and personality. Extensions of this method may allow the communication of such culture-specific features as aesthetic judgments and religious beliefs. Limitations of this approach will be noted, with specific reference to ETI who are not primarily visual.

  18. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Particle Tracks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests ways to bring home to the introductory physics student some of the excitement of recent discoveries in particle physics. Describes particle detectors and encourages the use of the Standard Model along with real images of particle tracks to determine three-dimensional views of tracks. (MVL)

  19. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  20. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Three-dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichert, Anke

    2001-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flue virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  2. A Three-Dimensional Optical Photonic Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Lin, S.

    1998-12-17

    The search for a photonic crystal to confine optical waves in all three dimensions (3D) has proven to be a formidable task. It evolves from an early theoretical suggestion [1,2], a brief skepticism [3-5] and triumph in developing the mm-wave [6-8] and infrared 3D photonic crystals [9]. Yet, the challenge remains, as the ultimate goal for optoelectronic applications is to realize a 3D crystal at X=1.5 pm communication wavelengths. Operating at visible and near infrared wavelengths, X=1-2 pm, a photonic crystal may enhance the spontaneous emission rate [1, 10] and give rise to a semiconductor lasers with a zero lasing threshold[11, 12]. Another important application is optically switching, routing and interconnecting light [13,14] with an ultrafast transmission speed of terabits per second. A photonic crystal may also serve as a platform for integrating an all-optical circuitry with multiple photonic components, such as waveguides and switches, built on one chip [15]. In this Letter, we report on the successful fabrication of a working 3D crystal operating at optical L The minimum feature size of the 3D structure is 180 nanometers. The 3D crystal is free from defects over the entire 6-inch silicon wafer and has an absolute photonic band gap centered at A.-1.6 pm. Our data provides the first conclusive evidence for the existence of a full 3D photonic band gap in optical A. This development will pave the way to tinier, cheaper, more effective waveguides, optical switches and lasers.

  3. Which animal model for understanding human navigation in a three-dimensional world?

    PubMed

    Orban, Guy A

    2013-10-01

    Single-cell studies of monkey posterior parietal cortex (PPC) have revealed the extensive neuronal representations of three-dimensional subject motion and three-dimensional layout of the environment. I propose that navigational planning integrates this PPC information, including gravity signals, with horizontal-plane based information provided by the hippocampal formation, modified in primates by expansion of the ventral stream.

  4. Quadratic algebras for three-dimensional superintegrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daskaloyannis, C. Tanoudis, Y.

    2010-02-15

    The three-dimensional superintegrable systems with quadratic integrals of motion have five functionally independent integrals, one among them is the Hamiltonian. Kalnins, Kress, and Miller have proved that in the case of nondegenerate potentials with quadratic integrals of motion there is a sixth quadratic integral, which is linearly independent of the other integrals. The existence of this sixth integral implies that the integrals of motion form a ternary parafermionic-like quadratic Poisson algebra with five generators. In this contribution we investigate the structure of this algebra. We show that in all the nondegenerate cases there is at least one subalgebra of three integrals having a Poisson quadratic algebra structure, which is similar to the two-dimensional case.

  5. Artifacts in three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Faletra, Francesco Fulvio; Ramamurthi, Alamelu; Dequarti, Maria Cristina; Leo, Laura Anna; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pandian, Natesa

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is subject to the same types of artifacts encountered on two-dimensional TEE. However, when displayed in a 3D format, some of the artifacts appear more "realistic," whereas others are unique to image acquisition and postprocessing. Three-dimensional TEE is increasingly used in the setting of percutaneous catheter-based interventions and ablation procedures, and 3D artifacts caused by the metallic components of catheters and devices are particularly frequent. Knowledge of these artifacts is of paramount relevance to avoid misinterpretation of 3D images. Although artifacts and pitfalls on two-dimensional echocardiography are well described and classified, a systematic description of artifacts in 3D transesophageal echocardiographic images and how they affect 3D imaging is still absent. The aim of this review is to describe the most relevant artifacts on 3D TEE, with particular emphasis on those occurring during percutaneous interventions for structural heart disease and ablation procedures.

  6. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane. 7 figs.

  7. Three-dimensional effects on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of boundary layer flows along the walls of wind tunnels were studied to validate the transfer of two dimensional calculations to three dimensional transonic flowfield calculations. Results from trials in various wind tunnels were examind to determine the effects of the wall boundary flow on the control surfaces of an airfoil. Models sliding along a groove in the wall of a channel at sub- and transonic speeds were examined, with the finding that with either nonuniformities in the groove, or even if the channel walls are uniform, the lateral boundary layer can cause variations in the central flow region or alter the onset of shock at the transition point. Models for the effects in both turbulence and in the absence of turbulence are formulated, and it is noted that the characteristics of individual wind tunnels must be studied to quantify any existing three dimensional effects.

  8. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Helical Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Egelman, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The field of three-dimensional electron microscopy began more than 45 years ago with a reconstruction of a helical phage tail, and helical polymers continue to be important objects for three-dimensional reconstruction due to the centrality of helical protein and nucleoprotein polymers in all aspects of biology. We are now witnessing a fundamental revolution in this area, made possible by direct electron detectors, which has led to near-atomic resolution for a number of important helical structures. Most importantly, the possibility of achieving such resolution routinely for a vast number of helical samples is within our reach. One of the main problems in helical reconstruction, ambiguities in assigning the helical symmetry, is overcome when one reaches a resolution where secondary structure is clearly visible. However, obstacles still exist due to the intrinsic variability within many helical filaments. PMID:25912526

  9. Three dimensional fabrication at small size scales

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that we live in a three-dimensional (3D) world and macroscale engineering is 3D, conventional sub-mm scale engineering is inherently two-dimensional (2D). New fabrication and patterning strategies are needed to enable truly three-dimensionally-engineered structures at small size scales. Here, we review strategies that have been developed over the last two decades that seek to enable such millimeter to nanoscale 3D fabrication and patterning. A focus of this review is the strategy of self-assembly, specifically in a biologically inspired, more deterministic form known as self-folding. Self-folding methods can leverage the strengths of lithography to enable the construction of precisely patterned 3D structures and “smart” components. This self-assembling approach is compared with other 3D fabrication paradigms, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:20349446

  10. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing. PMID:25921944

  11. Three-dimensional reconstruction of helical polymers.

    PubMed

    Egelman, Edward H

    2015-09-01

    The field of three-dimensional electron microscopy began more than 45years ago with a reconstruction of a helical phage tail, and helical polymers continue to be important objects for three-dimensional reconstruction due to the centrality of helical protein and nucleoprotein polymers in all aspects of biology. We are now witnessing a fundamental revolution in this area, made possible by direct electron detectors, which has led to near-atomic resolution for a number of important helical structures. Most importantly, the possibility of achieving such resolution routinely for a vast number of helical samples is within our reach. One of the main problems in helical reconstruction, ambiguities in assigning the helical symmetry, is overcome when one reaches a resolution where secondary structure is clearly visible. However, obstacles still exist due to the intrinsic variability within many helical filaments.

  12. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing.

  13. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  14. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane.

  15. Three-dimensional Allan fault plane analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, K.S.; Taylor, D.R.; Schnell, R.T.

    1994-12-31

    Allan fault-plane analysis is a useful tool for determining hydrocarbon migration paths and the location of possible traps. While initially developed for Gulf coast deltaic and interdeltaic environments, fault-plane analysis has been successfully applied in many other geologic settings. Where the geology involves several intersecting faults and greater complexity, many two-dimensional displays are required in the investigation and it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately visualize both fault relationships and migration routes. Three-dimensional geospatial fault and structure modeling using computer techniques, however, facilitates both visualization and understanding and extends fault-plane analysis into much more complex situations. When a model is viewed in three dimensions, the strata on both sides of a fault can be seen simultaneously while the true structural character of one or more fault surfaces is preserved. Three-dimensional analysis improves the speed and accuracy of the fault plane methodology.

  16. Simulation of complex three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diewert, G. S.; Rothmund, H. J.; Nakahashi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of splitting is used extensively to simulate complex three dimensional flows on modern computer architectures. Used in all aspects, from initial grid generation to the determination of the final converged solution, splitting is used to enhance code vectorization, to permit solution driven grid adaption and grid enrichment, to permit the use of concurrent processing, and to enhance data flow through hierarchal memory systems. Three examples are used to illustrate these concepts to complex three dimensional flow fields: (1) interactive flow over a bump; (2) supersonic flow past a blunt based conical afterbody at incidence to a free stream and containing a centered propulsive jet; and (3) supersonic flow past a sharp leading edge delta wing at incidence to the free stream.

  17. Three-dimensional Lorentz-violating action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, J. R.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Wotzasek, C.; Zarro, C. A. D.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the generation of the three-dimensional Chern-Simons-like Lorentz-breaking "mixed" quadratic action via an appropriate Lorentz-breaking coupling of vector and scalar fields to the spinor field and study some features of the scalar QED with such a term. We show that the same term emerges through a nonperturbative method, namely the Julia-Toulouse approach of condensation of charges and defects.

  18. Three-dimensional ballistocardiography in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scano, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is described the aim of which is to record a three dimensional ballistocardiogram under the condition of weightlessness and to compare it with tracings recorded on the same subject on the ground as a means of clarifying the meaning of ballistocardiogram waves in different physiological and perphaps pathological conditions. Another purpose is to investigate cardiovascular and possibly fluid adaptations to weightlessness from data collected almost simultaneously on the same subjects during the other cardiovascular during the other cardiovascular and metabolic experiments.

  19. Stress tensor correlators in three dimensional gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Grumiller, Daniel; Merbis, Wout

    2016-03-01

    We calculate holographically arbitrary n -point correlators of the boundary stress tensor in three-dimensional Einstein gravity with negative or vanishing cosmological constant. We provide explicit expressions up to 5-point (connected) correlators and show consistency with the Galilean conformal field theory Ward identities and recursion relations of correlators, which we derive. This provides a novel check of flat space holography in three dimensions.

  20. Three-Dimensional Dispaly Of Document Set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2003-06-24

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  1. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B [Oxnard, CA; Pennock, Kelly A [Richland, WA; Pottier, Marc C [Richland, WA; Schur, Anne [Richland, WA; Thomas, James J [Richland, WA; Wise, James A [Richland, WA

    2001-10-02

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  2. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2006-09-26

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may e transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  3. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.; York, Jeremy

    2009-06-30

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  4. Three-dimensional printing of scintillating materials.

    PubMed

    Mishnayot, Y; Layani, M; Cooperstein, I; Magdassi, S; Ron, G

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of three-dimensional printing techniques to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report on the development of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various applications.

  5. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  6. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  7. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  8. Mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  9. Mineralized Three-Dimensional Bone Constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  10. Three-dimensional motor schema based navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, Ronald C.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive schema-based navigation is possible in space domains by extending the methods developed for ground-based navigation found within the Autonomous Robot Architecture (AuRA). Reformulation of two dimensional motor schemas for three dimensional applications is a straightforward process. The manifold advantages of schema-based control persist, including modular development, amenability to distributed processing, and responsiveness to environmental sensing. Simulation results show the feasibility of this methodology for space docking operations in a cluttered work area.

  11. Three-dimensional adjustment of trilateration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, L.-Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional locations of the monuments in the USGS Hollister trilateration network were adjusted to fit line length observations observed in 1977, using a Bayesian approach, and incorporating prior elevation estimates as data in the adjustment procedure. No significant discrepancies in the measured line lengths were found, but significant elevation adjustments (up to 1.85 m) were needed to fit the length data.

  12. Three-dimensional photogrammetry for laboratory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Nabih M.

    1994-12-01

    The direct linear transformation (DLT) is a method that simplifies measurements of the three-dimensional coordinates of a point target in the laboratory using photographic two-dimensional imagery. This report describes a procedure to implement the DLT equations and gives the Fortran code of computer programs for the DLT calibration of multicamera system and 3-D reconstruction of a single point from several images.

  13. All-optical flip-flop based on coupled SOA-PSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Chen; Wang, Fu

    2016-07-01

    The semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has obvious advantages in all-optical signal processing, because of the simple structure, strong non-linearity, and easy integration. A variety of all-optical signal processing functions, such as all-optical wavelength conversion, all-optical logic gates and all-optical sampling, can be completed by SOA. So the SOA has been widespread concerned in the field of all-optical signal processing. Recently, the polarization rotation effect of SOA is receiving considerable interest, and many researchers have launched numerous research work utilizing this effect. In this paper, a new all-optical flip-flop structure using polarization switch (PSW) based on polarization rotation effect of SOA is presented.

  14. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  15. Three-dimensional Chiral Plasmonic Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Mario

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate chiral optical response in stacked arrangements of plasmonic nanostructures. We show that three-dimensional arrangements of plasmonic ``meta-atoms'' only exhibit a chiral optical response if similar plasmonic ``atoms'' are arranged in a handed fashion as we require resonant plasmonic coupling. Moreover, we demonstrate that such particle groupings, similarly to molecular systems, possess the capability to encode their three-dimensional arrangement in unique and well-modulated spectra, making them ideal candidates for a three-dimensional chiral plasmon ruler. Furthermore, we discuss the onset of a broadband chiral optical response in the wavelength regime between 700 nm and 3500 nm upon charge transfer between the nanoparticles. We show in experiment and simulation that this response is due to the ohmic contact between adjacent particles which causes a strong red-shift of the fundamental mode. The geometrical shape of the resulting fused particles allows for efficient excitation of higher order modes. Calculated spectra and field distributions confirm our interpretation and show a number of interacting plasmonic modes. Finally, we will discuss plasmonic diastereomers which consist of multiple chiral centers. We find that the chiral optical response of the composite molecules can be traced back to the properties of the constituting building blocks. We demonstrate that the optical response of complex chiral plasmonic systems can be decomposed and understood in terms of fundamental building blocks, offering simple and straightforward design rules for future applications such as chiral optical elements and enantiomer sensors.

  16. Reconfigurable, braced, three-dimensional DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Russell P.; Heilemann, Mike; Doose, Sören; Erben, Christoph M.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2008-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology makes use of the exquisite self-recognition of DNA in order to build on a molecular scale. Although static structures may find applications in structural biology and computer science, many applications in nanomedicine and nanorobotics require the additional capacity for controlled three-dimensional movement. DNA architectures can span three dimensions and DNA devices are capable of movement, but active control of well-defined three-dimensional structures has not been achieved. We demonstrate the operation of reconfigurable DNA tetrahedra whose shapes change precisely and reversibly in response to specific molecular signals. Shape changes are confirmed by gel electrophoresis and by bulk and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. DNA tetrahedra are natural building blocks for three-dimensional construction; they may be synthesized rapidly with high yield of a single stereoisomer, and their triangulated architecture conveys structural stability. The introduction of shape-changing structural modules opens new avenues for the manipulation of matter on the nanometre scale.

  17. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  18. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  19. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  20. Three-dimensional imaging characteristics and depth resolution in digital holographic three-dimensional imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2015-07-01

    A four-dimensional impulse response function for the digital holographic three-dimensional imaging spectrometry has been fully derived in closed form. Due to its factorizing nature of the mathematical expression of four-dimensional impulse response function, three-dimensional spatial part of impulse response function directly corresponds to threedimensional point spread function of in-line digital holography with rectangular aperture. Based on these mathematical results, this paper focuses on the investigation of spectral resolution and three-dimensional spatial resolution in digital holographic three-dimensional imaging spectrometry and digital holography. We found that the theoretical prediction agree well with the experimental results. This work suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding threedimensional spatial resolution of in-line digital holography.

  1. Three-dimensional laser window formation for industrial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.; Kowalski, David

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional, compound-curvature laser windows to extreme accuracies. These windows represent an integral component of specialized nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems that are used in a variety of compressor and turbine research testing facilities. These windows are molded to the flow surface profile of turbine and compressor casings and are required to withstand extremely high pressures and temperatures. This method of glass formation could also be used to form compound-curvature mirrors that would require little polishing and for a variety of industrial applications, including research view ports for testing devices and view ports for factory machines with compound-curvature casings. Currently, sodium-alumino-silicate glass is recommended for three-dimensional laser windows because of its high strength due to chemical strengthening and its optical clarity. This paper discusses the main aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities that are associated with the formation of these windows.

  2. Three dimensional self-assembly at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracias, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    At the nanoscale, three dimensional manipulation and assembly becomes extremely challenging and also cost prohibitive. Self-assembly provides an attractive and possibly the only highly parallel methodology to structure truly three dimensional patterned materials and devices at this size scale for applications in electronics, optics, robotics and medicine. This is a concise review along with a perspective of an important and exciting field in nanotechnology and is related to a Nanoengineering Pioneer Award that I received at this SPIE symposium for my contributions to the 3D selfassembly of nanostructures. I detail a historical account of 3D self-assembly and outline important developments in this area which is put into context with the larger research areas of 3D nanofabrication, assembly and nanomanufacturing. A focus in this review is on our work as it relates to the self-assembly with lithographically patterned units; this approach provides a means for heterogeneous integration of periodic, curved and angled nanostructures with precisely defined three dimensional patterns.

  3. The development of a three-dimensional partially elliptic flow computer program for combustor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional, partially elliptic, computer program was developed. Without requiring three dimensional computer storage locations for all flow variables, the partially elliptic program is capable of predicting three dimensional combustor flow fields with large downstream effects. The program requires only slight increase of computer storage over the parabolic flow program from which it was developed. A finite difference formulation for a three dimensional, fully elliptic, turbulent, reacting, flow field was derived. Because of the negligible diffusion effects in the main flow direction in a supersonic combustor, the set of finite-difference equations can be reduced to a partially elliptic form. Only the pressure field was governed by an elliptic equation and requires three dimensional storage; all other dependent variables are governed by parabolic equations. A numerical procedure which combines a marching integration scheme with an iterative scheme for solving the elliptic pressure was adopted.

  4. Three-dimensional nanoscopy of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Harke, Benjamin; Ullal, Chaitanya K; Keller, Jan; Hell, Stefan W

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate the direct three-dimensional imaging of densely packed colloidal nanostructures using stimulated emission depletion microscopy. A combination of two de-excitation patterns yields a resolution of 43 nm in the lateral and 125 nm in the axial direction and an effective focal volume that is by 126-fold smaller than that of a corresponding confocal microscope. The mapping of a model system of spheres organized by confined convective assembly unambiguously identified face-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, random hexagonal close-packed, and body-centered cubic structures.

  5. High resolution three-dimensional doping profiler

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping profiler provides a Schottky contact at one surface and an ohmic contact at the other. While the two contacts are coupled to a power source, thereby establishing an electrical bias in the semiconductor, a localized light source illuminates the semiconductor to induce a photocurrent. The photocurrent changes in accordance with the doping characteristics of the semiconductor in the illuminated region. By changing the voltage of the power source the depth of the depletion layer can be varied to provide a three dimensional view of the local properties of the semiconductor.

  6. Three dimensional digital holographic aperture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Stephen; Kaylor, Brant M; Barber, Zeb W; Reibel, Randy R

    2015-09-01

    Aperture synthesis techniques are applied to temporally and spatially diverse digital holograms recorded with a fast focal-plane array. Because the technique fully resolves the downrange dimension using wide-bandwidth FMCW linear-chirp waveforms, extremely high resolution three dimensional (3D) images can be obtained even at very long standoff ranges. This allows excellent 3D image formation even when targets have significant structure or discontinuities, which are typically poorly rendered with multi-baseline synthetic aperture ladar or multi-wavelength holographic aperture ladar approaches. The background for the system is described and system performance is demonstrated through both simulation and experiments. PMID:26368474

  7. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. PMID:26558661

  8. Electrode With Porous Three-Dimensional Support

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Dauchier, Jean-Michel; Simonneau, Olivier

    1999-07-27

    Electrode including a paste containing particles of electrochemically active material and a conductive support consisting of a three-dimensional porous material comprising strands delimiting contiguous pores communicating via passages, characterized in that the average width L in .mu.m of said passages is related to the average diameter .O slashed. in .mu.m of said particles by the following equation, in which W and Y are dimensionless coefficients: wherein W=0.16 Y=1.69 X=202.4 .mu.m and Z=80 .mu.m

  9. Three dimensional model of the human mandible.

    PubMed

    Muftić, O; Milcić, D; Saucha, J; Carek, V

    2000-07-01

    A new biomechanical three-dimensional (3D) model for the human mandible is proposed. A simple two-dimensional model cannot explain the biomechanics of the human mandible, where muscular forces through occlusion and condylar surfaces are in a state of dynamical 3D equilibrium. All forces are resolved into components according to a selected coordinate system. The muscular forces, which during clenching act on the jaw, along with the necessary force level for chewing, also act as some kind of stabilizers of the mandibular condyles preventing dislocation and loading of nonarticular tissues.

  10. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Three-dimensional echocardiography in valve disease

    PubMed Central

    COLOMBO, CHIARA; TAMBORINI, GLORIA; PEPI, MAURO; ALIMENTO, MARINA; FIORENTINI, CESARE

    2007-01-01

    This review covers the role of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography in the diagnosis of heart valve disease. Several factors have contributed to the evolution of this technique, which is currently a simple and routine method: rapid evolution in probe and computer technologies, demonstration that 3D data sets allowed more complete and accurate evaluation of cardiac structures, emerging clinical experience indicating the strong potential particularly in valve diseases, volume and function of the two ventricle measurements and several other fields. This report will review current and future applications of 3D echocardiography in mitral, aortic and tricuspid valve diseases underlying both qualitative (morphologic) and quantitative advantages of this technique. PMID:21977273

  12. Three-dimensional flow about penguin wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Sudki, Bassem; Lauria, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Penguins, contrary to airborne birds, do not need to compensate for gravity. Yet, the kinematics of their wings is highly three-dimensional and seems exceedingly complex for plain swimming. Is such kinematics the result of an evolutionary optimization or is it just a forced adaptation of an airborne flying apparatus to underwater swimming? Some answers will be provided based on flow dynamics around robotic penguin wings. Updates will also be presented on the development of a novel robotic arm intended to simulate penguin swimming and enable novel propulsion devices.

  13. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications. PMID:27699130

  14. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron. PMID:25032923

  15. All-Optical Vector Atomic Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Zhivun, E.; Hovde, D. C.; Budker, D.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ˜65 fT/√Hz in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5 mrad /√Hz in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12 fT /√Hz and 10 μrad /√Hz , respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  16. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications.

  17. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  18. All-optical control of molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2010-01-15

    We present a quantum electrodynamical procedure to demonstrate the all-optical control of molecular fluorescence. The effect is achieved on passage of an off-resonant laser beam through an optically activated system; the presence of a surface is not required. Following the derivation and analysis of the all-optical control mechanism, calculations are given to quantify the significant modification of spontaneous fluorescent emission with input laser irradiance. Specific results are given for molecules whose electronic spectra are dominated by transitions between three electronic levels, and suitable laser experimental methods are proposed. It is also shown that the phenomenon is sensitive to the handedness of circularly polarized throughput, producing a conferred form of optical activity.

  19. Plasmonic All-Optical Tunable Wavelength Shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Flugel, B.; Macararenhas, A.; Snoke, D. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K.

    2007-12-01

    At present, wavelength-division-multiplexed fibre lines routinely operate at 10 Gbit s{sup -1} per channel. The transition from static-path networks to true all-optical networks encompassing many nodes, in which channels are added/dropped and efficiently reassigned, will require improved tools for all-optical wavelength shifting. Specifically, one must be able to shift the carrier wavelength (frequency) of an optical data signal over tens of nanometres (a THz range) without the bottleneck of electrical conversion. Popular approaches to this problem make use of the nonlinear interaction between two wavelengths within a semiconductor optical amplifier whereas more novel methods invoke terahertz-frequency electro-optic modulation and polaritons. Here we outline the principles and demonstrate the use of optically excited plasmons as a tunable frequency source that can be mixed with a laser frequency through Raman scattering. The scheme is all-optical and enables dynamical control of the output carrier wavelength simply by varying the power of a control laser.

  20. Three-dimensional television: a broadcaster's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, S. J. E.; Armstrong, M.; Salmon, R. A.

    2009-02-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in the stereoscopic cinema and the increasing availability to the consumer of stereoscopic televisions and computer displays are leading broadcasters to consider, once again, the feasibility of stereoscopic broadcasting. High Definition Television is now widely deployed, and the R&D departments of broadcasters and consumer electronics manufacturers are starting to plan future enhancements to the experience of television. Improving the perception of depth via stereoscopy is a strong candidate technology. In this paper we will consider the challenges associated with the production, transmission and display of different forms of "three-dimensional" television. We will explore options available to a broadcaster wishing to start a 3D service using the technologies available at the present time, and consider how they could be improved to enable many more television programmes to be recorded and transmitted in a 3D-compatible form, paying particular attention to scenarios such as live broadcasting, where the workflows developed for the stereoscopic cinema are inapplicable. We will also consider the opportunities available for broadcasters to reach audiences with "three-dimensional" content via other media in the near future: for example, distributing content via the existing stereoscopic cinema network, or over the Internet to owners of stereoscopic computer displays.

  1. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  2. Three-dimensional flow in Kupffer's Vesicle.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Baker, D I; Smith, D J; Lopes, S S

    2016-09-01

    Whilst many vertebrates appear externally left-right symmetric, the arrangement of internal organs is asymmetric. In zebrafish, the breaking of left-right symmetry is organised by Kupffer's Vesicle (KV): an approximately spherical, fluid-filled structure that begins to form in the embryo 10 hours post fertilisation. A crucial component of zebrafish symmetry breaking is the establishment of a cilia-driven fluid flow within KV. However, it is still unclear (a) how dorsal, ventral and equatorial cilia contribute to the global vortical flow, and (b) if this flow breaks left-right symmetry through mechanical transduction or morphogen transport. Fully answering these questions requires knowledge of the three-dimensional flow patterns within KV, which have not been quantified in previous work. In this study, we calculate and analyse the three-dimensional flow in KV. We consider flow from both individual and groups of cilia, and (a) find anticlockwise flow can arise purely from excess of cilia on the dorsal roof over the ventral floor, showing how this vortical flow is stabilised by dorsal tilt of equatorial cilia, and (b) show that anterior clustering of dorsal cilia leads to around 40 % faster flow in the anterior over the posterior corner. We argue that these flow features are supportive of symmetry breaking through mechano-sensory cilia, and suggest a novel experiment to test this hypothesis. From our new understanding of the flow, we propose a further experiment to reverse the flow within KV to potentially induce situs inversus.

  3. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  4. Three-dimensional head anthropometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, Reyes; Shaw, Alex M.; Neumann, Ulrich; Mah, James

    2003-05-01

    Currently, two-dimensional photographs are most commonly used to facilitate visualization, assessment and treatment of facial abnormalities in craniofacial care but are subject to errors because of perspective, projection, lack metric and 3-dimensional information. One can find in the literature a variety of methods to generate 3-dimensional facial images such as laser scans, stereo-photogrammetry, infrared imaging and even CT however each of these methods contain inherent limitations and as such no systems are in common clinical use. In this paper we will focus on development of indirect 3-dimensional landmark location and measurement of facial soft-tissue with light-based techniques. In this paper we will statistically evaluate and validate a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also develop computer graphics tools for indirect anthropometric measurements in a three-dimensional head model (or polygonal mesh) including linear distances currently used in anthropometry. The measurements will be tested against a validated 3-dimensional digitizer (MicroScribe 3DX).

  5. In-lab three-dimensional printing

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue’s three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer. PMID:22652907

  6. Three-dimensional model of lignin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jurasek, L.

    1995-12-01

    An attempt to build a three-dimensional model of lignin structure using a computer program is described. The program simulates the biosynthesis of spruce lignin by allowing coniferyl alcohol subunits to be added randomly by six different types of linkages, assumed to be most common. The simulated biosynthesis starts from a number of seed points within restricted space, corresponding to 50 mM initial concentration of coniferyl alcohol. Rules of three-dimensional packing of the subunits within the lignin macro-molecule are observed during the simulated biosynthetic process. Branched oligomeric structures thus generated form crosslinks at those positions where the chains grow close enough to form a link. Inter-chain crosslinking usually joins the oligomers into one macromolecule. Intra-chain crosslinks are also formed and result in closed loops. Typically, a macromolecule with molecular weight of approx. 2 x 105 is formed, with internal density of 1.35g/cm3. Various characteristics of the internal structure, such as branching, crosslinking, bond frequencies, and chain length distribution are described. Breakdown of the polymer was also simulated and the effect of closed loops on the weight average molecular weight is shown. The effect of the shape of the biosynthetic space on the degree of crosslinking is discussed and predictions of the overall molecular shape of lignin particles are made.

  7. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  8. Three-dimensional strain analysis using Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjee, Matty; Nickleach, Scott

    2011-10-01

    A suite of geological computer programs written in Mathematica is currently available both within the online repository for the Journal of Structural Geology as well as on the first author's website ( http://www.sonoma.edu/users/m/mookerje/ProgramPage.htm). The majority of these programs focus on three-dimensional strain analysis (e.g., determining best-fit strain ellipsoids, plotting elliptical data on either a Flinn or Hsu diagram, and determining error bounds for three-dimensional strain data). This program suite also includes a ternary diagram plotting program, a rose diagram program, an equal area and equal angle projections program, and an instructional program for creating two-dimensional strain path animations. The bulk of this paper focuses on a new method for determining a best-fit ellipsoid from arbitrarily oriented sectional ellipses and methods for determining appropriate error bounds for strain parameters and orientation data. This best-fit ellipsoid method utilizes a least-squares approach and minimizes the error associated with the two-dimensional data-ellipse matrix elements with the corresponding matrix elements from sectional ellipses through a general ellipsoid. Furthermore, a kernel density estimator is utilized to yield reliable error margins for the strain parameters, octahedral shear strain, Flinn's k-value, and Lode's ratio. By assuming a gamma distribution for the simulated principal axes orientations, more realistic error bounds can be estimated for these axes orientations.

  9. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping E-mail: moli@umn.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: moli@umn.edu

    2015-09-07

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  10. Three-dimensional surface imaging in plastic surgery: foundation, practical applications, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica B; Small, Kevin H; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging has gained clinical acceptance in plastic and reconstructive surgery. In contrast to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging, three-dimensional surface imaging relies on triangulation in stereophotography to measure surface x, y, and z coordinates. This study reviews the past, present, and future directions of three-dimensional topographic imaging in plastic surgery. Historically, three-dimensional imaging technology was first used in a clinical setting in 1944 to diagnose orthodontologic conditions. Karlan established its use in the field of plastic surgery in 1979, analyzing contours and documenting facial asymmetries. Present use of three-dimensional surface imaging has focused on standardizing patient topographic measurements to enhance preoperative planning and to improve postoperative outcomes. Various measurements (e.g., volume, surface area, vector distance, curvature) have been applied to breast, body, and facial topography to augment patient analysis. Despite the rapid progression of the clinical applications of three-dimensional imaging, current use of this technology is focused on the surgeon's perspective and secondarily the patient's perspective. Advancements in patient simulation may improve patient-physician communication, education, and satisfaction. However, a communal database of three-dimensional surface images integrated with emerging three-dimensional printing and portable information technology will validate measurements and strengthen preoperative planning and postoperative outcomes. Three-dimensional surface imaging is a useful adjunct to plastic and reconstructive surgery practices and standardizes measurements to create objectivity in a subjective field. Key improvements in three-dimensional imaging technology may significantly enhance the quality of plastic and reconstructive surgery in the near future. PMID:25835245

  11. All optical binary delta-sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammad R.; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel A/D converter called "Binary Delta-Sigma Modulator" (BDSM) which operates only with nonnegative signal with positive feedback and binary threshold. This important modification to the conventional delta-sigma modulator makes the high-speed (>100GHz) all-optical implementation possible. It has also the capability to modify its own sampling frequency as well as its input dynamic range. This adaptive feature helps designers to optimize the system performance under highly noisy environment and also manage the power consumption of the A/D converters.

  12. All-optical nanomechanical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Andreas; Kiesel, Nikolai; Lutz, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a nanomechanical heat engine. We show how a levitated nanoparticle in an optical trap inside a cavity can be used to realize a Stirling cycle in the underdamped regime. The all-optical approach enables fast and flexible control of all thermodynamical parameters and the efficient optimization of the performance of the engine. We develop a systematic optimization procedure to determine optimal driving protocols. Further, we perform numerical simulations with realistic parameters and evaluate the maximum power and the corresponding efficiency. PMID:26001001

  13. All-optical nanomechanical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Andreas; Kiesel, Nikolai; Lutz, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a nanomechanical heat engine. We show how a levitated nanoparticle in an optical trap inside a cavity can be used to realize a Stirling cycle in the underdamped regime. The all-optical approach enables fast and flexible control of all thermodynamical parameters and the efficient optimization of the performance of the engine. We develop a systematic optimization procedure to determine optimal driving protocols. Further, we perform numerical simulations with realistic parameters and evaluate the maximum power and the corresponding efficiency.

  14. All-Optical Nanomechanical Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Andreas; Kiesel, Nikolai; Lutz, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a nanomechanical heat engine. We show how a levitated nanoparticle in an optical trap inside a cavity can be used to realize a Stirling cycle in the underdamped regime. The all-optical approach enables fast and flexible control of all thermodynamical parameters and the efficient optimization of the performance of the engine. We develop a systematic optimization procedure to determine optimal driving protocols. Further, we perform numerical simulations with realistic parameters and evaluate the maximum power and the corresponding efficiency.

  15. Comparison of all optical forwarding packet architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Rim; Farhat, Amel; Menif, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper two all optical packet forwarding architectures based on non linear effect in semiconductor optical amplifier in Mach-Zehnder configuration SOA-MZI are studied. The first architecture consist in combing flip flop functionality with the AND logic functionality in the same unit. Error free operation at 40 Gbps for two cascaded nodes is achieved. In the second architecture two separated units namely the flip flop and the AND logic gate are used. 100 Gbps bit rate is reached. At 40 Gbps error free operation is achieved for three cascaded nodes.

  16. All-optical symmetric ternary logic gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2010-09-01

    Symmetric ternary number (radix=3) has three logical states (1¯, 0, 1). It is very much useful in carry free arithmetical operation. Beside this, the logical operation using this type of number system is also effective in high speed computation and communication in multi-valued logic. In this literature all-optical circuits for three basic symmetrical ternary logical operations (inversion, MIN and MAX) are proposed and described. Numerical simulation verifies the theoretical model. In this present scheme the different ternary logical states are represented by different polarized state of light. Terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch has been used categorically in this manuscript.

  17. Automatic three-dimensional underground mine mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.F.; Vandapel, N.

    2006-01-15

    For several years, our research group has been developing methods for automated modeling of three-dimensional environments. In September 2002, we were given the opportunity to demonstrate our mapping capability in an underground coal mine. The opportunity arose as a result of the Quecreek mine accident, in which an inaccurate map caused miners to breach an abandoned, water-filled mine, trapping them for several days. Our field test illustrates the feasibility and potential of high-resolution 3D mapping of an underground coal mine using a cart-mounted 3D laser scanner In this paper we present our experimental setup, the automatic 3D modeling method used, and the results of the field test.

  18. Three-dimensional hologram display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a three-dimensional (3D) hologram display system. The 3D hologram display system includes a projector device for projecting an image upon a display medium to form a 3D hologram. The 3D hologram is formed such that a viewer can view the holographic image from multiple angles up to 360 degrees. Multiple display media are described, namely a spinning diffusive screen, a circular diffuser screen, and an aerogel. The spinning diffusive screen utilizes spatial light modulators to control the image such that the 3D image is displayed on the rotating screen in a time-multiplexing manner. The circular diffuser screen includes multiple, simultaneously-operated projectors to project the image onto the circular diffuser screen from a plurality of locations, thereby forming the 3D image. The aerogel can use the projection device described as applicable to either the spinning diffusive screen or the circular diffuser screen.

  19. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  20. Numerical simulation of three dimensional transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahu, Jubaraj; Steger, Joseph L.

    1987-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow over a projectile has been computed using an implicit, approximately factored, partially flux-split algorithm. A simple composite grid scheme has been developed in which a single grid is partitioned into a series of smaller grids for applications which require an external large memory device such as the SSD of the CRAY X-MP/48, or multitasking. The accuracy and stability of the composite grid scheme has been tested by numerically simulating the flow over an ellipsoid at angle of attack and comparing the solution with a single grid solution. The flowfield over a projectile at M = 0.96 and 4 deg angle-of-attack has been computed using a fine grid, and compared with experiment.

  1. Three dimensional fabric evolution of sheared sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Alsidqi; Alshibli, Khalid

    2012-10-24

    Granular particles undergo translation and rolling when they are sheared. This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) experimental assessment of fabric evolution of sheared sand at the particle level. F-75 Ottawa sand specimen was tested under an axisymmetric triaxial loading condition. It measured 9.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. The quantitative evaluation was conducted by analyzing 3D high-resolution x-ray synchrotron micro-tomography images of the specimen at eight axial strain levels. The analyses included visualization of particle translation and rotation, and quantification of fabric orientation as shearing continued. Representative individual particles were successfully tracked and visualized to assess the mode of interaction between them. This paper discusses fabric evolution and compares the evolution of particles within and outside the shear band as shearing continues. Changes in particle orientation distributions are presented using fabric histograms and fabric tensor.

  2. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  3. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  4. Three-dimensional comparative analysis of bitemarks.

    PubMed

    Lasser, Allan J; Warnick, Allan J; Berman, Gary M

    2009-05-01

    Historically, the inability to accurately represent bitemarks and other wound patterns has limited their evidentiary value. The development of the ABFO #2 scale by Krauss and Hyzer enabled forensic odontologists to correct for most photographic plane distortions. The technique presented here uses the ABFO #2 scale in conjunction with the evolving technologies of laser scanners and comparative software commonly used by the automobile industry for three-dimensional (3D) analysis. The 3D software comparison was performed in which measurements were analyzed of the normal distance for each point on the teeth relative to the bitemarks. It created a color-mapped display of the bitemark model, with the color indicating the deviation at each point. There was a correlation between the bitemark and the original teeth. PMID:19432742

  5. Three-dimensional tori and Arnold tongues

    SciTech Connect

    Sekikawa, Munehisa; Inaba, Naohiko; Kamiyama, Kyohei; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-15

    This study analyzes an Arnold resonance web, which includes complicated quasi-periodic bifurcations, by conducting a Lyapunov analysis for a coupled delayed logistic map. The map can exhibit a two-dimensional invariant torus (IT), which corresponds to a three-dimensional torus in vector fields. Numerous one-dimensional invariant closed curves (ICCs), which correspond to two-dimensional tori in vector fields, exist in a very complicated but reasonable manner inside an IT-generating region. Periodic solutions emerge at the intersections of two different thin ICC-generating regions, which we call ICC-Arnold tongues, because all three independent-frequency components of the IT become rational at the intersections. Additionally, we observe a significant bifurcation structure where conventional Arnold tongues transit to ICC-Arnold tongues through a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the neighborhood of a quasi-periodic Hopf bifurcation (or a quasi-periodic Neimark-Sacker bifurcation) boundary.

  6. Towards microscale electrohydrodynamic three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankang; Xu, Fangyuan; Cao, Yi; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen

    2016-02-01

    It is challenging for the existing three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to fabricate high-resolution 3D microstructures with low costs and high efficiency. In this work we present a solvent-based electrohydrodynamic 3D printing technique that allows fabrication of microscale structures like single walls, crossed walls, lattice and concentric circles. Process parameters were optimized to deposit tiny 3D patterns with a wall width smaller than 10 μm and a high aspect ratio of about 60. Tight bonding among neighbour layers could be achieved with a smooth lateral surface. In comparison with the existing microscale 3D printing techniques, the presented method is low-cost, highly efficient and applicable to multiple polymers. It is envisioned that this simple microscale 3D printing strategy might provide an alternative and innovative way for application in MEMS, biosensor and flexible electronics.

  7. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology

    PubMed Central

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M.; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

  8. Three-dimensional modular electronic interconnection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Gary S. (Inventor); Cardone, John (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional connection system uses a plurality of printed wiring boards with connectors completely around the printed wiring boards, and connected by an elastomeric interface connector. The device includes internal space to allow room for circuitry. The device is formed by stacking an electronics module, an elastomeric interface board on the electronics module such that the interface board's exterior makes electrical connection with the connectors around the perimeter of the interface board, but the internal portion is open to allow room for the electrical devices on the printed wiring board. A plurality of these devices are stacked between a top stiffener and a bottom device, and held into place by alignment elements.

  9. Surface fitting three-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Ford, C. P., III

    1975-01-01

    The geometry of general three-dimensional bodies was generated from coordinates of points in several cross sections. Since these points may not be on smooth curves, they are divided into groups forming segments and general conic sections are curve fit in a least-squares sense to each segment of a cross section. The conic sections are then blended in the longitudinal direction through longitudinal curves. Both the cross-sectional and longitudinal curves may be modified by specifying particular segments as straight lines or specifying slopes at selected points. This method was used to surface fit a 70 deg slab delta wing and the HL-10 Lifting Body. The results for the delta wing were very close to the exact geometry. Although there is no exact solution for the lifting body, the surface fit generated a smooth surface with cross-sectional planes very close to prescribed coordinate points.

  10. Magneto Transport in Three Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Timir; Wang, Lei; Jaroszynski, Jan; Yin, Ming; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Electrical properties of self-assembled three dimensional nanostructures are interesting topic. Here we report temperature dependence of magneto transport in such carbon nanostructures with periodic spherical voids. Specimens with different void diameters in the temperature range from 200 mK to 20 K were studied. Above 2 K, magnetoresistance, MR = [R(B) - R(0)] / R(0), crosses over from quadratic to a linear dependence with the increase of magnetic field [Wang et al., APL 2015; DOI:10.1063/1.4926606]. We observe MR to be non-saturating even up to 18 Tesla. Furthermore, MR demonstrates universality because all experimental data can be collapsed on to a single curve, as a universal function of B/T. Below 2 K, magnetoresistance saturates with increasing field. Quantum Hall like steps are also observed in this low temperature regime. Remarkably, MR of our sample displays orientation independence, an attractive feature for technological applications.

  11. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  12. Masking in three-dimensional auditory displays.

    PubMed

    Doll, T J; Hanna, T E; Russotti, J S

    1992-06-01

    The extent to which simultaneous inputs in a three-dimensional (3D) auditory display mask one another was studied in a simulated sonar task. The minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to detect an amplitude-modulated 500-Hz tone in a background of broadband noise was measured using a loudspeaker array in a free field. Three aspects of the 3D array were varied: angular separation of the sources, degree of correlation of the background noises, and listener head movement. Masking was substantially reduced when the sources were uncorrelated. The SNR needed for detection decreased with source separation, and the rate of decrease was significantly greater with uncorrelated sources than with partially or fully correlated sources. Head movement had no effect on the SNR required for detection. Implications for the design and application of 3D auditory displays are discussed.

  13. Three-dimensional tori and Arnold tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekikawa, Munehisa; Inaba, Naohiko; Kamiyama, Kyohei; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    This study analyzes an Arnold resonance web, which includes complicated quasi-periodic bifurcations, by conducting a Lyapunov analysis for a coupled delayed logistic map. The map can exhibit a two-dimensional invariant torus (IT), which corresponds to a three-dimensional torus in vector fields. Numerous one-dimensional invariant closed curves (ICCs), which correspond to two-dimensional tori in vector fields, exist in a very complicated but reasonable manner inside an IT-generating region. Periodic solutions emerge at the intersections of two different thin ICC-generating regions, which we call ICC-Arnold tongues, because all three independent-frequency components of the IT become rational at the intersections. Additionally, we observe a significant bifurcation structure where conventional Arnold tongues transit to ICC-Arnold tongues through a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the neighborhood of a quasi-periodic Hopf bifurcation (or a quasi-periodic Neimark-Sacker bifurcation) boundary.

  14. Three-dimensional pancreas organogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Grapin-Botton, A

    2016-09-01

    A rediscovery of three-dimensional culture has led to the development of organ biogenesis, homeostasis and disease models applicable to human tissues. The so-called organoids that have recently flourished serve as valuable models bridging between cell lines or primary cells grown on the bottom of culture plates and experiments performed in vivo. Though not recapitulating all aspects of organ physiology, the miniature organs generated in a dish are useful models emerging for the pancreas, starting from embryonic progenitors, adult cells, tumour cells and stem cells. This review focusses on the currently available systems and their relevance to the study of the pancreas, of β-cells and of several pancreatic diseases including diabetes. We discuss the expected future developments for studying human pancreas development and function, for developing diabetes models and for producing therapeutic cells. PMID:27615129

  15. The Three-Dimensional EIT Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gilbert, H. R.; Lawrence, G. R.; Ofman, L.; Wu, S. T.; Warmuth, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An EIT wave is an impulsive disturbance which has been observed in the EUV, Soft X-ray and white light corona, with corresponding observations in the chromosphere. The effects of these disturbances can be observed across the entire solar disk of the Sun, and throughout the inner heliosphere as well. However, the picture is not complete; observations alone do not establish a complete understanding of the nature of this three-dimensional phenomenon. A number of associated phenomena have been documented, though in most cases causality has not determined. Additionally, it is unclear which factors govern the impulse's ability to affect regions of the corona and heliosphere. We discuss the various observations and the models which provided links between the associated phenomena.

  16. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  17. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  18. Clinical application of three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Morbach, Caroline; Lin, Ben A; Sugeng, Lissa

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most valuable diagnostic tools in cardiology. Technological advances in ultrasound, computer and electronics enables three-dimensional (3-D) imaging to be a clinically viable modality which has significant impact on diagnosis, management and interventional procedures. Since the inception of 3D fully-sampled matrix transthoracic and transesophageal technology it has enabled easier acquisition, immediate on-line display, and availability of on-line analysis for the left ventricle, right ventricle and mitral valve. The use of 3D TTE has mainly focused on mitral valve disease, left and right ventricular volume and functional analysis. As structural heart disease procedures become more prevalent, 3D TEE has become a requirement for preparation of the procedure, intra-procedural guidance as well as monitoring for complications and device function. We anticipate that there will be further software development, improvement in image quality and workflow.

  19. Three dimensional fog forecasting in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.; Masbou, M.; Bott, A.

    2010-07-01

    Fog in complex terrain shows large temporal and spatial variations that can only be simulated with a three-dimensional model, but more modifications than increasing the resolution are needed. For a better representation of fog we present a second moment cloud water scheme with a parametrization of the Köhler theory which is combined with the mixed phase Ferrier microphysics scheme. The more detailed microphysics produce many differences to the first moment Ferrier scheme and are responsible for reproducing the typically low liquid water content of fog. With explicitly predicted droplet number concentrations, sedimentation of cloud water can be modeled without a prescribed fall speed, which mainly affects the vertical distribution of cloud water and the end of the fogs life cycle. The complex topography of the Swiss Alps and its surroundings are used for model testing. As the focus is on the models ability to forecast the spatial distribution of fog, cloud patterns derived from high resolution MSG satellite data, rather than few point observations from ground stations are used. In a continous five day period of anticyclonic conditions, the satellite observed fog patterns showed large day to day variations with almost no fog to large areas of fog. This variability was very well simulated in the three-dimensional fog forecast. The simulations also demonstrate the need for high horizontal resolutions between 1 and 3 km. For model initialization the complex topography is actually a simplifying factor, as cold air flow and pooling are dominating the more uncertain processes of evapotranspiration or errors in the soil moisture field.

  20. Three-dimensional image contrast using biospeckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Robson Pierangeli; Braga, Roberto A., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    The biospeckle laser (BSL) has been applied in many areas of knowledge and a variety of approaches has been presented to address the best results in biological and non-biological samples, in fast or slow activities, or else in defined flow of materials or in random activities. The methodologies accounted in the literature consider the apparatus used in the image assembling and the way the collected data is processed. The image processing steps presents in turn a variety of procedures with first or second order statistics analysis, and as well with different sizes of data collected. One way to access the biospeckle in defined flow, such as in capillary blood flow in alive animals, was the adoption of the image contrast technique which uses only one image from the illuminated sample. That approach presents some problems related to the resolution of the image, which is reduced during the image contrast processing. In order to help the visualization of the low resolution image formed by the contrast technique, this work presents the three-dimensional procedure as a reliable alternative to enhance the final image. The work based on a parallel processing, with the generation of a virtual map of amplitudes, and maintaining the quasi-online characteristic of the contrast technique. Therefore, it was possible to generate in the same display the observed material, the image contrast result and in addiction the three-dimensional image with adjustable options of rotation. The platform also offers to the user the possibility to access the 3D image offline.

  1. CROWNs: all-optical WDM multiring topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlamtac, Imrich; Fumagalli, Andrea F.

    1993-10-01

    Ring networks present an attractive solution for optical, high speed local and metropolitan area networks due to the simplicity of network interfaces and access control. Two problems need to be overcome to obtain an all optical network. One, the limitation on power budget resulting from optical losses that occur when data passes through intermediate nodes. The other, a reduced network throughput related to the linearity of the ring topology. Recent progress in WDM techniques has opened the possibility of overcoming this problem by an optical multi- channel solution. WDM taps the large fiber bandwidth by using different portions of the optical spectrum to realize (omega) different channels on the same fiber. However, in extant electronic node based architectures, even though high bandwidth optical transmission can be used to propagate packets between the nodes, the electronic elaboration of data at each node creates a performance bottleneck for the whole communication system. This leads to network throughput that is a mere fraction of the optical bandwidth potential. This work presents an approach to obtaining a concurrently accessed multi-ring all-optical WDM network (CROWN) with a node architecture in which packets pass through the node without being converted into the electronic domain. Using a single high speed transmitter and receiver, CROWN allows the data to be maintained in optical format while resolving receiver contentions.

  2. All-optical OFDM network coding scheme for all-optical virtual private communication in PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijun; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng; Bai, Lin; Huang, Zhitong

    2014-03-01

    A novel optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) network coding scheme is proposed over passive optical network (PON) system. The proposed scheme for all-optical virtual private network (VPN) does not only improve transmission efficiency, but also realize full-duplex communication mode in a single fiber. Compared with the traditional all-optical VPN architectures, the all-optical OFDM network coding scheme can support higher speed, more flexible bandwidth allocation, and higher spectrum efficiency. In order to reduce the difficulty of alignment for encoding operation between inter-communication traffic, the width of OFDM subcarrier pulse is stretched in our proposed scheme. The feasibility of all-optical OFDM network coding scheme for VPN is verified, and the relevant simulation results show that the full-duplex inter-communication traffic stream can be transmitted successfully. Furthermore, the tolerance of misalignment existing in inter-ONUs traffic is investigated and analyzed for all-optical encoding operation, and the difficulty of pulse alignment is proved to be lower.

  3. Primary and Secondary Three Dimensional Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, Nicolas

    Today's MEMS devices are limited more so by the batteries that supply their power than the fabrication methods used to build them. Thick battery electrodes are capable of providing adequate energy, but long and tortuous diffusion pathways lead to low power capabilities. On the other hand, thin film batteries can operate at significant current densities but require large surface areas to supply practical energy. This dilemma can be solved by either developing new high capacity materials or by engineering new battery designs that decouple power and energy. Three dimensional batteries redesign traditional configurations to create nonplanar interfaces between battery components. This can be done by introducing hierarchical structures into the electrode shape. Designs such as these provide a maximum surface area over which chemical reactions can occur. Furthermore, by maintaining small feature sizes, ion diffusion and electronic transport distances can remain minimal. Manipulating these properties ensures fast kinetics that are required for high power situations. Energy density is maximized by layering material in the vertical direction, thus ensuring a minimal footprint area. Three dimensional carbon electrodes are fabricated using basic MEMS techniques. A silicon mold is anisotropically etched to produce channels of a predetermined diameter. The channels are then filled using an infiltration technique with electrode slurry. Once dried, the mold is attached to a current collector and etched using a XeF2 process. Electrodes of varying feature sizes have been fabricated using this method with aspect ratios ranging from 3.5:1 to 7:1. 3D carbon electrodes are shown to obtain capacities over 8 mAh/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2, or nearly 700% higher than planar carbon electrodes. When assembled with a planar cathode, the battery cell produced an average discharge capacity of 40 J/cm 2 at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. This places the energy density values slightly less than thick

  4. Flow Fields Over Unsteady Three Dimensional Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Reesink, A.; Parsons, D. R.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.

    2013-12-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively measured in laboratory conditions and there is general understanding on the nature of the flow over dunes formed under equilibrium flow conditions. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly responding and reorganizing to these unsteady flows, over a range of both spatial and temporal scales. This is primarily through adjustment of bed forms (including ripples, dunes and bar forms) which then subsequently alter the flow field. This paper investigates, through the application of a numerical model, the influence of these roughness elements on the overall flow and the increase in flow resistance. A series of experiments were undertaken in a flume, 16m long and 2m wide, where a fine sand (D50 of 239μm) mobile bed was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate a series of quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. During the experiments flow was measured with acoustic Doppler velocimeters, (aDv's). On four occasions the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This data provide the necessary boundary conditions and validation data for a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model, which provided a three dimensional time dependent prediction of flow over the four static beds. The numerical predicted flow is analyzed through a series of approaches, and included: i) standard Reynolds decomposition to the flow fields; ii) Eulerian coherent structure detection methods based on the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor; iii) Lagrangian coherent structure identification methods based upon direct Lyapunov exponents (DLE). The results show that superimposed bed forms can cause changes in the nature of the classical separated flow region in particularly the number of locations where vortices are shed and the point of flow reattachment, which may be important for

  5. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivun, Elena; Patton, Brian; Hovde, Chris; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    Alkali-vapor magnetometers are among the most precise magnetic sensors today, reaching sensitivities on the scale of fT/√{Hz}. In general, alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in finite fields can only measure the scalar magnitude of the field (not its direction or projection). In this work we demonstrate an all-optical vector cesium magnetometer with 0 . 2pT /√{Hz} sensitivity to the field magnitude and 4mrad /√{Hz} angular precision in the field direction. Although this can be accomplished by applying orthogonal magnetic fields to the sensor and measuring the change in Larmor frequency, in our sensor we employ the vector light shift induced by orthogonal laser beams to achieve the same effect. We will present results from such a sensor operating in a 10 mG magnetic field and discuss its applications to fundamental physics experiments and remote magnetometry.

  6. A three-dimensional magnetostatics computer code for insertion devices.

    PubMed

    Chubar, O; Elleaume, P; Chavanne, J

    1998-05-01

    RADIA is a three-dimensional magnetostatics computer code optimized for the design of undulators and wigglers. It solves boundary magnetostatics problems with magnetized and current-carrying volumes using the boundary integral approach. The magnetized volumes can be arbitrary polyhedrons with non-linear (iron) or linear anisotropic (permanent magnet) characteristics. The current-carrying elements can be straight or curved blocks with rectangular cross sections. Boundary conditions are simulated by the technique of mirroring. Analytical formulae used for the computation of the field produced by a magnetized volume of a polyhedron shape are detailed. The RADIA code is written in object-oriented C++ and interfaced to Mathematica [Mathematica is a registered trademark of Wolfram Research, Inc.]. The code outperforms currently available finite-element packages with respect to the CPU time of the solver and accuracy of the field integral estimations. An application of the code to the case of a wedge-pole undulator is presented.

  7. Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-12-01

    Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

  8. Three-dimensional multimodal image-guidance for neurosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Munger, P.; Comeau, R.; Evans, A.; Olivier, A.; Davey, B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors address the use of multimodality imaging as an aid to the planning and guidance of neurosurgical procedures, and discuss the integration of anatomical (CT and MRI), vascular (DSA), and functional (PET) data for presentation to the surgeon during surgery. The workstation is an enhancement of a commercially available system, and in addition to the guidance offered via a hand-held probe, it incorporates the use of multimodality imaging and adds enhanced realism to the surgeon through the use of a stereoscopic three-dimensional (3-D) image display. The probe may be visualized stereoscopically in single or multimodality images. The integration of multimodality data in this manner provides the surgeon with a complete overview of brain structures on which he is performing surgery, or through which he is passing probes or cannulas, enabling him to avoid critical vessels and/or structures of functional significance.

  9. Three-Dimensional Facial Adaptation for MPEG-4 Talking Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammalidis, Nikos; Sarris, Nikos; Deligianni, Fani; Strintzis, Michael G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper studies a new method for three-dimensional (3D) facial model adaptation and its integration into a text-to-speech (TTS) system. The 3D facial adaptation requires a set of two orthogonal views of the user's face with a number of feature points located on both views. Based on the correspondences of the feature points' positions, a generic face model is deformed nonrigidly treating every facial part as a separate entity. A cylindrical texture map is then built from the two image views. The generated head models are compared to corresponding models obtained by the commonly used adaptation method that utilizes 3D radial bases functions. The generated 3D models are integrated into a talking head system, which consists of two distinct parts: a multilingual text to speech sub-system and an MPEG-4 compliant facial animation sub-system. Support for the Greek language has been added, while preserving lip and speech synchronization.

  10. Three-dimensional Printing in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Wengerter, Brian C; Emre, Gulus; Park, Jea Young; Geibel, John

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, which aim to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a biocompatible support material (scaffold) with a desired cell population to generate viable replacement tissue. Although this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for scaffold-free 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of "bioprinted organs." Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology before full clinical implementation. PMID:27189913

  11. Three dimensional simulations of internal solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guotu; Rizzi, Francesco; Knio, Omar

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on mass transport and mixing induced by mode-2 internal solitary waves (ISWs) propagating along a pycnocline between two continuously stratified fluid layers. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) model is developed for the incompressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq limit. By using high order schemes in both space and time, the model is able to accurately capture the convection-dominated flow at high Reynolds and Schmidt numbers. Simulations both with and without background shear are conducted. The spatial frequency analysis of both density and vorticity fields reveals that no long range spanwise structures are present during the propagation of ISWs, which makes a relatively short spanwise depth sufficient to characterize the evolution of the flow. The growth of 3D structures during the propagation of ISWs is quantified using a spanwise roughness measure. The flow energy budget, dye transport, density mixing and vortex circulations are also analyzed. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Physical Oceanography Program.

  12. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surface to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled by Coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The ICAS fills the need for high speed automated organic analysis by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry sensors, and also by radionuclide sensors which combines alpha, beta, and gamma counting.

  13. Three dimensional structures of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Three dimensional structure of an active region is determined from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 2, 6, and 20 cm. This region exhibits a single magnetic loop of length approx. 10 to the 10th power cm. The 2 cm radiation is mostly thermal bremsstrahlung and originates from the footpoints of the loop. The 6 and 20 cm radiation is dominated by the low harmonic gyroresonance radiation and originates from the upper portion of the legs or the top of the loop. The loop broadens toward the apex. The top of the loop is not found to be the hottest point, but two temperature maxima on either side of the loop apex are observed, which is consistent with the model proposed for long loops. From 2 and 6 cm observations it can be concluded that the electron density and temperature cannot be uniform in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the loop; the density should decrease away from the axis of the loop.

  14. Three-dimensional landing zone ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Goodrich, Shawn; Burns, H. N.

    2016-05-01

    Three-Dimensional Landing Zone (3D-LZ) refers to a series of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) programs to develop high-resolution, imaging ladar to address helicopter approach and landing in degraded visual environments with emphasis on brownout; cable warning and obstacle avoidance; and controlled flight into terrain. Initial efforts adapted ladar systems built for munition seekers, and success led to a the 3D-LZ Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) , a 27-month program to develop and demonstrate a ladar subsystem that could be housed with the AN/AAQ-29 FLIR turret flown on US Air Force Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters. Following the JCTD flight demonstration, further development focused on reducing size, weight, and power while continuing to refine the real-time geo-referencing, dust rejection, obstacle and cable avoidance, and Helicopter Terrain Awareness and Warning (HTAWS) capability demonstrated under the JCTD. This paper summarizes significant ladar technology development milestones to date, individual LADAR technologies within 3D-LZ, and results of the flight testing.

  15. Three-dimensional charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of tsunami waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional, time-dependent, nonlinear, incompressible, viscous flow calculations of realistic models of tsunami wave formation and run up have been performed using the Los Alamos-developed SOLA-3D code. The results of the SOLA calculations are compared with shallow-water, long-wave calculations for the same problems using the SWAN code. Tsunami wave formation by a continental slope subsidence has been examined using the two numerical models. The SOLA waves were slower than the SWAN waves and the interaction with the shoreline was more complicated for the SOLA waves. In the SOLA calculation, the first wave was generated by the cavity being filled along the shoreline close to the source of motion. The second wave was generated by the cavity being filled from the deep water end. The two waves interacted along the shoreline resulting in the second wave being the largest wave with a velocity greater than the first wave. The second wave overtook the first wave at later times and greater distances from the source. In the SWAN calculation, the second wave was smaller than the first wave. 6 refs.

  17. Three-dimensional supersonic internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, J. A.; Skews, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In order to examine the transition between regular and Mach reflection in a three-dimensional flow, a range of special geometry test pieces, and inlets, were designed. The concept is to have a geometry consisting of two plane wedges which results in regular reflection between the incident waves off the top and bottom of the inlet capped by two curved end sections causing Mach reflection. The merging of these two reflection patterns and the resulting downstream flow are studied using laser vapor screen and shadowgraph imaging supported by numerical simulation. An angled Mach disc is formed which merges with the line of regular reflection. A complex wave pattern results with the generation of a bridging shock connecting the reflected wave from the Mach reflection with the reflected waves from the regular reflection. In order to experimentally access the flow within the duct, a number of tests were conducted with one end cap removed. This resulted in a modified flow due to the expansive flow at the open end the influence of which was also studied in more detail.

  18. Collimation and Stability of Three Dimensional Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, P. E.; Clarke, D. A.; Howell, D. A.

    1993-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of cylindrical jets established in equilibrium with a surrounding uniform medium have been performed. Large scale structures such as helical twisting of the jet, elliptical distortion and bifurcation of the jet, and triangular distortion and trifurcation of the jet have been seen in the simulations. The grid resolution has been sufficient to allow the development of structures on smaller scales and has revealed higher order distortions of the jet surface and complex structure internal to the jet. However, smaller scale surface distortion and internal jet structure do not significantly modify the large scale dynamics. It is the large scale surface distortions and accompanying filamentation that dominate the jet dynamics. Decollimation occurs as the jet bifurcates or trifurcates. Jets with density less than the immediately surrounding medium rapidly decollimate and expand as the jet filaments into multiple streams leading to shock heating and mass entrainment. The resulting morphology resembles a turbulent plume and might be relevant to some FRI type radio sources. Jet densities higher than the immediately surrounding medium are required to produce FRII type radio source jet morphology and protostellar jet morphology. Thus, while jets may be denser or lighter than the external medium through which they propagate, it is the conditions in the cocoon or lobe around the jet that governs the dynamics far behind the jet front. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-8919180, EPSCoR grant EHR-9108761 and NSF-REU grant AST-9300413.

  19. Three-dimensional subband coding of video.

    PubMed

    Podilchuk, C I; Jayant, N S; Farvardin, N

    1995-01-01

    We describe and show the results of video coding based on a three-dimensional (3-D) spatio-temporal subband decomposition. The results include a 1-Mbps coder based on a new adaptive differential pulse code modulation scheme (ADPCM) and adaptive bit allocation. This rate is useful for video storage on CD-ROM. Coding results are also shown for a 384-kbps rate that are based on ADPCM for the lowest frequency band and a new form of vector quantization (geometric vector quantization (GVQ)) for the data in the higher frequency bands. GVQ takes advantage of the inherent structure and sparseness of the data in the higher bands. Results are also shown for a 128-kbps coder that is based on an unbalanced tree-structured vector quantizer (UTSVQ) for the lowest frequency band and GVQ for the higher frequency bands. The results are competitive with traditional video coding techniques and provide the motivation for investigating the 3-D subband framework for different coding schemes and various applications. PMID:18289965

  20. Survey Of Three-Dimensional Television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, James F.

    1980-06-01

    Since the introduction of television, various types of three-dimensional video systems have been used for industrial, medical, educational and entertainment purposes. The systems can be divided into two classes: (1) Stereoscopic Video Systems, which require special glasses or viewing aids; (2) Autostereoscopic Video Systems, which do not require glasses and are viewed by free vision. The two or more images required for these displays are picked-up by stereo optics with a single camera and multiplexed on a single communi-cation channel or they are picked up by two or more cameras utilizing an individual channel for each camera. One or more CRT's with stereo optics are employed in the receiver. The stereoscopic display provides the viewer with added realism and spacial information not available in any other manner. For entertainment purposes, the 3D picture enhances almost any program, including sports, drama and news. Typical industrial applications are for: remote viewing in connection with the remote driving of vehicles or operating manipulators; educational studies of solid geometry and atomic structure; and medical studies of surgical procedures. Stereo video also is being used in connection with microscopic optics to provide a stereo video microscope which has numerous advantages over a conventional optical microscope.

  1. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. Chemical analysis plays a vital role throughout the process of decontamination. Before clean-up operations can begin the site must be characterized with respect to the type and concentration of contaminants, and detailed site mapping must clarify areas of both high and low risk. During remediation activities chemical analysis provides a means to measure progress and to adjust clean-up strategy. Once the clean-up process has been completed the results of chemical analysis will verify that the site is in compliance with federal and local regulations.

  2. Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, E. R.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-12-15

    Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

  3. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  4. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1996-04-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D and D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled using coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The CLR also provides 3D facility maps which establish a 3D world view within which the robotic sensor system can operate.

  5. Lattice theory of three-dimensional cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a three-dimensional crack is analyzed within a lattice-statics approximation. The consequence of introducing a jog into the crack face as well as the effects of various nonlinear-force laws are studied. The phenomenon of lattice trapping (upper and lower bounds on the applied stress for an equilibrium crack of given length) is again obtained. It is possible to obtain some physical insight into which aspects of the force law are critical for crack stability. In particular, the inadequacy of a thermodynamic approach - which relates the critical stress to a surface energy corresponding to the area under the cohesive-force-vs-displacement curve - is demonstrated. Surface energy is a global property of the cohesive-force law. Crack stability is sensitive to much more refined aspects of the cohesive-force law. Crack healing is sensitive to the long-range portion of the cohesive force. Crack expansion is sensitive to the position of the maximum in the cohesive-force relation.

  6. Surface fitting three-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    The geometry of general three-dimensional bodies is generated from coordinates of points in several cross sections. Since these points may not be smooth, they are divided into segments and general conic sections are curve fit in a least-squares sense to each segment of a cross section. The conic sections are then blended in the longitudinal direction by fitting parametric cubic-spline curves through coordinate points which define the conic sections in the cross-sectional planes. Both the cross-sectional and longitudinal curves may be modified by specifying particular segments as straight lines and slopes at selected points. Slopes may be continuous or discontinuous and finite or infinite. After a satisfactory surface fit has been obtained, cards may be punched with the data necessary to form a geometry subroutine package for use in other computer programs. At any position on the body, coordinates, slopes and second partial derivatives are calculated. The method is applied to a blunted 70 deg delta wing, and it was found to generate the geometry very well.

  7. Magnetophotonic response of three-dimensional opals.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, José Manuel; Pascu, Oana; López-García, Martín; Canalejas, Víctor; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe; Fontcuberta, Josep; Roig, Anna; Herranz, Gervasi

    2011-04-26

    Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D-MPCs) are being postulated as appropriate platforms to tailor the magneto-optical spectral response of magnetic materials and to incorporate this functionality in a new generation of optical devices. By infiltrating self-assembled inverse opal structures with monodisperse nickel nanoparticles we have fabricated 3D-MPCs that show a sizable enhancement of the magneto-optical signal at frequencies around the stop-band edges of the photonic crystals. We have established a proper methodology to disentangle the intrinsic magneto-optical spectra from the nonmagnetic optical activity of the 3D-MPCs. The results of the optical and magneto-optical characterization are consistent with a homogeneous magnetic infiltration of the opal structure that gives rise to both a red-shift of the optical bandgap and a modification of the magneto-optical spectral response due to photonic bandgap effects. The results of our investigation demonstrate the potential of 3D-MPCs fabricated following the approach outlined here and offer opportunities to adapt the magneto-optical spectral response at optical frequencies by appropriate design of the opal structure or magnetic field strength.

  8. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, J. R.

    Improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral, and geothermal resources, and in characterizing oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem for natural sources is generally multidimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with complete data sets. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multidimensional magnetotelluric data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. In the past year, we have extended the two-dimensional (2D) version to permit incorporation of geological constraints, have developed ways to assess model resolution, and have completed work on an accurate and fast three-dimensional (3D) forward algorithm. We are proposing to further enhance the capabilities of the 2D code and to incorporate the 3D forward code in a fully 3D inverse algorithm. Finally, we will embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for further increasing resolution.

  9. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.R.

    1994-07-01

    Improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in characterizing oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem for natural sources is generally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with complete data sets. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional magnetotelluric data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. In the past year, we have extended the two- dimensional (2D) version to permit incorporation of geological constraints, have developed ways to assess model resolution and have completed work on an accurate and fast three-dimensional (3D) forward algorithm. We are proposing to further enhance the capabilities of the 2D code and to incorporate the 3D forward code in a fully 3D inverse algorithm. Finally, we will embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for further increasing resolution.

  10. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical conductivity depends on properties such as the presence of ionic fluids in interconnected pores that are difficult to sense with other remote sensing techniques. Thus improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in assessing the diffusion of fluids in oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem is fundamentally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with the complete data set. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. We have proven that a two-dimensional (2D) version of the algorithm is highly effective for real data and have made substantial progress towards a three-dimensional (3D) version. We are proposing to cure identified shortcomings and substantially expand the utility of the existing 2D program, overcome identified difficulties with extending our method to three-dimensions (3D) and embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for even further increasing resolution.

  11. A three-dimensional human walking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. S.; Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional human bipedal walking model with compliant legs is presented in this paper. The legs are modeled with time-variant dampers, and the model is able to characterize the gait pattern of an individual using a minimal set of parameters. Feedback control, for both the forward and lateral movements, is implemented to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The model provides an improvement over classic invert pendulum models. Numerical studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of leg stiffness and attack angle. Simulation results show that when walking at a given speed, increasing the leg stiffness with a constant attack angle results in a longer step length, a higher step frequency, a faster walking speed and an increase in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces. Increasing the attack angle with a constant leg stiffness results in a higher step frequency, a decrease in the step length, an increase in the total energy of the system and a decrease in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces.

  12. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  13. Three-Dimensional Displays In The Future Flight Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Alan L.

    1984-10-01

    This review paper summarizes the development and applications of computer techniques for the representation of three-dimensional data in the future flight station. It covers the development of the Lockheed-NASA Advanced Concepts Flight Station (ACFS) research simulators. These simulators contain: A Pilot's Desk Flight Station (PDFS) with five 13- inch diagonal, color, cathode ray tubes on the main instrument panel; a computer-generated day and night visual system; a six-degree-of-freedom motion base; and a computer complex. This paper reviews current research, development, and evaluation of easily modifiable display systems and software requirements for three-dimensional displays that may be developed for the PDFS. This includes the analysis and development of a 3-D representation of the entire flight profile. This 3-D flight path, or "Highway-in-the-Sky", will utilize motion and perspective cues to tightly couple the human responses of the pilot to the aircraft control systems. The use of custom logic, e.g., graphics engines, may provide the processing power and architecture required for 3-D computer-generated imagery (CGI) or visual scene simulation (VSS). Diffraction or holographic head-up displays (HUDs) will also be integrated into the ACFS simulator to permit research on the requirements and use of these "out-the-window" projection systems. Future research may include the retrieval of high-resolution, perspective view terrain maps which could then be overlaid with current weather information or other selectable cultural features.

  14. An algebraic turbulence model for three-dimensional viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Giel, P. W.; Boyle, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    An algebraic turbulence model is proposed for use with three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses. It incorporates features of both the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith models. The Baldwin-Lomax model uses the maximum of a function f(y) to determine length and velocity scales. An analysis of the Baldwin-Lomax model shows that f(y) can have a spurious maximum close to the wall, causing numerical problems and non-physical results. The proposed model uses integral relations to determine delta(*) u(sub e) and delta used in the Cebeci-Smith mode. It eliminates a constant in the Baldwin-Lomax model and determines the two remaining constants by comparison to the Cebeci-Smith formulation. Pressure gradient effects, a new wake model, and the implementation of these features in a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code are also described. Results are shown for a flat plate boundary layer, an annular turbine cascade, and endwall heat transfer in a linear turbine cascade. The heat transfer results agree well with experimental data which shows large variations in endwall Stanton number contours with Reynolds number.

  15. Three-Dimensional Balance of Cortical Tension and Axial Contractility Enables Fast Amoeboid Migration

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Meili, Ruedi; Bastounis, Effie; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Fast amoeboid migration requires cells to apply mechanical forces on their surroundings via transient adhesions. However, the role these forces play in controlling cell migration speed remains largely unknown. We used three-dimensional force microscopy to measure the three-dimensional forces exerted by chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells, and examined wild-type cells as well as mutants with defects in contractility, internal F-actin crosslinking, and cortical integrity. We showed that cells pull on their substrate adhesions using two distinct, yet interconnected mechanisms: axial actomyosin contractility and cortical tension. We found that the migration speed increases when axial contractility overcomes cortical tension to produce the cell shape changes needed for locomotion. We demonstrated that the three-dimensional pulling forces generated by both mechanisms are internally balanced by an increase in cytoplasmic pressure that allows cells to push on their substrate without adhering to it, and which may be relevant for amoeboid migration in complex three-dimensional environments. PMID:25692587

  16. Radial Stellar Pulsation and Three-dimensional Convection. IV. Full Amplitude Three-dimensional Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroux, Christopher M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of full amplitude RR Lyrae stars have been computed for several models across the instability strip. The three-dimensional nature of the calculations allows convection to be treated without reference to a phenomenological approach such as the local mixing length theory. Specifically, the time-dependent interaction of large-scale eddies and radial pulsation is controlled by conservation laws, while the effects of smaller convective eddies are simulated by an eddy viscosity model. The light amplitudes for these calculations are quite similar to those of our previous two-dimensional calculations in the middle of the instability strip, but somewhat lower near the red edge, the fundamental blue edge, and for the one first overtone model we computed. The time-dependent interaction between the radial pulsation and the convective energy transport is essentially the same in three dimensions as it is in two dimensions. There are some differences between the light curves of the two- and three-dimensional simulations, particularly during decreasing light. Reasons for the differences, both numerical and physical, are explored.

  17. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. IV. FULL AMPLITUDE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Christopher M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2015-02-10

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of full amplitude RR Lyrae stars have been computed for several models across the instability strip. The three-dimensional nature of the calculations allows convection to be treated without reference to a phenomenological approach such as the local mixing length theory. Specifically, the time-dependent interaction of large-scale eddies and radial pulsation is controlled by conservation laws, while the effects of smaller convective eddies are simulated by an eddy viscosity model. The light amplitudes for these calculations are quite similar to those of our previous two-dimensional calculations in the middle of the instability strip, but somewhat lower near the red edge, the fundamental blue edge, and for the one first overtone model we computed. The time-dependent interaction between the radial pulsation and the convective energy transport is essentially the same in three dimensions as it is in two dimensions. There are some differences between the light curves of the two- and three-dimensional simulations, particularly during decreasing light. Reasons for the differences, both numerical and physical, are explored.

  18. Three-dimensional Gradient Index Optics Fabricated in Diffusive Photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chunfang

    This thesis demonstrates three-dimensional gradient index (GRIN) optics fabricated in two diffusive photopolymers. These polymer optical components have localized gradient index structures, which are self-developed in diffusive photopolymers by introducing localized illuminations. Based on the sizes of the formed index structures, the photopolymer optics studied in this thesis fall into two categories: GRIN lens based optics and waveguide based optics. GRIN lenses and lens arrays with parabolic index profiles are created through Gaussian beam exposure, while GRIN lenses with arbitrary index profiles are created through a dual-axis galvo scanning system. Waveguide based optics, which include uniform waveguides, waveguide tapers, waveguides through thin optics and 900 sharp waveguide bends, are fabricated through direct-write lithography. Several quantitative characterization methods for the fabricated polymer optics are described. The index profiles of the GRIN lens based optics are quantitatively measured by a modified scanning transmission phase microscope and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Three-dimensional mode profile characterization of the polymer waveguides is carried out through a novel polymer sample preparation procedure and an active mode imaging system. A single mode performance is confirmed for the fabricated waveguides. A loss measurement for the waveguides is also accomplished. An index formation model is developed for a diffusive polymer developed by Dr. McLeod's group, which provides a fundamental guidance for fabricating custom-design index structures in the polymer. A hybrid GRIN axicon lens is fabricated to significantly extend the depth of focus in an endoscopy OCT application. Potential applications of the fabricated polymer optics include hybrid integrated optical circuits. The diffusive photopolymer with self-development characteristics provides a platform to integrate various optoelectronic subcomponents in integrated optical circuits.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of Theiler virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R A; Filman, D J; Fujinami, R S; Icenogle, J P; Hogle, J M

    1992-01-01

    Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus strains are categorized into two groups, a neurovirulent group that rapidly kills the host, and a demyelinating group that causes a generally nonlethal infection of motor neurons followed by a persistent infection of the white matter with demyelinating lesions similar to those found in multiple sclerosis. The three-dimensional structure of the DA strain, a member of the demyelinating group, has been determined at 2.8 A resolution. As in other picornaviruses, the icosahedral capsid is formed by the packing of wedge-shaped eight-stranded antiparallel beta barrels. The surface of Theiler virus has large star-shaped plateaus at the fivefold axes and broad depressions spanning the twofold axes. Several unusual structural features are clustered near one edge of the depression. These include two finger-like loops projecting from the surface (one formed by residues 78-85 of VP1, and the other formed by residues 56-65 of VP3) and a third loop containing three cysteines (residues 87, 89, and 91 of VP3), which appear to be covalently modified. Most of the sequence differences between the demyelinating and neurovirulent groups that could play a role in determining pathogenesis map to the surface of the star-shaped plateau. The distribution of these sequence differences on the surface of the virion is consistent with models in which the differences in the pathogenesis of the two groups of Theiler viruses are the result of differences in immunological or receptor-mediated recognition processes. Images PMID:1549565

  20. Three-dimensional kinematics of hummingbird flight.

    PubMed

    Tobalske, Bret W; Warrick, Douglas R; Clark, Christopher J; Powers, Donald R; Hedrick, Tyson L; Hyder, Gabriel A; Biewener, Andrew A

    2007-07-01

    Hummingbirds are specialized for hovering flight, and substantial research has explored this behavior. Forward flight is also important to hummingbirds, but the manner in which they perform forward flight is not well documented. Previous research suggests that hummingbirds increase flight velocity by simultaneously tilting their body angle and stroke-plane angle of the wings, without varying wingbeat frequency and upstroke: downstroke span ratio. We hypothesized that other wing kinematics besides stroke-plane angle would vary in hummingbirds. To test this, we used synchronized high-speed (500 Hz) video cameras and measured the three-dimensional wing and body kinematics of rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus, 3 g, N=5) as they flew at velocities of 0-12 m s(-1) in a wind tunnel. Consistent with earlier research, the angles of the body and the stroke plane changed with velocity, and the effect of velocity on wingbeat frequency was not significant. However, hummingbirds significantly altered other wing kinematics including chord angle, angle of attack, anatomical stroke-plane angle relative to their body, percent of wingbeat in downstroke, wingbeat amplitude, angular velocity of the wing, wingspan at mid-downstroke, and span ratio of the wingtips and wrists. This variation in bird-centered kinematics led to significant effects of flight velocity on the angle of attack of the wing and the area and angles of the global stroke planes during downstroke and upstroke. We provide new evidence that the paths of the wingtips and wrists change gradually but consistently with velocity, as in other bird species that possess pointed wings. Although hummingbirds flex their wings slightly at the wrist during upstroke, their average wingtip-span ratio of 93% revealed that they have kinematically ;rigid' wings compared with other avian species.

  1. Three dimensional study of Lutetia lineaments network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Aboudan, Alessio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Barbieri, Cesare

    2014-05-01

    The Scientific Imaging System for Rosetta, OSIRIS, acquired an imaging sequence of the Lutetia asteroid, allowing detection of a large number of lineaments distributed over most of its surface (Thomas et al., 2012, Planet. Space Sci., 66, 96-124; Massironi et al., 2012, Planet. Space Sci., 66, 125-136). In general these lineaments can be interpreted as the surface expression of discontinuities such as faults or fractures. Several categories of features has been observed, like troughs, scarps, faults, and ridges. These lineaments are generally more than 50 km long and up to 1.2 km in width, and seem to be arranged in systems (e.g. with common orientation). Moreover, in different geological regions of the asteroid a preferred orientation of lineaments can be recognized, but in all regions there are also lineaments which cross the local preferred trend. Noteworthy, lineaments radial to impact craters, that are common on other asteroidal bodies, are mostly absent on Lutetia (Thomas et al., 2012, Planet. Space Sci., 66, 96-124). However, on a non-spherical body it is not obvious to reconstruct the relationships occurring between the different lineaments. Indeed, lineations that appear to be similarly oriented on different asteroid facets could have no correlation at all (Buczkowski et al., 2007, Icarus, 193, 39-52). In this context, the 3D mapping of lineaments, that we performed directly on the Lutetia shape model, allowed us to obtain a three-dimensional model of these structures that have been reconstructed as planes cutting through the asteroid. This innovative methodology allowed us to detect several structures concentric with respect to the North Pole Crater Cluster, suggesting that these lineaments were originated by these impact events. However most lineaments can be reasonably grouped in different systems of lineaments with no obvious correlation with any impact event detected on the imaged surface. This opens new questions on the origin of these structures and

  2. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Mei Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-06-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L=2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion diifferential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (<10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j0(1+Ayn), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (<30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n. ©American Geophysical 1995

  3. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  4. All-Optical Interrogation of Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There have been two recent revolutionary advances in neuroscience: First, genetically encoded activity sensors have brought the goal of optical detection of single action potentials in vivo within reach. Second, optogenetic actuators now allow the activity of neurons to be controlled with millisecond precision. These revolutions have now been combined, together with advanced microscopies, to allow “all-optical” readout and manipulation of activity in neural circuits with single-spike and single-neuron precision. This is a transformational advance that will open new frontiers in neuroscience research. Harnessing the power of light in the all-optical approach requires coexpression of genetically encoded activity sensors and optogenetic probes in the same neurons, as well as the ability to simultaneously target and record the light from the selected neurons. It has recently become possible to combine sensors and optical strategies that are sufficiently sensitive and cross talk free to enable single-action-potential sensitivity and precision for both readout and manipulation in the intact brain. The combination of simultaneous readout and manipulation from the same genetically defined cells will enable a wide range of new experiments as well as inspire new technologies for interacting with the brain. The advances described in this review herald a future where the traditional tools used for generations by physiologists to study and interact with the brain—stimulation and recording electrodes—can largely be replaced by light. We outline potential future developments in this field and discuss how the all-optical strategy can be applied to solve fundamental problems in neuroscience. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This review describes the nexus of dramatic recent developments in optogenetic probes, genetically encoded activity sensors, and novel microscopies, which together allow the activity of neural circuits to be recorded and manipulated entirely using light. The

  5. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues. PMID:27410076

  6. On multiscale approaches to three-dimensional modelling of morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, R; Huang, C; Kazmierczak, B; Schneider, T; Izaguirre, J.A; Glimm, T; Hentschel, H.G.E; Glazier, J.A; Newman, S.A; Alber, M.S

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the foundation of a unified, object-oriented, three-dimensional biomodelling environment, which allows us to integrate multiple submodels at scales from subcellular to those of tissues and organs. Our current implementation combines a modified discrete model from statistical mechanics, the Cellular Potts Model, with a continuum reaction–diffusion model and a state automaton with well-defined conditions for cell differentiation transitions to model genetic regulation. This environment allows us to rapidly and compactly create computational models of a class of complex-developmental phenomena. To illustrate model development, we simulate a simplified version of the formation of the skeletal pattern in a growing embryonic vertebrate limb. PMID:16849182

  7. Three-dimensional landing zone joint capability technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Goodrich, Shawn; Ott, Carl; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Perez, Alfonso; Soukup, Joel; Burns, H. N.

    2014-06-01

    The Three-Dimensional Landing Zone (3D-LZ) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) is a 27-month program to develop an integrated LADAR and FLIR capability upgrade for USAF Combat Search and Rescue HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters through a retrofit of current Raytheon AN/AAQ-29 turret systems. The 3D-LZ JCTD builds upon a history of technology programs using high-resolution, imaging LADAR to address rotorcraft cruise, approach to landing, landing, and take-off in degraded visual environments with emphasis on brownout, cable warning and obstacle avoidance, and avoidance of controlled flight into terrain. This paper summarizes ladar development, flight test milestones, and plans for a final flight test demonstration and Military Utility Assessment in 2014.

  8. Functional Three-Dimensional Graphene/Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Duan, Xidong; Xu, Yuxi; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-08-23

    Integration of graphene with polymers to construct three-dimensional porous graphene/polymer composites (3DGPCs) has attracted considerable attention in the past few years for both fundamental studies and diverse technological applications. With the broad diversity in molecular structures of graphene and polymers via rich chemical routes, a number of 3DGPCs have been developed with unique structural, electrical, and mechanical properties, chemical tenability, and attractive functions, which greatly expands the research horizon of graphene-based composites. In particular, the properties and functions of the 3DGPCs can be readily tuned by precisely controlling the hierarchical porosity in the 3D graphene architecture as well as the intricate synergistic interactions between graphene and polymers. In this paper, we review the recent progress in 3DGPCs, including their synthetic strategies and potential applications in environmental protection, energy storage, sensors, and conducting composites. Lastly, we will conclude with a brief perspective on the challenges and future opportunities.

  9. Three dimensional CAD model of the Ignitor machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, S.; Zanaboni, P.; Macco, A.; Sioli, V.; Risso, E.

    1998-11-01

    defind The final, global product of all the structural and thermomechanical design activities is a complete three dimensional CAD (AutoCAD and Intergraph Design Review) model of the IGNITOR machine. With this powerful tool, any interface, modification, or upgrading of the machine design is managed as an integrated part of the general effort aimed at the construction of the Ignitor facility. ind The activities that are underway, to complete the design of the core of the experiment and that will be described, concern the following: ind - the cryogenic cooling system, ind - the radial press, the center post, the mechanical supports (legs) of the entire machine, ind - the inner mechanical supports of major components such as the plasma chamber and the outer poloidal field coils.

  10. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics. PMID:19098544

  11. Three-dimensional rogue waves in nonstationary parabolic potentials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya; Konotop, V V; Akhmediev, N

    2010-09-01

    Using symmetry analysis we systematically present a higher-dimensional similarity transformation reducing the (3+1) -dimensional inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with variable coefficients and parabolic potential to the (1+1) -dimensional NLS equation with constant coefficients. This transformation allows us to relate certain class of localized exact solutions of the (3+1) -dimensional case to the variety of solutions of integrable NLS equation of the (1+1) -dimensional case. As an example, we illustrated our technique using two lowest-order rational solutions of the NLS equation as seeding functions to obtain rogue wavelike solutions localized in three dimensions that have complicated evolution in time including interactions between two time-dependent rogue wave solutions. The obtained three-dimensional rogue wavelike solutions may raise the possibility of relative experiments and potential applications in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  12. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues.

  13. Joint three-dimensional inversion of magnetotelluric and magnetovariational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Dmitriev, V. I.; Gribenko, A. V.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of quantitative three-dimensional interpretation of the magnetotelluric (MT) data ranks among the most difficult problems in electromagnetic (EM) geophysics. Our paper presents a new rigorous numerical method for MT inversion, based on the integral equations technique. An important feature of the proposed method is the calculation of the Frechet derivative with the aid of a quasi-analytical approximation with an inhomogeneous background. This approach simplifies the algorithm of inversion and requires only a single forward modeling on each iteration. We have also developed a method for a joint inversion of MT and magnetovariational (MV) data. We show in the present paper that the joint inversion of MT impedances and the Wiese-Parkinson vectors can automatically allow for the static shift in the observed data, which is caused by the geoelectric inhomogeneities contained in the near-surface layer.

  14. Recent development of three-dimensional piping code SHAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the recent development of the three-dimensional, structural, and hydrodynamic analysis piping code SHAPS. Several new features have been incorporated into the program, including (1) an elbow hydrodynamic model for analyzing the effect of global motion on the pressure-wave propagation, (2) a component hydrodynamic model for treating fluid motion in the vicinity of rigid obstacles and baffle plates, (3) the addition of the implicit time integration scheme in the structural-dynamic analysis, (4) the option of an implicit-implicit fluid-structural linking scheme, and (5) provisions for two constitutive equations for materials under various loading conditions. Sample problems are given to illustrate these features. Their results are discussed in detail. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Numerical solution of three-dimensional magnetic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.H.; Greenside, H.S.

    1987-02-01

    A computer code is described that solves differential equations of the form B . del f = h for a single-valued solution f, given a toroidal three-dimensional divergence-free field B and a single-valued function h. The code uses a new algorithm that Fourier decomposes a given function in a set of flux coordinates in which the field lines are straight. The algorithm automatically adjusts the required integration lengths to compensate for proximity to low order rational surfaces. Applying this algorithm to the Cartesian coordinates defines a transformation to magnetic coordinates, in which the magnetic differential equation can be accurately solved. Our method is illustrated by calculating the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents for a stellarator.

  16. Functional Three-Dimensional Graphene/Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Duan, Xidong; Xu, Yuxi; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-08-23

    Integration of graphene with polymers to construct three-dimensional porous graphene/polymer composites (3DGPCs) has attracted considerable attention in the past few years for both fundamental studies and diverse technological applications. With the broad diversity in molecular structures of graphene and polymers via rich chemical routes, a number of 3DGPCs have been developed with unique structural, electrical, and mechanical properties, chemical tenability, and attractive functions, which greatly expands the research horizon of graphene-based composites. In particular, the properties and functions of the 3DGPCs can be readily tuned by precisely controlling the hierarchical porosity in the 3D graphene architecture as well as the intricate synergistic interactions between graphene and polymers. In this paper, we review the recent progress in 3DGPCs, including their synthetic strategies and potential applications in environmental protection, energy storage, sensors, and conducting composites. Lastly, we will conclude with a brief perspective on the challenges and future opportunities. PMID:27403991

  17. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube based photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells with a three dimensional (3D) morphology are an exciting new research thrust with promise to create cheaper, more efficient solar cells. This work introduces a new type of 3D PV device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. These arrays are paired with the thin film heterojunction, CdTe/CdS, to form a complete 3D carbon nanotube PV device (3DCNTPV). Marriage of a complicated 3D structure with production methods traditionally used for planar CdTe solar cell is challenging. This work examines the problems associated with processing these types of cells and systematically alters production methods of the semiconductor layers and electrodes to increase the short circuit current (Isc), eliminate parasitic shunts, and increase the open circuit voltage (Voc). The main benefit of 3D solar cell is the ability to utilize multiple photon interactions with the solar cell surface. The three dimensionality allows photons to interact multiple times with the photoactive material, which increases the absorption and the overall power output over what is possible with a two dimensional (2D) morphology. To quantify the increased power output arising from these multiple photon interactions, a new absorption efficiency term, eta3D, is introduced. The theoretical basis behind this new term and how it relates to the absorption efficiency of a planar cell, eta 2D, is derived. A unique model for the average number of multiple photon impingements, Gamma, is proposed based on three categories of 3D morphology: an infinite trench, an enclosed box, and an array of towers. The derivation of eta3D and Gamma for these 3D PV devices gives a complete picture of the enhanced power output over 2D cells based on CNT array height, pitch, radius, and shape. This theory is validated by monte carlo simulations and experiment. This new type of 3D PV devices has been shown to work experimentally. The first 3DCNTPV cells created posses Isc values of 0.085 to 17.872mA/cm2 and Voc values

  18. Projections of Three-Dimensional Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Felix; Rosa, De La

    2005-01-01

    When first-year calculus students are interested in studying double integrals, they can find, in standard textbooks, a detailed description of the different regions of integration. The aims of this paper are: to give a criterion to select the plane that will be projected, to classify the projections, and to give a simple rule to obtain them.…

  19. Structured image reconstruction for three-dimensional ghost imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Li, Enrong; Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2015-06-01

    A structured image reconstruction method has been proposed to obtain high quality images in three-dimensional ghost imaging lidar. By considering the spatial structure relationship between recovered images of scene slices at different longitudinal distances, orthogonality constraint has been incorporated to reconstruct the three-dimensional scenes in remote sensing. Numerical simulations have been performed to demonstrate that scene slices with various sparse ratios can be recovered more accurately by applying orthogonality constraint, and the enhancement is significant especially for ghost imaging with less measurements. A simulated three-dimensional city scene has been successfully reconstructed by using structured image reconstruction in three-dimensional ghost imaging lidar. PMID:26072814

  20. Advanced Three-Dimensional Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2005-01-01

    A desktop-scale, computer-controlled display system, initially developed for NASA and now known as the VolumeViewer(TradeMark), generates three-dimensional (3D) images of 3D objects in a display volume. This system differs fundamentally from stereoscopic and holographic display systems: The images generated by this system are truly 3D in that they can be viewed from almost any angle, without the aid of special eyeglasses. It is possible to walk around the system while gazing at its display volume to see a displayed object from a changing perspective, and multiple observers standing at different positions around the display can view the object simultaneously from their individual perspectives, as though the displayed object were a real 3D object. At the time of writing this article, only partial information on the design and principle of operation of the system was available. It is known that the system includes a high-speed, silicon-backplane, ferroelectric-liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM), multiple high-power lasers for projecting images in multiple colors, a rotating helix that serves as a moving screen for displaying voxels [volume cells or volume elements, in analogy to pixels (picture cells or picture elements) in two-dimensional (2D) images], and a host computer. The rotating helix and its motor drive are the only moving parts. Under control by the host computer, a stream of 2D image patterns is generated on the SLM and projected through optics onto the surface of the rotating helix. The system utilizes a parallel pixel/voxel-addressing scheme: All the pixels of the 2D pattern on the SLM are addressed simultaneously by laser beams. This parallel addressing scheme overcomes the difficulty of achieving both high resolution and a high frame rate in a raster scanning or serial addressing scheme. It has been reported that the structure of the system is simple and easy to build, that the optical design and alignment are not difficult, and that the

  1. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from the southwest looking northeast, from an altitude just above the high haze layer. The streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot are visible. The upper haze layer is mostly flat, with notable small peaks that can be matched with features in the lower cloud. In reality, these areas may represent a continuous vertical cloud column.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  2. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The upper haze layer has some features that match the lower cloud, such as the bright streak in the foreground of the frame. These are probably thick clouds that span several tens of vertical kilometers.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly

  3. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from above and to the south of the visualized area, showing the entire model. The entire region is overlain by a thin, transparent haze. In places the haze is high and thick, especially to the east (to the right of) the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper

  4. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The hotspot is clearly visible as a deep blue feature. The cloud streaks end near the hotspot, consistent with the idea that clouds traveling along these streak lines descend and evaporate as they approach the hotspot. The upper haze layer is slightly bowed upwards above the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional

  5. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the southeast, from between the cloud layers and over the north center of the region. The tall white clouds in the lower cloud deck are probably much like large terrestrial thunderclouds. They may be regions where atmospheric water powers vertical convection over large horizontal distances.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on

  6. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the west, from between the cloud layers and over the patchy white clouds to the east of the hotspot. This is probably an area where moist convection is occurring over large horizontal distances, similar to the atmosphere over the equatorial ocean on Earth. The clouds are high and thick, and are observed to change rapidly over short time scales.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  7. Photonic encryption using all optical logic.

    SciTech Connect

    Blansett, Ethan L.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Tang, Jason D.; Robertson, Perry J.; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Tarman, Thomas David; Pierson, Lyndon George

    2003-12-01

    With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines two classes of all optical logic (SEED, gain competition) and how each discrete logic element can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of the SEED and gain competition devices in an optical circuit were modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model of the SEED or gain competition device takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple and time delay characteristics. These 'black box' models are interconnected and cascaded in an

  8. Three-dimensional face model reproduction method using multiview images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Yoshio; Agawa, Hiroshi; Kishino, Fumio

    1991-11-01

    This paper describes a method of reproducing three-dimensional face models using multi-view images for a virtual space teleconferencing system that achieves a realistic visual presence for teleconferencing. The goal of this research, as an integral component of a virtual space teleconferencing system, is to generate a three-dimensional face model from facial images, synthesize images of the model virtually viewed from different angles, and with natural shadow to suit the lighting conditions of the virtual space. The proposed method is as follows: first, front and side view images of the human face are taken by TV cameras. The 3D data of facial feature points are obtained from front- and side-views by an image processing technique based on the color, shape, and correlation of face components. Using these 3D data, the prepared base face models, representing typical Japanese male and female faces, are modified to approximate the input facial image. The personal face model, representing the individual character, is then reproduced. Next, an oblique view image is taken by TV camera. The feature points of the oblique view image are extracted using the same image processing technique. A more precise personal model is reproduced by fitting the boundary of the personal face model to the boundary of the oblique view image. The modified boundary of the personal face model is determined by using face direction, namely rotation angle, which is detected based on the extracted feature points. After the 3D model is established, the new images are synthesized by mapping facial texture onto the model.

  9. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Rachmeler, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmieder, B.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  10. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide a valuable methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  11. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2007-08-01

    The visibility of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide an interesting methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  12. Three-dimensional optofluidic device for isolating microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keloth, A.; Paterson, L.; Markx, G. H.; Kar, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    Development of efficient methods for isolation and manipulation of microorganisms is essential to study unidentified and yet-to-be cultured microbes originating from a variety of environments. The discovery of novel microbes and their products have the potential to contribute to the development of new medicines and other industrially important bioactive compounds. In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and validation of an optofluidic device capable of redirecting microbes within a flow using optical forces. The device holds promise to enable the high throughput isolation of single microbes for downstream culture and analysis. Optofluidic devices are widely used in clinical research, cell biology and biomedical engineering as they are capable of performing analytical functions such as controlled transportation, compact and rapid processing of nanolitres to millilitres of clinical or biological samples. We have designed and fabricated a three dimensional optofluidic device to control and manipulate microorganisms within a microfluidic channel. The device was fabricated in fused silica by ultrafast laser inscription (ULI) followed by selective chemical etching. The unique three-dimensional capability of ULI is utilized to integrate microfluidic channels and waveguides within the same substrate. The main microfluidic channel in the device constitutes the path of the sample. Optical waveguides are fabricated at right angles to the main microfluidic channel. The potential of the optical scattering force to control and manipulate microorganisms is discussed in this paper. A 980 nm continuous wave (CW) laser source, coupled to the waveguide, is used to exert radiation pressure on the particle and particle migrations at different flow velocities are recorded. As a first demonstration, device functionality is validated using fluorescent microbeads and initial trials with microalgae are presented.

  13. Surface representations of two- and three-dimensional fluid flow topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1990-01-01

    We discuss our work using critical point analysis to generate representations of the vector field topology of numerical flow data sets. Critical points are located and characterized in a two-dimensional domain, which may be either a two-dimensional flow field or the tangential velocity field near a three-dimensional body. Tangent curves are then integrated out along the principal directions of certain classes of critical points. The points and curves are linked to form a skeleton representing the two-dimensional vector field topology. When generated from the tangential velocity field near a body in a three-dimensional flow, the skeleton includes the critical points and curves which provide a basis for analyzing the three-dimensional structure of the flow separation. The points along the separation curves in the skeleton are used to start tangent curve integrations to generate surfaces representing the topology of the associated flow separations.

  14. Three-dimensional image reconstruction for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Kleinermann, F; Avis, N J; Judah, S K; Barber, D C

    1996-11-01

    Very little work has been conducted on three-dimensional aspects of electrical impedance tomography (EIT), partly due to the increased computational complexity over the two-dimensional aspects of EIT. Nevertheless, extending EIT to three-dimensional data acquisition and image reconstruction may afford significant advantages such as an increase in the size of the independent data set and improved spatial resolution. However, considerable challenges are associated with the software aspects of three-dimensional EIT systems due to the requirement for accurate three-dimensional forward problem modelling and the derivation of three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms. This paper outlines the work performed to date to derive a three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for EIT based on the inversion of the sensitivity matrix approach for a finite right circular cylinder. A comparison in terms of the singular-value spectra and the singular vectors between the sensitivity matrices for a three-dimensional cylinder and a two-dimensional disc has been performed. This comparison shows that the three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm recruits more central information at lower condition numbers than the two-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm.

  15. Three-dimensional plasma equilibrium near a separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.H.; Pomphrey, N.; Boozer, A.H.

    1988-08-01

    The limiting behavior of a general three-dimensional MHD equilibrium near a separatrix is calculated explicitly. No expansions in ..beta.. or assumptions about island widths are made. Implications of the results for the numerical calculation of such equilibria, are discussed, as well as for issues concerning the existence of three-dimensional MHD equilibria. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of the myocardium with isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    Three methods of imaging the three-dimensional distribution of isotopes in the myocardium are discussed. Three-dimensional imaging was examined using multiple Anger-camera views. Longitudinal tomographic images with compensation for blurring were studied. Transverse-section reconstruction using coincidence detection of annihilation gammas from positron emitting isotopes was investigated.

  17. Pathogen propagation in cultured three-dimensional tissue mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for propagating a pathogen in a three-dimensional tissue mass cultured at microgravity conditions in a culture vessel containing culture media and a culture matrix is provided. The three-dimensional tissue mass is inoculated with a pathogen and pathogen replication in the cells of the tissue mass achieved.

  18. Exploiting desktop supercomputing for three-dimensional electron microscopy reconstructions using ART with blobs.

    PubMed

    Bilbao-Castro, J R; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; García, I; Carazo, J M; Fernández, J J

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy allows direct visualization of biological macromolecules close to their native state. The high impact of this technique in the structural biology field is highly correlated with the development of new image processing algorithms. In order to achieve subnanometer resolution, the size and number of images involved in a three-dimensional reconstruction increase and so do computer requirements. New chips integrating multiple processors are hitting the market at a reduced cost. This high-integration, low-cost trend has just begun and is expected to bring real supercomputers to our laboratory desktops in the coming years. This paper proposes a parallel implementation of a computation-intensive algorithm for three-dimensional reconstruction, ART, that takes advantage of the computational power in modern multicore platforms. ART is a sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithm that has turned out to be well suited for the conditions found in three-dimensional electron microscopy. In view of the performance obtained in this work, these modern platforms are expected to play an important role to face the future challenges in three-dimensional electron microscopy.

  19. Exploiting desktop supercomputing for three-dimensional electron microscopy reconstructions using ART with blobs.

    PubMed

    Bilbao-Castro, J R; Marabini, R; Sorzano, C O S; García, I; Carazo, J M; Fernández, J J

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy allows direct visualization of biological macromolecules close to their native state. The high impact of this technique in the structural biology field is highly correlated with the development of new image processing algorithms. In order to achieve subnanometer resolution, the size and number of images involved in a three-dimensional reconstruction increase and so do computer requirements. New chips integrating multiple processors are hitting the market at a reduced cost. This high-integration, low-cost trend has just begun and is expected to bring real supercomputers to our laboratory desktops in the coming years. This paper proposes a parallel implementation of a computation-intensive algorithm for three-dimensional reconstruction, ART, that takes advantage of the computational power in modern multicore platforms. ART is a sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithm that has turned out to be well suited for the conditions found in three-dimensional electron microscopy. In view of the performance obtained in this work, these modern platforms are expected to play an important role to face the future challenges in three-dimensional electron microscopy. PMID:18940260

  20. A three-dimensional digital visualization model of cervical nerves in a healthy person.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiaming; Fu, Dong; Li, Sen

    2013-07-15

    Three-dimensional reconstruction nerve models are classically obtained from two-dimensional ages of "visible human" frozen sections. However, because of the flexibility of nerve tissues and small color differences compared with surrounding tissues, the integrity and validity of nerve tissues can be impaired during milling. Thus, in the present study, we obtained two-dimensional data from a healthy volunteer based on continuous CT angiography and magnetic resonance myelography. Semi-automatic segmentation and reconstruction were then conducted at different thresholds in different tissues using Mimics software. Small anatomical structures such as muscles and cervical nerves were reconstructed using the medical computer aided design module. Three-dimensional digital models of the cervical nerves and their surrounding structures were successfully developed, which allowed visualization of the spatial relation of anatomical structures with a strong three-dimensional effect, distinct appearance, clear distribution, and good continuity, precision, and integrality. These results indicate the validity of a three-dimensional digital visualization model of healthy human cervical nerves, which overcomes the disadvantages of milling, avoids data loss, and exhibits a realistic appearance and three-dimensional image. PMID:25206491

  1. Secondary instability in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zang, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the transition to turbulence in three-dimensional reconnection of a magnetic neutral sheet. We find that the transition can occur via a three-step process. First, the sheet undergoes the usual tearing instability. Second, the tearing mode saturates to form a two-dimensional quasi-steady state. Third, this secondary equilibrium is itself unstable when it is perturbed by three-dimensional disturbances. Most of this paper is devoted to the analysis and simulation of the three-dimensional linear stability properties of the two-dimensional saturated tearing layer. The numerical simulations are performed with a semi-implicit, pseudospectral-Fourier collocation algorithm. We identify a three-dimensional secondary linear stability which grows on the ideal timescale. An examination of the modal energetics reveals that the largest energy transfer is from the mean field to the three-dimensional field, with the two-dimensional field acting as a catalyst.

  2. Occlusion-free monocular three-dimensional vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoracatos, Vassilios E.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a new, occlusion-free, monocular three-dimensional vision system. A matrix of light beams (lasers, fiber optics, etc.), substantially parallel to the optic axis of the lens of a video camera, is projected onto a scene. The corresponding coordinates of the perspective image generated on the video-camera sensor, the focal length of the camera lens, and the lateral position of the projected beams of light are used to determine the 'perspective depth' z* of the three-dimensional real image in the space between the lens and the image plane. Direct inverse perspective transformations are used to reconstruct the three- dimensional real-world scene. This system can lead to the development of three-dimensional real-image sensing devices for manufacturing, medical, and defense-related applications. If combined with existing technology, it has high potential for the development of three- dimensional television.

  3. Virtual three-dimensional blackboard: three-dimensional finger tracking with a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Andrew; Hassan-Shafique, Khurram; Shah, Mubarak; da Vitoria Lobo, N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for three-dimensional (3D) tracking of a human finger from a monocular sequence of images. To recover the third dimension from the two-dimensional images, we use the fact that the motion of the human arm is highly constrained owing to the dependencies between elbow and forearm and the physical constraints on joint angles. We use these anthropometric constraints to derive a 3D trajectory of a gesticulating arm. The system is fully automated and does not require human intervention. The system presented can be used as a visualization tool, as a user-input interface, or as part of some gesture-analysis system in which 3D information is important.

  4. Advanced three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.; Mosso, S.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project is to investigate, implement, and evaluate algorithms that have high potential for improving the robustness, fidelity and accuracy of three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations. Eulerian computations are necessary to simulate a number of important physical phenomena ranging from the molding process for metal parts to nuclear weapons safety issues to astrophysical phenomena such as that associated with a Type 2 supernovae. A number of algorithmic issues were explored in the course of this research including interface/volume tracking, surface physics integration, high resolution integration techniques, multilevel iterative methods, multimaterial hydrodynamics and coupling radiation with hydrodynamics. This project combines core strengths of several Laboratory divisions. The project has high institutional benefit given the renewed emphasis on numerical simulations in Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship and the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative and LANL`s tactical goals related to high performance computing and simulation.

  5. Three dimensional boundary element solutions for eddy current nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Song, Jiming; Nakagawa, Norio

    2014-02-01

    The boundary integral equations (BIE) method is a numerical computational method of solving linear partial differential equations which have been formulated as integral equations. It can be applied in many areas of engineering and science including fluid mechanics, acoustics, electromagnetics, and fracture mechanics. The eddy current problem is formulated by the BIE and discretized into matrix equations by the method of moments (MoM) or the boundary element method (BEM). The three dimensional arbitrarily shaped objects are described by a number of triangular patches. The Stratton-Chu formulation is specialized for the conductive medium. The equivalent electric and magnetic surface currents are expanded in terms of Rao-Wilton-Glisson (RWG) vector basis function while the normal component of magnetic field is expanded in terms of the pulse basis function. Also, a low frequency approximation is applied in the external medium. Additionally, we introduce Auld's impedance formulas to calculate impedance variation. There are very good agreements between numerical results and those from theory and/or experiments for a finite cross-section above a wedge.

  6. Three-dimensional simulation of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Mankofsky, A.; Kodis, M.A.; Vanderplaats, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present a three-dimensional nonlinear formulation and simulation of a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) using a sheath helix model. The simulation is capable of treating both DC and pulsed electron beams as well as single-frequency or multi-tone operation. The model relies upon a spectral decomposition of the electromagnetic fields in terms of the vacuum sheath helix polarizations. The field equations are integrated on a grid and advanced in time using a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, and the electron orbit equations are integrated using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Charge is accumulated on the grid and the field is interpolated to the particle location by a linear map. Several numerical cases are considered. Simulation of the injection of a DC beam and a signal at a single frequency is compared with a linear field theory of the helix TWT interaction, and good agreement is found. Simulation of a prebunched beam is also discussed, and compared with an experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  7. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation.

  8. Rat parotid gland cell differentiation in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Schulz, David J; Camden, Jean M; Liao, Zhongji; Peterson, Troy S; Seye, Cheikh I; Petris, Michael J; Weisman, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    The use of polarized salivary gland cell monolayers has contributed to our understanding of salivary gland physiology. However, these cell models are not representative of glandular epithelium in vivo, and, therefore, are not ideal for investigating salivary epithelial functions. The current study has developed a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model for rat Par-C10 parotid gland cells that forms differentiated acinar-like spheres on Matrigel. These 3D Par-C10 acinar-like spheres display characteristics similar to differentiated acini in salivary glands, including cell polarization, tight junction (TJ) formation required to maintain transepithelial potential difference, basolateral expression of aquaporin-3 and Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter-1, and responsiveness to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol that is decreased by the anion channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid or chloride replacement with gluconate. Incubation of the spheres in the hypertonic medium increased the expression level of the water channel aquaporin-5. Further, the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma induced alterations in TJ integrity in the acinar-like spheres without affecting individual cell viability, suggesting that cytokines may affect salivary gland function by altering TJ integrity. Thus, 3D Par-C10 acinar-like spheres represent a novel in vitro model to study physiological and pathophysiological functions of differentiated acini.

  9. Three-Dimensional Planning in Maxillofacial Fracture Surgery: Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacture Surgical Splints by Integrating Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Images Into Multislice Computerized Tomography Images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiayin; Zhou, Zhongwei; Li, Peng; Tang, Wei; Guo, Jixiang; Wang, Hu; Tian, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an innovative workflow for maxillofacial fracture surgery planning and surgical splint designing. The maxillofacial multislice computerized tomography (MSCT) data and dental cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) data both were obtained from 40 normal adults and 58 adults who suffered fractures. The each part of the CBCT dentition image was registered into MSCT image by the use of the iterative closest point algorithm. Volume evaluation of the virtual splints that were designed by the registered MSCT images and MSCT images of the same object was performed. Eighteen patients (group 1) were operated without any splint. Twenty-one (group 2) and 19 patients (group 3) used the splints designed according to the MSCT images and registered MSCT images, respectively. The authors' results showed that the mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.53 to 0.92 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.38 to 0.69 mm in fracture patients. The mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.47 to 0.85 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.33 to 0.71 mm in normal adults. 72.22% patients in group 1 recovered occlusion. 85.71% patients in group 2, and 94.73% patients in group 3 reconstructed occlusion. There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients (P <0.05). The MSCT images based splints' volume was statistically significantly distinct from the registered MSCT splints' volume in normal adults (P <0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients and normal adults (P <0.05). The occlusion recovery rate of group 3 was better than that of group 1 and group 2. The way of integrating CBCT images into MSCT images for splints designing was feasible. The volume of the splints designed by MSCT images tended to be smaller than the splints designed by

  10. Three-Dimensional Planning in Maxillofacial Fracture Surgery: Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacture Surgical Splints by Integrating Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Images Into Multislice Computerized Tomography Images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiayin; Zhou, Zhongwei; Li, Peng; Tang, Wei; Guo, Jixiang; Wang, Hu; Tian, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an innovative workflow for maxillofacial fracture surgery planning and surgical splint designing. The maxillofacial multislice computerized tomography (MSCT) data and dental cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) data both were obtained from 40 normal adults and 58 adults who suffered fractures. The each part of the CBCT dentition image was registered into MSCT image by the use of the iterative closest point algorithm. Volume evaluation of the virtual splints that were designed by the registered MSCT images and MSCT images of the same object was performed. Eighteen patients (group 1) were operated without any splint. Twenty-one (group 2) and 19 patients (group 3) used the splints designed according to the MSCT images and registered MSCT images, respectively. The authors' results showed that the mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.53 to 0.92 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.38 to 0.69 mm in fracture patients. The mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.47 to 0.85 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.33 to 0.71 mm in normal adults. 72.22% patients in group 1 recovered occlusion. 85.71% patients in group 2, and 94.73% patients in group 3 reconstructed occlusion. There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients (P <0.05). The MSCT images based splints' volume was statistically significantly distinct from the registered MSCT splints' volume in normal adults (P <0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients and normal adults (P <0.05). The occlusion recovery rate of group 3 was better than that of group 1 and group 2. The way of integrating CBCT images into MSCT images for splints designing was feasible. The volume of the splints designed by MSCT images tended to be smaller than the splints designed by

  11. Nanopattern-guided growth of single-crystal silicon on amorphous substrates and high-performance sub-100 nm thin-film transistors for three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian

    This thesis explores how nanopatterns can be used to control the growth of single-crystal silicon on amorphous substrates at low temperature, with potential applications on flat panel liquid-crystal display and 3-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits. I first present excimer laser annealing of amorphous silicon (a-Si) nanostructures on thermally oxidized silicon wafer for controlled formation of single-crystal silicon islands. Preferential nucleation at pattern center is observed due to substrate enhanced edge heating. Single-grain silicon is obtained in a 50 nm x 100 nm rectangular pattern by super lateral growth (SLG). Narrow lines (such as 20-nm-wide) can serve as artificial heterogeneous nucleation sites during crystallization of large patterns, which could lead to the formation of single-crystal silicon islands in a controlled fashion. In addition to eximer laser annealing, NanoPAtterning and nickel-induced lateral C&barbelow;rystallization (NanoPAC) of a-Si lines is presented. Single-crystal silicon is achieved by NanoPAC. The line width of a-Si affects the grain structure of crystallized silicon lines significantly. Statistics show that single-crystal silicon is formed for all lines with width between 50 nm to 200 nm. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nickel-induced lateral crystallization (Ni-ILC) of a-Si inside a pattern is revealed; lithography-constrained single seeding (LISS) is proposed to explain the single-crystal formation. Intragrain line and two-dimensional defects are also studied. To test the electrical properties of NanoPAC silicon films, sub-100 nm thin-film transistors (TFTs) are fabricated using Patten-controlled crystallization of Ṯhin a-Si channel layer and H&barbelow;igh temperature (850°C) annealing, coined PaTH process. PaTH TFTs show excellent device performance over traditional solid phase crystallized (SPC) TFTs in terms of threshold voltage, threshold voltage roll-off, leakage current, subthreshold swing, on

  12. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  13. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  14. GRIDMAKER. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, T.K.; Yeh, G.T.; Wilson, G.V.; Toran, L.E.

    1990-06-01

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneous systems by identifying the type of material in each element.

  15. A three-dimensional approach for analysis of sidewall injector mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, Victor; Smith, Donald M.; Mathur, Atul B.; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) analytical approach to calculate the mixing and combustion efficiency along engine combustors that use sidewall fuel injectors is described. The analysis consists of three parts: (1) an empirical correlation for fuel penetration, (2) application of integral conservation laws following jet turning and pressure equilibration, and (3) an analytical solution for the simplified three-dimensional partial differential equations to describe the downstream mixing and combustion process. Numerical results are compared to some empirical and experimental work, and favorable agreements are shown. The importance of including anisotropic turbulence and three-dimensional effects are illustrated by comparison with data and other less comprehensive analyses. The analytical solution is suitable for rapid estimates of engine performance and parametric studies of combustor designs containing transverse or angled injector ports arranged in rows and/or columns.

  16. Three-dimensional finite element analysis for high velocity impact. [of projectiles from space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, S. T. K.; Lee, C. H.; Brashears, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for solving unsteady, three-dimensional high velocity impact problems is presented. A computer program was developed based on the Eulerian hydroelasto-viscoplastic formulation and the utilization of the theorem of weak solutions. The equations solved consist of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, equation of state, and appropriate constitutive equations. The solution technique is a time-dependent finite element analysis utilizing three-dimensional isoparametric elements, in conjunction with a generalized two-step time integration scheme. The developed code was demonstrated by solving one-dimensional as well as three-dimensional impact problems for both the inviscid hydrodynamic model and the hydroelasto-viscoplastic model.

  17. Three-dimensional X-ray micro-velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Uemura, Tomomasa

    2011-01-01

    A direct measurement of three-dimensional X-ray velocimetry with micrometer spatial resolution is presented. The key to this development is the use of a Laue crystal as an X-ray beam splitter and mirror. Three-dimensional flow velocities in a 0.4 mm-diameter tubing were recorded, with <5 µm spatial resolution and speeds of 0.7 mm s−1. This development paves the way for three-dimensional velocimetry in many cases where visible-light techniques are not effective, such as multiphase flow or flow of optically opaque liquids. PMID:21335921

  18. Fully automated three-dimensional microscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschmann, Russell L.

    2000-04-01

    Tissue-scale structures such as vessel networks are imaged at micron resolution with the Virtual Tissue System (VT System). VT System imaging of cubic millimeters of tissue and other material extends the capabilities of conventional volumetric techniques such as confocal microscopy, and allows for the first time the integrated 2D and 3D analysis of important tissue structural relationships. The VT System eliminates the need for glass slide-mounted tissue sections and instead captures images directly from the surface of a block containing a sample. Tissues are en bloc stained with fluorochrome compounds, embedded in an optically conditioned polymer that suppresses image signals form dep within the block , and serially sectioned for imaging. Thousands of fully registered 2D images are automatically captured digitally to completely convert tissue samples into blocks of high-resolution information. The resulting multi gigabyte data sets constitute the raw material for precision visualization and analysis. Cellular function may be seen in a larger anatomical context. VT System technology makes tissue metrics, accurate cell enumeration and cell cycle analyses possible while preserving full histologic setting.

  19. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Petersen, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow dummy chips'' are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned on the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  20. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Petersen, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow "dummy chips" are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned o the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  1. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.; Gallman, P.; Gaudreault, J.; Mosehauer, R.; Slotwinski, A.; Jarvis, G.; Griffiths, P.

    1996-12-31

    This system (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. It is in the final phase of a 3-phase program to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and radioactive and organic contamination is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of dangerous inorganic materials such as asbestos and transite. 3D-ICAS robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected, using coherent laser radar tracking, which also provides 3D facility maps. High-speed automated organic analysis is provided by means of gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer sensor which can process a sample without contact in one minute. Volatile organics are extracted directly from contaminated surfaces without sample removal; multiple stage focusing is used for high time resolution. Additional discrimination is obtained through a final stage time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The radionuclide sensors combines {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} counting with energy discrimination of the {alpha} channel; this quantifies isotopes of U, Pu, Th, Tc, Np, and Am in one minute. The Molecular Vibrational Spectrometry sensor is used to characterize substrate material such as concrete, transite, wood, or asbestos; this can be used to provide estimates of the depth of contamination. The 3D-ICAS will be available for real-time monitoring immediately after each 1 to 2 minute sample period. After surface mapping, 3-D displays will be provided showing contours of detected contaminant concentrations. Permanent measurement and contaminant level archiving will be provided, assuring data integrity and allowing regulatory review before and after D&D operations.

  2. A Three-dimensional Camera: Development and Applications of a Three-dimensional Image Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cunwei; Kamitomo, Hiroya; Sun, Ke; Tsujino, Kazuhiro; Cho, Genki

    Three-dimensional (3-D) image measurement is a technique that uses a digital camera to determine the shape and dimensions of the surface of an object. Although it has been studied for a long time, various problems still remain to be solved for practical applications. The goal of our research is to solve these problems and to develop a 3-D camera that can be used for practical 3-D image measurements. This paper analyzes the problems associated with the conventional technology and introduces development goals for the new 3-D camera. The key techniques of this 3-D camera are explained, including techniques for optimizing the intensity-modulation pattern projection, controlling the projection pattern intensity, determining the projection position, and controlling the stripe period. The system is evaluated and some examples of applications are given. The proposed 3-D camera can automatically adjust for variations in an object's size, form, surface color, and reflection characteristics and it can measure non-stationary objects. Consequently, it has the potential to be used in a wide range of applications including product quality control, human measurement, and face recognition.

  3. Advances in three-dimensional diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    ter Haar Romeny, B M; Zuiderveld, K J; Van Waes, P F; Van Walsum, T; Van Der Weijden, R; Weickert, J; Stokking, R; Wink, O; Kalitzin, S; Maintz, T; Zonneveld, F; Viergever, M A

    1998-10-01

    The maturity of current 3D rendering software in combination with recent developments in computer vision techniques enable an exciting range of applications for the visualisation, measurement and interactive manipulation of volumetric data, relevant both for diagnostic imaging and for anatomy. This paper reviews recent work in this area from the Image Sciences Institute at Utrecht University. The processes that yield a useful visual presentation are sequential. After acquisition and before any visualisation, an essential step is to prepare the data properly: this field is known as 'image processing' or 'computer vision' in analogy with the processing in human vision. Examples will be discussed of modern image enhancement and denoising techniques, and the complex process of automatically finding the objects or regions of interest, i.e. segmentation. One of the newer and promising methodologies for image analysis is based on a mathematical analysis of the human (cortical) visual processing: multiscale image analysis. After preprocessing the 3D rendering can be acquired by simulating the 'ray casting' in the computer. New possibilities are presented, such as the integrated visualisation in one image of (accurately registered) datasets of the same patient acquired in different modality scanners. Other examples include colour coding of functional data such as SPECT brain perfusion or functional magnetic resonance (MR) data and even metric data such as skull thickness on the rendered 3D anatomy from MR or computed tomography (CT). Optimal use and perception of 3D visualisation in radiology requires fast display and truly interactive manipulation facilities. Modern and increasingly cheaper workstations ( < $10000) allow this to be a reality. It is now possible to manipulate 3D images of 256 at 15 frames per second interactively, placing virtual reality within reach. The possibilities of modern workstations become increasingly more sophisticated and versatile. Examples

  4. Improving Students' Sense of Three-Dimensional Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeson, Neville J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes activities to be used with fifth and sixth graders to improve students' spatial sense with respect to three-dimensional shapes. Includes the use of cubes, triangular prisms, tetrahedrons, and square pyramids. (MKR)

  5. Three-dimensional Simulation of Backward Raman Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Balakin; G.M. Fraiman; N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-12

    Three-dimensional (3-D) simulations for the Backward Raman Amplification (BRA) are presented. The images illustrate the effects of pump depletion, pulse diffraction, non-homogeneous plasma density, and plasma ionization.

  6. Visual Chemistry: Three-Dimensional Perception of Chemical Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban, Alexandru T.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses in great detail aspects connected with the visual and mental processing of chemical images. Presents various types of conventions for translating three-dimensional objects into two-dimensional representations. (Author/CCM)

  7. Construction of Three Dimensional Solutions for the Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yefet, A.; Turkel, E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider numerical solutions for the three dimensional time dependent Maxwell equations. We construct a fourth order accurate compact implicit scheme and compare it to the Yee scheme for free space in a box.

  8. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures.

  9. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures. PMID:26381761

  10. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  11. Direct Linear Transformation Method for Three-Dimensional Cinematography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Robert

    1978-01-01

    The ability of Direct Linear Transformation Method for three-dimensional cinematography to locate points in space was shown to meet the accuracy requirements associated with research on human movement. (JD)

  12. Photopolymer-based three-dimensional optical waveguide devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagami, M.; Yamashita, T.; Yonemura, M.; Kawasaki, A.; Watanabe, O.; Tomiki, M.

    2012-02-01

    Photopolymer based three-dimensional (3D) waveguide devices are very attractive in low-cost optical system integration. Especially, Light-Induced Self-Written (LISW) technology is suitable for this application, and the technology enables low-loss 3D optical circuitry formation from an optical fiber tip which soaked in photopolymer solution by employing its photo-polymerization due to own irradiation from the fiber tip. This technology is expected drastic mounting cost reduction in fields of micro-optic and hybrid integration devices assembly. The principle of the LISW optical waveguides is self-trapping effect of the irradiation flux into the self-organized waveguide, where, used wavelength can be chosen to fit photopolymer's reactivity from visible to infrared. Furthermore, this effect also makes possible grating formation and "optical solder" interconnection. Actually fabricated self-written grating shows well defined deep periodic index contrast and excellent optical property for the wavelength selectivity. And the "optical solder" interconnection realizes a passive optical interconnection between two faceted fibers or devices by the LISW waveguide even if there is a certain amount of gap and a small degree of misalignment exist. The LISW waveguides grow towards each other from both sides to a central point where the opposing beams overlap and are then combined into one waveguide. This distinctive effect is confirmed in all kind optical fibers, such as from a singlemode to 1-mm-corediameter multimode optical fiber. For example of complicated WDM optical transceiver module, mounted a branchedwaveguide and filter elements, effectiveness of LISW technology is outstanding. In assembling and packaging process, neither dicing nor polishing is needed. In this paper, we introduce LISW technology principles and potential application to integrated WDM optical transceiver devices for both of singlemode and multimode system developed in our research group.

  13. Three-dimensional simulation and prediction of craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Meehan, M; Teschner, M; Girod, S

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of patients with complex facial deformities is one of the most challenging multidisciplinary tasks in plastic surgery. Due to advancements in medical technology and surgical techniques in the last 20 years correction of severe malformations has become possible and is performed by highly specialized teams frequently in a single operation. Recent developments in three-dimensional (3-D) imaging techniques have already greatly facilitated diagnosis of complex craniofacial deformities. Computer-based simulation methods for surgical procedures that are based on imaging data have the potential to improve surgical treatment by providing the ability to perform 'virtual surgery' preoperatively and thus reduce patient risk and morbidity intraoperatively. A method is presented for interactive computer-assisted craniofacial plastic surgery planning and visualization, especially simulation of soft tissue changes using an experimental Craniofacial Surgery Planner. The system computes non-linear soft-tissue deformation because of bone realignment. It is capable of simulating bone cutting and bone realignment with integrated interactive collision detection. Furthermore, soft-tissue deformation and cutting due to surgical instruments can be visualized. Simulation processes are based on an individual patient's preoperative 3-D computed tomography and on a 3-D, photo-realistic model of the patient's preoperative appearance obtained by a laser range scanner. Very fast and robust prediction of non-linear soft-tissue deformation is computed by optimizing a non-linear cost function. PMID:14606542

  14. The perception of three-dimensionality across continuous surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Kent A.

    1989-01-01

    The apparent three-dimensionality of a viewed surface presumably corresponds to several internal preceptual quantities, such as surface curvature, local surface orientation, and depth. These quantities are mathematically related for points within the silhouette bounds of a smooth, continuous surface. For instance, surface curvature is related to the rate of change of local surface orientation, and surface orientation is related to the local gradient of distance. It is not clear to what extent these 3D quantities are determined directly from image information rather than indirectly from mathematically related forms, by differentiation or by integration within boundary constraints. An open empirical question, for example, is to what extent surface curvature is perceived directly, and to what extent it is quantitative rather than qualitative. In addition to surface orientation and curvature, one derives an impression of depth, i.e., variations in apparent egocentric distance. A static orthographic image is essentially devoid of depth information, and any quantitative depth impression must be inferred from surface orientation and other sources. Such conversion of orientation to depth does appear to occur, and even to prevail over stereoscopic depth information under some circumstances.

  15. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  16. A Three-Dimensional Receiver Operator Characteristic Surface Diagnostic Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves are commonly applied as metrics for quantifying the performance of binary fault detection systems. An ROC curve provides a visual representation of a detection system s True Positive Rate versus False Positive Rate sensitivity as the detection threshold is varied. The area under the curve provides a measure of fault detection performance independent of the applied detection threshold. While the standard ROC curve is well suited for quantifying binary fault detection performance, it is not suitable for quantifying the classification performance of multi-fault classification problems. Furthermore, it does not provide a measure of diagnostic latency. To address these shortcomings, a novel three-dimensional receiver operator characteristic (3D ROC) surface metric has been developed. This is done by generating and applying two separate curves: the standard ROC curve reflecting fault detection performance, and a second curve reflecting fault classification performance. A third dimension, diagnostic latency, is added giving rise to 3D ROC surfaces. Applying numerical integration techniques, the volumes under and between the surfaces are calculated to produce metrics of the diagnostic system s detection and classification performance. This paper will describe the 3D ROC surface metric in detail, and present an example of its application for quantifying the performance of aircraft engine gas path diagnostic methods. Metric limitations and potential enhancements are also discussed

  17. The three-dimensional structure of aquaporin-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz, Thomas; Hirai, Teruhisa; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Heymann, J. Bernard; Mitsuoka, Kaoru; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Smith, Barbara L.; Agre, Peter; Engel, Andreas

    1997-06-01

    The entry and exit of water from cells is a fundamental process of life. Recognition of the high water permeability of red blood cells led to the proposal that specialized water pores exist in the plasma membrane. Expression in Xenopus oocytes and functional studies of an erythrocyte integral membrane protein of relative molecular mass 28,000, identified it as the mercury-sensitive water channel, aquaporin-1 (AQP1). Many related proteins, all belonging to the major intrinsic protein (MIP) family, are found throughout nature. AQP1 is a homotetramer containing four independent aqueous channels. When reconstituted into lipid bilayers, the protein forms two-dimensional lattices with a unit cell containing two tetramers in opposite orientation. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of AQP1 determined at 6Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Each AQP1 monomer has six tilted, bilayer-spanning α-helices which form a right-handed bundle surrounding a central density. These results, together with functional studies, provide a model that identifies the aqueous pore in the AQP1 molecule and indicates the organization of the tetrameric complex in the membrane.

  18. The three-dimensional structure of aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Walz, T; Hirai, T; Murata, K; Heymann, J B; Mitsuoka, K; Fujiyoshi, Y; Smith, B L; Agre, P; Engel, A

    1997-06-01

    The entry and exit of water from cells is a fundamental process of life. Recognition of the high water permeability of red blood cells led to the proposal that specialized water pores exist in the plasma membrane. Expression in Xenopus oocytes and functional studies of an erythrocyte integral membrane protein of relative molecular mass 28,000, identified it as the mercury-sensitive water channel, aquaporin-1 (AQP1). Many related proteins, all belonging to the major intrinsic protein (MIP) family, are found throughout nature. AQP1 is a homotetramer containing four independent aqueous channels. When reconstituted into lipid bilayers, the protein forms two-dimensional lattices with a unit cell containing two tetramers in opposite orientation. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of AQP1 determined at 6A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Each AQP1 monomer has six tilted, bilayer-spanning alpha-helices which form a right-handed bundle surrounding a central density. These results, together with functional studies, provide a model that identifies the aqueous pore in the AQP1 molecule and indicates the organization of the tetrameric complex in the membrane. PMID:9177353

  19. Three-dimensional organization of a human water channel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; van Hoek, A N; Yeager, M; Verkman, A S; Mitra, A K

    1997-06-01

    Aquaporins (AQP) are members of the major intrinsic protein (MIP) superfamily of integral membrane proteins and facilitate water transport in various eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The archetypal aquaporin AQP1 is a partly glycosylated water-selective channel that is widely expressed in the plasma membranes of several water-permeable epithelial and endothelial cells. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of deglycosylated, human erythrocyte AQP1, determined at 7 A resolution in the membrane plane by electron crystallography of frozen-hydrated two-dimensional crystals. The structure has an inplane, intramolecular 2-fold axis of symmetry located in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. The AQP1 monomer is composed of six membrane-spanning, tilted alpha-helices. These helices form a barrel that encloses a vestibular region leading to the water-selective channel, which is outlined by densities attributed to the functionally important NPA boxes and their bridges to the surrounding helices. The intramolecular symmetry within the AQP1 molecule represents a new motif for the topology and design of membrane protein channels, and is a simple and elegant solution to the problem of bidirectional transport across the bilayer. PMID:9177354

  20. Three-dimensional periodic chiral sculptured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vijayakumar C.

    2013-01-01

    Sculptured thin films (STFs) are nano-engineered materials that have controllable porosity, structural chirality, and periodicity in one, two, or three dimensions. They have been exploited in developing optical elements such as thin-film filters, polarizers, sensors, and waveguides for integrated optics. A grating theory-based modeling approach for STFs as fully three-dimensional (3-D) periodic structures is developed. Input for this model consists of a structural parameter set that is easily accessible experimentally. This parameter set is common to evaluating STFs from a fabrication as well as modeling perspective and thus furnishes a basis for developing appropriate process monitoring and control methods necessary for successful commercial production. Using the proposed model, a quantitative understanding of the limits of applicability of traditional modeling methods for STFs and guidelines for robust design of STF-based devices are developed. This knowledge gained is applied to explore STFs in two illustrative examples: (1) as a notch filter and (2) as a 3-D photonic crystal.

  1. Wicking Enhancement in Three-Dimensional Hierarchical Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiting; Zhao, Junjie; Bagal, Abhijeet; Dandley, Erinn C; Oldham, Christopher J; Fang, Tiegang; Parsons, Gregory N; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2016-08-16

    Wicking, the absorption of liquid into narrow spaces without the assistance of external forces, has drawn much attention due to its potential applications in many engineering fields. Increasing surface roughness using micro/nanostructures can improve capillary action to enhance wicking. However, reducing the structure length scale can also result in significant viscous forces to impede wicking. In this work, we demonstrate enhanced wicking dynamics by using nanostructures with three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical features to increase the surface area while mitigating the obstruction of liquid flow. The proposed structures were engineered using a combination of interference lithography and hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires, where structures at two length scales were independently designed to control wicking behavior. The fabricated hierarchical 3D structures were tested for water and ethanol wicking properties, demonstrating improved wicking dynamics with intermediate nanowire lengths. The experimental data agree with the derived fluid model based on the balance of capillary and vicious forces. The hierarchical wicking structures can be potentially used in applications in water harvesting surfaces, microfluidics, and integrated heat exchangers. PMID:27459627

  2. Modelling for three dimensional coalescence of two bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Li, S.; Zhang, A. M.; Wang, Q. X.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the three dimensional (3D) interaction and coalescence of two bubbles subject to buoyancy and the dynamics of the subsequent joined bubble using the boundary integral method (BIM). An improved density potential method is implemented to control the mesh quality. It helps to avoid the numerical instabilities, which occur after coalescence. Numerical convergence tests are conducted in terms of mesh sizes and time steps. The 3D numerical model agrees well with an axisymmetric BIM model for axisymmetric cases as well as experimental results captured by high-speed camera. The bubble jetting, interaction, and coalescence of the two bubbles depend on the maximum bubble radii, the centre distance between two bubbles at inception, and the angle β between the centre line and the direction of buoyancy. We investigate coalescence of two bubbles for β = 0, π/4, and π/2, respectively, and at various centre distances at inception. Numerical results presented include the bubble and jet shapes, the velocity, and pressure fields surrounding the bubbles, as well as the time histories of bubble volumes, jet velocities, and positions of centroid of the bubble system.

  3. Bees use three-dimensional information to improve target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustjansky, Alexander; Chittka, Lars; Spaethe, Johannes

    2010-02-01

    Bumblebee detection of a flat circular disc (two-dimensional (2D) presentation) and a disc which was presented 10 cm in front of a structured background (and thus provided three-dimensional (3D) cues) was compared. A dual choice test using a Y-maze apparatus was conducted to estimate the minimum visual angle at which the bees were able to detect the disc. At large visual angles of 15, 10 and 5° bees’ performance between the 2D and the 3D presentation did not differ. However, when the disc subtended 3° at the bee’s eye, the bees performed significantly better when 3D information was available. Overall, bees were able to detect a target subtending a 40% smaller visual angle when it was presented in front of the structured background compared to a 2D presentation. This suggests that previous reports on the limits of target detection in bees using flat stimuli might have underestimated the bees’ ability to locate small flowers under natural conditions. Bees use motion parallax, i.e. the apparent relative motion of a stationary object against a background, for perceiving the third dimension. Our data suggest that bumblebees can integrate information from at least two types of feature detectors, motion and area, to improve single target detection.

  4. Bees use three-dimensional information to improve target detection.

    PubMed

    Kapustjansky, Alexander; Chittka, Lars; Spaethe, Johannes

    2010-02-01

    Bumblebee detection of a flat circular disc (two-dimensional (2D) presentation) and a disc which was presented 10 cm in front of a structured background (and thus provided three-dimensional (3D) cues) was compared. A dual choice test using a Y-maze apparatus was conducted to estimate the minimum visual angle at which the bees were able to detect the disc. At large visual angles of 15, 10 and 5 degrees bees' performance between the 2D and the 3D presentation did not differ. However, when the disc subtended 3 degrees at the bee's eye, the bees performed significantly better when 3D information was available. Overall, bees were able to detect a target subtending a 40% smaller visual angle when it was presented in front of the structured background compared to a 2D presentation. This suggests that previous reports on the limits of target detection in bees using flat stimuli might have underestimated the bees' ability to locate small flowers under natural conditions. Bees use motion parallax, i.e. the apparent relative motion of a stationary object against a background, for perceiving the third dimension. Our data suggest that bumblebees can integrate information from at least two types of feature detectors, motion and area, to improve single target detection.

  5. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs.

  6. Ultrasonic three-dimensional reconstruction of the heart.

    PubMed

    Salustri, A; Roelandt, J R

    1995-01-01

    The recent advances in ultrasound equipment, digital image acquisition, and display techniques made three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography a clinically feasible and exciting technique which allows objective analysis of structure and pathological conditions of complex geometry. In this report, different image acquisition techniques are described and compared. In our experience, with rotational scanning the acquisition of cross-sections for 3D reconstruction becomes an integral part of a routine diagnostic study, both with a multiplane transesophageal imaging transducer, and in precordial echocardiography. After digital reformatting and image processing, a volumetric data set is obtained, which allows the display of synthetic cross-sections in various orientations independent from the point of origin of the sector scan [anyplane two-dimensional (2D) imaging]. This also offers the possibility of volume quantification, without the assumption of theoretical geometrical model of the cavity. Finally, dynamic volume rendered display can be applied for the objective display of the anatomy and the complex relationship among the different structures.

  7. The Three-dimensional Structure of Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Rudnick, Lawrence; Stage, M. D.; Smith, J. D.; Isensee, Karl; Rho, Jeonghee; Allen, Glenn E.; Gomez, Haley; Kozasa, Takashi; Reach, William T.; Davis, J. E.; Houck, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    We used the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph to map nearly the entire extent of Cassiopeia A between 5 and 40 μm. Using infrared and Chandra X-ray Doppler velocity measurements, along with the locations of optical ejecta beyond the forward shock, we constructed a three-dimensional model of the remnant. The structure of Cas A can be characterized into a spherical component, a tilted thick disk, and multiple ejecta jets/pistons and optical fast-moving knots all populating the thick disk plane. The Bright Ring in Cas A identifies the intersection between the thick plane/pistons and a roughly spherical reverse shock. The ejecta pistons indicate a radial velocity gradient in the explosion. Some ejecta pistons are bipolar with oppositely directed flows about the expansion center while some ejecta pistons show no such symmetry. Some ejecta pistons appear to maintain the integrity of the nuclear burning layers while others appear to have punched through the outer layers. The ejecta pistons indicate a radial velocity gradient in the explosion. In three dimensions, the Fe jet in the southeast occupies a "hole" in the Si-group emission and does not represent "overturning," as previously thought. Although interaction with the circumstellar medium affects the detailed appearance of the remnant and may affect the visibility of the southeast Fe jet, the bulk of the symmetries and asymmetries in Cas A are intrinsic to the explosion.

  8. Experimental and three-dimensional finite element investigation of fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomidi, John A. R.

    Materials often fail at cyclic loads that are lower than their ultimate strength or even their yield strength due to progressive internal material degradation; commonly known as fatigue. Moreover, there is a wide scatter in observed fatigue lives of mechanical components operating under identical loading conditions. The randomness of fatigue failure is considered to be linked to basic microstructural effects such as random microstructure topology and the initiation/growth of cracks along inter/transgranular planes. Several modeling approaches have been previously presented ranging from 2D discrete element to 3D Finite Element methods with explicit representation of microstructure topology and continuum damage mechanics to capture dispersion in rolling contact fatigue life and fatigue spalling. There is, however, a need to compare the modeling approach with experimental fatigue test conditions in order to verify and as required enhance the modeling approach to capture observed fatigue failure. This dissertation presents experimental test results and three-dimensional modeling approach that capture fatigue failure. The three-dimensional modeling approach is enhanced according to the experimental observations to consider inter/trans granular failure, different modes of fatigue initiation and propagation and finally for considering effect of plasticity in fatigue of rolling contacts. The following phenomena have been investigated: (1) Fatigue of microbeams: (a )Results of fatigue life and failure from 3D modeling of intergranular fatigue in microbeams are compared with experimental observations reported in literature (2) Tensile fatigue of thin sheets: (a) A test rig with a new grip and alignment system is developed to address the challenges associated with thin sheet testing and conduct fatigue experiments. (b) The 3D fatigue model is enhanced to capture the dominant transgranular fatigue observed in the experiments. The observed and modeled fatigue life and failure

  9. Three-dimensional density distributions in the Asian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Li, C.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Fang, J.; Sino-probe-cugb

    2011-12-01

    We have inversed the residual Bouguer gravity anomalies to study the three-dimensional density distributions of the Asian lithosphere (60°~150°E and 15°~60°N). Firstly, we have collected the free-air gravity anomalies (30'×30') and topography data of GTOP030 with 5'×5' grid spacing, and then calculated the Bougouer gravity anomalies by terrain correction and Bougouer correction. We have also collected the depth data of the Moho discontinuity (30'×30') and the discontinuity of sedimentary layer. By using the Oldenburg-Parker formula (Parker, 1972) and the forward modeling method, we calculated the theoretical gravity anomalies which mainly are caused by the Moho discontinuity and the sedimentary layer discontinuity. In our study, the average depths of Moho discontinuity and sedimentary layer discontinuity are 33 km and 4 km, and the density differences are 0.42 g/cm3 and 0.2 g/cm3, respectively. In addition, we have simulated the gravity anomalies of the spherical harmonics with the 2-6 order for the lower mantle by using the formula of Bowin (1983) which represented the relation between the depth of field source and the order of the geopotential spherical harmonics. Using all data mentioned above, we have calculated the residual Bougouer gravity anomalies, which may be caused by anomalous density bodies in the lithosphere. Secondly, we used the calculated residual Bougouer gravity anomalies to inverse the three-dimensional density differences in the Asian lithosphere by using the Algebra Reconstruction Techniques (ART). During the inversion, the densities converted from the P-wave velocity data (with grid spacing of 2°×2°) according to the Birch Law are considered as the initial density model. The grid spacing is set as 2°×2° in the horizontal direction, and it is 25 km, 55 km and 100 km in the vertical direction, respectively. Comparing the density anomalies at the three depths, we can conclude that (1) the density in the lithosphere beneath Asian

  10. Circulation methods in unsteady and three-dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiankun

    The largely unstudied extension of ultrasonic circulation measurement techniques (UCMT) to determine instantaneous lift in unsteady and three-dimensional flows has been addressed in this work. A combined analytical-numerical-experimental approach was undertaken with the goal of developing methods to properly convert the measurable time-dependent bound circulation to instantaneous lift force in unsteady flows. The measurement of mean sectional lift distribution along structure spans in three-dimensional flows was also studied. An unsteady correction method for thin airfoils was developed analytically and validated numerically (with finite element solutions) to properly convert bound circulation to instantaneous lift based on unsteady potential flow theory. Results show that the unsteady correction method can provide increased accuracy for unsteady lift prediction over the Kutta-Joukowski method used in previous unsteady flow studies. The unsteady correction model generally should be included for instantaneous lift prediction as long as the bound circulation is time-dependent. Using the same framework, we also studied determination of instantaneous lift forces on stationary bluff bodies (circular cylinders) at low Reynolds number (Re = 100). Various force models, including an approximate vortex force model, were studied. A new unsteady model, similar to that developed for the thin airfoils, using instantaneous bound circulation values, was proposed. Another important issue studied in this thesis is the effect of acoustic path sensitivity on bound circulation determination, which we found to be crucial for accurately predicting the instantaneous lift in both unsteady flat plate and cylinder flows. Proper path selection should take into account the location of boundary layers, attached and shed vortices. These findings will be useful in future experimental design of UCMT, PIV and LDV methods. Finally, we used the UCMT method to experimentally study the mean spatial

  11. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  12. All-optical arithmetic unit with the help of terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer-based tree architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Dilip Kumar; Nath Roy, Jitendra

    2008-03-01

    An all-optical arithmetic unit with the help of terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer (TOAD)-based tree architecture is proposed. We describe the all-optical arithmetic unit by using a set of all-optical multiplexer, all-optical full-adder, and optical switch. The all-optical arithmetic unit can be used to perform a fast central processor unit using optical hardware components. We have tried to exploit the advantages of both optical tree architecture and TOAD-based switch to design an integrated all-optical circuit that can perform binary addition, addition with carry, subtract with borrow, subtract (2's complement), double, increment, decrement, and transfer operations.

  13. Effect of three-dimensionality on compressible mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Papamoschou, D. )

    1992-02-01

    Existing experimental data and hypotheses on the growth rates of compressible and incompressible turbulent shear layers are used to estimate the effect of three-dimensionality in the turbulent mixing enhancement in compressible shear flows that is critically important to the efficiency of scramjet powerplants. The general trend is found to be a decrease in growth rate with increasing three-dimensionality, excepting only the restricted regime, where the growth-rate increase is modest. 9 refs.

  14. Alignment-free three-dimensional optical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Shi, Jinwei; Sun, Liuyang; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional optical metamaterials based on multilayers typically rely on critical vertical alignment to achieve the desired functionality. Here the conditions under which three-dimensional metamaterials with different functionalities may be realized without constraints on alignment are analyzed and demonstrated experimentally. This study demonstrates that the release of alignment constraints for multilayered metamaterials is allowed, while their anomalous interaction with light is preserved.

  15. Initialization and Simulation of Three-Dimensional Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zheng, Z. C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of axial velocity profiles on vortex decay, in order to properly initialize and simulate three-dimensional wake vortex flow. Analytical relationships are obtained based on a single vortex model and computational simulations are performed for a rather practical vortex wake, which show that the single vortex analytical relations can still be applicable at certain streamwise sections of three-dimensional wake vortices.

  16. Three-dimensional study of the multi-cavity FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Kumar, V.

    1995-12-31

    The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser has been proposed earlier, as a new configuration to obtain short, intense pulses of radiation, the key idea being to pre-bunch the electron beam in a number of very short cavities. Those studies were one-dimensional. Here we use three-dimensional simulations to study the viability of this concept when three-dimensional effects are included, particularly with regard to the transverse modes of the optical beam.

  17. Three dimensional separation effects on a simplified wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Soerensen, N.N.; Michelsen, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    A qualitative investigation of the three dimensional effects on a twisted non-rotating wing without tapering is performed, using a general purpose Navier-Stokes solver. Different location of twist center as well as different twist ratios are examined for fully attached flow. The case of a partially separated blade is investigated as well. The three dimensional effects are primarily identified by comparing the lift and C{sub p} distribution of the blade with the two dimensional counterpart.

  18. Three-dimensional scanning microscopy through thin turbid media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Hsieh, Chia-Lung; Pu, Ye; Psaltis, Demetri

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate three-dimensional imaging through a thin turbid medium using digital phase conjugation of the second harmonic signal emitted from a beacon nanoparticle. The digitally phase-conjugated focus scans the volume in the vicinity of its initial position through numerically manipulated phase patterns projected onto the spatial light modulator. Accurate three dimensional images of a fluorescent sample placed behind a turbid medium are obtained.

  19. Advancing three-dimensional MEMS by complimentary laser micro manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Williams, John D.; Lemp, Tom; Lehecka, Tom M.; Medina, Francisco; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes improvements that enable engineers to create three-dimensional MEMS in a variety of materials. It also provides a means for selectively adding three-dimensional, high aspect ratio features to pre-existing PMMA micro molds for subsequent LIGA processing. This complimentary method involves in situ construction of three-dimensional micro molds in a stand-alone configuration or directly adjacent to features formed by x-ray lithography. Three-dimensional micro molds are created by micro stereolithography (MSL), an additive rapid prototyping technology. Alternatively, three-dimensional features may be added by direct femtosecond laser micro machining. Parameters for optimal femtosecond laser micro machining of PMMA at 800 nanometers are presented. The technical discussion also includes strategies for enhancements in the context of material selection and post-process surface finish. This approach may lead to practical, cost-effective 3-D MEMS with the surface finish and throughput advantages of x-ray lithography. Accurate three-dimensional metal microstructures are demonstrated. Challenges remain in process planning for micro stereolithography and development of buried features following femtosecond laser micro machining.

  20. Ordered three-dimensional interconnected nanoarchitectures in anodic porous alumina

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Jaime; Martín-González, Marisol; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Caballero-Calero, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional nanostructures combine properties of nanoscale materials with the advantages of being macro-sized pieces when the time comes to manipulate, measure their properties, or make a device. However, the amount of compounds with the ability to self-organize in ordered three-dimensional nanostructures is limited. Therefore, template-based fabrication strategies become the key approach towards three-dimensional nanostructures. Here we report the simple fabrication of a template based on anodic aluminum oxide, having a well-defined, ordered, tunable, homogeneous 3D nanotubular network in the sub 100 nm range. The three-dimensional templates are then employed to achieve three-dimensional, ordered nanowire-networks in Bi2Te3 and polystyrene. Lastly, we demonstrate the photonic crystal behavior of both the template and the polystyrene three-dimensional nanostructure. Our approach may establish the foundations for future high-throughput, cheap, photonic materials and devices made of simple commodity plastics, metals, and semiconductors. PMID:25342247

  1. Sur Lago area, Venezuela: Three dimensional integrated seismic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Growcott, A.; McIan, A.; Ramirez, R. )

    1993-02-01

    In 1988, 550 square km of 3D seismic data were acquired in the Sur Del Lago area. The aims of the survey were (1) To better define structures already identified from the existing 1 [times] 1 km 2D seismic grid at the level of potential Cretaceous limestone reservoirs and (2) To further study the prospectivity of potential structural and stratigraphic traps within the Tertiary section. Detailed interpretation of the 3D survey using an interactive workstation led to an improved structural definition at the Cogollo limestone level and the identification of fault related inversion lineaments and basement related Cretaceous limestone structures. Based upon the new seismic interpretation a 4 well exploration project was planned. The new program commenced with the drilling of exploration well SLA-7-IX in 1991 which proved commercial amounts of hydrocarbons in the western part of the area. Detailed information collected from the exploration wells includes a comprehensive electric log suite, ditch cuttings and vertical seismic profiles. The information is being used as detailed lithological, stratigraphic and seismic data input for velocity modeling, ray trace modeling, seismic attribute analysis, and reservoir characterization software in order to further understand the structural and stratigraphic potential of the area.

  2. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wan-Jun

    2005-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydrofocusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures. Keywords: SU-8, three-dimensional hydro-focusing, microfluidic, microchannel, cytometer

  3. Field-free molecular alignment induced by elliptically polarized laser pulses: Noninvasive three-dimensional characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hertz, E.; Guerin, S.; Jauslin, H. R.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.; Daems, D.

    2007-10-15

    An investigation of field-free molecular alignment produced by elliptically polarized laser pulses is reported. Experiments are conducted in CO{sub 2} at room temperature. A noninvasive all-optical technique, based on the cross defocusing of a probe pulse, is used to measure the alignment along two orthogonal directions which is sufficient to provide a three-dimensional characterization. The field-free molecular alignment produced by a laser of elliptical polarization is in good agreement in terms of amplitude and shape with theoretical predictions. It turns out to be almost equivalent to the superposition of the effects that one would obtain with two individual cross-polarized pulses. The investigation highlights notably the occurrence of field-free two-direction alignment alternation for a suitably chosen degree of ellipticity. The analogy between this specific ellipticity and the well-known 'magic angle' used in time-resolved spectroscopy to prevent rotational contributions is discussed.

  4. Physical origin of the high energy optical response of three dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Luis A; Depine, Ricardo A; Lozano, Gabriel; Míguez, Hernán

    2007-12-24

    The physical origin of the optical response observed in three-dimensional photonic crystals when the photon wavelength is equal or lower than the lattice parameter still remains unsatisfactorily explained and is the subject of an intense and interesting debate. Herein we demonstrate for the first time that all optical spectra features in this high energy region of photonic crystals arise from electromagnetic resonances within the ordered array, modified by the interplay between these resonances with the opening of diffraction channels, the presence of imperfections and finite size effects. All these four phenomena are taken into account in our theoretical approach to the problem, which allows us to provide a full description of the observed optical response based on fundamental phenomena as well as to attain fair fittings of experimental results.

  5. Three Dimensional Probability Distributions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Empirical probability density functions (PDFs) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have been derived from spacecraft data since the early years of the space age. A survey of the literature shows that past studies have investigated the separate Cartesian components of the magnetic field, the vector magnitude, and the direction of the IMF by means of one-dimensional or two-dimensional PDFs. But, to my knowledge, there exist no studies which investigate the three dimensional nature of the IMF by means of three dimensional PDFs, either in (Bx,By,Bz)(B_x,B_y,B_z)-coordinates or (BR,BT,BN)(B_R,B_T,B_N)-coordinates or some other appropriate system of coordinates. Likewise, there exist no studies which investigate three dimensional PDFs of magnetic field fluctuations, that is, vector differences bmB(t+τ)-bmB(t)bm{B}(t+tau)-bm{B}(t). In this talk, I shall present examples of three dimensional PDFs obtained from spacecraft data that demonstrate the solar wind magnetic field possesses a very interesting spatial structure that, to my knowledge, has not previously been identified. Perhaps because of the well known model of Barnes (1981) in which the magnitude of the IMF remains constant, it may be commonly believed that there is nothing new to learn from a full three dimensional PDF. To the contrary, there is much to learn from the investigation of three dimensional PDFs of the solar wind plasma velocity and the magnetic field, as well as three dimensional PDFs of their fluctuations. Knowledge of these PDFs will not only improve understanding of solar wind physics, it is an essential prerequisite for the construction of realistic models of the stochastic time series measured by a single spacecraft, one of the longstanding goals of space physics research. In addition, three dimensional PDFs contain valuable information about the anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations in three dimensional physical space, information that may help identify the reason why the three

  6. Femtosecond laser three-dimensional micro- and nanofabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-12-15

    The rapid development of the femtosecond laser has revolutionized materials processing due to its unique characteristics of ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity. The short pulse width suppresses the formation of a heat-affected zone, which is vital for ultrahigh precision fabrication, whereas the high peak intensity allows nonlinear interactions such as multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization to be induced in transparent materials, which provides versatility in terms of the materials that can be processed. More interestingly, irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials makes three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication available due to efficient confinement of the nonlinear interactions within the focal volume. Additive manufacturing (stereolithography) based on multiphoton absorption (two-photon polymerization) enables the fabrication of 3D polymer micro- and nanostructures for photonic devices, micro- and nanomachines, and microfluidic devices, and has applications for biomedical and tissue engineering. Subtractive manufacturing based on internal modification and fabrication can realize the direct fabrication of 3D microfluidics, micromechanics, microelectronics, and photonic microcomponents in glass. These microcomponents can be easily integrated in a single glass microchip by a simple procedure using a femtosecond laser to realize more functional microdevices, such as optofluidics and integrated photonic microdevices. The highly localized multiphoton absorption of a tightly focused femtosecond laser in glass can also induce strong absorption only at the interface of two closely stacked glass substrates. Consequently, glass bonding can be performed based on fusion welding with femtosecond laser irradiation, which provides the potential for applications in electronics, optics, microelectromechanical systems, medical devices, microfluidic devices, and small satellites. This review paper

  7. Three-dimensional spatial representation in freely swimming fish.

    PubMed

    Burt de Perera, Theresa; Holbrook, Robert I

    2012-08-01

    Research on spatial cognition has focused on how animals encode the horizontal component of space. However, most animals travel vertically within their environments, particularly those that fly or swim. Pelagic fish move with six degrees of freedom and must integrate these components to navigate accurately--how do they do this? Using an assay based on associative learning of the vertical and horizontal components of space within a rotating Y-maze, we found that fish (Astyanax fasciatus) learned and remembered information from both horizontal and vertical axes when they were presented either separately or as an integrated three-dimensional unit. When information from the two components conflicted, the fish used the previously learned vertical information in preference to the horizontal. This not only demonstrates that the horizontal and vertical components are stored separately in the fishes' representation of space (simplifying the problem of 3D navigation), but also suggests that the vertical axis contains particularly salient spatial cues--presumably including hydrostatic pressure. To explore this latter possibility, we developed a physical theoretical model that shows how fish could determine their absolute depth using pressure. We next considered full volumetric spatial cognition. Astyanax were trained to swim towards a reward in a Y-maze that could be rotated, before the arms were removed during probe trials. The subjects were tracked in three dimensions as they swam freely through the surrounding cubic tank. The results revealed that fish are able to accurately encode metric information in a volume, and that the error accrued in the horizontal and vertical axes whilst swimming in probe trials was similar. Together, these experiments demonstrate that unlike in surface-bound rats, the vertical component of the representation of space is vitally important to fishes. We hypothesise that the representation of space in the brain of vertebrates could ultimately be

  8. Three-Dimensional Printing Based Hybrid Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Richang; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms offer revolutionary and practical solutions to challenging problems in biology and medicine. Even though traditional micro/nanofabrication technologies expedited the emergence of the microfluidics field, recent advances in advanced additive manufacturing hold significant potential for single-step, stand-alone microfluidic device fabrication. One such technology, which holds a significant promise for next generation microsystem fabrication is three-dimensional (3D) printing. Presently, building 3D printed stand-alone microfluidic devices with fully embedded microchannels for applications in biology and medicine has the following challenges: (i) limitations in achievable design complexity, (ii) need for a wider variety of transparent materials, (iii) limited z-resolution, (iv) absence of extremely smooth surface finish, and (v) limitations in precision fabrication of hollow and void sections with extremely high surface area to volume ratio. We developed a new way to fabricate stand-alone microfluidic devices with integrated manifolds and embedded microchannels by utilizing a 3D printing and laser micromachined lamination based hybrid manufacturing approach. In this new fabrication method, we exploit the minimized fabrication steps enabled by 3D printing, and reduced assembly complexities facilitated by laser micromachined lamination method. The new hybrid fabrication method enables key features for advanced microfluidic system architecture: (i) increased design complexity in 3D, (ii) improved control over microflow behavior in all three directions and in multiple layers, (iii) transverse multilayer flow and precisely integrated flow distribution, and (iv) enhanced transparency for high resolution imaging and analysis. Hybrid manufacturing approaches hold great potential in advancing microfluidic device fabrication in terms of standardization, fast production, and user-independent manufacturing. PMID:27512530

  9. Investigating Hydrocarbon Seep Environments with High-Resolution, Three-Dimensional Geographic Visualizations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doolittle, D. F.; Gharib, J. J.; Mitchell, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed photographic imagery and bathymetric maps of the seafloor acquired by deep submergence vehicles such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) and Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) are expanding how scientists and the public view and ultimately understand the seafloor and the processes that modify it. Several recently acquired optical and acoustic datasets, collected during ECOGIG (Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf) and other Gulf of Mexico expeditions using the National Institute for Undersea Science Technology (NIUST) Eagle Ray, and Mola Mola AUVs, have been fused with lower resolution data to create unique three-dimensional geovisualizations. Included in these data are multi-scale and multi-resolution visualizations over hydrocarbon seeps and seep related features. Resolution of the data range from 10s of mm to 10s of m. When multi-resolution data is integrated into a single three-dimensional visual environment, new insights into seafloor and seep processes can be obtained from the intuitive nature of three-dimensional data exploration. We provide examples and demonstrate how integration of multibeam bathymetry, seafloor backscatter data, sub-bottom profiler data, textured photomosaics, and hull-mounted multibeam acoustic midwater imagery are made into a series a three-dimensional geovisualizations of actively seeping sites and associated chemosynthetic communities. From these combined and merged datasets, insights on seep community structure, morphology, ecology, fluid migration dynamics, and process geomorphology can be investigated from new spatial perspectives. Such datasets also promote valuable inter-comparisons of sensor resolution and performance.

  10. Electron tomography, three-dimensional Fourier analysis and colour prediction of a three-dimensional amorphous biophotonic nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Pálsdóttir, Hildur; Crum, John; Ellisman, Mark H.; Auer, Manfred; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Organismal colour can be created by selective absorption of light by pigments or light scattering by photonic nanostructures. Photonic nanostructures may vary in refractive index over one, two or three dimensions and may be periodic over large spatial scales or amorphous with short-range order. Theoretical optical analysis of three-dimensional amorphous nanostructures has been challenging because these structures are difficult to describe accurately from conventional two-dimensional electron microscopy alone. Intermediate voltage electron microscopy (IVEM) with tomographic reconstruction adds three-dimensional data by using a high-power electron beam to penetrate and image sections of material sufficiently thick to contain a significant portion of the structure. Here, we use IVEM tomography to characterize a non-iridescent, three-dimensional biophotonic nanostructure: the spongy medullary layer from eastern bluebird Sialia sialis feather barbs. Tomography and three-dimensional Fourier analysis reveal that it is an amorphous, interconnected bicontinuous matrix that is appropriately ordered at local spatial scales in all three dimensions to coherently scatter light. The predicted reflectance spectra from the three-dimensional Fourier analysis are more precise than those predicted by previous two-dimensional Fourier analysis of transmission electron microscopy sections. These results highlight the usefulness, and obstacles, of tomography in the description and analysis of three-dimensional photonic structures. PMID:19158016

  11. Artificial eye for scotopic vision with bioinspired all-optical photosensitivity enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hewei; Huang, Yinggang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-01-01

    The ability to acquire images under low-light conditions is critical for many applications. However, to date, strategies toward improving low-light imaging primarily focus on developing electronic image sensors. Inspired by natural scotopic visual systems, we adopt an all-optical method to significantly improve the overall photosensitivity of imaging systems. Such optical approach is independent of, and can effectively circumvent the physical and material limitations of, the electronics imagers used. We demonstrate an artificial eye inspired by superposition compound eyes and the retinal structure of elephantnose fish. The bioinspired photosensitivity enhancer (BPE) that we have developed enhances the image intensity without consuming power, which is achieved by three-dimensional, omnidirectionally aligned microphotocollectors with parabolic reflective sidewalls. Our work opens up a previously unidentified direction toward achieving high photosensitivity in imaging systems. PMID:26976565

  12. Artificial eye for scotopic vision with bioinspired all-optical photosensitivity enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hewei; Huang, Yinggang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-04-01

    The ability to acquire images under low-light conditions is critical for many applications. However, to date, strategies toward improving low-light imaging primarily focus on developing electronic image sensors. Inspired by natural scotopic visual systems, we adopt an all-optical method to significantly improve the overall photosensitivity of imaging systems. Such optical approach is independent of, and can effectively circumvent the physical and material limitations of, the electronics imagers used. We demonstrate an artificial eye inspired by superposition compound eyes and the retinal structure of elephantnose fish. The bioinspired photosensitivity enhancer (BPE) that we have developed enhances the image intensity without consuming power, which is achieved by three-dimensional, omnidirectionally aligned microphotocollectors with parabolic reflective sidewalls. Our work opens up a previously unidentified direction toward achieving high photosensitivity in imaging systems.

  13. Artificial eye for scotopic vision with bioinspired all-optical photosensitivity enhancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hewei; Huang, Yinggang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-04-12

    The ability to acquire images under low-light conditions is critical for many applications. However, to date, strategies toward improving low-light imaging primarily focus on developing electronic image sensors. Inspired by natural scotopic visual systems, we adopt an all-optical method to significantly improve the overall photosensitivity of imaging systems. Such optical approach is independent of, and can effectively circumvent the physical and material limitations of, the electronics imagers used. We demonstrate an artificial eye inspired by superposition compound eyes and the retinal structure of elephantnose fish. The bioinspired photosensitivity enhancer (BPE) that we have developed enhances the image intensity without consuming power, which is achieved by three-dimensional, omnidirectionally aligned microphotocollectors with parabolic reflective sidewalls. Our work opens up a previously unidentified direction toward achieving high photosensitivity in imaging systems. PMID:26976565

  14. Microfabrication and Test of a Three-Dimensional Polymer Hydro-focusing Unit for Flow Cytometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ren; Feeback, Daniel L.; Wang, Wanjun

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a novel three-dimensional (3D) hydro-focusing micro cell sorter for micro flow cytometry applications. The unit was microfabricated by means of SU-8 3D lithography. The 3D microstructure for coaxial sheathing was designed, microfabricated, and tested. Three-dimensional hydro-focusing capability was demonstrated with an experiment to sort labeled tanned sheep erythrocytes (red blood cells). This polymer hydro-focusing microstructure is easily microfabricated and integrated with other polymer microfluidic structures.

  15. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269608

  16. Biodynamic profiling of three-dimensional tissue growth techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Merrill, Dan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue culture presents a more biologically relevant environment in which to perform drug development than conventional two-dimensional cell culture. However, obtaining high-content information from inside three dimensional tissue has presented an obstacle to rapid adoption of 3D tissue culture for pharmaceutical applications. Biodynamic imaging is a high-content three-dimensional optical imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry and digital holography that uses intracellular dynamics as high-content image contrast. In this paper, we use biodynamic imaging to compare pharmaceutical responses to Taxol of three-dimensional multicellular spheroids grown by three different growth techniques: rotating bioreactor, hanging-drop and plate-grown spheroids. The three growth techniques have systematic variations among tissue cohesiveness and intracellular activity and consequently display different pharmacodynamics under identical drug dose conditions. The in vitro tissue cultures are also compared to ex vivo living biopsies. These results demonstrate that three-dimensional tissue cultures are not equivalent, and that drug-response studies must take into account the growth method.

  17. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world.

    PubMed

    Glennerster, Andrew

    2016-06-19

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'.

  18. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world.

    PubMed

    Glennerster, Andrew

    2016-06-19

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269608

  19. All-optical wavelength conversion for mode division multiplexed superchannels.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiaxin; Xu, Jing; Luo, Ming; Li, Xiang; Qiu, Ying; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Xinliang; Yu, Shaohua

    2016-04-18

    We report in this work the first all-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) of a mode division multiplexed (MDM) superchannel consisting of 2N modes by dividing the superchannel into N single-mode (SM) tributaries, wavelength converting N SM signals using well developed SM-AOWC techniques, and finally combining the N SM tributaries back to an MDM superchannel at the converted wavelength, inspired by the idea of using SM filtering techniques to filter multimode signals in astronomy. The conversions between multimode and SM are realized by 3D laser-writing photonic lanterns and SM-AOWCs are realized based on polarization insensitive four wave mixing (FWM) configuration in N semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). As a proof of concept demonstration, the conversion of a 6-mode MDM superchannel with each mode modulated with orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK)/16 quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signals is demonstrated in this work, indicating that the scheme is transparent to data format, polarization and compatible with multi-carrier signals. Data integrity of the converted superchannel has been verified by using coherent detection and digital signal processing (DSP). Bit error rates (BERs) below the forward error correction (FEC) hard limit (3.8 × 10-3) have been obtained for QPSK modulation at a net bitrate of 104.2 Gbit/s and BERs below the soft decision FEC threshold (1.98 × 10-2) have been achieved for 16-QAM format, giving a total aggregate bit rate of 185.8 Gbit/s when taking 20% coding overhead into account. Add and drop functionalities that usually come along with wavelength conversion in flexible network nodes have also been demonstrated. The working conditions of the SOAs, especially the pump and signal power levels, are critical for the quality of the converted signal and have been thoroughly discussed. The impact of imbalanced FWM conversion efficiency among different SM

  20. Three-dimensional high-resolution plasma bubble modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Jin, Hidekatsu

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPB from a space weather point of view. The development of EPB is known as a evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical modelings of the instability on the equatorial two-dimensional plane have been conducted since the late 1970's, and the nonlinear evolution of the instability has been clearly presented. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) modelings became popular tools for further understanding of the development of EPB such as 3D structure of EPB, meridional wind effects and gravity wave seeding. One of the biggest advantages of the 3D model is that the off-equatorial E region which is coupled with the equatorial F region can be included in the model. It is known from observations that the conductance of the off-equatorial E region controls the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, that is, sudden decrease of the E-region conductance around the sunset accelerates the evolution of the instability. We have developed a new 3D high-resolution model for EPB, and studied internal structure of EPB and the contribution of the off-equatorial E region. As it is necessary to use high-order numerical schemes to capture sharp plasma density gradient of EPB, we adopted the CIP scheme which can keep the third-order accuracy in time and space. The simulated EPB has asymmetrical density gradients at east and west walls, and the growth rate changes significantly depending on the condition of the off-equatorial E region. In the future, we will integrate the high-resolution model into whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model (GAIA) to study the growth of EPB under the realistic background conditions.