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Sample records for all-optical three-dimensional integral

  1. All-optical three-dimensional electron pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie Wong, Liang; Freelon, Byron; Rohwer, Timm; Gedik, Nuh; Johnson, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    We propose an all-optical, three-dimensional electron pulse compression scheme in which Hermite-Gaussian optical modes are used to fashion a three-dimensional optical trap in the electron pulse’s rest frame. We show that the correct choices of optical incidence angles are necessary for optimal compression. We obtain analytical expressions for the net impulse imparted by Hermite-Gaussian free-space modes of arbitrary order. Although we focus on electrons, our theory applies to any charged particle and any particle with non-zero polarizability in the Rayleigh regime. We verify our theory numerically using exact solutions to Maxwell’s equations for first-order Hermite-Gaussian beams, demonstrating single-electron pulse compression factors of \\gt {{10}2} in both longitudinal and transverse dimensions with experimentally realizable optical pulses. The proposed scheme is useful in ultrafast electron imaging for both single- and multi-electron pulse compression, and as a means of circumventing temporal distortions in magnetic lenses when focusing ultrashort electron pulses. Other applications include the creation of flat electron beams and ultrashort electron bunches for coherent terahertz emission.

  2. All optical three dimensional spatio-temporal correlator for automatic event recognition using a multiphoton atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monjur, Mehjabin S.; Fouda, Mohamed F.; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2016-12-01

    We describe an automatic event recognition (AER) system based on a three-dimensional spatio-temporal correlator (STC) that combines the techniques of holographic correlation and photon echo based temporal pattern recognition. The STC is shift invariant in space and time. It can be used to recognize rapidly an event (e.g., a short video clip) that may be present in a large video file, and determine the temporal location of the event. Using polar Mellin transform, it is possible to realize an STC that is also scale and rotation invariant spatially. Numerical simulation results of such a system are presented using quantum mechanical equations of evolution. For this simulation we have used the model of an idealized, decay-free two level system of atoms with an inhomogeneous broadening that is larger than the inverse of the temporal resolution of the data stream. We show how such a system can be realized by using a lambda-type three level system in atomic vapor, via adiabatic elimination of the intermediate state. We have also developed analytically a three dimensional transfer function of the system, and shown that it agrees closely with the results obtained via explicit simulation of the atomic response. The analytical transfer function can be used to determine the response of an STC very rapidly. In addition to the correlation signal, other nonlinear terms appear in the explicit numerical model. These terms are also verified by the analytical model. We describe how the AER can be operated in a manner such that the correlation signal remains unaffected by the additional nonlinear terms. We also show how such a practical STC can be realized using a combination of a porous-glass based Rb vapor cell, a holographic video disc, and a lithium niobate crystal.

  3. Integrated Aeromechanics with Three-Dimensional Solid-Multibody Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    A full three-dimensional finite element-multibody structural dynamic solver is coupled to a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for the prediction of integrated aeromechanical stresses and strains on a rotor blade in forward flight. The objective is to lay the foundations of all major pieces of an integrated three-dimensional rotor dynamic analysis - from model construction to aeromechanical solution to stress/strain calculation. The primary focus is on the aeromechanical solution. Two types of three-dimensional CFD/CSD interfaces are constructed for this purpose with an emphasis on resolving errors from geometry mis-match so that initial-stage approximate structural geometries can also be effectively analyzed. A three-dimensional structural model is constructed as an approximation to a UH-60A-like fully articulated rotor. The aerodynamic model is identical to the UH-60A rotor. For preliminary validation measurements from a UH-60A high speed flight is used where CFD coupling is essential to capture the advancing side tip transonic effects. The key conclusion is that an integrated aeromechanical analysis is indeed possible with three-dimensional structural dynamics but requires a careful description of its geometry and discretization of its parts.

  4. On-chip CMOS-compatible all-optical integrator

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, M.; Park, Y.; Razzari, L.; Little, B. E.; Chu, S. T.; Morandotti, R.; Moss, D. J.; Azaña, J.

    2010-01-01

    All-optical circuits for computing and information processing could overcome the speed limitations intrinsic to electronics. However, in photonics, very few fundamental 'building blocks' equivalent to those used in multi-functional electronic circuits exist. In this study, we report the first all-optical temporal integrator in a monolithic, integrated platform. Our device—a lightwave 'capacitor-like' element based on a passive micro-ring resonator—performs the time integral of the complex field of an arbitrary optical waveform with a time resolution of a few picoseconds, corresponding to a processing speed of ∼200 GHz, and a 'hold' time approaching a nanosecond. This device, compatible with electronic technology (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor), will be one of the building blocks of next-generation ultrafast data-processing technology, enabling optical memories and real-time differential equation computing units. PMID:20975692

  5. All-optical phase modulation for integrated interferometric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dante, Stefania; Duval, Daphné; Sepúlveda, Borja; González-Guerrero, Ana Belen; Sendra, José Ramón; Lechuga, Laura M

    2012-03-26

    We present the theoretical and the experimental implementation of an all-optical phase modulation system in integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometers to solve the drawbacks related to the periodic nature of the interferometric signal. Sensor phase is tuned by modulating the emission wavelength of low-cost commercial laser diodes by changing their output power. FFT deconvolution of the signal allows for direct phase readout, immune to sensitivity variations and to light intensity fluctuations. This simple phase modulation scheme increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements in one order of magnitude, rendering in a sensor with a detection limit of 1.9·10⁻⁷ RIU. The viability of the all-optical modulation approach is demonstrated with an immunoassay detection as a biosensing proof of concept.

  6. Human gesture recognition using three-dimensional integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Javier Traver, V; Latorre-Carmona, Pedro; Salvador-Balaguer, Eva; Pla, Filiberto; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integral imaging allows one to reconstruct a 3D scene, including range information, and provides sectional refocused imaging of 3D objects at different ranges. This paper explores the potential use of 3D passive sensing integral imaging for human gesture recognition tasks from sequences of reconstructed 3D video scenes. As a preliminary testbed, the 3D integral imaging sensing is implemented using an array of cameras with the appropriate algorithms for 3D scene reconstruction. Recognition experiments are performed by acquiring 3D video scenes of multiple hand gestures performed by ten people. We analyze the capability and performance of gesture recognition using 3D integral imaging representations at given distances and compare its performance with the use of standard two-dimensional (2D) single-camera videos. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using 3D integral imaging for human gesture recognition.

  7. Three-Dimensional Integrated Survey for Building Investigations.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Domenica; Angelini, Maria Giuseppa

    2015-11-01

    The study shows the results of a survey aimed to represent a building collapse and the feasibility of the modellation as a support of structure analysis. An integrated survey using topographic, photogrammetric, and terrestrial laser techniques was carried out to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) model of the building, plans and prospects, and the particulars of the collapsed area. Authors acquired, by a photogrammetric survey, information about regular parties of the structure; while using laser scanner data they reconstructed a set of more interesting architectural details and areas with higher surface curvature. Specifically, the process of texture provided a detailed 3D structure of the areas under investigation. The analysis of the data acquired resulted to be very useful both in identifying the causes of the disaster and also in helping the reconstruction of the collapsed corner showing the contribution that the integrated surveys can give in preserving architectural and historic heritage.

  8. Flat tori in three-dimensional space and convex integration.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Vincent; Jabrane, Saïd; Lazarus, Francis; Thibert, Boris

    2012-05-08

    It is well-known that the curvature tensor is an isometric invariant of C(2) Riemannian manifolds. This invariant is at the origin of the rigidity observed in Riemannian geometry. In the mid 1950s, Nash amazed the world mathematical community by showing that this rigidity breaks down in regularity C(1). This unexpected flexibility has many paradoxical consequences, one of them is the existence of C(1) isometric embeddings of flat tori into Euclidean three-dimensional space. In the 1970s and 1980s, M. Gromov, revisiting Nash's results introduced convex integration theory offering a general framework to solve this type of geometric problems. In this research, we convert convex integration theory into an algorithm that produces isometric maps of flat tori. We provide an implementation of a convex integration process leading to images of an embedding of a flat torus. The resulting surface reveals a C(1) fractal structure: Although the tangent plane is defined everywhere, the normal vector exhibits a fractal behavior. Isometric embeddings of flat tori may thus appear as a geometric occurrence of a structure that is simultaneously C(1) and fractal. Beyond these results, our implementation demonstrates that convex integration, a theory still confined to specialists, can produce computationally tractable solutions of partial differential relations.

  9. Flat tori in three-dimensional space and convex integration

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Vincent; Jabrane, Saïd; Lazarus, Francis; Thibert, Boris

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that the curvature tensor is an isometric invariant of C2 Riemannian manifolds. This invariant is at the origin of the rigidity observed in Riemannian geometry. In the mid 1950s, Nash amazed the world mathematical community by showing that this rigidity breaks down in regularity C1. This unexpected flexibility has many paradoxical consequences, one of them is the existence of C1 isometric embeddings of flat tori into Euclidean three-dimensional space. In the 1970s and 1980s, M. Gromov, revisiting Nash’s results introduced convex integration theory offering a general framework to solve this type of geometric problems. In this research, we convert convex integration theory into an algorithm that produces isometric maps of flat tori. We provide an implementation of a convex integration process leading to images of an embedding of a flat torus. The resulting surface reveals a C1 fractal structure: Although the tangent plane is defined everywhere, the normal vector exhibits a fractal behavior. Isometric embeddings of flat tori may thus appear as a geometric occurrence of a structure that is simultaneously C1 and fractal. Beyond these results, our implementation demonstrates that convex integration, a theory still confined to specialists, can produce computationally tractable solutions of partial differential relations. PMID:22523238

  10. Integration of Computed Tomography and Three-Dimensional Echocardiography for Hybrid Three-Dimensional Printing in Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Jordan; Pietila, Todd; Samuel, Bennett P; Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Haw, Marcus P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology aiding diagnostics, education, and interventional, and surgical planning in congenital heart disease (CHD). Three-dimensional printing has been derived from computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and 3D echocardiography. However, individually the imaging modalities may not provide adequate visualization of complex CHD. The integration of the strengths of two or more imaging modalities has the potential to enhance visualization of cardiac pathomorphology. We describe the feasibility of hybrid 3D printing from two imaging modalities in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (L-TGA). Hybrid 3D printing may be useful as an additional tool for cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons in planning interventions in children and adults with CHD.

  11. Integrated all-optical infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, John; Bonakdar, Alireza; Gelfand, Ryan; Dey, Dibyendu; Nia, Iman Hassani; Fathipour, Vala; Memis, Omer Gokalp; Mohseni, Hooman

    2012-05-09

    We report a type of infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser, in which far field light in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 6.1 μm) is modulated by a near field interaction of light in the telecommunications wavelength (1.55 μm). To achieve this all-optical switch, we used cross-polarized bowtie antennas and a centrally located germanium nanoslab. The bowtie antenna squeezes the short wavelength light into the gap region, where the germanium is placed. The perturbation of refractive index of the germanium due to the free carrier absorption produced by short wavelength light changes the optical response of the antenna and the entire laser intensity at 6.1 μm significantly. This device shows a viable method to modulate the far field of a laser through a near field interaction.

  12. PECASE: All-Optical Photonic Integrated Circuits in Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-14

    elements for dense integrated photonics . Figure 33 The cross sections of the simulated electric energy distributions of (a) the 1st and (b) the 2nd...Soltani, and A. Adibi, “High Quality Planar Silicon Nitride Microdisk Resonators for Integrated Photonics in the Visible Wavelength Range,” Optics...Soltani, and A. Adibi, “High quality planar silicon nitride microdisk resonators for integrated photonics in the visible wavelength range,” Opt. Express

  13. Digital Three-dimensional Reconstruction Based On Integral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Chen, Qian; Hua, Hong; Mao, Chen; Shao, Ajun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a digital three dimensional reconstruction method based on a set of small-baseline elemental images captured with a micro-lens array and a CCD sensor. In this paper, we adopt the ASIFT (Affine Scale-invariant feature transform) operator as the image registration method. Among the set of captured elemental images, the elemental image located in the middle of the overall image field is used as the reference and corresponding matching points in each elemental image around the reference elemental are calculated, which enables to accurately compute the depth value of object points relatively to the reference image frame. Using optimization algorithm with redundant matching points can achieve 3D reconstruction finally. Our experimental results are presented to demonstrate excellent performance in accuracy and speed of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26236151

  14. InP-based three-dimensional photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Diana; Zaytsev, Sergey; Pauchard, Alexandre; Hummel, Steve; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    Fast-growing internet traffic volumes require high data communication bandwidth over longer distances than short wavelength (850 nm) multi-mode fiber systems can provide. Access network bottlenecks put pressure on short-range (SR) telecommunication systems. To effectively address these datacom and telecom market needs, low cost, high-speed laser modules at 1310 and 1550 nm wavelengths are required. The great success of GaAs 850 nm VCSELs for Gb/s Ethernet has motivated efforts to extend VCSEL technology to longer wavelengths in the 1310 and 1550 nm regimes. However, the technological challenges associated with available intrinsic materials for long wavelength VCSELs are tremendous. Even with recent advances in this area, it is believed that significant additional development is necessary before long wavelength VCSELs that meet commercial specifications will be widely available. In addition, the more stringent OC192 and OC768 specifications for single-mode fiber (SMF) datacom may require more than just a long wavelength laser diode, VCSEL or not, to address numerous cost and performance issues. We believe that photonic integrated circuits, which compactly integrate surface-emitting lasers with additional active and passive optical components with extended functionality, will provide the best solutions to today's problems. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) have been investigated for more than a decade. However, they have produced limited commercial impact to date primarily because the highly complicated fabrication processes produce significant yield and device performance issues. In this presentation, we will discuss a new technology platform for fabricating InP-based photonic integrated circuits compatible with surface-emitting laser technology. Employing InP transparency at 1310 and 1550 nm wavelengths, we have created 3-D photonic integrated circuits (PICs) by utilizing light beams in both surface normal and in-plane directions within the InP-based structure

  15. Three dimensional path integration in the house mouse (Mus domestica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardunias, Paul M.; Jander, R.

    Previous studies have explored two-dimensional path integration in rodents by recording responses to passive rotation on a horizontal plane. This study adds the element of passive rotation in a vertical plane, necessitating the mouse to integrate positional information from three dimensions. Mice were trained to climb a wire mesh joining two horizontal planes. The whole arena was rotated 90° while the mouse was vertically oriented as it moved between planes. Rotation was conducted both clockwise and counter-clockwise, controls being provided by rotation of the arena while the mouse was in its nest-box. All 16 mice tested altered their direction of travel subsequent to rotation in the vertical plane, compensating with a change in their path on the following horizontal plane.

  16. Three dimensional path integration in the house mouse (Mus domestica).

    PubMed

    Bardunias, P M; Jander, R

    2000-12-01

    Previous studies have explored two-dimensional path integration in rodents by recording responses to passive rotation on a horizontal plane. This study adds the element of passive rotation in a vertical plane, necessitating the mouse to integrate positional information from three dimensions. Mice were trained to climb a wire mesh joining two horizontal planes. The whole arena was rotated 90 degrees while the mouse was vertically oriented as it moved between planes. Rotation was conducted both clockwise and counter-clockwise, controls being provided by rotation of the arena while the mouse was in its nest-box. All 16 mice tested altered their direction of travel subsequent to rotation in the vertical plane, compensating with a change in their path on the following horizontal plane.

  17. Three-dimensional identification of biological microorganism using integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Bahram; Moon, Inkyu; Yeom, Seokwon

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, we address the identification of biological microorganisms using microscopic integral imaging (II). II senses multi-view directional information of 3D objects illuminated by incoherent light. A micro-lenslet array generates a set of elemental images by projecting a 3D scene onto a detector array. In computational reconstruction of II, 3D volumetric scenes are numerically reconstructed by means of a geometrical ray projection method. The identification of the biological samples is performed using the 3D volume of the reconstructed object. In one approach, the multivariate statistical distribution of the reference sample is measured in 3D space and compared with an unknown input sample by means of statistical discriminant functions. The multivariate empirical cumulative density of the 3D volume image is determined for classification. On the other approach, the graph matching technique is applied to 3D volumetric images with Gabor feature extraction. The reference morphology is identified in unknown input samples using 3D grids. Experimental results are presented for the identification of sphacelaria alga and tribonema aequale alga. We present experimental results for both 3D and 2D imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D identification of microorganisms using II.

  18. Three-dimensional identification of biological microorganism using integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Javidi, Bahram; Moon, Inkyu; Yeom, Seokwon

    2006-12-11

    In this paper, we address the identification of biological microorganisms using microscopic integral imaging (II). II senses multi-view directional information of 3D objects illuminated by incoherent light. A micro-lenslet array generates a set of elemental images by projecting a 3D scene onto a detector array. In computational reconstruction of II, 3D volumetric scenes are numerically reconstructed by means of a geometrical ray projection method. The identification of the biological samples is performed using the 3D volume of the reconstructed object. In one approach, the multivariate statistical distribution of the reference sample is measured in 3D space and compared with an unknown input sample by means of statistical discriminant functions. The multivariate empirical cumulative density of the 3D volume image is determined for classification. On the other approach, the graph matching technique is applied to 3D volumetric images with Gabor feature extraction. The reference morphology is identified in unknown input samples using 3D grids. Experimental results are presented for the identification of sphacelaria alga and tribonema aequale alga. We present experimental results for both 3D and 2D imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D identification of microorganisms using II.

  19. Integrated all-optical logic discriminators based on plasmonic bandgap engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cuicui; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Optical computing uses photons as information carriers, opening up the possibility for ultrahigh-speed and ultrawide-band information processing. Integrated all-optical logic devices are indispensible core components of optical computing systems. However, up to now, little experimental progress has been made in nanoscale all-optical logic discriminators, which have the function of discriminating and encoding incident light signals according to wavelength. Here, we report a strategy to realize a nanoscale all-optical logic discriminator based on plasmonic bandgap engineering in a planar plasmonic microstructure. Light signals falling within different operating wavelength ranges are differentiated and endowed with different logic state encodings. Compared with values previously reported, the operating bandwidth is enlarged by one order of magnitude. Also the SPP light source is integrated with the logic device while retaining its ultracompact size. This opens up a way to construct on-chip all-optical information processors and artificial intelligence systems. PMID:24071647

  20. Three-dimensional method for integrated transient analysis of reactor-piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A three-dimensional method for integrated hydrodynamic, structural, and thermal analyses of reactor-piping systems is presented. The hydrodynamics are analyzed in a reference frame fixed to the piping and are treated with a two-dimensional Eulerian finite-difference technique. The structural responses are calculated with a three-dimensional co-rotational finite-element methodology. Interaction between fluid and structure is accounted for by iteratively enforcing the interface boundary conditions.

  1. An Exploration of Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment for Computational Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Baichang; Wang, Qiyun; Chen, Jie; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) is a fundamental skill for students, and assessment is a critical factor in education. However, there is a lack of effective approaches to CT assessment. Therefore, we designed the Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment (TDIA) framework in this article. The TDIA has two aims: one was to integrate three dimensions…

  2. Quantum integrable systems in three-dimensional magnetic fields: the Cartesian case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhalij, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we construct integrable three-dimensional quantum-mechanical systems with magnetic fields, admitting pairs of commuting second-order integrals of motion. The case of Cartesian coordinates is considered. Most of the systems obtained are new and not related to the separation of variables in the corresponding Schrödinger equation.

  3. Cascaded all-optical operations in a hybrid integrated 80-Gb/s logic circuit.

    PubMed

    LeGrange, J D; Dinu, M; Sochor, T; Bollond, P; Kasper, A; Cabot, S; Johnson, G S; Kang, I; Grant, A; Kay, J; Jaques, J

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate logic functionalities in a high-speed all-optical logic circuit based on differential Mach-Zehnder interferometers with semiconductor optical amplifiers as the nonlinear optical elements. The circuit, implemented by hybrid integration of the semiconductor optical amplifiers on a planar lightwave circuit platform fabricated in silica glass, can be flexibly configured to realize a variety of Boolean logic gates. We present both simulations and experimental demonstrations of cascaded all-optical operations for 80-Gb/s on-off keyed data.

  4. Three-dimensional object rotation-tolerant recognition for integral imaging using synthetic discriminant function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinbo; Wang, Xiaorui; Zhang, Jianqi; Xu, Yin

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel approach of three-dimensional object rotation-tolerant recognition that combines the merits of Integral Imaging (II) and Synthetic Discriminant Function (SDF). SDF aims at filters and distortion-tolerant recognition, and we use it for three-dimensional (3-D) rotation-tolerant recognition with II system. Using high relevancy of elemental images of II, the approach can not only realize 3-D rotation-tolerant recognition, but also reduce computational complexity. The correctness has been validated by experimental results.

  5. Ultrafast all-optical temporal differentiators based on CMOS-compatible integrated-waveguide Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, K A; Duchesne, D; Strain, M J; Morandotti, R; Sorel, M; Azaña, J

    2011-09-26

    We report the first realization of integrated, all-optical first- and higher-order photonic differentiators operating at terahertz (THz) processing speeds. This is accomplished in a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) CMOS-compatible platform using a simple integrated geometry based on (π-)phase-shifted Bragg gratings. Moreover, we achieve on-chip generation of sub-picosecond Hermite-Gaussian pulse waveforms, which are noteworthy for applications in next-generation optical telecommunications.

  6. Analysis of all-optical temporal integrator employing phased-shifted DFB-SOA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Ji, Xiao-Ling; Xu, Cong; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2014-11-17

    All-optical temporal integrator using phase-shifted distributed-feedback semiconductor optical amplifier (DFB-SOA) is investigated. The influences of system parameters on its energy transmittance and integration error are explored in detail. The numerical analysis shows that, enhanced energy transmittance and integration time window can be simultaneously achieved by increased injected current in the vicinity of lasing threshold. We find that the range of input pulse-width with lower integration error is highly sensitive to the injected optical power, due to gain saturation and induced detuning deviation mechanism. The initial frequency detuning should also be carefully chosen to suppress the integration deviation with ideal waveform output.

  7. A new boundary element formulation for two- and three-dimensional thermoelasticity using particular integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Donald P., Jr.; Banerjee, Prasanta K.

    1988-01-01

    New two- and three-dimensional BEM formulations are developed for steady-state and transient uncoupled thermoelasticity. These new procedures differ from previous work in that additional surface of volume integration is not required to incorporate thermal loads in the analysis. Instead, thermal body forces are introduced in the BEM system via particular integrals. The present formulation is implemented in a general-purpose multiregion system, and examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and versatility of the method.

  8. Chip-integrated ultrawide-band all-optical logic comparator in plasmonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cuicui; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    Optical computing opens up the possibility for the realization of ultrahigh-speed and ultrawide-band information processing. Integrated all-optical logic comparator is one of the indispensable core components of optical computing systems. Unfortunately, up to now, no any nanoscale all-optical logic comparator suitable for on-chip integration applications has been realized experimentally. Here, we report a subtle and effective technical solution to circumvent the obstacles of inherent Ohmic losses of metal and limited propagation length of SPPs. A nanoscale all-optical logic comparator suitable for on-chip integration applications is realized in plasmonic circuits directly. The incident single-bit (or dual-bit) logic signals can be compared and the comparison results are endowed with different logic encodings. An ultrabroad operating wavelength range from 700 to 1000 nm, and an ultrahigh output logic-state contrast-ratio of more than 25 dB are realized experimentally. No high power requirement is needed. Though nanoscale SPP light source and the logic comparator device are integrated into the same plasmonic chip, an ultrasmall feature size is maintained. This work not only paves a way for the realization of complex logic device such as adders and multiplier, but also opens up the possibility for realizing quantum solid chips based on plasmonic circuits. PMID:24463956

  9. Chip-integrated ultrawide-band all-optical logic comparator in plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuicui; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    Optical computing opens up the possibility for the realization of ultrahigh-speed and ultrawide-band information processing. Integrated all-optical logic comparator is one of the indispensable core components of optical computing systems. Unfortunately, up to now, no any nanoscale all-optical logic comparator suitable for on-chip integration applications has been realized experimentally. Here, we report a subtle and effective technical solution to circumvent the obstacles of inherent Ohmic losses of metal and limited propagation length of SPPs. A nanoscale all-optical logic comparator suitable for on-chip integration applications is realized in plasmonic circuits directly. The incident single-bit (or dual-bit) logic signals can be compared and the comparison results are endowed with different logic encodings. An ultrabroad operating wavelength range from 700 to 1000 nm, and an ultrahigh output logic-state contrast-ratio of more than 25 dB are realized experimentally. No high power requirement is needed. Though nanoscale SPP light source and the logic comparator device are integrated into the same plasmonic chip, an ultrasmall feature size is maintained. This work not only paves a way for the realization of complex logic device such as adders and multiplier, but also opens up the possibility for realizing quantum solid chips based on plasmonic circuits.

  10. Chip-integrated ultrawide-band all-optical logic comparator in plasmonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cuicui; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-27

    Optical computing opens up the possibility for the realization of ultrahigh-speed and ultrawide-band information processing. Integrated all-optical logic comparator is one of the indispensable core components of optical computing systems. Unfortunately, up to now, no any nanoscale all-optical logic comparator suitable for on-chip integration applications has been realized experimentally. Here, we report a subtle and effective technical solution to circumvent the obstacles of inherent Ohmic losses of metal and limited propagation length of SPPs. A nanoscale all-optical logic comparator suitable for on-chip integration applications is realized in plasmonic circuits directly. The incident single-bit (or dual-bit) logic signals can be compared and the comparison results are endowed with different logic encodings. An ultrabroad operating wavelength range from 700 to 1000 nm, and an ultrahigh output logic-state contrast-ratio of more than 25 dB are realized experimentally. No high power requirement is needed. Though nanoscale SPP light source and the logic comparator device are integrated into the same plasmonic chip, an ultrasmall feature size is maintained. This work not only paves a way for the realization of complex logic device such as adders and multiplier, but also opens up the possibility for realizing quantum solid chips based on plasmonic circuits.

  11. Three-dimensional visualization of objects in scattering medium by use of computational integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2008-08-18

    In this paper, we propose a method to three-dimensionally visualize objects in a scattering medium using integral imaging. Our approach is based on a particular use of the interference phenomenon between the ballistic photons getting through the scattering medium and the scattered photons being scattered by the medium. For three-dimensional (3D) sensing of the scattered objects, the synthetic aperture integral imaging system under coherent illumination records the scattered elemental images of the objects. Then, the computational geometrical ray propagation algorithm is applied to the scattered elemental images in order to eliminate the interference patterns between scattered and object beams. The original 3D information of the scattered objects is recovered by multiple imaging channels, each with a unique perspective of the object. We present both simulation and experimental results with virtual and real objects to demonstrate the proposed concepts.

  12. Three Dimensional Deformation of Mining Area Detection by InSAR and Probability Integral Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, H. D.; Gao, X. X.; Cheng, D.; Zhao, W. Y.; Zhao, C. L.

    2015-06-01

    A new solution algorithm that combined D-InSAR and probability integral method was proposed to generate the three dimensional deformation in mining area. The details are as follows: according to the geological and mining data, the control points set should be established, which contains correct phase unwrapping points in subsidence basin edge generated by D-InSAR and several GPS points; Using the modulus method to calculate the optimum parameters of probability integral prediction; Finally, generate the three dimensional deformation of mining work face by the parameters. Using this method, the land subsidence with big deformation gradients in mining area were correctly generated by example TerraSAR-X images. The results of the example show that this method can generate the correct mining subsidence basin with a few surface observations, and it is much better than the results of D-InSAR.

  13. One-Step Fabrication of Microchannels with Integrated Three Dimensional Features by Hot Intrusion Embossing

    PubMed Central

    Debono, Mike; Voicu, Dan; Pousti, Mohammad; Safdar, Muhammad; Young, Robert; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Greener, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    We build on the concept of hot intrusion embossing to develop a one-step fabrication method for thermoplastic microfluidic channels containing integrated three-dimensional features. This was accomplished with simple, rapid-to-fabricate imprint templates containing microcavities that locally control the intrusion of heated thermoplastic based on their cross-sectional geometries. The use of circular, rectangular and triangular cavity geometries was demonstrated for the purposes of forming posts, multi-focal length microlense arrays, walls, steps, tapered features and three-dimensional serpentine microchannels. Process variables, such as temperature and pressure, controlled feature dimensions without affecting the overall microchannel geometry. The approach was demonstrated for polycarbonate, cycloolefin copolymer and polystyrene, but in principle is applicable to any thermoplastic. The approach is a step forward towards rapid fabrication of complex, robust, microfluidic platforms with integrated multi-functional elements. PMID:27916849

  14. Note: Design and development of an integrated three-dimensional scanner for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rashmi, T.; Dharsana, G.; Sriramshankar, R.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-11-15

    A compact scanning head for the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) greatly enhances the portability of AFM and facilitates easy integration with other tools. This paper reports the design and development of a three-dimensional (3D) scanner integrated into an AFM micro-probe. The scanner is realized by means of a novel design for the AFM probe along with a magnetic actuation system. The integrated scanner, the actuation system, and their associated mechanical mounts are fabricated and evaluated. The experimentally calibrated actuation ranges are shown to be over 1 μm along all the three axes.

  15. A Differential Algebraic Integration Algorithm for Symplectic Mappings in Systems with Three-Dimensional Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P

    2004-09-15

    A differential algebraic integration algorithm is developed for symplectic mapping through a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic field. The self-consistent reference orbit in phase space is obtained by making a canonical transformation to eliminate the linear part of the Hamiltonian. Transfer maps from the entrance to the exit of any 3-D magnetic field are then obtained through slice-by-slice symplectic integration. The particle phase-space coordinates are advanced by using the integrable polynomial procedure. This algorithm is a powerful tool to attain nonlinear maps for insertion devices in synchrotron light source or complicated magnetic field in the interaction region in high energy colliders.

  16. Note: Design and development of an integrated three-dimensional scanner for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi, T.; Dharsana, G.; Sriramshankar, R.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-11-01

    A compact scanning head for the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) greatly enhances the portability of AFM and facilitates easy integration with other tools. This paper reports the design and development of a three-dimensional (3D) scanner integrated into an AFM micro-probe. The scanner is realized by means of a novel design for the AFM probe along with a magnetic actuation system. The integrated scanner, the actuation system, and their associated mechanical mounts are fabricated and evaluated. The experimentally calibrated actuation ranges are shown to be over 1 μm along all the three axes.

  17. A three-dimensional equivalent domain integral method for cracked solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional FEM analysis is presently undertaken via the general formulation of the equivalent-domain integral method for mixed-mode fracture problems in general anisotropic and nonlinear materials. In mixed-mode integrals, the total J-integral is split into three separate modes of fracture; direct and decomposition methods are effective in this separation of the modes, as presently demonstrated by their application to several pure and mixed-mode fracture problems. The results are found to agree well with those reported in the literature, and suggest the usefulness of the method as a FEM-program postprocessing subroutines.

  18. Lab-on-a-print: from a single polymer film to three-dimensional integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Siwei; Pan, Tingrui

    2009-04-21

    With the major advances in soft lithography and polymer materials, use of microfluidic devices has attracted tremendous attention recently. A simple and fast micromachining process is highly in demand to prototype such a device efficiently and economically. In this paper, we first reported an out-of-cleanroom printing-based integrated microfabrication process, referred to as the lab-on-a-print (LOP), for rapid-prototyping three-dimensional microfluidics. Using this lab-on-a-print process, we demonstrated the potential to accomplish an entire design-to-fabrication cycle within an hour, including about 70 microm resolution of direct-lithography patterning, well-controlled polyimide wet etching, three-dimensional pattern alignment and multilayer wax thermal-fusion packaging. A microfluidic gradient generator was prepared and tested for validation of the lab-on-a-print microfabrication process.

  19. Three-dimensional integral imaging display system via off-axially distributed image sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yongri; Qu, Hongjia; Zhang, Miao; Cho, Myungjin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional integral imaging display system with a multiple recorded images using off-axially distributed image sensing. First, the depth map of the 3D objects is extracted from the off-axially recorded multi-perspective 2D images by using profilometry technique. Then, the elemental image array is computationally synthesized using the extracted depth map based on ray mapping model. Finally, the 3D images are optically displayed in integral imaging system. To show the feasibility of the proposed method, the optical experiments for 3D objects are carried out and presented in this paper.

  20. Three-Dimensional Integration Technology for Advanced Focal Planes and Integrated Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Keast, Craig

    2007-02-28

    Over the last five years MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT-LL) has developed a three-dimensional (3D) circuit integration technology that exploits the advantages of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology to enable wafer-level stacking and micrometer-scale electrical interconnection of fully fabricated circuit wafers. Advanced focal plane arrays have been the first applications to exploit the benefits of this 3D integration technology because the massively parallel information flow present in 2D imaging arrays maps very nicely into a 3D computational structure as information flows from circuit-tier to circuit-tier in the z-direction. To date, the MIT-LL 3D integration technology has been used to fabricate four different focal planes including: a 2-tier 64 x 64 imager with fully parallel per-pixel A/D conversion; a 3-tier 640 x 480 imager consisting of an imaging tier, an A/D conversion tier, and a digital signal processing tier; a 2-tier 1024 x 1024 pixel, 4-side-abutable imaging modules for tiling large mosaic focal planes, and a 3-tier Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) 3-D LIDAR array, using a 30 volt APD tier, a 3.3 volt CMOS tier, and a 1.5 volt CMOS tier. Recently, the 3D integration technology has been made available to the circuit design research community through DARPA-sponsored Multiproject fabrication runs. The first Multiproject Run (3DL1) completed fabrication in early 2006 and included over 30 different circuit designs from 21 different research groups. 3D circuit concepts explored in this run included stacked memories, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and mixed-signal circuits. The second Multiproject Run (3DM2) is currently in fabrication and includes particle detector readouts designed by Fermilab. This talk will provide a brief overview of MIT-LL's 3D-integration process, discuss some of the focal plane applications where the technology is being applied, and provide a summary of some of the Multiproject Run circuit results.

  1. Ultrafast all-optical modulation with hyperbolic metamaterial integrated in Si photonic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Neira, Andres D; Wurtz, Gregory A; Ginzburg, Pavel; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2014-05-05

    The integration of optical metamaterials within silicon integrated photonic circuitry bears significantly potential in the design of low-power, nanoscale footprint, all-optical functionalities. We propose a novel concept and provide detailed analysis of an on-chip ultrafast all-optical modulator based on an hyperbolic metamaterial integrated in a silicon waveguide. The anisotropic metamaterial based on gold nanorods is placed on top of the silicon waveguide to form a modulator with a 300x440x600 nm(3) footprint. For the operating wavelength of 1.5 μm, the optimized geometry of the device has insertion loss of about 5 dB and a modulation depth of 35% with a sub-ps switching rate. The switching energy estimated from nonlinear transient dynamic numerical simulations is 3.7 pJ/bit when the transmission is controlled optically at a wavelength of 532 nm, resonant with the transverse plasmonic mode of the metamaterial. The switching mechanism is based on the control of the hybridization of eigenmodes in the metamaterial slab and the Si waveguide.

  2. Integral three-dimensional television with video system using pixel-offset method.

    PubMed

    Arai, Jun; Kawakita, Masahiro; Yamashita, Takayuki; Sasaki, Hisayuki; Miura, Masato; Hiura, Hitoshi; Okui, Makoto; Okano, Fumio

    2013-02-11

    Integral three-dimensional (3D) television based on integral imaging requires huge amounts of information. Previously, we constructed an Integral 3D television using Super Hi-Vision (SHV) technology, with 7680 pixels horizontally and 4320 pixels vertically. We report on improved image quality through the development of video system with an equivalent of 8000 scan lines for use with Integral 3D television. We conducted experiments to evaluate the resolution of 3D images using an experimental setup and were able to show that by using the pixel-offset method we have eliminated aliasing produced by full-resolution SHV video equipment. We confirmed that the application of the pixel-offset method to integral 3D television is effective in increasing the resolution of reconstructed images.

  3. Three-dimensional (3D) monolithically integrated photodetector and WDM receiver based on bulk silicon wafer.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Xianshu; Tu, Xiaoguang; Jia, Lianxi; Fang, Qing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2014-08-11

    We propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) monolithic optoelectronic integration platform. Such platform integrates both electrical and photonic devices in a bulk silicon wafer, which eliminates the high-cost silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is more suitable for process requirements of electronic and photonic integrated circuits (ICs). For proof-of-concept, we demonstrate a three-dimensional photodetector and WDM receiver system. The Ge is grown on a 8-inch bulk silicon wafer while the optical waveguide is defined in a SiN layer which is deposited on top of it, with ~4 µm oxide sandwiched in between. The light is directed to the Ge photodetector from the SiN waveguide vertically by using grating coupler with a Aluminum mirror on top of it. The measured photodetector responsivity is ~0.2 A/W and the 3-dB bandwidth is ~2 GHz. Using such vertical-coupled photodetector, we demonstrated an 8-channel receiver by integrating a 1 × 8 arrayed waveguide grating (AWG). High-quality optical signal detection with up to 10 Gbit/s data rate is demonstrated, suggesting a 80 Gbit/s throughput. Such receiver can be applied to on-chip optical interconnect, DRAM interface, and telecommunication systems.

  4. Server-based Approach to Web Visualization of Integrated Three-dimensional Brain Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, Andrew V.; Albright, Evan; Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Corina, David P.; Ojemann, George; Martin, Richard F.; Brinkley, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe a client-server approach to three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of neuroimaging data, which enables researchers to visualize, manipulate, and analyze large brain imaging datasets over the Internet. All computationally intensive tasks are done by a graphics server that loads and processes image volumes and 3-D models, renders 3-D scenes, and sends the renderings back to the client. The authors discuss the system architecture and implementation and give several examples of client applications that allow visualization and analysis of integrated language map data from single and multiple patients. PMID:15561787

  5. An integrated, multiparametric flow cytometry chip using "microfluidic drifting" based three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaole; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Zhao, Yanhui; McCoy, J Philip; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate an integrated, single-layer, miniature flow cytometry device that is capable of multi-parametric particle analysis. The device integrates both particle focusing and detection components on-chip, including a "microfluidic drifting" based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing component and a series of optical fibers integrated into the microfluidic architecture to facilitate on-chip detection. With this design, multiple optical signals (i.e., forward scatter, side scatter, and fluorescence) from individual particles can be simultaneously detected. Experimental results indicate that the performance of our flow cytometry chip is comparable to its bulky, expensive desktop counterpart. The integration of on-chip 3D particle focusing with on-chip multi-parametric optical detection in a single-layer, mass-producible microfluidic device presents a major step towards low-cost flow cytometry chips for point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  6. Fast evaluation of Sommerfeld integrals for EM scattering and radiation by three-dimensional buried objects

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, T.J.; Chew, W.C.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a fast method for electromagnetic scattering and radiation problems pertinent to three-dimensional (3-D) buried objects. In this approach, a new symmetrical form of the Green`s function is derived, which can reduce the number of Sommerfeld integrals involved in the buried objects problem. The integration along steepest descent paths and leading-order approximations are introduced to evaluate these Sommerfeld integrals, which can greatly accelerate the computation. Based on the fast evaluation of Sommerfeld integrals, the radiation of an arbitrarily oriented electric dipole buried in a half space is first analyzed and computed. Then, the scattering by buried dielectric objects and conducting objects is considered using the method of moments (MOM). Numerical results show that the fast method can save tremendous CPU time in radiation and scattering problems involving buried objects.

  7. High-resolution non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Tsai, Esther H R; Dinapoli, Roberto; Müller, Elisabeth; Bunk, Oliver; Raabe, Jörg; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-03-15

    Modern nanoelectronics has advanced to a point at which it is impossible to image entire devices and their interconnections non-destructively because of their small feature sizes and the complex three-dimensional structures resulting from their integration on a chip. This metrology gap implies a lack of direct feedback between design and manufacturing processes, and hampers quality control during production, shipment and use. Here we demonstrate that X-ray ptychography-a high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging technique-can create three-dimensional images of integrated circuits of known and unknown designs with a lateral resolution in all directions down to 14.6 nanometres. We obtained detailed device geometries and corresponding elemental maps, and show how the devices are integrated with each other to form the chip. Our experiments represent a major advance in chip inspection and reverse engineering over the traditional destructive electron microscopy and ion milling techniques. Foreseeable developments in X-ray sources, optics and detectors, as well as adoption of an instrument geometry optimized for planar rather than cylindrical samples, could lead to a thousand-fold increase in efficiency, with concomitant reductions in scan times and voxel sizes.

  8. High-resolution non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Tsai, Esther H. R.; Dinapoli, Roberto; Müller, Elisabeth; Bunk, Oliver; Raabe, Jörg; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Modern nanoelectronics has advanced to a point at which it is impossible to image entire devices and their interconnections non-destructively because of their small feature sizes and the complex three-dimensional structures resulting from their integration on a chip. This metrology gap implies a lack of direct feedback between design and manufacturing processes, and hampers quality control during production, shipment and use. Here we demonstrate that X-ray ptychography—a high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging technique—can create three-dimensional images of integrated circuits of known and unknown designs with a lateral resolution in all directions down to 14.6 nanometres. We obtained detailed device geometries and corresponding elemental maps, and show how the devices are integrated with each other to form the chip. Our experiments represent a major advance in chip inspection and reverse engineering over the traditional destructive electron microscopy and ion milling techniques. Foreseeable developments in X-ray sources, optics and detectors, as well as adoption of an instrument geometry optimized for planar rather than cylindrical samples, could lead to a thousand-fold increase in efficiency, with concomitant reductions in scan times and voxel sizes.

  9. Large-scale photonic integration for advanced all-optical routing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholes, Steven C.

    Advanced InP-based photonic integrated circuits are a critical technology to manage the increasing bandwidth demands of next-generation all-optical networks. Integrating many of the discrete functions required in optical networks into a single device provides a reduction in system footprint and optical losses by eliminating the fiber coupling junctions between components. This translates directly into increased system reliability and cost savings. Although many key network components have been realized via InP-based monolithic integration over the years, truly large-scale photonic ICs have only recently emerged in the marketplace. This lag-time has been mostly due to historically low device yields. In all-optical routing applications, large-scale photonic ICs may be able to address two of the key roadblocks associated with scaling modern electronic routers to higher capacities---namely, power and size. If the functions of dynamic wavelength conversion and routing are moved to the optical layer, we can eliminate the need for power-hungry optical-to-electrical (O/E) and electrical-to-optical (E/O) data conversions at each router node. Additionally, large-scale photonic ICs could reduce the footprint of such a system by combining the similar functions of each port onto a single chip. However, robust design and manufacturing techniques that will enable high-yield production of these chips must be developed. In this work, we demonstrate a monolithic tunable optical router (MOTOR) chip consisting of an array of eight 40-Gbps wavelength converters and a passive arrayed-waveguide grating router that functions as the packet-forwarding switch fabric of an all-optical router. The device represents one of the most complex InP photonic ICs ever reported, with more than 200 integrated functional elements in a single chip. Single-channel 40 Gbps wavelength conversion and channel switching using 231-1 PRBS data showed a power penalty as low as 4.5 dB with less than 2 W drive power

  10. All-optically integrated multimodality imaging system: combined photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a multimodality imaging system by optically integrating all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (AOPAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FLM) to provide complementary information including optical absorption, optical back-scattering and fluorescence contrast of biological tissue. By sharing the same low-coherence Michelson interferometer, AOPAM and OCT could be organically optically combined to obtain the absorption and scattering information of the biological tissues. Also, owing to using the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence signals are obtained to present the radiative and nonradiative transition process of absorption. Simultaneously photoacoustic angiography, tissue structure and fluorescence molecular in vivo images of mouse ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the optically integrated trimodality imaging system, which can present more information to study tumor angiogenesis, vasculature, anatomical structure and microenvironments in vivo.

  11. Multiport InP monolithically integrated all-optical wavelength router.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiu; Raz, Oded; Calabretta, Nicola; Zhao, Dan; Lu, Rongguo; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-15

    An indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated wavelength router is demonstrated in this Letter. The wavelength router has four input ports and four output ports, which integrate four wavelength converters and a 4×4 arrayed-waveguide grating router. Each wavelength converter is achieved based on cross-gain modulation and cross-phase modulation effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Error-free wavelength switching for a non-return-to-zero 231-1 ps eudorandom binary sequence at 40 Gb/s data rate is performed. Both 1×4 and 3×1 all-optical routing functions of this chip are demonstrated for the first time with power penalties as low as 3.2 dB.

  12. Three-Dimensional Integration of Black Phosphorus Photodetector with Silicon Photonics and Nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Che; Youngblood, Nathan; Peng, Ruoming; Yoo, Daehan; Mohr, Daniel A; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Li, Mo

    2017-02-08

    We demonstrate the integration of a black phosphorus photodetector in a hybrid, three-dimensional architecture of silicon photonics and metallic nanoplasmonics structures. This integration approach combines the advantages of the low propagation loss of silicon waveguides, high-field confinement of a plasmonic nanogap, and the narrow bandgap of black phosphorus to achieve high responsivity for detection of telecom-band, near-infrared light. Benefiting from an ultrashort channel (∼60 nm) and near-field enhancement enabled by the nanogap structure, the photodetector shows an intrinsic responsivity as high as 10 A/W afforded by internal gain mechanisms, and a 3 dB roll-off frequency of 150 MHz. This device demonstrates a promising approach for on-chip integration of three distinctive photonic systems, which, as a generic platform, may lead to future nanophotonic applications for biosensing, nonlinear optics, and optical signal processing.

  13. Integral three-dimensional television using a 2000-scanning-line video system.

    PubMed

    Arai, Jun; Okui, Makoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Okano, Fumio

    2006-03-10

    We have developed an integral three-dimensional (3-D) television that uses a 2000-scanning-line video system that can shoot and display 3-D color moving images in real time. We had previously developed an integral 3-D television that used a high-definition television system. The new system uses -6 times as many elemental images [160 (horizontal) x 118 (vertical) elemental images] arranged at -1.5 times the density to improve further the picture quality of the reconstructed image. Through comparison an image near the lens array can be reconstructed at -1.9 times the spatial frequency, and the viewing angle is -1.5 times as wide.

  14. Integrated three-dimensional models for noninvasive monitoring and valorization of the Morgantina silver treasure (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberghina, Maria Francesca; Alberghina, Filippo; Allegra, Dario; Di Paola, Francesco; Maniscalco, Laura; Milazzo, Giuseppe; Milotta, Filippo L. M.; Pellegrino, Lorella; Schiavone, Salvatore; Stanco, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    The Morgantina silver treasure belonging to the Archaeological Museum of Aidone (Sicily) was involved in a three-dimensional (3-D) survey and diagnostics campaign for monitoring the collection over time in anticipation of their temporary transfer to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for a period of 4 years. Using a multidisciplinary approach, a scientific and methodological protocol based on noninvasive techniques to achieve a complete and integrated knowledge of the precious items and their conservation state, as well as to increase their valorization, has been developed. All acquired data, i.e., 3-D models, ultraviolet fluorescence, x-ray images, and chemical information, will be made available, in an integrated way, within a web-oriented platform, which will present an in-progress tool to deepen existing archaeological knowledge and production technologies and to obtain referenced information of the conservation state before and after moving of the collection from its exposure site.

  15. Projection-type dual-view three-dimensional display system based on integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Chang-Kun; Hong, Keehoon; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2014-09-20

    A dual-view display system provides two different images in different directions. Most of them only present two-dimensional images for observers. In this paper, we propose a projection-type dual-view three-dimensional (3D) display system based on integral imaging. To assign directivities to the images, a projection-type display and dual-view screen with lenticular lenses are implemented. The lenticular lenses split the collimated image from the projection device into two different directions. The separated images are integrated by a single lens array in front of the screen, and full-parallax 3D images are observed in two different viewing regions. The visibility of the reconstructed 3D images can be improved by using high-density lenticular lenses and a high numerical aperture lens array. We explain the principle of the proposed method and verify the feasibility of the proposed system with simulations and experimental results.

  16. Bidirectional Data Injection Operation of Hybrid Integrated SOA MZI All-Optical Wavelength Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masaharu; Nishimura, Kohsuke; Inohara, Ryo; Usami, Masashi

    2007-02-01

    A bidirectional data signal input scheme of a semiconductor optical amplifier Mach Zehnder interferometer (SOA MZI) wavelength converter was proposed and experimentally verified for a nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ)-format signal. Theoretical analyses reveal that it is possible to mitigate the patterning effect induced by cross-gain modulation (XGM) by utilizing the difference of the ratio between the XGM and cross-phase modulation on the injection directions of data signals. A hybrid integrated SOA MZI all-optical wavelength converter, in which the coupling loss between the SOA and the silica waveguide was as small as 1 dB owing to a unique active alignment technique, was used for the experiment. We have verified the superior characteristics of the proposed operation scheme for the first time. Error-free wavelength-conversion operation for an NRZ signal at 40 Gb/s was confirmed.

  17. Chip-integrated all-optical diode based on nonlinear plasmonic nanocavities covered with multicomponent nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhen; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-01-01

    Ultracompact chip-integrated all-optical diode is realized experimentally in a plasmonic microstructure, consisting of a plasmonic waveguide side-coupled two asymmetric plasmonic composite nanocavities covered with a multicomponent nanocomposite layer, formed directly in a plasmonic circuit. Extremely large optical nonlinearity enhancement is obtained for the multicomponent nanocomposite cover layer, originating from resonant excitation, slow-light effect, and field enhancement effect. Nonreciprocal transmission was achieved based on the difference in the shift magnitude of the transparency window centers of two asymmetric plasmonic nanocavities induced by the signal light, itself, for the forward and backward propagation cases. An ultralow threshold incident light power of 145 μW (corresponding to a threshold intensity of 570 kW/cm2) is realized, which is reduced by seven orders of magnitude compared with previous reports. An ultrasmall feature size of 2 μm and a transmission contrast ratio of 15 dB are obtained simultaneously.

  18. Element Library for Three-Dimensional Stress Analysis by the Integrated Force Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method, a recently developed method for analyzing structures, is extended in this paper to three-dimensional structural analysis. First, a general formulation is developed to generate the stress interpolation matrix in terms of complete polynomials of the required order. The formulation is based on definitions of the stress tensor components in term of stress functions. The stress functions are written as complete polynomials and substituted into expressions for stress components. Then elimination of the dependent coefficients leaves the stress components expressed as complete polynomials whose coefficients are defined as generalized independent forces. Such derived components of the stress tensor identically satisfy homogenous Navier equations of equilibrium. The resulting element matrices are invariant with respect to coordinate transformation and are free of spurious zero-energy modes. The formulation provides a rational way to calculate the exact number of independent forces necessary to arrive at an approximation of the required order for complete polynomials. The influence of reducing the number of independent forces on the accuracy of the response is also analyzed. The stress fields derived are used to develop a comprehensive finite element library for three-dimensional structural analysis by the Integrated Force Method. Both tetrahedral- and hexahedral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary geometric configurations are developed. A number of examples with known analytical solutions are solved by using the developments presented herein. The results are in good agreement with the analytical solutions. The responses obtained with the Integrated Force Method are also compared with those generated by the standard displacement method. In most cases, the performance of the Integrated Force Method is better overall.

  19. Internal Shock Interactions in Propulsion/Airframe Integrated Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and design requirements of propulsion/airframe integration for high Mach number flight have led to extensive study of the three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet in recent years. Recent research publications have indicated testing over a broad range of Mach number (2 to 18) in a variety of test gases, such as air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane. Multiple experimental techniques have been employed to obtain detailed internal shock interaction data, performance data, and inlet starting limits. Computational fluid dynamics has been effectively used for preliminary parametric studies as well as in parallel with experiments to aid in the explanation of unusual or unexpected flow phenomena. Inlets of this genre afford a relatively simple, generic geometry while producing a highly complex, three-dimensional flow field dominated by shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions. While the importance of the viscous effects in high speed inlet interactions is recognized, the present work addresses in a parametric fashion the inviscid effects of leading edge sweep, sidewall compression, and inflow Mach number on the internal shock structure in terms of inlet compression and mass capture. In the process, the source of the of the Mach number invariance with leading edge sweep for a constant sidewall compression class of inlet is identified, and a previously undocumented spillage phenomenon in a constant effective wedge angle class of inlets is discussed.

  20. Three-Dimensional Integration of Graphene via Swelling, Shrinking, and Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghyun; Kim, Hoe Joon; Wang, Michael Cai; Leem, Juyoung; King, William P; Nam, SungWoo

    2015-07-08

    The transfer of graphene from its growth substrate to a target substrate has been widely investigated for its decisive role in subsequent device integration and performance. Thus far, various reported methods of graphene transfer have been mostly limited to planar or curvilinear surfaces due to the challenges associated with fractures from local stress during transfer onto three-dimensional (3D) microstructured surfaces. Here, we report a robust approach to integrate graphene onto 3D microstructured surfaces while maintaining the structural integrity of graphene, where the out-of-plane dimensions of the 3D features vary from 3.5 to 50 μm. We utilized three sequential steps: (1) substrate swelling, (2) shrinking, and (3) adaptation, in order to achieve damage-free, large area integration of graphene on 3D microstructures. Detailed scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurement studies show that the amount of substrate swelling as well as the flexural rigidities of the transfer film affect the integration yield and quality of the integrated graphene. We also demonstrate the versatility of our approach by extension to a variety of 3D microstructured geometries. Lastly, we show the integration of hybrid structures of graphene decorated with gold nanoparticles onto 3D microstructure substrates, demonstrating the compatibility of our integration method with other hybrid nanomaterials. We believe that the versatile, damage-free integration method based on swelling, shrinking, and adaptation will pave the way for 3D integration of two-dimensional (2D) materials and expand potential applications of graphene and 2D materials in the future.

  1. Integrated three-dimensional digital assessment of accuracy of anterior tooth movement using clear aligners

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Juan; He, Li; Tian, Jie; Bai, Yu-Xing; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy of anterior tooth movement using clear aligners in integrated three-dimensional digital models. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography was performed before and after treatment with clear aligners in 32 patients. Plaster casts were laser-scanned for virtual setup and aligner fabrication. Differences in predicted and achieved root and crown positions of anterior teeth were compared on superimposed maxillofacial digital images and virtual models and analyzed by Student's t-test. Results The mean discrepancies in maxillary and mandibular crown positions were 0.376 ± 0.041 mm and 0.398 ± 0.037 mm, respectively. Maxillary and mandibular root positions differed by 2.062 ± 0.128 mm and 1.941 ± 0.154 mm, respectively. Conclusions Crowns but not roots of anterior teeth can be moved to designated positions using clear aligners, because these appliances cause tooth movement by tilting motion. PMID:26629473

  2. Flat-panel see-through three-dimensional display based on integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes a technique to construct a flat-panel see-through three-dimensional (3D) display based on integral imaging. This display consists of multiple lens arrays, a transparent flat-panel display, and a light-blocking wall (LBW). Rays behind the display are reconstructed in front of it by combination of the lens arrays and the LBW to provide the see-through function. The combination of one of the lens arrays and the transparent flat-panel display produces full-parallax 3D images, which are superimposed on background images. The experimental system is constructed to verify the proposed technique. The see-through and superposition capabilities of the experimental system are demonstrated.

  3. Integrable Boundary for Quad-Graph Systems: Three-Dimensional Boundary Consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudrelier, Vincent; Crampé, Nicolas; Zhang, Qi Cheng

    2014-02-01

    We propose the notion of integrable boundary in the context of discrete integrable systems on quad-graphs. The equation characterizing the boundary must satisfy a compatibility equation with the one characterizing the bulk that we called the three-dimensional (3D) boundary consistency. In comparison to the usual 3D consistency condition which is linked to a cube, our 3D boundary consistency condition lives on a half of a rhombic dodecahedron. The We provide a list of integrable boundaries associated to each quad-graph equation of the classification obtained by Adler, Bobenko and Suris. Then, the use of the term ''integrable boundary'' is justified by the facts that there are Bäcklund transformations and a zero curvature representation for systems with boundary satisfying our condition. We discuss the three-leg form of boundary equations, obtain associated discrete Toda-type models with boundary and recover previous results as particular cases. Finally, the connection between the 3D boundary consistency and the set-theoretical reflection equation is established.

  4. Three-dimensional electro-floating display system using an integral imaging method.

    PubMed

    Min, Sung-Wook; Hahn, Minsoo; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-06-13

    A new-type of three-dimensional (3D) display system based on two different techniques, image floating and integral imaging, is proposed. The image floating is an antiquated 3D display technique, in which a large convex lens or a concave mirror is used to display the image of a real object to observer. The electro-floating system, which does not use a real object, requires a volumetric display part in order to present 3D moving pictures. Integral imaging is an autostereoscopic technique consisting of a lens array and a two-dimensional display device. The integral imaging method can be adapted for use in an electro-floating display system because the integrated image has volumetric characteristics within the viewing angle. The proposed system combines the merits of the two techniques such as an impressive feel of depth and the facility to assemble. In this paper, the viewing characteristics of the two techniques are defined and analyzed for the optimal design of the proposed system. The basic experiments for assembling the proposed system were performed and the results are presented. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D television.

  5. Monolithically integrated self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical coupler for three-dimensional photonic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Arbabi, Ehsan; Goddard, Lynford L.; Li, Xiuling; Chen, Xiaogang

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical photonic coupler monolithically integrated on top of a ridge waveguide to achieve three-dimensional (3D) photonic integration. The fabrication process is fully compatible with standard planar silicon processing technology. Strong light coupling between the vertical coupler and the ridge waveguide was observed experimentally, which may provide an alternative route for 3D heterogeneous photonic integration. The highest extinction ratio observed in the transmission spectrum passing through the ridge waveguide was 23 dB.

  6. Monolithically integrated self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical coupler for three-dimensional photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xin; Arbabi, Ehsan; Goddard, Lynford L.; Li, Xiuling; Chen, Xiaogang

    2015-07-20

    We demonstrate a self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical photonic coupler monolithically integrated on top of a ridge waveguide to achieve three-dimensional (3D) photonic integration. The fabrication process is fully compatible with standard planar silicon processing technology. Strong light coupling between the vertical coupler and the ridge waveguide was observed experimentally, which may provide an alternative route for 3D heterogeneous photonic integration. The highest extinction ratio observed in the transmission spectrum passing through the ridge waveguide was 23 dB.

  7. An Integrative Platform for Three-dimensional Quantitative Analysis of Spatially Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Guldner, Ian H; Yang, Lin; Cowdrick, Kyle R; Wang, Qingfei; Alvarez Barrios, Wendy V; Zellmer, Victoria R; Zhang, Yizhe; Host, Misha; Liu, Fang; Chen, Danny Z; Zhang, Siyuan

    2016-04-12

    Metastatic microenvironments are spatially and compositionally heterogeneous. This seemingly stochastic heterogeneity provides researchers great challenges in elucidating factors that determine metastatic outgrowth. Herein, we develop and implement an integrative platform that will enable researchers to obtain novel insights from intricate metastatic landscapes. Our two-segment platform begins with whole tissue clearing, staining, and imaging to globally delineate metastatic landscape heterogeneity with spatial and molecular resolution. The second segment of our platform applies our custom-developed SMART 3D (Spatial filtering-based background removal and Multi-chAnnel forest classifiers-based 3D ReconsTruction), a multi-faceted image analysis pipeline, permitting quantitative interrogation of functional implications of heterogeneous metastatic landscape constituents, from subcellular features to multicellular structures, within our large three-dimensional (3D) image datasets. Coupling whole tissue imaging of brain metastasis animal models with SMART 3D, we demonstrate the capability of our integrative pipeline to reveal and quantify volumetric and spatial aspects of brain metastasis landscapes, including diverse tumor morphology, heterogeneous proliferative indices, metastasis-associated astrogliosis, and vasculature spatial distribution. Collectively, our study demonstrates the utility of our novel integrative platform to reveal and quantify the global spatial and volumetric characteristics of the 3D metastatic landscape with unparalleled accuracy, opening new opportunities for unbiased investigation of novel biological phenomena in situ.

  8. An Integrative Platform for Three-dimensional Quantitative Analysis of Spatially Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldner, Ian H.; Yang, Lin; Cowdrick, Kyle R.; Wang, Qingfei; Alvarez Barrios, Wendy V.; Zellmer, Victoria R.; Zhang, Yizhe; Host, Misha; Liu, Fang; Chen, Danny Z.; Zhang, Siyuan

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic microenvironments are spatially and compositionally heterogeneous. This seemingly stochastic heterogeneity provides researchers great challenges in elucidating factors that determine metastatic outgrowth. Herein, we develop and implement an integrative platform that will enable researchers to obtain novel insights from intricate metastatic landscapes. Our two-segment platform begins with whole tissue clearing, staining, and imaging to globally delineate metastatic landscape heterogeneity with spatial and molecular resolution. The second segment of our platform applies our custom-developed SMART 3D (Spatial filtering-based background removal and Multi-chAnnel forest classifiers-based 3D ReconsTruction), a multi-faceted image analysis pipeline, permitting quantitative interrogation of functional implications of heterogeneous metastatic landscape constituents, from subcellular features to multicellular structures, within our large three-dimensional (3D) image datasets. Coupling whole tissue imaging of brain metastasis animal models with SMART 3D, we demonstrate the capability of our integrative pipeline to reveal and quantify volumetric and spatial aspects of brain metastasis landscapes, including diverse tumor morphology, heterogeneous proliferative indices, metastasis-associated astrogliosis, and vasculature spatial distribution. Collectively, our study demonstrates the utility of our novel integrative platform to reveal and quantify the global spatial and volumetric characteristics of the 3D metastatic landscape with unparalleled accuracy, opening new opportunities for unbiased investigation of novel biological phenomena in situ.

  9. An Integrative Platform for Three-dimensional Quantitative Analysis of Spatially Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Guldner, Ian H.; Yang, Lin; Cowdrick, Kyle R.; Wang, Qingfei; Alvarez Barrios, Wendy V.; Zellmer, Victoria R.; Zhang, Yizhe; Host, Misha; Liu, Fang; Chen, Danny Z.; Zhang, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic microenvironments are spatially and compositionally heterogeneous. This seemingly stochastic heterogeneity provides researchers great challenges in elucidating factors that determine metastatic outgrowth. Herein, we develop and implement an integrative platform that will enable researchers to obtain novel insights from intricate metastatic landscapes. Our two-segment platform begins with whole tissue clearing, staining, and imaging to globally delineate metastatic landscape heterogeneity with spatial and molecular resolution. The second segment of our platform applies our custom-developed SMART 3D (Spatial filtering-based background removal and Multi-chAnnel forest classifiers-based 3D ReconsTruction), a multi-faceted image analysis pipeline, permitting quantitative interrogation of functional implications of heterogeneous metastatic landscape constituents, from subcellular features to multicellular structures, within our large three-dimensional (3D) image datasets. Coupling whole tissue imaging of brain metastasis animal models with SMART 3D, we demonstrate the capability of our integrative pipeline to reveal and quantify volumetric and spatial aspects of brain metastasis landscapes, including diverse tumor morphology, heterogeneous proliferative indices, metastasis-associated astrogliosis, and vasculature spatial distribution. Collectively, our study demonstrates the utility of our novel integrative platform to reveal and quantify the global spatial and volumetric characteristics of the 3D metastatic landscape with unparalleled accuracy, opening new opportunities for unbiased investigation of novel biological phenomena in situ. PMID:27068335

  10. Information content per photon versus image fidelity in three-dimensional photon-counting integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Majeed M; Narravula, Srikanth; Pepin, Matthew; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-10-01

    Photon-counting integral imaging has been introduced recently, and its applications in three-dimensional (3D) object sensing, visualization, recognition, and classification under photon-starved conditions have been demonstrated. This paper sheds light on the underlying information-theoretic foundation behind the ability of photon-counting integral imaging in performing complex tasks with far fewer photons than conventional imaging systems. A metric for photon-information content is formulated in the context of 3D photon-counting imaging, and its properties are investigated. It is shown that there is an inherent trade-off between imaging fidelity, measured by the entropy-normalized mutual information associated with a given imaging system, and the amount of information in each photon used in the imaging process, as represented by the photon-number-normalized mutual information. The dependence of this trade-off on photon statistics, correlation in the 3D image, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the photon-detection system is also investigated.

  11. A facile method for integrating direct-write devices into three-dimensional printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yung-Hang; Wang, Kan; Wu, Changsheng; Chen, Yiwen; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2015-06-01

    Integrating direct-write (DW) devices into three-dimensional (3D) printed parts is key to continuing innovation in engineering applications such as smart material systems and structural health monitoring. However, this integration is challenging because: (1) most 3D printing techniques leave rough or porous surfaces if they are untreated; (2) the thermal sintering process required for most conductive inks could degrade the polymeric materials of 3D printed parts; and (3) the extensive pause needed for the DW process during layer-by-layer fabrication may cause weaker interlayer bonding and create structural weak points. These challenges are rather common during the insertion of conductive patterns inside 3D printed structures. As an avoidance tactic, we developed a simple ‘print-stick-peel’ method to transfer the DW device from the polytetrafluoroethylene or perfluoroalkoxy alkanes film onto any layer of a 3D printed object. This transfer can be achieved using the self-adhesion of 3D printing materials or applying additional adhesive. We demonstrated this method by transferring Aerosol Jet® printed strain sensors into parts fabricated by PolyJet™ printing. This report provides an investigation and discussion on the sensitivity, reliability, and influence embedding the sensor has on mechanical properties.

  12. Real-time in situ three-dimensional integral videography and surgical navigation using augmented reality: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Hoang Tran, Huy; Liao, Hongen; Masamune, Ken; Dohi, Takeyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a three-dimensional augmented reality system incorporating integral videography for imaging oral and maxillofacial regions, based on preoperative computed tomography data. Three-dimensional surface models of the jawbones, based on the computed tomography data, were used to create the integral videography images of a subject's maxillofacial area. The three-dimensional augmented reality system (integral videography display, computed tomography, a position tracker and a computer) was used to generate a three-dimensional overlay that was projected on the surgical site via a half-silvered mirror. Thereafter, a feasibility study was performed on a volunteer. The accuracy of this system was verified on a solid model while simulating bone resection. Positional registration was attained by identifying and tracking the patient/surgical instrument's position. Thus, integral videography images of jawbones, teeth and the surgical tool were superimposed in the correct position. Stereoscopic images viewed from various angles were accurately displayed. Change in the viewing angle did not negatively affect the surgeon's ability to simultaneously observe the three-dimensional images and the patient, without special glasses. The difference in three-dimensional position of each measuring point on the solid model and augmented reality navigation was almost negligible (<1 mm); this indicates that the system was highly accurate. This augmented reality system was highly accurate and effective for surgical navigation and for overlaying a three-dimensional computed tomography image on a patient's surgical area, enabling the surgeon to understand the positional relationship between the preoperative image and the actual surgical site, with the naked eye. PMID:23703710

  13. Real-time in situ three-dimensional integral videography and surgical navigation using augmented reality: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Hoang Tran, Huy; Liao, Hongen; Masamune, Ken; Dohi, Takeyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a three-dimensional augmented reality system incorporating integral videography for imaging oral and maxillofacial regions, based on preoperative computed tomography data. Three-dimensional surface models of the jawbones, based on the computed tomography data, were used to create the integral videography images of a subject's maxillofacial area. The three-dimensional augmented reality system (integral videography display, computed tomography, a position tracker and a computer) was used to generate a three-dimensional overlay that was projected on the surgical site via a half-silvered mirror. Thereafter, a feasibility study was performed on a volunteer. The accuracy of this system was verified on a solid model while simulating bone resection. Positional registration was attained by identifying and tracking the patient/surgical instrument's position. Thus, integral videography images of jawbones, teeth and the surgical tool were superimposed in the correct position. Stereoscopic images viewed from various angles were accurately displayed. Change in the viewing angle did not negatively affect the surgeon's ability to simultaneously observe the three-dimensional images and the patient, without special glasses. The difference in three-dimensional position of each measuring point on the solid model and augmented reality navigation was almost negligible (<1 mm); this indicates that the system was highly accurate. This augmented reality system was highly accurate and effective for surgical navigation and for overlaying a three-dimensional computed tomography image on a patient's surgical area, enabling the surgeon to understand the positional relationship between the preoperative image and the actual surgical site, with the naked eye.

  14. Comparing precorrected-FFT and fast multipole algorithms for solving three-dimensional potential integral equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.; Phillips, J.R.; Korsmeyer, T.

    1994-12-31

    Mixed first- and second-kind surface integral equations with (1/r) and {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative} (1/r) kernels are generated by a variety of three-dimensional engineering problems. For such problems, Nystroem type algorithms can not be used directly, but an expansion for the unknown, rather than for the entire integrand, can be assumed and the product of the singular kernal and the unknown integrated analytically. Combining such an approach with a Galerkin or collocation scheme for computing the expansion coefficients is a general approach, but generates dense matrix problems. Recently developed fast algorithms for solving these dense matrix problems have been based on multipole-accelerated iterative methods, in which the fast multipole algorithm is used to rapidly compute the matrix-vector products in a Krylov-subspace based iterative method. Another approach to rapidly computing the dense matrix-vector products associated with discretized integral equations follows more along the lines of a multigrid algorithm, and involves projecting the surface unknowns onto a regular grid, then computing using the grid, and finally interpolating the results from the regular grid back to the surfaces. Here, the authors describe a precorrectted-FFT approach which can replace the fast multipole algorithm for accelerating the dense matrix-vector product associated with discretized potential integral equations. The precorrected-FFT method, described below, is an order n log(n) algorithm, and is asymptotically slower than the order n fast multipole algorithm. However, initial experimental results indicate the method may have a significant constant factor advantage for a variety of engineering problems.

  15. Integration of hollow fiber membranes improves nutrient supply in three-dimensional tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Bettahalli, N M S; Vicente, J; Moroni, L; Higuera, G A; van Blitterswijk, C A; Wessling, M; Stamatialis, D F

    2011-09-01

    Sufficient nutrient and oxygen transport is a potent modulator of cell proliferation in in vitro tissue-engineered constructs. The lack of oxygen and culture medium can create a potentially lethal environment and limit cellular metabolic activity and growth. Diffusion through scaffold and multi-cellular tissue typically limits transport in vitro, leading to potential hypoxic regions and reduction in the viable tissue thickness. For the in vitro generation of clinically relevant tissue-engineered grafts, current nutrient diffusion limitations should be addressed. Major approaches to overcoming these include culture with bioreactors, scaffolds with artificial microvasculature, oxygen carriers and pre-vascularization of the engineered tissues. This study focuses on the development and utilization of a new perfusion culture system to provide adequate nutrient delivery to cells within large three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Perfusion of oxygenated culture medium through porous hollow fiber (HF) integrated within 3D free form fabricated (FFF) scaffolds is proposed. Mouse pre-myoblast (C2C12) cells cultured on scaffolds of poly(ethylene-oxide-terephthalate)-poly(butylene-terephthalate) block copolymer (300PEOT55PBT45) integrated with porous HF membranes of modified poly(ether-sulfone) (mPES, Gambro GmbH) is used as a model system. Various parameters such as fiber transport properties, fiber spacing within a scaffold and medium flow conditions are optimized. The results show that four HF membranes integrated with the scaffold significantly improve the cell density and cell distribution. This study provides a basis for the development of a new HF perfusion culture methodology to overcome the limitations of nutrient diffusion in the culture of large 3D tissue constructs.

  16. Encrypting three-dimensional information system based on integral imaging and multiple chaotic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yan; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Xiong, Zhao-Long; Deng, Huan

    2016-02-01

    An encrypting three-dimensional (3-D) information system based on integral imaging (II) and multiple chaotic maps is proposed. In the encrypting process, the elemental image array (EIA) which represents spatial and angular information of the real 3-D scene is picked up by a microlens array. Subsequently, R, G, and B color components decomposed by the EIA are encrypted using multiple chaotic maps. Finally, these three encrypted components are interwoven to obtain the cipher information. The decryption process implements the reverse operation of the encryption process for retrieving the high-quality 3-D images. Since the encrypted EIA has the data redundancy property due to II, and all parameters of the pickup part are the secret keys of the encrypting system, the system sensitivity on the changes of the plaintext and secret keys can be significantly improved. Moreover, the algorithm based on multiple chaotic maps can effectively enhance the security. A preliminary experiment is carried out, and the experimental results verify the effectiveness, robustness, and security of the proposed system.

  17. Quantum walks in synthetic gauge fields with three-dimensional integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boada, Octavi; Novo, Leonardo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Omar, Yasser

    2017-01-01

    There is great interest in designing photonic devices capable of disorder-resistant transport and information processing. In this work we propose to exploit three-dimensional integrated photonic circuits in order to realize two-dimensional discrete-time quantum walks in a background synthetic gauge field. The gauge fields are generated by introducing the appropriate phase shifts between waveguides. Polarization-independent phase shifts lead to an Abelian or magnetic field, a case we describe in detail. We find that, in the disordered case, the magnetic field enhances transport due to the presence of topologically protected chiral edge states that do not localize. Polarization-dependent phase shifts lead to effective non-Abelian gauge fields, which could be adopted to realize Rashba-like quantum walks with spin-orbit coupling. Our work introduces a flexible platform for the experimental study of multiparticle quantum walks in the presence of synthetic gauge fields, which paves the way towards topologically robust transport of many-body states of photons.

  18. Three-dimensional integrated microfluidic architectures enabled through electrically switchable nanocapillary array membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gatimu, E. N.; King, T. L.; Sweedler, J. V.; Bohn, P. W.

    2007-01-01

    The extension of microfluidic devices to three dimensions requires innovative methods to interface fluidic layers. Externally controllable interconnects employing nanocapillary array membranes (NCAMs) have been exploited to produce hybrid three-dimensional fluidic architectures capable of performing linked sequential chemical manipulations of great power and utility. Because the solution Debye length, κ−1, is of the order of the channel diameter, a, in the nanopores, fluidic transfer is controlled through applied bias, polarity and density of the immobile nanopore surface charge, solution ionic strength and the impedance of the nanopore relative to the microfluidic channels. Analyte transport between vertically separated microchannels can be saturated at two stable transfer levels, corresponding to reverse and forward bias. These NCAM-mediated integrated microfluidic architectures have been used to achieve highly reproducible and tunable injections down to attoliter volumes, sample stacking for preconcentration, preparative analyte band collection from an electrophoretic separation, and an actively-tunable size-dependent transport in hybrid structures with grafted polymers displaying thermally-regulated swelling behavior. The synthetic elaboration of the nanopore interior has also been used to great effect to realize molecular separations of high efficiency. All of these manipulations depend critically on the transport properties of individual nanocapillaries, and the study of transport in single nanopores has recently attracted significant attention. Both computation and experimental studies have utilized single nanopores as test beds to understand the fundamental chemical and physical properties of chemistry and fluid flow at nanometer length scales. PMID:19693375

  19. Mechanisms of Methylene Blue Degradation in Three-dimensionally Integrated Micro-solution Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ayano; Hayashi, Yui; Tanaka, Kenji; Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2015-09-01

    Plasma in aqueous solution has attracted much attention because they are expected to have possibilities to solve water-related environmental issues. In such application-oriented researches, degradation of methylene blue (MB) or other organic dyes has been widely used for investigating the effects of the plasma treatment on the water with organic contaminants. However, there are few reports on the detailed analysis of the products after the plasma treatment of MB aqueous solution for understanding mechanisms of the degradation processes. We have hence analyzed our degradation products using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. We have performed the MB degradation in three-dimensionally integrated micro-solution plasma, which has shown 16-fold higher performance in MB degradation than conventional solution plasma. The results of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry have indicated the formation of sulfoxides in the first stage of the degradation. Then, the methyl groups on the sulfoxides are partially oxidized. The sulfoxides are separated to form two benzene derivatives after that. Finally, weak functional groups are removed from the benzene derivatives.

  20. Experimental analysis and numerical modeling of mollusk shells as a three dimensional integrated volume.

    PubMed

    Faghih Shojaei, M; Mohammadi, V; Rajabi, H; Darvizeh, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new numerical technique is presented to accurately model the geometrical and mechanical features of mollusk shells as a three dimensional (3D) integrated volume. For this purpose, the Newton method is used to solve the nonlinear equations of shell surfaces. The points of intersection on the shell surface are identified and the extra interior parts are removed. Meshing process is accomplished with respect to the coordinate of each point of intersection. The final 3D generated mesh models perfectly describe the spatial configuration of the mollusk shells. Moreover, the computational model perfectly matches with the actual interior geometry of the shells as well as their exterior architecture. The direct generation technique is employed to generate a 3D finite element (FE) model in ANSYS 11. X-ray images are taken to show the close similarity of the interior geometry of the models and the actual samples. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to provide information on the microstructure of the shells. In addition, a set of compression tests were performed on gastropod shell specimens to obtain their ultimate compressive strength. A close agreement between experimental data and the relevant numerical results is demonstrated.

  1. Three-dimensional integration (3DI) of semiconductor circuit layers: New devices and fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehari, Babak E.

    1998-12-01

    The device density of Integrated Circuits (ICs) manufactured by current VLSI technology is reaching its theoretical limit. Nevertheless, the demand for integration of more devices per chip is growing. To accommodate this need three main possibilities can be explored: Wafer Scale Integration (WSI), Ultra Large Scale Integration (ULSI), and Three Dimensional Integration (3DI). A brief review of these techniques along with their comparative advantages and disadvantages is presented. It has been concluded that 3DI technology is superior to others. Therefore, an attempt is made to develop a viable fabrication process for this technology. This is done by first reviewing the current technologies that are utilized for fabrication of Integrated Circuits (ICs) and their compatibility with 3DI stringent requirements. Based on this review, a set of fabrication procedure for realization of 3DI technology, are presented in chapter 3. In Chapter 1 the compatibility of the currently used devices, such as BJTs and FETs, with 3DI technology is examined. Moreover, a new active device is developed for 3DI technology to replace BJTs and FETs in circuits. This new device is more compatible to the constrains of 3DI technology. Chapter 2 is devoted to solving the overall problems of 3DI circuits. The problem of heat and power dispassion and signal coupling (Cross-Talk) between the layers are reviewed, and an inter-layer shield is proposed to overcome these problems. The effectiveness of such a thin shield is considered theoretically. In Chapter 3 a fabrication process for 3DI technology is proposed. This is done after a short analysis of previous attempts in developing 3DI technologies. Chapter 4 focuses on analog extension of 3DI technology. Moreover, in this chapter microwave 3DI circuits or 3DI MMIC is investigated. Practical considerations in choice of material for the proposed device is the subject of study in Chapter 5. Low temperature ohmic contact and utilization of metal

  2. Integration of photonic nanojets and semiconductor nanoparticles for enhanced all-optical switching

    PubMed Central

    Born, Brandon; Krupa, Jeffrey D. A.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    All-optical switching is the foundation of emerging all-optical (terabit-per-second) networks and processors. All-optical switching has attracted considerable attention, but it must ultimately support operation with femtojoule switching energies and femtosecond switching times to be effective. Here we introduce an all-optical switch architecture in the form of a dielectric sphere that focuses a high-intensity photonic nanojet into a peripheral coating of semiconductor nanoparticles. Milli-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 200 and 100 fJ with switching times of 10 ps and 350 fs, respectively. Micro-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 1 pJ and 20 fJ with switching times of 2 ps and 270 fs, respectively. We show that femtojoule switching energies are enabled by localized photoinjection from the photonic nanojets and that femtosecond switching times are enabled by localized recombination within the semiconductor nanoparticles. PMID:26314911

  3. Integration of photonic nanojets and semiconductor nanoparticles for enhanced all-optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Brandon; Krupa, Jeffrey D. A.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-08-01

    All-optical switching is the foundation of emerging all-optical (terabit-per-second) networks and processors. All-optical switching has attracted considerable attention, but it must ultimately support operation with femtojoule switching energies and femtosecond switching times to be effective. Here we introduce an all-optical switch architecture in the form of a dielectric sphere that focuses a high-intensity photonic nanojet into a peripheral coating of semiconductor nanoparticles. Milli-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 200 and 100 fJ with switching times of 10 ps and 350 fs, respectively. Micro-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 1 pJ and 20 fJ with switching times of 2 ps and 270 fs, respectively. We show that femtojoule switching energies are enabled by localized photoinjection from the photonic nanojets and that femtosecond switching times are enabled by localized recombination within the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  4. Integration of photonic nanojets and semiconductor nanoparticles for enhanced all-optical switching.

    PubMed

    Born, Brandon; Krupa, Jeffrey D A; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Holzman, Jonathan F

    2015-08-28

    All-optical switching is the foundation of emerging all-optical (terabit-per-second) networks and processors. All-optical switching has attracted considerable attention, but it must ultimately support operation with femtojoule switching energies and femtosecond switching times to be effective. Here we introduce an all-optical switch architecture in the form of a dielectric sphere that focuses a high-intensity photonic nanojet into a peripheral coating of semiconductor nanoparticles. Milli-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 200 and 100 fJ with switching times of 10 ps and 350 fs, respectively. Micro-scale spheres coated with Si and SiC nanoparticles yield switching energies of 1 pJ and 20 fJ with switching times of 2 ps and 270 fs, respectively. We show that femtojoule switching energies are enabled by localized photoinjection from the photonic nanojets and that femtosecond switching times are enabled by localized recombination within the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  5. Three-dimensional modeling of Mount Vesuvius with sequential integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, Rosaria; de Franco, Roberto

    2003-05-01

    A new image of Mount Vesuvius and the surrounding area is recovered from the tomographic inversion of 693 first P wave arrivals recorded by 314 receivers deployed along five profiles which intersect the crater, and gravity data collected in 17,598 stations on land and offshore. The final three-dimensional (3-D) velocity model presented here is determined by interpolation of five 2-D velocity sections obtained from sequential integrated inversion (SII) of seismic and gravity data. The inversion procedure adopts the "maximum likelihood" scheme in order to jointly optimize seismic velocities and densities. In this way we recover velocity and density models both consistent with seismic and gravity data information. The model parameterization of these 2-D models is chosen in order to keep the diagonal elements of the seismic resolution matrix in the order of 0.2-0.8. The highest values of resolution are detected under the volcano edifice. The imaged 6-km-thick crustal volume underlies a 25 × 45 km2 area. The interpolation is performed by choosing the right grid for a smoothing algorithm which prepares optimum models for asymptotic ray theory methods. Hence this model can be used as a reference model for a 3-D tomographic inversion of seismic data. The 3-D gravity modeling is straightforward. The results of this study clearly image the continuous structure of the Mesozoic carbonate basement top and the connection of the volcano conduit structure to two shallow depressions, which in terms of hazard prevention are the regions through which magma may more easily flow toward the surface and cause possible eruptions.

  6. New cases of integrable systems with dissipation on tangent bundles of two- and three-dimensional spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamolin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Integrability in elementary functions is demonstrated for some classes of dynamic systems on tangent bundles of two- and three-dimensional spheres. The force fields possess the so-called variable dissipation with a zero mean and generalize those considered earlier.

  7. Three Dimensional, Integrated Characterization and Archival System for Remote Facility Contaminant Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Gallman, P.; Jarvis, G.; Griffiths, P.

    1999-04-25

    The largest problem facing the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) is the cleanup of the Cold War legacy nuclear production plants that were built and operated from the mid-forties through the late eighties. EM is now responsible for the remediation of no less than 353 projects at 53 sites across the country at, an estimated cost of $147 billion over the next 72 years. One of the keys to accomplishing a thorough cleanup of any site is a rigorous but quick contaminant characterization capability. If the contaminants present in a facility can be mapped accurately, the cleanup can proceed with surgical precision, using appropriate techniques for each contaminant type and location. The three dimensional, integrated characterization and archival system (3D-ICAS) was developed for the purpose of rapid, field level identification, mapping, and archiving of contaminant data. The system consists of three subsystems, an integrated work and operating station, a 3-D coherent laser radar, and a contaminant analysis unit. Target contaminants that can be identified include chemical (currently organic only), radiological, and base materials (asbestos). In operation, two steps are required. First, the remotely operable 3-D laser radar maps an area of interest in the spatial domain. Second, the remotely operable contaminant analysis unit maps the area of interest in the chemical, radiological, and base material domains. The resultant information is formatted for display and archived using an integrated workstation. A 3-D model of the merged spatial and contaminant domains cart be displayed along with a color-coded contaminant tag at each analysis point. In addition, all of the supporting detailed data are archived for subsequent QC checks. The 3D-ICAS system is capable of performing all contaminant characterization in a dwell time of 6 seconds. The radiological and chemical sensors operate at US Environmental Protection Agency regulatory levels. Base

  8. Integration of Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography in Radiosurgical Treatment Planning of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, Alfredo; Pontoriero, Antonio; Farago, Giuseppe; Midili, Federica; Siragusa, Carmelo; Granata, Francesca; Pitrone, Antonio; De Renzis, Costantino; Longo, Marcello; Tomasello, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Accuracy in delineating the target volume is a major issue for successful stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations. The aim of the present study was to describe a method to integrate three-dimensional (3D) rotational angiography ( (3DRA)) into CyberKnife treatment planning and to investigate its potential advantages compared with computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral arteriovenous malformation were included in the present study. All patients underwent multislice computed tomography and 3D-volumetric CTA, (3DRA), and 3D magnetic resonance angiography. The contouring of the target and critical volumes was done separately using CTA and thereafter directly using (3DRA). The composite, conjoint, and disjoint volumes were measured. Results: The use of CTA or (3DRA) resulted in significant differences in the target and critical volumes. The target volume averaged 3.49 {+-} 3.01 mL measured using CTA and 3.26 {+-} 2.93 mL measured using (3DRA), for a difference of 8% (p < .05). The conjoint and disjoint volume analysis showed an 88% volume overlap. The qualitative evaluation showed that the excess volume obtained using CTA was mostly tissue surrounding the nidus and venous structures. The mean contoured venous volume was 0.67 mL measured using CTA and 0.88 mL (range, 0.1-2.7) measured using (3DRA) (p < .05). Conclusions: (3DRA) is a volumetric angiographic study that can be integrated into computer-based treatment planning. Although whether (3DRA) provides superior accuracy has not yet been proved, its high spatial resolution is attractive and offers a superior 3D view. This allows a better 3D understanding of the target volume and distribution of the radiation doses within the volume. Additional technical efforts to improve the temporal resolution and the development of software tools aimed at improving the performance of 3D contouring

  9. THREE DIMENSIONAL INTEGRATED CHARACTERIZATION AND ARCHIVING SYSTEM (3D-ICAS)

    SciTech Connect

    George Jarvis

    2001-06-18

    The overall objective of this project is to develop an integrated system that remotely characterizes, maps, and archives measurement data of hazardous decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) areas. The system will generate a detailed 3-dimensional topography of the area as well as real-time quantitative measurements of volatile organics and radionuclides. The system will analyze substrate materials consisting of concrete, asbestos, and transite. The system will permanently archive the data measurements for regulatory and data integrity documentation. Exposure limits, rest breaks, and donning and removal of protective garments generate waste in the form of contaminated protective garments and equipment. Survey times are increased and handling and transporting potentially hazardous materials incur additional costs. Off-site laboratory analysis is expensive and time-consuming, often necessitating delay of further activities until results are received. The Three Dimensional Integrated Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) has been developed to alleviate some of these problems. 3D-ICAS provides a flexible system for physical, chemical and nuclear measurements reduces costs and improves data quality. Operationally, 3D-ICAS performs real-time determinations of hazardous and toxic contamination. A prototype demonstration unit is available for use in early 2000. The tasks in this Phase included: (1) Mobility Platforms: Integrate hardware onto mobility platforms, upgrade surface sensors, develop unit operations and protocol. (2) System Developments: Evaluate metals detection capability using x-ray fluorescence technology. (3) IWOS Upgrades: Upgrade the IWOS software and hardware for compatibility with mobility platform. The system was modified, tested and debugged during 1999 and 2000. The 3D-ICAS was shipped on 11 May 2001 to FIU-HCET for demonstration and validation of the design modifications. These modifications included simplifying the design from a two

  10. Integrated holographic system for all-optical manipulation of developing embryos

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Antkowiak, Maciej; Cizmarova, Hana; Ferrier, David E. K.; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a system for the combined optical injection and trapping of developing embryos. A Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser in tandem with a spatial light modulator, is used to perform fast and accurate beam-steering and multiplexing. We show successful intracellular delivery of a range of impermeable molecules into individual blastomeres of the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii embryo by optoinjection, even when the embryo is still enclosed in a chorion. We also demonstrate the ability of the femtosecond laser optoinjection to deliver materials into inner layers of cells in a well-developed embryo. By switching to the continuous wave mode of the Ti:sapphire laser, the same system can be employed to optically trap and orient the 60 μm sized P. lamarckii embryo whilst maintaining its viability. Hence, a complete all-optical manipulation platform is demonstrated paving the way towards single-cell genetic modification and cell lineage mapping in emerging developmental biology model species. PMID:21698019

  11. A finite element-boundary integral method for scattering and radiation by two- and three-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.; Collins, Jeffery D.

    1991-01-01

    A review of a hybrid finite element-boundary integral formulation for scattering and radiation by two- and three-dimensional composite structures is presented. In contrast to other hybrid techniques involving the finite element method, the proposed one is in principle exact and can be implemented using a low O(N) storage. This is of particular importance for large scale applications and is a characteristic of the boundary chosen to terminate the finite element mesh, usually as close to the structure as possible. A certain class of these boundaries lead to convolutional boundary integrals which can be evaluated via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) without a need to generate a matrix; thus, retaining the O(N) storage requirement. The paper begins with a general description of the method. A number of two- and three-dimensional applications are then given, including numerical computations which demonstrate the method's accuracy, efficiency, and capability.

  12. Compact 100Gb/s DP-QPSK integrated receiver module employing three-dimensional assembly technology.

    PubMed

    Tanobe, H; Kurata, Y; Nakanishi, Y; Fukuyama, H; Itoh, M; Yoshida, E

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate a compact 100 Gbit/s DP-QPSK receiver module that is only 18 mm (W) x 16 mm (D) x 2.8 mm (H). The module size is reduced by using a ball grid array (BGA) package with three-dimensional assembly technology and by applying a heterogeneous integrated PLC. Error-free DP-QPSK signal demodulation is successfully demonstrated.

  13. Three-dimensional lattice of Bäcklund transformations of integrable cases of the Davey-Stewartson system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    We construct a three-dimensional octahedral lattice of Bäcklund transformations of integrable cases of the Davey-Stewartson system. At the lattice sites, we arrange functions, which, on one hand, are used to define the dynamical variables of the Davey-Stewartson system and, on the other hand, are connected by bilinear relations of the Hirota type. One of the lattice equations is a purely discrete six-point equation that coincides with the famous Hirota equation.

  14. A metro-access integrated network with all-optical virtual private network function using DPSK/ASK modulation format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yue; Leng, Lufeng; Su, Yikai

    2008-11-01

    All-optical virtual private network (VPN), which offers dedicated optical channels to connect users within a VPN group, is considered a promising approach to efficient internetworking with low latency and enhanced security implemented in the physical layer. On the other hand, time-division multiplexed (TDM) / wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) network architecture based on a feeder-ring with access-tree topology, is considered a pragmatic migration scenario from current TDM-PONs to future WDM-PONs and a potential convergence scheme for access and metropolitan networks, due to its efficiently shared hardware and bandwidth resources. All-optical VPN internetworking in such a metro-access integrated structure is expected to cover a wider service area and therefore is highly desirable. In this paper, we present a TDM/WDM metro-access integrated network supporting all-optical VPN internetworking among ONUs in different sub- PONs based on orthogonal differential-phase-shift keying (DPSK) / amplitude-shift keying (ASK) modulation format. In each ONU, no laser but a single Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) is needed for the upstream and VPN signal generation, which is cost-effective. Experiments and simulations are performed to verify its feasibility as a potential solution to the future access service.

  15. Nanoscale on-chip all-optical logic parity checker in integrated plasmonic circuits in optical communication range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifan; Gong, Zibo; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checker is an essential core component for optical computing systems and ultrahigh-speed ultrawide-band information processing chips. Unfortunately, little experimental progress has been made in development of these devices to date because of material bottleneck limitations and a lack of effective realization mechanisms. Here, we report a simple and efficient strategy for direct realization of nanoscale chip-integrated all-optical logic parity checkers in integrated plasmonic circuits in the optical communication range. The proposed parity checker consists of two-level cascaded exclusive-OR (XOR) logic gates that are realized based on the linear interference of surface plasmon polaritons propagating in the plasmonic waveguides. The parity of the number of logic 1s in the incident four-bit logic signals is determined, and the output signal is given the logic state 0 for even parity (and 1 for odd parity). Compared with previous reports, the overall device feature size is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude, while ultralow energy consumption is maintained. This work raises the possibility of realization of large-scale integrated information processing chips based on integrated plasmonic circuits, and also provides a way to overcome the intrinsic limitations of serious surface plasmon polariton losses for on-chip integration applications. PMID:27073154

  16. Development of three-dimensional integrated microchannel-electrode system to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Obara, H; Sapkota, A; Takei, M

    2016-03-01

    An optical transparent 3-D Integrated Microchannel-Electrode System (3-DIMES) has been developed to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics in the microchannel. In this system, 40 multilayered electrodes are embedded at the 2 opposite sides along the 5 square cross-sections of the microchannel by using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems technology in order to achieve the optical transparency at the other 2 opposite sides. The concept of the 3-DIMES is that the particles are driven by electrokinetic forces which are dielectrophoretic force, thermal buoyancy, electrothermal force, and electroosmotic force in a three-dimensional scope by selecting the excitation multilayered electrodes. As a first step to understand the particles' movement driven by electrokinetic forces in high conductive fluid (phosphate buffer saline (PBS)) with the 3-DIMES, the velocities of particles' movement with one pair of the electrodes are measured three dimensionally by Particle Image Velocimetry technique in PBS; meanwhile, low conductive fluid (deionized water) is used as a reference. Then, the particles' movement driven by the electrokinetic forces is discussed theoretically to estimate dominant forces exerting on the particles. Finally, from the theoretical estimation, the particles' movement mainly results from the dominant forces which are thermal buoyancy and electrothermal force, while the velocity vortex formed at the 2 edges of the electrodes is because of the electroosmotic force. The conclusions suggest that the 3-DIMES with PBS as high conductive fluid helps to understand the three-dimensional advantageous flow structures for cell manipulation in biomedical applications.

  17. Development of three-dimensional integrated microchannel-electrode system to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Obara, H.; Sapkota, A.; Takei, M.

    2016-01-01

    An optical transparent 3-D Integrated Microchannel-Electrode System (3-DIMES) has been developed to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics in the microchannel. In this system, 40 multilayered electrodes are embedded at the 2 opposite sides along the 5 square cross-sections of the microchannel by using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems technology in order to achieve the optical transparency at the other 2 opposite sides. The concept of the 3-DIMES is that the particles are driven by electrokinetic forces which are dielectrophoretic force, thermal buoyancy, electrothermal force, and electroosmotic force in a three-dimensional scope by selecting the excitation multilayered electrodes. As a first step to understand the particles' movement driven by electrokinetic forces in high conductive fluid (phosphate buffer saline (PBS)) with the 3-DIMES, the velocities of particles' movement with one pair of the electrodes are measured three dimensionally by Particle Image Velocimetry technique in PBS; meanwhile, low conductive fluid (deionized water) is used as a reference. Then, the particles' movement driven by the electrokinetic forces is discussed theoretically to estimate dominant forces exerting on the particles. Finally, from the theoretical estimation, the particles' movement mainly results from the dominant forces which are thermal buoyancy and electrothermal force, while the velocity vortex formed at the 2 edges of the electrodes is because of the electroosmotic force. The conclusions suggest that the 3-DIMES with PBS as high conductive fluid helps to understand the three-dimensional advantageous flow structures for cell manipulation in biomedical applications. PMID:27042247

  18. Three dimensional fabrication of optical waveguiding elements for on-chip integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsi Sreenivas, V. V.; Bülters, M.; Schröder, M.; Bergmann, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    We present micro polymer optical waveguide elements fabricated using femtosecond laser and two-photon absorption (TPA) process. The POWs are constructed by tightly focusing a laser beam in SU-8 based resists transparent to the laser wavelength for single-photon absorption. The TPA process enables the patterning of the resist in three dimensions at a resolution of 100-200 nm, which provides a high degree of freedom for POW designs. Using this technology, we provide a novel approach to fabricate Three dimensional Polymer Optical Waveguides (3D-POW) and coupling with single mode fibers in the visible wavelength regions. Our research is also focused on fabricating passive micro optical elements such as splitters, combiners and simple logical gates. For this reason we are aiming to achieve optimum coupling efficiency between the 3D-POW and fibers. The technology also facilitates 3D-POW fabrication independent of the substrate material. We present these fabrication techniques and designs, along with supporting numerical simulations and its transmission properties. With a length of 270 μm and polymer core diameter of 9 μm with air cladding, the waveguides possess a total loss of 12 dB. This value also includes the external in and out mode coupling and in continuously being improved upon by design optimization and simulations. We verify the overall feasibility of the design and coupling mechanisms that can be exploited to execute waveguide based optical functions such as filtering and logical operations.

  19. A Three-Dimensional Simulation Model of Cardiomyocyte Integrating Excitation-Contraction Coupling and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that Ca2+ not only regulates the contraction of cardiomyocytes, but can also function as a signaling agent to stimulate ATP production by the mitochondria. However, the spatiotemporal resolution of current experimental techniques limits our investigative capacity to understand this phenomenon. Here, we created a detailed three-dimensional (3D) cardiomyocyte model to study the subcellular regulatory mechanisms of myocardial energetics. The 3D cardiomyocyte model was based on the finite-element method, with detailed subcellular structures reproduced, and it included all elementary processes involved in cardiomyocyte electrophysiology, contraction, and ATP metabolism localized to specific loci. The simulation results were found to be reproducible and consistent with experimental data regarding the spatiotemporal pattern of cytosolic, intrasarcoplasmic-reticulum, and mitochondrial changes in Ca2+; as well as changes in metabolite levels. Detailed analysis suggested that although the observed large cytosolic Ca2+ gradient facilitated uptake by the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter to produce cyclic changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ near the Z-line region, the average mitochondrial Ca2+ changes slowly. We also confirmed the importance of the creatine phosphate shuttle in cardiac energy regulation. In summary, our 3D model provides a powerful tool for the study of cardiac function by overcoming some of the spatiotemporal limitations of current experimental approaches. PMID:22261047

  20. Efficient Integration of Synaptic Events by NMDA Receptors in Three-Dimensional Neuropil

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kaiyu; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Sustained activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) plays an important role in controlling activity of neural circuits in the brain. However, whether this activation reflects the ambient level of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in brain tissue or whether it depends mainly on local synaptic discharges remains poorly understood. To shed light on the underlying biophysics here we developed and explored a detailed Monte Carlo model of a realistic three-dimensional neuropil fragment containing 54 excitatory synapses. To trace individual molecules and their individual receptor interactions on this scale, we have designed and implemented a dedicated computer cluster and the appropriate software environment. Our simulations have suggested that sparse synaptic discharges are 20–30 times more efficient than nonsynaptic (stationary, leaky) supply of glutamate in controlling sustained NMDAR occupancy in the brain. This mechanism could explain how the brain circuits provide substantial background activation of NMDARs while maintaining a negligible ambient glutamate level in the extracellular space. Thus the background NMDAR occupancy, rather than the background glutamate level, is likely to reflect the ongoing activity in local excitatory networks. PMID:25992724

  1. Comparison of passive ranging integral imaging and active imaging digital holography for three-dimensional object recognition.

    PubMed

    Frauel, Yann; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Matoba, Osamu; Castro, Albertina; Javidi, Bahram

    2004-01-10

    We present an overview of three-dimensional (3D) object recognition techniques that use active sensing by interferometric imaging (digital holography) and passive sensing by integral imaging. We describe how each technique can be used to retrieve the depth information of a 3D scene and how this information can then be used for 3D object recognition. We explore various algorithms for 3D recognition such as nonlinear correlation and target distortion tolerance. We also provide a comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques.

  2. Depth-Enhanced Integral Imaging with a Stepped Lens Array or a Composite Lens Array for Three-Dimensional Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heejin; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Hong, Jisoo; Lee, Byoungho

    2004-08-01

    In spite of the many advantages of integral imaging, the depth of reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) image is limited to around the only one image plane. Here, we propose a novel method for increasing the depth of a reconstructed image using a stepped lens array (SLA) or a composite lens array (CLA). We confirm our idea by fabricating SLA and CLA with two image planes each. By using a SLA or a CLA, it is possible to form the 3D image around several image planes and to increase the depth of the reconstructed 3D image.

  3. Direct laser writing of sub-50 nm nanofluidic channels buried in glass for three-dimensional micro-nanofluidic integration.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang; Cheng, Ya; Liu, Changning; Song, Jiangxin; He, Fei; Shen, Yinglong; Chen, Danping; Xu, Zhizhan; Fan, Zhichao; Wei, Xunbin; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-04-21

    We report on the fabrication of nanofluidic channels directly buried in silicate glass with transverse widths down to less than 50 nm using three-dimensional (3D) femtosecond laser direct writing. Using this technique, integrated micro-nanofluidic systems have been produced by simultaneously writing micro- and nanofluidic channels arranged into various 3D configurations in glass substrates. The fabricated micro- and nanofluidic systems have been used to demonstrate DNA analysis, e.g. stretching of DNA molecules. Our technique offers new opportunities to develop novel 3D micro-nanofluidic systems for a variety of lab-on-a-chip applications.

  4. Generalization of Boundary-Layer Momentum-Integral Equations to Three-Dimensional Flows Including Those of Rotating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Arthur

    1952-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations of motion and the equation of continuity are transformed so as to apply to an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system rotating with a uniform angular velocity about an arbitrary axis in space. A usual simplification of these equations as consistent with the accepted boundary-layer theory and an integration of these equations through the boundary layer result in boundary-layer momentum-integral equations for three-dimensional flows that are applicable to either rotating or nonrotating fluid boundaries. These equations are simplified and an approximate solution in closed integral form is obtained for a generalized boundary-layer momentum-loss thickness and flow deflection at the wall in the turbulent case. A numerical evaluation of this solution carried out for data obtained in a curving nonrotating duct shows a fair quantitative agreement with the measures values. The form in which the equations are presented is readily adaptable to cases of steady, three-dimensional, incompressible boundary-layer flow like that over curved ducts or yawed wings; and it also may be used to describe the boundary-layer flow over various rotating surfaces, thus applying to turbomachinery, propellers, and helicopter blades.

  5. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATIONS: Physical principles of the modeling of three-dimensional microwave and extremely high frequency integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdev, Vasilii I.; Kuzaev, G. A.; Nefedov, E. I.; Yashin, A. A.

    1992-03-01

    The fundamental principles, physical models, and design fundamentals of three-dimensional microwave integrated circuits are presented. The principles of mathematical modeling of transmission lines and basic elements are discussed. The topological approach to the description of the electromagnetic field in the elements of three-dimensional microwave integrated circuits is examined at the electrodynamic level. The structures of the base elements, functional units, and devices for processing signals from pickups as well as the physical and technological aspects of their fabrication based on three-dimensional microwave integrated circuits are examined.

  6. Three-Dimensional Integrated Circuit (3D IC) Key Technology: Through-Silicon Via (TSV).

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Neng

    2017-12-01

    3D integration with through-silicon via (TSV) is a promising candidate to perform system-level integration with smaller package size, higher interconnection density, and better performance. TSV fabrication is the key technology to permit communications between various strata of the 3D integration system. TSV fabrication steps, such as etching, isolation, metallization processes, and related failure modes, as well as other characterizations are discussed in this invited review paper.

  7. Three-Dimensional Integrated Circuit (3D IC) Key Technology: Through-Silicon Via (TSV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wen-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Neng

    2017-01-01

    3D integration with through-silicon via (TSV) is a promising candidate to perform system-level integration with smaller package size, higher interconnection density, and better performance. TSV fabrication is the key technology to permit communications between various strata of the 3D integration system. TSV fabrication steps, such as etching, isolation, metallization processes, and related failure modes, as well as other characterizations are discussed in this invited review paper.

  8. Integration of a three-dimensional process-based hydrological model into the Object Modeling System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integration of a spatial process model into an environmental modelling framework can enhance the model’s capabilities. We present the integration of the GEOtop model into the Object Modeling System (OMS) version 3.0 and illustrate its application in a small watershed. GEOtop is a physically base...

  9. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  10. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  11. A Boundary Integral Approach for Three-Dimensional Underwater Explosion Bubble Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    out based on these equations and a finite difference integration scheme. In their investigation, Plesset and Chapman simulated two specific cases of...type, the Rayleigh - Plesset equation can be integrated, yielding more consistent initial conditions for the internal pressure at a given radius. The...relation discussed in Chahine (1989) is based on the Rayleigh - Plesset equation or spherical bubbles and some empirical data from explosion bubble

  12. Integrating Substrateless Electrospinning with Textile Technology for Creating Biodegradable Three-Dimensional Structures.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2015-08-12

    The present study describes a unique way of integrating substrateless electrospinning process with textile technology. We developed a new collector design that provided a pressure-driven, localized cotton-wool structure in free space from which continuous high strength yarns were drawn. An advantage of this integration was that the textile could be drug/dye loaded and be developed into a core-sheath architecture with greater functionality. This method could produce potential nanotextiles for various biomedical applications.

  13. Solving the hypersingular boundary integral equation in three-dimensional acoustics using a regularization relationship.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zai You; Hung, Kin Chew; Zheng, Hui

    2003-05-01

    Regularization of the hypersingular integral in the normal derivative of the conventional Helmholtz integral equation through a double surface integral method or regularization relationship has been studied. By introducing the new concept of discretized operator matrix, evaluation of the double surface integrals is reduced to calculate the product of two discretized operator matrices. Such a treatment greatly improves the computational efficiency. As the number of frequencies to be computed increases, the computational cost of solving the composite Helmholtz integral equation is comparable to that of solving the conventional Helmholtz integral equation. In this paper, the detailed formulation of the proposed regularization method is presented. The computational efficiency and accuracy of the regularization method are demonstrated for a general class of acoustic radiation and scattering problems. The radiation of a pulsating sphere, an oscillating sphere, and a rigid sphere insonified by a plane acoustic wave are solved using the new method with curvilinear quadrilateral isoparametric elements. It is found that the numerical results rapidly converge to the corresponding analytical solutions as finer meshes are applied.

  14. Three-dimensional display based on integral imaging using light shaping diffusor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yan, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xingpeng; Su, Jian; Gao, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Integral imaging is known as a promising 3D display method for its ability to reconstruct the light field of the scene. However, integral imaging suffers from low spatial resolution and narrow viewing angle due to the limited spatial bandwidth product of LCD, which prevents its commercial application. In conventional integral imaging display, spatial resolution and viewing angle are two vital factors that should be considered, and many previous research focuses on the two factors. A novel integral imaging 3D display system with large viewing angle about 35° and high spatial resolution for HVS is presented. The method is composed of a high definition 5K LCD panel, a macro lens array and a light shaping diffusor. One point of the method different from conventional integral imaging in which micro lens array is used, a macro lens array with elemental lens diameter 1cm is employed in our method to ensure a large viewing angle, however, this may result in low spatial resolution for HVS. And the other point is a light shaping diffusor is placed in front of the lens array with proper distance, and lifelike 3D reconstruction is obtained. Experimental results with full parallax, large viewing angle and high resolution 3D images are shown to verify the validity of the proposed system.

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of chevron-notched specimens by boundary integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Ghosn, L.

    1983-01-01

    The chevron-notched short bar and short rod specimens was analyzed by the boundary integral equations method. This method makes use of boundary surface elements in obtaining the solution. The boundary integral models were composed of linear triangular and rectangular surface segments. Results were obtained for two specimens with width to thickness ratios of 1.45 and 2.00 and for different crack length to width ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Crack opening displacement and stress intensity factors determined from displacement calculations along the crack front and compliance calculations were compared with experimental values and with finite element analysis.

  16. Investigation of all-optical latching operation of a monolithically integrated SOA-MZI with a feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yusuke; Shimizu, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Kohroh; Uenohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-10

    We have investigated an all-optical set/reset and latching operation using a monolithically integrated InP-based semiconductor optical amplifier type Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a feedback loop. In simulation, operation conditions when both set and reset are possible was estimated for input light pulse with a FWHM of 31 and 12.5 ps, and the tolerance of the CW probe light and feedback loop loss becomes large with increasing the input light pulse power. In addition, the loop length could be longer than the distance of the light propagating in one bit pulse because of the longer carrier recovery time than one bit time duration. Moreover, we successfully achieved set/reset operation with 34- and 18-ps wide set/reset pulses.

  17. Bi-directional two-dimensional/three-dimensional convertible integral imaging using scattering polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Jiwoon; Hong, Jisoo; Park, Soon-gi; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2012-10-01

    A bi-directional 2D/3D convertible integral imaging system is proposed. Two optical modules composed of a scattering polarizer and a linear polarizer are adopted, and 2D or 3D mode operation is easily changed by converting polarization states of the projected images. In the 2D mode, the incident light is scattered at the scattering polarizer and the scattered light facing the lens-array is blocked, a 2D image is observable only at the same side as the projector. In the 3D mode, the incident light with the transmission polarization is directly projected onto a lens-array, and the 3D images are integrated. Our proposed system is able to display the 3D images as well as the 2D images for the observers who are placed in front and rear side of the system.

  18. Steady and unsteady three-dimensional transonic flow computations by integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hong

    1994-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the research performed under the grant: NAG1-1170, from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The report consists of three parts. The first part presents the work on unsteady flows around a zero-thickness wing. The second part presents the work on steady flows around non-zero thickness wings. The third part presents the massively parallel processing implementation and performance analysis of integral equation computations. At the end of the report, publications resulting from this grant are listed and attached.

  19. Integration of remote sensing based surface information into a three-dimensional microclimate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldens, Wieke; Heiden, Uta; Esch, Thomas; Mueller, Andreas; Dech, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Climate change urges cities to consider the urban climate as part of sustainable planning. Urban microclimate models can provide knowledge on the climate at building block level. However, very detailed information on the area of interest is required. Most microclimate studies therefore make use of assumptions and generalizations to describe the model area. Remote sensing data with area wide coverage provides a means to derive many parameters at the detailed spatial and thematic scale required by urban climate models. This study shows how microclimate simulations for a series of real world urban areas can be supported by using remote sensing data. In an automated process, surface materials, albedo, LAI/LAD and object height have been derived and integrated into the urban microclimate model ENVI-met. Multiple microclimate simulations have been carried out both with the dynamic remote sensing based input data as well as with manual and static input data to analyze the impact of the RS-based surface information and the suitability of the applied data and techniques. A valuable support of the integration of the remote sensing based input data for ENVI-met is the use of an automated processing chain. This saves tedious manual editing and allows for fast and area wide generation of simulation areas. The analysis of the different modes shows the importance of high quality height data, detailed surface material information and albedo.

  20. Digital terrain model (DTM) integration and three-dimensional query spaces in geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Dieter; Schmidt, Dieter

    1994-08-01

    The integration of digital terrain models (DTM) in geographic information systems (GIS) implies automatically an extension of the GIS reference surface and its query space. It is trivial that a DTM is the natural boundary representation of the earth's surface. Man-made objects, for instance homes, streets, bridges, dams should be considered in a second step because these objects cannot be represented well by boundary surfaces. The link of these objects to DTM can be realized by keys and pointers. Therefore, an efficient DTM integration in GIS is the first task to be solved. The paper introduces DTM data structures represented by NIAM diagrams. Using the entity-relationship model these diagrams are very capable to describe the power of relations. Next a 3-D query space is defined keeping in mind 3-D coordinates and 2- D topological elements. Based on this query space spatial operators are derived which fit in standard SQL vocabulary. The implementation part of the paper uses the exodus storage manger to map the DTM of the Federal State Baden-Wurrtemberg in a spatial database system.

  1. Three-dimensional integrated circuits for lab-on-chip dielectrophoresis of nanometer scale particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Samuel J.; Noyola, Arnaldo J.; Levitan, Steven P.; Chiarulli, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mixed-technology micro-system for electronically manipulating and optically detecting virusscale particles in fluids that is designed using 3D integrated circuit technology. During the 3D fabrication process, the top-most chip tier is assembled upside down and the substrate material is removed. This places the polysilicon layer, which is used to create geometries with the process' minimum feature size, in close proximity to a fluid channel etched into the top of the stack. By taking advantage of these processing features inherent to "3D chip-stacking" technology, we create electrode arrays that have a gap spacing of 270 nm. Using 3D CMOS technology also provides the ability to densely integrate analog and digital control circuitry for the electrodes by using the additional levels of the chip stack. We show simulations of the system with a physical model of a Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, which has a radius of approximately 125 nm, being dielectrophoretically arranged into striped patterns. We also discuss how these striped patterns of trapped nanometer scale particles create an effective diffraction grating which can then be sensed with macro-scale optical techniques.

  2. Three-Dimensional Integrated Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS). Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    3D-ICAS is being developed to support Decontamination and Decommissioning operations for DOE addressing Research Area 6 (characterization) of the Program Research and Development Announcement. 3D-ICAS provides in-situ 3-dimensional characterization of contaminated DOE facilities. Its multisensor probe contains a GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using noncontact infrared heating) sensor for organics, a molecular vibrational sensor for base material identification, and a radionuclide sensor for radioactive contaminants. It will provide real-time quantitative measurements of volatile organics and radionuclides on bare materials (concrete, asbestos, transite); it will provide 3-D display of the fusion of all measurements; and it will archive the measurements for regulatory documentation. It consists of two robotic mobile platforms that operate in hazardous environments linked to an integrated workstation in a safe environment.

  3. Integrated three-dimensional photonic nanostructures for achieving near-unity solar absorption and superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Ping; Hsieh, Mei-Li; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we proposed and realized 3D photonic nanostructures consisting of ultra-thin graded index antireflective coatings (ARCs) and woodpile photonic crystals. The use of the integrated ARC and photonic crystal structure can achieve broadband, broad-angle near unity solar absorption. The amorphous silicon based photonic nanostructure experimentally shows an average absorption of ˜95% for λ = 400-620 nm over a wide angular acceptance of θ = 0°-60°. Theoretical studies show that a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based structure can achieve an average absorption of >95% for λ = 400-870 nm. Furthermore, the use of the slanted SiO2 nanorod ARC surface layer by glancing angle deposition exhibits Cassie-Baxter state wetting, and superhydrophobic surface is obtained with highest water contact angle θCB ˜ 153°. These properties are fundamentally important for achieving maximum solar absorption and surface self-cleaning in thin film solar cell applications.

  4. Performance analysis of three dimensional integral equation computations on a massively parallel computer. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Terry G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of the integral equation computations using numerical source field-panel method in a massively parallel processing (MPP) environment. A comparative study of computational performance of the MPP CM-5 computer and conventional Cray-YMP supercomputer for a three-dimensional flow problem is made. A serial FORTRAN code is converted into a parallel CM-FORTRAN code. Some performance results are obtained on CM-5 with 32, 62, 128 nodes along with those on Cray-YMP with a single processor. The comparison of the performance indicates that the parallel CM-FORTRAN code near or out-performs the equivalent serial FORTRAN code for some cases.

  5. Biomimetics of the Extracellular Matrix: An Integrated Three-Dimensional Fiber-Hydrogel Composite for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jeannine; Gibson, Matt; Bandalini, Pierre Alain; Laird, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Moroni, Lorenzo; Seliktar, Dror

    2012-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and has practical macroscale dimensions for clinically relevant tissue defects. In a model system of articular cartilage tissue engineering, the fiber-hydrogel composites enhanced the biological response of adult stem cells, with dynamic mechanical stimulation resulting in near native levels of extracellular matrix. This technology platform was expanded through structural and biochemical modification of the fibers including hydrophilic fibers containing chondroitin sulfate, a significant component of endogenous tissues, and hydrophobic fibers containing ECM microparticles. PMID:22287978

  6. Reconstruction of three-dimensional occluded object using optical flow and triangular mesh reconstruction in integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Keehoon; Park, Gilbae; Chung, Indeok; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Lee, Byoungho

    2010-12-06

    We proposed a reconstruction method for the occluded region of three-dimensional (3D) object using the depth extraction based on the optical flow and triangular mesh reconstruction in integral imaging. The depth information of sub-images from the acquired elemental image set is extracted using the optical flow with sub-pixel accuracy, which alleviates the depth quantization problem. The extracted depth maps of sub-image array are segmented by the depth threshold from the histogram based segmentation, which is represented as the point clouds. The point clouds are projected to the viewpoint of center sub-image and reconstructed by the triangular mesh reconstruction. The experimental results support the validity of the proposed method with high accuracy of peak signal-to-noise ratio and normalized cross-correlation in 3D image recognition.

  7. Three-dimensional lossless digital signature embedding for the integrity of volumetric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng; Huang, H. K.; Liu, B. J.

    2006-03-01

    Our previous study presented a lossless digital signature embedding (LDSE) method for assuring the integrity of 2D medical images in network transit or during archival. With the advent of multi-detector CT scanners and volume acquisition technologies, a PACS exam can now potentially generate hundreds, even thousands, of images. To perform the 2D LDSE method on each individual image in the volume would be extremely time consuming and inefficient. For this reason, a novel 3D LDSE method has been investigated for 3D image volumes. The method begins with generating a single digital signature (DS) of the entire volume. Embedding of the DS is performed by first identifying a bit stream from the image volume based on the correlation of 3D pixel values. The bit stream is compressed using lossless compression methods and the DS is concatenated with the compressed bit stream. This concatenated bit stream is then embedded within the original image volume. During the verification process, the embedded bit stream is extracted and utilized to recover the original bit stream and the original DS. The original bit stream can be used to restore the image volume which in turn can be used in the verification of the DS. In addition, to 3D LDSE embedding methodology for image volumes, a new procedure is developed to address clinical workflow for 3D image volumes. Experimental results demonstrated that the 3D LDSE method can assure the integrity of 3D image volume efficiently and effectively. In addition, a 3D clinical image workflow procedure was demonstrated.

  8. Engineering three-dimensional hybrid supercapacitors and microsupercapacitors for high-performance integrated energy storage

    PubMed Central

    El-Kady, Maher F.; Ihns, Melanie; Li, Mengping; Hwang, Jee Youn; Mousavi, Mir F.; Chaney, Lindsay; Lech, Andrew T.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors now play an important role in the progress of hybrid and electric vehicles, consumer electronics, and military and space applications. There is a growing demand in developing hybrid supercapacitor systems to overcome the energy density limitations of the current generation of carbon-based supercapacitors. Here, we demonstrate 3D high-performance hybrid supercapacitors and microsupercapacitors based on graphene and MnO2 by rationally designing the electrode microstructure and combining active materials with electrolytes that operate at high voltages. This results in hybrid electrodes with ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of over 1,100 F/cm3. This corresponds to a specific capacitance of the constituent MnO2 of 1,145 F/g, which is close to the theoretical value of 1,380 F/g. The energy density of the full device varies between 22 and 42 Wh/l depending on the device configuration, which is superior to those of commercially available double-layer supercapacitors, pseudocapacitors, lithium-ion capacitors, and hybrid supercapacitors tested under the same conditions and is comparable to that of lead acid batteries. These hybrid supercapacitors use aqueous electrolytes and are assembled in air without the need for expensive “dry rooms” required for building today’s supercapacitors. Furthermore, we demonstrate a simple technique for the fabrication of supercapacitor arrays for high-voltage applications. These arrays can be integrated with solar cells for efficient energy harvesting and storage systems. PMID:25831542

  9. Three-dimensional speckle-noise reduction by using coherent integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2009-04-15

    We present a 3D imaging method to reduce speckle noise that exists in coherent imaging systems. This approach is based on integral imaging (II). The elemental images set having speckle-noise patterns of a 3D object is obtained by II technique under coherent illumination. The computational geometrical ray-propagation algorithm is applied to the elemental images in order to reconstruct the original 3D object. A uniform probability-density function is assumed for modeling the phase distribution of the speckle patterns. The statistical point estimator is used for 3D speckle removal. Speckle index is calculated to compare the computational reconstruction using the proposed method with that of conventional coherent image degraded by speckle patterns for 3D object reconstruction and by object recognition. Experimental results are presented. The speckle index, mean square error, and signal-to-noise ratio are used as performance metrics and are shown to have been significantly improved by the proposed method to reduce speckle noise in the 3D object reconstruction. 3D reconstruction experiments of objects with reduced speckle noise are presented. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D speckle removal using II and statistical estimation algorithms.

  10. Integrated three-dimensional photonic nanostructures for achieving near-unity solar absorption and superhydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Ping; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hsieh, Mei-Li

    2015-06-07

    In this paper, we proposed and realized 3D photonic nanostructures consisting of ultra-thin graded index antireflective coatings (ARCs) and woodpile photonic crystals. The use of the integrated ARC and photonic crystal structure can achieve broadband, broad-angle near unity solar absorption. The amorphous silicon based photonic nanostructure experimentally shows an average absorption of ∼95% for λ = 400–620 nm over a wide angular acceptance of θ = 0°–60°. Theoretical studies show that a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based structure can achieve an average absorption of >95% for λ = 400–870 nm. Furthermore, the use of the slanted SiO{sub 2} nanorod ARC surface layer by glancing angle deposition exhibits Cassie-Baxter state wetting, and superhydrophobic surface is obtained with highest water contact angle θ{sub CB} ∼ 153°. These properties are fundamentally important for achieving maximum solar absorption and surface self-cleaning in thin film solar cell applications.

  11. Integrated all-optical logic and arithmetic operations with the help of a TOAD-based interferometer device--alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jitendra Nath; Gayen, Dilip Kumar

    2007-08-01

    Interferometric devices have drawn a great interest in all-optical signal processing for their high-speed photonic activity. The nonlinear optical loop mirror provides a major support to optical switching based all-optical logic and algebraic operations. The gate based on the terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) has added new momentum in this field. Optical tree architecture (OTA) plays a significant role in the optical interconnecting network. We have tried to exploit the advantages of both OTA- and TOAD-based switches. We have proposed a TOAD-based tree architecture, a new and alternative scheme, for integrated all-optical logic and arithmetic operations.

  12. Integrated all-optical logic and arithmetic operations with the help of a TOAD-based interferometer device--alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Roy, Jitendra; Gayen, Dilip Kumar

    2007-08-01

    Interferometric devices have drawn a great interest in all-optical signal processing for their high-speed photonic activity. The nonlinear optical loop mirror provides a major support to optical switching based all-optical logic and algebraic operations. The gate based on the terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) has added new momentum in this field. Optical tree architecture (OTA) plays a significant role in the optical interconnecting network. We have tried to exploit the advantages of both OTA- and TOAD-based switches. We have proposed a TOAD-based tree architecture, a new and alternative scheme, for integrated all-optical logic and arithmetic operations.

  13. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  14. A high-order integral solver for scalar problems of diffraction by screens and apertures in three-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Oscar P.; Lintner, Stéphane K.

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for the numerical solution of problems of diffraction by infinitely thin screens in three-dimensional space. Our approach relies on new integral formulations as well as associated high-order quadrature rules. The new integral formulations involve weighted versions of the classical integral operators related to the thin-screen Dirichlet and Neumann problems as well as a generalization to the open-surface problem of the classical Calderón formulae. The high-order quadrature rules we introduce for these operators, in turn, resolve the multiple Green function and edge singularities (which occur at arbitrarily close distances from each other, and which include weakly singular as well as hypersingular kernels) and thus give rise to super-algebraically fast convergence as the discretization sizes are increased. When used in conjunction with Krylov-subspace linear algebra solvers such as GMRES, the resulting solvers produce results of high accuracy in small numbers of iterations for low and high frequencies alike. We demonstrate our methodology with a variety of numerical results for screen and aperture problems at high frequencies-including simulation of classical experiments such as the diffraction by a circular disc (featuring in particular the famous Poisson spot), evaluation of interference fringes resulting from diffraction across two nearby circular apertures, as well as solution of problems of scattering by more complex geometries consisting of multiple scatterers and cavities.

  15. A high-order integral solver for scalar problems of diffraction by screens and apertures in three-dimensional space

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Oscar P. Lintner, Stéphane K.

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for the numerical solution of problems of diffraction by infinitely thin screens in three-dimensional space. Our approach relies on new integral formulations as well as associated high-order quadrature rules. The new integral formulations involve weighted versions of the classical integral operators related to the thin-screen Dirichlet and Neumann problems as well as a generalization to the open-surface problem of the classical Calderón formulae. The high-order quadrature rules we introduce for these operators, in turn, resolve the multiple Green function and edge singularities (which occur at arbitrarily close distances from each other, and which include weakly singular as well as hypersingular kernels) and thus give rise to super-algebraically fast convergence as the discretization sizes are increased. When used in conjunction with Krylov-subspace linear algebra solvers such as GMRES, the resulting solvers produce results of high accuracy in small numbers of iterations for low and high frequencies alike. We demonstrate our methodology with a variety of numerical results for screen and aperture problems at high frequencies—including simulation of classical experiments such as the diffraction by a circular disc (featuring in particular the famous Poisson spot), evaluation of interference fringes resulting from diffraction across two nearby circular apertures, as well as solution of problems of scattering by more complex geometries consisting of multiple scatterers and cavities.

  16. Photoreceptor precursors derived from three-dimensional embryonic stem cell cultures integrate and mature within adult degenerate retina.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cordero, Anai; West, Emma L; Pearson, Rachael A; Duran, Yanai; Carvalho, Livia S; Chu, Colin J; Naeem, Arifa; Blackford, Samuel J I; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Lakowski, Jorn; Hubank, Mike; Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W B; Sowden, Jane C; Ali, Robin R

    2013-08-01

    Irreversible blindness caused by loss of photoreceptors may be amenable to cell therapy. We previously demonstrated retinal repair and restoration of vision through transplantation of photoreceptor precursors obtained from postnatal retinas into visually impaired adult mice. Considerable progress has been made in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro toward photoreceptor lineages. However, the capability of ESC-derived photoreceptors to integrate after transplantation has not been demonstrated unequivocally. Here, to isolate photoreceptor precursors fit for transplantation, we adapted a recently reported three-dimensional (3D) differentiation protocol that generates neuroretina from mouse ESCs. We show that rod precursors derived by this protocol and selected via a GFP reporter under the control of a Rhodopsin promoter integrate within degenerate retinas of adult mice and mature into outer segment-bearing photoreceptors. Notably, ESC-derived precursors at a developmental stage similar to postnatal days 4-8 integrate more efficiently compared with cells at other stages. This study shows conclusively that ESCs can provide a source of photoreceptors for retinal cell transplantation.

  17. Microfluidic chip with integrated electrical cell-impedance sensing for monitoring single cancer cell migration in three-dimensional matrixes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Anh; Yin, Tsung-I; Reyes, Diego; Urban, Gerald A

    2013-11-19

    Cell migration has been recognized as one hallmark of malignant tumor progression. By integrating the method of electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) with the Boyden chamber design, the state-of-the-art techniques provide kinetic information about cell migration and invasion processes in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrixes. However, the information related to the initial stage of cell migration with single-cell resolution, which plays a unique role in the metastasis-invasion cascade of cancer, is not yet available. In this paper, we present a microfluidic device integrated with ECIS for investigating single cancer cell migration in 3D matrixes. Using microfluidics techniques without the requirement of physical connections to off-chip pneumatics, the proposed sensor chip can efficiently capture single cells on microelectrode arrays for sequential on-chip 2D or 3D cell culture and impedance measurement. An on-chip single-cell migration assay was successfully demonstrated within several minutes. Migration of single metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells in their initial stage can be monitored in real time; it shows a rapid change in impedance magnitude of approximately 10 Ω/s, whereas no prominent impedance change is observed for less-metastasis MCF-7 cells. The proposed sensor chip, allowing for a rapid and selective detection of the migratory properties of cancer cells at the single-cell level, could be applied as a new tool for cancer research.

  18. Highly-ordered supportless three-dimensional nanowire networks with tunable complexity and interwire connectivity for device integration.

    PubMed

    Rauber, Markus; Alber, Ina; Müller, Sven; Neumann, Reinhard; Picht, Oliver; Roth, Christina; Schökel, Alexander; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-06-08

    The fabrication of three-dimensional assemblies consisting of large quantities of nanowires is of great technological importance for various applications including (electro-)catalysis, sensitive sensing, and improvement of electronic devices. Because the spatial distribution of the nanostructured material can strongly influence the properties, architectural design is required in order to use assembled nanowires to their full potential. In addition, special effort has to be dedicated to the development of efficient methods that allow precise control over structural parameters of the nanoscale building blocks as a means of tuning their characteristics. This paper reports the direct synthesis of highly ordered large-area nanowire networks by a method based on hard templates using electrodeposition within nanochannels of ion track-etched polymer membranes. Control over the complexity of the networks and the dimensions of the integrated nanostructures are achieved by a modified template fabrication. The networks possess high surface area and excellent transport properties, turning them into a promising electrocatalyst material as demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry studies on platinum nanowire networks catalyzing methanol oxidation. Our method opens up a new general route for interconnecting nanowires to stable macroscopic network structures of very high integration level that allow easy handling of nanowires while maintaining their connectivity.

  19. Integral dose and radiation-induced secondary malignancies: comparison between stereotactic body radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M

    2012-11-19

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10 Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76 Gy(10)). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3 Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  20. The Coupling of Finite Element and Integral Equation Representations for Efficient Three-Dimensional Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Zuffada, Cinzia; Jamnejad, Vahraz

    1996-01-01

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurtely simulating scattered or radiated fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength.

  1. Three-dimensional integral imaging displays using a quick-response encoded elemental image array: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markman, A.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Quick-response (QR) codes are barcodes that can store information such as numeric data and hyperlinks. The QR code can be scanned using a QR code reader, such as those built into smartphone devices, revealing the information stored in the code. Moreover, the QR code is robust to noise, rotation, and illumination when scanning due to error correction built in the QR code design. Integral imaging is an imaging technique used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) scene by combining the information from two-dimensional (2D) elemental images (EIs) each with a different perspective of a scene. Transferring these 2D images in a secure manner can be difficult. In this work, we overview two methods to store and encrypt EIs in multiple QR codes. The first method uses run-length encoding with Huffman coding and the double-random-phase encryption (DRPE) to compress and encrypt an EI. This information is then stored in a QR code. An alternative compression scheme is to perform photon-counting on the EI prior to compression. Photon-counting is a non-linear transformation of data that creates redundant information thus improving image compression. The compressed data is encrypted using the DRPE. Once information is stored in the QR codes, it is scanned using a smartphone device. The information scanned is decompressed and decrypted and an EI is recovered. Once all EIs have been recovered, a 3D optical reconstruction is generated.

  2. Fabrication and electrical characterization of sub-micron diameter through-silicon via for heterogeneous three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspour, R.; Brown, D. K.; Bakir, M. S.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and electrical characterization of high aspect-ratio (AR) sub-micron diameter through silicon vias (TSVs) for densely interconnected three-dimensional (3D) stacked integrated circuits (ICs). The fabricated TSV technology features an AR of 16:1 with 680 nm diameter copper (Cu) core and 920 nm overall diameter. To address the challenges in scaling TSVs, scallop-free low roughness nano-Bosch silicon etching and direct Cu electroplating on a titanium-nitride (TiN) diffusion barrier layer have been developed as key enabling modules. The electrical resistance of the sub-micron TSVs is measured to be on average 1.2 Ω, and the Cu resistivity is extracted to be approximately 2.95 µΩ cm. Furthermore, the maximum achievable current-carrying capacity (CCC) of the scaled TSVs is characterized to be approximately 360 µA for the 680 nm Cu core.

  3. Depth extraction of three-dimensional objects using block matching for slice images in synthetic aperture integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Jae; Lee, Byung-Gook; Yoo, Hoon

    2011-10-10

    We describe a computational method for depth extraction of three-dimensional (3D) objects using block matching for slice images in synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII). SAII is capable of providing high-resolution 3D slice images for 3D objects because the picked-up elemental images are high-resolution ones. In the proposed method, the high-resolution elemental images are recorded by moving a camera; a computational reconstruction algorithm based on ray backprojection generates a set of 3D slice images from the recorded elemental images. To extract depth information of the 3D objects, we propose a new block-matching algorithm between a reference elemental image and a set of 3D slice images. The property of the slices images is that the focused areas are the right location for an object, whereas the blurred areas are considered to be empty space; thus, this can extract robust and accurate depth information of the 3D objects. To demonstrate our method, we carry out the preliminary experiments of 3D objects; the results indicate that our method is superior to a conventional method in terms of depth-map quality.

  4. A method for converting three-dimensional models into auto-stereoscopic images based on integral photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Miwa; Iwadate, Yuichi

    2008-02-01

    We have been researching three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction from images captured by multiple cameras. Currently, we are investigating how to convert 3D models into stereoscopic images. We are interested in integral photography (IP), one of many stereoscopic display systems, because the IP display system reconstructs complete 3D auto-stereoscopic images in theory. This system consists of a high-resolution liquid-crystal panel and a lens array. It enables users to obtain a perspective view of 3D auto-stereoscopic images from any direction. We developed a method for converting 3D models into IP images using the OpenGL API. This method can be applied to normal CG objects because the 3D model is described in a CG format. In this paper, we outline our 3D modeling method and the performance of an IP display system. Then we discuss the method for converting 3D models into IP images and report experimental results.

  5. Facile fabrication of Ag dendrite-integrated anodic aluminum oxide membrane as effective three-dimensional SERS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong-yun; Lu, Ya; Zhao, Bin; Hao, Yao-wu; Liu, Ya-qing

    2016-07-01

    A novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrate has been successfully developed, where Ag-dendrites are assembled on the surface and embedded in the channels of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane, via electrodeposition in AgNO3/PVP aqueous system. Reaction conditions were systematically investigated to attain the best Raman enhancement. The growth mechanism of Ag dendritic nanostructures has been proposed. The Ag dendrite-integrated AAO membrane with unique hierarchical structures exhibits high SERS activity for detecting rhodamine 6G with a detection limit as low as 1 × 10-11 M. Furthermore, the three-dimensional (3D) substrates display a good reproducibility with the average intensity variations at the major Raman peak less than 12%. Most importantly, the 3D SERS substrates without any surface modification show an outstanding SERS response for the molecules with weak affinity for noble metal surfaces. The potential application for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was evaluated with fluoranthene as Raman target molecule and a sensitive SERS detection with a limit down to 10-8 M was reached. The 3D SERS-active substrate shows promising potential for rapid detection of trace organic pollutants even weak affinity molecules in the environment.

  6. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a "special divergence-free" (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  7. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  8. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  9. Mosaic-skeleton method as applied to the numerical solution of three-dimensional Dirichlet problems for the Helmholtz equation in integral form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashirin, A. A.; Smagin, S. I.; Taltykina, M. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Interior and exterior three-dimensional Dirichlet problems for the Helmholtz equation are solved numerically. They are formulated as equivalent boundary Fredholm integral equations of the first kind and are approximated by systems of linear algebraic equations, which are then solved numerically by applying an iteration method. The mosaic-skeleton method is used to speed up the solution procedure.

  10. Investigation Of Integrating Three-Dimensional (3-D) Geometry Into The Visual Anatomical Injury Descriptor (Visual AID) Using WebGL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    into the Visual Anatomical Injury Descriptor (Visual AID) Using WebGL AUTUMN KULAGA MENTOR: PATRICK GILLICH WARFIGHTER SURVIVABILITY BRANCH...Investigation Of Integrating Three-Dimensional (3-D) Geometry Into The Visual Anatomical Injury Descriptor (Visual AID) Using WebGL 5a. CONTRACT...discusses the Web-based 3-D environment prototype being developed to understand the feasibility of integrating WebGL into Visual AID. Using WebGL will

  11. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  12. All-optical SR flip-flop based on SOA-MZI switches monolithically integrated on a generic InP platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, St.; Vagionas, Ch.; Kanellos, G. T.; Kisacik, R.; Tekin, T.; Broeke, R.; Pleros, N.

    2016-03-01

    At the dawning of the exaflop era, High Performance Computers are foreseen to exploit integrated all-optical elements, to overcome the speed limitations imposed by electronic counterparts. Drawing from the well-known Memory Wall limitation, imposing a performance gap between processor and memory speeds, research has focused on developing ultra-fast latching devices and all-optical memory elements capable of delivering buffering and switching functionalities at unprecedented bit-rates. Following the master-slave configuration of electronic Flip-Flops, coupled SOA-MZI based switches have been theoretically investigated to exceed 40 Gb/s operation, provided a short coupling waveguide. However, this flip-flop architecture has been only hybridly integrated with silica-on-silicon integration technology exhibiting a total footprint of 45x12 mm2 and intra-Flip-Flop coupling waveguide of 2.5cm, limited at 5 Gb/s operation. Monolithic integration offers the possibility to fabricate multiple active and passive photonic components on a single chip at a close proximity towards, bearing promises for fast all-optical memories. Here, we present for the first time a monolithically integrated all-optical SR Flip-Flop with coupled master-slave SOA-MZI switches. The photonic chip is integrated on a 6x2 mm2 die as a part of a multi-project wafer run using library based components of a generic InP platform, fiber-pigtailed and fully packaged on a temperature controlled ceramic submount module with electrical contacts. The intra Flip-Flop coupling waveguide is 5 mm long, reducing the total footprint by two orders of magnitude. Successful flip flop functionality is evaluated at 10 Gb/s with clear open eye diagram, achieving error free operation with a power penalty of 4dB.

  13. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  14. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  15. All-optical DGD monitor for packet-switched networks based on an integrated active Mach Zehnder interferometer operating as logic XOR gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, R.; Martinez, J. M.; Ramos, F.; Marti, J.

    2008-11-01

    An all-optical differential group delay (DGD) monitor for packet-switched networks is proposed. The monitoring approach consists of an integrated active Mach-Zehnder interferometer acting as a logic XOR gate. According to the estimated DGD value, a latching switch is employed to route the input packets "on-the-fly". The simulation results show a successful operation which has been confirmed with the experimental validation of the XOR-based monitoring subsystem.

  16. NiCo2O4 nanosheets in-situ grown on three dimensional porous Ni film current collectors as integrated electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Ying; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Shuhui; Yang, Hai-Peng; Lu, Daniel; Fu, Xian-Zhu; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Three dimensional interconnected hierarchical porous Ni films are easily fabricated as effective current collectors through hydrogen bubble template electrochemical deposition. The binder-free integrated electrodes of spinel NiCo2O4 nanosheets directly coated the three dimensional porous Ni films are facilely obtained through successively electrochemical co-deposition of Ni/Co alloy layer then followed by subsequent annealing at 350 °C in air. Compared with NiCo2O4 nanosheets on smooth Ni foil or porous NiO/Ni film electrodes, the porous NiCo2O4/Ni integrated film electrodes for supercapacitors demonstrate remarkably higher area specific capacitance. The porous NiCo2O4/Ni film electrodes also exhibit excellent rate capability and cycling stability. The super electrochemical capacitive performances are attributed to the unique integrated architecture of NiCo2O4 nanosheets in-situ grown on three dimensional continuous hierarchical porous Ni collector collectors, which could provide large electrode-electrolyte interface area, high active sites, low contact resistance between current collector and active materials, fast electron conduction and ion/electrolyte diffusion.

  17. A Bioengineered Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Platform Integrated with Microfluidics To Address Antimicrobial Resistance in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Tezera, Liku B.; Zmijan, Robert; Drobniewski, Francis; Zhang, Xunli; Jayasinghe, Suwan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimicrobial resistance presents one of the most significant threats to human health, with the emergence of totally drug-resistant organisms. We have combined bioengineering, genetically modified bacteria, longitudinal readouts, and fluidics to develop a transformative platform to address the drug development bottleneck, utilizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis as the model organism. We generated microspheres incorporating virulent reporter bacilli, primary human cells, and an extracellular matrix by using bioelectrospray methodology. Granulomas form within the three-dimensional matrix, and mycobacterial stress genes are upregulated. Pyrazinamide, a vital first-line antibiotic for treating human tuberculosis, kills M. tuberculosis in a three-dimensional culture but not in a standard two-dimensional culture or Middlebrook 7H9 broth, demonstrating that antibiotic sensitivity within microspheres reflects conditions in patients. We then performed pharmacokinetic modeling by combining the microsphere system with a microfluidic plate and demonstrated that we can model the effect of dynamic antibiotic concentrations on mycobacterial killing. The microsphere system is highly tractable, permitting variation of cell content, the extracellular matrix, sphere size, the infectious dose, and the surrounding medium with the potential to address a wide array of human infections and the threat of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:28174307

  18. A Bioengineered Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Platform Integrated with Microfluidics To Address Antimicrobial Resistance in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Magdalena K; Tezera, Liku B; Zmijan, Robert; Drobniewski, Francis; Zhang, Xunli; Jayasinghe, Suwan; Elkington, Paul

    2017-02-07

    Antimicrobial resistance presents one of the most significant threats to human health, with the emergence of totally drug-resistant organisms. We have combined bioengineering, genetically modified bacteria, longitudinal readouts, and fluidics to develop a transformative platform to address the drug development bottleneck, utilizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis as the model organism. We generated microspheres incorporating virulent reporter bacilli, primary human cells, and an extracellular matrix by using bioelectrospray methodology. Granulomas form within the three-dimensional matrix, and mycobacterial stress genes are upregulated. Pyrazinamide, a vital first-line antibiotic for treating human tuberculosis, kills M. tuberculosis in a three-dimensional culture but not in a standard two-dimensional culture or Middlebrook 7H9 broth, demonstrating that antibiotic sensitivity within microspheres reflects conditions in patients. We then performed pharmacokinetic modeling by combining the microsphere system with a microfluidic plate and demonstrated that we can model the effect of dynamic antibiotic concentrations on mycobacterial killing. The microsphere system is highly tractable, permitting variation of cell content, the extracellular matrix, sphere size, the infectious dose, and the surrounding medium with the potential to address a wide array of human infections and the threat of antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Long-Time Numerical Integration of the Three-Dimensional Wave Equation in the Vicinity of a Moving Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryabenkii, V. S.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Tsynkov, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a family of algorithms for solving numerically a Cauchy problem for the three-dimensional wave equation. The sources that drive the equation (i.e., the right-hand side) are compactly supported in space for any given time; they, however, may actually move in space with a subsonic speed. The solution is calculated inside a finite domain (e.g., sphere) that also moves with a subsonic speed and always contains the support of the right-hand side. The algorithms employ a standard consistent and stable explicit finite-difference scheme for the wave equation. They allow one to calculate tile solution for arbitrarily long time intervals without error accumulation and with the fixed non-growing amount of tile CPU time and memory required for advancing one time step. The algorithms are inherently three-dimensional; they rely on the presence of lacunae in the solutions of the wave equation in oddly dimensional spaces. The methodology presented in the paper is, in fact, a building block for constructing the nonlocal highly accurate unsteady artificial boundary conditions to be used for the numerical simulation of waves propagating with finite speed over unbounded domains.

  20. A strategy for integrating essential three-dimensional microphysiological systems of human organs for realistic anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Heylman, Christopher; Sobrino, Agua; Shirure, Venktesh S; Hughes, Christopher Cw; George, Steven C

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world. Despite some success, traditional anticancer drugs developed to reduce tumor growth face important limitations primarily due to undesirable bone marrow and cardiovascular toxicity. Many drugs fail in clinical development after showing promise in preclinical trials, suggesting that the available in vitro and animal models are poor predictors of drug efficacy and toxicity in humans. Thus, novel models that more accurately mimic the biology of human organs are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. Three-dimensional (3D) microphysiological systems can utilize induced pluripotent stem cell technology, tissue engineering, and microfabrication techniques to develop tissue models of human tumors, cardiac muscle, and bone marrow on the order of 1 mm(3) in size. A functional network of human capillaries and microvessels to overcome diffusion limitations in nutrient delivery and waste removal can also nourish the 3D microphysiological tissues. Importantly, the 3D microphysiological tissues are grown on optically clear platforms that offer non-invasive and non-destructive image acquisition with subcellular resolution in real time. Such systems offer a new paradigm for high-throughput drug screening and will significantly improve the efficiency of identifying new drugs for cancer treatment that minimize cardiac and bone marrow toxicity.

  1. Integration of fringe projection and two-dimensional digital image correlation for three-dimensional displacements measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe-Sesé, Luis; López-Alba, Elías; Siegmann, Philip; Díaz, Francisco A.

    2016-12-01

    A low-cost approach for three-dimensional (3-D) full-field displacement measurement is applied for the analysis of large displacements involved in two different mechanical events. The method is based on a combination of fringe projection and two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) techniques. The two techniques have been employed simultaneously using an RGB camera and a color encoding method; therefore, it is possible to measure in-plane and out-of-plane displacements at the same time with only one camera even at high speed rates. The potential of the proposed methodology has been employed for the analysis of large displacements during contact experiments in a soft material block. Displacement results have been successfully compared with those obtained using a 3D-DIC commercial system. Moreover, the analysis of displacements during an impact test on a metal plate was performed to emphasize the application of the methodology for dynamics events. Results show a good level of agreement, highlighting the potential of FP + 2D DIC as low-cost alternative for the analysis of large deformations problems.

  2. Ultralow-power all-optical wavelength conversion in a silicon-on-insulator waveguide based on a heterogeneously integrated III-V microdisk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liu; Van Campenhout, Joris; Roelkens, Günther; Van Thourhout, Dries; Rojo-Romeo, Pedro; Regreny, Philippe; Seassal, Christian; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Baets, Roel

    2008-08-01

    Ultralow-power all-optical wavelength conversion is presented for a silicon-on-insulator wire waveguide with a heterogeneously integrated III-V microdisk laser. The principle relies on the suppression of natural lasing from the microdisk laser by an external injection. No probe beam is needed in this configuration. Static wavelength conversion with a control power of 6.4 μW or even lower is achieved. The resonance and gain provided by the microdisk cavity are at the origin of such low control power. Dynamically, wavelength conversion using a 5 Gbps non-return-to-zero bit sequence is demonstrated in the proposed device.

  3. Multi-format all-optical processing based on a large-scale, hybridly integrated photonic circuit.

    PubMed

    Bougioukos, M; Kouloumentas, Ch; Spyropoulou, M; Giannoulis, G; Kalavrouziotis, D; Maziotis, A; Bakopoulos, P; Harmon, R; Rogers, D; Harrison, J; Poustie, A; Maxwell, G; Avramopoulos, H

    2011-06-06

    We investigate through numerical studies and experiments the performance of a large scale, silica-on-silicon photonic integrated circuit for multi-format regeneration and wavelength-conversion. The circuit encompasses a monolithically integrated array of four SOAs inside two parallel Mach-Zehnder structures, four delay interferometers and a large number of silica waveguides and couplers. Exploiting phase-incoherent techniques, the circuit is capable of processing OOK signals at variable bit rates, DPSK signals at 22 or 44 Gb/s and DQPSK signals at 44 Gbaud. Simulation studies reveal the wavelength-conversion potential of the circuit with enhanced regenerative capabilities for OOK and DPSK modulation formats and acceptable quality degradation for DQPSK format. Regeneration of 22 Gb/s OOK signals with amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise and DPSK data signals degraded with amplitude, phase and ASE noise is experimentally validated demonstrating a power penalty improvement up to 1.5 dB.

  4. All-optical wavelength-routing switch with monolithically integrated filter-free tunable wavelength converters and an AWG.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Toru; Matsuo, Shinji; Kakitsuka, Takaaki; Shibata, Yasuo; Sato, Tomonari; Kawaguchi, Yoshihiro; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-03-01

    We present a compact 4x8 wavelength-routing switch that monolithically integrates fast tunable wavelength converters (TWCs) and an arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) for optical packet switching. The TWC consists of a double-ring-resonator-coupled tunable laser which allows rapid and stable switching, and an optical gate based on a parallel amplifier structure which prevents an input optical signal from being routed through the AWG (filter-free operation). A deep-ridge waveguide technology, employed for the AWG and ring resonators, facilitates the fabrication of the switch and makes the device compact. The filter-free TWCs achieve low crosstalk of the input optical signal of less than -22 dB. The wavelength routing operation of a non-return-to-zero (NRZ) signal at 10 Gbit/s is achieved with a switching time of less than 5 ns.

  5. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of three-dimensional catalytic electro-Fenton and membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Zhuang, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were conducted to investigate a novel system three-dimensional catalytic electro-Fenton (3DCEF, catalyst of sewage sludge based activated carbon which loaded Fe3O4) integrating with membrane bioreactor (3DCEF-MBR) on advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated that 3DCEF-MBR represented high efficiencies in eliminating COD and total organic carbon, giving the maximum removal efficiencies of 80% and 75%, respectively. The integrated 3DCEF-MBR system significantly reduced the transmembrane pressure, giving 35% lower than conventional MBR after 30 days operation. The enhanced hydroxyl radical oxidation and bacteria self repair function were the mechanisms for 3DCEF-MBR performance. Therefore, the integrated 3DCEF-MBR was expected to be the promising technology for advanced treatment in engineering applications.

  6. High efficiency integration of three-dimensional functional microdevices inside a microfluidic chip by using femtosecond laser multifoci parallel microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Du, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jia-Wen; Hu, Yan-Lei; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Li, Guo-Qiang; Lao, Zhao-Xin; Ni, Jin-Cheng; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong; Liu, Su-Ling; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency fabrication and integration of three-dimension (3D) functional devices in Lab-on-a-chip systems are crucial for microfluidic applications. Here, a spatial light modulator (SLM)-based multifoci parallel femtosecond laser scanning technology was proposed to integrate microstructures inside a given ‘Y’ shape microchannel. The key novelty of our approach lies on rapidly integrating 3D microdevices inside a microchip for the first time, which significantly reduces the fabrication time. The high quality integration of various 2D-3D microstructures was ensured by quantitatively optimizing the experimental conditions including prebaking time, laser power and developing time. To verify the designable and versatile capability of this method for integrating functional 3D microdevices in microchannel, a series of microfilters with adjustable pore sizes from 12.2 μm to 6.7 μm were fabricated to demonstrate selective filtering of the polystyrene (PS) particles and cancer cells with different sizes. The filter can be cleaned by reversing the flow and reused for many times. This technology will advance the fabrication technique of 3D integrated microfluidic and optofluidic chips.

  7. High efficiency integration of three-dimensional functional microdevices inside a microfluidic chip by using femtosecond laser multifoci parallel microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Du, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jia-Wen; Hu, Yan-Lei; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Li, Guo-Qiang; Lao, Zhao-Xin; Ni, Jin-Cheng; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong; Liu, Su-Ling; Sugioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency fabrication and integration of three-dimension (3D) functional devices in Lab-on-a-chip systems are crucial for microfluidic applications. Here, a spatial light modulator (SLM)-based multifoci parallel femtosecond laser scanning technology was proposed to integrate microstructures inside a given ‘Y’ shape microchannel. The key novelty of our approach lies on rapidly integrating 3D microdevices inside a microchip for the first time, which significantly reduces the fabrication time. The high quality integration of various 2D-3D microstructures was ensured by quantitatively optimizing the experimental conditions including prebaking time, laser power and developing time. To verify the designable and versatile capability of this method for integrating functional 3D microdevices in microchannel, a series of microfilters with adjustable pore sizes from 12.2 μm to 6.7 μm were fabricated to demonstrate selective filtering of the polystyrene (PS) particles and cancer cells with different sizes. The filter can be cleaned by reversing the flow and reused for many times. This technology will advance the fabrication technique of 3D integrated microfluidic and optofluidic chips. PMID:26818119

  8. An Integrated Sequence-Structure Database incorporating matching mRNA sequence, amino acid sequence and protein three-dimensional structure data.

    PubMed Central

    Adzhubei, I A; Adzhubei, A A; Neidle, S

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a non-homologous database, termed the Integrated Sequence-Structure Database (ISSD) which comprises the coding sequences of genes, amino acid sequences of the corresponding proteins, their secondary structure and straight phi,psi angles assignments, and polypeptide backbone coordinates. Each protein entry in the database holds the alignment of nucleotide sequence, amino acid sequence and the PDB three-dimensional structure data. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each entry are selected on the basis of exact matches of the source organism and cell environment. The current version 1.0 of ISSD is available on the WWW at http://www.protein.bio.msu.su/issd/ and includes 107 non-homologous mammalian proteins, of which 80 are human proteins. The database has been used by us for the analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in mRNA sequences showing their correlation with the three-dimensional structure features in the encoded proteins. Possible ISSD applications include optimisation of protein expression, improvement of the protein structure prediction accuracy, and analysis of evolutionary aspects of the nucleotide sequence-protein structure relationship. PMID:9399866

  9. A Parallel Discrete Surface Integral Equation Method For the Analysis of Three-Dimensional Microwave Circuit Devices with Planar Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Stephen D.; Lansing, Faiza

    1994-01-01

    It has been found that the Discrete Integral Equation (DSI)technique is a highly effective technique for the analysis of microwave circuits and devices [1,2]. The DSI is much more robust than the traditional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method in a number of ways.

  10. Three-dimensional metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce

    2012-06-12

    A fabrication method is capable of creating canonical metamaterial structures arrayed in a three-dimensional geometry. The method uses a membrane suspended over a cavity with predefined pattern as a directional evaporation mask. Metallic and/or dielectric material can be evaporated at high vacuum through the patterned membrane to deposit resonator structures on the interior walls of the cavity, thereby providing a unit cell of micron-scale dimension. The method can produce volumetric metamaterial structures comprising layers of such unit cells of resonator structures.

  11. Three dimensional quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, G.; Rajeev, S. G.; Yang, Z.

    1992-02-01

    The subject of this talk is the study of the low energy behavior of three (2+1) dimensional Quantum Chromodynamics. We show the existence of a phase where parity is unbroken and the flavor group U(2n) is broken into a subgroup U(n)×U(n). We derive the low energy effective action for the theory and show that it has solitonic excitations with Fermi statistic, to be identified with the three dimensional ``baryon''. Finally, we study the current algebra for this effective action and we find a co-homologically nontrivial generalization of Kac-Moody algebras to three dimension.

  12. Three Dimensional Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    2014-03-01

    Dirac points on the Fermi surface of two dimensional graphene are responsible for its unique electronic behavior. One can ask whether any three dimensional materials support similar pseudorelativistic physics in their bulk electronic spectra. This possibility has been investigated theoretically and is now supported by two successful experimental demonstrations reported during the last year. In this talk, I will summarize the various ways in which Dirac semimetals can be realized in three dimensions with primary focus on a specific theory developed on the basis of representations of crystal spacegroups. A three dimensional Dirac (Weyl) semimetal can appear in the presence (absence) of inversion symmetry by tuning parameters to the phase boundary separating a bulk insulating and a topological insulating phase. More generally, we find that specific rules governing crystal symmetry representations of electrons with spin lead to robust Dirac points at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. Combining these rules with microscopic considerations identifies six candidate Dirac semimetals. Another method towards engineering Dirac semimetals involves combining crystal symmetry and band inversion. Several candidate materials have been proposed utilizing this mechanism and one of the candidates has been successfully demonstrated as a Dirac semimetal in two independent experiments. Work carried out in collaboration with: Julia A. Steinberg, Steve M. Young, J.C.Y. Teo, C.L. Kane, E.J. Mele and Andrew M. Rappe.

  13. Micro-optical design of a three-dimensional microlens scanner for vertically integrated micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Baranski, Maciej; Bargiel, Sylwester; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Jia, Chenping; Frömel, Jörg; Wiemer, Maik

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the optical design of a miniature 3D scanning system, which is fully compatible with the vertical integration technology of micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS). The constraints related to this integration strategy are considered, resulting in a simple three-element micro-optical setup based on an afocal scanning microlens doublet and a focusing microlens, which is tolerant to axial position inaccuracy. The 3D scanning is achieved by axial and lateral displacement of microlenses of the scanning doublet, realized by micro-electro-mechanical systems microactuators (the transmission scanning approach). Optical scanning performance of the system is determined analytically by use of the extended ray transfer matrix method, leading to two different optical configurations, relying either on a ball lens or plano-convex microlenses. The presented system is aimed to be a core component of miniature MOEMS-based optical devices, which require a 3D optical scanning function, e.g., miniature imaging systems (confocal or optical coherence microscopes) or optical tweezers.

  14. Fabrication and integration of microprism mirrors for high-speed three-dimensional measurement in inertial microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Joonyoung; Kim, Jihye; Shin, Jung H.; Lee, Wonhee

    2014-09-01

    Inertial microfluidics utilizes fluid inertia from high flow velocity to manipulate particles and fluids in 3D. Acquiring a 3D information of particle positions and complex flow patterns within microfluidic devices requires 3D imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are often expensive and slow. Here, we report on a prism-mirror-embedded microfluidic device that allows simultaneous imaging of the top and side view of the microchannel for a high-speed, low-cost 3D imaging. The microprism mirrors are fabricated and integrated into a microfluidic system using conventional microfabrication techniques including wet etch and soft lithography. This inexpensive high quality prism mirror provides a highly reflective, smooth mirror surface with precise 45° reflection angle, enabling 3D measurement of inertial migration of microparticles in a rectangular channel at speeds in excess of 10 000 frame/s.

  15. Self-supported Cu3P nanowire arrays as an integrated high-performance three-dimensional cathode for generating hydrogen from water.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Liu, Qian; Cheng, Ningyan; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2014-09-01

    Searching for inexpensive hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts with high activity has attracted considerable research interest in the past years. Reported herein is the topotactic fabrication of self-supported Cu3 P nanowire arrays on commercial porous copper foam (Cu3 P NW/CF) from its Cu(OH)2 NW/CF precursor by a low-temperature phosphidation reaction. Remarkably, as an integrated three-dimensional hydrogen-evolving cathode operating in acidic electrolytes, Cu3 P NW/CF maintains its activity for at least 25 hours and exhibits an onset overpotential of 62 mV, a Tafel slope of 67 mV dec(-1) , and a Faradaic efficiency close to 100 %. Catalytic current density can approach 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of 143 mV.

  16. iRegNet3D: three-dimensional integrated regulatory network for the genomic analysis of coding and non-coding disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Liang, Siqi; Tippens, Nathaniel D; Zhou, Yaoda; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Yu, Haiyuan

    2017-01-18

    The mechanistic details of most disease-causing mutations remain poorly explored within the context of regulatory networks. We present a high-resolution three-dimensional integrated regulatory network (iRegNet3D) in the form of a web tool, where we resolve the interfaces of all known transcription factor (TF)-TF, TF-DNA and chromatin-chromatin interactions for the analysis of both coding and non-coding disease-associated mutations to obtain mechanistic insights into their functional impact. Using iRegNet3D, we find that disease-associated mutations may perturb the regulatory network through diverse mechanisms including chromatin looping. iRegNet3D promises to be an indispensable tool in large-scale sequencing and disease association studies.

  17. Numerical integration of gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects and its application to gravitational study of grand design spiral arm structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to integrate the gravitational field for general three-dimensional objects. By adopting the spherical polar coordinates centred at the evaluation point as the integration variables, we numerically compute the volume integral representation of the gravitational potential and of the acceleration vector. The variable transformation completely removes the algebraic singularities of the original integrals. The comparison with exact solutions reveals around 15 digits accuracy of the new method. Meanwhile, the six digit accuracy of the integrated gravitational field is realized by around 106 evaluations of the integrand per evaluation point, which costs at most a few seconds at a PC with Intel Core i7-4600U CPU running at 2.10 GHz clock. By using the new method, we show the gravitational field of a grand design spiral arm structure as an example. The computed gravitational field shows not only spiral shaped details but also a global feature composed of a thick oblate spheroid and a thin disc. The developed method is directly applicable to the electromagnetic field computation by means of Coulomb's law, the Biot-Savart law, and their retarded extensions. Sample FORTRAN 90 programs and test results are electronically available.

  18. Reductant-Assisted Self-Assembly with Cu/Sn Microbump for Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuka; Fukushima, Takafumi; Lee, Kang-Wook; Choki, Koji; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2013-04-01

    To establish liquid-assisted assembly processes applicable to heterogeneous system integrations, we present flip-chip self-assembly of dies with Cu/Sn microbumps using the difference in droplet wetting between hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas. Flip-chip self-assembly is assisted by a water-soluble flux that has high surface tension comparable to that of pure water and contains an additive of a reducing agent for metal oxides. Control of the additive concentration in the flux provides high wettability contrast that enable spontaneous and precise alignment of chips to hydrophilic areas formed on substrates within 5 µm in alignment accuracy. In the subsequent chip bonding process, the reductant can eliminate the metal oxide layer and improve the solder wettability of Sn to the corresponding electrode pads formed on the chips. In addition, we confirm, through electrical characteristic evaluation after thermal compression bonding, that the resulting daisy chain formed between the substrates and self-assembled chips with the flux shows sufficiently low contact resistance of below 20 mΩ/bump without disconnection.

  19. Three-dimensional optical method for integrated visualization of mouse islet microstructure and vascular network with subcellular-level resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ya-Yuan; Lu, Chih-Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Wen; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Enikolopov, Grigori; Sibley, Eric; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    Microscopic visualization of islets of Langerhans under normal and diabetic conditions is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. The intrinsic opacity of pancreata, however, limits optical accessibility for high-resolution light microscopy of islets in situ. Because the standard microtome-based, 2-D tissue analysis confines visualization of the islet architecture at a specific cut plane, 3-D representation of image data is preferable for islet assessment. We applied optical clearing to minimize the random light scattering in the mouse pancreatic tissue. The optical-cleared pancreas allowed penetrative, 3-D microscopic imaging of the islet microstructure and vasculature. Specifically, the islet vasculature was revealed by vessel painting-lipophilic dye labeling of blood vessels-for confocal microscopy. The voxel-based confocal micrographs were digitally processed with projection algorithms for 3-D visualization. Unlike the microtome-based tissue imaging, this optical method for penetrative imaging of mouse islets yielded clear, continuous optical sections for an integrated visualization of the islet microstructure and vasculature with subcellular-level resolution. We thus provide a useful imaging approach to change our conventional planar view of the islet structure into a 3-D panorama for better understanding of the islet physiology.

  20. Three-dimensional viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference seismic modelling using the staggered Adams-Bashforth time integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Wittkamp, Florian

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the performance of a higher order accurate staggered viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference method, in which the staggered Adams-Bashforth (ABS) third-order and fourth-order accurate time integrators are used for temporal discretization. ABS is a multistep method that uses previously calculated wavefields to increase the order of accuracy in time. The analysis shows that the numerical dispersion is much lower than that of the widely used second-order leapfrog method. Numerical dissipation is introduced by the ABS method which is significantly smaller for fourth-order than third-order accuracy. In 1-D and 3-D simulation experiments, we verify the convincing improvements of simulation accuracy of the fourth-order ABS method. In a realistic elastic 3-D scenario, the computing time reduces by a factor of approximately 2.4, whereas the memory requirements increase by approximately a factor of 2.2. The ABS method thus provides an alternative strategy to increase the simulation accuracy in time by investing computer memory instead of computing time.

  1. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  2. Three-Dimensional Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1988-01-01

    Report presents new theory of analytic functions of three-dimensional complex variables. While three-dimensional system subject to more limitations and more difficult to use than the two-dimensional system, useful in analysis of three-dimensional fluid flows, electrostatic potentials, and other phenomena involving harmonic functions.

  3. Band edge tailoring of InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells for a monolithically integrated all-optical switch.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jijun; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Gozu, Shin-ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a compact all-optical Michelson interferometer (MI) gating switch with monolithic integration of two different bandgap energies. Based on the ion-induced intermixing in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells, the blueshift of the band edge can be tailored. Through phosphorus ion implantation with a dose of 5 × 10(14) cm(-2) and subsequent annealing at 720 °C for 60 s, an implanted sample can acquire a high transmittance compared with the as-grown one. Meanwhile, the cross-phase modulation (XPM) efficiency of a non-implanted sample undergoing the same annealing process decreases little. An implanted part for signal propagation and a non-implanted section for XPM are thus monolithically integrated for an MI switch by an area-selective manner. Full switching of a π-rad nonlinear phase shift is achieved with pump pulse energy of 5.6 pJ at a 10-GHz repetition rate.

  4. A novel integration of three-dimensional electro-Fenton and biological activated carbon and its application in the advanced treatment of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hou, Baolin; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Xu, Peng; Jia, Shengyong; Li, Kun

    2015-11-01

    A novel integrated process with three-dimensional electro-Fenton (3D EF) and biological activated carbon (BAC) was employed in advanced treatment of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. SAC-Fe (sludge deserved activated carbon from sewage and iron sludge) and SAC (sludge deserved activated carbon) were used in 3D EF as catalytic particle electrodes (CPEs) and in BAC as carriers respectively. Results indicated that 3D EF with SAC-Fe as CPEs represented excellent pollutants and COLOR removals as well as biodegradability improvement. The efficiency enhancement attributed to generating more H2O2 and OH. The integrated process exhibited efficient performance of COD, BOD5, total phenols, TOC, TN and COLOR removals at a much shorter retention time, with the corresponding concentrations in effluent of 31.18, 6.69, 4.29, 17.82, 13.88mg/L and <20 times, allowing discharge criteria to be met. The integrated system was efficient, cost-effective and ecological sustainable and could be a promising technology for engineering applications.

  5. Genome3D: A viewer-model framework for integrating and visualizing multi-scale epigenomic information within a three-dimensional genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New technologies are enabling the measurement of many types of genomic and epigenomic information at scales ranging from the atomic to nuclear. Much of this new data is increasingly structural in nature, and is often difficult to coordinate with other data sets. There is a legitimate need for integrating and visualizing these disparate data sets to reveal structural relationships not apparent when looking at these data in isolation. Results We have applied object-oriented technology to develop a downloadable visualization tool, Genome3D, for integrating and displaying epigenomic data within a prescribed three-dimensional physical model of the human genome. In order to integrate and visualize large volume of data, novel statistical and mathematical approaches have been developed to reduce the size of the data. To our knowledge, this is the first such tool developed that can visualize human genome in three-dimension. We describe here the major features of Genome3D and discuss our multi-scale data framework using a representative basic physical model. We then demonstrate many of the issues and benefits of multi-resolution data integration. Conclusions Genome3D is a software visualization tool that explores a wide range of structural genomic and epigenetic data. Data from various sources of differing scales can be integrated within a hierarchical framework that is easily adapted to new developments concerning the structure of the physical genome. In addition, our tool has a simple annotation mechanism to incorporate non-structural information. Genome3D is unique is its ability to manipulate large amounts of multi-resolution data from diverse sources to uncover complex and new structural relationships within the genome. PMID:20813045

  6. Validation of a PicoGreen-based DNA quantification integrated in an RNA extraction method for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Sonnaert, Maarten; Roberts, Scott J; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2012-06-01

    DNA measurement and RNA extraction are two frequently used methods for cell characterization. In the conventional protocols, they require similar, but separate samples and in most cases, different pretreatments. The few combined protocols that exist still include time-consuming steps. Hence, to establish an efficient combined RNA extraction and DNA measurement protocol for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures, a PicoGreen-based DNA measurement was integrated in an existing RNA extraction protocol. It was validated by analysis of the influence of different lysis buffers, RLT, RA1, or Trizol, used for RNA extraction on the measured DNA concentration. The DNA cell yield was evaluated both in cell suspensions (2D) and on 3D cell-seeded scaffolds. Results showed that the different RNA lysis buffers caused a concentration-dependent perturbation of the PicoGreen signal. The measured DNA concentrations in 2D and 3D using RLT and RA1 buffer were comparable, also to the positive control. We, therefore, concluded that RNA extraction protocols using RA1 or RLT buffer allow the integration of a DNA quantification step without the buffer influencing the results. Hence, the combined DNA measurement and RNA extraction offer an alternative for DNA measurement techniques that is time and sample saving, for both 2D cell cultures and specific 3D constructs.

  7. Three dimensional Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    We extend the physics of graphene to three dimensional systems by showing that Dirac points can exist on the Fermi surface of realistic materials in three dimensions. Many of the exotic electronic properties of graphene can be ascribed to the pseudorelativistic behavior of its charge carriers due to two dimensional Dirac points on the Fermi surface. We show that certain nonsymmorphic spacegroups exhibit Dirac points among the irreducible representations of the appropriate little group at high symmetry points on the surface of the Brillouin zone. We provide a list of all Brillouin zone momenta in the 230 spacegroups that can host Dirac points. We describe microscopic considerations necessary to design materials in one of the candidate spacegroups such that the Dirac point appears at the Fermi energy without any additional non-Dirac-like Fermi pockets. We use density functional theory based methods to propose six new Dirac semimetals: BiO 2 and SbO2 in the beta-cristobalite lattice (spacegroup 227), and BiCaSiO4, BiMgSiO4, BiAlInO 4, and BiZnSiO4 in the distorted spinels lattice (spacegroup 74). Additionally we derive effective Dirac Hamiltonians given group representative operators as well as tight binding models incorporating spin-orbit coupling. Finally we study the Fermi surface of zincblende (spacegroup 216) HgTe which is effectively point-like at Gamma in the Brillouin zone and exhibits accidental degeneracies along a threefold rotation axis. Whereas compressive strain gaps the band structure into a topological insulator, tensile strain shifts the accidental degeneracies away from Gamma and enlarges the Fermi surface. States on the Fermi surface exhibit nontrivial spin texture marked by winding of spins around the threefold rotation axis and by spin vortices indicating a change in the winding number. This is confirmed by microscopic calculations performed in tensile strained HgTe and Hg0.5Zn 0.5 Te as well as k.p theory. We conclude with a summary of recent

  8. Three-Dimensional, Inkjet-Printed Organic Transistors and Integrated Circuits with 100% Yield, High Uniformity, and Long-Term Stability.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jimin; Takeda, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Cho, Kilwon; Tokito, Shizuo; Jung, Sungjune

    2016-11-22

    In this paper, we demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits (ICs) based on a 3D complementary organic field-effect transistor (3D-COFET). The transistor-on-transistor structure was achieved by vertically stacking a p-type OFET over an n-type OFET with a shared gate joining the two transistors, effectively halving the footprint of printed transistors. All the functional layers including organic semiconductors, source/drain/gate electrodes, and interconnection paths were fully inkjet-printed except a parylene dielectric which was deposited by chemical vapor deposition. An array of printed 3D-COFETs and their inverter logic gates comprising over 100 transistors showed 100% yield, and the uniformity and long-term stability of the device were also investigated. A full-adder circuit, the most basic computing unit, has been successfully demonstrated using nine NAND gates based on the 3D structure. The present study fulfills the essential requirements for the fabrication of organic printed complex ICs (increased transistor density, 100% yield, high uniformity, and long-term stability), and the findings can be applied to realize more complex digital/analogue ICs and intelligent devices.

  9. Three-dimensional echocardiographic technology.

    PubMed

    Salgo, Ivan S

    2007-05-01

    This article addresses the current state of the art of technology in three-dimensional echocardiography as it applies to transducer design, beam forming, display, and quantification. Because three-dimensional echocardiography encompasses many technical and clinical areas, this article reviews its strengths and limitations and concludes with an analysis of what to use when.

  10. Three-dimensional laser microvision.

    PubMed

    Shimotahira, H; Iizuka, K; Chu, S C; Wah, C; Costen, F; Yoshikuni, Y

    2001-04-10

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 mum; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 mum.

  11. Three-Dimensional Laser Microvision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimotahira, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Keigo; Chu, Sun-Chun; Wah, Christopher; Costen, Furnie; Yoshikuni, Yuzo

    2001-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 m; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 m.

  12. Submicron bidirectional all-optical plasmonic switches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Xiang; Xiao, Jinghua; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-small all-optical switches are of importance in highly integrated optical communication and computing networks. However, the weak nonlinear light-matter interactions in natural materials present an enormous challenge to realize efficiently switching for the ultra-short interaction lengths. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a submicron bidirectional all-optical plasmonic switch with an asymmetric T-shape single slit. Sharp asymmetric spectra as well as significant field enhancements (about 18 times that in the conventional slit case) occur in the symmetry-breaking structure. Consequently, both of the surface plasmon polaritons propagating in the opposite directions on the metal surface are all-optically controlled inversely at the same time with the on/off switching ratios of >6 dB for the device lateral dimension of <1 μm. Moreover, in such a submicron structure, the coupling of free-space light and the on-chip bidirectional switching are integrated together. This submicron bidirectional all-optical switch may find important applications in the highly integrated plasmonic circuits. PMID:23486232

  13. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-23

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  14. All-optical analog comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  15. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  16. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  17. All-optical reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  18. Fast all-optical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Poliakov, Evgeni Y. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method wherein polarization rotation in alkali vapors or other mediums is used for all-optical switching and digital logic and where the rate of operation is proportional to the amplitude of the pump field. High rates of speed are accomplished by Rabi flopping of the atomic states using a continuously operating monochromatic atomic beam as the pump.

  19. Energy-efficient 0.26-Tb/s coherent-optical OFDM transmission using photonic-integrated all-optical discrete Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Kang, I; Liu, X; Chandrasekhar, S; Rasras, M; Jung, H; Cappuzzo, M; Gomez, L T; Chen, Y F; Buhl, L; Cabot, S; Jaques, J

    2012-01-16

    We propose a novel energy-efficient coherent-optical OFDM transmission scheme based on hybrid optical-electronic signal processing. We demonstrate transmission of a 0.26-Tb/s OFDM superchannel, consisting of 13 x 20-Gb/s polarization-multiplexed QPSK subcarrier channels, over 400-km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) with BER less than 6.3x10(-4) using all-optical Fourier transform processing and electronic 7-tap blind digital equalization per subchannel. We further explore long-haul transmission over up to 960 km SSMF and show that the electronic signal processing is capable of compensating chromatic dispersion up to 16,000 ps/nm using only 15 taps per subchannel, even in the presence of strong inter-carrier interference.

  20. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  1. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  2. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  3. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  4. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  5. 3DNA: a versatile, integrated software system for the analysis, rebuilding, and visualization of three-dimensional nucleic-acid structures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a set of protocols showing how to use the 3DNA suite of programs to analyze, rebuild, and visualize three-dimensional nucleic-acid structures. The software determines a wide range of conformational parameters, including the identities and rigid-body parameters of interacting bases and base-pair steps, the nucleotides comprising helical fragments, the area of overlap of stacked bases, etc. The reconstruction of three-dimensional structure takes advantage of rigorously defined rigid-body parameters, producing rectangular block representations of the nucleic-acid bases and base pairs and all-atom models with approximate sugar-phosphate backbones. The visualization components create vector-based drawings and scenes that can be rendered as raster-graphics images, allowing for easy generation of publication-quality figures. The utility programs use geometric variables to control the view and scale of an object, for comparison of related structures. The commands run in seconds even for large structures. The software and related information are available at http://3dna.rutgers.edu/. PMID:18600227

  6. Three dimensional contact/impact methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of three-dimensional interface mechanics between reactor components and structures during static contact or dynamic impact is necessary to realistically evaluate their structural integrity to off-normal loads. In our studies of postulated core energy release events, we have found that significant structure-structure interactions occur in some reactor vessel head closure designs and that fluid-structure interactions occur within the reactor vessel. Other examples in which three-dimensional interface mechanics play an important role are: (1) impact response of shipping casks containing spent fuel, (2) whipping pipe impact on reinforced concrete panels or pipe-to-pipe impact after a pipe break, (3) aircraft crash on secondary containment structures, (4) missiles generated by turbine failures or tornados, and (5) drops of heavy components due to lifting accidents. The above is a partial list of reactor safety problems that require adequate treatment of interface mechanics and are discussed in this paper.

  7. Three-dimensional perspective visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    It was demonstrated that image processing computer graphic techniques can provide an effective means of physiographic analysis of remotely sensed regions through the use of three-dimensional perspective rendering. THe methods used to simulate and animate three-dimensional surfaces from two-dimensional imagery and digital elevation models are explained. A brief historic look at JPL's efforts in this field and several examples of animations, illustrating the evolution of these techniques from 1985, are shown. JPL's current research in this area is discussed along with examples of technology transfer and potential commercial application. The software is part of the VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) image processing system which was developed at the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of JPL.

  8. Three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for assessing waste sludge hydrolysis at different pretreated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Guo, Liang; Li, Qianqian; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Jin, Chunji

    2016-12-01

    Heat pretreatment process can promote sludge hydrolysis and enhance the degradability of waste sludge. The effect of heat pretreatment at different temperatures on the changes of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), carbohydrates, and proteins and the structural and functional properties of organics in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and dissolved organic matters (DOM) were systematically investigated. Heat pretreatment was conducted at 65, 80, 100, and 121 °C for 30 min. The SCOD in DOM increased with pretreated temperatures. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was utilized to evaluate the biodegradable and non-biodegradable components in EPS and DOM. Moreover, the humification index (HIX) and the fluorescence index (FI) were used to evaluate the humification and DOM source. At 80 °C, the percent fluorescence response (P i,n ) of easily biodegradable soluble microbial by-product substance was higher than others; meanwhile, little non-biodegradable humic acid-like substance was accumulated. In order to enhance sludge biodegradability, 80 °C was chosen as the optimal temperature for heat pretreatment.

  9. Temporal and spatial dynamics of large lake hypoxia: Integrating statistical and three-dimensional dynamic models to enhance lake management criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocaniov, Serghei A.; Scavia, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia or low bottom water dissolved oxygen (DO) is a world-wide problem of management concern requiring an understanding and ability to monitor and predict its spatial and temporal dynamics. However, this is often made difficult in large lakes and coastal oceans because of limited spatial and temporal coverage of field observations. We used a calibrated and validated three-dimensional ecological model of Lake Erie to extend a statistical relationship between hypoxic extent and bottom water DO concentrations to explore implications of the broader temporal and spatial development and dissipation of hypoxia. We provide the first numerical demonstration that hypoxia initiates in the nearshore, not the deep portion of the basin, and that the threshold used to define hypoxia matters in both spatial and temporal dynamics and in its sensitivity to climate. We show that existing monitoring programs likely underestimate both maximum hypoxic extent and the importance of low oxygen in the nearshore, discuss implications for ecosystem and drinking water protection, and recommend how these results could be used to efficiently and economically extend monitoring programs.

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of degradation products after treatment of methylene blue aqueous solution with three-dimensionally integrated microsolution plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Nomura, Ayano; Hayashi, Yui; Tanaka, Kenji; Goto, Motonobu

    2016-01-01

    Methylene blue can be degraded in three-dimensionally integrated microsolution plasma. The degradation products have been analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry to understand the degradation mechanisms. The results of MALDI TOF mass spectrometry have shown that sulfoxide is formed at the first stage of the oxidation. Then, partial oxidation proceeds on the methyl groups left on the sulfoxide. The sulfoxide is subsequently separated to two benzene derivatives. Finally, weak functional groups are removed from the benzene derivatives.

  11. Quasicrystalline three-dimensional foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Graner, F.; Mosseri, R.; Sadoc, J.-F.

    2017-03-01

    We present a numerical study of quasiperiodic foams, in which the bubbles are generated as duals of quasiperiodic Frank–Kasper phases. These foams are investigated as potential candidates to the celebrated Kelvin problem for the partition of three-dimensional space with equal volume bubbles and minimal surface area. Interestingly, one of the computed structures falls close to (but still slightly above) the best known Weaire–Phelan periodic candidate. In addition we find a correlation between the normalized bubble surface area and the root mean squared deviation of the number of faces, giving an additional clue to understanding the main geometrical ingredients driving the Kelvin problem.

  12. Gli3 coordinates three-dimensional patterning and growth of the tectum and cerebellum by integrating Shh and Fgf8 signaling.

    PubMed

    Blaess, Sandra; Stephen, Daniel; Joyner, Alexandra L

    2008-06-01

    The coordination of anterior-posterior (AP) and dorsal-ventral (DV) patterning of the mesencephalon (mes) and rhombomere 1 (r1) is instrumental for the development of three distinct brain structures: the tectum and cerebellum dorsally and the tegmentum ventrally. Patterning of the mes/r1 is primarily mediated by signaling molecules secreted from two organizers: sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the floor plate (DV) and Fgf8 from the isthmus (AP). Gli3, a zinc-finger transcription factor in the Shh signaling pathway, has been implicated in regulating Fgf8 expression and is therefore a potential candidate for coordinating the action of the two organizers. By inactivating mouse Gli3 at successive embryonic time points in vivo, we uncovered the extent and the underlying mechanism of Gli3 function in the mes/r1. We demonstrate that before E9.0, Gli3 is required for establishing a distinct posterior tectum, isthmus and cerebellum, but does not play a role in the development of the tegmentum. Between E9.0 and E11.0, Gli3 continues to be required for isthmus and cerebellum development, but primarily for defining the cerebellar foliation pattern. We show that Gli3 regulates patterning of the isthmus and cerebellar anlage by confining Fgf8 expression to the isthmus, and attenuates growth of dorsal r1 (before E11.0) and the dorsal mes and isthmus (beyond E11.0) through regulation of cell proliferation and viability. In conclusion, our results show that Gli3 is essential for the coordinated three-dimensional patterning and growth of the dorsal mes/r1.

  13. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Greengard, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    Three-dimensional vortex methods for the computation of incompressible fluid flow are presented from a unified point of view. Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms; in both of them, the vorticity is evaluated by a discretization of the spatial derivative of the flow map. The fact that the filament method, the one which is most often used in practice, can be formulated as a version of the Beale and Majda algorithm in a curved coordinate system is used to give a convergence theorem for the filament method. The method of Anderson is also discussed, in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. This remains true even when time discretization is taken into account. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed. 36 references, 4 figures.

  14. High speed all optical networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chlamtac, Imrich; Ganz, Aura

    1990-01-01

    An inherent problem of conventional point-to-point wide area network (WAN) architectures is that they cannot translate optical transmission bandwidth into comparable user available throughput due to the limiting electronic processing speed of the switching nodes. The first solution to wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) based WAN networks that overcomes this limitation is presented. The proposed Lightnet architecture takes into account the idiosyncrasies of WDM switching/transmission leading to an efficient and pragmatic solution. The Lightnet architecture trades the ample WDM bandwidth for a reduction in the number of processing stages and a simplification of each switching stage, leading to drastically increased effective network throughputs. The principle of the Lightnet architecture is the construction and use of virtual topology networks, embedded in the original network in the wavelength domain. For this construction Lightnets utilize the new concept of lightpaths which constitute the links of the virtual topology. Lightpaths are all-optical, multihop, paths in the network that allow data to be switched through intermediate nodes using high throughput passive optical switches. The use of the virtual topologies and the associated switching design introduce a number of new ideas, which are discussed in detail.

  15. Three-dimensional display technologies.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain's power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies.

  16. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  17. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  18. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengard, C. A.

    1984-08-01

    Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms. The method of Anderson in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field is discussed. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed.

  19. All-optical fast random number generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2010-09-13

    We propose a scheme of all-optical random number generator (RNG), which consists of an ultra-wide bandwidth (UWB) chaotic laser, an all-optical sampler and an all-optical comparator. Free from the electric-device bandwidth, it can generate 10Gbit/s random numbers in our simulation. The high-speed bit sequences can pass standard statistical tests for randomness after all-optical exclusive-or (XOR) operation.

  20. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered ‘quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory. PMID:25146338

  1. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-24

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle-light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd's mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  2. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A.; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle–light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd’s mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  3. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  4. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  5. Demonstration of an all-optical routing decision circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Martinez, J. M.; Herrera, J.; Clavero, R.; Ramos, F.; Koonen, A. M. J.; Marti, J.; Dorren, H. J. S.

    2007-11-01

    The routing decision functionality by all-optically interconnecting semiconductor-based all-optical logic gates and flip-flops is demonstrated in the frame of an all-optical packet switching network. We experimentally show that the output of the all-optical 2-bit correlator is capable of toggling the states of the integrated flip-flop every 2.5 ns via an adaptation stage. High extinction ratios are obtained at the output of the flip-flop, which can be used to feed a high-speed wavelength converter to complete the routing functionality of the AOLS node. The potential integration of these SOA-MZI based devices make the proposed approach a very interesting solution for future packet switched optical networks.

  6. Three-dimensional (3D) coseismic deformation map produced by the 2014 South Napa Earthquake estimated and modeled by SAR and GPS data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, Marco; Albano, Matteo; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a 3D map of coseismic displacements due to the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake, California, obtained by integrating displacement information data from SAR Interferometry (InSAR), Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI), Pixel Offset Tracking (POT) and GPS data acquired by both permanent stations and campaigns sites. This seismic event produced significant surface deformation along the 3D components causing several damages to vineyards, roads and houses. The remote sensing results, i.e. InSAR, MAI and POT, were obtained from the pair of SAR images provided by the Sentinel-1 satellite, launched on April 3rd, 2014. They were acquired on August 7th and 31st along descending orbits with an incidence angle of about 23°. The GPS dataset includes measurements from 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network (BARDN), 301 continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives, and 13 additional campaign sites from Barnhart et al, 2014 [1]. These data constrain the horizontal and vertical displacement components proving to be helpful for the adopted integration method. We exploit the Bayes theory to search for the 3D coseismic displacement components. In particular, for each point, we construct an energy function and solve the problem to find a global minimum. Experimental results are consistent with a strike-slip fault mechanism with an approximately NW-SE fault plane. Indeed, the 3D displacement map shows a strong North-South (NS) component, peaking at about 15 cm, a few kilometers far from the epicenter. The East-West (EW) displacement component reaches its maximum (~10 cm) south of the city of Napa, whereas the vertical one (UP) is smaller, although a subsidence in the order of 8 cm on the east side of the fault can be observed. A source modelling was performed by inverting the estimated displacement components. The best fitting model is given by a ~N330° E-oriented and ~70° dipping fault with a prevailing

  7. Progress Toward an Integration of Process-Structure-Property-Performance Models for "Three-Dimensional (3-D) Printing" of Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Haden, C. V.; Ghamarian, I.; Hayes, B. J.; Ales, T.; Penso, G.; Dixit, V.; Harlow, G.

    2014-07-01

    Electron beam direct manufacturing, synonymously known as electron beam additive manufacturing, along with other additive "3-D printing" manufacturing processes, are receiving widespread attention as a means of producing net-shape (or near-net-shape) components, owing to potential manufacturing benefits. Yet, materials scientists know that differences in manufacturing processes often significantly influence the microstructure of even widely accepted materials and, thus, impact the properties and performance of a material in service. It is important to accelerate the understanding of the processing-structure-property relationship of materials being produced via these novel approaches in a framework that considers the performance in a statistically rigorous way. This article describes the development of a process model, the assessment of key microstructural features to be incorporated into a microstructure simulation model, a novel approach to extract a constitutive equation to predict tensile properties in Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64), and a probabilistic approach to measure the fidelity of the property model against real data. This integrated approach will provide designers a tool to vary process parameters and understand the influence on performance, enabling design and optimization for these highly visible manufacturing approaches.

  8. Three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for assessing waste sludge hydrolysis treated with multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Lu, Mingmin; Li, Qianqian; Zhang, Jiawen; Zong, Yan; She, Zonglian

    2014-11-01

    The hydrolysis effect of waste sludge after multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria pretreatments is investigated using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) in this study. The compositional characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and dissolved organic matters (DOM) were analyzed to evaluate the sludge disintegration. The EPS and cell wall in sludge were disrupted after hydrolysis which led to carbohydrate, protein and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of DOM increasing in sludge supernatant. The bio-degradability level in the extracted fractions of EPS and DOM depending on the fluorescence zones was found after hydrolysis. The highest proportion of percent fluorescence response (Pi,n) in EPS and DOM was soluble microbial by-product and humic acid-like organics. A significant increase of humic acid-like organics in DOM after thermophilic bacteria hydrolysis was obtained. The assessment of hydrolysis using EEM coupled with FRI provided a new insight toward the bio-utilization process of waste sludge.

  9. Pulsatile cardiac tissue grafts using a novel three-dimensional cell sheet manipulation technique functionally integrates with the host heart, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akira; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Itabashi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Kira, Shinichiro; Hayakawa, Keiko; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Tanimoto, Kojiro; Hagiwara, Yoko; Satoh, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Okano, Teruo; Ogawa, Satoshi

    2006-03-17

    We devised a method of fabricating easily transplantable scaffoldless 3D heart tissue, made with a novel cell-sheet (CS) technology from cultured cardiomyocytes using a fibrin polymer coated dish. In the present study, we tested in vivo electrical communication which is essential for improving heart function between the host heart and the grafted CS. The epicardial surface of the ventricle of an anesthetized open-chest nude rat was ablated by applying a heated metal. Bilayered CS was obtained from neonatal rat primary culture. CS was transplanted onto the injured myocardial surface (sMI) (sMI+sheet group). The rats were allowed to recover for 1 to 4 weeks, to stabilize the grafts. Action potentials (APs) from the excised perfused heart were monitored by the fluorescence signal of di-4ANEPPS with a high speed charge-coupled device camera. The APs were observed under epicardial pacing of the host heart or the CS grafts. The pacing threshold of the current output was measured in the sMI+sheet group and in the nongrafted sMI group at the center of the sMI and in the normal zone (Nz). Bidirectional AP propagation between the sMI and Nz was observed in the sMI+sheet group (n=14), but was blocked at the marginal area of the sMI in the sMI group (n=9). The ratio of the pacing threshold (sMI/Nz) was significantly lower in the sMI+sheet than in the sMI group (3.0+/-0.7, 19.0+/-6.1 respectively P<0.05). There were neither spontaneous nor pacing-induced arrhythmias in these two groups. Bidirectional smooth AP propagation between the host heart and the grafted CS was observed. This finding suggested functional integration of this CS graft with the host heart without serious arrhythmia.

  10. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include "tritter" and "quarter" as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics.

  11. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include “tritter” and “quarter” as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics. PMID:23181189

  12. Three-dimensional structure of the greater Los Angeles basin: Insights from transects and models that integrate industry seismic reflection profiles, well logs, surface geology, and relocated earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Suess, M. P.; Rivero, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    We describe the geometry and activity of major, seismogenic fault systems in the Los Angeles basin and adjacent offshore areas using regional seismic reflection transects and three-dimensional structural and velocity models. The seismic transects, which integrates relocated earthquakes, focal mechanisms, and well control, image several active fault systems (Palos Verdes, Newport-Inglewood, Compton, Las Cienegas, Elysian Park, Puente Hills, Whittier, Oceanside, etc.) that threaten the Los Angeles metropolitan region. The models describe the three dimensional geometry and kinematic interaction of these faults systems, and incorporate 35,000 km of industry seismic reflection data, more than 1,000 well logs, surface geology, and re-located earthquake catalogs. The Los Angeles basin lies at the juncture of the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, and thus contains fault systems that belong to both of these tectonic provinces. The southern basin and Inner California Borderlands are dominated by northwest-southeast trending strike-slip and blind-thrust systems, parallel to the grain of the Peninsular Ranges, that partition oblique convergence. Many of these structures are reactivated normal faults that formed during Neogene rifting of the southern California margin. In contrast, the northern Los Angeles basin is dominated by east-west trending thrust and strike-slip systems that accommodate north-south shortening. These faults are part of the Transverse Ranges province, and locally dissect older Peninsular Range trends that are carried northward by motion along the San Andreas and related strike-slip fault systems. We consider the implications of these tectonic models for regional earthquake hazards assessment.

  13. Three dimensional identification card and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Wang, Shaoqing; Li, Chao; Li, Hao; Liu, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional Identification Card, with its three-dimensional personal image displayed and stored for personal identification, is supposed be the advanced version of the present two-dimensional identification card in the future [1]. Three dimensional Identification Card means that there are three-dimensional optical techniques are used, the personal image on ID card is displayed to be three-dimensional, so we can see three dimensional personal face. The ID card also stores the three-dimensional face information in its inside electronics chip, which might be recorded by using two-channel cameras, and it can be displayed in computer as three-dimensional images for personal identification. Three-dimensional ID card might be one interesting direction to update the present two-dimensional card in the future. Three-dimension ID card might be widely used in airport custom, entrance of hotel, school, university, as passport for on-line banking, registration of on-line game, etc...

  14. Three-dimensional map construction.

    PubMed

    Jenks, G F; Brown, D A

    1966-11-18

    Three-dimensional maps are useful tools which have been neglected for some time. They shouldbe more commonly used, and familiarity with the techniques discussed in this article should dispel any qualms anyone might ve about needing artistic talent to nstruct them. The saving in time esulting from the use of an anamorphoser provides a further incentive. The anamorphoser transformations discussed above were all prepared by using straight slits, oriented at right angles to each other and placed so that all planes of the elements were parallel to each other. It is possible to vary these conditions in an infinite number of ways and thereby produce nonparallel tranceformations. Some of these variations are illustrated in Fig. 10. All the illustrations in Fig. 10 are transformations of the planimetric weather map shown in Fig. 8A. The variations used for the maps of Fig. 10 are as follows. (A) All planes parallel, with a curved rear slit; (B) all planes parallel, with curved slits front and rear; ( C) all planes parallel, with S-shaped rear slit; (D) all planes parallel, with an undulating rear slit; (E) all planes parallel, with curved front and undulating rear slit; (F) plane of the original rotated on the horizontal axis-both slits curved; (G) plane of the original rotated on thevertical axis- both slits curved; (H) plane of the original rotated on the horizontal axis -both slits straight. These are only a few of the many transformations which can be made with an anamorphoser, butthey do point toward some interesting possibilities. For example, it appears that maps based onone projection might be altered to satisfy the coordinates of a completely different projection. Note, for example, the change of parallels from concave to convex curves (Figs. 8A and 10A) and the change from converging meridians to diverging meridians (Figs. 8A and l0G). Similarly, the grids of maps B, F, and H of Fig. 10 approximate projections which are quite different from the original. Other

  15. Polymeric components for all-optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Beeson, Karl W.; Pant, Deepti; Blomquist, Robert; Shacklette, Lawrence W.; McFarland, Michael J.

    2000-04-01

    All-optical networks that exhibit high speed, high capacity, scalability, configurability, and transparency are becoming a reality through the exploitation of the unique properties of fiber and integrated optics. An advanced polymeric waveguide technology was developed for affordable passive and active integrated optical elements that address the needs of these networks. We engineered high-performance organic polymers that can be readily made into photonic circuits of controlled numerical apertures and geometries. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, robustness, optical loss, thermal stability, and humidity resistance. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise continuous adjustment of the refractive index over a wide range. In polymer form, they exhibit state-of-the-art optical loss values, suppressed polarization effects, and exceptional environmental stability. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used. The devices we describe include demultiplexers, tunable wavelength filters, digital optical switches, and variable optical attenuators.

  16. The GALAXIE all-optical FEL project

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Arab, E.; Andonian, G.; Cahill, A.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukusawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Jovanovic, I.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Ovodenko, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Putterman, S.; Roberts, K.; Shumail, M.; and others

    2012-12-21

    We describe a comprehensive project, funded under the DARPA AXiS program, to develop an all-optical table-top X-ray FEL based on dielectric acceleration and electromagnetic undulators, yielding a compact source of coherent X-rays for medical and related applications. The compactness of this source demands that high field (>GV/m) acceleration and undulation-inducing fields be employed, thus giving rise to the project's acronym: GV/m AcceLerator And X-ray Integrated Experiment (GALAXIE). There are numerous physics and technical hurdles to surmount in this ambitious scenario, and the integrated solutions include: a biharmonic photonic TW structure, 200 micron wavelength electromagnetic undulators, 5 {mu}m laser development, ultra-high brightness magnetized/asymmetric emittance electron beam generation, and SASE FEL operation. We describe the overall design philosophy of the project, the innovative approaches to addressing the challenges presented by the design, and the significant progress towards realization of these approaches in the nine months since project initialization.

  17. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Petersen, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to integrated circuit packaging technology, and particularly to three dimensional packages involving high density stacks of integrated circuits. A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow ``dummy chips`` are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned on the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  18. 0.6-1.0 V operation set/reset voltage (3 V) generator for three-dimensional integrated resistive random access memory and NAND flash hybrid solid-state drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Hachiya, Shogo; Ishii, Tomoya; Ning, Sheyang; Tsurumi, Kota; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-04-01

    A 0.6-1.0 V, 25.9 mm2 boost converter is proposed to generate resistive random access memory (ReRAM) write (set/reset) voltage for three-dimensional (3D) integrated ReRAM and NAND flash hybrid solid-state drive (SSD). The proposed boost converter uses an integrated area-efficient V BUF generation circuit to obtain short ReRAM sector write time, small circuit size, and small energy consumption simultaneously. In specific, the proposed boost converter reduces ReRAM sector write time by 65% compared with a conventional one-stage boost converter (Conventional 1) which uses 1.0 V operating voltage. On the other hand, by using the same ReRAM sector write time, the proposed boost converter reduces 49% circuit area and 46% energy consumption compared with a conventional two-stage boost converter (Conventional 2). In addition, by using the proposed boost converter, the operating voltage, V DD, can be reduced to 0.6 V. The lowest 159 nJ energy consumption can be obtained when V DD is 0.7 V.

  19. Three dimensional imaging with randomly distributed sensors.

    PubMed

    DaneshPanah, Mehdi; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward A

    2008-04-28

    As a promising three dimensional passive imaging modality, Integral Imaging (II) has been investigated widely within the research community. In virtually all of such investigations, there is an implicit assumption that the collection of elemental images lie on a simple geometric surface (e.g. flat, concave, etc), also known as pickup surface. In this paper, we present a generalized framework for 3D II with arbitrary pickup surface geometry and randomly distributed sensor configuration. In particular, we will study the case of Synthetic Aperture Integral Imaging (SAII) with random location of cameras in space, while all cameras have parallel optical axes but different distances from the 3D scene. We assume that the sensors are randomly distributed in 3D volume of pick up space. For 3D reconstruction, a finite number of sensors with known coordinates are randomly selected from within this volume. The mathematical framework for 3D scene reconstruction is developed based on an affine transform representation of imaging under geometrical optics regime. We demonstrate the feasibility of the methods proposed here by experimental results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D imaging using randomly distributed sensors.

  20. Three Dimensional Illustrating--Three-Dimensional Vision and Deception of Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szállassy, Noémi; Gánóczy, Anita; Kriska, György

    2009-01-01

    The wide-spread digital photography and computer use gave the opportunity for everyone to make three-dimensional pictures and to make them public. The new opportunities with three-dimensional techniques give chance for the birth of new artistic photographs. We present in detail the biological roots of three-dimensional visualization, the phenomena…

  1. Three-dimensional velocity measurements using LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Preben

    The design requirements for and development of an LDA that measures the three components of the fluid velocity vector are described. The problems encountered in LDA measurements in highly turbulent flows, multivariate response, velocity bias, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and dynamic range, are discussed. The use of the fringe and/or the reference beam methods to measure the three velocity components, and the use of color, frequency shift, and polarization to separate three velocity projections are examined. Consideration is given to the coordinate transformation, the presentation of three-dimensional LDA data, and the possibility of three-dimensional bias correction. Procedures for conducting three-dimensional LDA measurements are proposed.

  2. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl- + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl-) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  3. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach.

    PubMed

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-07

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl(-) + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl(-)) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  4. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike self-consistent field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-07

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple S{sub N}2 reaction (Cl{sup −} + CH{sub 3}Cl → ClCH{sub 3} + Cl{sup −}) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  5. Numerical investigation of high-contrast ultrafast all-optical switching in low-refractive-index polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zi-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Chen; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    With the development of micro- or nano-fabrication technologies, great interest has been aroused in exploiting photonic crystal nanobeam structures. In this article the design of high-quality-factor (Q) polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities suitable for realizing ultrafast all-optical switching is presented based on the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Adopting the pump-probe technique, the ultrafast dynamic response of the all-optical switching in a nanobeam microcavity with a quality factor of 1000 and modal volume of 1.22 (λ/n)3 is numerically studied and a switching time as fast as 3.6 picoseconds is obtained. Our results indicate the great promise of applying photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities to construct integrated ultrafast tunable photonic devices or circuits incorporating polymer materials with large Kerr nonlinearity and ultrafast response speed.

  6. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  7. Three dimensional optic tissue culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Cardwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioreactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms normal, functional tissue organization and extracellular matrix.

  8. Imaging Three Dimensional Two-Particle Correlations for Heavy-Ion Reaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D; Enokizono, A; Heffner, M; Soltz, R; Danielewicz, P; Pratt, S

    2005-06-27

    The authors report an extension of the source imaging method for analyzing three-dimensional sources from three-dimensional correlations. The technique consists of expanding the correlation data and the underlying source function in spherical harmonics and inverting the resulting system of one-dimensional integral equations. With this strategy, they can image the source function quickly, even with the extremely large data sets common in three-dimensional analyses.

  9. Local observation of modes from three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystals with near-field microspectroscopy under supercontinuum illumination.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baohua; Norton, Andrew H; Li, Jiafang; Rahmani, Adel; Asatryan, Ara A; Botten, Lindsay C; Gu, Min

    2008-05-15

    A near-field microscope coupled with a near-infrared (NIR) supercontinuum source is developed and applied to characterize optical modes in a three-dimensional (3D) woodpile photonic crystal (PC) possessing a NIR partial bandgap. Spatially resolved near-field intensity distributions under different illumination wavelengths demonstrate that the electric fields preferentially dwell in the polymer rods or in the gaps between rods, respectively, for frequencies below or above the stop gap, as predicted by the 3D finite-difference time-domain modeling. Near-field microspectroscopy further reveals that the position-dependent band-edge effect plays an important role in PC-based all-optical integrated devices.

  10. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be construed as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  11. Topology of three-dimensional separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Peake, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that patterns of skin-friction lines and external streamlines reflect the properties of continuous vector fields, topology rules define a small number of singular points (nodes, saddle points, and foci) that characterize the patterns on the surface and on particular projections of the flow (e.g., the crossflow plane). The restricted number of singular points and the rules that they obey are considered as an organizing principle whose finite number of elements can be combined in various ways to connect together the properties common to all steady three dimensional viscous flows. Introduction of a distinction between local and global properties of the flow resolves an ambiguity in the proper definition of a three dimensional separated flow. Adoption of the notions of topological structure, structural stability, and bifurcation provides a framework to describe how three dimensional separated flows originate and succeed each other as the relevant parameters of the problem are varied.

  12. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be constrained as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  13. Vision in our three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of our perceptual experience are dominated by the fact that our two eyes point forward. Whilst the location of our eyes leaves the environment behind our head inaccessible to vision, co-ordinated use of our two eyes gives us direct access to the three-dimensional structure of the scene in front of us, through the mechanism of stereoscopic vision. Scientific understanding of the different brain regions involved in stereoscopic vision and three-dimensional spatial cognition is changing rapidly, with consequent influences on fields as diverse as clinical practice in ophthalmology and the technology of virtual reality devices. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269595

  14. Three-dimensional magnetic bubble memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compact memory uses magnetic bubble technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement, in the form of stacks of magnetic bubble layers, is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. Output tracks are used within each layer to allow data to be accessed uniquely and unambiguously. Storage can be achieved using either current access or field access magnetic bubble technology. Optical sensing via the Faraday effect is used to detect data. Optical sensing facilitates the accessing of data from within the three-dimensional package and lends itself to parallel operation for supporting high data rates and vector and parallel processing.

  15. Three-dimensional displays and stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2011-08-07

    Procedures for three-dimensional image reconstruction that are based on the optical and neural apparatus of human stereoscopic vision have to be designed to work in conjunction with it. The principal methods of implementing stereo displays are described. Properties of the human visual system are outlined as they relate to depth discrimination capabilities and achieving optimal performance in stereo tasks. The concept of depth rendition is introduced to define the change in the parameters of three-dimensional configurations for cases in which the physical disposition of the stereo camera with respect to the viewed object differs from that of the observer's eyes.

  16. Fabrication of three dimensional microstructure fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ying; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui; Zhong, Yongchun

    2015-05-01

    A method of fabricating three dimensional (3D) microstructured fiber is presented. Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were coated around the surface of a micro-fiber through isothermal heating evaporation induced self-assembly method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image shows that the colloidal crystal has continuous, uniform, and well-ordered face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, with [111] crystallographic direction normal to the surface of micro-fiber. This micro-fiber with three-dimensional photonic crystals structure is very useful in the applications of micro-fiber sensors or filters.

  17. Three-dimensional stochastic vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, R.; Pulvirenti, M.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of point vortices approximate, under suitable limits, the two-dimensional Euler flow for an ideal fluid. To find particle models for three-dimensional flows is a more intricate problem. A stochastic version of the algorithm introduced by Beale amd Maida (1982) for simulating the behavior of a three-dimensional Euler flow is introduced here, and convergence to the Navier-Stokes (NS) flow in R exp 3 is shown. The result is based on a stochastic Lagrangian picture of the NS equations.

  18. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-30

    13-1-0026 entitled "Three- Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics," Principal Investigator Dr. Ying-Tsong Lin. Sincerely, ;l1,J-Ju1𔃻 ~{hjM1...30/03/2016 01/01/2013-12/31/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBERS Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics 5b, GRANT NUMBER N0001 4-13-1... Water Acoustics Dr. Ying-Tsong Lin Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543

  19. All-optical flip-flop based on coupled SOA-PSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Chen; Wang, Fu

    2016-12-01

    The semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has obvious advantages in all-optical signal processing, because of the simple structure, strong non-linearity, and easy integration. A variety of all-optical signal processing functions, such as all-optical wavelength conversion, all-optical logic gates and all-optical sampling, can be completed by SOA. So the SOA has been widespread concerned in the field of all-optical signal processing. Recently, the polarization rotation effect of SOA is receiving considerable interest, and many researchers have launched numerous research work utilizing this effect. In this paper, a new all-optical flip-flop structure using polarization switch (PSW) based on polarization rotation effect of SOA is presented.

  20. Advanced three-dimensional dynamic analysis by boundary element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, P. K.; Ahma, S.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced formulations of boundary element method for periodic, transient transform domain and transient time domain solution of three-dimensional solids have been implemented using a family of isoparametric boundary elements. The necessary numerical integration techniques as well as the various solution algorithms are described. The developed analysis has been incorporated in a fully general purpose computer program BEST3D which can handle up to 10 subregions. A number of numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the dynamic analyses.

  1. Three-dimensional models. [For orbital celestial mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. )

    1990-06-01

    The Schwarzschild (1979) approach to the analysis of three-dimensional galactic models is reviewed. An analysis of triaxial Staeckel models is discussed which shows that such models have a wide variety of possible distribution functions. The uniqueness that Schwarzschild first encountered in his discrete formulation of the problem of finding a three-integral distribution function for a triaxial density is real and not an artifact of the finite cell approximation. 27 refs.

  2. Scaffold informatics and biomimetic design: three-dimensional medical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Martins, Tatiana Al-Chueyr Pereira; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-01-01

    This chapter briefly describes the concepts underlying medical imaging reconstruction and the requirements for its integration with subsequent applications as BioCAD, rapid prototyping (RP), and rapid manufacturing (RM) of implants, scaffolds, or organs. As an introduction to the problem, principles related to data acquisition, enhancement, segmentation, and interpolation are discussed. After this, some available three-dimensional medical reconstruction software tools are presented. Finally, applications of these technologies are illustrated.

  3. Three-dimensional patterning methods and related devices

    DOEpatents

    Putnam, Morgan C.; Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-12-27

    Three-dimensional patterning methods of a three-dimensional microstructure, such as a semiconductor wire array, are described, in conjunction with etching and/or deposition steps to pattern the three-dimensional microstructure.

  4. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Particle Tracks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests ways to bring home to the introductory physics student some of the excitement of recent discoveries in particle physics. Describes particle detectors and encourages the use of the Standard Model along with real images of particle tracks to determine three-dimensional views of tracks. (MVL)

  5. Three Dimensional Display Of Meteorological Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotch, Stanley L.

    1988-01-01

    Even a cursory reading of any daily newspaper shows that we are in the midst of a dramatic revolution in computer graphics. Virtually every day some new piece of hardware or software is announced, adding to the tools available to the working scientist. Three dimensional graphics form a significant part of this revolution having become virtually commonplace in advertising and on television.

  6. Three-dimensional chiral photonic superlattices.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Fischer, H; von Freymann, G; Wegener, M

    2010-01-15

    We investigate three-dimensional photonic superlattices composed of polymeric helices in various spatial checkerboard-like arrangements. Depending on the relative phase shift and handedness of the chiral building blocks, different circular-dichroism resonances appear or are suppressed. Samples corresponding to four different configurations are fabricated by direct laser writing. The measured optical transmittance spectra are in good agreement with numerical calculations.

  7. Three-dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichert, Anke

    2001-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flue virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  8. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  10. Three dimensional reconnection in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical issues related to three-dimensional reconnection and its application to the space and astrophysical environment are reviewed. Consideration is given to the meaning of reconnection in three dimensions, the way in which periodic and nonperiodic magnetic topologies alter the physics of reconnections, and the effects of chaotic magnetic fields on the reconnection process.

  11. [Three Dimensional Display in Nuclear Medicine].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Satomi; Souma, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques to obtain a tomographic image in nuclear medicine such as PET and SPECT are widely used. It is necessary to interpreting all of the tomographic images obtained in order to accurately evaluate the individual lesion, whereas three dimensional display is often useful in order to overview and evaluate the feature of the entire lesion or disease such as the position, size and abnormal pattern. In Japan, the use of three dimensional image analysis workstation with an application of the co-registration and image fusion between the functional images such as PET or SPECT and anatomical images such as CT or MRI has been generalized. In addition, multimodality imaging system such as a PET/CT and SPECT/CT has been widespread. Therefore, it is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy using three dimensionally image fusion to functional images with poor anatomical information. In this commentary, as an example of a three dimensional display that are commonly used in nuclear medicine examination in Japan, brain regions, cardiac region and bone and tumor region will be introduced separately.

  12. Growing Three-Dimensional Cocultures Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory process provides environmental conditions favoring simultaneous growth of cocultures of mammalian cells of more than one type. Cultures become three-dimensional tissuelike assemblies serving as organoid models of differentiation of cells. Process used, for example, to study growth of human colon cancers, starting from mixtures of normal colonic fibroblasts and partially differentiated colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  13. Three-Dimensional Pointers for Stereoscopic Projection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, H. J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Because class size often limits student opportunity to handle individual models, teachers use stereoscopic projections to demonstrate structural features. Describes three-dimensional pointers for use with different projection systems so teachers can indicate a particular atom or bond to entire classes, avoiding the perspective problems inherent in…

  14. Three-Dimensional Printing Surgical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle F.; Butler, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional printing, a technology used for decades in the industrial field, gains a lot of attention in the medical field for its potential benefits. With advancement of desktop printers, this technology is accessible and a lot of research is going on in the medical field. Objective: To evaluate its application in surgical field, which may include but not limited to surgical planning, surgical education, implants, and prosthesis, which are the focus of this review. Methods: Research was conducted by searching PubMed, Web of science, and other reliable sources. We included original articles and excluded articles based on animals, those more than 10 years old, and those not in English. These articles were evaluated, and relevant studies were included in this review. Discussion: Three-dimensional printing shows a potential benefit in surgical application. Printed implants were used in patient in a few cases and show successful results; however, longer follow-up and more trials are needed. Surgical and medical education is believed to be more efficient with this technology than the current practice. Printed surgical instrument and surgical planning are also believed to improve with three-dimensional printing. Conclusion: Three-dimensional printing can be a very powerful tool in the near future, which can aid the medical field that is facing a lot of challenges and obstacles. However, despite the reported results, further research on larger samples and analytical measurements should be conducted to ensure this technology's impact on the practice. PMID:26301002

  15. Three-dimensional implicit lambda methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napolitano, M.; Dadone, A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper derives the three dimensional lambda-formulation equations for a general orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system and provides various block-explicit and block-implicit methods for solving them, numerically. Three model problems, characterized by subsonic, supersonic and transonic flow conditions, are used to assess the reliability and compare the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  16. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-04

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  17. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications. PMID:27699130

  18. Quadratic algebras for three-dimensional superintegrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daskaloyannis, C. Tanoudis, Y.

    2010-02-15

    The three-dimensional superintegrable systems with quadratic integrals of motion have five functionally independent integrals, one among them is the Hamiltonian. Kalnins, Kress, and Miller have proved that in the case of nondegenerate potentials with quadratic integrals of motion there is a sixth quadratic integral, which is linearly independent of the other integrals. The existence of this sixth integral implies that the integrals of motion form a ternary parafermionic-like quadratic Poisson algebra with five generators. In this contribution we investigate the structure of this algebra. We show that in all the nondegenerate cases there is at least one subalgebra of three integrals having a Poisson quadratic algebra structure, which is similar to the two-dimensional case.

  19. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  20. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing.

  1. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane.

  2. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane. 7 figs.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  4. Bootstrapping the Three Dimensional Supersymmetric Ising Model.

    PubMed

    Bobev, Nikolay; El-Showk, Sheer; Mazáč, Dalimil; Paulos, Miguel F

    2015-07-31

    We implement the conformal bootstrap program for three dimensional conformal field theories with N=2 supersymmetry and find universal constraints on the spectrum of operator dimensions in these theories. By studying the bounds on the dimension of the first scalar appearing in the operator product expansion of a chiral and an antichiral primary, we find a kink at the expected location of the critical three dimensional N=2 Wess-Zumino model, which can be thought of as a supersymmetric analog of the critical Ising model. Focusing on this kink, we determine, to high accuracy, the low-lying spectrum of operator dimensions of the theory, as well as the stress-tensor two-point function. We find that the latter is in an excellent agreement with an exact computation.

  5. Three-dimensional effects on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of boundary layer flows along the walls of wind tunnels were studied to validate the transfer of two dimensional calculations to three dimensional transonic flowfield calculations. Results from trials in various wind tunnels were examind to determine the effects of the wall boundary flow on the control surfaces of an airfoil. Models sliding along a groove in the wall of a channel at sub- and transonic speeds were examined, with the finding that with either nonuniformities in the groove, or even if the channel walls are uniform, the lateral boundary layer can cause variations in the central flow region or alter the onset of shock at the transition point. Models for the effects in both turbulence and in the absence of turbulence are formulated, and it is noted that the characteristics of individual wind tunnels must be studied to quantify any existing three dimensional effects.

  6. Three dimensional fabrication at small size scales

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that we live in a three-dimensional (3D) world and macroscale engineering is 3D, conventional sub-mm scale engineering is inherently two-dimensional (2D). New fabrication and patterning strategies are needed to enable truly three-dimensionally-engineered structures at small size scales. Here, we review strategies that have been developed over the last two decades that seek to enable such millimeter to nanoscale 3D fabrication and patterning. A focus of this review is the strategy of self-assembly, specifically in a biologically inspired, more deterministic form known as self-folding. Self-folding methods can leverage the strengths of lithography to enable the construction of precisely patterned 3D structures and “smart” components. This self-assembling approach is compared with other 3D fabrication paradigms, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:20349446

  7. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-09-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  8. Three-dimensional metallic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2013-12-04

    Boron nitride (BN) and carbon are chemical analogues of each other and share similar structures such as one-dimensional nanotubes, two-dimensional nanosheets characterized by sp(2) bonding, and three-dimensional diamond structures characterized by sp(3) bonding. However, unlike carbon which can be metallic in one, two, and three dimensions, BN is an insulator, irrespective of its structure and dimensionality. On the basis of state-of-the-art theoretical calculations, we propose a tetragonal phase of BN which is both dynamically stable and metallic. Analysis of its band structure, density of states, and electron localization function confirms the origin of the metallic behavior to be due to the delocalized B 2p electrons. The metallicity exhibited in the studied three-dimensional BN structures can lead to materials beyond conventional ceramics as well as to materials with potential for applications in electronic devices.

  9. Analysis of three-dimensional transonic compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeade, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for computing the three-dimensional transonic flow around the blades of a compressor or of a propeller is given. The method is based on the use of the velocity potential, on the hypothesis that the flow is inviscid, irrotational and isentropic. The equation of the potential is solved in a transformed space such that the surface of the blade is mapped into a plane where the periodicity is implicit. This equation is in a nonconservative form and is solved with the help of a finite difference method using artificial time. A computer code is provided and some sample results are given in order to demonstrate the influence of three-dimensional effects and the blade's rotation.

  10. Three Dimensional Particle Tracking in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Superfluid helium is a macroscopic quantum state which exhibits exotic physical properties, such as flow without friction and ballistic heat transport. Superfluid flow is irrotational except about line-like topological phase defects with quantized circulation, known as quatized vortices. The presence of these vortices and their dynamics is the dominating factor of turbulence in superfluid flows. One commonly studied regime of superfluid turbulence is thermal counterflow, where a local heat flux drives the formation and growth of a tangle of vortices. This talk will present experimental studies of counterflow turbulence performed using a multi-camera three-dimensional imaging apparatus with micron-sized ice tracer particles as well as fluorescent nanoparticles. In particular, we will discuss the measurement of three-dimensional velocties and their autocorrelations. Additionally, we are developing new techniques for optical studies of bulk superfluid helium, with particular focus on characterizing tracer particles and particle dispersal mechanisms. Funding from NSF DMR-1407472.

  11. Three-dimensional adjustment of trilateration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, L.-Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional locations of the monuments in the USGS Hollister trilateration network were adjusted to fit line length observations observed in 1977, using a Bayesian approach, and incorporating prior elevation estimates as data in the adjustment procedure. No significant discrepancies in the measured line lengths were found, but significant elevation adjustments (up to 1.85 m) were needed to fit the length data.

  12. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  13. Mineralized Three-Dimensional Bone Constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  14. Mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  15. Real Imagery as a Three Dimensional Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    under two categories--stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays. The difference between these two displays is that autostereoscopic displays do not...require the use of special viewing glasses whereas stereoscopic displays do. In order to place a minimum incumbrance on the viewer, the autostereoscopic ...fooled into believing that the scene is three dimensional. This is accomplished even though the second view that normally comes with an autostereoscopic

  16. Three-dimensional ballistocardiography in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scano, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is described the aim of which is to record a three dimensional ballistocardiogram under the condition of weightlessness and to compare it with tracings recorded on the same subject on the ground as a means of clarifying the meaning of ballistocardiogram waves in different physiological and perphaps pathological conditions. Another purpose is to investigate cardiovascular and possibly fluid adaptations to weightlessness from data collected almost simultaneously on the same subjects during the other cardiovascular during the other cardiovascular and metabolic experiments.

  17. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2006-09-26

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may e transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  18. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B [Oxnard, CA; Pennock, Kelly A [Richland, WA; Pottier, Marc C [Richland, WA; Schur, Anne [Richland, WA; Thomas, James J [Richland, WA; Wise, James A [Richland, WA

    2001-10-02

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  19. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.; York, Jeremy

    2009-06-30

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  20. Three-Dimensional Dispaly Of Document Set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2003-06-24

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  1. Three Dimensional Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    to upsample the projection data in order to get sufficient image quality. Working within these memory constraints, three-dimensional images were... metallic film on the windscreen in order to block reflections from the cockpit. Photographs and scale drawings of the model are shown in Figures 11 and...as well as spurious responses in the final image. Theoretically, sufficient resolution should have been available without upsampling the original data

  2. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  3. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  4. Three-dimensional motor schema based navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, Ronald C.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive schema-based navigation is possible in space domains by extending the methods developed for ground-based navigation found within the Autonomous Robot Architecture (AuRA). Reformulation of two dimensional motor schemas for three dimensional applications is a straightforward process. The manifold advantages of schema-based control persist, including modular development, amenability to distributed processing, and responsiveness to environmental sensing. Simulation results show the feasibility of this methodology for space docking operations in a cluttered work area.

  5. Three-Dimensional (3D) Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-11

    witnessed by ongoing efforts in both Afghanistan and Iraq , must turn distribution challenges into opportunities by mastering Three-Dimensional (3D...sustainment. 5 Joint Logistics Functions •Supply •Services •Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •General Engineering Joint Personnel...Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •Explosive Ordinance Disposal •Human Resource Support •Legal Support •Religious Support •Financial

  6. Lossless compression for three-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Pearlman, William A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate and compare the performance of several three-dimensional (3D) embedded wavelet algorithms on lossless 3D image compression. The algorithms are Asymmetric Tree Three-Dimensional Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (AT-3DSPIHT), Three-Dimensional Set Partitioned Embedded bloCK (3D-SPECK), Three-Dimensional Context-Based Embedded Zerotrees of Wavelet coefficients (3D-CB-EZW), and JPEG2000 Part II for multi-component images. Two kinds of images are investigated in our study -- 8-bit CT and MR medical images and 16-bit AVIRIS hyperspectral images. First, the performances by using different size of coding units are compared. It shows that increasing the size of coding unit improves the performance somewhat. Second, the performances by using different integer wavelet transforms are compared for AT-3DSPIHT, 3D-SPECK and 3D-CB-EZW. None of the considered filters always performs the best for all data sets and algorithms. At last, we compare the different lossless compression algorithms by applying integer wavelet transform on the entire image volumes. For 8-bit medical image volumes, AT-3DSPIHT performs the best almost all the time, achieving average of 12% decreases in file size compared with JPEG2000 multi-component, the second performer. For 16-bit hyperspectral images, AT-3DSPIHT always performs the best, yielding average 5.8% and 8.9% decreases in file size compared with 3D-SPECK and JPEG2000 multi-component, respectively. Two 2D compression algorithms, JPEG2000 and UNIX zip, are also included for reference, and all 3D algorithms perform much better than 2D algorithms.

  7. Three-dimensional magnetic field annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, M.; Allen, H. R.; Grundy, R. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present a family of three-dimensional nonlinear solutions for magnetic field annihilation in a current sheet, including the effects of resistivity and viscosity. The different members of the family are characterized by the imposed vorticity of the flow that brings the field lines together. Since in a three- dimensional flow the vorticity can be increased by the stretching of vortex lines (an effect that is absent in two dimensions), we find some striking differences to our previous two-dimensional analysis. In both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses, above a certain critical imposed vorticity omegacrit, the flow breaks up into cells with current sheet is completely altered. In the two-dimensional analysis, omegacrit is a steeply increasing function of the viscous Reynolds number R, whereas in the three-dimensional case, it quickly asymptotes to only omegacrit = 2v0/L where v0 and L are the characteristic velocity and length scale of the flow, respectively. The width of the current sheet, which depends on the speed at which field lines are carried into it, also responds differently to an increase in R. In two dimensions, the current sheet narrows for all vorticities, but three dimensions, it narrows when the imposed vorticity is negative and widens when it is positive. Also we find that the current density within the current sheet varies as the nature of the flow is changed, rather than being constant as in the the two-dimensional case. Finally, we find that there is a minimum value of the plasma beta betamin below which the plasma pressure is negative. For the nonsheared (neutral current sheet) case, betamin increases rapidly with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm such that this type of annihilation is only possible for a high-beta plasma. For a sheared magnetic field, however, betamin is much lower, making this type of annihilation more relevant to the sonar corona.

  8. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics Dr. Ying...model to predict acoustic fluctuations and derive sound pressure sensitivity kernels due to 3-D sound speed perturbation in the water column. The...numerical method to be utilized is a tangent linear solution to predict acoustic fluctuations due to 3-D sound speed perturbation in the water column. This

  9. All-optical high performance graphene-photonic crystal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseini, Mehrdad; Malekmohammad, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The all-optical switch is realized based on nonlinear transmission changes in Fano resonance of 2D photonic crystals (PhC) which enhances the light intensity on the graphene in PhC; and in this study, the graphene layer is used as the nonlinear material. The refractive index change of graphene layer leads to a shift in the Fano resonance frequency due to the input light intensity through the Kerr nonlinear effect. Through finite-difference time-domain simulation, it is found that the high performance of all-optical switching can be achieved by the designed structure with a threshold pump intensity as low as MW/cm2. This structure is featured by optical bistability. The obtained results are applicable in micro optical integrated circuits for modulators, switches and logic elements for optical computation.

  10. All-Optical Fibre Networks For Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientkiewicz, Jacek K.

    1987-09-01

    A topic of the paper is fiber-optic integrated network (FOIN) suited to the most hostile environments existing in coal mines. The use of optical fibres for transmission of mine instrumentation data offers the prospects of improved safety and immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI). The feasibility of optically powered sensors has opened up new opportunities for research into optical signal processing architectures. This article discusses a new fibre-optic sensor network involving a time domain multiplexing(TDM)scheme and optical signal processing techniques. The pros and cons of different FOIN topologies with respect to coal mine applications are considered. The emphasis has been placed on a recently developed all-optical fibre network using spread spectrum code division multiple access (COMA) techniques. The all-optical networks have applications in explosive environments where electrical isolation is required.

  11. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  12. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  13. Reconfigurable, braced, three-dimensional DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Russell P; Heilemann, Mike; Doose, Sören; Erben, Christoph M; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology makes use of the exquisite self-recognition of DNA in order to build on a molecular scale. Although static structures may find applications in structural biology and computer science, many applications in nanomedicine and nanorobotics require the additional capacity for controlled three-dimensional movement. DNA architectures can span three dimensions and DNA devices are capable of movement, but active control of well-defined three-dimensional structures has not been achieved. We demonstrate the operation of reconfigurable DNA tetrahedra whose shapes change precisely and reversibly in response to specific molecular signals. Shape changes are confirmed by gel electrophoresis and by bulk and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. DNA tetrahedra are natural building blocks for three-dimensional construction; they may be synthesized rapidly with high yield of a single stereoisomer, and their triangulated architecture conveys structural stability. The introduction of shape-changing structural modules opens new avenues for the manipulation of matter on the nanometre scale.

  14. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  15. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  16. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  17. Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.; Schwarz, Adam J.

    2000-03-01

    A comprehensive study of approaches to three-dimensional visualization by volumetric display systems This groundbreaking volume provides an unbiased and in-depth discussion on a broad range of volumetric three-dimensional display systems. It examines the history, development, design, and future of these displays, and considers their potential for application to key areas in which visualization plays a major role. Drawing substantially on material that was previously unpublished or available only in patent form, the authors establish the first comprehensive technical and mathematical formalization of the field, and examine a number of different volumetric architectures. System level design strategies are presented, from which proposals for the next generation of high-definition predictable volumetric systems are developed. To ensure that researchers will benefit from work already completed, they provide: * Descriptions of several recent volumetric display systems prepared from material supplied by the teams that created them * An abstract volumetric display system design paradigm * An historical summary of 90 years of development in volumetric display system technology * An assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of many of the systems proposed to date * A unified presentation of the underlying principles of volumetric display systems * A comprehensive bibliography Beautifully supplemented with 17 color plates that illustrate volumetric images and prototype displays, Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems is an indispensable resource for professionals in imaging systems development, scientific visualization, medical imaging, computer graphics, aerospace, military planning, and CAD/CAE.

  18. All-optical nanomechanical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Andreas; Kiesel, Nikolai; Lutz, Eric

    2015-05-08

    We propose and theoretically investigate a nanomechanical heat engine. We show how a levitated nanoparticle in an optical trap inside a cavity can be used to realize a Stirling cycle in the underdamped regime. The all-optical approach enables fast and flexible control of all thermodynamical parameters and the efficient optimization of the performance of the engine. We develop a systematic optimization procedure to determine optimal driving protocols. Further, we perform numerical simulations with realistic parameters and evaluate the maximum power and the corresponding efficiency.

  19. All-Optical Nanomechanical Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Andreas; Kiesel, Nikolai; Lutz, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a nanomechanical heat engine. We show how a levitated nanoparticle in an optical trap inside a cavity can be used to realize a Stirling cycle in the underdamped regime. The all-optical approach enables fast and flexible control of all thermodynamical parameters and the efficient optimization of the performance of the engine. We develop a systematic optimization procedure to determine optimal driving protocols. Further, we perform numerical simulations with realistic parameters and evaluate the maximum power and the corresponding efficiency.

  20. All-optical phase discrimination using SOA.

    PubMed

    Power, Mark J; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2013-11-04

    We describe the first experimental demonstration of a novel all-optical phase discrimination technique, which can separate the two orthogonal phase components of a signal onto different frequencies. This method exploits nonlinear mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) to separate a 10.65 Gbaud QPSK signal into two 10.65 Gb/s BPSK signals which are then demodulated using a delay interferometer (DI). Eye diagrams and spectral measurements verify correct operation and a conversion efficiency greater than 9 dB is observed on both output BPSK channels when compared with the input QPSK signal.

  1. All-optical symmetric ternary logic gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2010-09-01

    Symmetric ternary number (radix=3) has three logical states (1¯, 0, 1). It is very much useful in carry free arithmetical operation. Beside this, the logical operation using this type of number system is also effective in high speed computation and communication in multi-valued logic. In this literature all-optical circuits for three basic symmetrical ternary logical operations (inversion, MIN and MAX) are proposed and described. Numerical simulation verifies the theoretical model. In this present scheme the different ternary logical states are represented by different polarized state of light. Terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch has been used categorically in this manuscript.

  2. Digitally encoded all-optical sensor multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Anjum

    1992-01-01

    A digital, all-optical temperature sensor design concept based on optical sampling and digital encoding is presented. The proposed sensor generates 2M binary digital codewords of length M bits. The codewords are generated serially and, therefore, only a single output fiber line is required. A multiplexing scheme, which minimizes the power requirement per sensor array and facilitates a cost-effective digit regeneration for remote monitoring over long distance, is presented. The sensor arrays are used as building blocks to configure large scale sensor networks based on LAN topologies.

  3. All optical binary delta-sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammad R.; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel A/D converter called "Binary Delta-Sigma Modulator" (BDSM) which operates only with nonnegative signal with positive feedback and binary threshold. This important modification to the conventional delta-sigma modulator makes the high-speed (>100GHz) all-optical implementation possible. It has also the capability to modify its own sampling frequency as well as its input dynamic range. This adaptive feature helps designers to optimize the system performance under highly noisy environment and also manage the power consumption of the A/D converters.

  4. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping E-mail: moli@umn.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: moli@umn.edu

    2015-09-07

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  5. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping; Li, Mo

    2015-09-01

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  6. Three-dimensional laser window formation for industrial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.; Kowalski, David

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional, compound-curvature laser windows to extreme accuracies. These windows represent an integral component of specialized nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems that are used in a variety of compressor and turbine research testing facilities. These windows are molded to the flow surface profile of turbine and compressor casings and are required to withstand extremely high pressures and temperatures. This method of glass formation could also be used to form compound-curvature mirrors that would require little polishing and for a variety of industrial applications, including research view ports for testing devices and view ports for factory machines with compound-curvature casings. Currently, sodium-alumino-silicate glass is recommended for three-dimensional laser windows because of its high strength due to chemical strengthening and its optical clarity. This paper discusses the main aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities that are associated with the formation of these windows.

  7. Three dimensional self-assembly at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracias, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    At the nanoscale, three dimensional manipulation and assembly becomes extremely challenging and also cost prohibitive. Self-assembly provides an attractive and possibly the only highly parallel methodology to structure truly three dimensional patterned materials and devices at this size scale for applications in electronics, optics, robotics and medicine. This is a concise review along with a perspective of an important and exciting field in nanotechnology and is related to a Nanoengineering Pioneer Award that I received at this SPIE symposium for my contributions to the 3D selfassembly of nanostructures. I detail a historical account of 3D self-assembly and outline important developments in this area which is put into context with the larger research areas of 3D nanofabrication, assembly and nanomanufacturing. A focus in this review is on our work as it relates to the self-assembly with lithographically patterned units; this approach provides a means for heterogeneous integration of periodic, curved and angled nanostructures with precisely defined three dimensional patterns.

  8. The development of a three-dimensional partially elliptic flow computer program for combustor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional, partially elliptic, computer program was developed. Without requiring three dimensional computer storage locations for all flow variables, the partially elliptic program is capable of predicting three dimensional combustor flow fields with large downstream effects. The program requires only slight increase of computer storage over the parabolic flow program from which it was developed. A finite difference formulation for a three dimensional, fully elliptic, turbulent, reacting, flow field was derived. Because of the negligible diffusion effects in the main flow direction in a supersonic combustor, the set of finite-difference equations can be reduced to a partially elliptic form. Only the pressure field was governed by an elliptic equation and requires three dimensional storage; all other dependent variables are governed by parabolic equations. A numerical procedure which combines a marching integration scheme with an iterative scheme for solving the elliptic pressure was adopted.

  9. All-optical OFDM network coding scheme for all-optical virtual private communication in PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijun; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng; Bai, Lin; Huang, Zhitong

    2014-03-01

    A novel optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) network coding scheme is proposed over passive optical network (PON) system. The proposed scheme for all-optical virtual private network (VPN) does not only improve transmission efficiency, but also realize full-duplex communication mode in a single fiber. Compared with the traditional all-optical VPN architectures, the all-optical OFDM network coding scheme can support higher speed, more flexible bandwidth allocation, and higher spectrum efficiency. In order to reduce the difficulty of alignment for encoding operation between inter-communication traffic, the width of OFDM subcarrier pulse is stretched in our proposed scheme. The feasibility of all-optical OFDM network coding scheme for VPN is verified, and the relevant simulation results show that the full-duplex inter-communication traffic stream can be transmitted successfully. Furthermore, the tolerance of misalignment existing in inter-ONUs traffic is investigated and analyzed for all-optical encoding operation, and the difficulty of pulse alignment is proved to be lower.

  10. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  11. Analysis of all-optical IP routers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamil, Lakshman S.; Masetti, Francesco B.; McDermott, Thomas C.; Castanon, Gerardo; Ge, Andrew; Tancevski, Ljubisa

    1998-10-01

    The increased data traffic experienced today and the projected increase in the data traffic in the future demand exploration of novel approaches to IP transport such as transport of IP traffic over optics. The bimodal nature of the IP traffic short packets which are typical of transactional-style flows and large packets or bursts which are encountered in the transport of large data blocks requires, design of routers that are capable of routing packets with variable lengths efficiently. In this paper, we discuss the design aspects of such all-optical IP-switches. The broadcast and select architecture is a prime candidate for implementing optical IP routers. Construction of optical routers with buffering, wavelength conversion and multipath routing are considered. The merits and demerits of all these cases and the effect of buffer size, wavelength conversion and multiple-path routing on the blocking probability and probability of packet loss are discussed.

  12. Three-dimensional flow about penguin wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Sudki, Bassem; Lauria, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Penguins, contrary to airborne birds, do not need to compensate for gravity. Yet, the kinematics of their wings is highly three-dimensional and seems exceedingly complex for plain swimming. Is such kinematics the result of an evolutionary optimization or is it just a forced adaptation of an airborne flying apparatus to underwater swimming? Some answers will be provided based on flow dynamics around robotic penguin wings. Updates will also be presented on the development of a novel robotic arm intended to simulate penguin swimming and enable novel propulsion devices.

  13. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications.

  14. Electrode With Porous Three-Dimensional Support

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Dauchier, Jean-Michel; Simonneau, Olivier

    1999-07-27

    Electrode including a paste containing particles of electrochemically active material and a conductive support consisting of a three-dimensional porous material comprising strands delimiting contiguous pores communicating via passages, characterized in that the average width L in .mu.m of said passages is related to the average diameter .O slashed. in .mu.m of said particles by the following equation, in which W and Y are dimensionless coefficients: wherein W=0.16 Y=1.69 X=202.4 .mu.m and Z=80 .mu.m

  15. Three-dimensional simulations of burning thermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspden, Andy; Bell, John; Woosley, Stan

    2010-11-01

    Flame ignition in type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) leads to isolated bubbles of burning buoyant fluid. As a bubble rises due to gravity, it becomes deformed by shear instabilities and transitions to a turbulent buoyant vortex ring. Morton, Taylor and Turner (1956) introduced the entrainment assumption, which can be applied to inert thermals. In this study, we use the entrainment assumption, suitably modified to account for burning, to predict the late-time asymptotic behaviour of these turbulent buoyant vortex rings in SNe Ia. The theory is validated against three- dimensional simulations with adaptive mesh refinement at effective resolutions up to 4096^3.

  16. Three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons.

    PubMed

    Esirkepov, Timur; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Bulanov, Sergei V; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2002-12-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons were observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of an intense short-laser-pulse propagation in an underdense plasma. Their structure resembles that of an oscillating electric dipole with a poloidal electric field and a toroidal magnetic field that oscillate in phase with the electron density with frequency below the Langmuir frequency. On the ion time scale, the soliton undergoes a Coulomb explosion of its core, resulting in ion acceleration, and then evolves into a slowly expanding quasineutral cavity.

  17. High resolution three-dimensional doping profiler

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping profiler provides a Schottky contact at one surface and an ohmic contact at the other. While the two contacts are coupled to a power source, thereby establishing an electrical bias in the semiconductor, a localized light source illuminates the semiconductor to induce a photocurrent. The photocurrent changes in accordance with the doping characteristics of the semiconductor in the illuminated region. By changing the voltage of the power source the depth of the depletion layer can be varied to provide a three dimensional view of the local properties of the semiconductor.

  18. Three-dimensional head anthropometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, Reyes; Shaw, Alex M.; Neumann, Ulrich; Mah, James

    2003-05-01

    Currently, two-dimensional photographs are most commonly used to facilitate visualization, assessment and treatment of facial abnormalities in craniofacial care but are subject to errors because of perspective, projection, lack metric and 3-dimensional information. One can find in the literature a variety of methods to generate 3-dimensional facial images such as laser scans, stereo-photogrammetry, infrared imaging and even CT however each of these methods contain inherent limitations and as such no systems are in common clinical use. In this paper we will focus on development of indirect 3-dimensional landmark location and measurement of facial soft-tissue with light-based techniques. In this paper we will statistically evaluate and validate a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also develop computer graphics tools for indirect anthropometric measurements in a three-dimensional head model (or polygonal mesh) including linear distances currently used in anthropometry. The measurements will be tested against a validated 3-dimensional digitizer (MicroScribe 3DX).

  19. Three-dimensional television: a broadcaster's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, S. J. E.; Armstrong, M.; Salmon, R. A.

    2009-02-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in the stereoscopic cinema and the increasing availability to the consumer of stereoscopic televisions and computer displays are leading broadcasters to consider, once again, the feasibility of stereoscopic broadcasting. High Definition Television is now widely deployed, and the R&D departments of broadcasters and consumer electronics manufacturers are starting to plan future enhancements to the experience of television. Improving the perception of depth via stereoscopy is a strong candidate technology. In this paper we will consider the challenges associated with the production, transmission and display of different forms of "three-dimensional" television. We will explore options available to a broadcaster wishing to start a 3D service using the technologies available at the present time, and consider how they could be improved to enable many more television programmes to be recorded and transmitted in a 3D-compatible form, paying particular attention to scenarios such as live broadcasting, where the workflows developed for the stereoscopic cinema are inapplicable. We will also consider the opportunities available for broadcasters to reach audiences with "three-dimensional" content via other media in the near future: for example, distributing content via the existing stereoscopic cinema network, or over the Internet to owners of stereoscopic computer displays.

  20. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  1. In-lab three-dimensional printing

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue’s three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer. PMID:22652907

  2. Three dimensional force balance of asymmetric droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Kun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    An equilibrium contact angle of a droplet is determined by a horizontal force balance among vapor, liquid, and solid, which is known as Young's law. Conventional wetting law is valid only for axis-symmetric droplets, whereas real droplets are often asymmetric. Here we show that three-dimensional geometry must be considered for a force balance for asymmetric droplets. By visualizing asymmetric droplets placed on a free-standing membrane in air with X-ray microscopy, we are able to identify that force balances in one side and in other side control pinning behaviors during evaporation of droplets. We find that X-ray microscopy is powerful for realizing the three-dimensional force balance, which would be essential in interpretation and manipulation of wetting, spreading, and drying dynamics for asymmetric droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  3. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  4. Three-dimensional terahertz wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-C

    2004-02-15

    Pulsed terahertz (THz) wave sensing and imaging is a coherent measurement technology. Like radar, based on the phase and amplitude of the THz pulse at each frequency, THz waves provide temporal and spectroscopic information that allows us to develop various three-dimensional (3D) terahertz tomographic imaging modalities. The 3D THz tomographic imaging methods we investigated include THz time-of-flight tomography, THz computed tomography (CT) and THz binary lens tomography. THz time-of-flight uses the THz pulses as a probe beam to temporally mark the target, and then constructs a 3D image of the target using the THz waves scattered by the target. THz CT is based on geometrical optics and inspired from X-ray CT. THz binary lens tomography uses the frequency-dependent focal-length property of binary lenses to obtain tomographic images of an object. Three-dimensional THz imaging has potential in such applications as non-destructive inspection. The interaction between a coherent THz pulse and an object provides rich information about the object under study; therefore, 3D THz imaging can be used to inspect or characterize dielectric and semiconductor objects. For example, 3D THz imaging has been used to detect and identify the defects inside a Space Shuttle insulation tile.

  5. Three-dimensional singular points in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Aynur

    1988-01-01

    When three-dimensional separation occurs on a body immersed in a flow governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the geometrical surfaces formed by the three vector fields (velocity, vorticity and the skin-friction) and a scalar field (pressure) become interrelated through topological maps containing their respective singular points and extremal points. A mathematically consistent description of these singular points becomes inevitable when we want to study the geometry of the separation. A separated stream surface requires, for example, the existence of a saddle-type singular point on the skin-friction surface. This singular point is actually, in the proper language of mathematics, a saddle of index two. The index is a measure of the dimension of the outset (set leaving the singular point). Hence, when a saddle of index two is specified, a two dimensional surface that becomes separated from the osculating plane of the saddle is implied. The three-dimensional singular point is interpreted mathematically and the most common aerodynamical singular points are discussed through this perspective.

  6. Three dimensional quantum geometry and deformed symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, E.; Mourad, J.; Noui, K.

    2009-05-01

    We study a three dimensional noncommutative space emerging in the context of three dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity. Our starting point is the assumption that the isometry group is deformed to the Drinfeld double D(SU(2)). We generalize to the deformed case the construction of E3 as the quotient of its isometry group ISU(2) by SU(2). We show that the algebra of functions on E3 becomes the noncommutative algebra of SU(2) distributions, C(SU(2))∗, endowed with the convolution product. This construction gives the action of ISU(2) on the algebra and allows the determination of plane waves and coordinate functions. In particular, we show the following: (i) plane waves have bounded momenta; (ii) to a given momentum are associated several SU(2) elements leading to an effective description of ϕ ɛC(SU(2))∗ in terms of several physical scalar fields on E3; (iii) their product leads to a deformed addition rule of momenta consistent with the bound on the spectrum. We generalize to the noncommutative setting the "local" action for a scalar field. Finally, we obtain, using harmonic analysis, another useful description of the algebra as the direct sum of the algebra of matrices. The algebra of matrices inherits the action of ISU(2): rotations leave the order of the matrices invariant, whereas translations change the order in a way we explicitly determine.

  7. All-optical image processing with nonlinear liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kuan-Lun

    Liquid crystals are fascinating materials because of several advantages such as large optical birefringence, dielectric anisotropic, and easily compatible to most kinds of materials. Compared to the electro-optical properties of liquid crystals widely applied in displays and switching application, transparency through most parts of wavelengths also makes liquid crystals a better candidate for all-optical processing. The fast response time of liquid crystals resulting from multiple nonlinear effects, such as thermal and density effect can even make real-time processing realized. In addition, blue phase liquid crystals with spontaneously self-assembled three dimensional cubic structures attracted academic attention. In my dissertation, I will divide the whole contents into six parts. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction of liquid crystals is presented, including the current progress and the classification of liquid crystals. Anisotropy and laser induced director axis reorientation is presented in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, I will solve the electrostrictive coupled equation and analyze the laser induced thermal and density effect in both static and dynamic ways. Furthermore, a dynamic simulation of laser induced density fluctuation is proposed by applying finite element method. In Chapter 4, two image processing setups are presented. One is the intensity inversion experiment in which intensity dependent phase modulation is the mechanism. The other is the wavelength conversion experiment in which I can read the invisible image with a visible probe beam. Both experiments are accompanied with simulations to realize the matching between the theories and practical experiment results. In Chapter 5, optical properties of blue phase liquid crystals will be introduced and discussed. The results of grating diffractions and thermal refractive index gradient are presented in this chapter. In addition, fiber arrays imaging and switching with BPLCs will be included in this chapter

  8. Three-dimensional context regulation of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Erler, Janine T; Weaver, Valerie M

    2009-01-01

    Tumor progression ensues within a three-dimensional microenvironment that consists of cellular and non-cellular components. The extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypoxia are two non-cellular components that potently influence metastasis. ECM remodeling and collagen cross-linking stiffen the tissue stroma to promote transformation, tumor growth, motility and invasion, enhance cancer cell survival, enable metastatic dissemination, and facilitate the establishment of tumor cells at distant sites. Matrix degradation can additionally promote malignant progression and metastasis. Tumor hypoxia is functionally linked to altered stromal-epithelial interactions. Hypoxia additionally induces the expression of pro-migratory, survival and invasion genes, and up-regulates expression of ECM components and modifying enzymes, to enhance tumor progression and metastasis. Synergistic interactions between matrix remodeling and tumor hypoxia influence common mechanisms that maximize tumor progression and cooperate to drive metastasis. Thus, clarifying the molecular pathways by which ECM remodeling and tumor hypoxia intersect to promote tumor progression should identify novel therapeutic targets.

  9. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology

    PubMed Central

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M.; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

  10. AAOGlimpse: Three-dimensional Data Viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortridge, Keith

    2011-10-01

    AAOGlimpse is an experimental display program that uses OpenGL to display FITS data (and even JPEG images) as 3D surfaces that can be rotated and viewed from different angles, all in real-time. It is WCS-compliant and designed to handle three-dimensional data. Each plane in a data cube is surfaced in the same way, and the program allows the user to travel through a cube by 'peeling off' successive planes, or to look into a cube by suppressing the display of data below a given cutoff value. It can blink images and can superimpose images and contour maps from different sources using their world coordinate data. A limited socket interface allows communication with other programs.

  11. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  12. Versatile three-dimensional cryogenic micropositioning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, J.; Böhm, A.; Primke, M.; Wyder, P.

    1996-01-01

    A simple design for a mechanically driven three-dimensional cryogenic micropositioner is presented. The design is based on a parallelogram structure constructed from leaf springs and wires. Actuation is achieved by the elastic deformation of the parallelogram by screws. Positions within a volume of roughly (2 mm)3 are attainable. The precision and reproducibility of positioning are in the μm-range. The deviations from linearity are smaller than 10% for the whole working range and the deviation from orthogonality is smaller than 3°. Calibration measurements performed on a Cu-mesh with a lattice constant of 60 μm are presented. In an experiment investigating the ballistic transport of carriers in the semimetal Bi, two such devices are used. The first one is used as a scanning unit for an optical fiber and the second one is used as micropositioner for a Cu point contact.

  13. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  14. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  15. Three-dimensional elastic lidar winds

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-07-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three- dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  16. Automatic three-dimensional underground mine mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.F.; Vandapel, N.

    2006-01-15

    For several years, our research group has been developing methods for automated modeling of three-dimensional environments. In September 2002, we were given the opportunity to demonstrate our mapping capability in an underground coal mine. The opportunity arose as a result of the Quecreek mine accident, in which an inaccurate map caused miners to breach an abandoned, water-filled mine, trapping them for several days. Our field test illustrates the feasibility and potential of high-resolution 3D mapping of an underground coal mine using a cart-mounted 3D laser scanner In this paper we present our experimental setup, the automatic 3D modeling method used, and the results of the field test.

  17. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face – tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor. PMID:25610354

  18. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling.

    PubMed

    Macierzyńska, Arleta; Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face - tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor.

  19. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  20. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  1. The Three-Dimensional EIT Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gilbert, H. R.; Lawrence, G. R.; Ofman, L.; Wu, S. T.; Warmuth, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An EIT wave is an impulsive disturbance which has been observed in the EUV, Soft X-ray and white light corona, with corresponding observations in the chromosphere. The effects of these disturbances can be observed across the entire solar disk of the Sun, and throughout the inner heliosphere as well. However, the picture is not complete; observations alone do not establish a complete understanding of the nature of this three-dimensional phenomenon. A number of associated phenomena have been documented, though in most cases causality has not determined. Additionally, it is unclear which factors govern the impulse's ability to affect regions of the corona and heliosphere. We discuss the various observations and the models which provided links between the associated phenomena.

  2. Three-dimensional hologram display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a three-dimensional (3D) hologram display system. The 3D hologram display system includes a projector device for projecting an image upon a display medium to form a 3D hologram. The 3D hologram is formed such that a viewer can view the holographic image from multiple angles up to 360 degrees. Multiple display media are described, namely a spinning diffusive screen, a circular diffuser screen, and an aerogel. The spinning diffusive screen utilizes spatial light modulators to control the image such that the 3D image is displayed on the rotating screen in a time-multiplexing manner. The circular diffuser screen includes multiple, simultaneously-operated projectors to project the image onto the circular diffuser screen from a plurality of locations, thereby forming the 3D image. The aerogel can use the projection device described as applicable to either the spinning diffusive screen or the circular diffuser screen.

  3. Magneto Transport in Three Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Timir; Wang, Lei; Jaroszynski, Jan; Yin, Ming; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Electrical properties of self-assembled three dimensional nanostructures are interesting topic. Here we report temperature dependence of magneto transport in such carbon nanostructures with periodic spherical voids. Specimens with different void diameters in the temperature range from 200 mK to 20 K were studied. Above 2 K, magnetoresistance, MR = [R(B) - R(0)] / R(0), crosses over from quadratic to a linear dependence with the increase of magnetic field [Wang et al., APL 2015; DOI:10.1063/1.4926606]. We observe MR to be non-saturating even up to 18 Tesla. Furthermore, MR demonstrates universality because all experimental data can be collapsed on to a single curve, as a universal function of B/T. Below 2 K, magnetoresistance saturates with increasing field. Quantum Hall like steps are also observed in this low temperature regime. Remarkably, MR of our sample displays orientation independence, an attractive feature for technological applications.

  4. Three dimensional carbon-nanotube polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhisheng; Xu, Bo; Wang, Li-Min; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Hui-Tian; Tian, Yongjun

    2011-09-27

    Eight fascinating sp(2)- and sp(3)-hybridized carbon allotropes have been uncovered using a newly developed ab initio particle-swarm optimization methodology for crystal structure prediction. These crystalline allotropes can be viewed respectively as three-dimensional (3D) polymers of (4,0), (5,0), (7,0), (8,0), (9,0), (3,3), (4,4), and (6,6) carbon nanotubes, termed 3D-(n, 0) or 3D-(n, n) carbons. The ground-state energy calculations show that the carbons all have lower energies than C(60) fullerene, and some are energetically more stable than the van der Waals packing configurations of their nanotube parents. Owing to their unique configurations, they have distinctive electronic properties, high Young's moduli, high tensile strength, ultrahigh hardness, good ductility, and low density, and may be potentially applied to a variety of needs.

  5. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  6. Three-dimensional image contrast using biospeckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Robson Pierangeli; Braga, Roberto A., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    The biospeckle laser (BSL) has been applied in many areas of knowledge and a variety of approaches has been presented to address the best results in biological and non-biological samples, in fast or slow activities, or else in defined flow of materials or in random activities. The methodologies accounted in the literature consider the apparatus used in the image assembling and the way the collected data is processed. The image processing steps presents in turn a variety of procedures with first or second order statistics analysis, and as well with different sizes of data collected. One way to access the biospeckle in defined flow, such as in capillary blood flow in alive animals, was the adoption of the image contrast technique which uses only one image from the illuminated sample. That approach presents some problems related to the resolution of the image, which is reduced during the image contrast processing. In order to help the visualization of the low resolution image formed by the contrast technique, this work presents the three-dimensional procedure as a reliable alternative to enhance the final image. The work based on a parallel processing, with the generation of a virtual map of amplitudes, and maintaining the quasi-online characteristic of the contrast technique. Therefore, it was possible to generate in the same display the observed material, the image contrast result and in addiction the three-dimensional image with adjustable options of rotation. The platform also offers to the user the possibility to access the 3D image offline.

  7. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy based on plasmonic detection of broadband ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianxiong; Cao, Rui; Ning, Bo; Dixon, Adam J.; Hossack, John A.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Anbo; Hu, Song

    2015-10-01

    We report on an implementation of all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which capitalizes on the effect of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for optical detection of ultrasound. The SPR sensor in our all-optical PAM shows, experimentally, a linear response to the acoustic pressure from 5.2 kPa to 2.1 MPa, an ultra-flat frequency response (±0.7 dB) from 680 kHz to 126 MHz, and a noise-equivalent pressure sensitivity of 3.3 kPa. With the broadband ultrasonic detection, our SPR-PAM has achieved high spatial resolution with relatively low anisotropy (i.e., 2.0 μm laterally and 8.4 μm axially). Three-dimensional high-resolution imaging of a single melanoma cell is demonstrated.

  8. Three-dimensional video-endoscopy: clinical use in gynaecological laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, R; Lehner, R; Vry, U; Pateisky, N; Sevelda, P; Husslein, P

    1994-12-10

    We describe a system that displays the abdominal organs in three dimensions during laparoscopy. The system consists of a single-rod-lens endoscope and two integrated microchip cameras. The surgeon has to wear active-liquid-crystal shutter-glasses to obtain a three-dimensional impression during the operation. Improved orientation in the abdominal cavity allows exact handling of surgical instruments. The three-dimensional system permits surgery with more accuracy, speed, dexterity, and safety than conventional two-dimensional systems.

  9. Localization and Dualities in Three-dimensional Superconformal Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Brian

    In this thesis we apply the technique of localization to three-dimensional N = 2 superconformal field theories. We consider both theories which are exactly superconformal, and those which are believed to flow to nontrivial superconformal fixed points, for which we consider implicitly these fixed points. We find that in such theories, the partition function and certain supersymmetric observables, such as Wilson loops, can be computed exactly by a matrix model. This matrix model consists of an integral over g , the Lie algebra of the gauge group of the theory, of a certain product of 1-loop factors and classical contributions. One can also consider a space of supersymmetric deformations of the partition function corresponding to the set of abelian global symmetries. In the second part of the thesis we apply these results to test dualities. We start with the case of ABJM theory, which is dual to M-theory on an asymptotically AdS4 x S7 background. We extract strong coupling results in the field theory, which can be compared to semiclassical, weak coupling results in the gravity theory, and a nontrivial agreement is found. We also consider several classes of dualities between two three-dimensional field theories, namely, 3D mirror symmetry, Aharony duality, and Giveon-Kutasov duality. Here the dualities are typically between the IR limits of two Yang-Mills theories, which are strongly coupled in three dimensions since Yang-Mills theory is asymptotically free here. Thus the comparison is again very nontrivial, and relies on the exactness of the localization computation. We also compare the deformed partition functions, which tests the mapping of global symmetries of the dual theories. Finally, we discuss some recent progress in the understanding of general three-dimensional theories in the form of the F-theorem, a conjectured analogy to the a-theorem in four dimensions and c-theorem in two dimensions, which is closely related to the localization computation.

  10. Multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography scanner using an all optical detection scheme for 3D morphological skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Edward Z; Povazay, Boris; Laufer, Jan; Alex, Aneesh; Hofer, Bernd; Pedley, Barbara; Glittenberg, Carl; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    A noninvasive, multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography (PAT/OCT) scanner for three-dimensional in vivo (3D) skin imaging is described. The system employs an integrated, all optical detection scheme for both modalities in backward mode utilizing a shared 2D optical scanner with a field-of-view of ~13 × 13 mm(2). The photoacoustic waves were detected using a Fabry Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor placed on the surface of the skin. The sensor is transparent in the spectral range 590-1200 nm. This permits the photoacoustic excitation beam (670-680 nm) and the OCT probe beam (1050 nm) to be transmitted through the sensor head and into the underlying tissue thus providing a backward mode imaging configuration. The respective OCT and PAT axial resolutions were 8 and 20 µm and the lateral resolutions were 18 and 50-100 µm. The system provides greater penetration depth than previous combined PA/OCT devices due to the longer wavelength of the OCT beam (1050 nm rather than 829-870 nm) and by operating in the tomographic rather than the optical resolution mode of photoacoustic imaging. Three-dimensional in vivo images of the vasculature and the surrounding tissue micro-morphology in murine and human skin were acquired. These studies demonstrated the complementary contrast and tissue information provided by each modality for high-resolution 3D imaging of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. Potential applications include characterizing skin conditions such as tumors, vascular lesions, soft tissue damage such as burns and wounds, inflammatory conditions such as dermatitis and other superficial tissue abnormalities.

  11. Photonic encryption using all optical logic.

    SciTech Connect

    Blansett, Ethan L.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Tang, Jason D.; Robertson, Perry J.; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Tarman, Thomas David; Pierson, Lyndon George

    2003-12-01

    With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines two classes of all optical logic (SEED, gain competition) and how each discrete logic element can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of the SEED and gain competition devices in an optical circuit were modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model of the SEED or gain competition device takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple and time delay characteristics. These 'black box' models are interconnected and cascaded in an

  12. Primary and Secondary Three Dimensional Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, Nicolas

    Today's MEMS devices are limited more so by the batteries that supply their power than the fabrication methods used to build them. Thick battery electrodes are capable of providing adequate energy, but long and tortuous diffusion pathways lead to low power capabilities. On the other hand, thin film batteries can operate at significant current densities but require large surface areas to supply practical energy. This dilemma can be solved by either developing new high capacity materials or by engineering new battery designs that decouple power and energy. Three dimensional batteries redesign traditional configurations to create nonplanar interfaces between battery components. This can be done by introducing hierarchical structures into the electrode shape. Designs such as these provide a maximum surface area over which chemical reactions can occur. Furthermore, by maintaining small feature sizes, ion diffusion and electronic transport distances can remain minimal. Manipulating these properties ensures fast kinetics that are required for high power situations. Energy density is maximized by layering material in the vertical direction, thus ensuring a minimal footprint area. Three dimensional carbon electrodes are fabricated using basic MEMS techniques. A silicon mold is anisotropically etched to produce channels of a predetermined diameter. The channels are then filled using an infiltration technique with electrode slurry. Once dried, the mold is attached to a current collector and etched using a XeF2 process. Electrodes of varying feature sizes have been fabricated using this method with aspect ratios ranging from 3.5:1 to 7:1. 3D carbon electrodes are shown to obtain capacities over 8 mAh/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2, or nearly 700% higher than planar carbon electrodes. When assembled with a planar cathode, the battery cell produced an average discharge capacity of 40 J/cm 2 at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. This places the energy density values slightly less than thick

  13. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C.

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for

  14. Digital vision system for three-dimensional model acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ta; Lin, Huei-Yung; Qin, Xiangdong; Subbarao, Murali

    2000-10-01

    A digital vision system and the computational algorithms used by the system for three-dimensional (3D) model acquisition are described. The system is named Stonybrook VIsion System (SVIS). The system can acquire the 3D model (which includes the 3D shape and the corresponding image texture) of a simple object within a 300 mm X 300 mm X 300 mm volume placed about 600 mm from the system. SVIS integrates Image Focus Analysis (IFA) and Stereo Image Analysis (SIA) techniques for 3D shape and image texture recovery. First, 4 to 8 partial 3D models of the object are obtained from 4 to 8 views of the object. The partial models are then integrated to obtain a complete model of the object. The complete model is displayed using a 3D graphics rendering software (Apple's QuickDraw). Experimental results on several objects are presented.

  15. Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-12-01

    Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

  16. Three-dimensional simulations of fracture dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, Vitaliy; Marra, Cameron J.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical studies of fracture dissolution are frequently based on two-dimensional models, where the fracture geometry is represented by an aperture field h(x,y). However, it is known that such models can break down when the spatial variations in aperture are rapid or large in amplitude; for example, in a rough fracture or when instabilities in the dissolution front develop into pronounced channels (or wormholes). Here we report a finite-volume implementation of a three-dimensional reactive transport model using the OpenFOAM® toolkit. Extensions to the OpenFOAM source code have been developed which displace and then relax the mesh in response to variations in the surface concentration; up to 100-fold increases in fracture aperture are possible without remeshing. Our code has simulated field-scale fractures with physical dimensions of about 10 m. We report simulations of smooth fractures, with small, well-controlled perturbations in fracture aperture introduced at the inlet. This allows for systematic convergence studies and for detailed comparisons with results from a two-dimensional model. Initially, the fracture aperture develops similarly in both models, but as local inhomogeneities develop the results start to diverge. We investigate numerically the onset of instabilities in the dissolution of fractures with small random variations in the initial aperture field. Our results show that elliptical cross sections, which are characteristic of karstic conduits, can develop very rapidly, on time scales of 10-20 years in calcite rocks.

  17. Tip selection in three-dimensional dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. R.; Tanveer, S.

    2004-11-01

    Dendrites are well-known to have a fully three-dimensional structure, often with four equally-spaced fins emanating from the steady parabolic tip, the pattern for which has now a good theoretical foundation.(McFadden, Coriell & Sekerka, J. Crys. Growth) 208 (2000) The four fins are of course related to four-fold crystalline anisotropy of quite small magnitude. We follow Tanveer(Tanveer, S. Phys. Rev. A) 40 (1989) in carefully exploring the matching of the inner solution in the neighborhood of the singularity nearest the real line to the small-surface-energy regular perturbation expansion, in order to obtain the (selected) tip radius and the amplitude of the fin. We consider the case for which the anisotropy parameter, α, is much larger than a dimensionless capillary length to the 4/7 power. We confirm what was already found in a slightly different parameter range(Ben Amar & Brener, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 71 (1993)--that the inner equation is essentially that of the two-dimensional case, with azimuthally-dependent parameters. We compare our results with those of Ben Amar & Brener.

  18. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1996-04-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D and D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled using coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The CLR also provides 3D facility maps which establish a 3D world view within which the robotic sensor system can operate.

  19. Three-dimensional context regulation of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Erler, Janine T.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor progression ensues within a three-dimensional microenvironment that consists of cellular and non-cellular components. The extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypoxia are two non-cellular components that potently influence metastasis. ECM remodeling and collagen cross-linking stiffen the tissue stroma to promote transformation, tumor growth, motility and invasion, enhance cancer cell survival, enable metastatic dissemination, and facilitate the establishment of tumor cells at distant sites. Matrix degradation can additionally promote malignant progression and metastasis. Tumor hypoxia is functionally linked to altered stromal-epithelial interactions. Hypoxia additionally induces the expression of pro-migratory, survival and invasion genes, and up-regulates expression of ECM components and modifying enzymes, to enhance tumor progression and metastasis. Synergistic interactions between matrix remodeling and tumor hypoxia influence common mechanisms that maximize tumor progression and cooperate to drive metastasis. Thus, clarifying the molecular pathways by which ECM remodeling and tumor hypoxia intersect to promote tumor progression should identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:18814043

  20. Magnetophotonic response of three-dimensional opals.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, José Manuel; Pascu, Oana; López-García, Martín; Canalejas, Víctor; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe; Fontcuberta, Josep; Roig, Anna; Herranz, Gervasi

    2011-04-26

    Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D-MPCs) are being postulated as appropriate platforms to tailor the magneto-optical spectral response of magnetic materials and to incorporate this functionality in a new generation of optical devices. By infiltrating self-assembled inverse opal structures with monodisperse nickel nanoparticles we have fabricated 3D-MPCs that show a sizable enhancement of the magneto-optical signal at frequencies around the stop-band edges of the photonic crystals. We have established a proper methodology to disentangle the intrinsic magneto-optical spectra from the nonmagnetic optical activity of the 3D-MPCs. The results of the optical and magneto-optical characterization are consistent with a homogeneous magnetic infiltration of the opal structure that gives rise to both a red-shift of the optical bandgap and a modification of the magneto-optical spectral response due to photonic bandgap effects. The results of our investigation demonstrate the potential of 3D-MPCs fabricated following the approach outlined here and offer opportunities to adapt the magneto-optical spectral response at optical frequencies by appropriate design of the opal structure or magnetic field strength.

  1. A three-dimensional human walking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. S.; Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional human bipedal walking model with compliant legs is presented in this paper. The legs are modeled with time-variant dampers, and the model is able to characterize the gait pattern of an individual using a minimal set of parameters. Feedback control, for both the forward and lateral movements, is implemented to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The model provides an improvement over classic invert pendulum models. Numerical studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of leg stiffness and attack angle. Simulation results show that when walking at a given speed, increasing the leg stiffness with a constant attack angle results in a longer step length, a higher step frequency, a faster walking speed and an increase in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces. Increasing the attack angle with a constant leg stiffness results in a higher step frequency, a decrease in the step length, an increase in the total energy of the system and a decrease in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces.

  2. Three-dimensional planning in craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Palau, Josep; Prieto-Gundin, Alejandra; Cazalla, Asteria Albert; Serrano, Miguel Bejarano; Fructuoso, Gemma Garcia; Ferrandis, Francisco Parri; Baró, Alejandro Rivera

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) planning in oral and maxillofacial surgery has become a standard in the planification of a variety of conditions such as dental implants and orthognathic surgery. By using custom-made cutting and positioning guides, the virtual surgery is exported to the operating room, increasing precision and improving results. Materials and Methods: We present our experience in the treatment of craniofacial deformities with 3D planning. Software to plan the different procedures has been selected for each case, depending on the procedure (Nobel Clinician, Kodak 3DS, Simplant O&O, Dolphin 3D, Timeus, Mimics and 3-Matic). The treatment protocol is exposed step by step from virtual planning, design, and printing of the cutting and positioning guides to patients’ outcomes. Conclusions: 3D planning reduces the surgical time and allows predicting possible difficulties and complications. On the other hand, it increases preoperative planning time and needs a learning curve. The only drawback is the cost of the procedure. At present, the additional preoperative work can be justified because of surgical time reduction and more predictable results. In the future, the cost and time investment will be reduced. 3D planning is here to stay. It is already a fact in craniofacial surgery and the investment is completely justified by the risk reduction and precise results. PMID:28299272

  3. Three-dimensional Diffusive Strip Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ruiz, Daniel; Meunier, Patrice; Duchemin, Laurent; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2016-11-01

    The Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) is a near-exact numerical method developed for mixing computations at large Péclet number in two-dimensions. The method consists in following stretched material lines to compute a-posteriori the resulting scalar field is extended here to three-dimensional flows, following surfaces. We describe its 3D peculiarities, and show how it applies to a simple Taylor-Couette configuration with non-rotating boundary conditions at the top end, bottom and outer cylinder. This flow produces an elaborate, although controlled, steady 3D flow which relies on the Ekman pumping arising from the rotation of the inner cylinder is both studied experimentally, and numerically modeled. A recurrent two-cells structure appears formed by stream tubes shaped as nested tori. A scalar blob in the flow experiences a Lagrangian oscillating dynamics with stretchings and compressions, driving the mixing process, and yielding both rapidly-mixed and nearly pure-diffusive regions. A triangulated-surface method is developed to calculate the blob elongation and scalar concentration PDFs through a single variable computation along the advected blob surface, capturing the rich evolution observed in the experiments.

  4. Lattice theory of three-dimensional cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a three-dimensional crack is analyzed within a lattice-statics approximation. The consequence of introducing a jog into the crack face as well as the effects of various nonlinear-force laws are studied. The phenomenon of lattice trapping (upper and lower bounds on the applied stress for an equilibrium crack of given length) is again obtained. It is possible to obtain some physical insight into which aspects of the force law are critical for crack stability. In particular, the inadequacy of a thermodynamic approach - which relates the critical stress to a surface energy corresponding to the area under the cohesive-force-vs-displacement curve - is demonstrated. Surface energy is a global property of the cohesive-force law. Crack stability is sensitive to much more refined aspects of the cohesive-force law. Crack healing is sensitive to the long-range portion of the cohesive force. Crack expansion is sensitive to the position of the maximum in the cohesive-force relation.

  5. Three-dimensional Printing in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Wengerter, Brian C; Emre, Gulus; Park, Jea Young; Geibel, John

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, which aim to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a biocompatible support material (scaffold) with a desired cell population to generate viable replacement tissue. Although this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for scaffold-free 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of "bioprinted organs." Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology before full clinical implementation.

  6. Three-dimensional landing zone ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Goodrich, Shawn; Burns, H. N.

    2016-05-01

    Three-Dimensional Landing Zone (3D-LZ) refers to a series of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) programs to develop high-resolution, imaging ladar to address helicopter approach and landing in degraded visual environments with emphasis on brownout; cable warning and obstacle avoidance; and controlled flight into terrain. Initial efforts adapted ladar systems built for munition seekers, and success led to a the 3D-LZ Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) , a 27-month program to develop and demonstrate a ladar subsystem that could be housed with the AN/AAQ-29 FLIR turret flown on US Air Force Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters. Following the JCTD flight demonstration, further development focused on reducing size, weight, and power while continuing to refine the real-time geo-referencing, dust rejection, obstacle and cable avoidance, and Helicopter Terrain Awareness and Warning (HTAWS) capability demonstrated under the JCTD. This paper summarizes significant ladar technology development milestones to date, individual LADAR technologies within 3D-LZ, and results of the flight testing.

  7. PLOT3D- DRAWING THREE DIMENSIONAL SURFACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is a package of programs to draw three-dimensional surfaces of the form z = f(x,y). The function f and the boundary values for x and y are the input to PLOT3D. The surface thus defined may be drawn after arbitrary rotations. However, it is designed to draw only functions in rectangular coordinates expressed explicitly in the above form. It cannot, for example, draw a sphere. Output is by off-line incremental plotter or online microfilm recorder. This package, unlike other packages, will plot any function of the form z = f(x,y) and portrays continuous and bounded functions of two independent variables. With curve fitting; however, it can draw experimental data and pictures which cannot be expressed in the above form. The method used is division into a uniform rectangular grid of the given x and y ranges. The values of the supplied function at the grid points (x, y) are calculated and stored; this defines the surface. The surface is portrayed by connecting successive (y,z) points with straight-line segments for each x value on the grid and, in turn, connecting successive (x,z) points for each fixed y value on the grid. These lines are then projected by parallel projection onto the fixed yz-plane for plotting. This program has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 with on-line CDC microfilm recorder.

  8. Three-dimensional laser velocimeter simultaneity detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter has laser optics for a first channel positioned to create a probe volume in space, and laser optics and for second and third channels, respectively, positioned to create entirely overlapping probe volumes in space. The probe volumes and overlap partially in space. The photodetector is positioned to receive light scattered by a particle present in the probe volume, while photodetectors and are positioned to receive light scattered by a particle present in the probe volume. The photodetector for the first channel is directly connected to provide a first channel analog signal to frequency measuring circuits. The first channel is therefore a primary channel for the system. Photodetectors and are respectively connected through a second channel analog signal attenuator to frequency measuring circuits and through a third channel analog signal attenuator to frequency measuring circuits. The second and third channels are secondary channels, with the second and third channels analog signal attenuators and controlled by the first channel measurement burst signal on line. The second and third channels analog signal attenuators and attenuate the second and third channels analog signals only when the measurement burst signal is false.

  9. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surface to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled by Coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The ICAS fills the need for high speed automated organic analysis by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry sensors, and also by radionuclide sensors which combines alpha, beta, and gamma counting.

  10. FRET Imaging in Three-dimensional Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Taboas, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool for examining cell biology in real-time. Studies utilizing FRET commonly employ two-dimensional (2D) culture, which does not mimic the three-dimensional (3D) cellular microenvironment. A method to perform quenched emission FRET imaging using conventional widefield epifluorescence microscopy of cells within a 3D hydrogel environment is presented. Here an analysis method for ratiometric FRET probes that yields linear ratios over the probe activation range is described. Measurement of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels is demonstrated in chondrocytes under forskolin stimulation using a probe for EPAC1 activation (ICUE1) and the ability to detect differences in cAMP signaling dependent on hydrogel material type, herein a photocrosslinking hydrogel (PC-gel, polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and a thermoresponsive hydrogel (TR-gel). Compared with 2D FRET methods, this method requires little additional work. Laboratories already utilizing FRET imaging in 2D can easily adopt this method to perform cellular studies in a 3D microenvironment. It can further be applied to high throughput drug screening in engineered 3D microtissues. Additionally, it is compatible with other forms of FRET imaging, such as anisotropy measurement and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), and with advanced microscopy platforms using confocal, pulsed, or modulated illumination. PMID:27500354

  11. Three-dimensional modelling of Venus photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Lefèvre, Franck; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Määttänen, Anni; Bekki, Slimane

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module recently added. We will describe preliminary results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012).

  12. Three-Dimensional Modelling of Venus Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Lebonnois, S.; Maattanen, A. E.; Bekki, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude and latitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module that takes into account the parametrized droplet size distribution. We will describe the results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012 ; Mahieux et al., PSS, 2014 ; Marcq et al., 2015, PSS).

  13. Three-dimensional modeling of tsunami waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional, time-dependent, nonlinear, incompressible, viscous flow calculations of realistic models of tsunami wave formation and run up have been performed using the Los Alamos-developed SOLA-3D code. The results of the SOLA calculations are compared with shallow-water, long-wave calculations for the same problems using the SWAN code. Tsunami wave formation by a continental slope subsidence has been examined using the two numerical models. The SOLA waves were slower than the SWAN waves and the interaction with the shoreline was more complicated for the SOLA waves. In the SOLA calculation, the first wave was generated by the cavity being filled along the shoreline close to the source of motion. The second wave was generated by the cavity being filled from the deep water end. The two waves interacted along the shoreline resulting in the second wave being the largest wave with a velocity greater than the first wave. The second wave overtook the first wave at later times and greater distances from the source. In the SWAN calculation, the second wave was smaller than the first wave. 6 refs.

  14. Three-dimensional visualization for large models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michael W.

    2001-09-01

    High-resolution (0.3-1 m) digital-elevation data is widely available from commercial sources. Whereas the production of two-dimensional (2D) mapping products from such data is standard practice, the visualization of such three-dimensional (3D) data has been problematic. The basis for this problem is the same as that for the large-model problem in computer graphics-- large amounts of geometry are difficult for current rendering algorithms and hardware. This paper describes a cost-effective solution to this problem that has two parts. First is the employment of the latest in cost-effective 3D chips and video boards that have recently emerged. The second part is the employment of quad-tree data structures for efficient data storage and retrieval during rendering. The result is the capability for real-time display of large (over tens of millions of samples) digital elevation models on modest PC-based systems. This paper shows several demonstrations of this approach using airborne lidar data. The implication of this work is a paradigm shift for geo-spatial information systems--3D data can now be as easy to use as 2D data.

  15. Three Dimensional Characterization of the Mundrabilla Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Carpenter, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    The differentiated meteorite, Mundrabilla, exhibits a rare structure of primary kamacite/taenite, and at least 25 volume % of sulfide (troilite and daubreelite). The structure has been investigated in three dimensions using the technique of gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) with a radioactive (60)Co isotope as the source of the flux. Using CT, a 50 kg slab with dimensions 12.6 x 8.2 x approx. 70 cm has been sectioned at 1 mm intervals over 50 cm length, and the three dimensional structure is at present being evaluated. These data revealed, in addition to the metallic and troilite-rich phases, the presence and distribution of graphite-rich cones (up to 5 cm long), and small (1-2 mm), low density particles. The graphite cones are readily visible on the surfaces of many of the sections of Mundrabilla, while the smaller phases have a density (determined from CT) of approximately 2.9 g/cc, and are assumed to be silicate inclusions. CT spatial resolution is not adequate to elucidate the shapes of these particles. One can only state that they show no directionality and are equiaxed.

  16. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical conductivity depends on properties such as the presence of ionic fluids in interconnected pores that are difficult to sense with other remote sensing techniques. Thus improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in assessing the diffusion of fluids in oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem is fundamentally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with the complete data set. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. We have proven that a two-dimensional (2D) version of the algorithm is highly effective for real data and have made substantial progress towards a three-dimensional (3D) version. We are proposing to cure identified shortcomings and substantially expand the utility of the existing 2D program, overcome identified difficulties with extending our method to three-dimensions (3D) and embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for even further increasing resolution.

  17. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  18. Globographic visualisation of three dimensional joint angles.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard

    2011-07-07

    Three different methods for describing three dimensional joint angles are commonly used in biomechanics. The joint coordinate system and Cardan/Euler angles are conceptually quite different but are known to represent the same underlying mathematics. More recently the globographic method has been suggested as an alternative and this has proved particularly attractive for the shoulder joint. All three methods can be implemented in a number of ways leading to a choice of angle definitions. Very recently Rab has demonstrated that the globographic method is equivalent to one implementation of the joint coordinate system. This paper presents a rigorous analysis of the three different methods and proves their mathematical equivalence. The well known sequence dependence of Cardan/Euler is presented as equivalent to configuration dependence of the joint coordinate system and orientation dependence of globographic angles. The precise definition of different angle sets can be easily visualised using the globographic method using analogues of longitude, latitude and surface bearings with which most users will already be familiar. The method implicitly requires one axis of the moving segment to be identified as its principal axis and this can be extremely useful in helping define the most appropriate angle set to describe the orientation of any particular joint. Using this technique different angle sets are considered to be most appropriate for different joints and examples of this for the hip, knee, ankle, pelvis and axial skeleton are outlined.

  19. Generation of three-dimensional medical thermograms.

    PubMed

    Chan, F H; So, A T; Lam, F K

    1996-01-01

    To visualise non-invasively human organs in their true form and shape has intrigued mankind for centuries. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging is one recent development that has brought us closer to fulfilling the age-old quest of non-invasive visualisation so that diagnoses by doctors can be efficiently enhanced. Nowadays, 3D CT and MRI images have been very popular. Thermography is an important medical imaging technique that displays the temperature distribution on the surface of a human organ and it has been proved to be significant in offering a unique physiological reflection of pathology that may confirm or enhance the anatomic findings of other diagnostic imaging modalities. It is the only imaging modality that can evaluate pain whereas plain radiographs, CT and MRI, etc. can only depict structural anatomic abnormalities that may not always coincide with patients' clinical complaints. It is against this background that 3D thermograms have been developed. A set of comprehensive calibration procedures for the 3-camera system have been designed based on different models for the optical and infrared cameras. The accuracy of the results is high enough to produce 3D thermograms that can be used to correlate with the 3D images from other medical imaging modalities. One important achievement of the system is that the resultant 3D images are absolutely dimensioned and hence, it is particularly favourable for fully autonomous applications with robots. The system can also provide an overall picture of both the structural abnormalities and nervous responses of patients.

  20. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. Chemical analysis plays a vital role throughout the process of decontamination. Before clean-up operations can begin the site must be characterized with respect to the type and concentration of contaminants, and detailed site mapping must clarify areas of both high and low risk. During remediation activities chemical analysis provides a means to measure progress and to adjust clean-up strategy. Once the clean-up process has been completed the results of chemical analysis will verify that the site is in compliance with federal and local regulations.

  1. Three-dimensional charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  2. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Risco, Cristina; de Castro, Isabel Fernández; Sanz-Sánchez, Laura; Narayan, Kedar; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies are beginning to have significant impact in the field of virology, as they are helping us understand how viruses take control of cells. In this article we review several methodologies for 3D imaging of cells and show how these technologies are contributing to the study of viral infections and the characterization of specialized structures formed in virus-infected cells. We include 3D reconstruction by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using serial sections, electron tomography, and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). We summarize from these methods selected contributions to our understanding of viral entry, replication, morphogenesis, egress and propagation, and changes in the spatial architecture of virus-infected cells. In combination with live-cell imaging, correlative microscopy, and new techniques for molecular mapping in situ, the availability of these methods for 3D imaging is expected to provide deeper insights into understanding the structural and dynamic aspects of viral infection.

  3. All-optical nonlinear plasmonic ring resonator switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozhat, N.; Granpayeh, N.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, all-optical nonlinear plasmonic ring resonator (PRR) switches containing 90o sharp and smooth bends have been proposed and numerically analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain method. Kerr nonlinear self-phase modulation (SPM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM) effects on the switching performance of the device have been studied. By applying a high-power lightwave, the signal can switch from one port to the other port due to the ON/OFF resonant states of the ring. We have shown that by utilizing the XPM effect, the output power ratio is improved by a factor of 2.5 and the required switching power is 31% of that of the case with only the SPM effect. Moreover, by utilizing sharp bend square-shaped ring resonators, the switching power is 10.4% lower than that of the smooth ones. The nonlinear PRR switches are suitable for application in photonic-integrated circuits as all-optical switches because of their nanoscale size and low required switching power.

  4. Applications of Three-Dimensional Printing in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi; Cheung, Tsz Fung; Fan, Vei Chen; Sin, Kin Man; Wong, Chrisity Wai Yan; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly advancing technology in the field of surgery. This article reviews its contemporary applications in 3 aspects of surgery, namely, surgical planning, implants and prostheses, and education and training. Three-dimensional printing technology can contribute to surgical planning by depicting precise personalized anatomy and thus a potential improvement in surgical outcome. For implants and prosthesis, the technology might overcome the limitations of conventional methods such as visual discrepancy from the recipient's body and unmatching anatomy. In addition, 3D printing technology could be integrated into medical school curriculum, supplementing the conventional cadaver-based education and training in anatomy and surgery. Future potential applications of 3D printing in surgery, mainly in the areas of skin, nerve, and vascular graft preparation as well as ear reconstruction, are also discussed. Numerous trials and studies are still ongoing. However, scientists and clinicians are still encountering some limitations of the technology including high cost, long processing time, unsatisfactory mechanical properties, and suboptimal accuracy. These limitations might potentially hamper the applications of this technology in daily clinical practice.

  5. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  6. An algebraic turbulence model for three-dimensional viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Giel, P. W.; Boyle, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    An algebraic turbulence model is proposed for use with three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses. It incorporates features of both the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith models. The Baldwin-Lomax model uses the maximum of a function f(y) to determine length and velocity scales. An analysis of the Baldwin-Lomax model shows that f(y) can have a spurious maximum close to the wall, causing numerical problems and non-physical results. The proposed model uses integral relations to determine delta(*) u(sub e) and delta used in the Cebeci-Smith mode. It eliminates a constant in the Baldwin-Lomax model and determines the two remaining constants by comparison to the Cebeci-Smith formulation. Pressure gradient effects, a new wake model, and the implementation of these features in a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code are also described. Results are shown for a flat plate boundary layer, an annular turbine cascade, and endwall heat transfer in a linear turbine cascade. The heat transfer results agree well with experimental data which shows large variations in endwall Stanton number contours with Reynolds number.

  7. Three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guifang; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    With the advances of stem cell research, development of intelligent biomaterials and three-dimensional biofabrication strategies, highly mimicked tissue or organs can be engineered. Among all the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting based on inkjet printing technology has the promises to deliver and create biomimicked tissue with high throughput, digital control, and the capacity of single cell manipulation. Therefore, this enabling technology has great potential in regenerative medicine and translational applications. The most current advances in organ and tissue bioprinting based on the thermal inkjet printing technology are described in this review, including vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In addition, the benign side effect of bioprinting to the printed mammalian cells can be utilized for gene or drug delivery, which can be achieved conveniently during precise cell placement for tissue construction. With layer-by-layer assembly, three-dimensional tissues with complex structures can be printed using converted medical images. Therefore, bioprinting based on thermal inkjet is so far the most optimal solution to engineer vascular system to the thick and complex tissues. Collectively, bioprinting has great potential and broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The future advances of bioprinting include the integration of different printing mechanisms to engineer biphasic or triphasic tissues with optimized scaffolds and further understanding of stem cell biology.

  8. The Bio Bay Game: Three-Dimensional Learning of Biomagnification

    PubMed Central

    JASTI, CHANDANA; LAUREN, HILLARY; WALLON, ROBERT C.; HUG, BARBARA

    2016-01-01

    Pressing concerns about sustainability and the state of the environment amplify the need to teach students about the connections between ecosystem health, toxicology, and human health. Additionally, the Next Generation Science Standards call for three-dimensional science learning, which integrates disciplinary core ideas, scientific practices, and crosscutting concepts. The Bio Bay Game is a way to teach students about the biomagnification of toxicants across trophic levels while engaging them in three-dimensional learning. In the game, the class models the biomagnification of mercury in a simple aquatic food chain as they play the roles of anchovies, tuna, and humans. While playing, the class generates data, which they analyze after the game to graphically visualize the buildup of toxicants. Students also read and discuss two articles that draw connections to a real-world case. The activity ends with students applying their understanding to evaluate the game as a model of biomagnification. Throughout the activity, students practice modeling and data analysis and engage with the crosscutting concepts of patterns and cause and effect to develop an understanding of core ideas about the connections between humans and the environment. PMID:27990023

  9. Three-Dimensional Frame Buffers For Interactive Analysis Of Three-Dimensional Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gregory M.

    1986-02-01

    Two-dimensional data such as photos, x-rays, various types of satellite images, sonar, radar, seismic plots, etc., in many cases must be analyzed using frame buffers for purposes of medical diagnoses, crop estimates, mineral exploration, and so forth. In many cases the same types of sensors used to gather such samples in two dimensions can gather 3D data for even more effective analysis. Just as 2D arrays of data can be analyzed using frame buffers, three-dimensional data can be analyzed using SOLIDS-BUFFER memories. Image processors deal with samples from two-dimensional arrays and are based on frame buffers. The SOLIDS PROCESSOR system deals with samples from a three-dimensional volume, or solid, and is based on a 3D frame buffer. This paper focuses upon the SOLIDS-BUFFER system as used in the INSIGHT SOLIDS-PROCESSOR system from Phoenix Data Systems.

  10. Three-Dimensional Balance of Cortical Tension and Axial Contractility Enables Fast Amoeboid Migration

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Meili, Ruedi; Bastounis, Effie; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Fast amoeboid migration requires cells to apply mechanical forces on their surroundings via transient adhesions. However, the role these forces play in controlling cell migration speed remains largely unknown. We used three-dimensional force microscopy to measure the three-dimensional forces exerted by chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells, and examined wild-type cells as well as mutants with defects in contractility, internal F-actin crosslinking, and cortical integrity. We showed that cells pull on their substrate adhesions using two distinct, yet interconnected mechanisms: axial actomyosin contractility and cortical tension. We found that the migration speed increases when axial contractility overcomes cortical tension to produce the cell shape changes needed for locomotion. We demonstrated that the three-dimensional pulling forces generated by both mechanisms are internally balanced by an increase in cytoplasmic pressure that allows cells to push on their substrate without adhering to it, and which may be relevant for amoeboid migration in complex three-dimensional environments. PMID:25692587

  11. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. IV. FULL AMPLITUDE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Christopher M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2015-02-10

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of full amplitude RR Lyrae stars have been computed for several models across the instability strip. The three-dimensional nature of the calculations allows convection to be treated without reference to a phenomenological approach such as the local mixing length theory. Specifically, the time-dependent interaction of large-scale eddies and radial pulsation is controlled by conservation laws, while the effects of smaller convective eddies are simulated by an eddy viscosity model. The light amplitudes for these calculations are quite similar to those of our previous two-dimensional calculations in the middle of the instability strip, but somewhat lower near the red edge, the fundamental blue edge, and for the one first overtone model we computed. The time-dependent interaction between the radial pulsation and the convective energy transport is essentially the same in three dimensions as it is in two dimensions. There are some differences between the light curves of the two- and three-dimensional simulations, particularly during decreasing light. Reasons for the differences, both numerical and physical, are explored.

  12. Three-dimensional Gradient Index Optics Fabricated in Diffusive Photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chunfang

    This thesis demonstrates three-dimensional gradient index (GRIN) optics fabricated in two diffusive photopolymers. These polymer optical components have localized gradient index structures, which are self-developed in diffusive photopolymers by introducing localized illuminations. Based on the sizes of the formed index structures, the photopolymer optics studied in this thesis fall into two categories: GRIN lens based optics and waveguide based optics. GRIN lenses and lens arrays with parabolic index profiles are created through Gaussian beam exposure, while GRIN lenses with arbitrary index profiles are created through a dual-axis galvo scanning system. Waveguide based optics, which include uniform waveguides, waveguide tapers, waveguides through thin optics and 900 sharp waveguide bends, are fabricated through direct-write lithography. Several quantitative characterization methods for the fabricated polymer optics are described. The index profiles of the GRIN lens based optics are quantitatively measured by a modified scanning transmission phase microscope and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Three-dimensional mode profile characterization of the polymer waveguides is carried out through a novel polymer sample preparation procedure and an active mode imaging system. A single mode performance is confirmed for the fabricated waveguides. A loss measurement for the waveguides is also accomplished. An index formation model is developed for a diffusive polymer developed by Dr. McLeod's group, which provides a fundamental guidance for fabricating custom-design index structures in the polymer. A hybrid GRIN axicon lens is fabricated to significantly extend the depth of focus in an endoscopy OCT application. Potential applications of the fabricated polymer optics include hybrid integrated optical circuits. The diffusive photopolymer with self-development characteristics provides a platform to integrate various optoelectronic subcomponents in integrated optical circuits.

  13. Visual Interpretation with Three-Dimensional Annotations (VITA): three-dimensional image interpretation tool for radiological reporting.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Brown, Michael S; Shih, George L

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces a software framework called Visual Interpretation with Three-Dimensional Annotations (VITA) that is able to automatically generate three-dimensional (3D) visual summaries based on radiological annotations made during routine exam reporting. VITA summaries are in the form of rotating 3D volumes where radiological annotations are highlighted to place important clinical observations into a 3D context. The rendered volume is produced as a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) object and is automatically added to the study for archival in Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). In addition, a video summary (e.g., MPEG4) can be generated for sharing with patients and for situations where DICOM viewers are not readily available to referring physicians. The current version of VITA is compatible with ClearCanvas; however, VITA can work with any PACS workstation that has a structured annotation implementation (e.g., Extendible Markup Language, Health Level 7, Annotation and Image Markup) and is able to seamlessly integrate into the existing reporting workflow. In a survey with referring physicians, the vast majority strongly agreed that 3D visual summaries improve the communication of the radiologists' reports and aid communication with patients.

  14. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  15. Remote Dynamic Three-Dimensional Scene Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, You; Liu, Qiong; Ji, Rongrong; Gao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Remote dynamic three-dimensional (3D) scene reconstruction renders the motion structure of a 3D scene remotely by means of both the color video and the corresponding depth maps. It has shown a great potential for telepresence applications like remote monitoring and remote medical imaging. Under this circumstance, video-rate and high resolution are two crucial characteristics for building a good depth map, which however mutually contradict during the depth sensor capturing. Therefore, recent works prefer to only transmit the high-resolution color video to the terminal side, and subsequently the scene depth is reconstructed by estimating the motion vectors from the video, typically using the propagation based methods towards a video-rate depth reconstruction. However, in most of the remote transmission systems, only the compressed color video stream is available. As a result, color video restored from the streams has quality losses, and thus the extracted motion vectors are inaccurate for depth reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a precise and robust scheme for dynamic 3D scene reconstruction by using the compressed color video stream and their inaccurate motion vectors. Our method rectifies the inaccurate motion vectors by analyzing and compensating their quality losses, motion vector absence in spatial prediction, and dislocation in near-boundary region. This rectification ensures the depth maps can be compensated in both video-rate and high resolution at the terminal side towards reducing the system consumption on both the compression and transmission. Our experiments validate that the proposed scheme is robust for depth map and dynamic scene reconstruction on long propagation distance, even with high compression ratio, outperforming the benchmark approaches with at least 3.3950 dB quality gains for remote applications. PMID:23667417

  16. Three-dimensional Spontaneous Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is best known from observations of the Sun where it causes solar flares. Observations estimate the reconnection rate as a small, but non-negligible fraction of the Alfvén speed, so-called fast reconnection. Until recently, the prevailing pictures of reconnection were either of resistivity or plasma microscopic effects, which was contradictory to the observed rates. Alternative pictures were either of reconnection due to the stochasticity of magnetic field lines in turbulence or the tearing instability of the thin current sheet. In this paper we simulate long-term three-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a thin, planar current sheet subject to a fast oblique tearing instability using direct numerical simulations of resistive-viscous magnetohydrodynamics. The late-time evolution resembles generic turbulence with a ‑5/3 power spectrum and scale-dependent anisotropy, so we conclude that the tearing-driven reconnection becomes turbulent reconnection. The turbulence is local in scale, so microscopic diffusivity should not affect large-scale quantities. This is confirmed by convergence of the reconnection rate toward ∼ 0.015{v}{{A}} with increasing Lundquist number. In this spontaneous reconnection, with mean field and without driving, the dissipation rate per unit area also converges to ∼ 0.006ρ {v}{{A}}3, and the dimensionless constants 0.015 and 0.006 are governed only by self-driven nonlinear dynamics of the sheared magnetic field. Remarkably, this also means that a thin current sheet has a universal fluid resistance depending only on its length to width ratio and to {v}{{A}}/c.

  17. Three-dimensional topological insulator based nanospaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari P.; Apalkov, Vadym; Stockman, Mark I.

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of the spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), first proposed by Bergman and Stockman in 2003, it has become possible to deliver optical energy beyond the diffraction limit and generate an intense source of an optical field. The spaser is a nanoplasmonic counterpart of a laser. One of the major advantages of the spaser is its size: A spaser is a truly nanoscopic device whose size can be made smaller than the skin depth of a material to a size as small as the nonlocality radius (˜1 nm). Recently, an electrically pumped graphene based nanospaser has been proposed that operates in the midinfrared region and utilizes a nanopatch of graphene as a source of plasmons and a quantum-well cascade as its gain medium. Here we propose an optically pumped nanospaser based on three-dimensional topological insulator (3D TI) materials, such as Bi2Se3 , that operates at an energy close to the bulk band-gap energy ˜0.3 eV and uses the surface as a source for plasmons and its bulk as a gain medium. Population inversion is obtained in the bulk and the radiative energy of the exciton recombination is transferred to the surface plasmons of the same material to stimulate spasing action. This is truly a nanoscale spaser as it utilizes the same material for dual purposes. We show theoretically the possibility of achieving spasing with a 3D TI. As the spaser operates in the midinfrared spectral region, it can be a useful device for a number of applications, such as nanoscopy, nanolithography, nanospectroscopy, and semiclassical information processing.

  18. [Three-dimensional reconstruction of heart valves].

    PubMed

    Flachskampf, F A; Kühl, H; Franke, A; Frielingsdorf, J; Klues, H; Krebs, W; Hanrath, P

    1995-08-01

    The reconstruction of three-dimensional data sets from two-dimensional echocardiographic images offers several fundamental advantages: 1. more complete data than present in the few standard 2D-view; 2. off-line generation of any desired plane, cut, or perspective after the data set has been acquired; 3. access to quantitative parameters like surface areas (e.g., of valve leaflets or portions of leaflets), volumes, and others, without geometric assumptions. The mitral valve has been the focus of several studies using various techniques of reconstruction of transthoracic or transesophageal images. These studies have shown the mitral annulus to be a non-planar, "saddle-shaped" structure, with an average distance of highest to lowest points of 14 mm in normals. This recognition of mitral annular non-planarity has led to a more stringent echocardiographic definition of mitral valve prolapse. Further studies have shown systolic shrinkage of mitral annular area by about 30% and systolic apico-basal translation of the annulus by approximately 1 cm in normals. In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, the annulus is flattened, and both cyclic change in annular area and apico-basal translation are significantly reduced. 3D-studies of the left ventricular outflow tract in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy allow measurement of outflow tract and leaflet surface areas and dynamic spatial visualization of systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet. Automated techniques to reconstruct the full grey value data set from a high number of parallel or rotational transesophageal planes allow impressive visualization of normal and diseased mitral and aortic valves or valve prostheses, with special emphasis on generating "surgical" views and perspectives, which cannot be obtained by conventional tomographic imaging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. 160 Gb/s OFDM transmission utilizing an all-optical symbol generator based on PLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaojun; Qiao, Yaojun; Li, Wei; Mei, Junyao; Qin, Yi

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate a 160 Gb/s orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system using an all-optical symbol generator based on planar light circuit (PLC) technology. Excellent bit error rate (BER) is observed after long-distance transmission. The proposed symbol generator fundamentally eliminates the processing speed limits introduced by electronics and is suitable for high integration, making it physically realizable to build high-speed all-optical OFDM systems with a large number of subcarriers.

  20. Downhole-electrode resistivity interpretation with three-dimensional models

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, D.J.

    1982-06-01

    Using an integral equation numerical solution, the theoretical results for (1) the potential, (2) the apparent resistivity calculated from the total horizontal electric field, (3) the apparent resistivity calculated from the potential due to different three-dimensional bodies in plan and cross-section views have been computed. The transmitter consists of a remote electrode and a dowhole electrode embedded in the body or located near the body. For hole-to-surface work, the potential offers little information about the parameters of a deep body. The apparent resistivity from the total electric field, with its distinctive patterns, best resolves the width, length, and dip of the model, while the apparent resistivity from the potential is more difficult to interpret. The cross-section views, for analysis of hole-to-hole surveys, theoretically define the body for the potential and the apparent resistivity derived from the potential, but their use in practice is limited.

  1. Three dimensional CAD model of the Ignitor machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, S.; Zanaboni, P.; Macco, A.; Sioli, V.; Risso, E.

    1998-11-01

    defind The final, global product of all the structural and thermomechanical design activities is a complete three dimensional CAD (AutoCAD and Intergraph Design Review) model of the IGNITOR machine. With this powerful tool, any interface, modification, or upgrading of the machine design is managed as an integrated part of the general effort aimed at the construction of the Ignitor facility. ind The activities that are underway, to complete the design of the core of the experiment and that will be described, concern the following: ind - the cryogenic cooling system, ind - the radial press, the center post, the mechanical supports (legs) of the entire machine, ind - the inner mechanical supports of major components such as the plasma chamber and the outer poloidal field coils.

  2. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  3. Numerical solution of three-dimensional magnetic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.H.; Greenside, H.S.

    1987-02-01

    A computer code is described that solves differential equations of the form B . del f = h for a single-valued solution f, given a toroidal three-dimensional divergence-free field B and a single-valued function h. The code uses a new algorithm that Fourier decomposes a given function in a set of flux coordinates in which the field lines are straight. The algorithm automatically adjusts the required integration lengths to compensate for proximity to low order rational surfaces. Applying this algorithm to the Cartesian coordinates defines a transformation to magnetic coordinates, in which the magnetic differential equation can be accurately solved. Our method is illustrated by calculating the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents for a stellarator.

  4. Wave diffraction around three-dimensional bodies in a current

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, K.F.; Isaacson, M.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-11-01

    The effects of a collinear current on the diffraction of regular waves around three-dimensional surface-piercing bodies are examined. With the current speed assumed to be small, the boundary-value problem is separated into a steady current problem with a rigid wall condition applied at the still water level and a linear wave propagation problem in the resulting current field. The boundary conditions of the wave propagation problem are satisfied by a time-stepping procedure and the field solution is obtained by an integral equation method. Free surface profiles, runup, and wave forces are described for a vertical circular cylinder in combined waves and a current. The current is shown to affect significantly the steady drift force and runup predictions. Comparisons of the computed wave forces are made with a previous numerical solution involving a semi-immersed sphere in deep water, and indicate good agreement.

  5. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues.

  6. Three-dimensional rogue waves in nonstationary parabolic potentials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya; Konotop, V V; Akhmediev, N

    2010-09-01

    Using symmetry analysis we systematically present a higher-dimensional similarity transformation reducing the (3+1) -dimensional inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with variable coefficients and parabolic potential to the (1+1) -dimensional NLS equation with constant coefficients. This transformation allows us to relate certain class of localized exact solutions of the (3+1) -dimensional case to the variety of solutions of integrable NLS equation of the (1+1) -dimensional case. As an example, we illustrated our technique using two lowest-order rational solutions of the NLS equation as seeding functions to obtain rogue wavelike solutions localized in three dimensions that have complicated evolution in time including interactions between two time-dependent rogue wave solutions. The obtained three-dimensional rogue wavelike solutions may raise the possibility of relative experiments and potential applications in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  7. Three-dimensional rogue waves in nonstationary parabolic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhenya; Konotop, V. V.; Akhmediev, N.

    2010-09-15

    Using symmetry analysis we systematically present a higher-dimensional similarity transformation reducing the (3+1)-dimensional inhomogeneous nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation with variable coefficients and parabolic potential to the (1+1)-dimensional NLS equation with constant coefficients. This transformation allows us to relate certain class of localized exact solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional case to the variety of solutions of integrable NLS equation of the (1+1)-dimensional case. As an example, we illustrated our technique using two lowest-order rational solutions of the NLS equation as seeding functions to obtain rogue wavelike solutions localized in three dimensions that have complicated evolution in time including interactions between two time-dependent rogue wave solutions. The obtained three-dimensional rogue wavelike solutions may raise the possibility of relative experiments and potential applications in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  8. Three-dimensional landing zone joint capability technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Goodrich, Shawn; Ott, Carl; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Perez, Alfonso; Soukup, Joel; Burns, H. N.

    2014-06-01

    The Three-Dimensional Landing Zone (3D-LZ) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) is a 27-month program to develop an integrated LADAR and FLIR capability upgrade for USAF Combat Search and Rescue HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters through a retrofit of current Raytheon AN/AAQ-29 turret systems. The 3D-LZ JCTD builds upon a history of technology programs using high-resolution, imaging LADAR to address rotorcraft cruise, approach to landing, landing, and take-off in degraded visual environments with emphasis on brownout, cable warning and obstacle avoidance, and avoidance of controlled flight into terrain. This paper summarizes ladar development, flight test milestones, and plans for a final flight test demonstration and Military Utility Assessment in 2014.

  9. Three dimensional direct numerical simulation of complex jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Kahouadji, Lyes; Juric, Damir; Chergui, Jalel; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations of two types of very challenging jet flow configurations. The first consists of a liquid jet surrounded by a faster coaxial air flow and the second consists of a global rotational motion. These computations require a high spatial resolution and are performed with a newly developed high performance parallel code, called BLUE, for the simulation of two-phase, multi-physics and multi-scale incompressible flows, tested on up to 131072 threads with excellent scalability performance. The method for the treatment of the fluid interfaces uses a hybrid Front Tracking/Level Set technique that defines the interface both by a discontinuous density field as well as by a local triangular Lagrangian mesh. Coriolis forces are taken into account and solved via an exact time-integration method that ensures numerical accuracy and stability. EPSRC UK Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  10. Symmetry enrichment in three-dimensional topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Shang-Qiang; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Ye, Peng

    2016-12-01

    While two-dimensional symmetry-enriched topological phases (SETs ) have been studied intensively and systematically, three-dimensional ones are still open issues. We propose an algorithmic approach of imposing global symmetry Gs on gauge theories (denoted by GT) with gauge group Gg. The resulting symmetric gauge theories are dubbed "symmetry-enriched gauge theories" (SEG), which may be served as low-energy effective theories of three-dimensional symmetric topological quantum spin liquids. We focus on SEGs with gauge group Gg=ZN1×ZN2×⋯ and onsite unitary symmetry group Gs=ZK1×ZK2×⋯ or Gs=U (1 ) ×ZK 1×⋯ . Each SEG(Gg,Gs) is described in the path-integral formalism associated with certain symmetry assignment. From the path-integral expression, we propose how to physically diagnose the ground-state properties (i.e., SET orders) of SEGs in experiments of charge-loop braidings (patterns of symmetry fractionalization) and the mixed multiloop braidings among deconfined loop excitations and confined symmetry fluxes. From these symmetry-enriched properties, one can obtain the map from SEGs to SETs . By giving full dynamics to background gauge fields, SEGs may be eventually promoted to a set of new gauge theories (denoted by GT*). Based on their gauge groups, GT*s may be further regrouped into different classes, each of which is labeled by a gauge group Gg*. Finally, a web of gauge theories involving GT,SEG,SET, and GT* is achieved. We demonstrate the above symmetry-enrichment physics and the web of gauge theories through many concrete examples.

  11. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube based photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells with a three dimensional (3D) morphology are an exciting new research thrust with promise to create cheaper, more efficient solar cells. This work introduces a new type of 3D PV device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. These arrays are paired with the thin film heterojunction, CdTe/CdS, to form a complete 3D carbon nanotube PV device (3DCNTPV). Marriage of a complicated 3D structure with production methods traditionally used for planar CdTe solar cell is challenging. This work examines the problems associated with processing these types of cells and systematically alters production methods of the semiconductor layers and electrodes to increase the short circuit current (Isc), eliminate parasitic shunts, and increase the open circuit voltage (Voc). The main benefit of 3D solar cell is the ability to utilize multiple photon interactions with the solar cell surface. The three dimensionality allows photons to interact multiple times with the photoactive material, which increases the absorption and the overall power output over what is possible with a two dimensional (2D) morphology. To quantify the increased power output arising from these multiple photon interactions, a new absorption efficiency term, eta3D, is introduced. The theoretical basis behind this new term and how it relates to the absorption efficiency of a planar cell, eta 2D, is derived. A unique model for the average number of multiple photon impingements, Gamma, is proposed based on three categories of 3D morphology: an infinite trench, an enclosed box, and an array of towers. The derivation of eta3D and Gamma for these 3D PV devices gives a complete picture of the enhanced power output over 2D cells based on CNT array height, pitch, radius, and shape. This theory is validated by monte carlo simulations and experiment. This new type of 3D PV devices has been shown to work experimentally. The first 3DCNTPV cells created posses Isc values of 0.085 to 17.872mA/cm2 and Voc values

  12. All-optical D and T flip-flops based on polarization switch of SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    The semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) plays an important role in the development of the all-optical signal processing because of the advantages of simple structure, easy integration and strong non-linearity. Especially the nonlinear polarization rotation effect of SOA is receiving considerable interest by many researchers nowadays. The all-optical flip-flop using the properties of SOA also obtains widespread attention by researchers, as all-optical flip-flop is an important part in the field of all-optical signal processing. In this paper, a new all-optical flip-flop structure using polarization switch (PSW) based on polarization rotation effect of SOA is presented. The main work of the paper is the simulation of all-optical logic gates and optical SR latch. The logic gate setup only uses one SOA, but it can get two different logic gates through a simulation. The extinction ratio of the logic gate is about 30dB. The structure of optical SR latch utilizes the two coupled polarization rotation switch of SOA. The structure of the flip-flop is based on these two parts. To demonstrate the feasibility of the structure, we analyze two types of flip-flops, including all-optical D and T flip-flops, whose clock pulse repetition rate is 1GHz with the pulse width of 0.3ns. The quality of all-optical flip-flop in this paper is measured by the falling and rising edge time. In the simulation, the falling edge time is about 50ps, while the rising edge time is higher than the falling edge time, because the gain increases slowly to the recovery time after the decrease of the gain of SOA. The results are useful for the development of all-optical flip-flop based on SOA.

  13. Numerical investigations in three-dimensional internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The present study is a preliminary investigation into the behavior of the flow within a 28 degree total geometric turning angle hypothetical Mach 10 inlet as calculated with the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Comparison between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional solutions have been made. The overall compression is not significantly different between the two-dimensional and center plane three dimensional solutions. Approximately one-half to two-thirds of the inlet flow at the exit of the inlet behave nominally two-dimensionally. On the other hand, flow field non-uniformities in the three-dimensional solution indicate the potential significance of the sidewall boundary layer flows ingested into the inlet. The tailoring of the geometry at the inlet shoulder and on the cowl obtained in the two-dimensional parametric design study have also proved to be effective at controlling the boundary layer behavior in the three-dimensional code. The three-dimensional inlet solution remained started indicating that the two-dimensional design had a sufficient margin to allow for three-dimensional flow field effects. Although confidence is being gained in the use of SCRAM3D (three-dimensional full Navier-Stokes code) as applied to similar flow fields, the actual effects of the three-dimensional flow fields associated with sidewalls and wind tunnel installations can require verification with ground-based experiments.

  14. Large-scale synthesis of a silicon photonic crystal with a complete three-dimensional bandgap near 1.5 micrometres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Alvaro; Chomski, Emmanuel; Grabtchak, Serguei; Ibisate, Marta; John, Sajeev; Leonard, Stephen W.; Lopez, Cefe; Meseguer, Francisco; Miguez, Hernan; Mondia, Jessica P.; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Toader, Ovidiu; van Driel, Henry M.

    2000-05-01

    Photonic technology, using light instead of electrons as the information carrier, is increasingly replacing electronics in communication and information management systems. Microscopic light manipulation, for this purpose, is achievable through photonic bandgap materials, a special class of photonic crystals in which three-dimensional, periodic dielectric constant variations controllably prohibit electromagnetic propagation throughout a specified frequency band. This can result in the localization of photons, thus providing a mechanism for controlling and inhibiting spontaneous light emission that can be exploited for photonic device fabrication. In fact, carefully engineered line defects could act as waveguides connecting photonic devices in all-optical microchips, and infiltration of the photonic material with suitable liquid crystals might produce photonic bandgap structures (and hence light-flow patterns) fully tunable by an externally applied voltage. However, the realization of this technology requires a strategy for the efficient synthesis of high-quality, large-scale photonic crystals with photonic bandgaps at micrometre and sub-micrometre wavelengths, and with rationally designed line and point defects for optical circuitry. Here we describe single crystals of silicon inverse opal with a complete three-dimensional photonic bandgap centred on 1.46µm, produced by growing silicon inside the voids of an opal template of close-packed silica spheres that are connected by small `necks' formed during sintering, followed by removal of the silica template. The synthesis method is simple and inexpensive, yielding photonic crystals of pure silicon that are easily integrated with existing silicon-based microelectronics.

  15. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Gears used in current helicopters and turboprops are designed for light weight, high margins of safety, and high reliability. However, unexpected gear failures may occur even with adequate tooth design. To design an extremely safe system, the designer must ask and address the question, "What happens when a failure occurs?" With gear-tooth bending fatigue, tooth or rim fractures may occur. A crack that propagates through a rim will be catastrophic, leading to disengagement of the rotor or propeller, loss of an aircraft, and possible fatalities. This failure mode should be avoided. A crack that propagates through a tooth may or may not be catastrophic, depending on the design and operating conditions. Also, early warning of this failure mode may be possible because of advances in modern diagnostic systems. One concept proposed to address bending fatigue fracture from a safety aspect is a splittooth gear design. The prime objective of this design would be to control crack propagation in a desired direction such that at least half of the tooth would remain operational should a bending failure occur. A study at the NASA Lewis Research Center analytically validated the crack-propagation failsafe characteristics of a split-tooth gear. It used a specially developed three-dimensional crack analysis program that was based on boundary element modeling and principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack shapes as well as the crack-propagation life were predicted on the basis of the calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack-propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack-growth theories. The preceding figures show the effect of the location of initial cracks on crack propagation. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth was simulated in a case study to evaluate crack-propagation paths. Tooth

  16. Advanced Three-Dimensional Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2005-01-01

    A desktop-scale, computer-controlled display system, initially developed for NASA and now known as the VolumeViewer(TradeMark), generates three-dimensional (3D) images of 3D objects in a display volume. This system differs fundamentally from stereoscopic and holographic display systems: The images generated by this system are truly 3D in that they can be viewed from almost any angle, without the aid of special eyeglasses. It is possible to walk around the system while gazing at its display volume to see a displayed object from a changing perspective, and multiple observers standing at different positions around the display can view the object simultaneously from their individual perspectives, as though the displayed object were a real 3D object. At the time of writing this article, only partial information on the design and principle of operation of the system was available. It is known that the system includes a high-speed, silicon-backplane, ferroelectric-liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM), multiple high-power lasers for projecting images in multiple colors, a rotating helix that serves as a moving screen for displaying voxels [volume cells or volume elements, in analogy to pixels (picture cells or picture elements) in two-dimensional (2D) images], and a host computer. The rotating helix and its motor drive are the only moving parts. Under control by the host computer, a stream of 2D image patterns is generated on the SLM and projected through optics onto the surface of the rotating helix. The system utilizes a parallel pixel/voxel-addressing scheme: All the pixels of the 2D pattern on the SLM are addressed simultaneously by laser beams. This parallel addressing scheme overcomes the difficulty of achieving both high resolution and a high frame rate in a raster scanning or serial addressing scheme. It has been reported that the structure of the system is simple and easy to build, that the optical design and alignment are not difficult, and that the

  17. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the southeast, from between the cloud layers and over the north center of the region. The tall white clouds in the lower cloud deck are probably much like large terrestrial thunderclouds. They may be regions where atmospheric water powers vertical convection over large horizontal distances.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on

  18. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The upper haze layer has some features that match the lower cloud, such as the bright streak in the foreground of the frame. These are probably thick clouds that span several tens of vertical kilometers.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly

  19. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the west, from between the cloud layers and over the patchy white clouds to the east of the hotspot. This is probably an area where moist convection is occurring over large horizontal distances, similar to the atmosphere over the equatorial ocean on Earth. The clouds are high and thick, and are observed to change rapidly over short time scales.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  20. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from the southwest looking northeast, from an altitude just above the high haze layer. The streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot are visible. The upper haze layer is mostly flat, with notable small peaks that can be matched with features in the lower cloud. In reality, these areas may represent a continuous vertical cloud column.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  1. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The hotspot is clearly visible as a deep blue feature. The cloud streaks end near the hotspot, consistent with the idea that clouds traveling along these streak lines descend and evaporate as they approach the hotspot. The upper haze layer is slightly bowed upwards above the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional

  2. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from above and to the south of the visualized area, showing the entire model. The entire region is overlain by a thin, transparent haze. In places the haze is high and thick, especially to the east (to the right of) the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper

  3. Materials and devices for all-optical helicity-dependent switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah El Hadri, Mohammed; Hehn, Michel; Malinowski, Grégory; Mangin, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Since the first observation of ultrafast demagnetization in Ni thin films by Beaurepaire et al 20 years ago, understanding the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and magnetization has become a topic of huge interest. In 2007, an intriguing discovery related to ultrafast demagnetization was the observation of all-optical switching (AOS) of magnetization in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo alloy films using only femtosecond laser pulses. This review discusses the recent studies elucidating several key issues regarding the all-optical switching phenomenon. Although AOS had long been restricted to GdFeCo alloys, it turned out to be a more general phenomenon for a variety of ferrimagnetic as well as ferromagnetic materials. This discovery helped pave the way for the integration of all-optical writing in data storage industries. Nevertheless, theoretical models explaining the switching in GdFeCo alloy films do not appear to apply in the other materials, thus questioning the uniqueness of the microscopic origin of all-optical switching. By investigating the integration of all-optical switching in spintronic devices, two types of all-optical switching mechanism have been distinguished: a single-pulse heat-only switching in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo alloys, and a two regime helicity-dependent switching in both ferrimagnetic TbCo alloys and ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayers. Another key issue discussed in this review is the necessary condition for the observation of all-optical switching. Many models have been proposed but are strongly challenged by the discovery of such switching in ferromagnets. A comprehensive investigation of the magnetic parameters governing all-optical switching demonstrate that its observation requires magnetic domains larger than the laser spot size during the cooling process; such a criterion is common for both ferri- and ferro-magnets. These investigations strongly improve our understanding and give intriguing insights into the rich physics of the ultrafast

  4. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Rachmeler, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmieder, B.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  5. Three-dimensional optofluidic device for isolating microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keloth, A.; Paterson, L.; Markx, G. H.; Kar, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    Development of efficient methods for isolation and manipulation of microorganisms is essential to study unidentified and yet-to-be cultured microbes originating from a variety of environments. The discovery of novel microbes and their products have the potential to contribute to the development of new medicines and other industrially important bioactive compounds. In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and validation of an optofluidic device capable of redirecting microbes within a flow using optical forces. The device holds promise to enable the high throughput isolation of single microbes for downstream culture and analysis. Optofluidic devices are widely used in clinical research, cell biology and biomedical engineering as they are capable of performing analytical functions such as controlled transportation, compact and rapid processing of nanolitres to millilitres of clinical or biological samples. We have designed and fabricated a three dimensional optofluidic device to control and manipulate microorganisms within a microfluidic channel. The device was fabricated in fused silica by ultrafast laser inscription (ULI) followed by selective chemical etching. The unique three-dimensional capability of ULI is utilized to integrate microfluidic channels and waveguides within the same substrate. The main microfluidic channel in the device constitutes the path of the sample. Optical waveguides are fabricated at right angles to the main microfluidic channel. The potential of the optical scattering force to control and manipulate microorganisms is discussed in this paper. A 980 nm continuous wave (CW) laser source, coupled to the waveguide, is used to exert radiation pressure on the particle and particle migrations at different flow velocities are recorded. As a first demonstration, device functionality is validated using fluorescent microbeads and initial trials with microalgae are presented.

  6. Three-dimensional metrology inside a vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costille, Anne; Beaumont, Florent; Prieto, Eric; Carle, Michael; Fabron, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Several three dimensional coordinates systems are proposed by companies to provide accurate measurement of mechanical parts in a volume. None of them are designed to perform the metrology of a system in a vacuum chamber. In the frame of the test of NISP instrument from ESA Euclid mission, the question was raised to perform a three dimensional measurement of different parts during the thermal test of NISP instrument into ERIOS chamber done at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM). One of the main objectives of the test campaign will be the measurement of the focus position of NISP image plane with respect to the EUCLID object plane to ensure a good focalisation of NISP instrument after integration on the payload. A Metrology Verification System (MVS) has been proposed. Its goal is to provide at operational temperature the measurement of references frames set on a EUCLID telescope simulator and NISP, the knowledge of the coordinates of the object point source provided by the telescope simulator and the measurement of the angle between the telescope simulator optical axis and NISP optical axis. The MVS concept is based on the use of a laser tracker, outside the vacuum chamber, that measures reflectors inside the vacuum chamber through a curved window. We will present preliminary results that show the possibility to perform this type of measurements and the accuracy reached in this configuration. An analysis of the contributors to the measurement error budget of the MVS is proposed, based on the current knowledge of the MVS performance and constraints during the TB/TV tests.

  7. Three-dimensional face model reproduction method using multiview images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Yoshio; Agawa, Hiroshi; Kishino, Fumio

    1991-11-01

    This paper describes a method of reproducing three-dimensional face models using multi-view images for a virtual space teleconferencing system that achieves a realistic visual presence for teleconferencing. The goal of this research, as an integral component of a virtual space teleconferencing system, is to generate a three-dimensional face model from facial images, synthesize images of the model virtually viewed from different angles, and with natural shadow to suit the lighting conditions of the virtual space. The proposed method is as follows: first, front and side view images of the human face are taken by TV cameras. The 3D data of facial feature points are obtained from front- and side-views by an image processing technique based on the color, shape, and correlation of face components. Using these 3D data, the prepared base face models, representing typical Japanese male and female faces, are modified to approximate the input facial image. The personal face model, representing the individual character, is then reproduced. Next, an oblique view image is taken by TV camera. The feature points of the oblique view image are extracted using the same image processing technique. A more precise personal model is reproduced by fitting the boundary of the personal face model to the boundary of the oblique view image. The modified boundary of the personal face model is determined by using face direction, namely rotation angle, which is detected based on the extracted feature points. After the 3D model is established, the new images are synthesized by mapping facial texture onto the model.

  8. Realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of observed precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, I. S.; Bettenhausen, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of precipitation typically utilize a number of instruments on various platforms. Ground validation campaigns incorporate ground-based and airborne measurements to characterize and study precipitating clouds, while the precipitation measurement constellation envisioned by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission includes measurements from differing space-borne instruments. In addition to disparities such as frequency channel selection and bandwidth, measurement geometry and resolution differences between observing platforms result in inherent inconsistencies between data products. In order to harmonize measurements from multiple passive radiometers, a framework is required that addresses these differences. To accomplish this, we have implemented a flexible three-dimensional radiative transfer model. As its core, the radiative transfer model uses the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) version 2 to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions using Monte Carlo integration. Gaseous absorption is computed with MonoRTM and formatted into look-up tables for rapid processing. Likewise, scattering properties are pre-computed using a number of publicly available codes, such as T-Matrix and DDSCAT. If necessary, a melting layer model can be applied to the input profiles. Gaussian antenna beams estimate the spatial resolutions of the passive measurements, and realistic bandpass characteristics can be included to properly account for the spectral response of the simulated instrument. This work presents three-dimensional simulations of WindSat brightness temperatures for an oceanic rain event sampled by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The 2B-31 combined Precipitation Radar / TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) retrievals provide profiles that are the input to the radiative transfer model. TMI brightness temperatures are also simulated. Comparisons between monochromatic, pencil beam simulations and

  9. Pathogen Propagation in Cultured Three-Dimensional Tissue Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for propagating a pathogen in a three-dimensional tissue mass cultured at microgravity conditions in a culture vessel containing culture media and a culture matrix is provided. The three-dimensional tissue mass is inoculated with a pathogen and pathogen replication in the cells of the tissue mass achieved.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of the myocardium with isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    Three methods of imaging the three-dimensional distribution of isotopes in the myocardium are discussed. Three-dimensional imaging was examined using multiple Anger-camera views. Longitudinal tomographic images with compensation for blurring were studied. Transverse-section reconstruction using coincidence detection of annihilation gammas from positron emitting isotopes was investigated.

  11. Pathogen propagation in cultured three-dimensional tissue mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for propagating a pathogen in a three-dimensional tissue mass cultured at microgravity conditions in a culture vessel containing culture media and a culture matrix is provided. The three-dimensional tissue mass is inoculated with a pathogen and pathogen replication in the cells of the tissue mass achieved.

  12. Computer-Generated, Three-Dimensional Character Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Baerle, Susan Lynn

    This master's thesis begins by discussing the differences between 3-D computer animation of solid three-dimensional, or monolithic, objects, and the animation of characters, i.e., collections of movable parts with soft pliable surfaces. Principles from two-dimensional character animation that can be transferred to three-dimensional character…

  13. Scanning holographic microscopy of three-dimensional fluorescent specimens

    PubMed Central

    Indebetouw, Guy; Zhong, Wenwei

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the three-dimensional reconstructions of fluorescent biological specimens using scanning holographic microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstructions with transverse resolution below about 1 μm of transmission and fluorescence emission images are presented and analyzed. The limitations of the method are discussed. PMID:16783434

  14. Using three-dimensional spacetime diagrams in special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dray, Tevian

    2013-08-01

    We provide three examples of the use of geometric reasoning with three-dimensional spacetime diagrams, rather than algebraic manipulations using three-dimensional Lorentz transformations, to analyze problems in special relativity. The examples are the "rising manhole" paradox, the "moving spotlight" problem, and Einstein's light-clock derivation of time dilation.

  15. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest; Rosselot, Donald; Aull, Mark; Balapa, Manohar

    2006-10-01

    Three dimensional visual recognition and measurement are important in many machine vision applications. In some cases, a stationary camera base is used and a three-dimensional model will permit the measurement of depth information from a scene. One important special case is stereo vision for human visualization or measurements. In cases in which the camera base is also in motion, a seven dimensional model may be used. Such is the case for navigation of an autonomous mobile robot. The purpose of this paper is to provide a computational view and introduction of three methods to three-dimensional vision. Models are presented for each situation and example computations and images are presented. The significance of this work is that it shows that various methods based on three-dimensional vision may be used for solving two and three dimensional vision problems. We hope this work will be slightly iconoclastic but also inspirational by encouraging further research in optical engineering.

  16. Radiative transfer for a three-dimensional raining cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haferman, J. L.; Krajewski, W. F.; Smith, T. F.; Sanchez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite-sensor-based microwave brightness temperatures for a three-dimensional raining cloud over a reflecting surface are computed by using a radiative transfer model based on the discrete-ordinates solution procedure. The three-dimensional model applied to a plane layer is validated by comparison with results from a one-dimensional model that is available in the literature. Results examining the effects of cloud height, rainfall rate, surface reflectance, rainfall footprint area, and satellite viewing position on one- and three-dimensional brightness temperature calculations are reported. The numerical experiments indicate that, under certain conditions, three-dimensional effects are significant in the analysis of satellite-sensor-based rainfall retrieval algorithms. The results point to the need to consider carefully three-dimensional effects as well as surface reflectance effects when interpreting satellite-measured radiation data.

  17. Virtual three-dimensional blackboard: three-dimensional finger tracking with a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Andrew; Hassan-Shafique, Khurram; Shah, Mubarak; da Vitoria Lobo, N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for three-dimensional (3D) tracking of a human finger from a monocular sequence of images. To recover the third dimension from the two-dimensional images, we use the fact that the motion of the human arm is highly constrained owing to the dependencies between elbow and forearm and the physical constraints on joint angles. We use these anthropometric constraints to derive a 3D trajectory of a gesticulating arm. The system is fully automated and does not require human intervention. The system presented can be used as a visualization tool, as a user-input interface, or as part of some gesture-analysis system in which 3D information is important.

  18. All-optical arithmetic unit with the help of terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer-based tree architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Dilip Kumar; Nath Roy, Jitendra

    2008-03-01

    An all-optical arithmetic unit with the help of terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer (TOAD)-based tree architecture is proposed. We describe the all-optical arithmetic unit by using a set of all-optical multiplexer, all-optical full-adder, and optical switch. The all-optical arithmetic unit can be used to perform a fast central processor unit using optical hardware components. We have tried to exploit the advantages of both optical tree architecture and TOAD-based switch to design an integrated all-optical circuit that can perform binary addition, addition with carry, subtract with borrow, subtract (2's complement), double, increment, decrement, and transfer operations.

  19. High-order all-optical differential equation solver based on microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sisi; Xiang, Lei; Zou, Jinghui; Zhang, Qiang; Wu, Zhao; Yu, Yu; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2013-10-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a feasible integrated scheme to solve all-optical differential equations using microring resonators (MRRs) that is capable of solving first- and second-order linear ordinary differential equations with different constant coefficients. Employing two cascaded MRRs with different radii, an excellent agreement between the numerical simulation and the experimental results is obtained. Due to the inherent merits of silicon-based devices for all-optical computing, such as low power consumption, small size, and high speed, this finding may motivate the development of integrated optical signal processors and further extend optical computing technologies.

  20. Instrumented cardiac microphysiological devices via multimaterial three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Lind, Johan U; Busbee, Travis A; Valentine, Alexander D; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Yuan, Hongyan; Yadid, Moran; Park, Sung-Jin; Kotikian, Arda; Nesmith, Alexander P; Campbell, Patrick H; Vlassak, Joost J; Lewis, Jennifer A; Parker, Kevin K

    2017-03-01

    Biomedical research has relied on animal studies and conventional cell cultures for decades. Recently, microphysiological systems (MPS), also known as organs-on-chips, that recapitulate the structure and function of native tissues in vitro, have emerged as a promising alternative. However, current MPS typically lack integrated sensors and their fabrication requires multi-step lithographic processes. Here, we introduce a facile route for fabricating a new class of instrumented cardiac microphysiological devices via multimaterial three-dimensional (3D) printing. Specifically, we designed six functional inks, based on piezo-resistive, high-conductance, and biocompatible soft materials that enable integration of soft strain gauge sensors within micro-architectures that guide the self-assembly of physio-mimetic laminar cardiac tissues. We validated that these embedded sensors provide non-invasive, electronic readouts of tissue contractile stresses inside cell incubator environments. We further applied these devices to study drug responses, as well as the contractile development of human stem cell-derived laminar cardiac tissues over four weeks.

  1. Mechanical testing for three-dimensional motion analysis reliability.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily; Kaufman, Kenton; Kingsbury, Trevor; Wolf, Erik; Wilken, Jason; Wyatt, Marilynn

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use simple mechanical tests to evaluate the reliability of three-dimensional motion analysis systems and biomechanical models. Three different tests were conducted at four motion analysis laboratories where clinical care and research studies are routinely performed. The laboratories had different motion capture systems, different types and number of cameras, different types and numbers of force plates and different biomechanical models. These mechanical tests evaluated the accuracy of the motion capture system, the integration of the force plate and the motion capture system, and the strength of the biomechanical model used to calculate rotational kinematics. Results of motion capture system accuracy tests showed that, for all labs, the error between the measured and calculated distances between markers was less than 2mm and 1° for marker separations which ranged from 24mm to 500mm. Results from the force plate integration tests demonstrated errors in center of pressure calculation of less than 4mm across all labs, despite varied force plate and motion system configurations. Finally, errors across labs for single joint rotations and for combined rotations at the hip and knee were less than 2° at the hip and less than 10° at the knee. These results demonstrate that system accuracy and reliability can be obtained allowing the collection of comparable data across different motion analysis laboratories with varying configurations and equipment. This testing is particularly important when multi-center studies are planned in order to assure data consistency across labs.

  2. Instrumented cardiac microphysiological devices via multimaterial three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Johan U.; Busbee, Travis A.; Valentine, Alexander D.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Yuan, Hongyan; Yadid, Moran; Park, Sung-Jin; Kotikian, Arda; Nesmith, Alexander P.; Campbell, Patrick H.; Vlassak, Joost J.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Parker, Kevin K.

    2016-10-01

    Biomedical research has relied on animal studies and conventional cell cultures for decades. Recently, microphysiological systems (MPS), also known as organs-on-chips, that recapitulate the structure and function of native tissues in vitro, have emerged as a promising alternative. However, current MPS typically lack integrated sensors and their fabrication requires multi-step lithographic processes. Here, we introduce a facile route for fabricating a new class of instrumented cardiac microphysiological devices via multimaterial three-dimensional (3D) printing. Specifically, we designed six functional inks, based on piezo-resistive, high-conductance, and biocompatible soft materials that enable integration of soft strain gauge sensors within micro-architectures that guide the self-assembly of physio-mimetic laminar cardiac tissues. We validated that these embedded sensors provide non-invasive, electronic readouts of tissue contractile stresses inside cell incubator environments. We further applied these devices to study drug responses, as well as the contractile development of human stem cell-derived laminar cardiac tissues over four weeks.

  3. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation.

  4. Nanopattern-guided growth of single-crystal silicon on amorphous substrates and high-performance sub-100 nm thin-film transistors for three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian

    This thesis explores how nanopatterns can be used to control the growth of single-crystal silicon on amorphous substrates at low temperature, with potential applications on flat panel liquid-crystal display and 3-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits. I first present excimer laser annealing of amorphous silicon (a-Si) nanostructures on thermally oxidized silicon wafer for controlled formation of single-crystal silicon islands. Preferential nucleation at pattern center is observed due to substrate enhanced edge heating. Single-grain silicon is obtained in a 50 nm x 100 nm rectangular pattern by super lateral growth (SLG). Narrow lines (such as 20-nm-wide) can serve as artificial heterogeneous nucleation sites during crystallization of large patterns, which could lead to the formation of single-crystal silicon islands in a controlled fashion. In addition to eximer laser annealing, NanoPAtterning and nickel-induced lateral C&barbelow;rystallization (NanoPAC) of a-Si lines is presented. Single-crystal silicon is achieved by NanoPAC. The line width of a-Si affects the grain structure of crystallized silicon lines significantly. Statistics show that single-crystal silicon is formed for all lines with width between 50 nm to 200 nm. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nickel-induced lateral crystallization (Ni-ILC) of a-Si inside a pattern is revealed; lithography-constrained single seeding (LISS) is proposed to explain the single-crystal formation. Intragrain line and two-dimensional defects are also studied. To test the electrical properties of NanoPAC silicon films, sub-100 nm thin-film transistors (TFTs) are fabricated using Patten-controlled crystallization of Ṯhin a-Si channel layer and H&barbelow;igh temperature (850°C) annealing, coined PaTH process. PaTH TFTs show excellent device performance over traditional solid phase crystallized (SPC) TFTs in terms of threshold voltage, threshold voltage roll-off, leakage current, subthreshold swing, on

  5. Three-Dimensional Planning in Maxillofacial Fracture Surgery: Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacture Surgical Splints by Integrating Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Images Into Multislice Computerized Tomography Images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiayin; Zhou, Zhongwei; Li, Peng; Tang, Wei; Guo, Jixiang; Wang, Hu; Tian, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an innovative workflow for maxillofacial fracture surgery planning and surgical splint designing. The maxillofacial multislice computerized tomography (MSCT) data and dental cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) data both were obtained from 40 normal adults and 58 adults who suffered fractures. The each part of the CBCT dentition image was registered into MSCT image by the use of the iterative closest point algorithm. Volume evaluation of the virtual splints that were designed by the registered MSCT images and MSCT images of the same object was performed. Eighteen patients (group 1) were operated without any splint. Twenty-one (group 2) and 19 patients (group 3) used the splints designed according to the MSCT images and registered MSCT images, respectively. The authors' results showed that the mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.53 to 0.92 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.38 to 0.69 mm in fracture patients. The mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.47 to 0.85 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.33 to 0.71 mm in normal adults. 72.22% patients in group 1 recovered occlusion. 85.71% patients in group 2, and 94.73% patients in group 3 reconstructed occlusion. There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients (P <0.05). The MSCT images based splints' volume was statistically significantly distinct from the registered MSCT splints' volume in normal adults (P <0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients and normal adults (P <0.05). The occlusion recovery rate of group 3 was better than that of group 1 and group 2. The way of integrating CBCT images into MSCT images for splints designing was feasible. The volume of the splints designed by MSCT images tended to be smaller than the splints designed by

  6. Non-invasive three-dimensional localisation of arrhythmogenic foci in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in ventricular tachycardia by radionuclide ventriculography: phase analysis of double-angulated integrated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

    PubMed Central

    Weismüller, P; Clausen, M; Weller, R; Richter, P; Steinmann, J; Henze, E; Dormehl, I; Kochs, M; Adam, W E; Hombach, V

    1993-01-01

    A new tomographic technique combined with phase analysis was used to detect premature and ectopic ventricular contraction patterns in 15 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and during ventricular tachycardia in seven patients. Data generated by gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were analysed by backprojection of the Fourier coefficients, double-angulation, and integration to thick slices containing the ventricles, thus allowing visualisation of the contraction patterns in three perpendicular views. The results were compared with those of catheter mapping. In nine patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome the site of initial contraction detected was identical with the site of the accessory pathway found by catheter mapping. The sites of origin of the ventricular tachycardias determined by catheter mapping were within 3 cm of the sites detected by the new technique. This new technique seems to be a promising non-invasive method for localising ectopic ventricular activity that will considerably shorten the time required for subsequent invasive procedures. Images PMID:8461217

  7. Scale invariance implies conformal invariance for the three-dimensional Ising model.

    PubMed

    Delamotte, Bertrand; Tissier, Matthieu; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Using the Wilson renormalization group, we show that if no integrated vector operator of scaling dimension -1 exists, then scale invariance implies conformal invariance. By using the Lebowitz inequalities, we prove that this necessary condition is fulfilled in all dimensions for the Ising universality class. This shows, in particular, that scale invariance implies conformal invariance for the three-dimensional Ising model.

  8. Three dimensional controlled assembly of gold nanoparticles using a micromachined platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanduja, Nishant; Selvarasah, Selvapraba; Chen, Chia-Ling; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Xiong, Xugang; Makaram, Prashanth; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2007-02-01

    By using optical lithographic procedures, the authors present a micromachined platform for large scale three dimensional (3D) assembly of gold nanoparticles with diameters of ˜50nm. The gold nanoparticles are formed into 3D low resistance bridges (two terminal resistance of ˜40Ω) interconnecting the two microelectrodes using ac dielectrophoresis. The thickness of the parylene interlevel dielectric can be adjusted to vary the height of the 3D platform for meeting different application requirements. This research represents a step towards realizing high density, three dimensional structures and devices for applications such as nanosensors, vertical integration of nanosystems, and characterization of nanomaterials.

  9. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  10. Artificial eye for scotopic vision with bioinspired all-optical photosensitivity enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hewei; Huang, Yinggang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-04-01

    The ability to acquire images under low-light conditions is critical for many applications. However, to date, strategies toward improving low-light imaging primarily focus on developing electronic image sensors. Inspired by natural scotopic visual systems, we adopt an all-optical method to significantly improve the overall photosensitivity of imaging systems. Such optical approach is independent of, and can effectively circumvent the physical and material limitations of, the electronics imagers used. We demonstrate an artificial eye inspired by superposition compound eyes and the retinal structure of elephantnose fish. The bioinspired photosensitivity enhancer (BPE) that we have developed enhances the image intensity without consuming power, which is achieved by three-dimensional, omnidirectionally aligned microphotocollectors with parabolic reflective sidewalls. Our work opens up a previously unidentified direction toward achieving high photosensitivity in imaging systems.

  11. Artificial eye for scotopic vision with bioinspired all-optical photosensitivity enhancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hewei; Huang, Yinggang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-04-12

    The ability to acquire images under low-light conditions is critical for many applications. However, to date, strategies toward improving low-light imaging primarily focus on developing electronic image sensors. Inspired by natural scotopic visual systems, we adopt an all-optical method to significantly improve the overall photosensitivity of imaging systems. Such optical approach is independent of, and can effectively circumvent the physical and material limitations of, the electronics imagers used. We demonstrate an artificial eye inspired by superposition compound eyes and the retinal structure of elephantnose fish. The bioinspired photosensitivity enhancer (BPE) that we have developed enhances the image intensity without consuming power, which is achieved by three-dimensional, omnidirectionally aligned microphotocollectors with parabolic reflective sidewalls. Our work opens up a previously unidentified direction toward achieving high photosensitivity in imaging systems.

  12. Artificial eye for scotopic vision with bioinspired all-optical photosensitivity enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hewei; Huang, Yinggang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-01-01

    The ability to acquire images under low-light conditions is critical for many applications. However, to date, strategies toward improving low-light imaging primarily focus on developing electronic image sensors. Inspired by natural scotopic visual systems, we adopt an all-optical method to significantly improve the overall photosensitivity of imaging systems. Such optical approach is independent of, and can effectively circumvent the physical and material limitations of, the electronics imagers used. We demonstrate an artificial eye inspired by superposition compound eyes and the retinal structure of elephantnose fish. The bioinspired photosensitivity enhancer (BPE) that we have developed enhances the image intensity without consuming power, which is achieved by three-dimensional, omnidirectionally aligned microphotocollectors with parabolic reflective sidewalls. Our work opens up a previously unidentified direction toward achieving high photosensitivity in imaging systems. PMID:26976565

  13. All-optical flip-flop based on vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Song, Deqiang; Gauss, Veronica; Zhang, Haijiang; Gross, Matthias; Wen, Pengyue; Esener, Sadik

    2007-10-15

    We report the operation of an all-optical set-reset (SR) flip-flop based on vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs). This flip-flop is cascadable, has low optical switching power (~10 microW), and has the potential to be integrated on a small footprint (~100 microm(2)). The flip-flop is composed of two cross-coupled electrically pumped VCSOA inverters and uses the principles of cross-gain modulation, polarization gain anisotropy, and highly nonlinear gain characteristics to achieve flip-flop functionality. We believe that, when integrated on chip, this type of all-optical flip-flop opens new prospects for implementing all-optical fast memories and timing regeneration circuits.

  14. Three-dimensional surface inspection for semiconductor components with fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fuqin; Ding, Yi; Peng, Kai; Xi, Jiangtao; Yin, Yongkai; Zhu, Ziqi

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing integration level of components in modern electronic devices, three-dimensional automated optical inspection has been widely used in the manufacturing process of electronic and communication industries to improve the product quality. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional inspection and metrology system for semiconductor components with fringe projection profilometry, which is composed of industry camera, telecentric lens and projection module. This system is used to measure the height, flatness, volume, shape, coplanarity for quality checking. To detect the discontinuous parts in the internal surface of semiconductor components, we employ the fringes with multiple spatial frequencies to avoid the measurement ambiguity. The complete three-dimensional information of semiconductor component is obtained by fusing the absolute phase maps from different views. The practical inspection results show that the depth resolution of our system reaches 10 μm . This system can be further embedded for the online inspection of various electronic and communication products.

  15. Fick-Jacobs equation for channels over three-dimensional curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero Valdes, Carlos; Herrera Guzman, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a new formula for the effective diffusion coefficient of a generalized Fick-Jacobs equation for narrow three-dimensional channels. The generalized Fick-Jacobs equation is obtained by projecting the three-dimensional diffusion equation along the normal directions of a curve in three-dimensional space that roughly resembles the narrow channel. The projection (or dimensional reduction) is achieved by integrating the diffusion equation along the cross sections of the channel contained in the planes orthogonal to the curve. We show that the resulting formula for the associated effective diffusion coefficient can be expressed in terms of the geometric moments of the channel's cross sections and the curve's curvature. We show the effect that a rotating cross section with offset has on the effective diffusion coefficient.

  16. Three-dimensional finite element analysis for high velocity impact. [of projectiles from space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, S. T. K.; Lee, C. H.; Brashears, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for solving unsteady, three-dimensional high velocity impact problems is presented. A computer program was developed based on the Eulerian hydroelasto-viscoplastic formulation and the utilization of the theorem of weak solutions. The equations solved consist of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, equation of state, and appropriate constitutive equations. The solution technique is a time-dependent finite element analysis utilizing three-dimensional isoparametric elements, in conjunction with a generalized two-step time integration scheme. The developed code was demonstrated by solving one-dimensional as well as three-dimensional impact problems for both the inviscid hydrodynamic model and the hydroelasto-viscoplastic model.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Confined Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional confined flow model is presented. The flow field is computed by calculating velocity and enthalpy along a set of streamlines. The finite difference equations are obtained by applying conservation principles to streamtubes constructed around the chosen streamlines. With appropriate substitutions for the body force terms, the approach computes three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic channel flows. A listing of a computer code, based on this approach is presented in FORTRAN IV language. The code computes three dimensional compressible viscous flow through a rectangular duct, with the duct cross section specified along the axis.

  18. Three-dimensional particle imaging by wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Towers, Catherine E; Towers, David P; Campbell, Heather I; Zhang, Sijiong; Greenaway, Alan H

    2006-05-01

    We present two methods for three-dimensional particle metrology from a single two-dimensional view. The techniques are based on wavefront sensing where the three-dimensional location of a particle is encoded into a single image plane. The first technique is based on multiplanar imaging, and the second produces three-dimensional location information via anamorphic distortion of the recorded images. Preliminary results show that an uncertainty of 8 microm in depth can be obtained for low-particle density over a thin plane, and an uncertainty of 30 microm for higher particle density over a 10 mm deep volume.

  19. More About The Farley Three-Dimensional Braider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    Farley three-dimensional braider, undergoing development, is machine for automatic fabrication of three-dimensional braided structures. Incorporates yarns into structure at arbitrary braid angles to produce complicated shape. Braiding surface includes movable braiding segments containing pivot points, along which yarn carriers travel during braiding process. Yarn carrier travels along sequence of pivot points as braiding segments move. Combined motions position yarns for braiding onto preform. Intended for use in making fiber preforms for fiber/matrix composite parts, such as multiblade propellers. Machine also described in "Farley Three-Dimensional Braiding Machine" (LAR-13911).

  20. Rapidly Reconfigurable All-Optical Universal Logic Gates

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, L L; Kallman, J S; Bond, T C

    2006-06-21

    We present designs and simulations for a highly cascadable, rapidly reconfigurable, all-optical, universal logic gate. We will discuss the gate's expected performance, e.g. speed, fanout, and contrast ratio, as a function of the device layout and biasing conditions. The gate is a three terminal on-chip device that consists of: (1) the input optical port, (2) the gate selection port, and (3) the output optical port. The device can be built monolithically using a standard multiple quantum well graded index separate confinement heterostructure laser configuration. The gate can be rapidly and repeatedly reprogrammed to perform any of the basic digital logic operations by using an appropriate analog electrical or optical signal at the gate selection port. Specifically, the same gate can be selected to execute one of the 2 basic unary operations (NOT or COPY), or one of the 6 binary operations (OR, XOR, AND, NOR, XNOR, or NAND), or one of the many logic operations involving more than two inputs. The speed of the gate for logic operations as well as for reprogramming the function of the gate is primarily limited to the small signal modulation speed of a laser, which can be on the order of tens of GHz. The reprogrammable nature of the universal gate offers maximum flexibility and interchangeability for the end user since the entire application of a photonic integrated circuit built from cascaded universal logic gates can be changed simply by adjusting the gate selection port signals.

  1. Three-dimensional laser radar modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Carlsson, Tomas

    2001-09-01

    Laser radars have the unique capability to give intensity and full 3-D images of an object. Doppler lidars can give velocity and vibration characteristics of an objects. These systems have many civilian and military applications such as terrain modelling, depth sounding, object detection and classification as well as object positioning. In order to derive the signal waveform from the object one has to account for the laser pulse time characteristics, media effects such as the atmospheric attenuation and turbulence effects or scattering properties, the target shape and reflection (BRDF), speckle noise together with the receiver and background noise. Finally the type of waveform processing (peak detection, leading edge etc.) is needed to model the sensor output to be compared with observations. We have developed a computer model which models performance of a 3-D laser radar. We will give examples of signal waveforms generated from model different targets calculated by integrating the laser beam profile in space and time over the target including reflection characteristics during different speckle and turbulence conditions. The result will be of help when designing and using new laser radar systems. The importance of different type of signal processing of the waveform in order to fulfil performance goals will be shown.

  2. The three dimensional current system during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, Jesper; Hoffman, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and it's coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) is centered around 65 / 72 deg magnetic latitude post-midnight / pre-midnight. Thus, we find a distinct latitudinal shift between the locations of the westward electrojet at these local times. The spatiotemporal behavior of the WEJ differs at these two local times. Attempting to explain this significant finding we propose two possible simple current systems. 1) The classical substorm current wedge, which is a single 3D current system. The distinct poleward kink and the different spatiotemporal behavior, however, present considerable complications for this solution. 2) A new 3D current system that consists of 2 wedge type systems: the classical substorm current wedge in the pre-midnight region and another current wedge in the post-midnight region. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere. To support the empirical modeling we performed Biot and Savart integrations to simulate the ground perturbations. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from the simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  3. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.; Gallman, P.; Gaudreault, J.; Mosehauer, R.; Slotwinski, A.; Jarvis, G.; Griffiths, P.

    1996-12-31

    This system (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. It is in the final phase of a 3-phase program to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and radioactive and organic contamination is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of dangerous inorganic materials such as asbestos and transite. 3D-ICAS robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected, using coherent laser radar tracking, which also provides 3D facility maps. High-speed automated organic analysis is provided by means of gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer sensor which can process a sample without contact in one minute. Volatile organics are extracted directly from contaminated surfaces without sample removal; multiple stage focusing is used for high time resolution. Additional discrimination is obtained through a final stage time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The radionuclide sensors combines {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} counting with energy discrimination of the {alpha} channel; this quantifies isotopes of U, Pu, Th, Tc, Np, and Am in one minute. The Molecular Vibrational Spectrometry sensor is used to characterize substrate material such as concrete, transite, wood, or asbestos; this can be used to provide estimates of the depth of contamination. The 3D-ICAS will be available for real-time monitoring immediately after each 1 to 2 minute sample period. After surface mapping, 3-D displays will be provided showing contours of detected contaminant concentrations. Permanent measurement and contaminant level archiving will be provided, assuring data integrity and allowing regulatory review before and after D&D operations.

  4. Dynamics of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Yuan, Heng

    2013-10-20

    We present the transfer function of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope through a series of differential equations and validate the transfer function by experimental test. A transfer function is the basis for further control system design. We build the differential equations based on a complete set of Bloch equations describing the all-optical atomic spin gyroscope, and obtain the transfer function through application of the Laplace transformation to these differential equations. Moreover, we experimentally validate the transfer function in an all-optical Cs-Xe129 atomic spin gyroscope through a series of step responses. This transfer function is convenient for analysis of the form of control system required. Furthermore, it is available for the design of the control system specifically to improve the performance of all-optical atomic spin gyroscopes.

  5. All-optical gates based on photonic crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moille, Grégory; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    We briefly review the technology of advanced nonlinear resonators for all-optical gating with a specific focus on the application of high-performance signal sampling and on the properties of III-V semiconductor photonic crystals

  6. Interactive dynamic three-dimensional scene for the ground-based three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Peining; Sang, Xinzhu; Guo, Nan; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays provides valuable tools for many fields, such as scientific experiment, education, information transmission, medical imaging and physical simulation. Ground based 360° 3D display with dynamic and controllable scene can find some special applications, such as design and construction of buildings, aeronautics, military sand table and so on. It can be utilized to evaluate and visualize the dynamic scene of the battlefield, surgical operation and the 3D canvas of art. In order to achieve the ground based 3D display, the public focus plane should be parallel to the camera's imaging planes, and optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane in both vertical and horizontal directions. Virtual cameras are used to display 3D dynamic scene with Unity 3D engine. Parameters of virtual cameras for capturing scene are designed and analyzed, and locations of virtual cameras are determined by the observer's eye positions in the observing space world. An interactive dynamic 3D scene for ground based 360° 3D display is demonstrated, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization.

  7. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures.

  8. Direct Linear Transformation Method for Three-Dimensional Cinematography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Robert

    1978-01-01

    The ability of Direct Linear Transformation Method for three-dimensional cinematography to locate points in space was shown to meet the accuracy requirements associated with research on human movement. (JD)

  9. Three-dimensional Simulation of Backward Raman Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Balakin; G.M. Fraiman; N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-12

    Three-dimensional (3-D) simulations for the Backward Raman Amplification (BRA) are presented. The images illustrate the effects of pump depletion, pulse diffraction, non-homogeneous plasma density, and plasma ionization.

  10. Improving Students' Sense of Three-Dimensional Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeson, Neville J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes activities to be used with fifth and sixth graders to improve students' spatial sense with respect to three-dimensional shapes. Includes the use of cubes, triangular prisms, tetrahedrons, and square pyramids. (MKR)

  11. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  12. A fusion algorithm for building three-dimensional maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Kober, V.; Sochenkov, I.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2015-09-01

    Recently various algorithms for building of three-dimensional maps of indoor environments have been proposed. In this work we use a Kinect camera that captures RGB images along with depth information for building three-dimensional dense maps of indoor environments. Commonly mapping systems consist of three components; that is, first, spatial alignment of consecutive data frames; second, detection of loop-closures, and finally, globally consistent alignment of the data sequence. It is known that three-dimensional point clouds are well suited for frame-to-frame alignment and for three-dimensional dense reconstruction without the use of valuable visual RGB information. A new fusion algorithm combining visual features and depth information for loop-closure detection followed by pose optimization to build global consistent maps is proposed. The performance of the proposed system in real indoor environments is presented and discussed.

  13. Construction of Three Dimensional Solutions for the Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yefet, A.; Turkel, E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider numerical solutions for the three dimensional time dependent Maxwell equations. We construct a fourth order accurate compact implicit scheme and compare it to the Yee scheme for free space in a box.

  14. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  15. Three-dimensional ultrathin planar lenses by acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Yu, Gaokun; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xinye; Li, Guangyun; Cheng, Su; Cheng, Jianchun

    2014-10-30

    Acoustic lenses find applications in various areas ranging from ultrasound imaging to nondestructive testing. A compact-size and high-efficient planar acoustic lens is crucial to achieving miniaturization and integration, and should have deep implication for the acoustic field. However its realization remains challenging due to the trade-off between high refractive-index and impedance-mismatch. Here we have designed and experimentally realized the first ultrathin planar acoustic lens capable of steering the convergence of acoustic waves in three-dimensional space. A theoretical approach is developed to analytically describe the proposed metamaterial with hybrid labyrinthine units, which reveals the mechanism of coexistence of high refractive index and well-matched impedance. A hyperbolic gradient-index lens design is fabricated and characterized, which can enhance the acoustic energy by 15 dB at the focal point with very high transmission efficiency. Remarkably, the thickness of the lens is only approximately 1/6 of the operating wavelength. The lens can work within a certain frequency band for which the ratio between the bandwidth and the center frequency reaches 0.74. By tailoring the structure of the metamaterials, one can further reduce the thickness of the lens or even realize other acoustic functionalities, opening new opportunity for manipulation of low-frequency sounds with versatile potential.

  16. Three-dimensional acceleration planning for atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David Teh-Han

    The next generation of reusable launch vehicles will benefit from an improved entry guidance algorithm. Improvements have been made to the current Space Shuttle entry guidance algorithm that will provide an ability to handle aborts, reach large crossranges, and provide complete onboard planning capability. Building on the entry guidance algorithm for the Space Shuttle, three versions of a three-dimensional acceleration based entry guidance algorithm have been created and tested. The Space Shuttle entry guidance algorithm is extended to three dimensions by planning the drag profile and the occurrence of bank reversals. The three versions of the planning algorithm that have been developed are a single bank reversal planner, a two bank reversal planner, and a single bank reversal update planner. Tests of the single and two bank reversal versions show that the planning algorithms are capable of producing feasible trajectories for a wide range of various entry conditions. Integration and testing of the update planning algorithm with a feedback linearizing control law in a high fidelity simulation developed by NASA Marshall has demonstrated the algorithm's ability to handle a variety of entry conditions in an onboard environment.

  17. Three-dimensional adaptive grid-embedding Euler technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Roger L.; Dannenhoffer, John F., III

    1994-06-01

    A new three-dimensional adaptive-grid Euler procedure is presented that automatically detects high-gradient regions in the flow and locally subdivides the computational grid in these regions to provide a uniform, high level of accuracy over the entire domain. A tunable, semistructured data system is utilized that provides global topological unstructured-grid flexibility along with the efficiency of a local, structured-grid system. In addition, this structure data allows for the flow solution algorithm to be executed on a wide variety of parallel/vector computing platforms. An explicit, time-marching, control volume procedure is used to integrate the Euler equations to a steady state. In addition, a multiple-grid procedure is used throughout the embedded-grid regions as well as on subgrids coarser than the initial grid to accelerate convergence and properly propagate disturbance waves through refined-grid regions. Upon convergence, high flow gradient regions, where it is assumed that large truncation errors in the solution exist, are detected using a combination of directional refinement vectors that have large components in areas of these gradients. The local computational grid is directionally subdivided in these regions and the flow solution is reinitiated. Overall convergence occurs when a prespecified level of accuracy is reached. Solutions are presented that demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the present procedure.

  18. Accurate three-dimensional documentation of distinct sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahesh K.; Dutta, Ashish; Subramanian, Venkatesh K.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most critical aspects of documenting distinct sites is acquiring detailed and accurate range information. Several three-dimensional (3-D) acquisition techniques are available, but each has its own limitations. This paper presents a range data fusion method with the aim to enhance the descriptive contents of the entire 3-D reconstructed model. A kernel function is introduced for supervised classification of the range data using a kernelized support vector machine. The classification method is based on the local saliency features of the acquired range data. The range data acquired from heterogeneous range sensors are transformed into a defined common reference frame. Based on the segmentation criterion, the fusion of range data is performed by integrating finer regions of range data acquired from a laser range scanner with the coarser region of Kinect's range data. After fusion, the Delaunay triangulation algorithm is applied to generate the highly accurate, realistic 3-D model of the scene. Finally, experimental results show the robustness of the proposed approach.

  19. Methods for analysis of cracks in three-dimensional solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Various analytical and numerical methods used to evaluate the stress intensity factors for cracks in three-dimensional (3-D) solids are reviewed. Classical exact solutions and many of the approximate methods used in 3-D analyses of cracks are reviewed. The exact solutions for embedded elliptic cracks in infinite solids are discussed. The approximate methods reviewed are the finite element methods, the boundary integral equation (BIE) method, the mixed methods (superposition of analytical and finite element method, stress difference method, discretization-error method, alternating method, finite element-alternating method), and the line-spring model. The finite element method with singularity elements is the most widely used method. The BIE method only needs modeling of the surfaces of the solid and so is gaining popularity. The line-spring model appears to be the quickest way to obtain good estimates of the stress intensity factors. The finite element-alternating method appears to yield the most accurate solution at the minimum cost.

  20. Wicking Enhancement in Three-Dimensional Hierarchical Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiting; Zhao, Junjie; Bagal, Abhijeet; Dandley, Erinn C; Oldham, Christopher J; Fang, Tiegang; Parsons, Gregory N; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2016-08-16

    Wicking, the absorption of liquid into narrow spaces without the assistance of external forces, has drawn much attention due to its potential applications in many engineering fields. Increasing surface roughness using micro/nanostructures can improve capillary action to enhance wicking. However, reducing the structure length scale can also result in significant viscous forces to impede wicking. In this work, we demonstrate enhanced wicking dynamics by using nanostructures with three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical features to increase the surface area while mitigating the obstruction of liquid flow. The proposed structures were engineered using a combination of interference lithography and hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires, where structures at two length scales were independently designed to control wicking behavior. The fabricated hierarchical 3D structures were tested for water and ethanol wicking properties, demonstrating improved wicking dynamics with intermediate nanowire lengths. The experimental data agree with the derived fluid model based on the balance of capillary and vicious forces. The hierarchical wicking structures can be potentially used in applications in water harvesting surfaces, microfluidics, and integrated heat exchangers.