Science.gov

Sample records for all-sky x-ray image

  1. LOBSTER-ISS: an imaging x-ray all-sky monitor for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, George W.; Brunton, Adam N.; Bannister, Nigel P.; Pearson, James F.; Ward, Martin; Stevenson, Tim J.; Watson, D. J.; Warwick, Bob; Whitehead, S.; O'Brian, Paul; White, Nicholas; Jahoda, Keith; Black, Kevin; Hunter, Stanley D.; Deines-Jones, Phil; Priedhorsky, William C.; Brumby, Steven P.; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Vestrand, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Irving, Thomas H.; Price, Steve; Eckersley, Steve; Renouf, Ian; Smith, Mark; Parmar, Arvind N.; McHardy, I. M.; Uttley, P.; Lawrence, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design of Lobster-ISS, an X-ray imaging all-sky monitor (ASM) to be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station. Lobster-ISS is the subject of an ESA Phase-A study which will begin in December 2001. With an instantaneous field of view 162 x 22.5 degrees, Lobster-ISS will map almost the complete sky every 90 minute ISS orbit, generating a confusion-limited catalogue of ~250,000 sources every 2 months. Lobster-ISS will use focusing microchannel plate optics and imaging gas proportional micro-well detectors; work is currently underway to improve the MCP optics and to develop proportional counter windows with enhanced transmission and negligible rates of gas leakage, thus improving instrument throughput and reducing mass. Lobster-ISS provides an order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivity of X-ray ASMs, and will, for the first time, provide continuous monitoring of the sky in the soft X-ray region (0.1-3.5 keV). Lobster-ISS provides long term monitoring of all classes of variable X-ray source, and an essential alert facility, with rapid detection of transient X-ray sources such as Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows being relayed to contemporary pointed X-ray observatories. The mission, with a nominal lifetime of 3 years, is scheduled for launch on the Shuttle c.2009.

  2. INTEGRAL/IBIS 7-year All-Sky Hard X-ray Survey. I. Image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonos, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Tsygankov, S.; Sazonov, S.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pavlinsky, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.

    2010-09-01

    This paper is the first in a series devoted to the hard X-ray whole sky survey performed by the INTEGRAL observatory over seven years. Here we present an improved method for image reconstruction with the IBIS coded mask telescope. The main improvements are related to the suppression of systematic effects that strongly limit sensitivity in the region of the Galactic plane (GP), especially in the crowded field of the Galactic center (GC). We extended the IBIS/ISGRI background model to take into account the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). To suppress residual systematic artifacts on a reconstructed sky image, we applied nonparametric sky image filtering based on wavelet decomposition. The implemented modifications of the sky reconstruction method decrease the systematic noise in the ~20 Ms deep field of GC by ~44%, and practically remove it from the high-latitude sky images. New observational data sets, along with an improved reconstruction algorithm, allow us to conduct the hard X-ray survey with the best currently available minimal sensitivity 3.7 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 ~ 0.26 mCrab in the 17-60 keV band at a 5σ detection level. The survey covers 90% of the sky down to the flux limit of 6.2 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 (~4.32 mCrab) and 10% of the sky area down to the flux limit of 8.6 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (~0.60 mCrab). Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with the instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic, and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA.

  3. Next generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.

    1997-01-10

    We set forth a conceptual design for x-ray all-sky monitor based on lobster-eye wide-field telescopes. This instrument, suitable for a small satellite, would monitor the flux of objects as faint as 2x10{sup -15} W/m{sup 2} (0.5-2.4 keV) on a daily basis with a signal-to-noise of 5. Sources would be located to 1-2 arc-minutes. Detailed simulations show that crosstalk from the cruciform lobster images would not significantly compromise performance. At this sensitivity limit, we could monitor not just x-ray binaries but fainter classes of x-ray sources. Hundreds of active galactic nuclei, coronal sources, and cataclysmic variables could be tracked on a daily basis. Large numbers of fast transients should be visible, including gamma-ray bursts and the soft x-ray breakout of nearby type II supernovae. Long-term x-ray measurements will advance our understanding of the geometries and perhaps masses of AGN, and coronal energy sources in stars.

  4. Astrophysics with All-Sky X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, N.; Mihara, T.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, M.

    2009-03-01

    MAXI, an X-ray all-sky monitor mission on the Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station, scheduled to be launched in 2009 May, is currently in the final test phase. We will hold this workshop to inform the MAXI capability widely to the scientists in the world, to discuss the MAXI's science and to maximize its scientific output. We will invite several speakers and call for contributed short talks and posters. Due to the unprecedented sensitivity of a few milli-Crab in a day covering most of the sky, MAXI can monitor the variability of a large number of X-ray sources at much lower flux levels than is possible with the current all-sky or wide-field missions. Its science output will be greatly enhanced by the joint multi-wavelength observations with contemporary missions such as INTEGRAL, Swift, GLAST and ground-based optical/NIR/radio observatories, as well as deep follow-up observation in X-ray by Suzaku, XMM, and Chandra. Collaboration with future X-ray all-sky programs, such as eRosita will be also usefull.

  5. THEMIS / All-Sky Imagers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A collection of ground-based All-Sky Imagers (ASI) make up another important component of the THEMIS mission. It is sometimes referred to as the sixth THEMIS satellite. Imagery from each camera is ...

  6. All-sky Compton imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ballmoos, Peter; Boggs, Steven E.; Jean, Pierre; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The All-Sky Compton Imager (ASCI) is a mission concept for MeV Gamma-Ray astronomy. It consists of a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors, shielded only by a plastic anticoicidence, and weighting less than 100 kg. Situated on a deployable structure at a distance of 10 m from the spacecraft orbiting at L2 or in a HEO, the ASCI not only avoids albedo- and spacecraft-induced background, but it benefits from a continuous all-sky exposure. The modest effective area is more than compensated by the 4 π field-of-view. Despite its small size, ASCI's γ-ray line sensitivity after its nominal lifetime of 3 years is ~ 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 at 1 MeV for every γ-ray source in the sky. With its high spectral and 3-D spatial resolution, the ASCI will perform sensitive γray spectroscopy and polarimetry in the energy band 100 keV-10 MeV. The All-Sky Compton Imager is particularly well suited to the task of measuring the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background - and simultaneously covering the wide range of science topics in gamma-ray astronomy.

  7. The Modern Black Hole X-Ray Binary Database: A Comprehensive All-Sky Observational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, Bailey; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Heinke, Craig O.; Gladstone, Jeanette C

    2014-08-01

    Stellar mass black holes accreting in binary systems provide valuable insight into how binary systems evolve and how mass is transferred via accretion. With the advent of more sensitive all-sky X-ray instruments like the Swift Burst Alert Transient Monitor (BAT) and the Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image (MAXI) telescope, the transient X-ray Universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of these resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary activity over the last 18 years as revealed by all-sky X-ray instruments and scanning surveys. As a result, we have detected over 90 outbursts occurring in 43 transient BHXRBs, and estimate that current instruments can detect ~ 6-12 transient BHXRB outbursts every year, more than a factor of three larger than is commonly assumed. Most significantly, we find that the outbursts undergone by BHXRBs that do not complete the canonical pattern make up ~ 50% of all outbursts occurring in Galactic BHXRBs. Such a high fraction of "failed" outbursts challenges the standard paradigm for accretion behaviour in transient BHXRBs. We present the detailed findings of our database and discuss how both the larger number of these so-called "failed" outbursts and the BHXRB outbursts in general have significant implications for the mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXRB population.

  8. The second ROSAT All-Sky Survey source catalogue: the deepest X-ray All-Sky Survey before eROSITA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, T.; Freyberg, M.; Truemper, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue (RASS2, (Boller, Freyberg, Truemper 2014, submitted)). The RASS2 is an extension of the ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue (BSC) and the ROSAT Faint Source Catalogue (FSC). The total number of sources in the second RASS catalogue is 124489. The extensions include (i) the supply of new user data products, i.e., X-ray images, X-ray spectra, and X-ray light curves, (ii) a visual screening of each individual detection, (iii) an improved detection algorithm compared to the SASS II processing. This results into an as most as reliable and as most as complete catalogue of point sources detected during the ROSAT Survey observations. We discuss for the first time the intra-day timing and spectral properties of the second RASS catalogue. We find new highly variable sources and we discuss their timing properties. Power law fits have been applied which allows to determine X-ray fluxes, X-ray absorbing columns, and X-ray photon indices. We give access to the second RASS catalogue and the associated data products via a web-interface to allow the community to perform further scientific exploration. The RASS2 catalogue provides the deepest X-ray All-Sky Survey before eROSITA data will become available.

  9. WATCHDOG: A COMPREHENSIVE ALL-SKY DATABASE OF GALACTIC BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C.

    2016-02-15

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (∼40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ∼20 years. Our findings suggest that this “hard-only” behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these “hard-only” outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population.

  10. Implementing an all-sky x-ray camera on space station

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.; Brandt, S.; Borozdin, K.; Black, K.

    1999-01-22

    A pinhole camera is an elegant but effective approach to an x-ray all-sky monitor. It is an ideal astrophysical instrument for the Space Station, because it does not require pointing, is robust against contamination, and requires modest resources (120 kg, 50 Watts, 10 kpbs). Nonetheless, it would be more sensitive than any previous all-sky x-ray monitor. By continuously monitoring the entire unocculted sky, this instrument would be sensitive to changes at all timescales. Besides monitoring the brightest few hundred x-ray sources, including about a dozen active galactic nuclei, this instrument would be uniquely sensitive to fast transients, unlike any scanning instrument. We would expect to detect several hundred events per year with timescales from a minute to a day, and better understand their correlation with magnetic activity on nearby stars. We would also expect to detect about 50 gamma-ray bursts per year and locate them to 1 square degree, independently verifying the BATSE sky distribution. We discuss the issues involved in flying this instrument on the Space Station. These include the management of image data from a continuously scanning 2-dimensional field, autonomous determination of aspect using x-ray image data, the detection and exclusion of solar panel occultation from the data, the optimum integration of a very wide-field instrument onto an EXPRESS pallet, safety validation of already-built hardware, and thermal considerations for a very low-power instrument. We conclude that Space Station is an attractive platform to conduct wide-field x-ray astronomy.

  11. X ray observations of late-type stars using the ROSAT all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Fleming, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    The ROSAT mission made the first x ray survey of the entire sky using an imaging detector. Although ROSAT is a joint NASA/German project and involves direct American participation during its second phase of pointed observations, the all-sky survey remains the sole property of the German investigators. NASA grant represented the first use of ROSAT data analysis funds to support direct American participation in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The project involved a collaborative agreement between the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) and the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) where JILA supplied MPE with a post-doctoral research associate with experience in the field of stellar (coronal) x ray emission to work within their ROSAT group. In return, members of the cool star research group at JILA were given the opportunity to collaborate on projects involving ROSAT all-sky survey data. Both sides have benefitted (and still benefit) from this arrangement since MPE suffers from a shortage of researchers who are interested in x ray emission from 'normal' stars and white dwarfs. MPE has also drawn upon experience in optical identification of x ray sources from the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey in planning their own identification strategies for the ROSAT all-sky survey. The JILA cool stars group has benefitted since access to all-sky survey data has expanded the scope of their already extensive research programs involving multiwavelength observations of late-type stars. ROSAT was successfully launched on 1 June 1990 and conducted the bulk of the survey from 30 July 1990 to 25 January 1991. Data gaps in the survey have subsequently been made up. At the time of this writing (February 1992), the survey data have been processed once with the Standard Analysis Software System (SASS). A second processing will soon begin with improvements made to the SASS to correct errors and bugs found while carrying out scientific projects with data

  12. THE 22 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Tueller, J.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Holland, S.; Beardmore, A.; Evans, P.; Godet, O.; Chincarini, G.; Campana, S.

    2010-02-01

    We present the catalog of sources detected in the first 22 months of data from the hard X-ray survey (14-195 keV) conducted with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) coded mask imager on the Swift satellite. The catalog contains 461 sources detected above the 4.8{sigma} level with BAT. High angular resolution X-ray data for every source from Swift-XRT or archival data have allowed associations to be made with known counterparts in other wavelength bands for over 97% of the detections, including the discovery of {approx}30 galaxies previously unknown as active galactic nuclei and several new Galactic sources. A total of 266 of the sources are associated with Seyfert galaxies (median redshift z {approx} 0.03) or blazars, with the majority of the remaining sources associated with X-ray binaries in our Galaxy. This ongoing survey is the first uniform all-sky hard X-ray survey since HEAO-1 in 1977. Since the publication of the nine-month BAT survey we have increased the number of energy channels from four to eight and have substantially increased the number of sources with accurate average spectra. The BAT 22 month catalog is the product of the most sensitive all-sky survey in the hard X-ray band, with a detection sensitivity (4.8{sigma}) of 2.2 x 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (1 mCrab) over most of the sky in the 14-195 keV band.

  13. High sensitivity all sky X-ray monitor and survey with MAXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, N.; Mihara, T.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Kawai, N.; Kataoka, J.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsunemi, H.; Miyata, E.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Morii, M.

    2007-07-01

    MAXI is an all sky X-ray monitor to be mounted on the Japanese Experimental Module in the International Space Station (ISS). It scans almost all over the sky every 96 minutes, in the course of the orbital motion of the ISS. MAXI is designed to have a sensitivity, significantly higher than the previous X-ray monitors, and then, to detect X-ray sources as faint as 1 mCrab in a week observation. Therefore, MAXI is expected to create a novel catalogue of not only the stable X-ray sources but also the highly variable ones in the sky, especially active galactic nuclei for the first time. If MAXI detects X-ray phenomena, alerts will be quickly made through the Internet.

  14. High sensitivity all sky X-ray monitor and survey with MAXI

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, N.; Mihara, T.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsunemi, H.; Miyata, E.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Morii, M.

    2007-07-12

    MAXI is an all sky X-ray monitor to be mounted on the Japanese Experimental Module in the International Space Station (ISS). It scans almost all over the sky every 96 minutes, in the course of the orbital motion of the ISS. MAXI is designed to have a sensitivity, significantly higher than the previous X-ray monitors, and then, to detect X-ray sources as faint as 1 mCrab in a week observation. Therefore, MAXI is expected to create a novel catalogue of not only the stable X-ray sources but also the highly variable ones in the sky, especially active galactic nuclei for the first time. If MAXI detects X-ray phenomena, alerts will be quickly made through the Internet.

  15. X-RAY-EMITTING STARS IDENTIFIED FROM THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AND THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Agueeros, Marcel A.; Newsom, Emily R.; Anderson, Scott F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Szkody, Paula; Covey, Kevin R.; Posselt, Bettina; Margon, Bruce; Voges, Wolfgang

    2009-04-15

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) was the first imaging X-ray survey of the entire sky. Combining the RASS Bright and Faint Source Catalogs yields an average of about three X-ray sources per square degree. However, while X-ray source counterparts are known to range from distant quasars to nearby M dwarfs, the RASS data alone are often insufficient to determine the nature of an X-ray source. As a result, large-scale follow-up programs are required to construct samples of known X-ray emitters. We use optical data produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify 709 stellar X-ray emitters cataloged in the RASS and falling within the SDSS Data Release 1 footprint. Most of these are bright stars with coronal X-ray emission unsuitable for SDSS spectroscopy, which is designed for fainter objects (g > 15 [mag]). Instead, we use SDSS photometry, correlations with the Two Micron All Sky Survey and other catalogs, and spectroscopy from the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope to identify these stellar X-ray counterparts. Our sample of 707 X-ray-emitting F, G, K, and M stars is one of the largest X-ray-selected samples of such stars. We derive distances to these stars using photometric parallax relations appropriate for dwarfs on the main sequence, and use these distances to calculate L{sub X} . We also identify a previously unknown cataclysmic variable (CV) as a RASS counterpart. Separately, we use correlations of the RASS and the SDSS spectroscopic catalogs of CVs and white dwarfs (WDs) to study the properties of these rarer X-ray-emitting stars. We examine the relationship between (f{sub X} /f{sub g} ) and the equivalent width of the H{beta} emission line for 46 X-ray-emitting CVs and discuss tentative classifications for a subset based on these quantities. We identify 17 new X-ray-emitting DA (hydrogen) WDs, of which three are newly identified WDs. We report on follow-up observations of three candidate cool X-ray-emitting WDs (one DA and two DB (helium) WDs

  16. MOXE: An X-ray all-sky monitor for Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Moss, C. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    A Monitoring Monitoring X-Ray Equipment (MOXE) is being developed for the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission. MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor based on array of pinhole cameras, to be provided via a collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives are to alert other observers on Spectrum-X-Gamma and other platforms of interesting transient activity, and to synoptically monitor the X-ray sky and study long-term changes in X-ray binaries. MOXE will be sensitive to sources as faint as 2 milliCrab (5 sigma) in 1 day, and cover the 2 to 20 KeV band.

  17. A systematic study of X-ray variability in the ROSAT all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmeister, B.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2003-05-01

    We present a systematic search for variability among the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) X-ray sources. We generated lightcurves for about 30 000 X-ray point sources detected sufficiently high above background. For our variability study different search algorithms were developed in order to recognize flares, periods and trends, respectively. The variable X-ray sources were optically identified with counterparts in the SIMBAD, the USNO-A2.0 and NED data bases, but a significant part of the X-ray sources remains without cataloged optical counterparts. Out of the 1207 sources classified as variable 767 (63.5%) were identified with stars, 118 (9.8%) are of extragalactic origin, 10 (0.8%) are identified with other sources and 312 (25.8%) could not uniquely be identified with entries in optical catalogs. We give a statistical analysis of the variable X-ray population and present some outstanding examples of X-ray variability detected in the ROSAT all-sky survey. Most prominent among these sources are white dwarfs, apparently single, yet nevertheless showing periodic variability. Many flares from hitherto unrecognised flare stars have been detected as well as long term variability in the BL Lac 1E1757.7+7034. The complete version of Table 7 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/247

  18. Instrumentation for a next-generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, A. G.

    1999-12-15

    We have proposed an x-ray all-sky monitor for a small satellite mission that will be ten times more sensitive than past monitors and that opens up a new band of the soft x-ray spectrum (0.1-3.0 keV) for study. We discuss three approaches to the construction of the optics. The first method, well within the reach of existing technology, is to approximate the lobster-eye geometry by building crossed arrays of planar reflectors, this gives great control over the reflecting surface but is limited in terms of resolution at the baseline 4 arc minute level. The second method is to use microchannel plates; this technology has the potential to greatly exceed the baseline resolution and sensitivity but is yet to be fully demonstrated. The third method, while still in its infancy, may yet prove to be the most powerful; this approach relies on photolithography to expose a substrate that can then be developed and replicated. The scientific case for this mission is almost too broad to state here. The instrument we describe will allow investigation of the long term light curves of thousands of AGN, it will detect thousands of transients, including GRBs and type II supernova, and the stellar coronae of hundreds of the brightest x-ray stars can be monitored. In addition the classical objectives of all-sky monitors--long-term all-sky archive and watchdog alert to new events--will be fulfilled at an unprecedented level. We also note that by opening up a little-explored band of the x-ray sky the opportunity for new discovery is presented. A satisfying example of entering new territory while still retaining the guarantee of expanding the domain of existing research.

  19. Time Domain X-ray Astronomy with "All-Sky" Focusing Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The largest and most diverse types of temporal variations in all of astronomy occur in the soft, i.e. 0.5 to 10 keV, X-ray band. They range from millisecond QPO’s in compact binaries to year long flares from AGNs due to the absorption of a star by a SMBH, and the appearance of transient sources at decadal intervals. Models predict that at least some gravitational waves will be accompanied by an X-ray flare. A typical GRB produces more photons/sq. cm. in the soft band than it does in the Swift BAT 15 to 150 keV band. In addition the GRB X-ray fluence and knowledge of the details of the onset of the X-ray afterglow is obtained by observing the seamless transition from the active burst phase that has been attributed to internal shocks to the afterglow phases that has been attributed to external shocks. Detecting orphan X-ray afterglows will augment the event rate. With high sensitivity detectors some GRB identifications are likely to be with the youngest, most distant galaxies in the universe. Previous all-sky X-ray monitors have been non focusing limited field of view scanning instruments. An “All-Sky” (actually several ster FOV), focusing lobster-eye X-ray telescope will have much more grasp than the previous instruments and will allow a wide range of topics to be studied simultaneously. Two types of lobster-eye telescopes have been proposed. One type focuses in one dimension and uses a coded mask for resolution in the second. The other type focuses in two dimensions but has less effective area and less bandwidth. Both types are compatible with a Probe mission.

  20. Hyperspectral all-sky imaging of auroras.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, Fred; Ivanov, Yuriy; Chernouss, Sergey; Trondsen, Trond; Roldugin, Alexey; Fedorenko, Yury; Kozelov, Boris; Kirillov, Andrey; Kornilov, Ilia; Safargaleev, Vladimir; Holmen, Silje; Dyrland, Margit; Lorentzen, Dag; Baddeley, Lisa

    2012-12-03

    A prototype auroral hyperspectral all-sky camera has been constructed and tested. It uses electro-optical tunable filters to image the night sky as a function of wavelength throughout the visible spectrum with no moving mechanical parts. The core optical system includes a new high power all-sky lens with F-number equal to f/1.1. The camera has been tested at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO) during the auroral season of 2011/2012. It detects all sub classes of aurora above ~½ of the sub visual 1kR green intensity threshold at an exposure time of only one second. Supervised classification of the hyperspectral data shows promise as a new method to process and identify auroral forms.

  1. X-ray Lobster Eye all-sky monitor for rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dániel, V.; Inneman, A.; Pína, L.; Zadražil, V.; Báča, T.; Stehlíková, V.; Nentvich, O.; Urban, M.; Maršíková, V.; McEntaffer, R.; Tutt, J.; Schulz, T.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a Lobster Eye (LE) X-ray telescope developed for the Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R) experiment. The primary payload of the rocket experiment is a soft X-ray spectroscope developed by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA. The Czech team participates by hard LE X-ray telescope as a secondary payload. The astrophysical objective of the rocket experiment is the Vela Supernova of size about 8deg x 8deg. In the center of the nebula is a neutron star with a strong magnetic field, roughly the mass of the Sun and a diameter of about 20 kilometers forming the Vela pulsar. The primary objective of WRX-R is the spectral measurement of the outer part of the nebula in soft X-ray and FOV of 3.25deg x 3.25deg. The secondary objective (hard LE X-ray telescope) is the Vela neutron star observation. The hard LE telescope consists of two X-ray telescopes with the Timepix detector. First telescope uses 2D LE Schmidt optics (2DLE- REX) with focal length over 1m and 4 Timepix detectors (2x2 matrix). The telescope FOV is 1.5deg x 1.5deg with spectral range from 3keV to 60keV. The second telescope uses 1D LE Schmidt optics (1D-LE-REX) with focal length of 25 cm and one Timepix detector. The telescope is made as a wide field with FOV 4.5deg x 3.5deg and spectral range from 3keV to 40keV. The rocket experiment serves as a technology demonstration mission for the payloads. The LE X-ray telescopes can be in the future used as all-sky monitor/surveyor. The astrophysical observation can cover the hard X-ray observation of astrophysical sources in time-domain, the GRBs surveying or the exploration of the gravitational wave sources.

  2. An all sky study of fast X-ray transients. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Alanna

    1988-01-01

    In the HEAO 1 A-2 survey of fast X-ray transients, a search of 2 to 20 keV scanning data was made for brief increases in flux, greater than 4 millicrabs, on timescales approximately 1 to 10 to the 4th s above a 12-hour average. The search was divided into two regions, and all-sky survey of the Galaxy, and a survey of the Magellanic Clouds. In the latter, 37 events were found and identified with 4 of the 5 brighest sources in the LMC, plus 2 as flares from a foreground star. Np X-ray bursts, no gamma-ray bursts, and no events from the SMC were found. In the all-sky survey, after excluding well-known variable sources, out of the equivalent of approximately 104 days of data, 15 events were found which falling into 2 broad categories: flares from coronal sources, roughly isotropically distributed, with optically thin thermal spectra; and harder fast transients apparently distributed near the Galactic plane. The first were identified as flares from ubiquitous active cool dwarf stars. It was hypothesized that the second may have been from distant Be-neutron star binaries. However, at least two of the harder, more luminous events remained unidentified. Future research should examine the nature of these rare events, and how they may fit into a hierarchy of hard fast transients from gamma-ray bursts to outbursts from pulsar systems.

  3. Wavelet Denoising and Flare Detection in X-Ray All-Sky Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movit, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Recent techniques in wavelet analysis are applied to X-ray all-sky monitor data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor (ASM) and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in order to characterize flaring activity and variability of potential neutrino sources. A flexible technique has been developed based on wavelet outlier detection methods and a Poisson burst model thresholding prescription. Outliers can be detected by correlating the highest level of a thresholded multi-resolution wavelet decomposition with the time series data points represented. This method can be used to determine flare duration and timing for use with a neutrino multi-messenger analysis, but could also be applied to a variety of astronomical time series problems. The denoising process is used to remove background noise from an ASM data set to simplify variability studies. Results from an example source are presented to show the effectiveness of the wavelet methods. The results of a future flare detection analysis will be applied to neutrino candidates from the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) and IceCube telescopes to reduce background and to investigate time correlations in order to search for neutrino point sources. Objects of interest for future study include BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and microquasars.

  4. THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Evans, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

  5. RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10o

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S.; Jahoda, K.; Gilfanov, M.

    2004-05-01

    We report results of a serendipitous hard X-ray (3-20 keV), nearly all-sky (|b|>10o) survey based on RXTE/PCA observations performed during satellite reorientations in 1996-2002. The survey is 80% (90%) complete to a 4σ limiting flux of ≈ 1.8 (2.5) × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 3-20 keV band. The achieved sensitivity in the 3-8 keV and 8-20 keV subbands is similar to and an order of magnitude higher than that of the previously record HEAO-1 A1 and HEAO-1 A4 all-sky surveys, respectively. A combined 7× 103 sq deg area of the sky is sampled to flux levels below 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 (3-20 keV). In total 294 sources are detected and localized to better than 1 deg. 236 (80%) of these can be confidently associated with a known astrophysical object; another 22 likely result from the superposition of 2 or 3 closely located known sources. 35 detected sources remain unidentified, although for 12 of these we report a likely soft X-ray counterpart from the ROSAT all-sky survey bright source catalog. Of the reliably identified sources, 63 have local origin (Milky Way, LMC or SMC), 64 are clusters of galaxies and 100 are active galactic nuclei (AGN). The fact that the unidentified X-ray sources have hard spectra suggests that the majority of them are AGN, including highly obscured ones (NH>1023 cm-2). For the first time we present a log N-log S diagram for extragalactic sources above 4× 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 at 8-20 keV. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/418/927

  6. ROSAT all-sky survey observations of X-ray variability in cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have identified 24 active late-type giant stars, including 11 RS CVn systems, with soft X-ray count rates high enough to allow the detection of statistically significant variability on a Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) orbital timescale (96 minutes) as observed by the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) during the all-sky survey. Our sensitivity typically lies in the range of 10% - 25%, depending on the source count rate. Comparison is made to the daily, nonflare solar soft X-ray variability as observed by the Solrad satellites during solar minimum in 1969 and solar maximum in 1975. Seven of the 24 stars show significant variability; in two of these cases (HR 3922 and HR 8448) major flares were observed in which the peak count rate is enhanced by at least a factor of 3 above quiescent. While HR 3922 (G5 III) is not (yet) classified as an RS CVn star, its flare is more energetic (3 x 10(exp 31) ergs/s) than previously observed RS CVn flares. The apparently single giant HR 8167 (G8 III) also shows two flares. While one might expect to find an anticorrelation between saturated coronae and variability, we find no evidence of this: the two stars in our sample with the highest ratio of f(sub x)/f(sub v) both show variability. We also point out that Capella (G6 III + F9 III) is one of the stars manifesting variability.

  7. ROSAT all-sky survey observations of X-ray variability in cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have identified 24 active late-type giant stars, including 11 RS CVn systems, with soft X-ray count rates high enough to allow the detection of statistically significant variability on a Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) orbital timescale (96 minutes) as observed by the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) during the all-sky survey. Our sensitivity typically lies in the range of 10% - 25%, depending on the source count rate. Comparison is made to the daily, nonflare solar soft X-ray variability as observed by the Solrad satellites during solar minimum in 1969 and solar maximum in 1975. Seven of the 24 stars show significant variability; in two of these cases (HR 3922 and HR 8448) major flares were observed in which the peak count rate is enhanced by at least a factor of 3 above quiescent. While HR 3922 (G5 III) is not (yet) classified as an RS CVn star, its flare is more energetic (3 x 10(exp 31) ergs/s) than previously observed RS CVn flares. The apparently single giant HR 8167 (G8 III) also shows two flares. While one might expect to find an anticorrelation between saturated coronae and variability, we find no evidence of this: the two stars in our sample with the highest ratio of f(sub x)/f(sub v) both show variability. We also point out that Capella (G6 III + F9 III) is one of the stars manifesting variability.

  8. The coronal dividing line in the Rosat X-ray All-Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Rosso, C.

    1991-01-01

    Rosat All-Sky Survey soft X-ray observations of nearly 1000 bright single evolved stars of spectral types G, K, and M in the vicinity of the dividing line proposed by Linsky and Haisch (1979) are reported. Most observations consist of upper limits in the 0.1-2.0-keV band distributed between 604 stellar targes of spectral type K3 or earlier and 264 stellar targets of spectral type K4 or later. Of the 65 Rosat detections, only one involves an apparently single star of spectral type later than K3: HR 4289 (K5 III). A clear dichotomy exists between coronal and noncoronal stars of luminosity classes II, III, and IV at approximately spectral type Ke. The extremely low upper limit for the archetypal 'noncoronal' red giant, Arcturus, less than 3 x 24 exp 25 ergs/s achieved by Rosat during an 18.6-ks targeted observations by Ayres et al. (1991) indicates a very steep decline at the coronal dividing line.

  9. The coronal dividing line in the ROSAT X-ray All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Rosso, C.

    1991-12-01

    Rosat All-Sky Survey soft X-ray observations of nearly 1000 bright single evolved stars of spectral types G, K, and M in the vicinity of the dividing line proposed by Linsky and Haisch (1979) are reported. Most observations consist of upper limits in the 0.1-2.0-keV band distributed between 604 stellar targes of spectral type K3 or earlier and 264 stellar targets of spectral type K4 or later. Of the 65 Rosat detections, only one involves an apparently single star of spectral type later than K3: HR 4289 (K5 III). A clear dichotomy exists between coronal and noncoronal stars of luminosity classes II, III, and IV at approximately spectral type Ke. The extremely low upper limit for the archetypal 'noncoronal' red giant, Arcturus, less than 3 x 24 exp 25 ergs/s achieved by Rosat during an 18.6-ks targeted observations by Ayres et al. (1991) indicates a very steep decline at the coronal dividing line.

  10. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  11. MOXE - An X-ray all-sky monitor for the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Moss, C. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    A Monitoring X-Ray Equipment (MOXE) is being developed for the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission. MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor based on array of pinhole cameras, to be provided via a collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives are to alert other observers on Spectrum-X-Gamma and other platforms of interesting transient activity, and to synoptically monitor the X-ray sky and study long-term changes in X-ray binaries. MOXE will be sensitive to source as faint as 2 milliCrab (5 sigma) in 1 day, and cover the 2 to 20 KeV band.

  12. Results from the Ariel-5 all-sky X-ray monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of results obtained from the first year of Ariel-5 all-sky monitor operation is presented. Transient source observations, as well as the results of long term studies of Sco X-1, Cyg X-3, and Cyg X-1 are described. By example, the included results are indicative of the temporal effects to which the all-sky monitor remains sensitive as it begins its second year of observation.

  13. Clustering of AGNs in All-Sky X-ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, T.; Krumpe, M.; Coil, A. L.; Aceves, H.; Cappelluti, N.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from two recent projects on the correlation function analysis of AGNs from all-sky surveys to investigate the low-redshift clustering properties of AGNs. We have used ROSAT All-Sky Survey sources identified with broad line AGNs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By investigating the cross-correlation function (CCF) between these AGNs and SDSS galaxies, we have overcome the statistical limitation caused by the small number of AGNs. This has allowed us to investigate the luminosity-dependence of AGN clustering, where luminous AGNs (with Log LX ? 44) cluster more strongly, like red galaxies, than lower luminosity ones, which cluster like blue galaxies. With a novel method of applying Halo Occupation Distribution modeling to the CCF, we found, not only the mean mass of ˜10^13 Msol of DMHs occupied by the AGNs, but also the occupation distribution of the AGNs among the DMHs. As a separate project, we used AGNs in the Swift BAT Survey, which contains both un-obscured (type I) and obscured (type II) AGNs to investigate its auto-correlation function, finding similar results. We discuss the improvements on low-redshift AGN clustering studies expected from MAXI.

  14. All-Sky Microwave Imager Data Assimilation at NASA GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Jin, Jianjun; El Akkraoui, Amal; McCarty, Will; Todling, Ricardo; Gu, Wei; Gelaro, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Efforts in all-sky satellite data assimilation at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have been focused on the development of GSI configurations to assimilate all-sky data from microwave imagers such as the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR-2). Electromagnetic characteristics associated with their wavelengths allow microwave imager data to be relatively transparent to atmospheric gases and thin ice clouds, and highly sensitive to precipitation. Therefore, GMAOs all-sky data assimilation efforts are primarily focused on utilizing these data in precipitating regions. The all-sky framework being tested at GMAO employs the GSI in a hybrid 4D-EnVar configuration of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation system, which will be included in the next formal update of GEOS. This article provides an overview of the development of all-sky radiance assimilation in GEOS, including some performance metrics. In addition, various projects underway at GMAO designed to enhance the all-sky implementation will be introduced.

  15. AN EXTENDED AND MORE SENSITIVE SEARCH FOR PERIODICITIES IN ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER/ALL-SKY MONITOR X-RAY LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Alan M.; Bradt, Hale V.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Harris, Robert J. E-mail: hale@space.mit.edu E-mail: robin.corbet@nasa.gov

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a systematic search in {approx}14 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor (ASM) data for evidence of periodicities. Two variations of the commonly used Fourier analysis search method have been employed to significantly improve upon the sensitivity achieved by Wen et al. in 2006, who also searched for periodicities in ASM data. In addition, the present search is comprehensive in terms of sources studied and frequency range covered, and has yielded the detection of the signatures of the orbital periods of eight low-mass X-ray binary systems and of ten high-mass X-ray binaries not listed in the tables of Wen et al. Orbital periods, epochs, signal amplitudes, modulation fractions, and folded light curves are given for each of these systems. Seven of the orbital periods are the most precise reported to date. In the course of this work, the 18.545 day orbital period of IGR J18483-0311 was co-discovered, and the first detections in X-rays were made of the {approx}3.9 day orbital period of LMC X-1 and the {approx}3.79 hr orbital period of 4U 1636-536. The results inform future searches for orbital and other periodicities in X-ray binaries.

  16. Rosat X-ray All-Sky Survey observations of hybrid stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Rosso, C.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the Rosat All-Sky Survey for nine hybrid stars, objects showing spectroscopic evidence for cool massive winds and 500,000-K material, are presented. Two of the nine stars were detected above a limiting flux threshold of 2 x 10 exp -13 ergs/sq cm s. The K3 III star Delta And was detected just at this threshold. The K4 III star Alpha TrA was measured at 8 x 10 exp -13 ergs/sq cm s. Since these detections were made in both low- and high-energy bands of the Rosat 0.1-2.4-keV passband, it is suggested that the emissions originate in coronae of about 10 exp 7 K.

  17. RXTE All-Sky Slew Survey. Catalog of X-Ray Sources at B Greater Than 10 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S.; Jahoda, K.; Gilfanov, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of a serendipitous hard X-ray (3-20 keV), nearly all-sky (absolute value of b greater than l0 deg.) survey based on RXTE/PCA observations performed during satellite reorientations in 1996-2002. The survey is 80% (90%) complete to a 4(sigma) limiting flux of approx. = 1.8 (2.5) x 10(exp -l1) erg/s sq cm in the 3-20 keV band. The achieved sensitivity in the 3-8 keV and 8-20 keV subbands is similar to and an order of magnitude higher than that of the previously record HEAO-1 A1 and HEAO-1 A4 all-sky surveys, respectively. A combined 7 x 10(exp 3) sq. deg area of the sky is sampled to flux levels below l0(exp -11) erg/ s sq cm (3-20 keV). In total 294 sources are detected and localized to better than 1 deg. 236 (80%) of these can be confidently associated with a known astrophysical object; another 22 likely result from the superposition of 2 or 3 closely located known sources. 35 detected sources remain unidentified, although for 12 of these we report a likely soft X-ray counterpart from the ROSAT all-sky survey bright source catalog. Of the reliably identified sources, 63 have local origin (Milky Way, LMC or SMC), 64 are clusters of galaxies and 100 are active galactic nuclei (AGN). The fact that the unidentified X-ray sources have hard spectra suggests that the majority of them are AGN, including highly obscured ones (N(sub H) greater than l0(exp 23)/sq cm). For the first time we present a log N-log S diagram for extragalactic sources above 4 x l0(exp -12) erg/ s sq cm at 8-20 keV. Key words. cosmo1ogy:observations - diffuse radiation - X-rays general

  18. SPIDERS: selection of spectroscopic targets using AGN candidates detected in all-sky X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwelly, T.; Salvato, M.; Merloni, A.; Brusa, M.; Buchner, J.; Anderson, S. F.; Boller, Th.; Brandt, W. N.; Budavári, T.; Clerc, N.; Coffey, D.; Del Moro, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Green, P. J.; Jin, C.; Menzel, M.-L.; Myers, A. D.; Nandra, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Ridl, J.; Schwope, A. D.; Simm, T.

    2017-07-01

    SPIDERS (SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) survey running in parallel to the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) cosmology project. SPIDERS will obtain optical spectroscopy for large numbers of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy cluster members detected in wide-area eROSITA, XMM-Newton and ROSAT surveys. We describe the methods used to choose spectroscopic targets for two sub-programmes of SPIDERS X-ray selected AGN candidates detected in the ROSAT All Sky and the XMM-Newton Slew surveys. We have exploited a Bayesian cross-matching algorithm, guided by priors based on mid-IR colour-magnitude information from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, to select the most probable optical counterpart to each X-ray detection. We empirically demonstrate the high fidelity of our counterpart selection method using a reference sample of bright well-localized X-ray sources collated from XMM-Newton, Chandra and Swift-XRT serendipitous catalogues, and also by examining blank-sky locations. We describe the down-selection steps which resulted in the final set of SPIDERS-AGN targets put forward for spectroscopy within the eBOSS/TDSS/SPIDERS survey, and present catalogues of these targets. We also present catalogues of ˜12 000 ROSAT and ˜1500 XMM-Newton Slew survey sources that have existing optical spectroscopy from SDSS-DR12, including the results of our visual inspections. On completion of the SPIDERS programme, we expect to have collected homogeneous spectroscopic redshift information over a footprint of ˜7500 deg2 for >85 per cent of the ROSAT and XMM-Newton Slew survey sources having optical counterparts in the magnitude range 17 < r < 22.5, producing a large and highly complete sample of bright X-ray-selected AGN suitable for statistical studies of AGN evolution and clustering.

  19. Studies of Transient X-Ray Sources with the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The All-Sky Monitor, an imaging X-ray detector launched aboard the Ariel 5 satellite, was used to obtain detailed light curves of three new sources. Additional data essential to the determination of the characteristic luminosities, rates of occurrence (and possible recurrence), and spatial distribution of these objects was also obtained. The observations are consistent with a roughly uniform galactic disk population consisting of at least two source sub-classes, with the second group (Type 2) at least an order of magnitude less luminous and correspondingly more frequent than the first (Type 1). While both subtypes are probably unrelated to the classical optical novae (or supernovae), they are most readily interpreted within the standard mass exchange X-ray binary model, with outbursts triggered by Roche-lobe overflow (Type 1) or enhancements in the stellar wind density of the companion (Type 2), respectively.

  20. The Sondrestrom Research Facility All-sky Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, E. A.; Grill, M.; Gudmundsson, E.; Stromme, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sondrestrom Upper Atmospheric Research Facility is located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, just north of the Arctic Circle and 100 km inland from the west coast of Greenland. The facility is operated by SRI International in Menlo Park, California, under the auspices of the U.S. National Science Foundation. Operating in Greenland since 1983, the Sondrestrom facility is host to more than 20 instruments, the majority of which provide unique and complementary information about the arctic upper atmosphere. Together these instruments advance our knowledge of upper atmospheric physics and determine how the tenuous neutral gas interacts with the charged space plasma environment. The suite of instrumentation supports many disciplines of research - from plate tectonics to auroral physics and space weather. The Sondrestrom facility has recently acquired two new all-sky imagers. In this paper, we present images from both new imagers, placing them in context with other instruments at the site and detailing to the community how to gain access to this new data set. The first new camera replaces the intensified auroral system which has been on site for nearly three decades. This new all-sky imager (ASI), designed and assembled by Keo Scientific Ltd., employs a medium format 180° fisheye lens coupled to a set of five 3-inch narrowband interference filters. The current filter suite allows operation at the following wavelengths: 750 nm, 557.7 nm, 777.4 nm, 630.0 nm, and 732/3 nm. Monochromatic images from the ASI are acquired at a specific filter and integration time as determined by a unique configuration file. Integrations as short as 0.5 sec can be commanded for exceptionally bright features. Preview images are posted to the internet in near real-time, with final images posted weeks later. While images are continuously collected in a "patrol mode," users can request special collection sequences for targeted experiments. The second new imager installed at the Sondrestrom

  1. Gravity wave observations using an all-sky imager network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max; Almeida, Lazaro M.; Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Nicoli Candido, Claudia Maria; Alves Bolzan, Maurício José; Guarnieri, Fernando; Messias Almeida, Lazaro

    Gravity waves in the mesosphere were observed by airglow all-sky imager network of the UNI- VAP at São José dos Campos (23o S, 45o W), Braśpolis (22o S, 45o W) and Palmas (10o S, 48o W), a e o Brazil. Gravity wave characteristics like morphology, horizontal wavelength, period, phase speed and propagation direction will be analysed and discussed. The results will be compared with other observation sites in Brazil. Wave directionality will also be discussed in terms of wave sources and wind filtering.

  2. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  3. All Sky Imager Network for Science and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, A.; Kendall, E. A.; Zalles, D. R.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2012-12-01

    A new all sky imager network for space weather monitoring and education outreach has been developed by SRI International. The goal of this program is to install sensitive, low-light all-sky imagers across the continental United States to observe upper atmospheric airglow and aurora in near real time. While aurora borealis is often associated with the high latitudes, during intense geomagnetic storms it can extend well into the continental United States latitudes. Observing auroral processes is instrumental in understanding the space weather, especially in the times of increasing societal dependence on space-based technologies. Under the THEMIS satellite program, Canada has installed a network of all-sky imagers across their country to monitor aurora in real-time. However, no comparable effort exists in the United States. Knowledge of the aurora and airglow across the entire United States in near real time would allow scientists to quickly assess the impact of a geomagnetic storm in concert with data from GPS networks, ionosondes, radars, and magnetometers. What makes this effort unique is that we intend to deploy these imagers at high schools across the country. Selected high-schools will necessarily be in rural areas as the instrument requires dark night skies. At the commencement of the school year, we plan to give an introductory seminar on space weather at each of these schools. Science nuggets developed by SRI International in collaboration with the Center for GeoSpace Studies and the Center for Technology in Learning will be available for high school teachers to use during their science classes. Teachers can use these nuggets as desired within their own curricula. We intend to develop a comprehensive web-based interface that will be available for students and scientific community alike to observe data across the network in near real time and also to guide students towards complementary space weather data sets. This interface will show the real time extent of

  4. Validation of spatially resolved all sky imager derived DNI nowcasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Pascal; Wilbert, Stefan; Schüler, David; Prahl, Christoph; Haase, Thomas; Ramirez, Lourdes; Zarzalejo, Luis; Meyer, Angela; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Blanc, Philippe; Dubrana, Jean; Kazantzidis, Andreas; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Hirsch, Tobias; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Mainly due to clouds, Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) displays short-term local variabilities affecting the efficiency of concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. To enable efficient plant operation, DNI nowcasts in high spatial and temporal resolutions for 15 to 30 minutes ahead are required. Ground-based All Sky Imagers (ASI) can be used to detect, track and predict 3D positions of clouds possibly shading the plant. The accuracy and reliability of these ASI-derived DNI nowcasts must be known to allow its application in solar power plants. Within the framework of the European project DNICast, an ASI-based nowcasting system was developed and implemented at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA). Its validation methodology and validation results are presented in this work. The nowcasting system outperforms persistence forecasts for volatile irradiance situations.

  5. Using All Sky Imaging to Improve Telescope Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Gary M.

    2017-06-01

    Automated scheduling makes it possible for a small telescope to observe a large number of targets in a single night. But when used in areas which have less-than-perfect sky conditions such automation can lead to large numbers of observations of clouds and haze. This paper describes the development of a "sky-aware" telescope automation system that integrates the data flow from an SBIG AllSky340c camera with an enhanced dispatch scheduler to make optimum use of the available observing conditions for two highly instrumented backyard telescopes. Using the minute by minute time series image stream and a self maintained reference database, the software maintains a file of sky brightness, transparency, stability, and forecasted visibility at several hundred grid positions. The scheduling software uses this information in real time to exclude targets obscured by clouds and select the best observing task, taking into account the requirements and limits of each instrument.

  6. Tracking patchy pulsating aurora through all-sky images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grono, Eric; Donovan, Eric; Murphy, Kyle R.

    2017-07-01

    Pulsating aurora is frequently observed in the evening and morning sector auroral oval. While the precipitating electrons span a wide range of energies, there is increasing evidence that the shape of pulsating auroral patches is controlled by structures in near-equatorial cold plasma; these patches appear to move with convection, for example. Given the tremendous and rapidly increasing amount of auroral image data from which the velocity of these patches can be inferred, it is timely to develop and implement techniques for the automatic identification of pulsating auroral patch events in these data and for the automatic determination of the velocity of individual patches from that data. As a first step towards this, we have implemented an automatic technique for determining patch velocities from sequences of images from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager (ASI) and applied it to many pulsating aurora events. Here we demonstrate the use of this technique and present the initial results, including a comparison between ewograms (east-west keograms) and time series of patch position as determined by the algorithm. We discuss the implications of this technique for remote sensing convection in the inner magnetosphere.

  7. Digital all-sky polarization imaging of partly cloudy skies.

    PubMed

    Pust, Nathan J; Shaw, Joseph A

    2008-12-01

    Clouds reduce the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) of skylight relative to that of a clear sky. Even thin subvisual clouds in the "twilight zone" between clouds and aerosols produce a drop in skylight DOLP long before clouds become visible in the sky. In contrast, the angle of polarization (AOP) of light scattered by a cloud in a partly cloudy sky remains the same as in the clear sky for most cases. In unique instances, though, select clouds display AOP signatures that are oriented 90 degrees from the clear-sky AOP. For these clouds, scattered light oriented parallel to the scattering plane dominates the perpendicularly polarized Rayleigh-scattered light between the instrument and the cloud. For liquid clouds, this effect may assist cloud particle size identification because it occurs only over a relatively limited range of particle radii that will scatter parallel polarized light. Images are shown from a digital all-sky-polarization imager to illustrate these effects. Images are also shown that provide validation of previously published theories for weak (approximately 2%) polarization parallel to the scattering plane for a 22 degrees halo.

  8. ASHI, an All Sky Heliospheric Imager for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Yu, H. S.; Bisi, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    We wish to answer the scientific question: "What are the shapes and time histories of heliospheric structures in the plasma parameters, density and velocity as structures move outward from the Sun and surround the spacecraft?" To provide answers to this question, we propose ASHI, an All-Sky Heliospheric Imager for future NASA missions. ASHI's primary applicability is to view the inner heliosphere from deep space as a photometric system. The zodiacal-light photometers on the twin Helios spacecraft, the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) on the Coriolis satellite, and the Heliospheric Imagers (HIs) on the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft, all point the way towards an optimum instrument for viewing Thomson-scattering observations. The specifications for such systems include viewing the whole sky starting beyond a few degrees of the Sun, and covering a hemisphere or more of sky. With an imager mass of about 2.5 kg per system (scalable to lower values for instruments viewing from closer than 1 AU), ten-minute exposures, 20 arc-second pointing, and low power consumption, this type of instrument has been a popular choice for recent NASA Mission concepts such as STEREO, Solar Orbiter, Solar probe, and EASCO. A key photometric specification for such imagers is 0.1% differential photometry which enables the 3-D reconstruction of density starting from near the Sun and extending outward. A proven concept using SMEI analyses, ASHI will provide an order of magnitude better resolution in three dimensions over time. As a new item we intend to include velocity in this concept, and for a heliospheric imager in deep space, provide high-resolution comparisions of in-situ density and velocity measurements obtained at the spacecraft, to structures observed remotely.

  9. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  10. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  11. Nanoscale X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakdinawat, Anne; Attwood, David

    2010-12-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in the field of soft- and hard-X-ray microscopy, both technically, through developments in source, optics and imaging methodologies, and also scientifically, through a wide range of applications. While an ever-growing community is pursuing the extensive applications of today's available X-ray tools, other groups are investigating improvements in techniques, including new optics, higher spatial resolutions, brighter compact sources and shorter-duration X-ray pulses. This Review covers recent work in the development of direct image-forming X-ray microscopy techniques and the relevant applications, including three-dimensional biological tomography, dynamical processes in magnetic nanostructures, chemical speciation studies, industrial applications related to solar cells and batteries, and studies of archaeological materials and historical works of art.

  12. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  13. Candidate isolated neutron stars and other optically blank x-ray fields identified from the rosat all-sky and sloan digital sky surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Haberl, Frank; Voges, Wolfgang; Annis, James; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-11-01

    Only seven radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) emitting thermal X rays are known, a sample that has yet to definitively address such fundamental issues as the equation of state of degenerate neutron matter. We describe a selection algorithm based on a cross-correlation of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that identifies X-ray error circles devoid of plausible optical counterparts to the SDSS g {approx} 22 magnitudes limit. We quantitatively characterize these error circles as optically blank; they may host INSs or other similarly exotic X-ray sources such as radio-quiet BL Lacs, obscured AGN, etc. Our search is an order of magnitude more selective than previous searches for optically blank RASS error circles, and excludes the 99.9% of error circles that contain more common X-ray-emitting subclasses. We find 11 candidates, nine of which are new. While our search is designed to find the best INS candidates and not to produce a complete list of INSs in the RASS, it is reassuring that our number of candidates is consistent with predictions from INS population models. Further X-ray observations will obtain pinpoint positions and determine whether these sources are entirely optically blank at g {approx} 22, supporting the presence of likely isolated neutron stars and perhaps enabling detailed follow-up studies of neutron star physics.

  14. X-ray backscatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  15. Sealed position sensitive hard X-ray detector having large drift region for all sky camera with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Perlman, D.; Parsignault, D.; Burns, R.

    1979-01-01

    A sealed position sensitive proportional counter filled with two atmospheres of 95% xenon and 5% methane, and containing a drift region of 24 atm cm, has operated in a stable manner for many months. The detector contains G-10 frames to support the anode and cathode wires. The detector was sealed successfully by a combination of vacuum baking the G-10 frames at 150 C for two weeks followed by assembly into the detector in an environment of dry nitrogen, and the use of passive internal getters. The counter is intended for use with a circumferential cylindrical collimator. Together they provide a very broad field of view detection system with the ability to locate cosmic hard X-ray and soft gamma ray sources to an angular precision of a minute of arc. A set of instruments based on this principle have been proposed for satellites to detect and precisely locate cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  16. Sealed position sensitive hard X-ray detector having large drift region for all sky camera with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Perlman, D.; Parsignault, D.; Burns, R.

    1979-01-01

    A sealed position sensitive proportional counter filled with two atmospheres of 95% xenon and 5% methane, and containing a drift region of 24 atm cm, has operated in a stable manner for many months. The detector contains G-10 frames to support the anode and cathode wires. The detector was sealed successfully by a combination of vacuum baking the G-10 frames at 150 C for two weeks followed by assembly into the detector in an environment of dry nitrogen, and the use of passive internal getters. The counter is intended for use with a circumferential cylindrical collimator. Together they provide a very broad field of view detection system with the ability to locate cosmic hard X-ray and soft gamma ray sources to an angular precision of a minute of arc. A set of instruments based on this principle have been proposed for satellites to detect and precisely locate cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  17. The ROSAT all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, W.

    1993-12-01

    The ROSAT (Roentgensatellit) X-ray astronomy satellite has completed the first all-sky X-ray and XUV survey with imaging telescopes. About 60,000 new X-ray and 400 new XUV sources were detected. This contribution will deal with preliminary results from the ROSAT ALL-SKY X-RAY SURVEY. The ROSAT diffuse and point-source X-ray skymaps, the positional accuracy obtained for the X-ray sources, and a few results from correlations performed with available catalogues in various energy bands like the Radio, Infrared, Visible, UV, and hard X-rays as well as identifications from optical follow-up observations are presented.

  18. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  19. Industrial X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, Lewis Research Center jointly sponsored a conference with the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory focused on high speed imaging. This conference, and early funding by Lewis Research Center, helped to spur work by Silicon Mountain Design, Inc. to break the performance barriers of imaging speed, resolution, and sensitivity through innovative technology. Later, under a Small Business Innovation Research contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the company designed a real-time image enhancing camera that yields superb, high quality images in 1/30th of a second while limiting distortion. The result is a rapidly available, enhanced image showing significantly greater detail compared to image processing executed on digital computers. Current applications include radiographic and pathology-based medicine, industrial imaging, x-ray inspection devices, and automated semiconductor inspection equipment.

  20. Instrument for the monochromatic observation of all sky auroral images.

    PubMed

    Mende, S B; Eather, R H; Aamodt, E K

    1977-06-01

    To investigate the dynamics of auroras and faint upper atmospheric emissions, a new type of imaging instrument was developed. The instrument is a wide field of view, narrow-spectral-band imaging system using an intensified S.E.C. TV camera in a time exposure mode. Pictures were taken at very low light levels of a few photons per exposure per resolution element. These pictures are displayed in the form of a pseudocolor presentation in which the color represents spectral ratios of two of the observed auroral spectral emission features. The spectral ratios play an important part in the interpretation of auroral particle dynamics. A digital picture processing facility is also part of the system which enables the digital manppulation of the pictures at standard TV rates. As an example, hydrogen auroras can be displayed having been corrected for nonspectral background by subtracting a picture obtained by a suitable background filter. The instrumentation was calibrated in the laboratory and was used in several field xperiments. Elaborate exposure sequences were developed to extend the dynamic range and to cover the large range of auroral brightnesses in a fairly linear manner.

  1. Beyond MACS: An All-Sky Search for the Most X-ray Luminous Clusters of Galaxies Out to z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Harald

    Galaxy clusters are seeing a dramatic renaissance as cosmological tools and astrophysical laboratories. In the local Universe (z<0.3), extensive statistical and in-depth studies of the most extreme clusters have greatly advanced our understanding of the interplay of gas, galaxies, and dark matter in these largest building blocks of the Universe. The high- redshift counterparts and predecessors of the most famous and best studied local systems have, however, remained elusive until recently. In 2009, the completion of the Massive Cluster Survey (MACS) yielded the definitive sample of very X-ray luminous clusters at 0.3 < z < 0.6. Thanks to its huge sky coverage of almost 23,000 square degrees, MACS was able to increase the number of such systems known by a factor of 30 over previous surveys, thereby dramatically extending the redshift baseline for studies of cluster and galaxy evolution, and establishing massive clusters as independent cosmological probes. MACS clusters have been used extensively by the extragalactic community in many high-profile investigations, demonstrating the legacy character and broad applicability of MACS for astrophysical and cosmological research. The importance and value of this sample was underlined again very recently by the award of an HST Multi-Cycle Treasury program which will use 524 orbits to observe 25 massive galaxy clusters, 16 of which are MACS discoveries. We here propose a new all-sky X-ray cluster survey, eMACS, to take the process to its logical and ultimate conclusion. Using again data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and lowering the flux limit to half that used for MACS, we will extend MACS in a quest to discover extremely X-ray luminous clusters at 0.5 < z < 1, a nearly unexplored mass/redshift range. Expected to find more than 80 of these extremely rare systems at z>0.5, an increase of nearly an order of magnitude over the number of such systems presently known, eMACS will create a sample of unprecedented power for

  2. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey: Herschel Image Atlas and Aperture Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jason K.; Sanders, D. B.; Larson, K. L.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Howell, J. H.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Xu, K. C.; Paladini, R.; Schulz, B.; Shupe, D.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Billot, N.; Chan, B. H. P.; Evans, A. S.; Fadda, D.; Frayer, D. T.; Haan, S.; Ishida, C. M.; Iwasawa, K.; Kim, D.-C.; Lord, S.; Murphy, E.; Petric, A.; Privon, G. C.; Surace, J. A.; Treister, E.

    2017-04-01

    Far-infrared images and photometry are presented for 201 Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies [LIRGs: log ({L}{IR}/{L}⊙ )=11.00{--}11.99, ULIRGs: log ({L}{IR}/{L}⊙ )=12.00{--}12.99], in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), based on observations with the Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments. The image atlas displays each GOALS target in the three PACS bands (70, 100, and 160 μm) and the three SPIRE bands (250, 350, and 500 μm), optimized to reveal structures at both high and low surface brightness levels, with images scaled to simplify comparison of structures in the same physical areas of ˜100 × 100 kpc2. Flux densities of companion galaxies in merging systems are provided where possible, depending on their angular separation and the spatial resolution in each passband, along with integrated system fluxes (sum of components). This data set constitutes the imaging and photometric component of the GOALS Herschel OT1 observing program, and is complementary to atlases presented for the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory. Collectively, these data will enable a wide range of detailed studies of active galactic nucleus and starburst activity within the most luminous infrared galaxies in the local universe. Based on Herschel Space Observatory observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by the European-led Principal Investigator consortia, and important participation from NASA.

  3. Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  4. X-Ray Polarization Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    anatomic structures. Johns and Yaffe (2), building on the work of Alvarez and Macovski (3) and that of Lehmann et al (4), discuss a method for...sources of contrast related to both the wave and par- ticulate nature of x rays. References 1. Johns PC, Yaffe MJ. X-ray characterization of normal and...application to mammography. Med Phys 1985; 12:289–296. 3. Alvarez RE, Macovski A. Energy-selective reconstructions in x-ray computerized tomography. Phys

  5. Digital X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, David R.

    The use of X-ray image receptors that produce a digital image is becoming increasingly important. Possible benefits include improved dynamic range and detective quantum efficiency, improved detectability for objects of low intrinsic contrast, and reduced radiation dose. The image can be available quickly. The display is separated from the image capture so that processing and contrast adjustment are possible before the image is viewed. The availability of a digital image means ready input into PACS and opens up the possibility of computer-aided detection and classification of abnormality. Possible drawbacks of digital systems include high cost, limited high contrast resolution and the fact that their clinical value is sometimes not proven in comparison with conventional, analogue techniques. The high contrast resolution attainable with such systems is discussed and the problem of sampling limitations and aliasing considered. The properties and limitations of digital systems using computed radiography, caesium iodide plus CCDs and active matrix arrays with either caesium iodide or selenium detectors are demonstrated. Examples are given of digital systems for mammography and general radiography and their performance is demonstrated in terms of clinical assessment and measurements of the modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency.

  6. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  7. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  8. X-ray imaging for palaeontology.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, P

    2004-05-01

    Few may be aware that X-ray imaging is used in palaeontology and has been used since as early as 1896. The X-raying, preparation and exposure of Hunsrück slate fossils are described. Hospital X-ray machines are used by the author in his work. An X-ray is vital to provide evidence that preparation of a slate is worthwhile as well as to facilitate preparation even if there is little external sign of what lies within. The beauty of the X-ray exposure is an added bonus.

  9. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treis, J.; Andritschke, R.; Hartmann, R.; Herrmann, S.; Holl, P.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Meidinger, N.; Porro, M.; Richter, R. H.; Schopper, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2009-03-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 × 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  10. X-Ray Imaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 1O(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionally less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. At the same time, there will be substantial potential for collisions between the space platforms and space debris. The current NASA catalogue contains over 4500 objects floating in space which are not considered payloads. This debris can have significant effects on collision with orbiting spacecraft. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are being performed to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. In particular the study of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact on the various surfaces anticipated on the Space Station is very important at this point in time. The need to assess the threat of such debris clouds on space structures is an on-going activity. The Space Debris Impact facility in Building 4612 provides a test facility to monitor the types of damage produced with hypervelocity impact. These facilities are used to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Flash radiography or x-ray imaging has traditionally provided such information and as such has been an important tool for recording damage in situ with the event. The proper

  11. Hard X ray imaging telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, P.

    1990-03-01

    This final report covers the work carried out under the LLNL Contract Number B063682, Subcontractor Regents University of California at Santa Barbara. The research carried out under this contract involves the construction of a telemetry, target acquisition and guidance system, and of a light-weight gondola to house an x ray spectrometer. This work is part of the design and construction of the balloon experiment, GRATIS, which will perform the first arcminute imaging of cosmic sources in the 30 to 200 keV energy band. Observations conducted with GRATIS are expected to provide data relevant to several key problems in high energy astrophysics including the physical processes responsible for the high energy tail observed in the soft gamma-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies and the origin of both the diffuse and point source components of the gamma-ray emission from the Galactic Center. This report discusses the scientific motivations for this experiment, presents several aspects of the design and construction of the hardware components, gives an overview of the stabilized platform, and demonstrates the expected performance and sensitivity.

  12. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  13. Hard X-ray imaging from Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Murray, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

  14. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  15. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; hide

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  16. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; hide

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  17. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  18. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  19. Equatorial All Sky Imager Images from the Seychelles during the March 17th, 2015 geomagnetic storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, B.

    2015-12-01

    An all sky imager was installed in the Seychelles earlier this year. The Seychelles islands are located northeast of Madagascar and east of Somalia in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The all sky imager is located on the island of Mahe (4.6667°S, 55.4667°E geographic), (10.55°S, 127.07°E geomagnetic), with filters of 557.7, 620.0, 630.0, 765.0 and 777.4 nm. Images with a 90 second exposure from Seychelles in 777.4nm and 630.0nm from the night before and night of the March 17th geomagnetic storm are discussed in comparison to solar wind measurements at ACE and the disturbance storm time (Dst) index. These images show line-of-sight intensities of photons received dependent on each filters wavelength. A time series of these images sometimes will show the movement of relatively dark areas, or depletions, in each emission. The depletion regions are known to cause scintillation in GPS signals. The direction and speed of movement of these depletions are related to changes observed in the solar wind.

  20. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2016-07-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  1. Diffractive Imaging Using Partially Coherent X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Vine, D. J.; Dilanian, R. A.; Flewett, S.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Balaur, E.; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-11

    The measured spatial coherence characteristics of the illumination used in a diffractive imaging experiment are incorporated in an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental x-ray diffraction data using 1.4 keV x rays. Conventional coherent diffractive imaging, which assumes full spatial coherence, is a limiting case of our approach. Even in cases in which the deviation from full spatial coherence is small, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of wave field reconstructions. Our formulation is applicable to x-ray and electron diffraction imaging techniques provided that the spatial coherence properties of the illumination are known or can be measured.

  2. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  3. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  4. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  5. X-ray imaging and x-ray source development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Balhorn, R.; Anderson, E.

    1993-12-01

    The Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a continuing effort to develop both x-ray sources and x-ray sources and x-ray microscopy. This effort includes the ongoing development of: (1) a wide range of x-ray lasers at the Nova Laser Facility, (2) a zone plate lens--multilayer mirror based x-ray microscope (3) three dimensional, high resolution x-ray microscopy (4) short wavelength, normal incidence multilayer x-ray mirrors, (5) compact, high average power lasers for producing x-ray lasers and laser plasma x-ray sources. We have constructed and operated an x-ray laser based transmission x-ray microscope. The advantage offered by the x-ray laser source is the extreme high brightness allows high resolution images to be made on a timescale faster than that for x-ray damage effects to appear. The microscope, consists of: the x-ray laser, a multilayer coated, near normal incidence spherical mirror used as a condenser, a silicon nitride specimen holder, an x-ray zone plate used as an objective lens, and a microchannel plate x-ray detector. The x-ray laser used is the Ni-like Ta x-ray laser operating with a wavelength of 4.48 nm, a pulselength of 200 spec, a divergence of 10 mrad, and an output energy of 10 microjoules.

  6. Alaskan Auroral All-Sky Images on the World Wide Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    In response to a 1995 NASA SPDS announcement of support for preservation and distribution of important data sets online, the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, proposed to provide World Wide Web access to the Poker Flat Auroral All-sky Camera images in real time. The Poker auroral all-sky camera is located in the Davis Science Operation Center at Poker Flat Rocket Range about 30 miles north-east of Fairbanks, Alaska, and is connected, through a microwave link, with the Geophysical Institute where we maintain the data base linked to the Web. To protect the low light-level all-sky TV camera from damage due to excessive light, we only operate during the winter season when the moon is down. The camera and data acquisition is now fully computer controlled. Digital images are transmitted each minute to the Web linked data base where the data are available in a number of different presentations: (1) Individual JPEG compressed images (1 minute resolution); (2) Time lapse MPEG movie of the stored images; and (3) A meridional plot of the entire night activity.

  7. Monitoring the Sky with the Prototype All-Sky Imager on the LWA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Hartman, J. M.; Clarke, T. E.; Dowell, J.; Dubois, A.; Dubois, D.; Henning, P. A.; Lazio, J.; Michalak, S.; Schinzel, F. K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real time. PASI has recorded over 13,000hr of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74MHz, for pulse widths of 5s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of >2.7×10-23, >1.1×10-23, and >2.8×10-23Jm-2Hz-1 to have rate densities <1.2×10-4, <5.6×10-4, and <7.2×10-4 year-1deg-2.

  8. Application of simple all-sky imagers for the estimation of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Nikitidou, Efterpi; Salamalikis, Vasileios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Aerosol optical depth is a key atmospheric constituent for direct normal irradiance calculations at concentrating solar power plants. However, aerosol optical depth is typically not measured at the solar plants for financial reasons. With the recent introduction of all-sky imagers for the nowcasting of direct normal irradiance at the plants a new instrument is available which can be used for the determination of aerosol optical depth at different wavelengths. In this study, we are based on Red, Green and Blue intensities/radiances and calculations of the saturated area around the Sun, both derived from all-sky images taken with a low-cost surveillance camera at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Spain. The aerosol optical depth at 440, 500 and 675nm is calculated. The results are compared with collocated aerosol optical measurements and the mean/median difference and standard deviation are less than 0.01 and 0.03 respectively at all wavelengths.

  9. X-ray imaging: Status and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, R.W.; Martz, H.E.; Hernandez, J.M.; Haskins, J.J.; Day, R.A.; Brase, J.M.; Cross, B.; Wherry, D.

    1987-08-01

    There is a veritable renaissance occurring in x-ray imaging. X-ray imaging by radiography has been a highly developed technology in medicine and industry for many years. However, high resolution imaging has not generally been practical because sources have been relatively dim and diffuse, optical elements have been nonexistent for most applications, and detectors have been slow and of low resolution. Materials analysis needs have therefore gone unmet. Rapid progress is now taking place because we are able to exploit developments in microelectronics and related material fabrication techniques, and because of the availability of intense x-ray sources. This report describes the methods and uses of x-ray imaging along with a discussion of technology advances in these areas.

  10. Monitoring the Low Frequency Sky with the LWA1 and the Prototype All-Sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, Kenneth Steven; LWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of all 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 14,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz. These data have resulted in the discovery of radio emission from large meteors (Fireballs), and has been used to set improved limits on slow transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz. PASI is also being used to characterize how the ionosphere affects low frequency transient astronomy. Construction of the LWA has been supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N00014-07-C-0147. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1139963 and AST-1139974 of the University Radio Observatory program.

  11. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, D.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography.

  12. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  13. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm S.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1997-01-01

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  14. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  15. Imaging of x rays for magnetospheric investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Imhof, W.L.; Voss, H.D.; Datlowe, D.W. . Space Sciences Lab.)

    1994-02-01

    X-ray imagers can provide large-scale maps of bremsstrahlung x rays produced by electron precipitation into the atmosphere. Complete day and night coverage is obtained and the electron energy spectra at each position in space can be derived from the measured x-ray energy spectra. Early x-ray imagers were limited in field of view and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment, launched on a TIROS satellite, makes time-space mappings by scanning a 16-pixel pinhole camera. The data distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating feature. However, the spatial deconvolution is complex and features stay in the field of view for only [approximately]10 min. These problems will be resolved by a high-altitude ([approximately]9 R[sub e]) imaging spectrometer PIXIE on the ISTP/GGS Polar Satellite to be launched in 1994. PIXIE's position-sensitive proportional counter will continuously image the entire auroral zone for periods of hours.

  16. Imaging of x rays for magnetospheric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, William L.; Voss, Henry D.; Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1994-02-01

    X-ray imagers can provide large-scale maps of bremsstrahlung x rays produced by electron precipitation into the atmosphere. Complete day and night coverage is obtained and the electron energy spectra at each position in space can be derived from the measured x-ray energy spectra. Early x-ray imagers were limited in field of view and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment, launched on a TIROS satellite, makes time-space mappings by scanning a 16-pixel pinhole camera. The data distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating feature. However, the spatial deconvolution is complex and features stay in the field of view for only approximately 10 min. These problems will be resolved by a high- altitude (approximately 9 Re) imaging spectrometer PIXIE on the ISTP/GGS Polar Satellite to be launched in 1994. PIXIE's position-sensitive proportional counter will continuously image the entire auroral zone for periods of hours.

  17. The X-ray imager on AXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.

    2001-02-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20×40 cm 2 CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  18. Imaging plates calibration to X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Andreoli, P.; Cipriani, M.; Claps, G.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; De Angelis, R.; Giulietti, D.; Ingenito, F.; Pacella, D.

    2016-05-01

    The growing interest for the Imaging Plates, due to their high sensitivity range and versatility, has induced, in the last years, to detailed characterizations of their response function in different energy ranges and kind of radiation/particles. A calibration of the Imaging Plates BAS-MS, BAS-SR, BAS-TR has been performed at the ENEA-Frascati labs by exploiting the X-ray fluorescence of different targets (Ca, Cu, Pb, Mo, I, Ta) and the radioactivity of a BaCs source, in order to cover the X-ray range between few keV to 80 keV.

  19. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd2O2S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications.

  20. Imaging Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Baker, Phillip C.; Shealy, David L.; Core, David B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Kerstetter, Ted

    1993-01-01

    We have designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscopes. These instruments use flow-polished Zerodur mirror substrates which have been coated with multilayers optimized for maximum reflectivity at normal incidence at 135 A. They are being developed as prototypes for the Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope. Ultrasmooth mirror sets of hemlite grade sapphire have been fabricated and they are now being coated with multilayers to reflect soft X-rays at 38 A, within the biologically important 'water window'. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of the microscope optics and structural components as well as the mounting of the optics and assembly of the microscopes. We also describe the optical alignment, interferometric and visible light testing of the microscopes, present interferometrically measured performance data, and provide the first results of optical imaging tests.

  1. High-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer (HEXIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, James L.; Gruber, Duane E.; Heindl, William A.; Pelling, Michael R.; Peterson, Laurence E.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Skelton, Robert E.; Hink, Paul L.; Slavis, Kimberly R.; Binns, W. Robert

    1998-11-01

    HEXIS is a MIDEX-class mission concept for x-ray astronomy. Its objectives are to improve our knowledge of the high energy x-ray sky by increasing the number of sources above 20 keV to > 2,000, discovering transient sources such as x-ray novae and gamma-ray bursts, and making spectral and temporal studies of the sources. With mission life > 3 years, a 1-year all-sky survey sensitivity of approximately 0.3 mCrab, and continuous monitoring of the entire visible sky, HEXIS will provide unprecedented capabilities. Source positions will be determined to accuracies of a few arcmin or better. Spectra will be determined with an energy resolution of a few keV and source variability will be studied on time scales from < 1 sec to years. In addition, 10 times more sensitive studies of limited fields will be performed at the same time. Gamma-ray bursts will be detected about 4 times/week at about the same sensitivity as BATSE and the sensitivity to nova-like x-ray transients will be approximately 6 mCrab in one day. HEXIS contains a set of coded mask imagers that use position-sensitive CZT detectors operating from approximately 5 keV to 200 keV. Detector planes are built with 41 cm(superscript 2) CZT detector modules which employ crossed-strip readout to obtain a pixel size of 0.5 mm. Nine modules are grouped in a 369 cm(superscript 2) array for each imager. In the past 2 years significant progress has been made on techniques requires for HEXIS: position-sensitive CZT detectors and ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Scientific and technical details of HEXIS are presented together with result form tests of detectors and a coded mask imager.

  2. The first long-term all-sky imager observation of lunar sodium tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2016-12-01

    The Moon possesses a long tail of neutral sodium atoms that are emitted from the lunar surface and transported anti-sunward by the solar radiation pressure. Since the earth crosses the lunar sodium tail for a few days around the new moon, the resonant light emission from sodium atoms can be detected from the ground. Here we show the first long-term (16 years) observation of the lunar sodium tail, using an all-sky imager at Shigaraki Observatory (35°N, 136°E), Japan. We have surveyed our database of all-sky sodium images at a wavelength of 589.3 nm to find more than 20 events in which a bright spot emerges around the anti-lunar point during the new moon periods. We could not find any clear correlation between the sodium brightness and solar wind parameters (density, speed, dynamic pressure, and F10.7 index). In particular, no enhancement of the sodium spot brightness is detected even under very high density solar wind conditions (70 cm-3; an order-of-magnitude higher than usual), which means that solar wind sputtering is not a principal mechanism of the formation of the lunar sodium tail.

  3. Motion based X-ray imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Krisztián; Máthé, Domokos; Osváth, Szabolcs

    2014-10-01

    A new X-ray imaging method (patent pending) was developed to visualize function-related motion information. We modify existing X-ray imaging methods to provide four images without increasing the necessary measurement time or radiation dose. The most important of these images is a new "kinetic" image that represents motions inside the object or living body. The motion-based contrast of the kinetic image can help visualize details that were not accessible before. The broad range of the movements and high sensitivity of the method are illustrated by imaging the mechanics of a working clock and the chest of a living African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). The heart, valves, aorta, and lungs of the frog are clearly visualized in spite of the low soft tissue contrast of the animal. The new technology also reconstructs a "static" image similar to the existing conventional X-ray image. The static image shows practically the same information as the conventional image. The new technology presents two more images which show the point-wise errors of the static and kinetic images. This technique gives a better estimation of errors than present methods because it is based entirely on measured data. The new technology could be used in imaging cardiopulmonary movements, nondestructive testing, or port security screening.

  4. Development of high throughput X-ray telescopes for X-ray imaging and dispersive spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the technical approach to the realization of a high throughput Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray mirror became better defined in terms of construction methodology and factors which affect maximum size. More progress was made than anticipated in the area of automatic figure formation. However, effort to improve the resolution of float glass by simple techniques were not successful. Mirror development, spectroscopy, all sky telescope, and explorer concept studies are discussed.

  5. Imaging of X rays for magnetospheric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, William L.; Voss, Henry D.; Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1992-06-01

    Precipitation of energetic electrons from the magnetosphere into the auroral zone produces x- ray bremsstrahlung. Although in-situ electron spectrometers can provide detailed information at the point of observation, only x-ray imagers can provide large scale maps of the 1 to 300 keV energy electron precipitation. X-ray imaging provides complete day and night coverage of the electron energy spectra at each position. Early x-ray images, such as those obtained from 1979 - 1983, served to demonstrate the importance of narrow elongated arcs of energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone. They also characterized the spectral parameters and precipitation rates required for understanding source and loss mechanisms in the magnetosphere, but they were limited in field of view and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE), soon to be launched on a TIROS satellite, will make time-space mappings by scanning a 16 pixel pinhole camera. These data will distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating features. However, the spatial deconvolution is complex and features stay in the field of view for only approximately 10 minutes. These problems will be resolved by a high altitude (approximately 9 Re) imaging spectrometer PIXIE on the ISTP/GGS Polar Satellite to be launched in 1994. PIXIE's position sensitive proportional counter will continuously image the entire auroral zone for periods of hours. The resulting images will be important for understanding how the electrons are accelerated in the magnetosphere and why and where they precipitate into the atmosphere. Future needs and plans for next generation imagers will be discussed.

  6. Digital x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-18

    The global objective of this cooperation was to lower the cost and improve the quality of breast health care in the United States. We planned to achieve it by designing a very high performance digital radiography unit for breast surgical specimen radiography in the operating room. These technical goals needed to be achieved at reasonable manufacturing costs to enable MedOptics to achieve high market penetration at a profit. Responsibility for overall project execution rested with MedOptics. MedOptics fabricated and demonstrated hardware, and selected components and handled the overall integration. After completion of this CRADA, MedOptics worked with collaborators to demonstrate clinical performance and utility. Finally, the company marketed the device. LLNL convened a multi-directorate expert panel for an intensive review of MedOptics point design. A written brief of panel conclusions and recommendations was prepared. In addition, LLNL was responsible for: computationally simulating the effects of varying source voltage and filtering (predicting the required dynamic range for the detector); evaluating CsI:Tl, CdWO4 and scintillating glass as image converters; recommending image enhancement algorithms. The LLNL modeling results guided the design and experimental elements of the project. The Laboratory's unique array of sources and detectors was employed to resolve specific technical questions. Our image processing expertise was applied to the selection of enhancement tools for image display.

  7. Imaging and mapping the impact of clouds on skyglow with all-sky photometry.

    PubMed

    Jechow, Andreas; Kolláth, Zoltán; Ribas, Salvador J; Spoelstra, Henk; Hölker, Franz; Kyba, Christopher C M

    2017-07-27

    Artificial skyglow is constantly growing on a global scale, with potential ecological consequences ranging up to affecting biodiversity. To understand these consequences, worldwide mapping of skyglow for all weather conditions is urgently required. In particular, the amplification of skyglow by clouds needs to be studied, as clouds can extend the reach of skyglow into remote areas not affected by light pollution on clear nights. Here we use commercial digital single lens reflex cameras with fisheye lenses for all-sky photometry. We track the reach of skyglow from a peri-urban into a remote area on a clear and a partly cloudy night by performing transects from the Spanish town of Balaguer towards Montsec Astronomical Park. From one single all-sky image, we extract zenith luminance, horizontal and scalar illuminance. While zenith luminance reaches near-natural levels at 5 km distance from the town on the clear night, similar levels are only reached at 27 km on the partly cloudy night. Our results show the dramatic increase of the reach of skyglow even for moderate cloud coverage at this site. The powerful and easy-to-use method promises to be widely applicable for studies of ecological light pollution on a global scale also by non-specialists in photometry.

  8. Fabrication of imaging X-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.; Brookover, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of optics for X-ray astronomy and laboratory applications are described and illustrated with diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and sample images. Particular attention is given to the Wolter I telescope developed for spectroscopic observation of 8-30-A cosmic X-ray sources from a rocketborne X-ray Objective Grating Spectrometer; this instrument employs three nested paraboloid-hyperboloid mirrors of 5083 Al alloy, figured by diamond turning and covered with a thin coating of acrylic lacquer prior to deposition of a 40-nm-thick layer of Sn. In calibration tests at NASA Marshall, the FWHM of the line-spread function at 1.33 nm was found to be 240 microns, corresponding to 21 arcsec. Also presented are the results of reflectivity measurements on C and W multilayers sputtered on Si and fusion glass substrates.

  9. PROPERTIES OF LARGE-AMPLITUDE VARIABLE STARS DETECTED WITH TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY PUBLIC IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzuma, Shinjirou; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2009-11-15

    We present a catalog of variable stars in the near-infrared wavelength detected with overlapping regions of the Two Micron All Sky Survey public images, and discuss their properties. The investigated region is in the direction of the Galactic center (-30 deg. {approx}< l {approx}< 20 deg., |b| {approx}< 20 deg.), which covers the entire bulge. We have detected 136 variable stars, of which six are already known and 118 are distributed in the |b| {<=} 5 deg. region. Additionally, 84 variable stars have optical counterparts in Digitized Sky Survey images. The three diagrams (color-magnitude, light variance, and color-color diagrams) indicate that most of the detected variable stars should be large-amplitude and long-period variables such as Mira variables or OH/IR stars. The number density distribution of the detected variable stars implies that they trace the bar structure of the Galactic bulge.

  10. Water window imaging x ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high resolution x ray microscope for imaging microscopic structures within biological specimens has an optical system including a highly polished primary and secondary mirror coated with identical multilayer coatings, the mirrors acting at normal incidence. The coatings have a high reflectivity in the narrow wave bandpass between 23.3 and 43.7 angstroms and have low reflectivity outside of this range. The primary mirror has a spherical concave surface and the secondary mirror has a spherical convex surface. The radii of the mirrors are concentric about a common center of curvature on the optical axis of the microscope extending from the object focal plane to the image focal plane. The primary mirror has an annular configuration with a central aperture and the secondary mirror is positioned between the primary mirror and the center of curvature for reflecting radiation through the aperture to a detector. An x ray filter is mounted at the stage end of the microscope, and film sensitive to x rays in the desired band width is mounted in a camera at the image plane of the optical system. The microscope is mounted within a vacuum chamber for minimizing the absorption of x rays in air from a source through the microscope.

  11. Optimizing RHESSI X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, Chang; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    RHESSI X-ray imaging is possible with angular resolution as fine as 2 arcsec (FWHM) at energies from as low as 3 keV to >100 keV. However, taking full advantage of this capability has proven to be challenging given the Fourier-transform imaging technique that is used, specific instrumental considerations that must be taken into account, and the many different options of the available image reconstruction algorithms. Such considerations as the best reconstruction algorithm to use, the optimal weighting of the different Fourier components, deciding between short image integration times and rapid imaging cadence, the different energy ranges covered by the 9 detectors, the effect of pulse pile-up and albedo, etc. must all be taken into account in obtaining and interpreting RHESSI X-ray images. This poster describes different techniques for optimizing the image reconstruction depending on the science objectives - identifying compact or extended sources, searching for source motion, obtaining the best photometry, determining the believability of different features in an image, etc. The emphasis is on making full use of data from all the RHESSI detectors, including the ones behind the finest grids when warranted by the source structure. This is the case for the hard X-ray emission along the ribbons of the flare on 2005 May 13 reported by Liu et al. (2007) and this event will be used as an example.

  12. Optimizing RHESSI X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, Chang; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    RHESSI X-ray imaging is possible with angular resolution as fine as 2 arcsec (FWHM) at energies from as low as 3 keV to >100 keV. However, taking full advantage of this capability has proven to be challenging given the Fourier-transform imaging technique that is used, specific instrumental considerations that must be taken into account, and the many different options of the available image reconstruction algorithms. Such considerations as the best reconstruction algorithm to use, the optimal weighting of the different Fourier components, deciding between short image integration times and rapid imaging cadence, the different energy ranges covered by the 9 detectors, the effect of pulse pile-up and albedo, etc. must all be taken into account in obtaining and interpreting RHESSI X-ray images. This poster describes different techniques for optimizing the image reconstruction depending on the science objectives - identifying compact or extended sources, searching for source motion, obtaining the best photometry, determining the believability of different features in an image, etc. The emphasis is on making full use of data from all the RHESSI detectors, including the ones behind the finest grids when warranted by the source structure. This is the case for the hard X-ray emission along the ribbons of the flare on 2005 May 13 reported by Liu et al. (2007) and this event will be used as an example.

  13. Healing X-ray scattering images

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zheng; Yu, Dantong; Yager, Kevin G.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray scattering images contain numerous gaps and defects arising from detector limitations and experimental configuration. We present a method to heal X-ray scattering images, filling gaps in the data and removing defects in a physically meaningful manner. Unlike generic inpainting methods, this method is closely tuned to the expected structure of reciprocal-space data. In particular, we exploit statistical tests and symmetry analysis to identify the structure of an image; we then copy, average and interpolate measured data into gaps in a way that respects the identified structure and symmetry. Importantly, the underlying analysis methods provide useful characterization of structures present in the image, including the identification of diffuse versus sharp features, anisotropy and symmetry. The presented method leverages known characteristics of reciprocal space, enabling physically reasonable reconstruction even with large image gaps. The method will correspondingly fail for images that violate these underlying assumptions. The method assumes point symmetry and is thus applicable to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data, but only to a subset of wide-angle data. Our method succeeds in filling gaps and healing defects in experimental images, including extending data beyond the original detector borders. PMID:28875032

  14. Healing X-ray scattering images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiliang; Lhermitte, Julien; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zheng; Yu, Dantong; Yager, Kevin G

    2017-07-01

    X-ray scattering images contain numerous gaps and defects arising from detector limitations and experimental configuration. We present a method to heal X-ray scattering images, filling gaps in the data and removing defects in a physically meaningful manner. Unlike generic inpainting methods, this method is closely tuned to the expected structure of reciprocal-space data. In particular, we exploit statistical tests and symmetry analysis to identify the structure of an image; we then copy, average and interpolate measured data into gaps in a way that respects the identified structure and symmetry. Importantly, the underlying analysis methods provide useful characterization of structures present in the image, including the identification of diffuse versus sharp features, anisotropy and symmetry. The presented method leverages known characteristics of reciprocal space, enabling physically reasonable reconstruction even with large image gaps. The method will correspondingly fail for images that violate these underlying assumptions. The method assumes point symmetry and is thus applicable to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data, but only to a subset of wide-angle data. Our method succeeds in filling gaps and healing defects in experimental images, including extending data beyond the original detector borders.

  15. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  16. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-01-31

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  17. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    set of two major x-ray astronomy missions based on the concepts I developed and demonstrated under this SR&T grant. The first Maxim is to image the sky at 100 micro-arcsecond resolution. That is one thousand times higher resolution than Hubble. The full Maxim has the ultimate goal of imaging the event horizon of a black hole in an active galactic nucleus (ALAN). This will require 0.1 micro-arcsecond resolution - one million times higher than Hubble! Nonetheless, using the techniques developed under this grant, it has become possible. Maxim Pathfinder is now in the NASA planning for a new start in approximately 20 10. The full Maxim is carried as a vision mission for the post 2015 timeframe. Finally, this grant is the evolved version of the SR&T grant we carried during the 1980s and up to 1994. At that point in time this grant was also working on x-ray optics, but concentrating on x-ray spectroscopy. The techniques developed by 1990 were not chosen for use on Chandra or XMM-Newton because they were too new. During the last year, however, the Constellation-X mission recognized the need for better spectroscopy techniques and tapped our expertise. We were able to support the initial work on Con-X through this program. It now appears that the off-plane mount will be used in Con-X, increasing performance and decreasing cost and risk.

  18. Event Study of the Peak Auroral Emission Altitude from All-sky Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Gustavsson, B.; Partamies, N. J.; Kauristie, K.

    2011-12-01

    The MIRACLE network monitors auroral activity in the Fennoscandian sector of Europe. Network stations cover the range of 55° to 57° magnetic latitude North and span two hours in magnetic local time. Some of the MIRACLE network stations include digital all-sky cameras (ASC). Some of the ASCs currently in use are: systems with an image intensifier in front of a CCD (iCCD), systems with electron multiplying CCD (emCCD). Both iCCD and emCCD cameras in the MIRACLE network operate at three different wavelengths: 427.8 nm, 557.7 nm and 630.0 nm. Each wavelength is selected using narrow band filters on a filter wheel placed in front of the CCD. Our goal is to evaluate the peak auroral emission altitude using ASC images at different stations pairs for a set of auroral event in order to evaluate the altitude of peak auroral emissions for different auroral structures. We adapted the AIDA software package developed by Björn Gustavsson in Kiruna for ASC images. Position calibrated images at two (or more) ASC stations are for optical triangulation of a set of auroral structures.

  19. Bone cartilage imaging with x-ray interferometry using a practical x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Makifuchi, Chiho; Kiyohara, Junko; Itou, Tsukasa; Honda, Chika; Momose, Atsushi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer for the imaging of bone cartilage using a practical X-ray tube and to develop that imaging system for clinical use. Wave-optics simulation was performed to design the interferometer with a practical X-ray tube, a source grating, two X-ray gratings, and an X-ray detector. An imaging system was created based on the results of the simulation. The specifications were as follows: the focal spot size was 0.3 mm of an X-ray tube with a tungsten anode (Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). The tube voltage was set at 40 kVp with an additive aluminum filter, and the mean energy was 31 keV. The pixel size of the X-ray detector, a Condor 486 (Fairchild Imaging, California, USA), was 15 μm. The second grating was a Ronchi-type grating whose pitch was 5.3 μm. Imaging performance of the system was examined with X-ray doses of 0.5, 3 and 9 mGy so that the bone cartilage of a chicken wing was clearly depicted with X-ray doses of 3 and 9 mGy. This was consistent with the simulation's predictions. The results suggest that X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry would be a promising tool in detecting soft tissues in the human body such as bone cartilage for the X-ray image diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further optimization of the system will follow to reduce the X-ray dose for clinical use.

  20. All-Sky Imaging With the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodi, James; Case, G.; Cherry, M.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Finger, M.; Jenke, P.

    2011-09-01

    As demonstrated by BATSE and GBM, Earth occultation with non-imaging detectors can be used as a method for measuring source fluxes by looking at the differences in count rates in a detector that occur when a source moves into or out of occultation by the Earth. The Earth Occultation Technique applied to GBM's array of twelve NaI detectors makes it possible to monitor the entire sky every 26 days in the energy range 8 - 500 keV. The standard Earth Occultation Technique equires a predefined input catalog of source positions. Having an incomplete catalog has been shown to result in increased systematic errors. In order to find sources not included in the input catalog, an indirect imaging method has been developed that uses the projection of the Earth's limb onto the sky at the time a source occults. Over the course of an orbital precession period ( 53 days), all available projection angles are sampled. These projections add constructively near the position of a source, thus allowing the source to be localized. We present all-sky image results in the 12-25, 25-50, and 100-300 keV energy bands for 3 years of data from GBM, and discuss the correlations with the Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/SPI, and Fermi/LAT catalogs.

  1. Compton-thick AGN in the 70-month Swift-BAT All-Sky Hard X-ray Survey: A Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ranalli, P.; Gkiokas, E.; Corral, A.; Lanzuisi, G.

    2016-10-01

    The 70-month Swift-BAT catalogue provides a sensitive view of the extragalactic X-ray sky at hard energies (>10 keV) containing about 800 active galactic nuclei (AGN). We explore its content in heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN by combining the BAT (14-195 keV) with the lower energy XRT (0.3-10 keV) data. We apply a Bayesian methodology using Markov chains to estimate the exact probability distribution of the column density for each source. We find 53 possible Compton-thick sources (probability range 3-100%) translating to a ~7% fraction of the AGN in our sample. We derive the first parametric luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN. The unabsorbed luminosity function can be represented by a double power law with a break at L⋆ ~ 2 × 1042erg s-1 in the 20-40 keV band. The Compton-thick AGN contribute ~17% of the total AGN emissivity. We derive an accurate Compton-thick number count distribution taking into account the exact probability of a source being Compton-thick and the flux uncertainties. This number count distribution is critical for the calibration of the X-ray background synthesis models, i.e. for constraining the intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN. We find that the number counts distribution in the 14-195 keV band agrees well with our models which adopt a low intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN (~ 12%) among the total AGN population and a reflected emission of ~ 5%. In the extreme case of zero reflection, the number counts can be modelled with a fraction of at most 30% Compton-thick AGN of the total AGN population and no reflection. Moreover, we compare our X-ray background synthesis models with the number counts in the softer 2-10 keV band. This band is more sensitive to the reflected component and thus helps us to break the degeneracy between the fraction of Compton-thick AGN and the reflection emission. The number counts in the 2-10 keV band are well above the models which assume a 30% Compton-thick AGN fraction and zero reflection, while

  2. X-ray imaging with compound refractive lens and microfocus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, Ladislav; Dudchik, Yury; Jelinek, Vaclav; Sveda, Libor; Marsik, Jiri; Horvath, Martin; Petr, Ondrej

    2008-08-01

    Compound refractive lenses (CRL), consisting of a lot number in-line concave microlenses made of low-Z material were studied. Lenses with focal length 109 mm and 41 mm for 8-keV X-rays, microfocus X-ray tube and X-ray CCD camera were used in experiments. Obtained images show intensity distribution of magnified microfocus X-ray source focal spot. Within the experiments, one lens was also used as an objective lens of the X-ray microscope, where the copper anode X-ray microfocus tube served as a source. Magnified images of gold mesh with 5 microns bars were obtained. Theoretical limits of CRL and experimental results are discussed.

  3. Comparisons Between GPS Ionospheric Scintillations and Observations of Auroral Structuring from All Sky Imagers over Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bust, G. S.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Mitchell, C.; Kinrade, J.; Murr, D.

    2011-12-01

    While GPS phase scintillations have been observed at high latitudes (primarily in the Northern Hemisphere) for several years, there remains ambiguity as to what degree the observations are due to F region irregularities formed from gradient-drift instabilities and related processes, versus E and F region structuring due to particle precipitation. One possible way to determine between the two processes is to correlate GPS scintillation observations with observations of auroral structuring from All Sky Imagers (ASI). Unfortunately, there have only been two unambiguous events where there are clear correlations between GPS scintillations and auroral structuring in the literature. In January 2010, an agreement was made between NSF, the British Antarctic Survey, and the University of Bath, UK to allow the installation of a Bath GPS scintillation receiver at South Pole Station. In December 2010, the first of three GPS scintillation receivers to be installed remotely at AGO stations was installed at the AGO station located at P3 (82.755 S, 28.577 E). Both South Pole and P3 have All Sky Imagers (ASI) co-located with the GPS scintillation receivers. Thus, for the first time we have the ability to conduct long term studies correlating GPS scintillations with observations from ASIs. This paper reports on a case study event from May 20, 2010. On that date the ASI located at South Pole observed significant auroral structuring over most of the day. Simultaneously, the GPS receiver at South Pole observed significant amounts of phase scintillations over several hours. Analysis of the observations over the day focuses on whether or not the ASI observations and GPS scintillation observations are correlated in space and time. If there is a strong correlation, then the interesting research question is are the scintillation observations primarily due to temporal variations of auroral precipitation, or spatially structuring of auroral forms that are moving across the GPS field of view

  4. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections.

  5. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  6. Quantitative x-ray imager (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Scott C.; Archuleta, Tom N.; Oertel, John A.; Walsh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    We report on development of a quantitative x-ray imager (QXI) for the national Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Included in this development is a study of photocathode response as a function of photon energy, 2-17.5 keV, which is related to diagnostic development on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The QXI is defined as being a quantative imager due to the repeated characterization. This instrument is systematically checked out, electronically as well as its photocathode x-ray response, both on a direct current and pulsed x-ray sources, before and after its use on a shot campaign. The QXI is a gated x-ray imager1 used for a variety of experiments conducted in the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Radiation Physics Program. The camera was assembled in Los Alamos and has been under development since 1997 and has now become the workhorse framing camera by the program. The electronics were built by Grant Applied Physics of San Fransisco, CA.2 The QXI has been used at the LANL Trident, LLNL Nova, and University of Rochester Laboratory OMEGA laser facilities. The camera consists of a grated microchannel plate (MCP), a phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate coupled to film for data readout, along with high speed electronic pulsers to drive the x-ray detector. The QXI has both a two-strip and a four-strip detection head and has the ability to individually bias the gain of each of the strips. The timing of the QXI was done at the Trident short pulse laboratory, using 211 nm light. Single strip jitter was looked at as well and determined to be <25 ps. Flatfielding of the photocathode across the MCP was done with the Trident main laser with 150 J on a gold disk with a 1 ns. Spatial resolution was determined to be <5 μm by using the same laser conditions as before and a backlit 1000 lp/in. grid. The QXI has been used on cylindrical implosion work at the Nova Laser Facility, and on direct-drive cylinder mix and indirect-drive high convergence implosion experiments at

  7. Morphology of Omega band aurora observed by THEMIS all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Tanaka, Y.; Hori, T.

    2016-12-01

    We examined Omega band auroras observed with the THEMIS ground based all-sky imager network. Using 8 years data from January 2007 we found a large number of events ( 330) that showed characteristics of omega band aurora. We examined optical signatures on the generation of omega band aurora from the growth to the declining through expansion period. We found that Omega band aurora can be classified into the following three sub-types: 1) Classical Omega band, 2) Tongue/torch, and combined type of 3) Omega band and Tongue/torch. The interesting features for the growth of omega band aurora are as follows: the omega band aurora grew from a faint seed, not via distortion of pre-existing east-west band aurora. The aurora did not show any shear motion during the growth of auroral activity. A black hole-like dark aurora was found during growth and expansion period. Eastern boundary on omega aurora shows a clear contrast between light and darkness. Omega band aurora generally consists with intense pulsating auroras. In this study we show morphological features on the generation of optical omega auroras and also show statistical results on the occurrences of three different type of aurora, eastward drift speed, duration and recurrent frequency of the event. Then we attempt to provide insight into the generation of these auroral forms in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

  8. Study of the Nortern polar ionosphere by all-sky imager, riometer and magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Trondsen, Espen; Marple, Steve; Dahle, Kolbjorn; Stauning, Peter

    The variety of the auroral forms and their behaviour, as a result of the complexity of the processes in the upper atmosphere at high latitudes and the connection between them as well as the large number of influencing factors give a lot of possibilities for new investigations. The opportunity for simultaneous multi-instrument observations by different instruments, as well by sets of instruments of the same kind, nowadays is a precondition for an extensive research of the polar ionosphere phenomena. For this study, simultaneous observations' data of the OI 5577 ´˚ and 6300 ´˚ emissions, the electron precipitation flux and the terrestrial magnetic A A field have been used from the following instruments: the All-Sky Imager (ASI), ALOMAR Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (AIRIS) and the magnetometer, positioned at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes (69.3° N, 16.03° E); ASI, 64-beam Imaging Riometer and the magnetometer at the Auroral Observatory, Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78.20° N, 15.83° E); IRIS at Kilpisj¨rvi, Finland (69.05° N, 20.79° E). The fields of view of the instruments cover a large a area of the auroral oval and the polar cap. The distribution and the behaviour of the optical emissions and the absorption features have been analysed. A good correlation between the spatial and temporal evolutions of the optical emissions, the precipitating electron fluxes and the terrestrial magnetic field has been observed. The response of the ionosphere to the solar and geomagnetic activity changes has been studied. Data access has been provided under the Project "ALOMAR eARI" (RITA-CT-2003-506208), Andenes, Norway. This Project received research funding from the European Community's 6th Framework Program.

  9. Imaging science at Amazon rainforest, Brazil, using an all-sky imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderaro, G. L.; Pimenta, A. A.; Manzi, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Near-simultaneous all-sky (160 degrees field of view) observations of the OI 630.0 nm, OI777.4 nm, OI557.7 nm and 589 nm nightglow emissions are being carried out on a routine basis at ZF-2 Cuireiras Biological Reserve (2.59 degrees S, 60.22 degrees W, altitude 87 m), Amazonas state, Brazil, since July 2015. In the thermosphere-ionosphere, three types of phenomena are studied using 630.0 nm and 777.4 nm observations: (1) brightness waves (BW) associated with the midnight temperature maximum (MTM), (2) electron density enhancement associated with plasma blobs and MSTID with characteristics matching a Perkins-instability. In the mesosphere we study gravity waves events, probably generated by lower atmospheric due to treetops of the Amazon rainforest.

  10. Photon counting multienergy x-ray imaging: effect of the characteristic x rays on detector performance.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Fritz, Shannon G; Chapman, John W

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of characteristic x rays on the performance of photon counting detectors for multienergy x-ray imaging. X-ray and CT systems with photon counting detectors have compelling advantages compared to energy integrating detectors, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector is the detector of choice. However, current CZT detectors exhibit several limitations that hamper their practical applications. These limitations include hole trapping, high leakage current, and charge sharing between detector pixels. Charge sharing occurs due to the diffusion of charge when it drifts toward the pixel electrodes. It also occurs due to nonlocal reabsorption of characteristic and scattered x rays created in the detector volume. Hole trapping, leakage current, and charge diffusion may potentially have technical solutions. Characteristic x-ray escape and scatter, however, are fundamental in nature and cannot be easily addressed. The x-ray scatter in the CZT material is small at photon energies used in x-ray imaging. Therefore, the remaining major factor is characteristic x ray. Monte Carlo simulations were used for this study. An experimental photon counting multienergy x-ray imaging system was used to compare simulations to experimental results. An x-ray spectrum at 120 kVp tube voltage was used. The x-ray energy range was split into five subregions (energy bins) and Monte Carlo simulations were performed at average x-ray energies corresponding to these energy bins. The detector pixel size was changed within the 0.1-1 mm range, which covered all possible applications including radiography and CT imaging. The pixel shapes included square and strip pixels. For strip pixels, tilted angle irradiation of the CZT detector was also investigated. The characteristic x rays escaped the pixels in approximately 70% of all x-ray interactions for the smallest pixel size of 0.1 mm. The escape fraction decreased to 20% for the largest pixel size of 1

  11. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  12. Application of machine learning methods to the solar disk state detection by all-sky images over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinitskiy, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach to automatic solar disk state detection by all-sky images using machine learning methods is developed and implemented. The efficiency of the most widely used machine learning algorithms is analyzed. The effect of reducing the dimensionality of the feature space on the classification accuracy is estimated. The multilayer artificial neural network model has shown the best accuracy in terms of the true score. The operation result demonstrates the effectiveness of machine learning methods applied to solar disk state detection by all-sky images.

  13. X-ray imaging for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray screening of luggage by aviation security personnel may be badly hindered by the lack of visual cues to depth in an image that has been produced by transmitted radiation. Two-dimensional "shadowgraphs" with "organic" and "metallic" objects encoded using two different colors (usually orange and blue) are still in common use. In the context of luggage screening there are no reliable cues to depth present in individual shadowgraph X-ray images. Therefore, the screener is required to convert the 'zero depth resolution' shadowgraph into a three-dimensional mental picture to be able to interpret the relative spatial relationship of the objects under inspection. Consequently, additional cognitive processing is required e.g. integration, inference and memory. However, these processes can lead to serious misinterpretations of the actual physical structure being examined. This paper describes the development of a stereoscopic imaging technique enabling the screener to utilise binocular stereopsis and kinetic depth to enhance their interpretation of the actual nature of the objects under examination. Further work has led to the development of a technique to combine parallax data (to calculate the thickness of a target material) with the results of a basis material subtraction technique to approximate the target's effective atomic number and density. This has been achieved in preliminary experiments with a novel spatially interleaved dual-energy sensor which reduces the number of scintillation elements required by 50% in comparison to conventional sensor configurations.

  14. The PERCIVAL soft X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Marras, A.; Bayer, M.; Correa, J.; Göttlicher, P.; Lange, S.; Shevyakov, I.; Smoljanin, S.; Tennert, M.; Viti, M.; Xia, Q.; Zimmer, M.; Das, D.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Turchetta, R.; Cautero, G.; Gianoncelli, A.; Giuressi, D.; Menk, R.; Stebel, L.; Yousef, H.; Marchal, J.; Rees, N.; Tartoni, N.; Graafsma, H.

    2015-02-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art Synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of Free Electron Lasers enabling revolutionary science on atomic length and time scales with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon counting capability with low probability of false positives, and (multi)-megapixels. PERCIVAL (``Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large'') is currently being developed by a collaboration of DESY, RAL, Elettra, DLS and Pohang to address this need for the soft X-ray regime. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS), i.e. based on CMOS technology. It will be back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to its preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 × 10 cm2, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic ``PERCIVAL13M'' sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within its 27 μm pixels to measure 1 to ~ 105 (500 eV) simultaneously-arriving photons. A smaller ``PERCIVAL2M'' with ~ 1.4k × 1.5k pixels is also planned. Currently, small-scale back-illuminated prototype systems (160 × 210 pixels of 25 μm pitch) are undergoing detailed testing with X-rays and optical photons. In March 2014, a prototype sensor was tested at 350 eV-2 keV at Elettra's TwinMic beamline. The data recorded include diffraction patterns at 350 eV and 400 eV, knife edge and sub-pixel pinhole illuminations, and comparisons of different pixel types. Another prototype chip will be submitted in fall 2014, first larger sensors could be in hand in late 2015.

  15. New Mission Concept Study: Energetic X-Ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Report summarizes the activity carried out under the New Mission Concept (NMC) study for a mission to conduct a sensitive all-sky imaging survey in the hard x-ray (HX) band (approximately 10-600 keV). The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission was originally proposed for this NMC study and was then subsequently proposed for a MIDEX mission as part of this study effort. Development of the EXIST (and related) concepts continues for a future flight proposal. The hard x-ray band (approximately 10-600 keV) is nearly the final band of the astronomical spectrum still without a sensitive imaging all-sky survey. This is despite the enormous potential of this band to address a wide range of fundamental and timely objectives - from the origin and physical mechanisms of cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to the processes on strongly magnetic neutron stars that produce soft gamma-repeaters and bursting pulsars; from the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasars to the origin and evolution of the hard x-ray diffuse background; from the nature and number of black holes and neutron stars and the accretion processes onto them to the extreme non-thermal flares of normal stars; and from searches for expected diffuse (but relatively compact) nuclear line (Ti-44) emission in uncatalogued supernova remnants to diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton emission from galaxy clusters. A high sensitivity all-sky survey mission in the hard x-ray band, with imaging to both address source confusion and time-variable background radiations, is very much needed.

  16. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  17. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  18. Substorm triggering by new plasma intrusion: THEMIS all-sky imager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L.; Zou, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mende, S.

    2010-07-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm auroral onset. Based on event and statistical analysis of THEMIS all-sky imager data, we show that there is a distinct and repeatable sequence of events leading to onset, the sequence having similarities to and important differences from previous ideas. The sequence is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and followed by a north-south (N-S) arc moving equatorward toward the onset latitude. Because of the linkage of fast magnetotail flows to PBIs and to N-S auroras, the results indicate that onset is preceded by enhanced earthward plasma flows associated with enhanced reconnection near the pre-existing open-closed field line boundary. The flows carry new plasma from the open field line region to the plasma sheet. The auroral observations indicate that Earthward-transport of the new plasma leads to a near-Earth instability and auroral breakup ˜5.5 min after PBI formation. Our observations also indicate the importance of region 2 magnetosphere-ionosphere electrodynamic coupling, which may play an important role in the motion of pre-onset auroral forms and determining the local times of onsets. Furthermore, we find motion of the pre-onset auroral forms around the Harang reversal and along the growth phase arc, reflecting a well-developed region 2 current system within the duskside convection cell, and also a high probability of diffuse-appearing aurora occurrence near the onset latitude, indicating high plasma pressure along these inner plasma sheet field lines, which would drive large region 2 currents.

  19. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  20. A soft X-ray image of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.; Snowden, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A soft X-ray image of the moon obtained by the Roentgen Observatory Satellite ROSAT clearly shows a sunlit crescent, demonstrating that the moon's X-ray luminosity arises from backscattering of solar X-rays. The moon's optically dark side is also X-ray dark, and casts a distinct shadow on the diffuse cosmic X-ray background. Unexpectedly, the dark side seems to emit X-rays at a level about one percent of that of the bright side; this emission very probably results from energetic solar-wind electrons striking the moon's surface.

  1. Direct x-ray sensing CCD array for intraoral dental x-ray imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John D.; Williams, Donald W.; Langford, D. S.

    1994-05-01

    A commercial prototype electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array has been developed. Image quality parameters were measured using x-ray sources at the National Institute of Standard and Technology radiation physical department in Gaithersburg, MD. Detector response to x-rays in the 10 to 70 keV energy range was measured. The beam hardening effects of human anatomy on a typical 70 kVp spectra was measured using a tissue-equivalent dental phantom.

  2. DETERMINING CORRECT LOCATION OF INTERFACES IN X-RAY IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2004-09-28

    X-ray phase-contrast enhanced imaging enables characterization of objects otherwise transparent to x-rays. Such imaging is accomplished with a point-source or plane-wave x-rays and in the simplest implementation takes advantage of the refraction of x-rays at interfaces to provide contrast. The refraction of x-rays, while small, can lead to measurable displacements of interfaces in the image plane. A simple approximate analytical expression is obtained for the required correction. The resulting expression is verified with a full raytrace calculation.

  3. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  4. X-ray holographic microscopy: Improved images of zymogen granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Howells, M.; Kirz, J.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.

    1988-10-01

    Soft x-ray holography has long been considered as a technique for x-ray microscopy. It has been only recently, however, that sub-micron resolution has been obtained in x-ray holography. This paper will concentrate on recent progress we have made in obtaining reconstructed images of improved quality. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Multimodal x-ray scatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, O.; Bech, M.; Jensen, T. H.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Binderup, T.; Menzel, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2009-12-01

    We describe a small-angle x-ray scattering-based imaging technique that reveals the distribution and orientation of nano-scale structures over extended areas. By combining two measurement and analysis schemes, complementary structural information is available which renders the technique suitable for a broad range of applications, e.g. in materials science and bio-imaging. Through a combination of current techniques and on-line analysis schemes, measurements with a so far unprecedented combination of speed, dynamic range and point density became feasible. This is illustrated by data recorded for a section of a mouse soleus muscle visualizing fine muscle and Achilles tendon structures down to the 10 nm range over a 10 mm2 sample area.

  6. Near infrared imaging and {o I} spectroscopy of IC 443 using two micron all sky survey and infrared space observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rho, J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Cutri, C. M.; Reach, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    We present near-infrared J (1.25 mum), H (1.65 mum), and K-s (2.17 mum) imaging of the entire supernova remnant IC 443 from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) LWS observations of [O I] for 11 positions in the northeast.

  7. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  8. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraenkel, Ben; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, A. Lane; Stodiek, Wolfgang; von Goeler, Schweickhard E.

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  9. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  10. COATLI: an all-sky robotic optical imager with 0.3 arcsec image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Alan M.; Cuevas Cardona, Salvador; Alvarez Nuñez, Luis C.; Ángeles, Fernando; Becerra-Godínez, Rosa L.; Chapa, Oscar; Farah, Alejandro S.; Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Figueroa, Liliana; Langarica Lebre, Rosalía.; Quiróz, Fernando; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ruíz-Diáz-Soto, Jaime; Tejada, Carlos; Tinoco, Silvio J.

    2016-08-01

    COATLI will provide 0.3 arcsec FWHM images from 550 to 900 nm over a large fraction of the sky. It consists of a robotic 50-cm telescope with a diffraction-limited fast-guiding imager. Since the telescope is small, fast guiding will provide diffraction-limited image quality over a field of at least 1 arcmin and with coverage of a large fraction of the sky, even in relatively poor seeing. The COATLI telescope will be installed at the at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, México, during 2016 and the diffraction-limited imager will follow in 2017.

  11. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  12. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  13. X-ray imaging with the PILATUS 100k detector.

    PubMed

    Bech, M; Bunk, O; David, C; Kraft, P; Brönnimann, C; Eikenberry, E F; Pfeiffer, F

    2008-04-01

    We report on the application of the PILATUS 100K pixel detector for medical imaging. Experimental results are presented in the form of X-ray radiographs using standard X-ray absorption contrast and a recently developed phase contrast imaging method. The results obtained with the PILATUS detector are compared to results obtained with a conventional X-ray imaging system consisting of an X-ray scintillation screen, lens optics, and a charge coupled device. Finally, the results for both systems are discussed more quantitatively based on an image power spectrum analysis.

  14. Simulation tools for analyzer-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudevilla, Oriol; Zhou, Wei; Stoupin, Stanislav; Verman, Boris; Brankov, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) belongs to a broader family of phase-contrast (PC) X-ray imaging modalities. Unlike the conventional X-ray radiography, which measures only X-ray absorption, in PC imaging one can also measures the X-rays deflection induced by the object refractive properties. It has been shown that refraction imaging provides better contrast when imaging the soft tissue, which is of great interest in medical imaging applications. In this paper, we introduce a simulation tool specifically designed to simulate the analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. By utilizing ray tracing and basic physical principles of diffraction theory our simulation tool can predicting the X-ray beam profile shape, the energy content, the total throughput (photon count) at the detector. In addition we can evaluate imaging system point-spread function for various system configurations.

  15. Ultrafast imaging of nanosecond pulse x-ray simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham W.; George, David S.; Harrison, David; Hill, Stephen; Hohlfelder, Robert J.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor; Gallegos, Roque R.; Ingle, Martin B.; Simpson, Peter

    2008-11-01

    Ultra fast X-ray imaging has been undertaken upon AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories' radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<20ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad (Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The paper highlights the new ULTRA fast framing camera, developed by Photek Ltd. in-conjunction with AWE, which is capable of imaging up to 500 Million frames per second. Unique sequences of time resolved high spatial resolution images, have been captured in the nanosecond timeframe with zero interframe time, of the source x-rays, utilising our novel configurations. Further, a dedicated diagnostic experiment capturing time resolved x-ray phenomenon, utilising a customised streak tomographic technique, with a multi-billion frames per second recording and 2048 frames capture sequence capability, is described. The fundamental principles of our imaging systems can be applied to other visible and x-ray imaging scenarios.

  16. A new x-ray scatter reduction method based on frequency division multiplexing x-ray imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chang, S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray scatter may significantly degrade imaging performance in x-ray radiography applications, including flatpanel detector-based x-ray imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT (CBCT), primarily due to their large projection field sizes. It results in soft tissue contrast reduction, potentially severe image artifacts, and increased patient dose. Several different approaches have been developed to reject the scatter contributions, including analytical calculation, empirical algorithms, Monte-Carlo simulation, blocker based measurement, and slot scan technique. We recently developed a new x-ray scatter rejection method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. The key enabling technology is the carbon nanotube (CNT)-based multi-beam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technology. The proposed FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiation from each individual x-ray tube is modulated at a certain given frequency. The collimated x-ray beams passed through the object and were captured by a high speed x-ray detector. A demultiplexing algorithm was applied to reject the scatter radiation from the primary radiation based on their different modulation frequencies. The x-ray images generated by the FDMX imaging technique clearly demonstrated improved imaging quality in terms of lower scatter-to-primary-ratio (SPR) and higher contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). It shows great potential of improving x-ray imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

  17. Coded aperture imaging for fluorescent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, A.; MacDowell, A. A.; Marchesini, S.; Parkinson, D. Y.

    2014-06-15

    We employ a coded aperture pattern in front of a pixilated charge couple device detector to image fluorescent x-rays (6–25 KeV) from samples irradiated with synchrotron radiation. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays, and given a known source plane, allow for a large numerical aperture x-ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop and fabricate the free standing No-Two-Holes-Touching aperture pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the recorded encoded pattern were developed by means of a ray tracing technique and confirmed by experiments on standard samples.

  18. Imaging Polarimeter for a Sub-MeV Gamma-Ray All-sky Survey Using an Electron-tracking Compton Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, S.; Takada, A.; Mizumura, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Miuchi, K.; Mizumoto, T.; Nakamasu, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Oda, M.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Sonoda, S.; Tanimori, T.; Tomono, D.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2017-04-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray polarimetry is a promising tool to study the geometry and the magnetic configuration of various celestial objects, such as binary black holes or gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, statistically significant polarizations have been detected in few of the brightest objects. Even though future polarimeters using X-ray telescopes are expected to observe weak persistent sources, there are no effective approaches to survey transient and serendipitous sources with a wide field of view (FoV). Here we present an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a highly sensitive gamma-ray imaging polarimeter. The ETCC provides powerful background rejection and a high modulation factor over an FoV of up to 2π sr thanks to its excellent imaging based on a well-defined point-spread function. Importantly, we demonstrated for the first time the stability of the modulation factor under realistic conditions of off-axis incidence and huge backgrounds using the SPring-8 polarized X-ray beam. The measured modulation factor of the ETCC was 0.65 ± 0.01 at 150 keV for an off-axis incidence with an oblique angle of 30° and was not degraded compared to the 0.58 ± 0.02 at 130 keV for on-axis incidence. These measured results are consistent with the simulation results. Consequently, we found that the satellite-ETCC proposed in Tanimori et al. would provide all-sky surveys of weak persistent sources of 13 mCrab with 10% polarization for a 107 s exposure and over 20 GRBs down to a 6 × 10-6 erg cm-2 fluence and 10% polarization during a one-year observation.

  19. Dental x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Eyad; Fahmy, Gamal F.; Nassar, Diaa; Ammar, Hany

    2004-08-01

    Law enforcement agencies have been exploiting biometric identifiers for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, it has become important to automate forensic identification systems. While, ante mortem (AM) identification, that is identification prior to death, is usually possible through comparison of many biometric identifiers, postmortem (PM) identification, that is identification after death, is impossible using behavioral biometrics (e.g. speech, gait). Moreover, under severe circumstances, such as those encountered in mass disasters (e.g. airplane crashers) or if identification is being attempted more than a couple of weeks postmortem, under such circumstances, most physiological biometrics may not be employed for identification, because of the decay of soft tissues of the body to unidentifiable states. Therefore, a postmortem biometric identifier has to resist the early decay that affects body tissues. Because of their survivability and diversity, the best candidates for postmortem biometric identification are the dental features. In this paper we present an over view about an automated dental identification system for Missing and Unidentified Persons. This dental identification system can be used by both law enforcement and security agencies in both forensic and biometric identification. We will also present techniques for dental segmentation of X-ray images. These techniques address the problem of identifying each individual tooth and how the contours of each tooth are extracted.

  20. New intraoral x-ray fluorographic imaging for dentistry

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, T.; Osada, T.; Aoyama, W.; Iguchi, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kanno, M.; Moriya, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Tusuda, M.

    1983-06-01

    A new dental x-ray fluorographic unit has been developed. This unit is composed of small intraoral x-ray tube, a compact x-ray image intensifier, and a high-resolution TV system. The purposes for developing this equipment were to (1) directly observe the tooth during endodontic procedures and (2) reduce x-ray exposure to the patient and the dentist. The radiation exposure can be reduced to about 1/600 the exposure used with conventional dental film. In clinical trials, a satisfactory fluorographic dental image for endodontic treatment was obtained with this new device.

  1. Obtaining flat x-ray images from round objects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A technique to correct deficiencies in x-ray images of cylindrical or spherical objects that are a consequence of the geometry of the sample is derived, for both two-dimensional (2D) and linescan imaging. The methods described involve the use of attenuators specifically shaped to equalize the x-ray ...

  2. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  3. Characterization of low intensity X-ray imaging devices (Lixiscope)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Radioisotopic sources were used to excite the LIXISCOPE in preliminary experimental attempts to evaluate the usefulness of this instrument for industrial and medical applications. The characteristics of the LIXISCOPE when excited by x-ray produced by conventional electrically powered x-ray generators were studied. The optimum x-ray spectrum was determined and the mode of operation of the generator, which yields satisfactory LIXISCOPE images of medical and industrial specimens was investigated.

  4. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) image is a spectrum of a black hole, which is similar to the colorful spectrum of sunlight produced by a prism. The x-rays of interest are shown here recorded in bright stripes that run rightward and leftward from the center of the image. These x-rays are sorted precisely according to their energy with the highest-energy x-rays near the center of the image and the lower-energy x-rays farther out. The spectrum was obtained by using the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG), which intercepts x-rays and changes their direction by the amounts that depend sensitively on the x-ray energy. The assembly holds 540 gold transmission gratings. When in place behind the mirrors, the gratings intercept the x-rays reflected from the telescope. The bright spot at the center is due to a fraction of the x-ray radiation that is not deflected by the LETG. The spokes that intersect the central spot and the faint diagonal rays that flank the spectrum itself are artifacts due to the structure that supports the LETG grating elements. (Photo credit: NASA Cfa/J. McClintock et al)

  5. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) image is a spectrum of a black hole, which is similar to the colorful spectrum of sunlight produced by a prism. The x-rays of interest are shown here recorded in bright stripes that run rightward and leftward from the center of the image. These x-rays are sorted precisely according to their energy with the highest-energy x-rays near the center of the image and the lower-energy x-rays farther out. The spectrum was obtained by using the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG), which intercepts x-rays and changes their direction by the amounts that depend sensitively on the x-ray energy. The assembly holds 540 gold transmission gratings. When in place behind the mirrors, the gratings intercept the x-rays reflected from the telescope. The bright spot at the center is due to a fraction of the x-ray radiation that is not deflected by the LETG. The spokes that intersect the central spot and the faint diagonal rays that flank the spectrum itself are artifacts due to the structure that supports the LETG grating elements. (Photo credit: NASA Cfa/J. McClintock et al)

  6. A Statistical Study of Pulsating Aurora using THEMIS All-sky Ground Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, K. M.; Jones, S.; Lessard, M.; Donovan, E. F.; Spanswick, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    Pulsating aurora is a common phenomenon that occurs primarily in the aftermath of substorms where dim, long period pulsating patches appear. Previous studies on pulsating aurora have used minimal data sets to investigate pulsation periods and MLAT distribution. None of these studies were based on very large data sets, as we now have available. In this study, which includes over half a year of optical data, we determine occurrence rates of pulsating aurora in terms of magnetic latitude and local time, pulsating auroral onsets at different stations to show temporal evolution, relationship to substorms, etc. Preliminary results obtained from the Gillam All-Sky Camera (66°N, 327°E) over 119 days with good optical data beginning September 2007 through the end of March 2008, 74 of which contain pulsating aurora, include: 31.48% of all clear optical data exhibits pulsating aurora, 68.75% of all optically observed pulsating aurora onsets occur post substorm breakup, and a greater likelihood for observing pulsating aurora after midnight (54% probability versus a 14% probability before midnight)

  7. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  8. Differential phase contrast x-ray microimaging with scanning-imaging x-ray microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2012-08-01

    A novel x-ray microimaging system that consists of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a one-dimensional objective is developed. These two optical systems are set normal to each other regarding the optical axis. A two-dimensional image is obtained with one-dimensional translation scan of the line probe. During scans, positional data in the normal to the scanning direction are obtained simultaneously with the imaging microscope optics. Differential phase contrast (DPC) image and absorption contrast (AC) image can be arbitrarily obtained by image processing after data acquisition. Preliminary experiment has been carried out by using a couple of one-dimensional Fresnel zone plate as the linear-focusing device and the one-dimensional objective. Two-dimensional DPC and AC images of test sample have been successfully obtained with 8 keV x-rays.

  9. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    NAG5-5020 covered a period of 7.5 years during which a great deal of progress was made in x-ray optical techniques under this grant. We survived peer review numerous times during the effort to keep the grant going. In 1994, when the grant started we were actively pursuing the application of spherical mirrors to improving x-ray telescopes. We had found that x-ray detectors were becoming rapidly more sophisticated and affordable, but that x-ray telescopes were only being improved through the intense application of money within the AXAF program. Clearly new techniques for the future were needed. We were successful in developing and testing at the HELSTF facility in New Mexico a four reflection coma-corrected telescope made from spheres. We were able to demonstrate 0.3 arcsecond resolution, almost to the diffraction limit of the system. The community as a whole was, at that time, not particularly interested in looking past AXAF (Chandra) and the effort needed to evolve. Since we had reached the diffraction limit using non-Wolter optics we then decided to see if we could build an x-ray interferometer in the laboratory. In the lab the potential for improved resolution was substantial. If synthetic aperture telescopes could be built in space, then orders of magnitude improvement would become feasible. In 1998 NASA, under the direction of Dr. Nick White of Goddard, started a study to assess the potential and feasibility of x-ray interferometry in space. My work became of central interest to the committee because it indicated that such was possible. In early 1999 we had the breakthrough that allowed us build a practical interferometer. By using flats and hooking up with the Marshall Space Flight Center facilities we were able to demonstrate fringes at 1.25keV on a one millimeter baseline. This actual laboratory demonstration provided the solid proof of concept that NASA needed.

  10. X-ray Photon Counting and Two-Color X-ray Imaging Using Indirect Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Bart; Yao, Qiang; Witvrouwen, Nick; Uwaerts, Dirk; Vandewiele, Stijn; Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a 1 cm2, 90 × 92-pixel image sensor. It is made X-ray sensitive by the use of a scintillator. Its pixels have a charge packet counting circuit topology with two channels, each realizing a different charge packet size threshold and analog domain event counting. Here, the sensor’s performance was measured in setups representative of a medical X-ray environment. Further, two-energy-level photon counting performance is demonstrated, and its capabilities and limitations are documented. We then provide an outlook on future improvements. PMID:27240362

  11. ASPEX: a pret-a-porter all sky monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroci, M.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Pacciani, L.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.

    2006-06-01

    We present a concept study for a novel All Sky Monitor experiment employing very limited resources. Our experience in designing, building and testing SuperAGILE - the hard X-ray imager for the AGILE mission - has demonstrated the possibility to develop a medium-sensitivity, wide field imager, with (at launch stage) ~5.5 kg weight, 12 Watts power and 0.04 cubic meters volume. With these few resources, it can provide crossed one-dimensional images of 1/10 th of the sky, with on-axis 6 arcminutes angular resolution and ~10 mCrab 1-day sensitivity in the 15-45 keV energy range. In this paper we introduce to the ASPEX (All Sky Project for Extraterrestrial X-rays) project and show how a much more efficient All Sky Monitor can now be designed using the same approach and techniques, overcoming a number of severe limitations suffered by SuperAGILE due to the context of the AGILE mission, for which it was designed. The low resources and its efficiency in localizing X-ray transients and in long-term monitoring the steady X-ray sky, make ASPEX a suitable option for several new mission concepts (e.g., PHAROS, ESTREMO, ...).

  12. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  13. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  14. Magnified hard x-ray image in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, James; Feng Zhechuan; Xu Gu

    2010-06-28

    The possibility of magnified x-ray imaging is explored, by the near-field attenuation of a sample intercepting a spherical wave-front, plus the beam profile modulation by Borrmann pyramid based on dynamic x-ray scattering. It is verified by experiments in one dimension as well as numerical simulation.

  15. Comment on ``Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taibi, A.; Baldelli, P.; Tuffanelli, A.; Gambaccini, M.

    2002-07-01

    In the paper "Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging" (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 466 (2001) 99) the authors infer, from simple approximations, that the use of HOPG monochromator has no advantage in mammography compared to existing systems. We show that in order to compare imaging properties of different X-ray sources it is necessary to evaluate the spectra after the attenuation of the tissue to be imaged. Indeed, quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources have the potential to enhance image contrast and to reduce patient dose.

  16. Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1993-06-08

    Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

  17. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H.; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O.

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible within situsample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  18. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; ...

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable,more » for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.« less

  19. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  20. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H.; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O.

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  1. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  2. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation: lecture 4. Soft x-ray imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    The history and present techniques of soft x-ray imaging are reviewed briefly. The physics of x-ray imaging is described, including the temporal and spatial coherence of x-ray sources. Particular technologies described are: contact x-ray microscopy, zone plate imaging, scanned image zone plate microscopy, scanned image reflection microscopy, and soft x-ray holography and diffraction. (LEW)

  3. A backscattered x-ray imager for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Eric Jude L.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Shukla, Hemant; Gulabani, Daya

    2005-04-01

    Conventional X-ray radiographic systems rely on transmitted photons for the production of images. Backscatter imaging makes use of the more abundant scattered photons for image formation. Specifically, incoherently (Compton) scattered X-ray photons are detected and used for image formation in this modality of medical imaging. However, additional information is obtained when the transmitted X-ray photons are also detected and used. Transmission radiography produces a two-dimensional image of a three dimensional system, therefore image information from a shallower object is often contaminated by image information from underlying objects. Backscattered x-ray imaging largely overcomes this deficiency by imaging depth selectively, which reduces corruption of shallow imaging information by information from deeper objects lying under it. Backscattered x-ray imaging may be particularly useful for examining anatomical structures at shallow depths beneath the skin. Some typical applications for such imaging might be breast imaging, middle ear imaging, imaging of skin melanomas, etc. Previous investigations, by way of theoretical calculations and computational simulations into the feasibility of this kind of imaging have uncovered high-contrast and SNR parameters. Simulations indicate that this method can be used for imaging relatively high-density objects at depths of up to approximately five centimeters below the surface. This paper presents both theoretical and experimental SNR results on this new medical imaging modality.

  4. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  5. X-ray backscatter imaging for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Daniel; Edwards, Talion; Toh, Chin

    2011-06-23

    Scatter x-ray imaging (SXI) is a real time, digital, x-ray backscatter imaging technique that allows radiographs to be taken from one side of an object. This x-ray backscatter imaging technique offers many advantages over conventional transmission radiography that include single-sided access and extremely low radiation fields compared to conventional open source industrial radiography. Examples of some applications include the detection of corrosion, foreign object debris, water intrusion, cracking, impact damage and leak detection in a variety of material such as aluminum, composites, honeycomb structures, and titanium.

  6. Soft X-ray study of solar wind charge exchange from the Earth's magnetosphere : Suzaku observations and a future X-ray imaging mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Terada, N.; Kasahara, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Nishijo, K.; Noda, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the Earth's magnetosphere using the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are shown, together with our X-ray imaging mission concept to characterize the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere. In recent years, the SWCX emission from the Earth's magnetosphere, originally discovered as unexplained noise during the soft X-ray all sky survey (Snowden et al. 1994), is receiving increased attention on studying geospace. The SWCX is a reaction between neutrals in exosphere and highly charged ions in the magnetosphere originated from solar wind. Robertson et al. (2005) modeled the SWCX emission as seen from an observation point 50 Re from Earth. In the resulting X-ray intensities, the magnetopause, bow shock and cusp were clearly visible. High sensitivity soft X-ray observation with CCDs onboard recent X-ray astronomy satellites enables us to resolve SWCX emission lines and investigate time correlation with solar wind as observed with ACE and WIND more accurately. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite launched in 2005. The line of sight direction through cusp is observable, while constraints on Earth limb avoidance angle of other satellites often limits observable regions. Suzaku firstly detected the SWCX emission while pointing in the direction of the north ecliptic pole (Fujimoto et al. 2007). Using the Tsyganenko 1996 magnetic field model, the distance to the nearest SWCX region was estimated as 2-8 Re, implying that the line of sight direction can be through magnetospheric cusp. Ezoe et al. (2010) reported SWCX events toward the sub-solar side of the magnetosheath. These cusp and sub-solar side magnetosheath regions are predicted to show high SWCX fluxes by Robertson et al. (2005). On the other hand, Ishikawa et al. (2013) discovered a similarly strong SWCX event when the line of sight direction did not transverse these two regions. Motivated by these detections

  7. Application of X-ray imaging techniques to auroral monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Burstein, P.

    1981-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic particles into the ionosphere produces bremsstrahlung X-rays and K-alpha line emission from excited oxygen and nitrogen. If viewed from a spacecraft in a highly elliptical polar orbit, this soft (0.3 - 3.0 keV) X-radiation will provide an almost uninterrupted record of dayside and nightside auroras. A grazing incidence X-ray telescope especially designed for such auroral monitoring is described. High photon collection efficiency will permit exposure times of approximately 100 seconds during substorms. Spectrophotometry will allow users to derive the energy spectrum of the precipitating particles. If placed in a 15 earth-radius orbit, the telescope can produce auroral X-ray images with 30 km resolution. Absolute position of X-ray auroras can be established with a small optical telescope co-aligned with the X-ray telescope. Comparison of X-ray and optical images will establish the height and global distribution of X-ray aurorae, relative to well-known optical auroras, thus melding the new X-ray results with knowledge of optical auroras.

  8. Coherent X-ray Imaging Techniques for Shock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David

    2015-06-01

    X-ray radiography has been used for several decades in dynamic experiments to measure material flow in extreme conditions via absorption of x-rays propagating through the materials. Image contrast in traditional radiography is determined by the absorption coefficients and areal densities of the materials at a given x-ray wavelength, and often limits these measurements to materials with sufficiently high atomic numbers and areal density, while low-Z materials and small areal density variations are completely transparent and not visible in the image. Coherent x-ray sources, such as those found at synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers, provide new opportunities for imaging dynamic experiments due to their high spatial and spectral coherence, high brightness and short temporal duration (<100 ps). Phase-sensitive techniques, such as phase contrast imaging (PCI), rely on the overlap and interference of the x-rays due to spatial variations in their transmitted phase, and are enabled primarily by high spatial coherence of the x-ray source. Objects that are otherwise transparent to x-rays can be imaged with PCI, and small variations in areal density become visible that would be not observable with traditional radiography. In this talk an overview of PCI will be given, and current applications of this technique in high-energy density physics, shock physics and material dynamics will be presented. Other future uses of imaging using coherent x-ray sources in dynamic high-pressure experiments will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  9. Point Source All Sky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky as seen by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The measured brightnesses of half a billion stars (points) have been combined into colors representing three distinct wavelengths of infrared light: blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns. This image is centered on the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, toward the constellation of Sagittarius. The reddish stars seemingly hovering in the middle of the Milky Way's disc -- many of them never observed before -- trace the densest dust clouds in our galaxy. The two faint smudges seen in the lower right quadrant are our neighboring galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04250

  10. Point Source All Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky as seen by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The measured brightnesses of half a billion stars (points) have been combined into colors representing three distinct wavelengths of infrared light: blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns. This image is centered on the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, toward the constellation of Sagittarius. The reddish stars seemingly hovering in the middle of the Milky Way's disc -- many of them never observed before -- trace the densest dust clouds in our galaxy. The two faint smudges seen in the lower right quadrant are our neighboring galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  11. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guangxing; Martz, Harry; Glenn, Steven; Divin, Charles; Birrer, Nat

    2016-08-19

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  12. Nanomaterials for X-ray imaging: gold nanoparticle enhancement of X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Ortiz, Vivian; Liu, Yanan; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R; Tatíček, Milan; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2011-07-13

    We present the development of a new imaging technique for the early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma that utilizes surface-modified gold nanoparticles in combination with X-ray imaging. Tissues labeled with these electron-dense particles show enhanced X-ray scattering over normal tissues, distinguishing cells containing gold nanoparticles from cells without gold in X-ray scatter images. Our results suggest that this novel approach could enable the in vivo detection of tumors as small as a few millimeters in size.

  13. Nanomaterials for X-ray Imaging: Gold Nanoparticle-Enhancement of X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Ortiz, Vivian; Liu, Yanan; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R.; Tatíček, Milan

    2011-01-01

    We present the development of a new imaging technique for the early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma that utilizes surface-modified gold nanoparticles in combination with x-ray imaging. Tissues labeled with these electron-dense particles show enhanced x-ray scattering over normal tissues, distinguishing cells containing gold nanoparticles from cells without gold in x-ray scatter images. Our results suggest that this novel approach could enable the in vivo detection of tumors as small as a few millimeters in size. PMID:21644516

  14. Development toward high-resolution X-ray phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Momose, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Since the 1990s, the use of X-ray phase contrast has been extensively studied for imaging weakly absorbing objects consisting of low-Z elements such as biological soft tissues and polymers. The development of X-ray microscopy was also progressing during this time, although absorption contrast was only available. It was straightforward and important to develop phase-contrast X-ray microscopy. One characteristic in the development is that quantitative phase measurement is possible through the acquisition of phase-contrast images under a specific procedure, thanks to digital X-ray image detectors. Therefore, such a technique is called 'phase imaging' rather than phase-contrast imaging in this review. Highly sensitive three-dimensional phase imaging is feasible in combination with tomography. This article reviews the progress in X-ray phase imaging, especially with regards to X-ray microscopy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The low intensity X-ray imaging scope /Lixiscope/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.; Webber, R. L.; Farr, M. R.; Rennie, J.

    1978-01-01

    A fully portable, small-format X-ray imaging system, Lixiscope (low intensity X-ray imaging scope) is described. In the prototype, which has been built to demonstrate the feasibility of the Lixiscope concept, only well-developed and available components have been used. Consideration is given to the principles of operation of the device, some of its performance characteristics as well as possible dental, medical and industrial applications.

  16. The low intensity X-ray imaging scope /Lixiscope/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.; Webber, R. L.; Farr, M. R.; Rennie, J.

    1978-01-01

    A fully portable, small-format X-ray imaging system, Lixiscope (low intensity X-ray imaging scope) is described. In the prototype, which has been built to demonstrate the feasibility of the Lixiscope concept, only well-developed and available components have been used. Consideration is given to the principles of operation of the device, some of its performance characteristics as well as possible dental, medical and industrial applications.

  17. The Rosat x-ray sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    The ROSAT (Röntgensatellit) X-ray astronomy satellite has completed the first all-sky x-ray and XUV survey with imaging telescopes. About 60 000 new x-ray and 400 new XUV (1) sources were detected. This contribution will deal with preliminary results from the ROSAT ALL-SKY X-RAY SURVEY. The ROSAT diffuse and point-source x-ray skymaps, the positional accuracy obtained for the x-ray sources, and a few results from correlations performed with available catalogues in various energy bands like the Radio, Infrared, Visible, UV, and hard x-rays as well as identifications from optical follow-up observations will be presented.

  18. Simultaneous Observation of Wave Packet of the Atmospheric Gravity Waves by ISS-IMAP and All-sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukino, H.; Saito, A.; Sakanoi, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scale of the atmospheric gravity wave in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere was analyzed using the simultaneous observational data of ISS-IMAP and an all-sky imager at Hawaii. There are a plenty of previous studies that discuss the relationship between the wave structures of the mesospheric airglow and the tropospheric events. The problem of the ground-based observation of the airglow is that it cannot distinguish spatial variations from temporal variations for the structures whose scale size is larger than its field-of-view. ISS-IMAP started the observation in October, 2012 to survey the atmospheric gravity waves whose horizontal scale size is 50 km and longer. The spatial resolution of the VIsible-light and infrared Spectrum Imager (VISI) of ISS-IMAP/VISI imaging observation is from 10 km to 25 km. Simultaneous observations start from March 14, 2013. The atmospheric gravity waves that detected by VISI in 762 nm were compared with the observations of ground-based all-sky imagers in 557.7 nm. The generation and the propagation of the atmospheric gravity waves were investigated with this simultaneous observation. The relationship between the tropospheric events and the atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere is studied with the wide field-of-view observation by VISI/ISS-IMAP, and the continuous observation of the ground-based imagers. VISI frequently observed wave packets whose scale size is 1,000-2,000 km. These wave packets were observed by the ground-based imager as a series of waves whose wave length is 20-40 km, and that continue for 5-6 hours. The generation, the propagation and the distraction of the atmospheric gravity waves will be discussed in this presentation.

  19. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1~keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The foxsi project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  20. Combining X-Ray Imaging And Machine Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gary G.

    1988-02-01

    The use of x-rays as a light source for medical diagnosis has been around since the early 20th century. The use of x-rays as a tool in nondestructive testing (for industrial use) has been around almost as long. Photographic film has been the medium that converts the x-ray energy that it encounters into areas of light and dark depending on the amount of energy absorbed. Referring to industrial use of x-rays only, many systems have been manufactured that replaced the photographic film with a combination of x-rays, fluorescent screen, and a television camera. This type of system was mainly used as a nondestructive testing tool to inspect various products (such as tires) for internal flaws and always used an operator to make the decisions. In general, the images produced by such systems were poor in nature due to lack of contrast and noise. The improvements in digital image processing and complex algorithms have made it possible to combine machine vision and x-rays to address a whole new spectrum of applications that require automatic analysis for flaw inspection. The objective of this presentation will be to familiarize the audience with some of the techniques used to solve automatic real-time x-ray problems. References will be made to real applications in the aerospace, pharmaceutical, food, and automotive industries.

  1. Development of X-Ray Talbot-Lau Interferometer with a Practical X-Ray Tube for Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makifuchi, Chiho; Kido, Kazuhiro; Kiyohara, Junko; Ito, Tsukasa; Nagatsuka, Sumiya; Momose, Atsushi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer for the imaging of bone cartilage using a practical X-ray tube and to develop that imaging system for clinical use. Wave-optics simulation was performed to design the interferometer with a practical X-ray tube, a source grating, two X-ray gratings, and an X-ray detector. An imaging system was created based on the results of the simulation. The specifications were as follows: the focal spot size was 0.3 mm of an X-ray tube with a tungsten anode. The tube voltage was set at 40 kVp with an additive aluminum filter. The pixel size of the X-ray detector was 85 μm. The amplitude grating was a Ronchi-type grating whose pitch was 5.3 μm. Imaging performance of the system was examined with X-ray doses of 0.5, 1 and 3 mGy so that the bone cartilage of a chicken wing was clearly depicted with X-ray doses of 3 mGy. This was consistent with the simulation's predictions. Further optimization of the system will follow to reduce the X-ray dose for clinical use.

  2. All-Sky Image Fusion for a Synoptic Survey Telescope in Arctic and Antarctic Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøtte, M.; Virani, S.; Holzinger, M.; Register, A.; Perez, C.; Tapia, J.

    2016-09-01

    Near-Earth object (NEO) detection, transient astronomical event detection, and Space Situational Awareness (SSA) support are all provided by wide-field, high cadence synoptic telescope surveys. Many such exquisite and monolithic synoptic surveys achieve impressive performance and are certainly changing these application areas. In the past 15 years Raven-class telescopes have made a clear case for the utility of commercial-off-the-shelf systems in SSA. This paper documents the initial efforts and next steps for the Omnidirectional Space Situational Awareness (OmniSSA) array, a wide-field-of-view synoptic survey system that leverages the Raven-class telescope paradigm. The approach utilizes multiple overlapping wide field-of-view sensors with post-processing super resolution and image stacking techniques to generate synthetic images equivalent to larger wide field-of-view systems. The synthetic array offers potential to utilize a plurality of components that are individually low cost and commercial off-the-shelf. A brief survey of synoptic survey systems is presented, followed by a description of the current hardware implementation of the OmniSSA array and preliminary out-of-the-box results for baseline OmniSSA camera SR and image stacking routines.

  3. X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Nikulin, Andrei Y.; Muddle, Barrington C.

    An experimental "momentum transfer" X-ray diffraction imaging technique is suggested and tested for nondestructive determination of nanoscale particles and clusters in three-dimensions with a spatial resolution of few nanometers. The advantage of the proposed approach is that it does not require coherent X-ray source and therefore is suitable for almost any beamline and many laboratory sources. A simple and robust quantitative technique to reconstruct an average nanoparticle randomly dispersed over a large volume within a sample should enable researchers to study nanoparticles using conventional laboratory X-ray diffraction equipment with resolution up to a few nanometers.

  4. Applications of Indirect Imaging Techniques in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaftis, E. T.

    A review is given on aspects of indirect imaging techniques in X-ray binaries which are used as diagnostics tools for probing the X-ray dominated accretion disc physics. These techniques utilize observed properties such as the emission line profile variability, the time delays between simultaneous optical/X-ray light curves, the light curves of eclipsing systems and the pulsed emission from the compact object in order to reconstruct the accretion disc's line emissivity (Doppler tomography), the irradiated disc and heated secondary (echo mapping), the outer disc structure (modified eclipse mapping) and the accreting regions onto the compact object, respectively.

  5. Light-pollution measurement with the Wide-field all-sky image analyzing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítek, S.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure light pollution in the capital of Czech Republic, Prague. As a measuring instrument is used calibrated consumer level digital single reflex camera with IR cut filter, therefore, the paper reports results of measuring and monitoring of the light pollution in the wavelength range of 390 - 700 nm, which most affects visual range astronomy. Combining frames of different exposure times made with a digital camera coupled with fish-eye lens allow to create high dynamic range images, contain meaningful values, so such a system can provide absolute values of the sky brightness.

  6. X-ray properties of an anthropomorphic breast phantom for MRI and x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Freed, Melanie; Badal, Andreu; Jennings, Robert J; de las Heras, Hugo; Myers, Kyle J; Badano, Aldo

    2011-06-21

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the x-ray properties of a dual-modality, anthropomorphic breast phantom whose MRI properties have been previously evaluated. The goal of this phantom is to provide a platform for optimization and standardization of two- and three-dimensional x-ray and MRI breast imaging modalities for the purpose of lesion detection and discrimination. The phantom is constructed using a mixture of lard and egg whites, resulting in a variable, tissue-mimicking structure with separate adipose- and glandular-mimicking components. The phantom can be produced with either a compressed or uncompressed shape. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were estimated using elemental compositions from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference and the atomic interaction models from the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and compared with human values from the literature. The image structure was examined quantitatively by calculating and comparing spatial covariance matrices of the phantom and patient mammography images. Finally, a computerized version of the phantom was created by segmenting a computed tomography scan and used to simulate x-ray scatter of the phantom in a mammography geometry. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were within 20% and 15% of the values for adipose and glandular tissues, respectively, which is within the estimation error of these values. Matching was improved at higher energies (>20 keV). Tissue structures in the phantom have a size similar to those in the patient data, but are slightly larger on average. Correlations in the patient data appear to be longer than those in the phantom data in the anterior-posterior direction; however, they are within the error bars of the measurement. Simulated scatter-to-primary ratio values of the phantom images were as high as 85% in some areas and were strongly affected by the heterogeneous nature of the phantom. Key physical x-ray properties of

  7. X-ray properties of an anthropomorphic breast phantom for MRI and x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Melanie; Badal, Andreu; Jennings, Robert J.; de las Heras, Hugo; Myers, Kyle J.; Badano, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the x-ray properties of a dual-modality, anthropomorphic breast phantom whose MRI properties have been previously evaluated. The goal of this phantom is to provide a platform for optimization and standardization of two- and three-dimensional x-ray and MRI breast imaging modalities for the purpose of lesion detection and discrimination. The phantom is constructed using a mixture of lard and egg whites, resulting in a variable, tissue-mimicking structure with separate adipose- and glandular-mimicking components. The phantom can be produced with either a compressed or uncompressed shape. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were estimated using elemental compositions from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference and the atomic interaction models from the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and compared with human values from the literature. The image structure was examined quantitatively by calculating and comparing spatial covariance matrices of the phantom and patient mammography images. Finally, a computerized version of the phantom was created by segmenting a computed tomography scan and used to simulate x-ray scatter of the phantom in a mammography geometry. Mass attenuation coefficients of the phantom materials were within 20% and 15% of the values for adipose and glandular tissues, respectively, which is within the estimation error of these values. Matching was improved at higher energies (>20 keV). Tissue structures in the phantom have a size similar to those in the patient data, but are slightly larger on average. Correlations in the patient data appear to be longer than those in the phantom data in the anterior-posterior direction; however, they are within the error bars of the measurement. Simulated scatter-to-primary ratio values of the phantom images were as high as 85% in some areas and were strongly affected by the heterogeneous nature of the phantom. Key physical x-ray properties of

  8. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  9. Coherent x-ray scatter imaging for foodstuff contamination detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Gerhard; Bomsdorf, H.; Harding, Geoffrey L.; Kanzenbach, Jurgen; Linde, R.

    1994-03-01

    Using the novel technique of energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction tomography, measurements were made of the coherent X-ray scatter from various types of foodstuff (chocolate, bacon, cherry jam, chicken breast) with their typical contaminants (macrolon, blue foil, cherry stones/wood and bone, respectively). In addition, it is shown how the use of a window technique in the diffraction spectrum allows cancellation of the foodstuff contribution in scatter images, leaving only that of the contaminant. The extension to multicomponent systems, allowing arbitrary elimination of unwanted materials in coherent scatter images, is possible. Taken together, these results indicate the great potential of coherent X-ray scatter analysis for contamination detection in the foodstuff industry. By development of more efficient X-ray scatter geometries, using e.g. fan beam irradiation with simultaneous acquisition of spectra from different voxels, the requirements of industrial mass production with respect to inspection time and resolution are likely to be met.

  10. Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Luo, Shengnian; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Kapustinsky, Jon S.

    2012-05-02

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  11. Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N.

    2012-10-15

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  12. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  13. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources.

    PubMed

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-05-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  14. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  15. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-11-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  16. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, John M.

    1989-08-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) The calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development; (2) The use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution; and (3) The application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  17. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) The calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development; (2) The use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution; and (3) The application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  18. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  19. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  20. Rapid combinatorial screening by synchrotron X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eba, Hiromi; Sakurai, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    An X-ray imaging system, which does not require any scans of the sample or an X-ray beam and which, therefore, dramatically reduces the amount of time required, was employed to evaluate combinatorial libraries efficiently. Two-dimensional X-ray fluorescence (XRF) images of an 8 mm × 8 mm area were observed for combinatorial substrates of manganese-cobalt spinel MnCo 2O 4 and lithium ferrite LiFeO 2 via an exposure time of 1-3 s using synchrotron X-rays. Thus, XRF signals from a whole substrate could be observed at once in a short space of time. In order to observe the chemical environment simultaneously for all materials arranged on the substrate, the fluorescent X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) was measured by repeating the imaging during the monochromator scans across the absorption edge for metals. This is extremely efficient because XAFS spectra for all materials placed on the common substrate are obtained from only a single energy scan. One can determine the valence numbers, as well as other aspects of the chemical environment of the metal included in each material, from the differences in spectral features and the energy shifts. Hence, combinatorial libraries can be screened very rapidly, and therefore efficiently, using the X-ray imaging system.

  1. [The application of X-ray imaging in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Kučerová, Stěpánka; Safr, Miroslav; Ublová, Michaela; Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr

    2014-07-01

    X-ray is the most common, basic and essential imaging method used in forensic medicine. It serves to display and localize the foreign objects in the body and helps to detect various traumatic and pathological changes. X-ray imaging is valuable in anthropological assessment of an individual. X-ray allows non-invasive evaluation of important findings before the autopsy and thus selection of the optimal strategy for dissection. Basic indications for postmortem X-ray imaging in forensic medicine include gunshot and explosive fatalities (identification and localization of projectiles or other components of ammunition, visualization of secondary missiles), sharp force injuries (air embolism, identification of the weapon) and motor vehicle related deaths. The method is also helpful for complex injury evaluation in abused victims or in persons where abuse is suspected. Finally, X-ray imaging still remains the gold standard method for identification of unknown deceased. With time modern imaging methods, especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are more and more applied in forensic medicine. Their application extends possibilities of the visualization the bony structures toward a more detailed imaging of soft tissues and internal organs. The application of modern imaging methods in postmortem body investigation is known as digital or virtual autopsy. At present digital postmortem imaging is considered as a bloodless alternative to the conventional autopsy.

  2. X-ray phase imaging with a paper analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Kaye S.; Paganin, David M.; Siu, Karen K. W.

    2012-03-19

    We present a simple x-ray phase imaging method that utilizes the sample-induced distortion of a high contrast random intensity pattern to quantitatively retrieve the two-dimensional phase map at the exit surface of a coherently illuminated sample. This reference pattern is created by placing a sheet of sandpaper in the x-ray beam, with the sample-induced distortion observed after propagation to the detector, a meter downstream. Correlation analysis comparing a single ''sample and sandpaper'' image to a reference ''sandpaper only'' image produces two sensitive differential phase contrast images, giving the sample phase gradient in vertical and horizontal directions. These images are then integrated to recover the projected phase depth of the sample. The simple experimental set-up, retention of flux, and the need for only a single sample image per reconstruction suggest that this method is of value in imaging a range of dynamic processes at both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources.

  3. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  4. Retrieval of Garstang's emission function from all-sky camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kundracik, František

    2015-10-01

    The emission function from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this function. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a function of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405-3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to retrieve. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.

  5. COMPTEL all-sky imaging at 2.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, M.; Ryan, J.; Fletcher, S.; Bennett, K.; van Dijk, R.; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; Diehl, R.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A.

    1997-05-01

    It is now generally accepted that accretion of matter onto a compact object (white dwarf, neutron star or black hole) is one of the most efficient processes in the universe for producing high energy radiations. Measurements of the {gamma}-ray emission will provide a potentially valuable means for furthering our understanding of the accretion process. Here we focus on neutron capture processes, which can be expected in any situation where energetic neutrons may be produced and where the liberated neutrons will interact with matter before they decay (where they have a chance of undergoing some type of neutron capture). Line emission at 2.2 MeV, resulting from neutron capture on hydrogen, is believed to be the most important neutron capture emission. Observations of this line in particular would provide a probe of neutron production processes (i.e., the energetic particle interactions) within the accretion flow. Here we report on the results of our effort to image the full sky at 2.2 MeV using data from the {ital COMPTEL} experiment on the {ital Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory} ({ital CGRO}). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. COMPTEL all-sky imaging at 2.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, M.; Ryan, J.; Fletcher, S.; Bennett, K.; Dijk, R. van; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; Diehl, R.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A.

    1997-05-10

    It is now generally accepted that accretion of matter onto a compact object (white dwarf, neutron star or black hole) is one of the most efficient processes in the universe for producing high energy radiations. Measurements of the {gamma}-ray emission will provide a potentially valuable means for furthering our understanding of the accretion process. Here we focus on neutron capture processes, which can be expected in any situation where energetic neutrons may be produced and where the liberated neutrons will interact with matter before they decay (where they have a chance of undergoing some type of neutron capture). Line emission at 2.2 MeV, resulting from neutron capture on hydrogen, is believed to be the most important neutron capture emission. Observations of this line in particular would provide a probe of neutron production processes (i.e., the energetic particle interactions) within the accretion flow. Here we report on the results of our effort to image the full sky at 2.2 MeV using data from the COMPTEL experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)

  7. Frontiers in imaging magnetism with polarized x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2015-01-08

    Although magnetic imaging with polarized x-rays is a rather young scientific discipline, the various types of established x-ray microscopes have already taken an important role in state-of-the-art characterization of the properties and behavior of spin textures in advanced materials. The opportunities ahead will be to obtain in a unique way indispensable multidimensional information of the structure, dynamics and composition of scientifically interesting and technologically relevant magnetic materials.

  8. Method of fabricating an imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E. (Inventor); Burgess, A. S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A process for fabricating an X-ray spectrometer having imaging and energy resolution of X-ray sources is discussed. The spectrometer has an array of adjoinging rectangularly shaped detector cells formed in a silicon body. The walls of the cells are created by laser drilling holes completely through the silicon body and diffusing n(+) phosphorous doping material therethrough. A thermally migrated aluminum electrode is formed centrally through each of the cells.

  9. Dilation x-ray imager a new∕faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF.

    PubMed

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Barrios, M A; Felker, B; Smith, R F; Collins, G W; Jones, O S; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Piston, K; Raman, K S; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2012-10-01

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ∼7 × 10(18) neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIFa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2012-10-01

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ˜7 × 1018 neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010), 10.1063/1.3479111] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  11. Two dimensional x-ray phase imaging using single grating interferometer with embedded x-ray targets.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Fujino, Sho; Yamazaki, Amane; Ito, Yasuhiro; Hosoi, Takuji; Watanabe, Heiji; Shimura, Takayoshi

    2015-06-29

    Using multidot metal targets embedded in a diamond substrate, we created a single-grating Talbot-Lau interferometer and used it to capture two dimensional (2D) x-ray phase images. The ensemble of these targets constitutes a tiny virtual array of x-ray source and enables x-ray phase-contrast imaging with no source or absorption grating within a 1 m source-detector distance for 8 keV x-rays. We directly resolved a dot-pattern self-image of the phase grating with 6 µm pitch by using an x-ray image detector with 24 µm pixels and obtained 2D differential-phase and dark-field images from a single-exposure. Using the 2D differential-phase images, we also obtained a phase image with no streak artifacts.

  12. Coherent diffraction imaging using focused hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunam; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Su Yong; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Marathe, Shashidhara; Song, Changyong; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kang, Hyon Chol

    2016-05-01

    A quantitative height profile image of a silicon nano-trench structure was obtained via coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) utilizing focused X-rays at a photon energy of 5.5 keV. The ability to optimize the spatial coherence and the photon flux density of a focused X-ray beam was the key technique for achieving such technical progress at a given X-ray photon flux. This was achieved by investigating the tunability of the focused beam's optical properties and performing a CDI experiment with the focused X-rays. The relationship between the focused X-rays' optical properties ( e.g., photon flux density and spatial coherence length) and the incident beam's size, which can be tuned by adjusting the slits in front of the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) was elucidated. We also obtained a quantitative image of a nano-trench sample produced via the reconstruction process of CDI, which utilizes carefully tuned, focused X-rays.

  13. Fourier-Transform Ghost Imaging with Hard X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Ronghua; Han, Shensheng; Xie, Honglan; Du, Guohao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Zhu, Daming

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge gained through x-ray crystallography fostered structural determination of materials and greatly facilitated the development of modern science and technology in the past century. However, it is only applied to crystalline structures and cannot resolve noncrystalline materials. Here we demonstrate a novel lensless Fourier-transform ghost imaging method with pseudothermal hard x rays that extends x-ray crystallography to noncrystalline samples. By measuring the second-order intensity correlation function of the light, Fourier-transform diffraction pattern of a complex amplitude sample is achieved at the Fresnel region in our experiment and the amplitude and phase distributions of the sample in the spatial domain are retrieved successfully. For the first time, ghost imaging is experimentally realized with x rays. Since a highly coherent x-ray source is not required, the method can be implemented with laboratory x-ray sources and it also provides a potential solution for lensless diffraction imaging with fermions, such as neutrons and electrons where intensive coherent sources usually are not available.

  14. A satellite imager for atmospheric X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, W.; Voss, H. D.; Sanders, T. C.

    1985-02-01

    A high-sensitivity X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (XRIS) was developed for measurements of atmospheric bremsstrahlung X-rays. The XRIS instrument flown on a 3-axis stabilized polar orbiting satellite (S81-1) employed a one-dimensional pinhole camera to acquire a 2-dimensional X-ray image as the satellite passed over an auroral scene. Using a position sensitive gas proportional counter, with an active area of 1200 sq cm divided into sixteen cross-track pixels, the instrument had a geometric factor of about 0.4 sq cm-steradian per pixel (6 sq cm-sr total) for X-rays of 4 to 40 keV. At an orbital altitude of 250 km, it provided a spatial resolution of 30 km and the temporal resolution was one-eighth of a second. Designed primarily to detect artificial electron precipitation at lower latitudes, the instrument also produced the first satellite X-ray images of the aurora during May and June, 1982. Special features of the instrument included a quadrupole broom magnet to reject energetic electrons, a multilayer plastic-on-tantalum shielding to suppress the bremsstrahlung X-rays generated from electrons which impact the instrument surface, and a new technique for position sensing within the detector, using signal division in a resistor array.

  15. Fourier-Transform Ghost Imaging with Hard X Rays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Ronghua; Han, Shensheng; Xie, Honglan; Du, Guohao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Zhu, Daming

    2016-09-09

    Knowledge gained through x-ray crystallography fostered structural determination of materials and greatly facilitated the development of modern science and technology in the past century. However, it is only applied to crystalline structures and cannot resolve noncrystalline materials. Here we demonstrate a novel lensless Fourier-transform ghost imaging method with pseudothermal hard x rays that extends x-ray crystallography to noncrystalline samples. By measuring the second-order intensity correlation function of the light, Fourier-transform diffraction pattern of a complex amplitude sample is achieved at the Fresnel region in our experiment and the amplitude and phase distributions of the sample in the spatial domain are retrieved successfully. For the first time, ghost imaging is experimentally realized with x rays. Since a highly coherent x-ray source is not required, the method can be implemented with laboratory x-ray sources and it also provides a potential solution for lensless diffraction imaging with fermions, such as neutrons and electrons where intensive coherent sources usually are not available.

  16. A statistical study of the motion of pulsating aurora patches: using the THEMIS All-Sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bing; Donovan, Eric; Liang, Jun; Spanswick, Emma

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies of the motion of patches that comprise patchy pulsating aurora (PPA) have been based on a limited number of events. In this study, we use a large database of PPA patches obtained from the THEMIS all-sky imager at Gillam (66.18° magnetic latitude, 332.78° magnetic longitude) between May 2006 and July 2013 to explore the velocity of the PPA patches. Our results show that PPA patches mainly drift eastward after midnight and westward before midnight. In addition, we found that patch velocities are in the expected range of convection given the magnetic latitude and that the velocities do not seem to depend on auroral electrojet (AE) index. The results suggest that the drifts of auroral patches could be a proxy for the ionospheric convection, and possibly provide a convenient and accurate method to remotely sense the magnetospheric convection.

  17. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  18. Phase-Sensitive X-ray Imaging of Synovial Joints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Zhong; Connor, Dean; Mollenhauer, Jorgen; Muehleman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the efficacy of phase-sensitive x-ray imaging for intact synovial joints, whereby refraction effects, along with the attenuation of conventional radiography, can be exploited. Design Intact cadaveric human knee joints were imaged, in the computed tomographic mode, using an analyzer based x-ray system at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A collimated fan beam of 51 keV X-rays was prepared by a silicon [1,1,1 reflection] double-crystal monochromator. The x-ray beam transmitted through the specimen was imaged after diffraction in the vertical plane by means of the analyzer crystal with the analyzer crystal tuned to its half-reflectivity point (6.5 microradians). A two-dimensional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used for reconstructing transverse slices of images. Results The resulting images demonstrate simultaneous soft-tissue and bone contrast at a level that has not been achieved previously. Identifiable structures include articular cartilage, cruciate ligaments, loose connective tissue, menisci, and chondrocalcinosis. Conclusion Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging using an analyzer-based system renders exceptionally high quality images of soft and hard tissues within synovial joints, with high contrast and resolution, and thus holds promise for the eventual clinical utility. PMID:19328880

  19. GEO-X: GEOspace X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro

    We introduce a soft X-ray mission GEO-X (GEOspace X-ray imager), in order to image Earth’s magnetosphere. The aimed launch year of GEO-X is around 2020. A wide-field of view (10 deg x 10 deg) of the soft X-ray imaging spectrometer onboard GEO-X enables us to visualize location, size and shape of the magneotopause, cusp and bowshock, as well as their responses to solar wind condition. Recent observations with Earth-orbiting X-ray astronomy satellites have revealed time-variable X-ray emission from Earth’s magnetosphere via charge exchange reaction between solar wind and exospheric neutrals (e.g., Snowden et al. 1994, ApJ, Fujimoto et al. 2007 PASJ, Cater et al. 2011 A&A, Ezoe et al. 2011 ASR). The X-ray intensity is expected to be enhanced at magnetospheric boundaries such as magnetosheath and cusps because of high solar wind and exospheric neutral densities (Robertson et al. 2006, JGR). Therefore, the X-ray emission can be a new tool to image Earth’s magnetosphere with high time resolution in principle. However, narrow field of view of the instruments and unoptimized satellites’ orbit hinder us from using this emission for imaging of Earth’s magnetosphere. GEO-X promises to open a new window of the X-ray imaging and to provide yet another new and complementary tool to characterize response of Earth’s magnetosphere to solar wind condition. A field of view will cover 5 Re x 5 Re, a image resolution of <5 arcmin will correspond to <0.1 Re and a grasp of >10 cm(2) deg(2) at 0.6 keV will allow high sensitivity detection of time variable X-ray emission with the time resolution of <1 hr for bright X-ray events. In this presentation, we will present concept and status of the GEO-X mission.

  20. Soft x-ray imager onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ozaki, Masayuki; Natsukari, Chikara; Tomida, Hiroshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Yamauchi, Makoto; Hatsukade, Isamu; Bamba, Aya

    2013-09-01

    The Soft X-ray Imager, SXI, is an X-ray CCD camera onboard the ASTRO-H satellite to be launched in 2015. ASTRO-H will carry two types of soft X-ray detector. The X-ray calorimeter, SXS, has an excellent energy resolution with a narrow field of view while the SXI has a medium energy resolution with a large field of view, 38' square. We employ 4 CCDs of P-channel type with a depletion layer of 200 μm. Having passed the CDR, we assemble the FM so that we can join the final assembly. We present here the SXI status and its expected performance in orbit.

  1. In situ X-ray-based imaging of nano materials

    DOE PAGES

    Weker, Johanna Nelson; Huang, Xiaojing; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-02-13

    We study functional nanomaterials that are heterogeneous and understanding their behavior during synthesis and operation requires high resolution diagnostic imaging tools that can be used in situ. Over the past decade, huge progress has been made in the development of X-ray based imaging, including full field and scanning microscopy and their analogs in coherent diffractive imaging. Currently, spatial resolution of about 10 nm and time resolution of sub-seconds are achievable. For catalysis, X-ray imaging allows tracking of particle chemistry under reaction conditions. In energy storage, in situ X-ray imaging of electrode particles is providing important insight into degradation processes. Recently,more » both spatial and temporal resolutions are improving to a few nm and milliseconds and these developments will open up unprecedented opportunities.« less

  2. Imaging cochlear soft tissue displacement with coherent x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Christoph; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-10-01

    At present, imaging of cochlear mechanics at mid-cochlear turns has not been accomplished. Although challenging, this appears possible with partially coherent hard x-rays. The present study shows results from stroboscopic x-ray imaging of a test object at audio frequencies. The vibration amplitudes were quantified. In a different set of experiments, an intact and calcified gerbil temporal bone was used to determine displacements of the reticular lamina, tectorial membrane, and Reissner’s membrane with the Lucas and Kanade video flow algorithm. The experiments validated high frequency x-ray imaging and imaging in a calcified cochlea. The present work is key for future imaging of cochlear micromechanics at a high spatial resolution.

  3. Segmentation and image navigation in digitized spine x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2000-06-01

    The National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-rays of the cervical and lumbar spines. Extensive health information has been collected on the subjects of these x-rays, but no information has been derived from the image contents themselves. We are researching algorithms to segment anatomy in these images and to derive from the segmented data measurements useful for indexing this image set for characteristics important to researchers in rheumatology, bone morphometry, and related areas. Active Shape Modeling is currently being investigated for use in location and boundary definition for the vertebrae in these images.

  4. Detecting X-rays with an optical imaging chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The different morphologies of photoelectron tracks and minimum ionizing tracks can be used for charged particle rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  5. Optical imaging chamber for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The differing morphologies of photoelectron tracks and high-energy charged particle tracks can be used for background rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  6. Detecting X-rays with an optical imaging chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1992-10-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The different morphologies of photoelectron tracks and minimum ionizing tracks can be used for charged particle rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  7. A hybrid X-ray imaging spectrometer for NeXT and the next generation X-ray satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuru, T. G.; Tanimori, T.; Bamba, A.; Imanishi, K.; Koyama, K.; Kubo, H.; Matsumoto, H.; Miuchi, K.; Nagayoshi, M.; Orito, R.; Takada, A.; Takagi, S.; Tsujimoto, M.; Ueno, M.; Tsunemi, H.; Hayashida, K.; Miyata, E.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new type of wide band X-ray imaging spectrometer as a focal plane detector of the super mirror onboard on future X-ray missions including post Astro-E2. This camera is realized by the hybrid of back illumination CCDs and a back supportless CCD for 0.05-10 keV band, and a Micro Pixel Gas Chamber detecting X-rays at 10-80 keV.

  8. High-Energy Diffraction-Enhanced X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Akio; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Tohoru; Yamazaki, Takanori; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2010-06-23

    In order to apply the diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) method for much wider variety of samples, we have developed the high-energy DEI system. The energy of X-ray was increased up to 70 keV to achieve high permeability for heavy elements. The diffraction of Si(440) was used to keep large field of view. Demonstrative observation of an electrical cable was performed using the X-ray emitted from the vertical wiggler. The obtained images visualized not only the core and ground wire made of copper but also the isolator and outer jacket made of polymer clearly. The comparison of images obtained by the DEI and the absorption-contrast imaging showed that the sensitivity of DEI is about 10 times higher than that of the absorption method for light elements, and 3 times for heavy elements.

  9. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; Sayre, D.

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  10. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; ...

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore » microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  11. Energy weighted x-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Georg; Zang, Andrea; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Kraus, Manuel; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, Andre; Wandner, Johannes; Weber, Thomas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Wong, Winnie S; Campbell, Michael; Meiser, Jan; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

    2014-10-06

    The dark-field image obtained in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide information about the objects' microstructures on a scale smaller than the pixel size even with low geometric magnification. In this publication we demonstrate that the dark-field image quality can be enhanced with an energy-resolving pixel detector. Energy-resolved x-ray dark-field images were acquired with a 16-energy-channel photon-counting pixel detector with a 1 mm thick CdTe sensor in a Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometer. A method for contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) enhancement is proposed and validated experimentally. In measurements, a CNR improvement by a factor of 1.14 was obtained. This is equivalent to a possible radiation dose reduction of 23%.

  12. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, F.; Astolfo, A.; Stampanoni, M.; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y.; Kaplan, F.; Margaritondo, G.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project. PMID:25723946

  13. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Albertin, F; Astolfo, A; Stampanoni, M; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y; Kaplan, F; Margaritondo, G

    2015-03-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page `reading'. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project.

  14. Dynamical diffraction imaging (topography) with X-ray synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Steiner, B. W.; Dobbyn, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    By contrast to electron microscopy, which yields information on the location of features in small regions of materials, X-ray diffraction imaging can portray minute deviations from perfect crystalline order over larger areas. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray optics technology uses a highly parallel incident beam to eliminate ambiguities in the interpretation of image details; scattering phenomena previously unobserved are now readily detected. Synchrotron diffraction imaging renders high-resolution, real-time, in situ observations of materials under pertinent environmental conditions possible.

  15. Transforming Our Understanding of the X-ray Universe: The Imaging X-ray Polarimeter Explorer (IXPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Matt, Giorgio; Marshall, Herman; ODell, Stephen L.; Pavlov, George; Ramsey, Brian; Romani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Accurate X-ray polarimetry can provide unique information on high-energy-astrophysical processes and sources. As there have been no meaningful X-ray polarization measurements of cosmic sources since our pioneering work in the 1970's, the time is ripe to explore this new parameter space in X-ray astronomy. To accomplish this requires a well-calibrated and well understood system that-particularly for an Explorer mission-has technical, cost, and schedule credibility. The system that we shall present satisfies these conditions, being based upon completely calibrated imaging- and polarization-sensitive detectors and proven X-ray-telescope technology.

  16. Large-area mercuric iodide x-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Partain, Larry D.; Pavlyuchkova, Raisa; Virshup, Gary F.; Zuck, Asaf; Melekhov, Leonid; Dagan, O.; Vilensky, Alexander I.; Gilboa, Haim

    2002-05-01

    Single crystals of mercuric iodide have been studied for many years for nuclear detectors. We have investigated the use of x-ray photoconductive polycrystalline mercuric iodide coatings on amorphous silicon flat panel thin film transistor (TFT) arrays as x-ray detectors for radiographic and fluoroscopic applications in medical imaging. The mercuric iodide coatings were vacuum deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD). This coating technology is capable of being scaled up to sizes required in common medical imaging applications. Coatings were deposited on 4 inches X 4 inches TFT arrays for imaging performance evaluation and also on conductive-coated glass substrates for measurements of x-ray sensitivity, dark current and image lag. The TFT arrays used included pixel pitch dimensions of both 100 and 139 microns. Coating thickness between 150 microns and 250 microns were tested in the 25 kVp-100 kVp x-ray energy range utilizing exposures typical for both fluoroscopic, and radiographic imaging. X-ray sensitivities measured for the mercuric iodide samples and coated TFT detectors were superior to any published results for competitive materials (up to 7100 ke/mR/pixel for 100 micron pixels). It is believed that this higher sensitivity, can result in fluoroscopic imaging signal levels high enough to overshadow electronic noise. Image lag characteristics appear adequate for fluoroscopic rates. Resolution tests on resolution target phantoms showed that resolution is limited to the Nyquist frequency for the 139 micron pixel detectors. The ability to operate at low voltages gives adequate dark currents for most applications and allows low voltage electronics designs. Mercuric Iodide coated TFT arrays were found to be outstanding candidates for direct digital radiographic detectors for both static and dynamic (fluoroscopic) applications. Their high x-ray sensitivity, high resolution, low dark current, low voltage operation, and good lag characteristics provide a unique

  17. XIPE: the x-ray imaging polarimetry explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffitta, P.; Bellazzini, R.; Bozzo, E.; Burwitz, V.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Costa, E.; Courvoisier, T.; Feng, H.; Gburek, S.; Goosmann, R.; Karas, V.; Matt, G.; Muleri, F.; Nandra, K.; Pearce, M.; Poutanen, J.; Reglero, V.; Sabau Maria, D.; Santangelo, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tenzer, C.; Vink, J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zane, S.; Agudo, I.; Antonelli, A.; Attina, P.; Baldini, L.; Bykov, A.; Carpentiero, R.; Cavazzuti, E.; Churazov, E.; Del Monte, E.; De Martino, D.; Donnarumma, I.; Doroshenko, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Ferreira, I.; Gallo, E.; Grosso, N.; Kaaret, P.; Kuulkers, E.; Laranaga, J.; Latronico, L.; Lumb, D. H.; Macian, J.; Malzac, J.; Marin, F.; Massaro, E.; Minuti, M.; Mundell, C.; Ness, J. U.; Oosterbroek, T.; Paltani, S.; Pareschi, G.; Perna, R.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pinazo, H. B.; Pinchera, M.; Rodriguez, J. P.; Roncadelli, M.; Santovincenzo, A.; Sazonov, S.; Sgro, C.; Spiga, D.; Svoboda, J.; Theobald, C.; Theodorou, T.; Turolla, R.; Wilhelmi de Ona, E.; Winter, B.; Akbar, A. M.; Allan, H.; Aloisio, R.; Altamirano, D.; Amati, L.; Amato, E.; Angelakis, E.; Arezu, J.; Atteia, J.-L.; Axelsson, M.; Bachetti, M.; Ballo, L.; Balman, S.; Bandiera, R.; Barcons, X.; Basso, S.; Baykal, A.; Becker, W.; Behar, E.; Beheshtipour, B.; Belmont, R.; Berger, E.; Bernardini, F.; Bianchi, S.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G.; Blasi, P.; Blay, P.; Bodaghee, A.; Boer, M.; Boettcher, M.; Bogdanov, S.; Bombaci, I.; Bonino, R.; Braga, J.; Brandt, W.; Brez, A.; Bucciantini, N.; Burderi, L.; Caiazzo, I.; Campana, R.

    2016-07-01

    XIPE, the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer, is a mission dedicated to X-ray Astronomy. At the time of writing XIPE is in a competitive phase A as fourth medium size mission of ESA (M4). It promises to reopen the polarimetry window in high energy Astrophysics after more than 4 decades thanks to a detector that efficiently exploits the photoelectric effect and to X-ray optics with large effective area. XIPE uniqueness is time-spectrally-spatially- resolved X-ray polarimetry as a breakthrough in high energy astrophysics and fundamental physics. Indeed the payload consists of three Gas Pixel Detectors at the focus of three X-ray optics with a total effective area larger than one XMM mirror but with a low weight. The payload is compatible with the fairing of the Vega launcher. XIPE is designed as an observatory for X-ray astronomers with 75 % of the time dedicated to a Guest Observer competitive program and it is organized as a consortium across Europe with main contributions from Italy, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, Poland, Sweden.

  18. The CZT X-ray Imager on AXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.; Neubert, T.

    2001-03-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: The X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20 cm × 40 cm CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  19. Analyser-based x-ray imaging for biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suortti, Pekka; Keyriläinen, Jani; Thomlinson, William

    2013-12-01

    Analyser-based imaging (ABI) is one of the several phase-contrast x-ray imaging techniques being pursued at synchrotron radiation facilities. With advancements in compact source technology, there is a possibility that ABI will become a clinical imaging modality. This paper presents the history of ABI as it has developed from its laboratory source to synchrotron imaging. The fundamental physics of phase-contrast imaging is presented both in a general sense and specifically for ABI. The technology is dependent on the use of perfect crystal monochromator optics. The theory of the x-ray optics is developed and presented in a way that will allow optimization of the imaging for specific biomedical systems. The advancement of analytical algorithms to produce separate images of the sample absorption, refraction angle map and small-angle x-ray scattering is detailed. Several detailed applications to biomedical imaging are presented to illustrate the broad range of systems and body sites studied preclinically to date: breast, cartilage and bone, soft tissue and organs. Ultimately, the application of ABI in clinical imaging will depend partly on the availability of compact sources with sufficient x-ray intensity comparable with that of the current synchrotron environment.

  20. The imaging of X-rays for magnetospheric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Voss, H. D.; Datlowe, D. W.

    An overview of the history, present status, and development prospects of X-ray imagers for magnetospheric investigations is presented. Early X-ray images, such as those obtained from 1979 to 1983, demonstrated the importance of narrow elongated arcs of energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone. They also characterized the spectral parameters and precipitation rates required for understanding source and loss mechanisms in the magnetosphere, but they were limited in FOV and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment, soon to be launched on a TIROS satellite, will make time-space mappings by scanning a 16-pixel pinhole camera. These data will distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating feature.

  1. Efficient x-ray image enhancement algorithm using image fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kuan; Wen, Yumei; Cai, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) plays an important role in image and signal processing fields, and it can extract information at different scales. Image fusion is a process of combining two or more images into an image, which extracts features from source images and provides more information than one image. The research presented in this article is aimed at the development of an automated imaging enhancement system in digital radiography (DR) images, which can clearly display all the defects in one image and don't bring blocking effect. In terms of characteristic of the collected radiographic signals, in the proposed scheme the subsection of signals is mapped to 0-255 gray scale to form several gray images and then these images are fused to form a new enhanced image. This article focuses on comparing the discriminating power of several multiresolution images decomposing methods using contrast pyramid, wavelet, and ridgelet respectively. The algorithms are extensively tested and the results are compared with standard image enhancement algorithms. Tests indicate that the fused images present a more detailed representation of the x-ray image. Detection, recognition, and search tasks may therefore benefit from this.

  2. Reconstruction method for x-ray imaging capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Daniel; Lifshitz, Ronen; Bar-Ilan, Omer; Weiss, Noam; Shapiro, Yoel; Kimchy, Yoav

    2017-03-01

    A colon imaging capsule has been developed by Check-Cap Ltd (C-Scan® Cap). For the procedure, the patient swallows a small amount of standard iodinated contrast agent. To create images, three rotating X-ray beams are emitted towards the colon wall. Part of the X-ray photons are backscattered from the contrast medium and the colon. These photons are collected by an omnidirectional array of energy discriminating photon counting detectors (CdTe/CZT) within the capsule. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Compton backscattering photons pertain different energies and are counted separately by the detection electronics. The current work examines a new statistical approach for the algorithm that reconstructs the lining of the colon wall from the X-ray detector readings. The algorithm performs numerical optimization for finding the solution to the inverse problem applied to a physical forward model, reflecting the behavior of the system. The forward model that was employed, accounts for the following major factors: the two mechanisms of dependence between the distance to the colon wall and the number photons, directional scatter distributions, and relative orientations between beams and detectors. A calibration procedure has been put in place to adjust the coefficients of the forward model for the specific capsule geometry, radiation source characteristics, and the detector response. The performance of the algorithm was examined in phantom experiments and demonstrated high correlation between actual phantom shape and x-ray image reconstruction. Evaluation is underway to assess the algorithm performance in clinical setting.

  3. Lensless imaging of nanoporous glass with soft X-rays

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Joshua J.; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; ...

    2013-06-01

    Coherent soft X-ray diffraction has been used to image nanoporous glass structure in two dimensions using different methods. The merit of the reconstructions was judged using a new method of Fourier phase correlation with a final, refined image. The porous structure was found to have a much larger average size then previously believed.

  4. Development of X-ray imaging microscopes for LMJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troussel, Philippe; Rosch, Rudolph; Reverdin, Charles; Soullié, Gérard; Boutin, Jean Yves; Marmoret, Rémy; Richard, André; Bridou, Francoise; Delmotte, Franck

    2010-11-01

    For the future Laser Megajoules French facility (LMJ), our laboratory develops time-resolved X-ray Imaging systems to diagnose laser produced plasma. In this presentation, we describe the design of these imagers which combine grazing X-ray microscope and camera. A first set of three imaging diagnostics will give basic measurements during all the life of the facility : two twelve-image microscopes focalize X-rays from the target on a framing camera. The third one produces an image on a streak camera. These microscopes also contain refractive lenses to extend the spectral range up to 15 keV. A second set of diagnostics will consist of advanced high resolution X-ray imaging systems. Imaging studies performed with a microscope composed of three concave toroidal mirrors are presented. This microscope, working at 0.6 degrees grazing incidence, has a focal length longer than 80 cm. About the imaging performances, we have achieved a spatial resolution of about 6 microns for the sagittal dimension and around 10 microns for the tangential dimension within a field of 1 mm. To increase the bandwidth of reflectivity of all these mirrors until 10 keV, multilayer coatings have been deposited.

  5. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  6. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; McBride, Steve; Turin, Paul; Glaser, David; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Delory, Gregory; Lin, R. P.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Terada, Yukikatsu; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Kokubun, Motohide; Saito, Shinya; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Masuda, Satoshi; Minoshima, Takashi; Shomojo, Masumi

    2009-08-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  7. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.; Tajima, H.

    2010-05-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  8. A New Display Format Relating Azimuth-Scanning Radar Data and All-Sky Images in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Seker, Ilgin; Mathews, John D.; Aponte, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Here we correlate features in a sequence of all-sky images of 630 nm airglow with the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of electron densities in the F region above Arecibo. Pairs of 180 azimuth scans (using the Gregorian and line feeds) of the two-beam incoherent scatter radar (ISR) have been plotted in cone pictorials of the line-of-sight electron densities. The plots include projections of the 630 nm airglow onto the ground using the same spatial scaling as for the ISR data. Selected sequential images from the night of 16-17 June 2004 correlate ionospheric plasma features with scales comparable to the ISR density-cone diameter. The entire set of over 100 images spanning about eight hours is available as a movie. The correlation between the airglow and the electron densities is not unexpected, but the new display format shows the 3-D structures better than separate 2-D plots in latitude and longitude for the airglow and in height and time for the electron densities. Furthermore, the animations help separate the bands of airglow from obscuring clouds and the star field.

  9. A New Display Format Relating Azimuth-Scanning Radar Data and All-Sky Images in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Seker, Ilgin; Mathews, John D.; Aponte, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Here we correlate features in a sequence of all-sky images of 630 nm airglow with the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of electron densities in the F region above Arecibo. Pairs of 180 azimuth scans (using the Gregorian and line feeds) of the two-beam incoherent scatter radar (ISR) have been plotted in cone pictorials of the line-of-sight electron densities. The plots include projections of the 630 nm airglow onto the ground using the same spatial scaling as for the ISR data. Selected sequential images from the night of 16-17 June 2004 correlate ionospheric plasma features with scales comparable to the ISR density-cone diameter. The entire set of over 100 images spanning about eight hours is available as a movie. The correlation between the airglow and the electron densities is not unexpected, but the new display format shows the 3-D structures better than separate 2-D plots in latitude and longitude for the airglow and in height and time for the electron densities. Furthermore, the animations help separate the bands of airglow from obscuring clouds and the star field.

  10. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  11. Cloud cover and solar disk state estimation using all-sky images: deep neural networks approach compared to routine methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinitskiy, Mikhail; Sinitsyn, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    Shortwave radiation is an important component of surface heat budget over sea and land. To estimate them accurate observations of cloud conditions are needed including total cloud cover, spatial and temporal cloud structure. While massively observed visually, for building accurate SW radiation parameterizations cloud structure needs also to be quantified using precise instrumental measurements. While there already exist several state of the art land-based cloud-cameras that satisfy researchers needs, their major disadvantages are associated with inaccuracy of all-sky images processing algorithms which typically result in the uncertainties of 2-4 octa of cloud cover estimates with the resulting true-scoring cloud cover accuracy of about 7%. Moreover, none of these algorithms determine cloud types. We developed an approach for cloud cover and structure estimating, which provides much more accurate estimates and also allows for measuring additional characteristics. This method is based on the synthetic controlling index, namely the "grayness rate index", that we introduced in 2014. Since then this index has already demonstrated high efficiency being used along with the technique namely the "background sunburn effect suppression", to detect thin clouds. This made it possible to significantly increase the accuracy of total cloud cover estimation in various sky image states using this extension of routine algorithm type. Errors for the cloud cover estimates significantly decreased down resulting the mean squared error of about 1.5 octa. Resulting true-scoring accuracy is more than 38%. The main source of this approach uncertainties is the solar disk state determination errors. While the deep neural networks approach lets us to estimate solar disk state with 94% accuracy, the final result of total cloud estimation still isn`t satisfying. To solve this problem completely we applied the set of machine learning algorithms to the problem of total cloud cover estimation

  12. Phase imaging using a polychromatic x-ray laboratory source.

    PubMed

    Arhatari, B D; Hannah, K; Balaur, E; Peele, A G

    2008-11-24

    We describe a quantitative phase imaging process using an x-ray laboratory-based source with an extremely broad bandwidth spectrum. The thickness of a homogeneous object can be retrieved by using separately spectrally weighted values for the attenuation coefficient and the decrement of the real part of the refractive index. This method is valid for a wide range of object types, including objects with an absorption edge in the used energy range. The accessibility of conventional x-ray laboratory sources makes this method very useful for quantitative phase retrieval of homogeneous objects. We demonstrate the application of this method for quantitative phase retrieval imaging in tomographic measurements.

  13. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E.J.; Huntington, C.M.; Trantham, M.R.; Keiter, P.A; Drake, R.P.; Montgomery, David; Benage, John F.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  14. XIPE The X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffitta, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    XIPE (the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer) is now in the study phase for ESA M4 down-selection in mid-2017. XIPE will be operated as a conventional X-ray observatory but providing polarimetry simultaneously to the usual imaging, temporal and spectral information. 75 % of the time will be available through a competitive Guest Observer Program This is made possible by its unique payload configuration consisting of three GPDs at the focus of three large, albeit low-weight, X-ray telescopes and fitting in the Vega launcher. In this talk I will review the major aspects involved with this kind of measurement, the scientific target, the mission and payload profile of XIPE.

  15. The Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian; O’Dell, Stephen; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Soffita, Paolo; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Kaspi, Victoria; Mulieri, Fabio; Marshall, Herman; Matt, Giorgio; Romani, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is an exciting international collaboration for a scientific mission that dramatically brings together the unique talents of the partners to expand observation space by simultaneously adding polarization measurements to the array of source properties currently measured (energy, time, and location). IXPE uniquely brings to the table polarimetric imaging. IXPE will thus open new dimensions for understanding how X-ray emission is produced in astrophysical objects, especially systems under extreme physical conditions-such as neutron stars and black holes. Polarization singularly probes physical anisotropies-ordered magnetic fields, aspheric matter distributions, or general relativistic coupling to black-hole spin-that are not otherwise measurable. Hence, IXPE complements all other investigations in high-energy astrophysics by adding important and relatively unexplored information to the parameter space for studying cosmic X-ray sources and processes, as well as for using extreme astrophysical environments as laboratories for fundamental physics.

  16. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  17. Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF [DIXI (Dilation x-ray imager) a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2012-07-19

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ~7 1018 neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for DIXI, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [1] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. Lastly, the measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  18. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging of Shuttle Insulating Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zhengwei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray radiation has been widely used for imaging applications since Rontgen first discovered X-rays over a century ago. Its large penetration depth makes it ideal for the nondestructive visualization of internal structure of materials or objects unobtainable otherwise. Currently widely used nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools-X-ray radiography and tomography are absorption-based, and work well in highly absorbing materials where density or composition variations due to internal structure or defects are high enough to be spatially distinguished in terms of absorption contrast. However, in many cases where materials such as insulating foam are light-weight, the conventional absorption-based X-ray methods for NDE become less effective. Indeed, the low-density shuttle insulating foam used for flight mission poses a great challenge to the standard NDE tools in that the absorption contrast arising from internal defects of such a low- density material is either weak or indistinguishable. In this presentation, the latest progress in phase contrast X-ray imaging of internal defects of insulating foam will be presented and discussed, demonstrating new opportunities to solve challenging issues involved in advanced materials development and processing for space exploration.

  19. Hierarchical multimodal tomographic x-ray imaging at a superbend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Mikuljan, G.; Jefimovs, K.; Trtik, P.; Vila-Comamala, J.; David, C.; Abela, R.

    2008-08-01

    Over the last decade, synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy has established itself as a fundamental tool for non-invasive, quantitative investigations of a broad variety of samples, with application ranging from space research and materials science to biology and medicine. Thanks to the brilliance of modern third generation sources, voxel sizes in the micrometer range are routinely achieved by the major X-ray microtomography devices around the world, while the isotropic 100 nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments. The beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experiments (TOMCAT) of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut, operates a multimodal endstation which offers tomographic capabilities in the micrometer range in absorption contrast - of course - as well as phase contrast imaging. Recently, the beamline has been equipped with a full field, hard X-rays microscope with a theoretical pixel size down to 30 nm and a field of view of 50 microns. The nanoscope performs well at X-ray energies between 8 and 12 keV, selected from the white beam of a 2.9 T superbend by a [Ru/C]100 fixed exit multilayer monochromator. In this work we illustrate the experimental setup dedicated to the nanoscope, in particular the ad-hoc designed X-ray optics needed to produce a homogeneous, square illumination of the sample imaging plane as well as the magnifying zone plate. Tomographic reconstructions at 60 nm voxel size will be shown and discussed.

  20. Hard x-ray imaging polarimeter for PolariS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Kim, Juyong; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Keigo; Gunji, Shuichi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Yoneyama, Tomokage; Ikeyama, Yuki; Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Hard X-ray imaging polarimeters are developed for the X-ray γ-ray polaeimtery satellite PolariS. The imaging polarimter is scattering type, in which anisotropy in the direction of Compton scattering is employed to measure the hard X-ray (10-80 keV) polarization, and is installed on the focal planes of hard X-ray telescopes. We have updated the design of the model so as to cover larger solid angles of scattering direction. We also examine the event selection algorithm to optimize the detection efficiency of recoiled electrons in plastic scintillators. We succeed in improving the efficiency by factor of about 3-4 from the previous algorithm and criteria for 18-30 keV incidence. For 23 keV X-ray incidence, the recoiled electron energy is about 1 keV. We measured the efficiency to detect recoiled electrons in this case, and found about half of the theoretical limit. The improvement in this efficiency directly leads to that in the detection efficiency. In other words, however, there is still a room for improvement. We examine various process in the detector, and estimate the major loss is primarily that of scintillation light in a plastic scintillator pillar with a very small cross section (2.68mm squared) and a long length (40mm). Nevertheless, the current model provides the MDP of 6% for 10mCrab sources, which are the targets of PolariS.

  1. THCOBRA X-ray imaging detector operating in pure Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Silva, A. L. M.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Fortes, I.; Monteiro, S. G.; Sousa, S.; Ribeiro, F. M.; De Francesco, S.; Covita, D. S.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2017-05-01

    MicroPattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) have been explored for X-ray imaging, namely for photon counting imaging which allows the improvement of image quality and the collection of more information than the conventional commercial systems. A 2D-THCOBRA based detector was developed, studied and used to acquire X-ray transmission images. The 2D-THCOBRA structure used has an active area of 2.8 × 2.8 cm2 and allows obtaining the position and energy information of each single photon that interacts with the detector. It is filled with pure Kr at 1 bar operating in a sealed mode. Within this work the performance of the detector is evaluated in terms of charge gain, count rate, time stability, energy and spatial resolutions. The detector presents a charge gain of 2 × 104 and an energy resolution of 23% for 5.9 keV, showing gain stability along time for a count rate of about 1 × 105 Hz/mm2. It presents a spatial resolution of 600 μm (σ = 255 μm) and 500 μm (σ = 213 μm) for x and y directions, respectively, and, considering energy bins about 650 μm (σ = 277 μm) for approximately 16.5 keV. X-ray transmission images of some samples presented here show good prospects for X-ray imaging applications.

  2. Detecting X-ray Emission from Cometary Atmospheres Using the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Bodewits, D; Porter, F S; Ezoe, Y; Hamaguchi, K; Hanya, M; Itoh, M; Kilbourne, C A; Kohmura, T; Maeda, Y; Negoro, H; Tsuboi, Y; Tsunemi, H; Urata, Y

    2009-11-16

    The Suzaku X-ray imaging spectrometer has been used to observe the X-ray emission from comets 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C and 8P/Tuttle. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C was observed during May and June of 2006, while it was near perihelion and passed within 0.1 AU of the Earth. Comet 8P/Tuttle was observed during January of 2008 when it was at its closest approach to the Earth at 0.25 AU, and again near perihelion at a distance of 0.5 Au from Earth. In the case of comet 73P/Schwassmann Wachmann 3C, the XIS spectra show line emission from highly charged oxygen and carbon ions as well as emission from what is most likely L-shell transitions from Mg, Si, and S ions. This line emission is caused by charge exchange recombination between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals, and can be used as a diagnostic of the solar wind. Here we present some of the results of the observation of the comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C.

  3. X-Ray Detector for Digital Fluoroscopy and Digital Radiography in Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Keiichi

    Recently digital X-ray detectors are developed for medical imaging. By comparison with the structure of X-ray image intensifier system and X-ray flat panel detector (FPD), the dynamic of digital images is more superior and would result in enhanced diagnosis. Moreover the difference from the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of X-ray image intensifier and FPD is shown as the significant index of X-ray image quality.

  4. Comparative studies of X-ray images and fluorescence images of the same specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, T.; Tomie, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2003-03-01

    A flash contact soft x-ray microscope using laser-induced plasma as a flash x-ray source is a practical instrument for observation of living organisms in water [1-4]. As previously reported we developed a tabletop flash contact soft x-ray microscope System [3]. In this System, x-ray images are given as whole projection of the specimens on the PMMA membrane. This causes us some complexity for understanding the x-ray images. It is necessary to attribute features in the x-ray images to sub-cellular structures of the specimen. For this purpose we have developed a new sample holder, where specimens are observable with a fluorescence microscope just before x-ray exposure. Fluorescence images of onion epidermal cells stained by DAPI and x-ray images of the same specimens are compared.

  5. X-ray phase contrast imaging at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Kube, G.; Kunz, P.; Sharafutdinov, A.; Weber, T.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments have been performed to explore the potential of the low emittance 855MeV electron beam of the Mainz Microtron MAMI for imaging with coherent X-rays. Transition radiation from a micro-focused electron beam traversing a foil stack served as X-ray source with good transverse coherence. Refraction contrast radiographs of low absorbing materials, in particular polymer strings with diameters between 30 and 450μm, were taken with a polychromatic transition radiation X-ray source with a spectral distribution in the energy range between 8 and about 40keV. The electron beam spot size had standard deviation σh = (8.6±0.1)μm in the horizontal and σv = (7.5±0.1)μm in the vertical direction. X-ray films were used as detectors. The source-to-detector distance amounted to 11.4m. The objects were placed in a distance of up to 6m from the X-ray film. Holograms of strings were taken with a beam spot size σv = (0.50±0.05)μm in vertical direction, and a monochromatic X-ray beam of 6keV energy. A good longitudinal coherence has been obtained by the (111) reflection of a flat silicon single crystal in Bragg geometry. It has been demonstrated that a direct exposure CCD chip with a pixel size of 13×13μm^2 provides a highly efficient on-line detector. Contrast images can easily be generated with a complete elimination of all parasitic background. The on-line capability allows a minimization of the beam spot size by observing the smallest visible interference fringe spacings or the number of visible fringes. It has been demonstrated that X-ray films are also very useful detectors. The main advantage in comparison with the direct exposure CCD chip is the resolution. For the Structurix D3 (Agfa) X-ray film the standard deviation of the resolution was measured to be σf = (1.2±0.4)μm, which is about a factor of 6 better than for the direct exposure CCD chip. With the small effective X-ray spot size in vertical direction of σv = (1.2±0.3)μm and a geometrical

  6. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  7. Probe reconstruction for holographic X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Johannes; Robisch, Anna-Lena; Osterhoff, Markus; Salditt, Tim

    2017-01-01

    In X-ray holographic near-field imaging the resolution and image quality depend sensitively on the beam. Artifacts are often encountered due to the strong focusing required to reach high resolution. Here, two schemes for reconstructing the complex-valued and extended wavefront of X-ray nano-probes, primarily in the planes relevant for imaging (i.e. focus, sample and detection plane), are presented and compared. Firstly, near-field ptychography is used, based on scanning a test pattern laterally as well as longitudinally along the optical axis. Secondly, any test pattern is dispensed of and the wavefront reconstructed only from data recorded for different longitudinal translations of the detector. For this purpose, an optimized multi-plane projection algorithm is presented, which can cope with the numerically very challenging setting of a divergent wavefront emanating from a hard X-ray nanoprobe. The results of both schemes are in very good agreement. The probe retrieval can be used as a tool for optics alignment, in particular at X-ray nanoprobe beamlines. Combining probe retrieval and object reconstruction is also shown to improve the image quality of holographic near-field imaging. PMID:28244446

  8. Dose optimization in pediatric cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, Amber J.; Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore x-ray beam parameters with intent to optimize pediatric x-ray settings in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp) and of copper (Cu) x-ray beam filtration independently on the image quality to dose balance for pediatric patient sizes. The impact of antiscatter grid removal on the image quality to dose balance was also investigated. Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate phantoms approximating chest sizes typical of pediatric patients were captured using a modern flat-panel receptor based x-ray imaging system. Tin was used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium used in clinical procedures. Measurements of tin detail contrast and flat field image noise provided the contrast to noise ratio. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose (E) measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose, which evaluated the dose efficiency of the x-ray parameters investigated. The kVp, tube current (mA), and pulse duration were set manually by overriding the system's automatic dose control mechanisms. Images were captured with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm added Cu filtration, for 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 kVp with the antiscatter grid in place, and then with it removed. Results: For a given phantom thickness, as the Cu filter thickness was increased, lower kVp was favored. Examining kVp alone, lower values were generally favored, more so for thinner phantoms. Considering ESD, the 8.5 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration. The 12 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.9 mm Cu, and the 16 cm phantom had highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.4 mm Cu. With regard to E, the 8.5 and 12 cm phantoms had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration, and the 16 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.25 mm Cu. Antiscatter grid removal improved the FOM for a given set of x-ray

  9. Hard X-ray Imaging Polarimeter for PolariS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We present the current status of development of hard X-ray imaging polarimeters for the small satellite mission PolariS. The primary aim of PolariS is hard X-ray (10-80keV) polarimetry of sources brighter than 10mCrab. Its targets include stellar black holes, neutron stars, super nova remnants, and active galactic nuclei. This aim is enabled with three sets of hard X-ray telescopes and imaging polarimeters installed on their focal planes. The imaging polarimeter consists of two kinds of (plastic and GSO) scintillator pillars and multi-anode photo multiplier tubes (MAPMTs). When an X-ray photon incident to a plastic scintillator cause a Compton scattering, a recoiled electron makes a signal on the corresponding MAPMT pixel, and a scatted X-rays absorbed in surrounding GSO makes another signal. This provide information on the incident position and the scattered direction. The latter information is employed for polarimetry. For 20keV X-ray incidence, the recoiled electron energy is as low as 1keV. Thus, the performance of this imaging polarimeter is primarily determined by the efficiency that we can detect low level signal of recoiled electrons generated in plastic scintillators. The efficiency could depend on multiple factors, e.g. quenching of light in scintillators, electric noise, pedestal error, cross talk of the lights to adjacent MAPMT pixels, MAPMT dark current etc. In this paper, we examined these process experimentally and optimize the event selection algorithm, in which single photo-electron events are selected. We then performed an X-ray (10-80keV monochromatic polarized beam) irradiation test at a synchrotron facility. The modulation contrast (M) is about 60% in 15-80keV range. We succeeded in detecting recoiled electrons for 10-80keV X-ray incidence, though detection efficiency is lower at lowest end of the energy range. Expected MDP will also be shown.

  10. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  11. Cloud Screening and Quality Control Algorithm for Star Photometer Data: Assessment with Lidar Measurements and with All-sky Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Navas-Guzman, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, delta Ae(lambda), and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of delta Ae() and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable Ae(lambda) and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  12. Imaging X-ray spectrophotometric observation of SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vartanian, M. H.; Lum, K. S. K.; Ku, W. H.-M.

    1985-01-01

    An imaging gas scintillation proportional counter (IGSPC) at the focal plane of a grazing incidence telescope was carried aloft by a sounding rocket and used to observe soft X-ray emission from the supernova remnant SN 1006. The instrument obtained the first unambiguous detection of strong (8 + or 0.0-2 photons/sq cm s) oxygen He-alpha and Ly-alpha emission at 0.59 + or - 0.02 keV from SN 1006. This line emission is consistent with emission from a 1.8 x 10 to the 6th K plasma, although hard X-ray emission from an additional power law or a higher temperature component was also observed. The X-ray emission may be interpreted as due to either (1) a combination of blast-wave and reverse shock assuming equilibrium ionization in the plasma or (2) blast-wave emission alone with a significant degree of ionization disequilibrium.

  13. Lab-based x-ray nanoCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Allner, Sebastian; Ferstl, Simone; Dierolf, Martin; Tuohimaa, Tomi; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Due to the recent development of transmission X-ray tubes with very small focal spot sizes, laboratory-based CT imaging with sub-micron resolutions is nowadays possible. We recently developed a novel X-ray nanoCT setup featuring a prototype nanofocus X-ray source and a single-photon counting detector. The system is based on mere geometrical magnification and can reach resolutions of 200 nm. To demonstrate the potential of the nanoCT system for biomedical applications we show high resolution nanoCT data of a small piece of human tooth comprising coronal dentin. The reconstructed CT data clearly visualize the dentin tubules within the tooth piece.

  14. Imaging X-ray spectrophotometric observation of SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vartanian, M. H.; Lum, K. S. K.; Ku, W. H.-M.

    1985-01-01

    An imaging gas scintillation proportional counter (IGSPC) at the focal plane of a grazing incidence telescope was carried aloft by a sounding rocket and used to observe soft X-ray emission from the supernova remnant SN 1006. The instrument obtained the first unambiguous detection of strong (8 + or 0.0-2 photons/sq cm s) oxygen He-alpha and Ly-alpha emission at 0.59 + or - 0.02 keV from SN 1006. This line emission is consistent with emission from a 1.8 x 10 to the 6th K plasma, although hard X-ray emission from an additional power law or a higher temperature component was also observed. The X-ray emission may be interpreted as due to either (1) a combination of blast-wave and reverse shock assuming equilibrium ionization in the plasma or (2) blast-wave emission alone with a significant degree of ionization disequilibrium.

  15. The hard x-ray imager onboard IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Limousin, Olivier; Kokubun, Motohide; Watanabe, Shin; Laurent, Philippe; Arnaud, Monique; Tajima, Hiroyasu

    2010-07-01

    The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) is one of the instruments onboard International X-ray Observatory (IXO), to be launched into orbit in 2020s. It covers the energy band of 10-40 keV, providing imaging-spectroscopy with a field of view of 8 x 8 arcmin2. The HXI is attached beneath the Wide Field Imager (WFI) covering 0.1-15 keV. Combined with the super-mirror coating on the mirror assembly, this configuration provides observation of X-ray source in wide energy band (0.1-40.0 keV) simultaneously, which is especially important for varying sources. The HXI sensor part consists of the semiconductor imaging spectrometer, using Si in the medium energy detector and CdTe in the high energy detector as its material, and an active shield covering its back to reduce background in orbit. The HXI technology is based on those of the Japanese-lead new generation X-ray observatory ASTRO-H, and partly from those developed for Simbol-X. Therefore, the technological development is in good progress. In the IXO mission, HXI will provide a major assets to identify the nature of the object by penetrating into thick absorbing materials and determined the inherent spectral shape in the energy band well above the structure around Fe-K lines and edges.

  16. Monochromatic X-ray imaging using a combination of doubly curved crystal and polycapillary X-ray lens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C A

    2015-01-01

    A monochromatic X-ray imaging setup based on a combination of a doubly curved crystal and a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens was designed. In this setup, the bent crystal optic was used not only to monochromatize but also to focus the divergent X-ray beam from a conventional X-ray source to form a monochromatic X-ray focal spot with a size of 426 × 467 μm2 at 17.5 keV. The beam expanding from this focal point was focused by the polycapillary optic to obtain a focal spot which was then used as the monochromatic X-ray imaging virtual source. The output focal spot size of the focusing polycapillary optic at 17.5 keV was 97 μm. Compared with the beam expansion after the focal spot of the bent crystal optic, the beam expansion after the focal spot of the focusing polycapillary optic was relatively large. This was helpful for magnifying the X-ray image of the sample. The focused beam was helpful to decrease the exposure time for imaging small samples.

  17. A High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Devicm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Dallas, William J.; Ovitt, Theron W.; Lamoreaux, Richard D.; Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes a high resolution x-ray imaging device, which is under development at the University of Arizona. It is sponsored by NIH for application in coronary angiography, but has also application in other x-ray imaging fields requi ing high spatial resolution, such as mammography and nondestructive tasting. It consists of a 6" diameter external modular sensor, coupled fiber optically to the input of a 6" proximity focussed image intensifier. The intensifier's output is coupled via 6 fiber optic tapers to 6 CCD's for readout. The tapers are joined at the large end to form a 6" by 6" coplanar fiber optic taper assembly. The electronics is designed to form a composite image out of the 6 individual images provided by the 6 CCD's and display the image in full resolution (1152 x 1152) on a high resolution physicians review console. The paper discusses the design considerations, the features, the major problems and some preliminary results.

  18. Imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X rays using a laboratory X-ray charge-coupled-device system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, Gerard A.; Doty, John P.; Ricker, George R.; Vallerga, John V.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a laboratory instrument for imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X-rays (300 eV to 10 keV) utilizing a virtual-phase CCD. This instrument has achieved a spatial resolution of 22 microns (limited by pixel size) with an overall array area of 584 x 390 pixels. It has achieved an energy resolution of about 140 eV FWHM for single-pixel Fe-55 X-ray events (5.9 keV) with the CCD operated at -30 C. The CCD has been operated in photon-counting mode at room temperature, and X-ray spectra with an energy resolution of about 450 eV at 5.9 keV have been obtained. The low energy X-ray sensitivity of the CCD also has been demonstrated by detecting carbon K-alpha X-rays (277eV).

  19. The Focusing Optics X-Ray Solar Imager: FOXSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krucker, Saem; Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Turin, Paul; Lin, R. P.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray (HXR) focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of an indirect imaging system, the derived images have a low dynamic range (typically <10) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the particle acceleration processes which occur there. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding impulsive energy release on the Sun. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro-H team at JAXA/ISAS has provided double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI is a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  20. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...high spatial coherence, such as synchrotrons 46, microfocus x - ray tubes 7, or laser plasma x - ray sources 8,9are employed is the phase contrast component...imaging apparatus to determine the deflection of the bead as a function of acoustic pressure. The x - rays , generated by a microfocus x - ray tube

  1. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  2. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Daiji; Tokuoka, Atsushi; Katori, Megumi; Minamiyama, Yasuto; Yamashita, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2012-07-31

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  3. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  4. Enhancing resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Do Young; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong

    2016-12-01

    Achieving a resolution near 1 nm is a critical issue in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) for applications in materials and biology. Albeit with various advantages of CDI based on synchrotrons and newly developed x-ray free electron lasers, its applications would be limited without improving resolution well below 10 nm. Here, we review the issues and efforts in improving CDI resolution including various methods for resolution determination. Enhancing diffraction signal at large diffraction angles, with the aid of interference between neighboring strong scatterers or templates, is reviewed and discussed in terms of increasing signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we discuss errors in image reconstruction algorithms—caused by the discreteness of the Fourier transformations involved—which degrade the spatial resolution, and suggest ways to correct them. We expect this review to be useful for applications of CDI in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  5. Theory of Angular Dispersive Imaging Hard X-ray Spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Shvyd'ko, Yury

    2015-05-13

    A spectrograph is an optical instrument that disperses photons of different energies into distinct directions and space locations and that images photon spectra on a position-sensitive detector. Spectrographs consist of collimating, angular dispersive, and focusing optical elements. Bragg reflecting crystals arranged in an asymmetric scattering geometry can be used as the dispersing elements in the hard-x-ray regime. A ray-transfer matrix technique is applied to propagate x-rays through the optical elements. Several optical designs of hard-x-ray spectrographs are proposed and their performance is analyzed. Spectrographs with an energy resolution of 0.1 meV and a spectral window of imaging up to a few tens of meVs are shown to be feasible for inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy applications. In another example, a spectrograph with a 1-meV spectral resolution and 85-meV spectral window of imaging is considered for Cu K-edge resonant IXS.

  6. Hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy of FOXSI microflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven; Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Juan; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Foster, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The ability to investigate particle acceleration and hot thermal plasma in solar flares relies on hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy using bremsstrahlung emission from high-energy electrons. Direct focusing of hard X-rays (HXRs) offers the ability to perform cleaner imaging spectroscopy of this emission than has previously been possible. Using direct focusing, spectra for different sources within the same field of view can be obtained easily since each detector segment (pixel or strip) measures the energy of each photon interacting within that segment. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload has successfully completed two flights, observing microflares each time. Flare images demonstrate an instrument imaging dynamic range far superior to the indirect methods of previous instruments like the RHESSI spacecraft.In this work, we present imaging spectroscopy of microflares observed by FOXSI in its two flights. Imaging spectroscopy performed on raw FOXSI images reveals the temperature structure of flaring loops, while more advanced techniques such as deconvolution of the point spread function produce even more detailed images.

  7. X-RAY IMAGING Achieving the third dimension using coherence

    DOE PAGES

    Robinson, Ian; Huang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-25

    X-ray imaging is extensively used in medical and materials science. Traditionally, the depth dimension is obtained by turning the sample to gain different views. The famous penetrating properties of X-rays mean that projection views of the subject sample can be readily obtained in the linear absorption regime. 180 degrees of projections can then be combined using computed tomography (CT) methods to obtain a full 3D image, a technique extensively used in medical imaging. In the work now presented in Nature Materials, Stephan Hruszkewycz and colleagues have demonstrated genuine 3D imaging by a new method called 3D Bragg projection ptychography1. Ourmore » approach combines the 'side view' capability of using Bragg diffraction from a crystalline sample with the coherence capabilities of ptychography. Thus, it results in a 3D image from a 2D raster scan of a coherent beam across a sample that does not have to be rotated.« less

  8. Some ideas on the advantages of soft x-rays as imaging particles

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.

    1988-07-01

    This paper discusses uses of soft x-rays as imaging particles. Particular topics discussed are: Soft x-ray as a biological probe; overview of x-ray microscope techniques; analysis of the usefulness of x-rays in imaging and microanalysis; and physical radiation damage. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Multilayer Coated X-Ray Optics for the Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Dwight C.

    1996-01-01

    Hoover et. al. built and tested two imaging Schwarzschild multilayer microscopes. These instruments were constructed as prototypes for the "Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope," which is a doubly reflecting, multilayer x-ray microscope configured to operate within the "water window." The "water window" is the narrow region of the x-ray spectrum between the K absorption edges of oxygen (lamda = 23.3 Angstroms) and of carbon (lamda = 43.62 Angstroms), where water is relatively highly transmissive and carbon is highly absorptive. This property of these materials, thus permits the use of high resolution multilayer x-ray microscopes for producing high contrast images of carbon-based structures within the aqueous physiological environments of living cells. We report the design, fabrication and testing of multilayer optics that operate in this regime.

  10. Evidence for beamed electrons in a limb X-ray flare observed by Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, Eberhard; Elwert, Gerhard

    1986-01-01

    The limb flare of November 18, 1980, 14:51 UT, was investigated on the basis of X-ray images taken by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) and of X-ray spectra from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The impulsive burst was also recorded at microwave frequencies between 2 and 20 GHz whereas no optical flare and no radio event at frequencies below 1 GHz were reported. The flare occurred directly at the SW limb of the solar disk. Taking advantage of the spatial resolution of HXIS images, the time evolution of the X-radiation originating from relatively small source regions can be studied. Using Monte Carlo computations of the energy distribution of energetic electrons traversing the solar plasma, the bremsstrahlung spectra produced by the electrons were derived.

  11. Fast X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai

    2014-06-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with X-ray. However, challenges remain in dynamic XLCT imaging, where short scan time, good spatial resolution, and whole-body field of view should be considered simultaneously. In this paper, by the use of a single-view XLCT reconstruction method based on a compressive sensing (CS) technique, incorporating a cone beam XLCT imaging system, we implement fast 3-D XLCT imaging. To evaluate the performance of the method, two types of phantom experiments were performed based on a cone beam XLCT imaging system. In Case 1, one tube filled with the X-ray-excitable nanophosphor (Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+)) was immerged in different positions in the phantom to evaluate the effect of the source position on single-view XLCT reconstruction accuracy. In Case 2, two tubes filled with Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+) were immerged in different heights in the phantom to evaluate the whole-body imaging performance of single-view XLCT reconstruction. The experimental results indicated that the tubes used in previous phantom experiments can be resolved from single-view XCLT reconstruction images. The location error is less than 1.2 mm. In addition, since only one view data are needed to implement 3-D XLCT imaging, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced (∼1 frame/s) compared with previous XLCT systems. Hence, the technique is suited for imaging the fast distribution of the X-ray-excitable nanophosphors within a biological object.

  12. Flexible digital x-ray technology for far-forward remote diagnostic and conformal x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joseph; Marrs, Michael; Strnad, Mark; Apte, Raj B.; Bert, Julie; Allee, David; Colaneri, Nicholas; Forsythe, Eric; Morton, David

    2013-05-01

    Today's flat panel digital x-ray image sensors, which have been in production since the mid-1990s, are produced exclusively on glass substrates. While acceptable for use in a hospital or doctor's office, conventional glass substrate digital x-ray sensors are too fragile for use outside these controlled environments without extensive reinforcement. Reinforcement, however, significantly increases weight, bulk, and cost, making them impractical for far-forward remote diagnostic applications, which demand rugged and lightweight x-ray detectors. Additionally, glass substrate x-ray detectors are inherently rigid. This limits their use in curved or bendable, conformal x-ray imaging applications such as the non-destructive testing (NDT) of oil pipelines. However, by extending low-temperature thin-film transistor (TFT) technology previously demonstrated on plastic substrate- based electrophoretic and organic light emitting diode (OLED) flexible displays, it is now possible to manufacture durable, lightweight, as well as flexible digital x-ray detectors. In this paper, we discuss the principal technical approaches used to apply flexible display technology to two new large-area flexible digital x-ray sensors for defense, security, and industrial applications and demonstrate their imaging capabilities. Our results include a 4.8″ diagonal, 353 x 463 resolution, flexible digital x-ray detector, fabricated on a 6″ polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) plastic substrate; and a larger, 7.9″ diagonal, 720 x 640 resolution, flexible digital x-ray detector also fabricated on PEN and manufactured on a gen 2 (370 x 470 mm) substrate.

  13. Phase Effects on Mesoscale Object X-ray Absorption Images

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Jr., H E; Aufderheide, M B; Barty, A; Lehman, S K; Kozioziemski, B J; Schneberk, D J

    2004-09-24

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory particular emphasis is being placed on the nondestructive characterization (NDC) of 'mesoscale' objects.[Martz and Albrecht 2003] We define mesoscale objects as objects that have mm extent with {micro}m features. Here we confine our discussions to x-ray imaging methods applicable to mesoscale object characterization. The goal is object recovery algorithms including phase to enable emerging high-spatial resolution x-ray imaging methods to ''see'' inside or image mesoscale-size materials and objects. To be successful our imaging characterization effort must be able to recover the object function to one micrometer or better spatial resolution over a few millimeters field-of-view with very high contrast.

  14. Incoherent Diffractive Imaging via Intensity Correlations of Hard X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Anton; Ayyer, Kartik; Chapman, Henry N.; Röhlsberger, Ralf; von Zanthier, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Established x-ray diffraction methods allow for high-resolution structure determination of crystals, crystallized protein structures, or even single molecules. While these techniques rely on coherent scattering, incoherent processes like fluorescence emission—often the predominant scattering mechanism—are generally considered detrimental for imaging applications. Here, we show that intensity correlations of incoherently scattered x-ray radiation can be used to image the full 3D arrangement of the scattering atoms with significantly higher resolution compared to conventional coherent diffraction imaging and crystallography, including additional three-dimensional information in Fourier space for a single sample orientation. We present a number of properties of incoherent diffractive imaging that are conceptually superior to those of coherent methods.

  15. Biomedical spectral x-ray imaging: promises and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Eaker, Diane R.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2011-10-01

    Imaging arrays with sub-millimeter detector pixels that count and allocate energy to each detected photon are now being introduced into biomedical computed tomography scanners. Consequently, bremsstrahlung x-ray can provide the advantages of simultaneous recording of multiple quasi-monochromatic x-ray images which can be used for identification of various materials within the image field. This capability increases the inherent contrast within biomedical CT images and also introduces the ability to use high atomic weight "foreign" elements (e.g., strontium) which are surrogates for "native" biological elements (e.g., calcium) to monitor tissue function (e.g., bone deposition). Challenges for this methodology include limited maximum fluence due to photon pile-up, charge-sharing between contiguous pixels and heterogeneous pixel characteristics due to manufacturing difficulties.

  16. Segmentation of x-ray images using Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thai, T.Q.

    1991-01-01

    Segmentation is a process of separating objects of interest from their background or from other objects in an image. Without a suitable segmentation scheme, it is very difficult to detect contraband in X-rays images. In this paper, a Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling (PRL) segmentation scheme is presented and compared with other segmentation methods. PRL segmentation is an interative algorithm that labels each pixel in an image by cooperative use of two information sources: the pixel probability and the degree of certainty of its probability supported by the neighboring pixels. The practical implementation and results of the PRL segmentation on X-ray baggage images are also discussed and compared with other segmentation methods. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  17. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

  18. R&D 100, 2016: Ultrafast X-ray Imager

    ScienceCinema

    Porter, John; Claus, Liam; Sanchez, Marcos; Robertson, Gideon; Riley, Nathan; Rochau, Greg

    2016-12-09

    The Ultrafast X-ray Imager is a solid-state camera capable of capturing a sequence of images with user-selectable exposure times as short as 2 billionths of a second. Using 3D semiconductor integration techniques to form a hybrid chip, this camera was developed to enable scientists to study the heating and compression of fusion targets in the quest to harness the energy process that powers the stars.

  19. Hard x ray imaging graphics development and literature search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1991-01-01

    This report presents work performed between June 1990 and June 1991 and has the following objectives: (1) a comprehensive literature search of imaging technology and coded aperture imaging as well as relevant topics relating to solar flares; (2) an analysis of random number generators; and (3) programming simulation models of hard x ray telescopes. All programs are compatible with NASA/MSFC Space Science LAboratory VAX Cluster and are written in VAX FORTRAN and VAX IDL (Interactive Data Language).

  20. R&D 100, 2016: Ultrafast X-ray Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, John; Claus, Liam; Sanchez, Marcos; Robertson, Gideon; Riley, Nathan; Rochau, Greg

    2016-11-07

    The Ultrafast X-ray Imager is a solid-state camera capable of capturing a sequence of images with user-selectable exposure times as short as 2 billionths of a second. Using 3D semiconductor integration techniques to form a hybrid chip, this camera was developed to enable scientists to study the heating and compression of fusion targets in the quest to harness the energy process that powers the stars.

  1. Thermospheric wind and temperature fields observed using two ground based all-sky imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometers in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M.; Bristow, W. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Kosch, M. J.; Ishii, M.; Paxton, L. J.; Davies, T.

    2016-12-01

    During the austral summer of 2015-2016 two new all-sky imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometers were installed in Antarctica to measure wind and temperature fields in the lower and middle thermosphere, at heights spanning a range from approximately 110 to 240 km altitude. The instruments are located at McMurdo and South Pole stations, both of which are typically near the equatorward edge of the polar cap under quiet to moderate levels of activity. Automated nightly observations began in March (McMurdo) and April (South Pole) of 2016. The instruments record Doppler spectra of the thermospheric oxygen 558 nm green line and 630 nm red line emissions. They view the sky down to around 70 degrees zenith angle, with this field being divided in software into 115 sub-regions, each of which gives an independent measure of Doppler temperature and line-of-sight wind. Typical integration times are one to several minutes. Here we will present an overview of the results obtained during this first season, including both climatological averages and examples of data from individual days. The overall behavior is generally as expected, with winds blowing approximately antisunward at all local times. However substantial local perturbations about this mean flow occur frequently, and are seen to be collocated with regions of strong ion convection observed by the SuperDARN radar network, and with regions of bright aurora, as observed by the Fabry-Perot instruments themselves, and by the SSUSI instruments aboard the DMSP F16 to F18 satellites. F-region neutral temperatures recorded on most days are spatially uniform and slowly varying in time. However very significant spatial and temporal temperature variations are observed during times of geomagnetic disturbance. Wave activity is also very a very common feature of the observed wind fields. These results are morphologically quite different to the behavior seen by similar instruments located in the northern hemisphere auroral zone. Reasons for

  2. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  3. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere, a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth Moon L1 point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and direction

  4. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm2 CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R2 > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a small animal

  5. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  6. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  7. The relationship between the size of x-ray focal spot and image geometry definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejian; Qin, Xulei; Li, Ye; Liu, Yanyang

    2016-11-01

    In order to improve the performance of X ray geometric imaging, the key factors of size and image of X ray focus and geometric clarity as well as imaging quality of real time imaging system were studied by using software simulation. Analyze the reasons and factors that affecting the X - ray focus size and blurred image, evaluated the performance of X ray geometric imaging through the relationship between the relationship of X-ray focus size and image geometric definition. It provides a low cost and high efficiency solution for the selection of X-ray tube in the system design.

  8. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Imaging: Towards its Interdisciplinary Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottler, C.; Revol, V.; Kaufmann, R.; Urban, C.; Knop, K.; Sennhauser, U.; Jerjen, I.; Lüthi, T.; Cardot, F.; Niedermann, P.; Morel, J.-P.; Maake, C.; Walt, H.; Knop, E.; Blanc, N.

    2010-04-01

    X-ray phase imaging including phase tomography has been attracting increasing attention during the past few decades. The advantage of X-ray phase imaging is that an extremely high sensitivity is achieved for weakly absorbing materials, such as biological soft tissues, which generate a poor contrast by conventional schemes. Especially for such living samples, where the reduction of the applied dose is of paramount interest, phase sensitive measurements schemes have an inherent potential for a significant dose reduction combined with an image quality enhancement. Several methods have been invented for x-ray phase contrast imaging that either use an approach based on interferometry, diffraction or wave-field propagation. Some of these techniques have a potential for commercial applications, such as in medicine, non-destructive testing, security and inspection. The scope of this manuscript thus deals with one particular such technique that measures the diffraction caused by the specimen by means of a grating interferometer. Examples of measurements are shown that depict the potential of phase contrast imaging for future commercial applications, such as in medical imaging, non-destructive testing and inspection for quality control. The current state of the technology is briefly reviewed as well as its shortcomings to be overcome with regard to the applications.

  9. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  10. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  11. Elemental imaging of cartilage by scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, C.J.; Foster, G.F.; Burge, R.E. ); Ali, S.Y.; Scotchford, C.A. , Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex ); Kirz, J. ); Rivers, M.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Elemental imaging via scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning fluorescence x-ray microscopy (SFXM) has been used to image calcium deposits in cartilage. In the case of STXM, 0.1 {mu}m thick sections were imaged to investigate the proximity of calcium deposits in relation to chondrocyte cells. The resolution available was 0.5 {mu}m, and field widths of up to 25 {mu}m were used at this resolution. The resolution available in SFXM was 10 {mu}m, and field widths of up to 2 mm were used at this resolution on 5-{mu}m thick specimens. Together these techniques were used to map calcium deposits at the cellular level, and at the full tissue size level.

  12. Bimodal Imaging at ICON Using Neutrons and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, A. P.; Hovind, J.; Boillat, P.; Muehlebach, C.; Carminati, C.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Lehmann, E. H.

    For experiments with low contrast between the relevant features it can be beneficial to add a second modality to reduce ambiguity. At Paul Scherrer Institut the two neutron imaging facilities NEUTRA (thermal neutrons) and ICON (cold neutrons) we have installed X-ray beamlines for on-site bimodal imaging with neutrons and X-rays. This allows us to leave the sample untouched in the sample environment throughout an experiment and to reduce the waiting times between acquisitions using each modality. The applications and energy ranges of the X-ray installations are different at the two facilities. At NEUTRA larger samples are intended (60-320 kV) and at ICON small samples and simultaneous acquisition are intended (40-150 kV). Here, we report the more recent installation at ICON. The X-ray beamline uses a cone beam source and is arranged across the neutron beamline. The beamline is designed to allow up to ten times magnification. This matches the voxel-size that can be achieved with the micro-setup for neutrons. The oblique arrangement of the X-ray beamline further makes real-time acquisition possible since both modalities have a free view of the sample at any time. Reconstruction of cone beam data requires more knowledge about the beam geometry and sample position. Therefore, the beamline is equipped with laser based distance sensors and a calibration procedure has been developed to increase the accuracy of the reconstruction. The purpose of using multimodal acquisition is to fuse the data in a way that enhances the output of the experiment. We demonstrate the current system performance and provide a basic analysis with experiment data.

  13. Ptychographic coherent x-ray surface scattering imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Woo; Jiang, Zhang; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jin

    Lensless x-ray coherent diffraction imaging enables the determination of nano-scaled structures in physical and biological sciences. Several coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) methods have been developed in both transmission and reflection modes such as Bragg CDI, plane-wave CDI, Fresnel CDI, coherent surface scattering imaging (CSSI) and so on. The grazing-incidence coherent surface scattering (CSSI) technique, which is recently developed by T. Sun et al., takes advantage of enhanced x-ray surface scattering and interference near total external reflection, and thereby overcomes some limitations that the transmission mode have. However, the sample size can be investigated is limited by x-ray beam size because the sample is supposed to be isolated. We incorporated ptychographic algorithm with coherent surface scattering imaging to overcome this limitation and make it more useful and applicable. The ptychographic coherent surface scattering imaging technique enables us to measure 2D roughness of the flat surface such as thin film and silicon wafer regardless of the surface area. LDRD.

  14. Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Voss, H. D.; Mobilia, J.; Datlowe, D. W.; Chinn, V. L.; Hilsenrath, M.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities sponsored by the Office of Naval Research for the Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE). The MAXIE instrument was developed as a joint activity of Lockheed, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Bergen, Norway. Lockheed was responsible for the overall management of the program, interfacing with the appropriate government agencies, the overall electrical and mechanical design, flight software, environmental testing, spacecraft integration activities, on orbit checkout, and data processing activities. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE), the ONR 401 experiment, is the first in a new class of satellite-borne remote sensing instruments. The primary innovation is the ability to obtain rapid, sequential, images with high sensitivity of the earth's X ray aurora from a low altitude polar orbiting satellite. These images can be used to identify dynamic temporal variations in the three-dimensional (energy and position) distribution of electron precipitation into the atmosphere. MAXIE was launched on the TIROS NOAA-13 satellite on 9 August 1993. The experiment performed well during its turn-on sequence; however, the spacecraft bus failed on 21 August 1993. New spacebased technologies successfully used in MAXIE were mixed-mode ASIC microcircuits, a zero torque scanning system with associated viscoelastic damping, a paraffin stow release mechanism, a parallel integrating PHA processor, a low noise Si(Li) sensor telescope, and an advanced thermal cooling system. MAXIE's on orbit operation, control of penetrating particle backgrounds, and scientific data indicated good overall performance.

  15. Pinhole X-ray fluorescence imaging of gadolinium and gold nanoparticles using polychromatic X-rays: a Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seongmoon; Sung, Wonmo; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to develop a Monte Carlo (MC) model for pinhole K-shell X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging of metal nanoparticles using polychromatic X-rays. The MC model consisted of two-dimensional (2D) position-sensitive detectors and fan-beam X-rays used to stimulate the emission of XRF photons from gadolinium (Gd) or gold (Au) nanoparticles. Four cylindrical columns containing different concentrations of nanoparticles ranging from 0.01% to 0.09% by weight (wt%) were placed in a 5 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom. The images of the columns had detectable contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of 5.7 and 4.3 for 0.01 wt% Gd and for 0.03 wt% Au, respectively. Higher concentrations of nanoparticles yielded higher CNR. For 1×1011 incident particles, the radiation dose to the phantom was 19.9 mGy for 110 kVp X-rays (Gd imaging) and 26.1 mGy for 140 kVp X-rays (Au imaging). The MC model of a pinhole XRF can acquire direct 2D slice images of the object without image reconstruction. The MC model demonstrated that the pinhole XRF imaging system could be a potential bioimaging modality for nanomedicine. PMID:28860750

  16. Pinhole X-ray fluorescence imaging of gadolinium and gold nanoparticles using polychromatic X-rays: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seongmoon; Sung, Wonmo; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to develop a Monte Carlo (MC) model for pinhole K-shell X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging of metal nanoparticles using polychromatic X-rays. The MC model consisted of two-dimensional (2D) position-sensitive detectors and fan-beam X-rays used to stimulate the emission of XRF photons from gadolinium (Gd) or gold (Au) nanoparticles. Four cylindrical columns containing different concentrations of nanoparticles ranging from 0.01% to 0.09% by weight (wt%) were placed in a 5 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom. The images of the columns had detectable contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of 5.7 and 4.3 for 0.01 wt% Gd and for 0.03 wt% Au, respectively. Higher concentrations of nanoparticles yielded higher CNR. For 1×10(11) incident particles, the radiation dose to the phantom was 19.9 mGy for 110 kVp X-rays (Gd imaging) and 26.1 mGy for 140 kVp X-rays (Au imaging). The MC model of a pinhole XRF can acquire direct 2D slice images of the object without image reconstruction. The MC model demonstrated that the pinhole XRF imaging system could be a potential bioimaging modality for nanomedicine.

  17. Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging of Zeolite Microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Wonsuk; Song, Sanghoon; Kim, Hyunjung; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-04-19

    We measured coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD), an emerging technique to obtain three-dimensional internal and external images of crystals, on ZSM-5 zeolite microcrystals to get internal density distribution and to map deformation field of strain. The experiments were performed at the beamline 34-ID-C in Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory in the US. The CXD patterns of ZSM-5 zeolite microcrystals with sizes of 2 {mu}m by monochromatic coherent x-rays with energy of 9 keV were obtained under continuously surrounding and Bragg conditions as a function of temperature. The oversampled diffraction patterns are inverted to obtain three-dimensional images of the shapes and internal strain fields of zeolite microcrystals using phase retrieval algorithms of error reduction and a hybrid input-output method. The internal density and strain distribution as a function of temperature are discussed.

  18. Computer-aided X-ray holographic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Morita, H.; Ando, K.; Sasaki, K.

    1981-07-01

    A computer-aided X-ray holographic imaging method is proposed. In this system a three-dimensional image of an object is reconstructed by extracting the hologram, which corresponds to the complete coherence, from the intensity signals obtained under temporally and spatially partial coherent illumination of the object. This method requires neither a priori information about the object's structures nor placement of a pointlike target near the object to obtain the reference waves. The coherence function is detected differentially from intensities of infinitesimal intervals on the hemispherical hologram plane so that it does not suffer from the short temporal coherence length of available X-ray sources. Two deconvolution processings to compensate the effects of the spatially and temporally partial coherency of the waves are also adopted. Principle, design conditions, and a few numerical results are given.

  19. Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Bitter, M.; Moon, M. K.; Nam, U. W.; Jin, K. C.; Kong, K. N.; Seon, K. I.

    2003-03-01

    Two x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers are presently designed for the KSTAR tokamak. The instruments will provide temporally and spatially resolved spectra of heliumlike argon (or krypton) from a large cross section of the plasma. The spectral data will be used for profile measurements—both within and perpendicular to the horizontal midplane of KSTAR—of the ion and electron temperatures, the rotation velocity, and the ionization equilibrium. Each spectrometer will consist of a spherically bent quartz crystal and large area two-dimensional position-sensitive multiwire proportional counter. The article presents the design for the KSTAR x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers, and the fabrication and initial test results from the large area two-dimensional multiwire proportional counter.

  20. Fabrication of an X-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Burgess, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray detector array yields mosaic image of object emitting 1- to 30-keV range fabricated from n-doped silicon wafer. In proposed fabrication technique, thin walls of diffused n+ dopant divide wafer into pixels of rectangular cross section, each containing central electrode of thermally migrated p-type metal. This pnn+ arrangement reduces leakage current by preventing transistor action caused by pnp structure of earlier version.

  1. Design considerations for soft X-ray television imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, Kenneth; Golub, Leon

    1988-01-01

    Television sensors for X-rays can be coupled to converters and image intensifiers to obtain active areas, high flux capabilities, quantum efficiency, high time resolution, or ease of construction and operation that may not be obtained with a directly illuminated sensor. A general purpose system which makes use of these capabilities for a number of applications is decribed. Some of the performance characteristics of this type of system are examined, and the expected future developments for such systems are briefly addressed.

  2. A Soft X-ray Imager for MIRAX

    SciTech Connect

    Zand, Jean in 't; Mels, Wim; Heise, John

    2006-06-09

    The flight spare model of the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras is being considered as the Soft X-ray Imager for MIRAX. A description is provided of this instrument, the performance of its siblings on BeppoSAX, and the prospects of flying it on MIRAX. Like on BeppoSAX, the instrument on MIRAX will excel in the study of transient phenomena lasting shorter than 1 day.

  3. Fabrication of an X-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Burgess, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray detector array yields mosaic image of object emitting 1- to 30-keV range fabricated from n-doped silicon wafer. In proposed fabrication technique, thin walls of diffused n+ dopant divide wafer into pixels of rectangular cross section, each containing central electrode of thermally migrated p-type metal. This pnn+ arrangement reduces leakage current by preventing transistor action caused by pnp structure of earlier version.

  4. Design considerations for soft X-ray television imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, Kenneth; Golub, Leon

    1988-01-01

    Television sensors for X-rays can be coupled to converters and image intensifiers to obtain active areas, high flux capabilities, quantum efficiency, high time resolution, or ease of construction and operation that may not be obtained with a directly illuminated sensor. A general purpose system which makes use of these capabilities for a number of applications is decribed. Some of the performance characteristics of this type of system are examined, and the expected future developments for such systems are briefly addressed.

  5. Magnetic imaging with polarized soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Properties, behavior, and functionalities of magnetic materials are largely determined by microscopic spin textures, particularly their formation into domains, their coupling mechanisms and their dynamic behavior. Advanced characterization tools are prerequisite to fundamentally understand magnetic materials and control spins for novel magnetic applications. Magnetic microscopies allow us to image directly the static and dynamic features of the relevant microscopic magnetization structures in advanced magnetic materials and thus provide detailed and direct insight into underlying physical phenomena. A large variety of magnetic imaging techniques has become available with particular strengths but also certain limitations. Essential features of magnetic microscopies are a high spatial resolution down into the nanometer regime, as this is the fundamental length scale of magnetic exchange interaction and the ultimate length scale in advanced magnetic technologies; magnetic and elemental sensitivity with quantitative capabilities, as the properties of advanced magnetic materials can be tailored by combining various magnetic elements and their magnetic moments; high temporal resolution from the ns to the fs regime to understand the associated spin dynamic processes and the functionality in magnetic devices; tomographic capabilities with nm resolution as new directions in nanoscience and technologies are moving into 3 dim arrangements of spin structures; and interfacial sensitivity as novel ways to control spins harness either the coupling across interfaces in multilayered structures or utilize non-collinear spin arrangements, which often occur from symmetry breaking at surfaces and interfaces. The unique properties of polarized soft x-rays, their abundancy and specific interaction with magnetic materials in form of dichroism effects have triggered the development of various magnetic x-ray imaging techniques. This review will provide an overview of the current state

  6. Design of a normal incidence multilayer imaging X-ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Gabardi, David R.; Hoover, Richard B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Lindblom, Joakim F.

    1989-01-01

    Normal incidence multilayer Cassegrain X-ray telescopes were flown on the Stanford/MSFC Rocket X-ray Spectroheliograph. These instruments produced high spatial resolution images of the sun and conclusively demonstrated that doubly reflecting multilayer X-ray optical systems are feasible. The images indicated that aplanatic imaging soft X-ray/EUV microscopes should be achievable using multilayer optics technology. A doubly reflecting normal incidence multilayer imaging X-ray microscope based on the Schwarzschild configuration has been designed. The design of the microscope and the results of the optical system ray trace analysis are discussed. High resolution aplanatic imaging X-ray microscopes using normal incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors should have many important applications in advanced X-ray astronomical instrumentation, X-ray lithography, biological, biomedical, metallurgical, and laser fusion research.

  7. NASA Unveils First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    Extraordinary first images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory trace the aftermath of a gigantic stellar explosion in such stunning detail that scientists can see evidence of what may be a neutron star or black hole near the center. Another image shows a powerful X-ray jet blasting 200,000 light years into intergalactic space from a distant quasar. Released today, both images confirm that NASA's newest Great Observatory is in excellent health and its instruments and optics are performing up to expectations. Chandra, the world's largest and most sensitive X-ray telescope, is still in its orbital check-out and calibration phase. "When I saw the first image, I knew that the dream had been realized," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. "This observatory is ready to take its place in the history of spectacular scientific achievements." "We were astounded by these images," said Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X- ray Center, Cambridge, MA. "We see the collision of the debris from the exploded star with the matter around it, we see shock waves rushing into interstellar space at millions of miles per hour, and, as a real bonus, we see for the first time a tantalizing bright point near the center of the remnant that could possibly be a collapsed star associated with the outburst." Chandra's PKS 0637-752 PKS 0637-752 After the telescope's sunshade door was opened last week, one of the first images taken was of the 320-year-old supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, which astronomers believe was produced by the explosion of a massive star. Material blasted into space from the explosion crashed into surrounding material at 10 million miles per hour. This collision caused violent shock waves, like massive sonic booms, creating a vast 50-million degree bubble of X-ray emitting gas. Heavy elements in the hot gas produce X-rays of specific energies. Chandra's ability

  8. Temporal-Spatial Structure of Magnetic Merging at the Magnetopause Inferred from 557.7-nm All-Sky Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Burke, W. J.; Lester, M.; Ober, D. M.; Scudder, J. D.; Siebert, K. D.; Weimer, D. R.; Russell, C. T.; Balogh, A.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that high-resolution 557.7-nm all-sky images are useful tools for investigating the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Analysis of ground and satellite measurements leads us to conclude that high-latitude merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 30 s to 3 min. Variations of 557.7 nm emissions were observed at a 10 s cadence at Ny-Alesund on 19 December 2001, while significant changes in the IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. The optical patterns are consistent with a scenario in which merging occurs around the rim of the high-latitude cusp at positions dictated by the IMF clock angle. Electrons energized at merging sites represent plausible sources for 557.7 nm emissions in the cusp. Polar observations at the magnetopause have directly linked enhanced fluxes of > or = 0.5 keV electrons with merging. Spectra of electrons responsible for some of the emissions, measured during a DMSP F15 overflight, exhibit "inverted-V" features, indicating further acceleration above the ionosphere. SuperDARN spectral width boundaries, characteristic of open-closed field line transitions, are located at the equatorward edge of the 557.7nm emissions. Optical data suggest that with IMF B(sub Y) > 0, the Northern Hemisphere cusp divides into three source regions. When the IMF clock angle was approx. 150 deg structured 557.7-nm emissions came from east of the 13:00 MLT meridian. At larger clock angles the emissions appeared between 12:00 and 13:00 MLT. No significant 557.7-nm emissions were detected in the prenoon MLT sector. MHD simulations corroborate our scenario, showing that with the observed large dipole-tilt and IMF clock angles, merging sites develop near the front and eastern portions of the high-altitude cusp rim in the Northern Hemisphere and near the western part of the cusp rim in the Southern Hemisphere.

  9. The Einstein All-Sky IPC slew survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Fabbiano, G.

    1989-01-01

    The construction of the Einstein All-Sky Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) slew survey is considered. It contains approximately 1000 sources between 10(exp -12) and 10(exp -10) erg/sq cm/s with a concentration toward the ecliptic poles and away from the galactic plane. Several sizable samples of bright soft X-ray selected objects for follow-up ROSAT and ASTRO-D observations and statistical study are presented. The survey source list is expected to be available by late 1989. Both paper and remote access online data base versions are to be available. An identification program is considered.

  10. IXPE - The Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is a Small Explorer Mission that will be proposed in response to NASA's upcoming Announcement of Opportunity. IXPE will transform our understanding of the most energetic and exotic astrophysical objects, especially neutron stars and black holes, by measuring the linear polarization of astronomical objects as a function of energy, time and, where relevant, position. As the first dedicated polarimetry observatory IXPE will add a new dimension to the study of cosmic sources, enlarging the observational phase space and providing answers to fundamental questions. IXPE will feature x-ray optics fabricated at NASA/MSFC and gas pixel focal plane detectors provided by team members in Italy (INAF and INFN). This presentation will give an overview of the proposed IXPE mission, detailing the payload configuration, the expected sensitivity, and a typical observing program.

  11. Micro-X X-ray Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, David

    2014-06-01

    Micro-X is a NASA funded, rocket borne X-ray imaging spectrometer utilizing Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) to perform high resolution microcalorimetry in the soft X-ray band on astronomical sources. The TESs utilize the 50 mK stage of an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) as a heat sink - one of the biggest challenges in payload design and calibration is to maintain the temperature of the detectors. To achieve the best thermal environment and therefore the best possible resolution of the detectors, we combine software modeling of heat flow within the instrument with data from laboratory tests of thermal connections between the Front End Assembly and ADR. We present a brief overview of the instrument design, recent lab results and modeling, and an update of ongoing progress with the preparations for launch.

  12. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hailey, Charles J.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    1992-01-01

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

  13. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

    1992-06-02

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

  14. Development of X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; Nam, U. W.; Kim, Y. J.; Moon, M. K.

    2003-10-01

    The engineering design for two high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometers, which will be part of the basic diagnostics for the KSTAR tokamak, has been finalized. Each of the spectrometers will consists of a spherically bent crystal and a 10 cm x 30 cm large 2D position-sensitive multi-wire proportional counter. The instruments will provide spatially and temporally resolved spectra of the resonance line of helium-like argon (or krypton) and the associated satellites from multiple lines of sight parallel and perpendicular to the horizontal mid-plane for measurements of the profiles of the ion and electron temperatures, plasma rotation velocity, and ionization equilibrium. A 2D detector with delay-line readout and supporting electronics has been fabricated and calibrated with an X-ray source. The engineering design of the spectrometers and the calibration results of the 2D detector will be presented.

  15. Contrast agents for preclinical targeted X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Zuber, Guy; Vandamme, Thierry

    2014-09-30

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an X-ray based instrument that it is specifically designed for biomedical research at a preclinical stage for live imaging of small animals. This imaging modality is cost-effective, fast, and produces remarkable high-resolution images of X-ray opaque skeleton. Administration of biocompatible X-ray opaque contrast agent allows delineation of the blood vessels, and internal organs and even detection of tumor metastases as small as 300 μm. However, the main limitation of micro-CT lies in the poor efficacy or toxicity of the contrast agents. Moreover, contrast agents for micro-CT have to be stealth nanoparticulate systems, i.e. preventing their rapid renal clearance. The chemical composition and physicochemical properties will condition their uptake and elimination pathways, and therefore all the biological fluids, organs, and tissues trough this elimination route of the nanoparticles will be contrasted. Furthermore, several technologies playing on the nanoparticle properties, aim to influence these biological pathways in order to induce their accumulation onto given targeted sites, organs of tumors. In function of the methodologies carried out, taking benefit or not of the action of immune system, of the natural response of the organism like hepatocyte uptake or enhanced permeation and retention effect, or even accumulation due to ligand/receptor interactions, the technologies are called passive or active targeted imaging. The present review presents the most recent advances in the development of specific contrast agents for targeted X-ray imaging micro-CT, discussing the recent advance of in vivo targeting of nanoparticulate contrast agents, and the influence of the formulations, nature of the nanocarrier, nature and concentration of the X-ray contrasting materials, effect of the surface properties, functionalization and bioconjugation. The pharmacokinetic and versatility of nanometric systems appear particularly advantageous

  16. The Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite (AXIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Mushotzky, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite (AXIS) will follow in the footsteps of the spectacularly successful Chandra X-ray Observatory with similar or higher angular resolution and an order of magnitude more collecting area in the 0.3-10keV band. These capabilities will enable major advances in many of the most active areas of astrophysics, including (i) mapping event horizon scale structure in AGN accretion disks and the determination of supermassive black hole (SMBH) spins through monitoring of gravitationally-microlensed quasars; (ii) dramatically deepening our understanding of AGN feedback in galaxies and galaxy clusters out to high-z through the direct imaging of AGN winds and the interaction of jets with the hot interstellar/intracluster medium; (iii) understanding the fueling of AGN by probing hot flows inside of the SMBH sphere of influence; (iv) obtaining geometric distance measurements using dust scattering halos. With a nominal 2028 launch, AXIS will be enormously synergistic with LSST, ALMA, WFIRST and ATHENA, and will be a valuable precursor to Lynx. AXIS is enabled by breakthroughs in the construction of light-weight X-ray optics from mono-crystalline silicon blocks, building on recent developments in the semiconductor industry. Here, we describe the straw-man concept for AXIS, some of the high profile science that this observatory will address, and how you can become involved.

  17. Condor: a simulation tool for flash X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Max F; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R N C

    2016-08-01

    Flash X-ray imaging has the potential to determine structures down to molecular resolution without the need for crystallization. The ability to accurately predict the diffraction signal and to identify the optimal experimental configuration within the limits of the instrument is important for successful data collection. This article introduces Condor, an open-source simulation tool to predict X-ray far-field scattering amplitudes of isolated particles for customized experimental designs and samples, which the user defines by an atomic or a refractive index model. The software enables researchers to test whether their envisaged imaging experiment is feasible, and to optimize critical parameters for reaching the best possible result. It also aims to support researchers who intend to create or advance reconstruction algorithms by simulating realistic test data. Condor is designed to be easy to use and can be either installed as a Python package or used from its web interface (http://lmb.icm.uu.se/condor). X-ray free-electron lasers have high running costs and beam time at these facilities is precious. Data quality can be substantially improved by using simulations to guide the experimental design and simplify data analysis.

  18. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopic Imaging Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.; Smith, R.; Garcia, M.; Tananbaum, H.; White, N.; Petre, R.; Ptak, A.; Hornschemeier, A.; Zhang, W.; Bandler, S.; Daelemans, G.; Bautz, M.; Hielmann, R.; McEntaffer, R.; Bregman, J.; Reid, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopic Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) is a NASA facility class X-ray observatory which can carry out many of the science goals of the International X-ray Observatory as outlined in the NWNH Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Studies of the mission configuration and science reach will inform NASA technology investments over the next several years. The primary science goals will be directly observing the effects of strong gravity in black holes; mapping temperatures, abundances and dynamics in hot gas on scales ranging from the local ISM to galaxy clusters; observing feedback from AGN and star formation in galaxies; finding the missing baryonic matter; and studying the structure of neutron stars. The mission configuration required to achieve these goals builds on the IXO segmented glass optics technology, but with a (shorter)10m focal length. These optics provide 10 arcsec HPD (5 arcsec goal) images and 1m2 of area at 1.25keV and 0.2m2 at 6keV. A new micro-calorimeter configuration provides 2 eV spectral resolution over a central 0.6 arcmin area, and < 5eV over a 4.8 arcmin square extended region. A grating spectrometer provides the low-energy spectroscopy (from 0.3keV to 1.0keV) with spectral resolution of>3000 and an effective area of>1000cm2.

  19. New large-area x-ray image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouimette, Donald R.; Nudelman, Sol; Aikens, Richard S.

    1998-07-01

    A new high speed/high resolution X-ray detector called the XEBIT (X-ray sensitive Electron Beam Image Tube) is currently under development at the University of Connecticut Health Center. This large area (9' diameter) direct conversion detector is based on an X-ray photoconductor called thallium bromide. The device utilizes cathode ray tube technology to provide a 30 frame per second raster scanned electron beam to both charge and readout the photoconductor. Thallium bromide is a high Z material with a linear attenuation coefficient of 28.11 cm-1 at 60 kev. This high stopping power results in a quantum efficiency of 57% at 60 kev for 300 micron thick layers. Thallium bromide is a very good X-ray photoconductor that requires 6.5 ev to create an electron-hole pair. For 60 kev photons, this results in a gain 9230 per absorbed photon. With a hole-mobility lifetime product of 1.5 X 10-6 cm2/volt, good charge collection can be achieved at reasonable field strengths. Thallium bromide has a very high band gap of 2.7 ev and a dielectric constant of 33. Its resistivity, which is 5 X 109 ohm-cm at room temperature, is dominated by ionic conductivity. Fortunately, ionic conductivity has a strong temperature dependence that can be significantly reduced with moderate cooling to -25 degrees centigrade. The XEBIT uses thallium bromide as an X- ray photoconductor in a vidicon type image tube. Its principals of operation are very similar to the standard light sensitive vidicon that were utilized extensively in the commercial television industry. A scanning electron beam charges the TlBr surface, with respect to the positively biased front surface, providing the necessary electric field across the photoconductor for charge transport. X-rays then penetrate the window and are absorbed by the thallium bromide. The absorbed photons generate large numbers of electron-hole pairs due to the high conversion gain. Electrons drift under the electric field to the positive bias electrode and the

  20. Detection of soft X-rays from Alpha Lyrae and Eta Bootis with an imaging X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Fabricant, D.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Gorenstein, P.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for observations of Alpha Lyr (Vega) and Eta Boo with an imaging X-ray telescope during two rocket flights. It is found that Vega and Eta Boo are soft X-ray sources with respective luminosities of approximately 3 x 10 to the 28th erg/s (0.15-0.8 keV) and 1 x 10 to the 29th erg/s (0.15-1.5 keV). Surface X-ray luminosities of about 640,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Vega and 300,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Eta Boo are estimated and shown to fall within the range of solar coronal X-ray emission. It is concluded that in view of the substantially larger surface areas of these stars, the relatively large total soft X-ray luminosity (as compared with that of the sun) can in both cases be understood as resulting from a moderately active corona, although the Vega observation is in severe conflict with simple models for X-ray emission from single main-sequence stars.

  1. CCD camera as feasible large-area-size x-ray detector for x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-06-01

    As X-ray fluorescence radiation isotropically spreads from the sample, one of the most important requirements for spectrometers for many years has been a large solid angle. Charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras are quite promising options because they have a fairly large area size, usually larger than 150 mm(2). The present work has examined the feasibility of a commercially available camera with an ordinary CCD chip (1024 × 1024 pixels, the size of one pixel is 13 μm × 13 μm, designed for visible light) as an X-ray fluorescence detector. As X-ray photons create charges in the CCD chip, reading very quickly the amount is the key for this method. It is very simple if the charges always go into one pixel. As the charges quite often spread to several pixels, and sometimes can be lost, it is important to recover the information by filtering out the unsuccessful events. For this, a simple, versatile, and reliable scheme has been proposed. It has been demonstrated that the energy resolution of the present camera is 150 eV at Mn Kα, and also that its overall achievement in seeing minor elements is almost compatible with conventional X-ray fluorescence detectors. When the CCD camera is combined with a micro-pinhole collimator, full field X-ray fluorescence imaging with a spatial resolution of 20 μm becomes possible. Further feasibility in practical X-ray fluorescence analysis is discussed.

  2. CCD camera as feasible large-area-size x-ray detector for x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-06-01

    As X-ray fluorescence radiation isotropically spreads from the sample, one of the most important requirements for spectrometers for many years has been a large solid angle. Charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras are quite promising options because they have a fairly large area size, usually larger than 150 mm2. The present work has examined the feasibility of a commercially available camera with an ordinary CCD chip (1024 × 1024 pixels, the size of one pixel is 13 μm × 13 μm, designed for visible light) as an X-ray fluorescence detector. As X-ray photons create charges in the CCD chip, reading very quickly the amount is the key for this method. It is very simple if the charges always go into one pixel. As the charges quite often spread to several pixels, and sometimes can be lost, it is important to recover the information by filtering out the unsuccessful events. For this, a simple, versatile, and reliable scheme has been proposed. It has been demonstrated that the energy resolution of the present camera is 150 eV at Mn Kα, and also that its overall achievement in seeing minor elements is almost compatible with conventional X-ray fluorescence detectors. When the CCD camera is combined with a micro-pinhole collimator, full field X-ray fluorescence imaging with a spatial resolution of 20 μm becomes possible. Further feasibility in practical X-ray fluorescence analysis is discussed.

  3. Lobster Eye X-Ray Imaging Underwater Scatterometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-29

    cone. For this purpose POC developed hard X-ray lobster eye (LE) focusing optics. A lobster (or shrimp, crayfish, or other crustacean ) views the...principle remains the same as that in the eye of the crustacean . LEXIUS integrates LE X-ray focusing optics, X-ray generators, an X-ray camera, and a

  4. X-ray imaging performance of structured cesium iodide scintillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Ristic, Goran; Rowlands, J A

    2004-09-01

    Columnar structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators doped with Thallium (Tl) have been used extensively for indirect x-ray imaging detectors. The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology for systematic investigation of the inherent imaging performance of CsI as a function of thickness and design type. The results will facilitate the optimization of CsI layer design for different x-ray imaging applications, and allow validation of physical models developed for the light channeling process in columnar CsI layers. CsI samples of different types and thicknesses were obtained from the same manufacturer. They were optimized either for light output (HL) or image resolution (HR), and the thickness ranged between 150 and 600 microns. During experimental measurements, the CsI samples were placed in direct contact with a high resolution CMOS optical sensor with a pixel pitch of 48 microns. The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector with different CsI configurations were measured experimentally. The aperture function of the CMOS sensor was determined separately in order to estimate the MTF of CsI alone. We also measured the pulse height distribution of the light output from both the HL and HR CsI at different x-ray energies, from which the x-ray quantum efficiency, Swank factor and x-ray conversion gain were determined. Our results showed that the MTF at 5 cycles/mm for the HR type was 50% higher than for the HL. However, the HR layer produces approximately 36% less light output. The Swank factor below K-edge was 0.91 and 0.93 for the HR and HL types, respectively, thus their DQE(0) were essentially identical. The presampling MTF decreased as a function of thickness L. The universal MTF, i.e., MTF plotted as a function of the product of spatial frequency f and CsI thickness L, increased as a function of L. This indicates that the light channeling process in CsI improved the MTF of

  5. New contrasts for x-ray imaging and synergy with optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge

    2017-02-01

    Due to its penetrating power, fine resolution, unique contrast, high-speed, and cost-effectiveness, x-ray imaging is one of the earliest and most popular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. Current x-ray radiographs and CT images are mostly on gray-scale, since they reflect overall energy attenuation. Recent advances in x-ray detection, contrast agent, and image reconstruction technologies have changed our perception and expectation of x-ray imaging capabilities, and generated an increasing interest in imaging biological soft tissues in terms of energy-sensitive material decomposition, phase-contrast, small angle scattering (also referred to as dark-field), x-ray fluorescence and luminescence properties. These are especially relevant to preclinical and mesoscopic studies, and potentially mendable for hybridization with optical molecular tomography. In this article, we review new x-ray imaging techniques as related to optical imaging, suggest some combined x-ray and optical imaging schemes, and discuss our ideas on micro-modulated x-ray luminescence tomography (MXLT) and x-ray modulated opto-genetics (X-Optogenetics).

  6. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  7. TU-G-207-00: Emerging Applications of X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications.

  8. Image x-ray emission converters and microstrip porous dielectric x-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lorikyan, M. P.

    2008-11-01

    The effective, fast, and accurate registration of x ray depends on the quality conversion of the X-quanta to photoelectrons. In this respect, of high interest are porous x-ray emission converters (PXECs). They are analogs of porous secondary electron emitters (PSEEs); the only difference is that active porous material should have high absorption properties for the X-quanta energies to be detected. Microstrip porous dielectric detector (MSPDD) is highly effective for x-ray registration without preliminary conversion of the X-quanta. Earlier it was shown that PSEE similar to PXEC has a high emission factor for 1-2 MeV {beta}-particles and 5 MeV {alpha}-particles. It was shown that MSPDDs and PSEEs are very stable.

  9. An X-ray image of the large magellanic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Petre, R.

    1994-01-01

    We have used archival ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) pointed observations to construct maps of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in four energy bands between 0.5 and 2.0 keV. These represent the most complete, deepest, and most detailed X-ray images of the LMC to date. While confirming the general morphology of the diffuse LMC emission observed by Wang et al. with Einstein IPC data, these images reveal a wealth of detailed structure of high statistical significance on angular scales from a few arcminutes to a few degrees. In addition, at least twice as many discrete sources are detected as were found using the IPC.

  10. X-ray image enhancement via determinant based feature selection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, R; Hegarty, J; Broughton, R; Butler, A; Coope, I; Renaud, P

    2013-12-01

    Previous work has investigated the feasibility of using Eigenimage-based enhancement tools to highlight abnormalities on chest X-rays (Butler et al in J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol 52:244-253, 2008). While promising, this approach has been limited by computational restrictions of standard clinical workstations, and uncertainty regarding what constitutes an adequate sample size. This paper suggests an alternative mathematical model to the above referenced singular value decomposition method, which can significantly reduce both the required sample size and the time needed to perform analysis. Using this approach images can be efficiently separated into normal and abnormal parts, with the potential for rapid highlighting of pathology.

  11. Application of x-ray imaging to oil refinery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, B.R.; Newton, D.; Smith, G.B.

    1996-12-31

    X-ray imaging is a non-intrusive method of visualizing the flow patterns of rapidly changing multiphase systems and is based on the variation in the absorbance of X-rays by the different phases. BP has applied the X-ray technique to a variety of problems encountered within the oil and petrochemical industries in which two or three phases are present e.g. Fluid Catalytic Cracking (riser, stripper, regenerator) and three phase systems such as slurry bubble column reactors. In general, to obtain the maximum productivity from these units it is essential to optimize the contacting between a catalyst and a process fluid or fluids. This work reports on laboratory experimental work in which full scale refinery components were visualized in order to characterize the existing designs. Modified designs were then tested and evaluated before implementation on the refinery unit. Economic assessments of some of the benefits which can be realized in an oil refinery as a result of such design improvements are also presented. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  12. An image focusing means by using an opaque object to diffract x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Weaver, H. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for focusing and imaging x-rays. An opaque sphere is used as a diffractive imaging element to diffract x-rays from an object so that the divergent x-ray wavefronts are transformed into convergent wavefronts and are brought to focus to form an image of the object with a large depth of field.

  13. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible image...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1630 - Electrostatic x-ray imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrostatic x-ray imaging system. 892.1630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1630 Electrostatic x-ray imaging system. (a) Identification. An electrostatic x-ray imaging system is a device intended for...

  16. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After barely 2 months in space, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) took this sturning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, revealing something never seen before, a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. The image shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light-year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous x-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With CXO's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with CXO's Advanced Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and High Energy Transmission Grating. The Crab Nebula, easily the most intensively studied object beyond our solar system, has been observed using virtually every astronomical instrument that could see that part of the sky

  17. The NOAA GOES-12 Solar X-ray Imager (SXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. M.; Pizzo, V. J.; Wilkinson, D. C.; Davis, J. M.

    2001-05-01

    The Solar X-ray Imager (SXI), planned for launch in July 2001 on NOAA's GOES-12 satellite, will provide nearly uninterrupted, full-disk, soft X-ray solar movies, with a continuous frame rate significantly exceeding that for previous similar instruments. The SXI provides images with a one-minute cadence and a single-image (adjustable) dynamic range near 100. A set of metallic thin-film filters provides a degree of temperature discrimination in the 0.6-6.0 nm bandpass. The spatial resolution of approximately 10 arcseconds FWHM is sampled with 5 arcsecond pixels. NOAA's operational space weather forecasting requirements drive the observing sequences toward long-term uniformity. This will yield an excellent standardized set of contextual data products for the historical record. Sequences can be selected or modified based on solar activity levels. Data products will be made available to the research community via NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center World Wide Web site in near real-time (minutes). Among the data products are raw and calibrated images in SolarSoft compliant FITS format. Other data products will include multiple image products such as standardized movies at fixed UT times and wide dynamic range composite images. The Web interface is designed to be user friendly, providing a range of search and preview capabilities.

  18. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After barely 2 months in space, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) took this sturning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, revealing something never seen before, a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. The image shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light-year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous x-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With CXO's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with CXO's Advanced Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and High Energy Transmission Grating. The Crab Nebula, easily the most intensively studied object beyond our solar system, has been observed using virtually every astronomical instrument that could see that part of the sky

  19. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  20. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro

    DOE PAGES

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G.; Derdak, Zoltan; ...

    2015-01-05

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. Here in this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images ofmore » Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. Lastly, as x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.« less

  1. A Highly Sensitive X-ray Imaging Modality for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Detection in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G.; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities. PMID:25559398

  2. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-21

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of hepatocellular carcinoma labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.

  3. Dark-field hyperspectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Christopher K.; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Connolley, Thomas; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Seller, Paul; Cernik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, there has been a drive to develop non-destructive X-ray imaging techniques that provide chemical or physical insight. To date, these methods have generally been limited; either requiring raster scanning of pencil beams, using narrow bandwidth radiation and/or limited to small samples. We have developed a novel full-field radiographic imaging technique that enables the entire physio-chemical state of an object to be imaged in a single snapshot. The method is sensitive to emitted and scattered radiation, using a spectral imaging detector and polychromatic hard X-radiation, making it particularly useful for studying large dense samples for materials science and engineering applications. The method and its extension to three-dimensional imaging is validated with a series of test objects and demonstrated to directly image the crystallographic preferred orientation and formed precipitates across an aluminium alloy friction stir weld section. PMID:24808753

  4. X-ray micrography and imaging of Escherichia coli cell shape using laser plasma pulsed point x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Rajyaguru, J M; Kado, M; Richardson, M C; Muszynski, M J

    1997-04-01

    High-resolution x-ray microscopy is a relatively new technique and is performed mostly at a few large synchrotron x-ray sources that use exposure times of seconds. We utilized a bench-top source of single-shot laser (ns) plasma to generate x-rays similar to synchrotron facilities. A 5 microlitres suspension of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in 0.9% phosphate buffered saline was placed on polymethylmethyacrylate coated photoresist, covered with a thin (100 nm) SiN window and positioned in a vacuum chamber close to the x-ray source. The emission spectrum was tuned for optimal absorption by carbon-rich material. Atomic force microscope scans provided a surface and topographical image of differential x-ray absorption corresponding to specimen properties. By using this technique we observed a distinct layer around whole cells, possibly representing the Gram-negative envelope, darker stained areas inside the cell corresponding to chromosomal DNA as seen by thin section electron microscopy, and dent(s) midway through one cell, and 1/3- and 2/3-lengths in another cell, possibly representing one or more division septa. This quick and high resolution with depth-of-field microscopy technique is unmatched to image live hydrated ultrastructure, and has much potential for application in the study of fragile biological specimens.

  5. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  6. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of x-ray induced dynamics in Xe clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, M.; Ferguson, K.; Gorkhover, T.; Carron, S.; Cryan, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Bacellar, C.; Chatterley, A.; Ziemkiewicz, M.; Bernando, C.; Gomez, L.; Jones, C.; Kwok, J.; Tanyag, R. M. P.; Mueller, M.; Rupp, D.; Möller, T.; Gessner, O.; Vilesov, A.; Bostedt, C.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles irradiated by intense x-ray pulses from the LCLS free-electron laser are immediately transformed into a highly excited nanoplasma. Within the first few femtoseconds of the x-ray pulse the particles are ionized and on longer time scales they disintegrate due to Coulomb forces. We performed an x-ray pump / x-ray probe experiment to investigate how the nanoplasma creation and disintegration changes the particle's diffraction response. As samples we used pristine Xe clusters as well as Xe clusters embedded in He droplets. The data show that for pristine clusters the higher diffraction orders diminish first and vanish completely as the nanoplasma expansion progresses. This effect is less prominent in the embedded clusters. We compare our results to previous studies on optically pumped clusters (T. Gorkhover et al., Nat. Photonics, 2016). This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Implications of stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for spectroscopy, imaging, and diffraction in the regime from soft to hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The ultrahigh peak brilliance available at X-ray free-electron lasers opens the possibility to transfer nonlinear spectroscopic techniques from the optical and infrared into the X-ray regime. Here, we present a conceptual treatment of nonlinear X-ray processes with an emphasis on stimulated resonant X-ray scattering as well as a quantitative estimate for the scaling of stimulated X-ray scattering cross sections. These considerations provide the order of magnitude for the required X-ray intensities to experimentally observe stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for photon energies ranging from the extreme ultraviolet to the soft and hard X-ray regimes. At the same time, the regime where stimulated processes can safely be ignored is identified. With this basis, we discuss prospects and implications for spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

  8. Analytical evaluation of the X-ray scattering contribution to imaging degradation in grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The focusing performance of X-ray optics (conveniently expressed in terms of HEW, Half Energy Width) strongly depend on both mirrors deformations and photon scattering caused by the microroughness of reflecting surfaces. In particular, the contribution of X-ray Scattering (XRS) to the HEW of the optic is usually an increasing function H(E) of the photon energy E. Therefore, in future hard X-ray imaging telescopes of the future (SIMBOL-X, NeXT, Constellation-X, XEUS), the X-ray scattering could be the dominant problem since they will operate also in the hard X-ray band (i.e. beyond 10 keV). In order to ensure the imaging quality at all energies, clear requirements have to be established in terms of reflecting surfaces microroughness. Methods: Several methods were proposed in the past years to estimate the scattering contribution to the HEW, dealing with the surface microroughness expressed in terms of its Power Spectral Density (PSD), on the basis of the well-established theory of X-ray scattering from rough surfaces. We faced that problem on the basis on the same theory, but we tried a new approach: the direct, analytical translation of a given surface roughness PSD into a H(E) trend, and - vice versa - the direct translation of a H(E) requirement into a surface PSD. This PSD represents the maximum tolerable microroughness level in order to meet the H(E) requirement in the energy band of a given X-ray telescope. Results: We have thereby found a new, analytical and widely applicable formalism to compute the XRS contribution to the HEW from the surface PSD, provided that the PSD had been measured in a wide range of spatial frequencies. The inverse problem was also solved, allowing the immediate evaluation of the mirror surface PSD from a measured function H(E). The same formalism allows establishing the maximum allowed PSD of the mirror in order to fulfill a given H(E) requirement. Practical equations are firstly developed for the case of a single

  9. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging using a tabletop Talbot-Lau interferometer with multiline embedded x-ray targets.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Takayoshi; Morimoto, Naoki; Fujino, Sho; Nagatomi, Takaharu; Oshima, Keni-chi; Harada, Jimpei; Omote, Kazuhiko; Osaka, Naohisa; Hosoi, Takuji; Watanabe, Heiji

    2013-01-15

    We demonstrate hard x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) using a tabletop Talbot-Lau interferometer in which the x-ray source and source grating are replaced with an x-ray source with multiline metal targets embedded in a diamond substrate. This source realizes an array of linear x-ray sources of a few micrometers width without fabrication difficulty because of the shallow penetration depth of electrons irradiated to the metal targets. This enhances the coherence of x rays from each linear source and allows XPCI within 45 cm source-detector distance under 1.2 W input power for 8 keV x rays.

  10. Photon counting x-ray imaging with K-edge filtered x-rays: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2016-03-01

    In photon counting (PC) x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT), the broad x-ray spectrum can be split into two parts using an x-ray filter with appropriate K-edge energy, which can improve material decomposition. Recent experimental study has demonstrated substantial improvement in material decomposition with PC CT when K-edge filtered x-rays were used. The purpose of the current work was to conduct further investigations of the K-edge filtration method using comprehensive simulation studies. The study was performed in the following aspects: (1) optimization of the K-edge filter for a particular imaging configuration, (2) effects of the K-edge filter parameters on material decomposition, (3) trade-off between the energy bin separation, tube load, and beam quality with K-edge filter, (4) image quality of general (unsubtracted) images when a K-edge filter is used to improve dual energy (DE) subtracted images, and (5) improvements with K-edge filtered x-rays when PC detector has limited energy resolution. The PC x-ray images of soft tissue phantoms with 15 and 30 cm thicknesses including iodine, CaCO3, and soft tissue contrast materials, were simulated. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the contrast elements was determined in general and material-decomposed images using K-edge filters with different atomic numbers and thicknesses. The effect of the filter atomic number and filter thickness on energy separation factor and SNR was determined. The boundary conditions for the tube load and halfvalue layer were determined when the K-edge filters are used. The material-decomposed images were also simulated using PC detector with limited energy resolution, and improvements with K-edge filtered x-rays were quantified. The K-edge filters with atomic numbers from 56 to 71 and K-edge energies 37.4-63.4 keV, respectively, can be used for tube voltages from 60 to 150 kVp, respectively. For a particular tube voltage of 120 kVp, the Gd and Ho were the optimal filter materials

  11. ERRATUM; A Deep X-Ray Image of IC 2391

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Theodore; Patten, Brian M.

    1998-06-01

    In the paper ``A Deep X-Ray Image of IC 2391'' by Theodore Simon and Brian M. Patten (PASP, 110, 283 [1998]), there is a typographical error in the mean energy conversion factor given on page 284, column (2). The correct value is (2.8+/-0.1)x10^-11 ergs cm^-2 s^-1 per HRI count s^-1. The factor ``x10^-11'' was omitted from the published version of the paper. The Press apologizes for this error.

  12. Global X-ray Imaging of the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in situ, or by remote sensing. In situ measurements return precise information about plasma composition, instabilities and dynamics, but cannot provide the global view necessary to understand the overall behaviour and evolution of the plasma, which instead can be explored by remote imaging. We propose a new approach by remote global X-ray imaging, now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge-exchange X-ray emission; this has been found, by observatories such as XMM-Newton, to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere and to peak in the sub-solar magnetosheath, where both solar wind and neutral exospheric densities are high. We describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the Earth's dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to address key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with planetary magnetospheres. This medium-size mission incorporates a wide-field soft X-ray telescope, using micropore optics and CCD detectors, for imaging and spectroscopy, a proton and alpha particle sensor designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an ion composition analyser which aims to characterise the populations of minor ions in the solar wind, and a magnetometer for accurate measurements of the strength and direction of the magnetic field. Details of the mission profile will be presented, as well as simulations of the expected performance for possible mission configurations. The AXIOM Team: G. Branduardi-Raymont(1), S. F. Sembay(2), J. P. Eastwood(3), D. G. Sibeck(4), A. Abbey(2), P. Brown(3), J. A. Carter(2), C. M. Carr(3), C. Forsyth(1), D. Kataria(1), S. Milan(2), C. J. Owen(1), A. M. Read(2), C. S. Arridge(1), A. J. Coates(1), M. R. Collier(4), S. W. H. Cowley(2), G. Fraser(2), G

  13. Fresnel lens arrays for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Christoph; Predehl, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Arrays of achromatic Fresnel lenses are investigated for future high-resolution X-ray imaging missions. Unlike single-focus instruments, parallel arrangements of numerous tiny telescopes provide an easy and natural approach to spectroscopic observations in several energy bands, at an unprecedented short focal length of few 103 m. We suggest an optimized design with an angular resolution around 1 mas between 5 and 10 keV and analyze its optical capabilities as well as issues like the background problem which affects the achievable signal-to-noise ratio. An astronomical simulation is performed on the sun-like star Capella.

  14. X-Ray Phase Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    introduce the phase retrieval method that is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE), which describes how the phase contrast is encoded in the...understand how the phase contrast is encoded in the projec- tion images. This understanding can be gained from the x- ray propagation equation such as the...ray intensity I ~rDð Þ is determined not only by attenuation map A2o ~rð Þ in the projection, but also by the encoded phase contrast, that is, by the

  15. The need for hard X-ray imaging observations at the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Canonical models of solar hard X-ray bursts; associated length and time scales; the adequacies and inadequacies of previous observations; theoretical modeling predictions; arcsecond imaging of solar hard X-rays are outlined.

  16. Development of the water window imaging X-ray microscope utilizing normal-incidence multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A water-window imaging X-ray telescope configured with normal-incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors has been developed to obtain images with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast of carbon-based microstructures within living cells. The narrow bandpass response inherent in multilayer X-ray optics is accurately tuned to wavelengths within the water window.

  17. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Contrast and resolution in imaging with microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...water jet of carbon suspension and imaged using a microfocus x - ray source coupled in-line with a synchronously gated intensified optically coupled...

  18. Development of the water window imaging X-ray microscope utilizing normal-incidence multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A water-window imaging X-ray telescope configured with normal-incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors has been developed to obtain images with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast of carbon-based microstructures within living cells. The narrow bandpass response inherent in multilayer X-ray optics is accurately tuned to wavelengths within the water window.

  19. RELEVANT ASPECTS OF MEDIUM-SCALE TIDs RELATED WITH MIDLATITUDES SPREAD- F OBSERVED BY ALL-SKY IMAGING SYSTEM IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE OVER TWO FULL SOLAR CYCLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Using ground-based measurements we investigate the occurrence of medium-scale TIDs (MSTIDs) in the OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images in the Brazilian low latitudes region related with midlatitude Spread F, during over two full solar cycles. The OI 630 nm images obtained during these periods show thermospheric dark band structures (MSTIDs) in low latitudes region propagating from southeast to northwest. These dark patches moved with average speed of about 50-200 m/s. Only during low solar activity period (LSA), ascending solar activity period (ASA) and descending solar activity period the DBS occurrences were observed in the OI630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images. However, during high solar activity (HAS) we didn’t observe the DBS in the all-sky images. In addition, ionospheric data over two stations in Brazil, one at the magnetic equator (São Luís) and the other close to the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (Cachoeira Paulista) were used to study this kind of structures during high and low solar activity periods. It should be pointed out that these thermospheric/ionospheric events are not related to geomagnetic disturbed conditions. In this work, we present and discuss this phenomenon in the Brazilian sector over two full solar cycles under different solar activity conditions. A possible mechanism for generation of these dark band structures is presented.

  20. Optical design of COATLI: an all-sky robotic optical imager with 0.3 arcsec image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Cuevas, Salvador; Watson, Alan M.; Chapa, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    COATLI is a new instrument and telescope that will provide 0.3 arcsec FWHM images from 550 to 920 nm over a large fraction of the sky. It consists of a robotic 50-cm telescope with a diffraction-limited imager. The imager has a steering mirror for fast guiding, a blue channel using a EMCCD from 400 to 550 nm to measure image motion, a red channel using a standard CCD from 550 to 920 nm, and an active optics system based on a deformable mirror to compensate static aberrations in the red channel. Since the telescope is small, fast guiding will provide diffraction-limited image quality in the red channel over a large fraction of the sky, even in relatively poor seeing. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in Baja California, Mexico, in September 2016 and will operate initially with a simple interim imager. The definitive COATLI instrument will be installed in 2017. In this paper, we present some of the details of the optical design of the instrument.

  1. Systems design of COATLI: an all-sky robotic optical imager with 0.3 arcsec image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, Salvador; Langarica, Rosalia; Watson, Alan M.; Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Ángeles, Fernando; Farah, Alejandro S.; Figueroa, Liliana; Becerra-Godínez, Rosa L.; Chapa, Oscar; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Quiróz, Fernando; Tejada, Carlos; Álvarez-Núñez, Luis C.; Ruz, Jaime; Tinoco, Silvio J.

    2016-08-01

    COATLI is a new instrument and telescope that will provide 0.3 arcsec FWHM images from 550 to 920 nm over a large fraction of the sky. It consists of a robotic 50-cm telescope with a diffraction-limited imager. The imager has a steering mirror for fast guiding, a blue channel using an EMCCD from 400 to 550 nm to measure image motion, a red channel using a standard CCD from 550 to 920 nm, and an active optics system based on a deformable mirror to compensate static aberrations in the red channel. Since the telescope is small, fast guiding will provide diffraction-limited image quality in the red channel over a large fraction of the sky, even in relatively poor seeing. The COATLI telescope will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, México, in 2016 and will initially operate with a simple interim imager. The definitive COATLI instrument will be installed in 2017. In this work we present the general optomechanical and control electronics design of COATLI.

  2. Imaging properties and its improvements of scanning/imaging x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Akihisa Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-28

    A scanning / imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) system has been developed at SPring-8. The SIXM consists of a scanning X-ray microscope with a one-dimensional (1D) X-ray focusing device and an imaging (full-field) X-ray microscope with a 1D X-ray objective. The motivation of the SIXM system is to realize a quantitative and highly-sensitive multimodal 3D X-ray tomography by taking advantages of both the scanning X-ray microscope using multi-pixel detector and the imaging X-ray microscope. Data acquisition process of a 2D image is completely different between in the horizontal direction and in the vertical direction; a 1D signal is obtained with the linear-scanning while the other dimensional signal is obtained with the imaging optics. Such condition have caused a serious problem on the imaging properties that the imaging quality in the vertical direction has been much worse than that in the horizontal direction. In this paper, two approaches to solve this problem will be presented. One is introducing a Fourier transform method for phase retrieval from one phase derivative image, and the other to develop and employ a 1D diffuser to produce an asymmetrical coherent illumination.

  3. Monochromatic Mammographic Imaging Using X-Ray Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiro, Francisca

    2002-06-01

    Monochromatic imaging is typically done with synchrotron sources. These sources are expensive and not practical for clinical settings. However, conventional laboratory sources normally have insufficient intensity. Polycapillary x-ray optics can be used to efficiently produce an intense parallel beam, which can be diffracted from a crystal to create monochromatic radiation. Monochromatic parallel beam imaging produces high subject contrast, high resolution, and low patient dose. Contrast, resolution, and intensity measurements were performed with both high and low angular acceptance crystals. Testing was first done at 8 keV with an intense copper rotating anode source. Preliminary l7.5 kev measurements were then made with a molybdenum source. At 8 keV, contrast enhancement was a factor of five relative to the polychromatic case, in good agreement with theoretical values. At l7.5 kev, monochromatic subject contrast was a factor of two times greater than the conventional polychromatic contrast. The measured angular resolution with a silicon crystal is 0.6 mrad at 8 keV, and 0.2 - 0.3 mrad at 17.5 keV. For a 50-mm thick patient, this angle corresponds to 50 lp/mm with an ideal detector. The use of polychromatic collimating optics allow monochromatic mammographic imaging measurements with a conventional x-ray source in a practical clinical setting.

  4. Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi G.; Dotani, Tadayasu; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Anabuki, Naohisa; Nagino, Ryo; Ueda, Shutaro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Ozaki, Masayuki; Natsukari, Chikara; Hiraga, Junko S.; Tomida, Hiroshi; Kimura, Masashi; Kohmura, Tadayoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Yamauchi, Makoto; Hatsukade, Isamu; Nishioka, Yusuke; Bamba, Aya; Katada, Shuhei; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Iwai, Masachika; Kondo, Keisuke; Takeyoshi, Tukasa; Doty, John P.

    2014-07-01

    Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) is a CCD camera onboard the ASTRO-H satellite which is scheduled to be launched in 2015. The SXI camera contains four CCD chips, each with an imaging area of 31mm x 31 mm, arrayed in mosaic, covering the whole FOV area of 38' x 38'. The CCDs are a P-channel back-illuminated (BI) type with a depletion layer thickness of 200 _m. High QE of 77% at 10 keV expected for this device is an advantage to cover an overlapping energy band with the Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) onboard ASTRO-H. Most of the flight components of the SXI system are completed until the end of 2013 and assembled, and an end-to-end test is performed. Basic performance is verified to meet the requirements. Similar performance is confirmed in the first integration test of the satellite performed in March to June 2014, in which the energy resolution at 5.9 keV of 160 eV is obtained. In parallel to these activities, calibrations using engineering model CCDs are performed, including QE, transmission of a filter, linearity, and response profiles.

  5. X-ray biomedical imaging beamline at SSRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Deng, B.; Du, G.; Fu, Y.; He, Y.; Guo, H.; Peng, G.; Xue, Y.; Zhou, G.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y.; Chen, R.; Tong, Y.; Xiao, T.

    2013-08-01

    Since May 6, 2009, the X-ray biomedical imaging beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) has been formally opened to users. The beamline is composed of a wiggler source with the intensity of magnetic field of 2.0 Tesla, a double crystal monochromator (DCM) cooled with liquid nitrogen, a 6-axis filter for high heat load reducing on the downstream optics such as Be window and DCM. The photon energy range for the monochromatic beam is 8-72.5keV. Three sets of digital X-ray detectors are provided to users with the pixel size range being 0.37-13μm. Several imaging methods such as micro-CT, in-line phase contrast imaging could be applied in biomedicine, material science and paleontology studies. The spatial resolution of 0.8μm and the temporal resolution of 1 ms could be realized. By the end of 2012, the beamline has provided more than 13900 hours beamtime for users, while over half of the research proposals come from biomedicine field. Nearly 2000 person-times have come and done their experiments at the beamline. More than 470 user proposals have been perfomed and more than 110 papers from users have been published. Some typical experimental results on biomedical applications will be introduced.

  6. Nanoscale X-Ray Microscopic Imaging of Mammalian Mineralized Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Joy C.; Almeida, Eduardo; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Lee, Chialing; Liu, Yijin; Chen, Jie; Meirer, Florian; Feser, Michael; Gelb, Jeff; Rudati, Juana; Tkachuk, Andrei; Yun, Wenbing; Pianetta, Piero

    2010-01-01

    A novel hard transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light-source operating from 5 to 15 keV X-ray energy with 14 to 30 µm2 field of view has been used for high-resolution (30–40 nm) imaging and density quantification of mineralized tissue. TXM is uniquely suited for imaging of internal cellular structures and networks in mammalian mineralized tissues using relatively thick (50 µm), untreated samples that preserve tissue micro- and nanostructure. To test this method we performed Zernike phase contrast and absorption contrast imaging of mouse cancellous bone prepared under different conditions of in vivo loading, fixation, and contrast agents. In addition, the three-dimensional structure was examined using tomography. Individual osteocytic lacunae were observed embedded within trabeculae in cancellous bone. Extensive canalicular networks were evident and included processes with diameters near the 30–40 nm instrument resolution that have not been reported previously. Trabecular density was quantified relative to rod-like crystalline apatite, and rod-like trabecular struts were found to have 51–54% of pure crystal density and plate-like areas had 44–53% of crystal density. The nanometer resolution of TXM enables future studies for visualization and quantification of ultrastructural changes in bone tissue resulting from osteoporosis, dental disease, and other pathologies. PMID:20374681

  7. Stabilized display of coronary x-ray image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Robert A.; Whiting, James S.; Da, Xiaolin; Eigler, Neal L.

    2004-05-01

    Display stabilization is a technique by which a feature of interest in a cine image sequence is tracked and then shifted to remain approximately stationary on the display device. Prior simulations indicate that display stabilization with high playback rates ( 30 f/s) can significantly improve detectability of low-contrast features in coronary angiograms. Display stabilization may also help to improve the accuracy of intra-coronary device placement. We validated our automated tracking algorithm by comparing the inter-frame difference (jitter) between manual and automated tracking of 150 coronary x-ray image sequences acquired on a digital cardiovascular X-ray imaging system with CsI/a-Si flat panel detector. We find that the median (50%) inter-frame jitter between manual and automatic tracking is 1.41 pixels or less, indicating a jump no further than an adjacent pixel. This small jitter implies that automated tracking and manual tracking should yield similar improvements in the performance of most visual tasks. We hypothesize that cardiologists would perceive a benefit in viewing the stabilized display as an addition to the standard playback of cine recordings. A benefit of display stabilization was identified in 87 of 101 sequences (86%). The most common tasks cited were evaluation of stenosis and determination of stent and balloon positions. We conclude that display stabilization offers perceptible improvements in the performance of visual tasks by cardiologists.

  8. Simulation of a compact analyzer-based imaging system with a regular x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudevilla, Oriol; Zhou, Wei; Stoupin, Stanislav; Verman, Boris; Brankov, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    Analyzer-based Imaging (ABI) belongs to a broader family of phase-contrast (PC) X-ray techniques. PC measures X-ray deflection phenomena when interacting with a sample, which is known to provide higher contrast images of soft tissue than other X-ray methods. This is of high interest in the medical field, in particular for mammogram applications. This paper presents a simulation tool for table-top ABI systems using a conventional polychromatic X-ray source.

  9. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging. Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator. Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 103. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 104. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases the

  10. Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Th.; Freyberg, M. J.; Trümper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. Methods: We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4° × 6.4° sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the variable point-spread function (PSF) across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. X-ray control images showing the source and background extraction regions were generated, which were visually inspected. Simulations were performed to assess the spurious source content of the 2RXS catalogue. X-ray spectra and light curves were extracted for the 2RXS sources, with spectral and variability parameters derived from these products. Results: We obtained about 135 000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5, as adopted in the 1RXS faint source catalogue. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spurious detections. A more conservative likelihood threshold of 9, on the other hand, yields about 71 000 detections with a 5% spurious fraction. We recommend thresholds appropriate to the scientific application. X-ray images and overlaid X-ray contour lines provide an additional user product to evaluate the detections visually, and we performed our own visual inspections to flag uncertain detections. Intra-day variability in the X-ray light curves was quantified based on the

  11. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Judge, J.

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.

  12. Water window ptychographic imaging with characterized coherent X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Max; Skopintsev, Petr; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Senkbeil, Tobias; von Gundlach, Andreas; Gorniak, Thomas; Shabalin, Anatoly; Viefhaus, Jens; Rosenhahn, Axel; Vartanyants, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    A ptychographical coherent diffractive imaging experiment in the water window with focused soft X-rays at 500 eV is reported. An X-ray beam with high degree of coherence was selected for ptychography at the P04 beamline of PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. The beam coherence was measured with the newly developed non-redundant array method, and a coherence length of 4.1 µm and global degree of coherence of 35% at 100 µm exit slit opening in the vertical direction were determined. A pinhole, 2.6 µm in size, selected the coherent part of the beam that was used to obtain ptychographic reconstruction results of a lithographically manufactured test sample and a fossil diatom. The achieved resolution was 53 nm for the test sample and was only limited by the size of the detector. The diatom was imaged at a resolution better than 90 nm. PMID:25931102

  13. Fast CCD camera for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved x-ray scattering and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falus, P.; Borthwick, M. A.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2004-11-01

    A new, fast x-ray detector system is presented for high-throughput, high-sensitivity, time-resolved, x-ray scattering and imaging experiments, most especially x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). After a review of the architectures of different CCD chips and a critical examination of their suitability for use in a fast x-ray detector, the new detector hardware is described. In brief, its principal component is an inexpensive, commercial camera—the SMD1M60—originally designed for optical applications, and modified for use as a direct-illumination x-ray detector. The remainder of the system consists of two Coreco Imaging PC-DIG frame grabber boards, located inside a Dell Power-edge 6400 server. Each frame grabber sits on its own PCI bus and handles data from 2 of the CCD's 4 taps. The SMD1M60 is based on a fast, frame-transfer, 4-tap CCD chip, read out at12-bit resolution at frame rates of up to 62 Hz for full frame readout and up to 500 Hz for one-sixteenth frame readout. Experiments to characterize the camera's suitability for XPCS and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) are presented. These experiments show that single photon events are readily identified, and localized to within a pixel index or so. This is a sufficiently fine spatial resolution to maintain the speckle contrast at an acceptable value for XPCS measurements. The detective quantum efficiency of the SMD1M60 is 49% for directly-detected 6.3 keV x rays. The effects of data acquisition strategies that permit near-real-time data compression are also determined and discussed. Overall, the SMD1M60 detector system represents a major improvement in the technology for time-resolved x-ray experiments, that require an area detector with time-resolutions in few-milliseconds-to-few-seconds range, and it should have wide applications, extending beyond XPCS.

  14. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  15. Long Duration X-ray Bursts Observed by MAXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, Motoko; Iwakiri, Wataru; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) is X-ray mission on the International Space Station. MAXI scans all sky every 92 min and detects various X-ray transient events including X-ray bursts. Among the X-ray bursts observed by MAXI, eleven had long duration and were observed more than one scan. Six out of eleven long bursts have the e-folding time of >1 h, that should be classified as "superbursts", while the rest are "intermediate-duration bursts". The total emitted energy of these long X-ray bursts range from 1041 to 1042 ergs. The lower limits of the superburst recurrence time of 4U 0614+091 and Ser X-1 are calculated as 4400 and 59 days, which may be consistent with the observed recurrence time of 3523 and 1148 days, respectively.

  16. Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors: Large Format X-ray Spectral Imagers for the Next Generation of X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckart, Megan E.; Mazin, B. A.; Bumble, B.; Golwala, S. R.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Day, P. K.; Harrison, F. A.

    2006-09-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) have the potential to provide megapixel imagers with few eV spectral resolution for future X-ray missions such as Gen-X. MKIDs offer the advantage over many other cryogenic detector technologies that they can be easily multiplexed, so that arrays with many thousand pixels are readily achievable. In addition, the readout electronics can be operated at room temperature, a significant advantage for space applications. MKIDs exploit the dependence of surface impedance of a superconductorwith the quasiparticle density. Quasiparticles are created by absorption of X-rays, with number proportional to the X-ray energy. The impedance change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit. The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. To apply the MKID scheme to X-ray detection we pattern tantalum strips with aluminum MKIDs attached at each end. An incident X-ray is absorbed in the Ta and creates millions of quasiparticle excitations, which diffuse to each end of the strip, finally entering the Al resonators where they are trapped and sensed. Simultaneous monitoring of the signal at both ends of the strip allow position and energy determination for each photon. We have demonstrated working strip detectors in the laboratory, and will present our measurements of the quasiparticle diffusion constant and the quasiparticle lifetime in tantalum, the aluminum quasiparticle lifetime, and the energy resolution of the detector. We will also discuss ideas for future detector designs and suggest ultimate performance goals for X-ray astronomy applications.

  17. Application of imaging plate to x-ray imaging and spectroscopy in laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Snavely, R; Gregori, G; Koch, J A; Park, H; Remington, B A

    2006-04-25

    We report recent progress of x-ray diagnostic techniques in laser plasma experiment with using imaging plates. Imaging plate is a photo-stimulable phosphor screen (BaF(Br0.85,10.15):Eu{sup 2+}) deposited on flexible metal or plastic substrate. We applied the imaging plate to x-ray microscopy in laser fusion experiment experiments. Self-emission x-ray images of imploded core were obtained successfully with using imaging plate and high magnification target mounted pinhole arrays. The imaging plates were applied also in ultra-intense laser experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Small samarium foil was irradiated by high intensity laser pulse from the Vulcan laser system. The k shell x-rays from the foil ({approx}40keV) was used as a line x-ray source for microscopic radiography. Performance of imaging plate on high-energy x-ray backlit radiography was demonstrated by imaging sinusoidal grooves of 6um amplitude on a Au foil. Detailed spectrum of k shell x-ray from Cu embedded foil target was successfully observed by fully coupling imaging plate with a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometer. The performances of the imaging plates evaluated in actual laser plasma experiments will be presented.

  18. Single grating x-ray imaging for dynamic biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kaye S.; Paganin, David M.; Parsons, David W.; Donnelley, Martin; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Siu, Karen K. W.

    2012-07-01

    Biomedical studies are already benefiting from the excellent contrast offered by phase contrast x-ray imaging, but live imaging work presents several challenges. Living samples make it particularly difficult to achieve high resolution, sensitive phase contrast images, as exposures must be short and cannot be repeated. We therefore present a single-exposure, high-flux method of differential phase contrast imaging [1, 2, 3] in the context of imaging live airways for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) treatment assessment [4]. The CF study seeks to non-invasively observe the liquid lining the airways, which should increase in depth in response to effective treatments. Both high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to track micron size changes in a liquid that is not easily differentiated from the tissue on which it lies. Our imaging method achieves these goals by using a single attenuation grating or grid as a reference pattern, and analyzing how the sample deforms the pattern to quantitatively retrieve the phase depth of the sample. The deformations are mapped at each pixel in the image using local cross-correlations comparing each 'sample and pattern' image with a reference 'pattern only' image taken before the sample is introduced. This produces a differential phase image, which may be integrated to give the sample phase depth.

  19. Hybrid lightweight X-ray optics for half arcsecond imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul

    This proposal is for the development of grazing incidence optics suitable to meet the 0.5 arcsec imaging and 2.3 square meter effective area requirements of the X-ray Surveyor mission concept, currently under study by NASA. Our approach is to combine two promising technologies, as yet individually unproven at the 0.5 arcsec level, into a hybrid mirror approach. The two technologies are thin piezoelectric film adjustable optics under development at SAO and PSU, and differential deposition under development at NASA MSFC. These technologies are complementary: adjustable optics are best suited to fixing low spatial frequency errors due to piezoelectric cell size limitations, and differential deposition is best suited for fixing mid-spatial frequency errors so as to limit the amount of material that must be deposited. Thus, the combination of the two techniques extends the bandwidth of figure errors that can be corrected beyond what it was for either individual technique. Both technologies will be applied to fabricate Wolter-I mirror segment from single thermally formed glass substrates. This work is directed at mirror segments only (not full shells), as we believe segments are the most appropriate for developing the 3 m diameter X-ray Surveyor high resolution mirror. In this program we will extend differential deposition to segment surfaces (from line profiles), investigate the most realistic error bandwidths for each technology, and determine the impacts of one technologys processing steps on the other to find if there is an optimal order to combining the technologies. In addition, we will also conduct a conical/cylindrical mirror metrology "round-robin," to cross-calibrate the different cylindrical metrology to one another as a means of minimizing systematic errors. Finally, we will examine the balancing and compensating of mirror stress due to the various thin films employed (piezoelectric layer, differential deposition, X-ray reflecting layer(s)) with an eye to

  20. Coded Mask Imaging of High Energy X-rays with CZT Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Duttweiler, F.; Heindl, W. A.; Hink, P. L.; Huszar, G. L.; Kalemci, E.; Leblanc, P. C.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Slavis, K. R.; Stephan, E. A.

    1998-12-01

    Coded mask imagers are appropriate for important objectives of high energy X-ray astronomy, e.g., gamma- ray burst localization, all-sky monitors and surveys, and deep surveys of limited regions. We report results from a coded mask imager developed to establish the proof-of-concept for this technique with CZT detectors. The detector is 2 mm thick with orthogonal crossed strip readout and an advanced electrode design to improve the energy resolution. Each detector face has 22 strip electrodes, and the strip pitch and pixel size are 500 microns. ASIC readout is used and the energy resolution varies from 3 to 6 keV FWHM over the 14 to 184 keV keV range. A coded mask with 2 x 2 cycles of a 23 x 23 MURA pattern (860 micron unit cell) was built from 600 micron thick tantalum to provide good X-ray modulation up to 200 keV. The detector, mask, and a tiny Gd-153 source of 41 keV X-rays were positioned with a spacing that caused the mask cells in the shadowgram to have a projected size of 1300 microns at the detector. Multiple detector positions were used to measure the shadowgram of a full mask cycle and this was recorded with 100 percent modulation transfer by the detector, due to its factor of 2.6 oversampling of the mask unit cell, and very high strip-to-strip selectivity and spatial accuracy. Deconvolution of the shadowgram produced a correlation image in which the source was detected as a 76-sigma peak with the correct FWHM and base diameter. Off-source image pixels had gaussian fluctuations that agree closely with the measurement statistics. Off-source image defects such as might be produced by systematic effects were too small to be seen and limited to <0.5 percent of the source peak. These results were obtained with the "raw" shadowgram and image; no "flat fielding" corrections were used.

  1. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  2. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  3. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  4. Real-Time, Light Weight, X-Ray Imager. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-06

    Lght Weight, X-Ray Imager"I Principle hwvesdgatow Eiren Kutlubay Miderm Report Table of Contents Front Cover Report Dcm taonpage Foreword 1...of the system to an X-ray exposure. Lanex screens will be used for the initial tests. Phantoms will be available to be used under X-ray exposure

  5. The ultrafast high-peak power lasers in future biomedical and medical x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, J. C.; Fourmaux, S.; Krol, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progresses in ultrafast laser-based X-ray sources and their potential applications to high throughput X-ray imaging. Prospects for the utilization of X-rays sources related to the Laser Wakefield electron Acceleration (LWFA) are more specifically discussed with emphasis on application in diagnostic radiology.

  6. Design and analysis of soft X-ray imaging microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Cheng, Wang; Wu, Jiang; Hoover, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The spherical Schwarzschild microscope for soft X-ray applications in microscopy and projection lithography consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third-order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for X-ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. To reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles are here considered. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical Head reflecting two-mirror microscope configurations. The Head microscope with a NA of 0.4 achieves diffraction limited performance for objects with a diameter of 40 microns. Thus, it seems possible to record images with a feature size less than 100 A with a 40x microscope when using 40 A radiation.

  7. 'Edge illumination' in X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Diemoz, Paul C.; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Millard, Thomas P.; Zapata, Cesar E.; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-07-31

    In the late '90s, the concept of 'edge illumination' was developed at ELETTRA in Italy as an alternative method to increase the phase sensitivity of an imaging system. The main idea was to be able to reproduce the fine angular selection of 'analyzer' crystals without actually using a crystal, as this would allow employing the method with divergent and polychromatic (i.e. conventional) x-ray sources. It was observed that this could be achieved by illuminating only the edges of the detector pixels, and that the method's sensitivity could be progressively increased by illuminating smaller pixel fractions closer to its physical edge. A few years later the idea was adapted for use with a conventional source by means of two sets of x-ray masks ('coded aperture' masks), which enabled obtaining the same effect for each row (or column) of pixels of an area detector illuminated by a cone beam. This article reviews the method and presents recent examples of application.

  8. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; Sheu, Y.M.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  9. Magnetic imaging by x-ray holography using extended references.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Thomas A; Ogrin, Feodor; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; Langridge, Sean; Whiteside, Amy; Moore, Thomas; Beutier, Guillaume; van der Laan, Gerrit

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate magnetic lensless imaging by Fourier transform holography using extended references. A narrow slit milled through an opaque gold mask is used as a holographic reference and magnetic contrast is obtained by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We present images of magnetic domains in a Co/Pt multilayer thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. This technique holds advantages over standard Fourier transform holography, where small holes are used to define the reference beam. An increased intensity through the extended reference reduces the counting time to record the farfield diffraction pattern. Additionally it was found that manufacturing narrow slits is less technologically demanding than the same procedure for holes. We achieve a spatial resolution of ∼30 nm, which was found to be limited by the sample period of the chosen experimental setup. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  10. Coherent Diffraction Imaging with Hard X-Ray Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, Liberato De; Giannini, Cinzia; Pelliccia, Daniele; Cedola, Alessia; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) has been widely applied in the nanoscopic world, offering nanometric-scale imaging of noncrystallographic samples, and permitting the next-generation structural studies on living cells, single virus particles and biomolecules. The use of curved wavefronts in CXDI has caused a tidal wave in the already promising application of this emergent technique. The non-planarity of the wavefront allows to accelerate any iterative phase-retrieval process and to guarantee a reliable and unique solution. Nowadays, successful experiments have been performed with Fresnel zone plates and planar waveguides as optical elements. Here we describe the use of a single planar waveguide as well as two crossed waveguides in the experiments which first showed this optical element a promising tool for producing a line- or point-like coherent source, respectively.

  11. Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy Imaging of Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, M. K.; Kilcoyne, A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D. K.; Fakra, S.; Robinson, M.; Chase, K.

    2003-12-01

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopes (STXM) are used to image a diversity of carbon and metal containing items such as biofilms in soils, magnetic materials, polymers and meteorites. Studies on particles collected on SiO2 filters from biomass burns in Flagstaff, Arizona and individual aerosols collected in South Africa on TEM grids are underway at beamlines 5.3.2 and 11.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sub micron particles are imaged in the transmission mode over the energy range of 280 - 1900 eV. Spectromicroscopic studies on individual particles using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) probe multiple species within or on the same particle. In (STXM) an X-ray beam is focused with a zone plate onto a sample and the transmitted radiation is detected. Since the signal is obtained in the transmission mode, optically thin samples are required. Hence, atmospheric aerosols with submicron thickness and diameter are well suited for this method. Near edge spectra of various elements were scanned in step sizes from 0.1-0.5 eV around characteristic absorption edges, creating 2 dimensional images at each energy. While STXM images are taken with a lower spatial resolution (currently 40 nm) than microscopies such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, detailed chemical information with spatial distributions, and oxidation states is obtained. A particular focus of this work is to obtain more detailed information on the type of carbons, multiply, or singly bonded and whether or not carbon is bonded to oxygen. The ultimate goal is discrimination between organic and black carbon within individual aerosol particles and determining if organic carbon, black carbon, and metal species are distributed homogeneously throughout aerosol particles. Initial scans of the samples from Flagstaff show spectral evidence of aromatic carbon, without distinct C=O signatures. NEXAFS

  12. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray source for mammography: Feasibility study...W81XWH-04-1-0481 TITLE: High Resolution X - ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Jun 2005 – 31 May 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Resolution X - ray

  13. Images of the laser entrance hole from the static x-ray imager at NIF.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M B; Jones, O S; Meezan, N B; Milovich, J L; Town, R P; Alvarez, S S; Beeler, R G; Bradley, D K; Celeste, J R; Dixit, S N; Edwards, M J; Haugh, M J; Kalantar, D H; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Moody, J D; Oberhelman, S K; Piston, K W; Pivovaroff, M J; Suter, L J; Teruya, A T; Thomas, C A; Vernon, S P; Warrick, A L; Widmann, K; Wood, R D; Young, B K

    2010-10-01

    The static x-ray imager at the National Ignition Facility is a pinhole camera using a CCD detector to obtain images of Hohlraum wall x-ray drive illumination patterns seen through the laser entrance hole (LEH). Carefully chosen filters, combined with the CCD response, allow recording images in the x-ray range of 3-5 keV with 60 μm spatial resolution. The routines used to obtain the apparent size of the backlit LEH and the location and intensity of beam spots are discussed and compared to predictions. A new soft x-ray channel centered at 870 eV (near the x-ray peak of a 300 eV temperature ignition Hohlraum) is discussed.

  14. X-ray excited luminescent chemical imaging (XELCI) for non-invasive imaging of implant infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benza, Donald; Uzair, Unaiza; Raval, Yash; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J.; Behrend, Caleb J.; Anker, Jeffrey N.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray excited luminescent chemical imaging (XELCI) uses a combination of X-ray excitation to provide high resolution and optical detection to provide chemical sensing. A key application is to detect and study implant-associated infection. The implant is coated with a layer of X-ray scintillators which generate visible near infrared light when irradiated with an X-ray beam. This light first passes through a pH indicator dye-loaded film placed over the scintillator film in order to modulate the luminescence spectrum according to pH. The light then passes through tissue is collected and the spectral ratio measured to determine pH. A focused X-ray beam irradiates a point in the scintillator film, and a pH image is formed point-by-point by scanning the beam across the sample. The sensor and scanning system are described along with preliminary results showing images in rabbit models.

  15. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  16. Development of x-ray microcalorimeter imaging spectrometers for the X-ray Surveyor mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Miniussi, Antoine R.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wakeham, Nicholas A.; Wassell, Edward J.; Yoon, Wonsik; Becker, Dan; Bennett, Douglas; Doriese, William B.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gard, Johnathan D.; Hilton, Gene C.; Mates, Benjamin; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Reintsema, Carl D.; Swetz, Daniel; Ullom, Joel N.; Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Irwin, Kent D.; Lee, Sang-Jun; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Four astrophysics missions are currently being studied by NASA as candidate large missions to be chosen in the 2020 astrophysics decadal survey.1 One of these missions is the "X-Ray Surveyor" (XRS), and possible configurations of this mission are currently under study by a science and technology definition team (STDT). One of the key instruments under study is an X-ray microcalorimeter, and the requirements for such an instrument are currently under discussion. In this paper we review some different detector options that exist for this instrument, and discuss what array formats might be possible. We have developed one design option that utilizes either transition-edge sensor (TES) or magnetically coupled calorimeters (MCC) in pixel array-sizes approaching 100 kilo-pixels. To reduce the number of sensors read out to a plausible scale, we have assumed detector geometries in which a thermal sensor such a TES or MCC can read out a sub-array of 20-25 individual 1" pixels. In this paper we describe the development status of these detectors, and also discuss the different options that exist for reading out the very large number of pixels.

  17. Development of X-Ray Microcalorimeter Imaging Spectrometers for the X-Ray Surveyor Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Betncourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Miniussi, Antoine R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Four astrophysics missions are currently being studied by NASA as candidate large missions to be chosen inthe 2020 astrophysics decadal survey.1 One of these missions is the X-Ray Surveyor (XRS), and possibleconfigurations of this mission are currently under study by a science and technology definition team (STDT). Oneof the key instruments under study is an X-ray microcalorimeter, and the requirements for such an instrument arecurrently under discussion. In this paper we review some different detector options that exist for this instrument,and discuss what array formats might be possible. We have developed one design option that utilizes eithertransition-edge sensor (TES) or magnetically coupled calorimeters (MCC) in pixel array-sizes approaching 100kilo-pixels. To reduce the number of sensors read out to a plausible scale, we have assumed detector geometriesin which a thermal sensor such a TES or MCC can read out a sub-array of 20-25 individual 1 pixels. In thispaper we describe the development status of these detectors, and also discuss the different options that exist forreading out the very large number of pixels.

  18. Design of a normal incidence multilayer imaging x-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Shealy, D L; Gabardi, D R; Hoover, R B; Walker, A B; Lindblom, J F; Barbee, T W

    1989-01-01

    Normal incidence multilayer Cassegrain x-ray telescopes were flown on the Stanford/MSFC Rocket X-Ray Spectroheliograph. These instruments produced high spatial resolution images of the Sun and conclusively demonstrated that doubly reflecting multilayer x-ray optical systems are feasible. The images indicated that aplanatic imaging soft x-ray /EUV microscopes should be achievable using multilayer optics technology. We have designed a doubly reflecting normal incidence multilayer imaging x-ray microscope based on the Schwarzschild configuration. The Schwarzschild microscope utilizes two spherical mirrors with concentric radii of curvature which are chosen such that the third-order spherical aberration and coma are minimized. We discuss the design of the microscope and the results of the optical system ray trace analysis which indicates that diffraction-limited performance with 600 Å spatial resolution should be obtainable over a 1 mm field of view at a wavelength of 100 Å. Fabrication of several imaging soft x-ray microscopes based upon these designs, for use in conjunction with x-ray telescopes and laser fusion research, is now in progress. High resolution aplanatic imaging x-ray microscopes using normal incidence multilayer x-ray mirrors should have many important applications in advanced x-ray astronomical instrumentation, x-ray lithography, biological, biomedical, metallurgical, and laser fusion research.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, David Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  1. Eigen analysis for classifying chest x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.

    2004-10-01

    A method first employed for face recognition has been employed to analyse a set of chest x-ray images. After marking certain common features on the images, they are registered by means of an affine transformation. The differences between each registered image and the mean of all images in the set are computed and the first K principal components are found, where K is less than or equal to the number of images in the set. These form eigenimages (we have coined the term 'eigenchests') from which an approximation to any one of the original images can be reconstructed. Since the method effectively treats each pixel as a dimension in a hyperspace, the matrices concerned are huge; we employ the method developed by Turk and Pentland for face recognition to make the computations tractable. The K coefficients for the eigenimages encode the variation between images and form the basis for discriminating normal from abnormal. Preliminary results have been obtained for a set of eigenimages formed from a set of normal chests and tested on separate sets of normals and patients with pneumonia. The distributions of coefficients have been observed to be different for the two test sets and work is continuing to determine the most sensitive method for detecting the differences.

  2. Diffraction enhanced kinetic depth X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, A.

    An increasing number of fields would benefit from a single analytical probe that can characterise bulk objects that vary in morphology and/or material composition. These fields include security screening, medicine and material science. In this study the X-ray region is shown to be an effective probe for the characterisation of materials. The most prominent analytical techniques that utilise X-radiation are reviewed. The study then focuses on methods of amalgamating the three dimensional power of kinetic depth X-ray (KDFX) imaging with the materials discrimination of angular dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), thus providing KDEX with a much needed material specific counterpart. A knowledge of the sample position is essential for the correct interpretation of diffraction signatures. Two different sensor geometries (i.e. circumferential and linear) that are able to collect end interpret multiple unknown material diffraction patterns and attribute them to their respective loci within an inspection volume are investigated. The circumferential and linear detector geometries are hypothesised, simulated and then tested in an experimental setting with the later demonstrating a greater ability at discerning between mixed diffraction patterns produced by differing materials. Factors known to confound the linear diffraction method such as sample thickness and radiation energy have been explored and quantified with a possible means of mitigation being identified (i.e. via increasing the sample to detector distance). A series of diffraction patterns (following the linear diffraction approach) were obtained from a single phantom object that was simultaneously interrogated via KDEX imaging. Areas containing diffraction signatures matched from a threat library have been highlighted in the KDEX imagery via colour encoding and match index is inferred by intensity. This union is the first example of its kind and is called diffraction enhanced KDEX imagery. Finally an additional

  3. Dynamic Granularity for X-Ray Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Bigman, Verle H.; Edens, Aaron D.; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic range and spatial resolution are correlated, because imaging units such as pixels or film grains can cover a wider dynamic range if they are larger, so that they can contain more electrons in a well or fluorescence centers in a grain. However, for systems that are subject to low photon flux, statistical noise influences the spatial resolution. Statistical noise is important for many experiments that rely on single shot X-ray imaging diagnostics. Detectors face a limited photon flux and often also a limited detection probability, where photons of higher energy may just penetrate the detector. The effective spatial resolution depends on detector efficiency, incident photon flux, detector cell size (grain/pixel), and the detector's inherent noise. We describe the combined influences with a ``dynamic granularity'' function, based on measurements of the grain size dependent distinguishability of grey levels. The dynamic granularity is unique to each imaging system, but allows us to quantify the performance of different detectors in a system. We have characterized a fast microchannel plate imaging detector and imaging plate with respect to dynamic granularity on the 6.151 keV crystal imaging system at the Z-Beamlet laser. Sandia Natl. Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Natl. Nucl. Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  4. 3D x-ray reconstruction using lightfield imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sajib; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew; Pickering, Mark R.

    2014-09-01

    Existing Computed Tomography (CT) systems require full 360° rotation projections. Using the principles of lightfield imaging, only 4 projections under ideal conditions can be sufficient when the object is illuminated with multiple-point Xray sources. The concept was presented in a previous work with synthetically sampled data from a synthetic phantom. Application to real data requires precise calibration of the physical set up. This current work presents the calibration procedures along with experimental findings for the reconstruction of a physical 3D phantom consisting of simple geometric shapes. The crucial part of this process is to determine the effective distances of the X-ray paths, which are not possible or very difficult by direct measurements. Instead, they are calculated by tracking the positions of fiducial markers under prescribed source and object movements. Iterative algorithms are used for the reconstruction. Customized backprojection is used to ensure better initial guess for the iterative algorithms to start with.

  5. Hard X-ray Microscopic Images of the Human Hair

    SciTech Connect

    Goo, Jawoong; Jeon, Soo Young; Oh, Tak Heon; Hong, Seung Phil; Lee, Won-Soo; Yon, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-19

    The better visualization of the human organs or internal structure is challenging to the physicist and physicians. It can lead to more understanding of the morphology, pathophysiology and the diagnosis. Conventionally used methods to investigate cells or architectures, show limited value due to sample processing procedures and lower resolution. In this respect, Zernike type phase contrast hard x-ray microscopy using 6.95keV photon energy has advantages. We investigated hair fibers of the normal healthy persons. Coherence based phase contrast images revealed three distinct structures of hair, medulla, cortex, and cuticular layer. Some different detailed characters of each sample were noted. And further details would be shown and these results would be utilized as basic data of morphologic study of human hair.

  6. XIPE the X-Ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffitta, Paolo; Barcons, Xavier; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Braga, Joao; Costa, Enrico; Fraser, George W.; Gburek, Szymon; Huovelin, Juhani; Matt, Giorgio; Pearce, Mark; hide

    2013-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017. The proposal was, unfortunately, not selected. To be compliant with this schedule, we designed the payload mostly with existing items. The XIPE proposal takes advantage of the completed phase A of POLARIX for an ASI small mission program that was cancelled, but is different in many aspects: the detectors, the presence of a solar flare polarimeter and photometer and the use of a light platform derived by a mass production for a cluster of satellites. XIPE is composed of two out of the three existing JET-X telescopes with two Gas Pixel Detectors (GPD) filled with a He-DME mixture at their focus. Two additional GPDs filled with a 3-bar Ar-DME mixture always face the Sun to detect polarization from solar flares. The Minimum Detectable Polarization of a 1 mCrab source reaches 14 in the 210 keV band in 105 s for pointed observations, and 0.6 for an X10 class solar flare in the 1535 keV energy band. The imaging capability is 24 arcsec Half Energy Width (HEW) in a Field of View of 14

  7. Hard X-ray Microscopic Images of the Human Hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Jawoong; Jeon, Soo Young; Oh, Tak Heon; Hong, Seung Phil; Yon, Hwa Shik; Lee, Won-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The better visualization of the human organs or internal structure is challenging to the physicist and physicians. It can lead to more understanding of the morphology, pathophysiology and the diagnosis. Conventionally used methods to investigate cells or architectures, show limited value due to sample processing procedures and lower resolution. In this respect, Zernike type phase contrast hard x-ray microscopy using 6.95keV photon energy has advantages. We investigated hair fibers of the normal healthy persons. Coherence based phase contrast images revealed three distinct structures of hair, medulla, cortex, and cuticular layer. Some different detailed characters of each sample were noted. And further details would be shown and these results would be utilized as basic data of morphologic study of human hair.

  8. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Biçer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  9. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Biçer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversionmore » approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.« less

  10. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  11. Hyperspectral Image Reconstruction for X-ray Fluorescence Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Bicer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-04-07

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  12. XIPE: the X-ray imaging polarimetry explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffitta, Paolo; Barcons, Xavier; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Braga, João; Costa, Enrico; Fraser, George W.; Gburek, Szymon; Huovelin, Juhani; Matt, Giorgio; Pearce, Mark; Poutanen, Juri; Reglero, Victor; Santangelo, Andrea; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Weisskopf, Martin; Aloisio, Roberto; Amato, Elena; Attiná, Primo; Axelsson, Magnus; Baldini, Luca; Basso, Stefano; Bianchi, Stefano; Blasi, Pasquale; Bregeon, Johan; Brez, Alessandro; Bucciantini, Niccoló; Burderi, Luciano; Burwitz, Vadim; Casella, Piergiorgio; Churazov, Eugene; Civitani, Marta; Covino, Stefano; Curado da Silva, Rui Miguel; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Dadina, Mauro; D'Amico, Flavio; De Rosa, Alessandra; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Dovciak, Michal; Elsner, Ronald; Eyles, Chris J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fabiani, Sergio; Feng, Hua; Giarrusso, Salvatore; Goosmann, René W.; Grandi, Paola; Grosso, Nicolas; Israel, Gianluca; Jackson, Miranda; Kaaret, Philip; Karas, Vladimir; Kuss, Michael; Lai, Dong; Rosa, Giovanni La; Larsson, Josefin; Larsson, Stefan; Latronico, Luca; Maggio, Antonio; Maia, Jorge; Marin, Frédéric; Massai, Marco Maria; Mineo, Teresa; Minuti, Massimo; Moretti, Elena; Muleri, Fabio; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Peres, Giovanni; Pesce, Melissa; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Pinchera, Michele; Porquet, Delphine; Ramsey, Brian; Rea, Nanda; Reale, Fabio; Rodrigo, Juana Maria; Różańska, Agata; Rubini, Alda; Rudawy, Pawel; Ryde, Felix; Salvati, Marco; de Santiago, Valdivino Alexandre; Sazonov, Sergey; Sgró, Carmelo; Silver, Eric; Spandre, Gloria; Spiga, Daniele; Stella, Luigi; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamborra, Francesco; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Teixeira Dias, Teresa; van Adelsberg, Matthew; Wu, Kinwah; Zane, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    Abstract X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017. The proposal was, unfortunately, not selected. To be compliant with this schedule, we designed the payload mostly with existing items. The XIPE proposal takes advantage of the completed phase A of POLARIX for an ASI small mission program that was cancelled, but is different in many aspects: the detectors, the presence of a solar flare polarimeter and photometer and the use of a light platform derived by a mass production for a cluster of satellites. XIPE is composed of two out of the three existing JET-X telescopes with two Gas Pixel Detectors (GPD) filled with a He-DME mixture at their focus. Two additional GPDs filled with a 3-bar Ar-DME mixture always face the Sun to detect polarization from solar flares. The Minimum Detectable Polarization of a 1 mCrab source reaches 14 % in the 2-10 keV band in 105 s for pointed observations, and 0.6 % for an X10 class solar flare in the 15-35 keV energy band. The imaging capability is 24 arcsec Half Energy Width (HEW) in a Field of

  13. High-speed X-ray phase imaging and X-ray phase tomography with Talbot interferometer and white synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Momose, Atsushi; Yashiro, Wataru; Maikusa, Hirohide; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2009-07-20

    X-ray Talbot interferometry, which uses two transmission gratings, has the advantage that broad energy bandwidth x-rays can be used. We demonstrate the use of white synchrotron radiation for high-speed X-ray phase imaging and tomography in combination with an X-ray Talbot interferometer. The moiré fringe visibility over 20% was attained, enabling quantitative phase measurement. X-ray phase images with a frame rate of 500 f/s and an X-ray phase tomogram with a scan time of 0.5 s were obtained successfully. This result suggests a breakthrough for time-resolved three-dimensional observation of objects that weakly absorb X-rays, such as soft material and biological objects.

  14. The solar x-ray imager for GOES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemen, James R.; Duncan, Dexter W.; Edwards, Christopher G.; Friedlaender, Frank M.; Jurcevich, Bruce K.; Morrison, Mons D.; Springer, Larry A.; Stern, Robert A.; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Catura, Richard C.

    2004-02-01

    The next generation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Geo-Stationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft will include an X-ray telescope that will monitor the Sun for predicting solar energetic events and for providing information about the large-scale solar magnetic field. The Solar X-ray Imager that will be flown on the GOES N spacecraft in late 2004 makes use of a super-polished grazing incidence mirror, a highly efficient back-thinned CCD, and thin metalized filters to observe the million-degree corona with 10-arcsec resolution (5 arcsec pixel size). Full-sun images will be acquired with SXI on a one-minute cadence at wavelengths between approximately 10 and 60 Å. SXI data will be used to forecast 'space weather', i.e., the effects of charged particles that are produced at the Sun as they interact at the earth. Major contributors to space weather include: variations in the Sun's solar wind, solar flares, and solar mass ejections. Effects of space weather include: radiation damage and particle events in high-inclination orbit spacecraft, disruption of various kinds of communications equipment, degradation of navigational tools such as GPS, potential health hazards during space walks, and power blackouts. Data acquired by the SXI will additionally provide invaluable context information for upcoming solar missions such as STEREO and SDO. The Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory has prepared two flight model SXIs that are being readied for flight on the GOES N and GOES O or P spacecraft.

  15. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  16. Effect of repeated x-ray exposure on the resolution of amorphous selenium based x-ray imagers

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, M. Z.; Chowdhury, L.; DeCrescenzo, G.; Tousignant, O.; Kasap, S. O.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A numerical model and the experimental methods to study the x-ray exposure dependent change in the modulation transfer function (MTF) of amorphous selenium (a-Se) based active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) are described. The physical mechanisms responsible for the x-ray exposure dependent change in MTF are also investigated. Methods: A numerical model for describing the x-ray exposure dependent MTF of a-Se based AMFPIs has been developed. The x-ray sensitivity and MTF of an a-Se AMFPI have been measured as a function of exposure. The instantaneous electric field and free and trapped carrier distributions in the photoconductor layer are obtained by numerically solving the Poisson’s equation, continuity equations, and trapping rate equations using the backward Euler finite difference method. From the trapped carrier distributions, a method for calculating the MTF due to incomplete charge collection is proposed. Results: The model developed in this work and the experimental data show a reasonably good agreement. The model is able to simultaneously predict the dependence of the sensitivity and MTF on accumulated exposure at different applied fields and bias polarities, with the same charge transport parameters that are typical of the particular a-Se photoconductive layer that is used in these AMFPIs. Under negative bias, the MTF actually improves with the accumulated x-ray exposure while the sensitivity decreases. The MTF enhancement with exposure decreases with increasing applied field. Conclusions: The most prevalent processes that control the MTF under negative bias are the recombination of drifting holes with previously trapped electrons (electrons remain in deep traps due to their long release times compared with the time scale of the experiments) and the deep trapping of drifting holes and electrons. PMID:20384271

  17. Investigation of the hard x-ray background in backlit pinhole imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, J. R. Holloway, J. P.; Peebles, J. L.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Drake, R. P.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-rays from laser-produced hot electrons (>10 keV) in backlit pinhole imagers can give rise to a background signal that decreases signal dynamic range in radiographs. Consequently, significant uncertainties are introduced to the measured optical depth of imaged plasmas. Past experiments have demonstrated that hard x-rays are produced when hot electrons interact with the high-Z pinhole substrate used to collimate the softer He-α x-ray source. Results are presented from recent experiments performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to further study the production of hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate and how these x-rays contribute to the background signal in radiographs. Radiographic image plates measured hard x-rays from pinhole imagers with Mo, Sn, and Ta pinhole substrates. The variation in background signal between pinhole substrates provides evidence that much of this background comes from x-rays produced in the pinhole substrate itself. A Monte Carlo electron transport code was used to model x-ray production from hot electrons interacting in the pinhole substrate, as well as to model measurements of x-rays from the irradiated side of the targets, recorded by a bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrometer. Inconsistencies in inferred hot electron distributions between the different pinhole substrate materials demonstrate that additional sources of hot electrons beyond those modeled may produce hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate.

  18. Therapy Imaging: Limitations Of Imaging With High Energy X-Ray Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, P.; Rawlinson, J. A.; Fenster, A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the major problems in radiation therapy is ensuring that the correct region of the patient receives the prescribed x-ray treatment and that the surrounding tissues are spared. One way to identify patient positioning errors is to make an image using the radiotherapy treatment beam. We have examined two of the factors that can influence the quality of images made with high energy x-ray beams: (i) the size of the x-ray source, and; (ii) the signal-to-noise characteristics of the detectors used to form images with high energy x-ray beams. We have developed a novel method of measuring the source distributions for 60Co machines and linear accelerators and from the measurements have been able to obtain the modulation transfer functions of their x-ray sources. We have also measured the modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and the noise power spectra (NPS) of the x-ray detectors. Based on these measurements, we conclude that images made with high energy x-ray beams are limited by film granularity and that improved images can be obtained by alternative detector systems.

  19. Dark-field X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Di Bella, C.; Lura, P.; Prade, F.; Herzen, J.; Sarapata, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Griffa, M. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Jerjen, I.

    2014-10-13

    We introduce in this Letter an approach to X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials based upon the intrinsic X-ray scattering produced by the material microstructural heterogeneity at a length scale below the imaging system spatial resolution. The basic principle for image contrast creation consists in a reduction of such scattering by permeation of the porosity by water. The implementation of the approach is based upon X-ray dark-field imaging via Talbot-Lau interferometry. The proof-of-concept is provided by performing laboratory-scale dark-field X-ray radiography of mortar samples during a water capillary uptake experiment. The results suggest that the proposed approach to visualizing unsaturated water transport in porous materials is complementary to neutron and magnetic resonance imaging and alternative to standard X-ray imaging, the latter requiring the use of contrast agents because based upon X-ray attenuation only.

  20. Space station application of CCD image sensors for x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrance, John L.

    1997-01-10

    Charge Coupled Device (CCD) type solid state image sensors are employed in a number of space based imaging experiments and will be the basis for a camera system to acquire x-ray diffraction images on board the Space Station. This paper will present the system engineering considerations that led to the selection of CCDs over other x-ray imaging technologies and the design of the camera system. This will include discussion of the special requirements imposed by the space environment and this x-ray crystallography mission. This systems engineering discussion will be followed by a summary of high spatial resolution CCDs that are candidates for this camera, what may become available in the future, and what improvements would make CCDs even more suited to such X-ray imaging applications on the ground as well as in space.

  1. Blind source separation based x-ray image denoising from an image sequence.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan; Fei, Bin; Li, Wei-Liang

    2015-09-01

    Blind source separation (BSS) based x-ray image denoising from an image sequence is proposed. Without priori knowledge, the useful image signal can be separated from an x-ray image sequence, for original images are supposed as different combinations of stable image signal and random image noise. The BSS algorithms such as fixed-point independent component analysis and second-order statistics singular value decomposition are used and compared with multi-frame averaging which is a common algorithm for improving image's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Denoising performance is evaluated in SNR, standard deviation, entropy, and runtime. Analysis indicates that BSS is applicable to image denoising; the denoised image's quality will get better when more frames are included in an x-ray image sequence, but it will cost more time; there should be trade-off between denoising performance and runtime, which means that the number of frames included in an image sequence is enough.

  2. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning-imaging X-ray microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning-imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown.

  3. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, Jr., George F.

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  4. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using x-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    Holographic x-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent x-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the x-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered x-rays from the object and unscattered coherent x-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent x-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent x-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  5. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh Z.; Burk, Laurel; Wang, Ko-Han; Cao, Guohua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-08-01

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity.We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  6. CT imaging of small animals using monochromatized synchrotron x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Rarback, H.; Nachaliel, E.; Rivers, M.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, L.D.; Oversluizen, T.; Slatkin, D.N.; Spanne, P.; Spector, S.; Garrett, R.F.; Luke, P.N.; Pehl, R.; Thompson, A.C.; Appel, R.; Miller, M.H.

    1992-12-31

    Rats and chicken embryos were imaged in vivo with a prototype Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system using monochromatized x rays from the X17 superconducting wiggler at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The CT configuration coated of a horizontal low-divergence, fan-shaped beam, 70 mm wide and 0.5 mm high, and a subject rotating about a vertical aids. A linear-array high-purity Ge detector with 140 elements, each 0.5 mm wide and 6 mm thick, was used with a data acquisition system that provides a linear response over almost six orders of magnitude of detector current. The dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) algorithm was applied to images of the rat head acquired at 20 and 45 keV to obtain two new images, one representing the low-Z, and the other the intermediate-Z clement group. The results indicate that the contrast resolution and the quantification accuracy of the images improve stepwise; first, with the monochromatic beam and, second, the DPA method. The system is a prototype for a brain scanner.

  7. CT imaging of small animals using monochromatized synchrotron x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Rarback, H.; Nachaliel, E.; Rivers, M.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, L.D.; Oversluizen, T.; Slatkin, D.N.; Spanne, P.; Spector, S. ); Garrett, R.F. ); Luke, P.N.; Pehl, R.; Thompson, A.C. ); Appel, R.; Miller, M.H. (A

    1992-01-01

    Rats and chicken embryos were imaged in vivo with a prototype Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system using monochromatized x rays from the X17 superconducting wiggler at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The CT configuration coated of a horizontal low-divergence, fan-shaped beam, 70 mm wide and 0.5 mm high, and a subject rotating about a vertical aids. A linear-array high-purity Ge detector with 140 elements, each 0.5 mm wide and 6 mm thick, was used with a data acquisition system that provides a linear response over almost six orders of magnitude of detector current. The dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) algorithm was applied to images of the rat head acquired at 20 and 45 keV to obtain two new images, one representing the low-Z, and the other the intermediate-Z clement group. The results indicate that the contrast resolution and the quantification accuracy of the images improve stepwise; first, with the monochromatic beam and, second, the DPA method. The system is a prototype for a brain scanner.

  8. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  9. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles.

  10. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  11. Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows coal worker's lungs. There are diffuse, small, light areas on both sides (1 to 3 mm) in ... the lungs. Diseases that may result in an x-ray like this include: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) - ...

  12. Quality assessment of digital X-ray chest images using an anthropomorphic chest phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodovatov, A. V.; Kamishanskaya, I. G.; Drozdov, A. A.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2017-02-01

    The current study is focused on determining the optimal tube voltage for the conventional X-ray digital chest screening examinations, using a visual grading analysis method. Chest images of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired in posterior-anterior projection on four digital X-ray units with different detector types. X-ray images obtained with an anthropomorphic phantom were accepted by the radiologists as corresponding to a normal human anatomy, hence allowing using phantoms in image quality trials without limitations.

  13. Assessment of Restoration Methods of X-Ray Images with Emphasis on Medical Photogrammetric Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, various medical X-ray imaging methods such as digital radiography, computed tomography and fluoroscopy are used as important tools in diagnostic and operative processes especially in the computer and robotic assisted surgeries. The procedures of extracting information from these images require appropriate deblurring and denoising processes on the pre- and intra-operative images in order to obtain more accurate information. This issue becomes more considerable when the X-ray images are planned to be employed in the photogrammetric processes for 3D reconstruction from multi-view X-ray images since, accurate data should be extracted from images for 3D modelling and the quality of X-ray images affects directly on the results of the algorithms. For restoration of X-ray images, it is essential to consider the nature and characteristics of these kinds of images. X-ray images exhibit severe quantum noise due to limited X-ray photons involved. The assumptions of Gaussian modelling are not appropriate for photon-limited images such as X-ray images, because of the nature of signal-dependant quantum noise. These images are generally modelled by Poisson distribution which is the most common model for low-intensity imaging. In this paper, existing methods are evaluated. For this purpose, after demonstrating the properties of medical X-ray images, the more efficient and recommended methods for restoration of X-ray images would be described and assessed. After explaining these approaches, they are implemented on samples from different kinds of X-ray images. By considering the results, it is concluded that using PURE-LET, provides more effective and efficient denoising than other examined methods in this research.

  14. A ROSAT high resolution x ray image of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J.

    1993-01-01

    The soft x ray properties of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 are a crucial test of the 'hidden Seyfert 1' model. It is important to determine whether the soft x rays come from the nucleus, or from a number of other possible regions in the circumnuclear starburst disk. We present preliminary results of a ROSAT HRI observation of NGC 1068 obtained during the verification phase. The fraction of x rays that can be attributed to the nucleus is about 70 percent so the 'soft x ray problem' remains. There is also significant diffuse x ray flux on arcminute scales, which may be related to the 'diffuse ionized medium' seen in optical emission lines, and the highly ionized Fe K(alpha) emission seen by BBXRT.

  15. X-ray Imaging of Mucilaginous Sheath of Phytoplankton in Lake Biwa by Soft X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, K.; Ichise, S.; Ohigashi, T.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2011-09-01

    In Lake Biwa, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) index is increasing in spite of a decrease in the values of the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) index. Picophytoplankton with a mucilaginous sheath is considered an important source of non-biodegradable organic compounds. In order to elucidate the mechanism, x-ray images of planktons inhabiting Lake Biwa were taken. The laboratory-cultured phytoplanktons with sheaths—Synechoccoucs, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Phormidium tenue—were observed by the soft x-ray microscope (BL12) of the Ritsumeikan University SR Center. Synechoccoucs cells were successfully observed with high contrast, and the mucilaginous sheath around the cell was also observed. However, although P. tenu cells were successfully observed with high contrast, it was impossible to confirm the mucilaginous sheath around the cell.

  16. Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-10-15

    Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

  17. Coherent X-ray scattering and lensless imaging at the European XFEL Facility.

    PubMed

    Vartanyants, I A; Robinson, I K; McNulty, I; David, C; Wochner, P; Tschentscher, Th

    2007-11-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a rapidly advancing form of lensless microscopy. The phase information of the diffraction pattern is embedded in a sufficiently sampled coherent diffraction pattern. Using advanced computational methods, this diffraction pattern can be inverted to produce an image of a sample with diffraction-limited resolution. It is attractive to use high-power coherent X-ray beams produced by future X-ray free-electron lasers for imaging nanoscale condensed matter, materials and biological samples. Here, the scientific case, requirements and the possible realisation of the coherent X-ray diffraction imaging beamlines at the European XFEL Facility are presented.

  18. The all-sky camera revitalized.

    PubMed

    Oznovich, I; Yee, R; Schiffler, A; McEwen, D J; Sofko, G J

    1994-10-20

    An all-sky camera, a ground imager used since the 1950's in the aeronomy and space physics studies, was refurbished with a modern control, digitization, and archiving system. Monochromatic and broadband digital images of airglow and aurora are continuously integrated and recorded by the low-cost unmanned system, which is located in northern Canada. Radiometric corrections applied to the data include noise subtraction, normalization to a flat-field response, and absolute calibration. The images are geometrically corrected with star positions and projected onto a geographic or geomagnetic coordinate system. An illustration of the application of corrected all-sky camera images to the study of auroral spirals is given.

  19. ITER core imaging X-ray spectroscopy: Atomic physics issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Clementson, J.; Widmann, K.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Johnson, D.; Barnsley, R.; Chung, H. K.; Safronova, U. I.

    2017-03-01

    The Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer (CIXS) will be employed for measurements of the ion temperature and of the toroidal rotation velocity, Ti and vϕ, respectively, as a function of the radius of ITER plasmas. The diagnostic is based on precision determinations of the Doppler broadening, centroid shift, and intensity of the lines of highly ionized heavy impurities using a curved Bragg crystal spectral disperser and imager. The ions under consideration for the diagnostic are those of tungsten, krypton, xenon, iron, and argon. A detailed discussion is given of the need for atomic physics experiments and calculations involving the primary diagnostic lines and their collisional and dielectronic satellites. Such experiments and calculations define the instrument parameters, determine the diagnostic uncertainties, and provide paths for extending the diagnostic capabilities to measure impurity concentrations, electron temperature, and ion transport parameters. Enabling the diagnostic to measure radially dependent ion transport coefficients, in particular, requires a large amount of high-quality atomic data in the form of reliable excitation, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients as well as ionization balance calculations which make use of these data. Because core imaging spectrometers are being developed and implemented on present-day magnetic fusion devices, much of the atomic data are already needed and can be tested in the analysis of existing spectra recorded by these diagnostics.

  20. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Fushie, T.; Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A.; Toyokawa, H.; Takahashi, H.

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 μm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  1. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  2. Relationship between x-ray illumination field size and flat field intensity and its impacts on x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Xue; Niu Tianye; Jia Xun; Zhu Lei

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used for various clinical applications, while its performance is still hindered by image artifacts. This work investigates a new source of reconstruction error, which is often overlooked in the current CBCT imaging. The authors find that the x-ray flat field intensity (I{sub 0}) varies significantly as the illumination volume size changes at different collimator settings. A wrong I{sub 0} value leads to inaccurate CT numbers of reconstructed images as well as wrong scatter measurements in the CBCT research. Methods: The authors argue that the finite size of x-ray focal spot together with the detector glare effect cause the I{sub 0} variation at different illumination sizes. Although the focal spot of commercial x-ray tubes typically has a nominal size of less than 1 mm, the off-focal-spot radiation covers an area of several millimeters on the tungsten target. Due to the large magnification factor from the field collimator to the detector, the penumbra effects of the collimator blades result in different I{sub 0} values for different illumination field sizes. Detector glare further increases the variation, since one pencil beam of incident x-ray is scattered into an area of several centimeters on the detector. In this paper, the authors study these two effects by measuring the focal spot distribution with a pinhole assembly and the detector point spread function (PSF) with an edge-spread function method. The authors then derive a formula to estimate the I{sub 0} value for different illumination field sizes, using the measured focal spot distribution and the detector PSF. Phantom studies are carried out to investigate the accuracy of scatter measurements and CT images with and without considering the I{sub 0} variation effects. Results: On our tabletop system with a Varian Paxscan 4030CB flat-panel detector and a Varian RAD-94 x-ray tube as used on a clinical CBCT system, the focal spot distribution has a

  3. Relationship between x-ray illumination field size and flat field intensity and its impacts on x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Jia, Xun; Zhu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used for various clinical applications, while its performance is still hindered by image artifacts. This work investigates a new source of reconstruction error, which is often overlooked in the current CBCT imaging. The authors find that the x-ray flat field intensity (I0) varies significantly as the illumination volume size changes at different collimator settings. A wrong I0 value leads to inaccurate CT numbers of reconstructed images as well as wrong scatter measurements in the CBCT research. Methods: The authors argue that the finite size of x-ray focal spot together with the detector glare effect cause the I0 variation at different illumination sizes. Although the focal spot of commercial x-ray tubes typically has a nominal size of less than 1 mm, the off-focal-spot radiation covers an area of several millimeters on the tungsten target. Due to the large magnification factor from the field collimator to the detector, the penumbra effects of the collimator blades result in different I0 values for different illumination field sizes. Detector glare further increases the variation, since one pencil beam of incident x-ray is scattered into an area of several centimeters on the detector. In this paper, the authors study these two effects by measuring the focal spot distribution with a pinhole assembly and the detector point spread function (PSF) with an edge-spread function method. The authors then derive a formula to estimate the I0 value for different illumination field sizes, using the measured focal spot distribution and the detector PSF. Phantom studies are carried out to investigate the accuracy of scatter measurements and CT images with and without considering the I0 variation effects. Results: On our tabletop system with a Varian Paxscan 4030CB flat-panel detector and a Varian RAD-94 x-ray tube as used on a clinical CBCT system, the focal spot distribution has a measured full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM

  4. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  5. X-ray imaging optimization of 3D tissue engineering scaffolds via combinatorial fabrication methods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M.; Becker, Matthew L.; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Schumacher, Gary E.; Flaim, Glenn M.; Kohn, Joachim; Simon, Carl G.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial method for determining optimum tissue scaffold composition for several X-ray imaging techniques. X-ray radiography and X-ray microcomputed tomography enable non-invasive imaging of implants in vivo and in vitro. However, highly porous polymeric scaffolds do not always possess sufficient X-ray contrast and are therefore difficult to image with X-ray-based techniques. Incorporation of high radiocontrast atoms, such as iodine, into the polymer structure improves X-ray radiopacity but also affects physicochemical properties and material performance. Thus, we have developed a combinatorial library approach to efficiently determine the minimum amount of contrast agent necessary for X-ray-based imaging. The combinatorial approach is demonstrated in a polymer blend scaffold system where X-ray imaging of poly(desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester carbonate) (pDTEc) scaffolds is improved through a controlled composition variation with an iodinated-pDTEc analog (pI2DTEc). The results show that pDTEc scaffolds must include at least 9%, 16%, 38% or 46% pI2DTEc (by mass) to enable effective imaging by microradiography, dental radiography, dental radiography through 0.75 cm of muscle tissue or micro-computed tomography, respectively. Only two scaffold libraries were required to determine these minimum pI2DTEc percentages required for X-ray imaging, which demonstrates the efficiency of this new combinatorial approach for optimizing scaffold formulations. PMID:18242689

  6. X-ray phase imaging with a grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Weitkamp, Timm; Diaz, Ana; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco; Cloetens, Peter; Ziegler, Eric

    2005-08-08

    Using a high-efficiency grating interferometer for hard X rays (10-30 keV) and a phase-stepping technique, separate radiographs of the phase and absorption profiles of bulk samples can be obtained from a single set of measurements. Tomographic reconstruction yields quantitative three-dimensional maps of the X-ray refractive index, with a spatial resolution down to a few microns. The method is mechanically robust, requires little spatial coherence and monochromaticity, and can be scaled up to large fields of view, with a detector of correspondingly moderate spatial resolution. These are important prerequisites for use with laboratory X-ray sources.

  7. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  8. Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging with the Compact Light Source based on inverse Compton X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian; Ruth, Ronald; Rifkin, Jeff; Loewen, Rod; Feidenhans’l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2009-01-01

    The first imaging results obtained from a small-size synchrotron are reported. The newly developed Compact Light Source produces inverse Compton X-rays at the intersection point of the counter propagating laser and electron beam. The small size of the intersection point gives a highly coherent cone beam with a few milliradian angular divergence and a few percent energy spread. These specifications make the Compact Light Source ideal for a recently developed grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging method. PMID:19096173

  9. The Lixiscope: a Pocket-size X-ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    A Low Intensity X ray Imaging device with the acronym LIXISCOPE is described. The Lixiscope has a small format and is powered only by a 2.7V battery. The high inherent gain of the Lixiscope permits the use of radioactive sources in lieu of X-ray machines in some fluoroscopic applications. In this mode of operation the complete X ray imaging system is truly portable and pocket-sized.

  10. X-ray phase contrast imaging and noise evaluation using a single phase grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, J; Mercère, P; Idir, M; Silva, P Da; Vincent, G; Primot, Jérôme

    2013-07-15

    In this paper we present some quantitative measurements of X-ray phase contrast images and noise evaluation obtained with a recent grating based X-ray phase contrast interferometer. This device is built using a single phase grating and a large broadband X-ray source. It was calibrated using a reference sample and finally used to perform measurements of a biological fossil: a mosquito trapped in amber. As phase images, noise was evaluated from the measured interferograms.

  11. Soft x-ray imaging by a commercial solid-state television camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Isao; Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Tanimoto, Mitsumori; Yano, Masaaki

    1987-04-01

    A commerical, solid-state television camera has been used to record images of soft x radiation (0.8-12 keV). The performance of the camera is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated compared with an x-ray photographic film (Kodak direct exposure film). In the application, the camera has been used to provide image patterns of x rays from laser-produced plasmas. It is demonstrated that the camera has several advantages over x-ray photographic film.

  12. LogN-logS slope determination in imaging X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, Tommaso; Romaine, Suzanne; Schmitt, H. M. M.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of estimating the slope of the number-counts relations for the specific case of imaging X-ray surveys is briefly discussed. Results have been obtained from extensive simulations of Einstein Observatory imaging X-ray data. It is concluded that the bias which affects the X-ray number-counts slope determination is much smaller than that which affects the radio number-counts slope.

  13. The MPI/AIT X-ray Imager (MAXI): High speed pn-CCD's for x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Strueder, L.; Braeuninger, H.; Meier, M.; Predehl, P.; Reppin, C.; Sterzik, M.; Truemper, J. . Inst. fuer Astrophysik); Cattaneo, P.; Hauff, D.; Lutz, G.; Schuster, K.F.; Schwarz, A. . Werner-Heisenberg-Inst. fuer Physik); Kenziorra, E.; Staubert, A. (Tuebingen

    1989-06-01

    MAXI (MPI/AIT X-RAY Imager) is part of a proposal submitted to the European Space Agency (ESA) as focal plane instrumentation of the X-ray Multi Mission (XMM). Within a collaboration of 13 European institutes we have proposed a fully depleted (sensitive) pn CCD of 280 {mu}m thickness with a homogeneous sensitive area of 36 cm{sup 2} and a pixel size of 150 {times} 150 {mu}m{sup 2} which is well matched with the telescope's angular resolution of 30 arcsec, translating to a position resolution of approximately 1 mm in the focal plane. The X-ray sensitivity is higher than 90% from 250 eV up to 10 keV, the readout time in the full frame mode of the complete focal plane will be 2 ms with a readout noise of better than 5 e{sup {minus}} (rms). Prototypes of all individual components of the camera system have been fabricated and tested. The camera concept will be presented. The measured transfer properties of the CCD and the on-chip electronics will be treated. Taking into account the coupling of the on-chip amplifier to the following front-end electronics the expected performance will be derived.

  14. X-MIME: An Imaging X-ray Spectrometer for Detailed Study of Jupiter's Icy Moons and the Planet's X-ray Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Such maps would provide important constraints on formation and evolution scenarios for the surfaces of these moons. Here we describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  15. Temporal resolved x-ray penumbral imaging technique using heuristic image reconstruction procedure and wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Nozaki, Shinya; Chen, Yen-wei

    2004-10-01

    Temporal resolved x-ray penumbral imaging has been developed using an image reconstruction procedure of the heuristic method and a wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera (XSC). Reconstruction procedure of the penumbral imaging is inherently intolerant to noise, a reconstructed image is strongly distorted by artifacts caused by noise in a penumbral image. Statistical fluctuation in the number of detected photon is the dominant source of noise in an x-ray image, however acceptable brightness of an image is limited by dynamic range of an XSC. The wide dynamic range XSC was used to obtain penumbral images bright enough to be reconstructed. Additionally, the heuristic method was introduced in the penumbral image reconstruction procedure. Distortion of reconstructed images is sufficiently suppressed by these improvements. Density profiles of laser driven brominated plastic and tin plasma were measured with this technique.

  16. Imaging the sun in hard x rays using Fourier telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    For several years, solar flares have been observed with a variety of instruments confirming that tremendous amounts of energy are locally stored in the solar magnetic field and then rapidly released during the life of the flare. In concert with observations, theorists have attempted to describe the means by which these energetic events occur and evolve. Two competing theories have emerged and have stood the test of time. One theory describes the flare in terms of nonthermal, electron beam injection into a thick target while the other uses a thermal approach. Both theories provide results which are reasonably consistent with current observations; but to date, none have been able to provide conclusive evidence as to the validity of either model. Imaging on short time scales (1 s) and/or small size scales (1 arc s) should give definitive answers to these questions. In order to test whether a realistic telescope can indeed discriminate between models, we construct model sources based upon the thermal and the nonthermal models and calculate the emission as a function of time and energy in the range from 10 to 100 keV. In addition, we construct model telescopes representing both the spatial modulation collimator (SMC) and the rotating modulation collimator (RMC) techniques of observation using random photon counting statistics. With these two types of telescopes we numerically simulate the instrument response to the above two model flares to see if there are distinct x-ray signatures which may be discernable. We find that theoretical descriptions of the primary models of solar flares do indeed predict different hard x-ray signatures for 1 sec time scales and at 1-5 arc sec spatial resolution. However, these distinguishing signatures can best be observed early in the impulsive phase and from a position perpendicular to the plane of the loop. Furthermore, we find that Fourier telescopes with reasonable and currently attainable design characteristics can image these

  17. Gold nanoparticle contrast agents in advanced X-ray imaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungsook; Jung, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-17

    Recently, there has been significant progress in the field of soft- and hard-X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications, both technically and scientifically, via developments in sources, optics and imaging methodologies. While one community is pursuing extensive applications of available X-ray tools, others are investigating improvements in techniques, including new optics, higher spatial resolutions and brighter compact sources. For increased image quality and more exquisite investigation on characteristic biological phenomena, contrast agents have been employed extensively in imaging technologies. Heavy metal nanoparticles are excellent absorbers of X-rays and can offer excellent improvements in medical diagnosis and X-ray imaging. In this context, the role of gold (Au) is important for advanced X-ray imaging applications. Au has a long-history in a wide range of medical applications and exhibits characteristic interactions with X-rays. Therefore, Au can offer a particular advantage as a tracer and a contrast enhancer in X-ray imaging technologies by sensing the variation in X-ray attenuation in a given sample volume. This review summarizes basic understanding on X-ray imaging from device set-up to technologies. Then this review covers recent studies in the development of X-ray imaging techniques utilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their relevant applications, including two- and three-dimensional biological imaging, dynamical processes in a living system, single cell-based imaging and quantitative analysis of circulatory systems and so on. In addition to conventional medical applications, various novel research areas have been developed and are expected to be further developed through AuNP-based X-ray imaging technologies.

  18. Phase-contrast imaging with a novel X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yumiko; Kuwada, Takao; Sakai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Imagaki, Manabu; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Ken; Sato, Isamu

    2010-04-06

    A novel X-ray source based on Parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) has been employed for phase-contrast imaging at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA), Nihon University, Japan. The PXR X-rays were generated by the 100 MeV electron beam passing through a Si single crystal. The X-rays in the 16approx34 keV range were chosen for imaging of biological samples. The quasi-monochromatic, tunable, and coherent X-ray source is appropriate for this application. In addition, the large X-ray beam irradiation field of approximately 100 mm in diameter, which was achieved without special optics, suggests that the PXR is applicable to imaging for medical diagnostics.

  19. Energy-resolved X-ray imaging method with a counting-type pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Kajiwara, K.; Sato, M.; Kawase, M.; Honma, T.; Takagaki, M.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed an energy-resolved X-ray imaging method using the counting-type pixel detector PILATUS-100K. X-ray intensities were recorded as a scan of threshold energies, and the X-ray energy was determined by an s-curve fitting analysis. As a capability study of ultra precise energy-resolved imaging, X-ray beam intensities at 15.75, 15.76, 15.77, 15.78, 15.79, and 15.80 keV were measured and their threshold scan distributions could be clearly separated from each other. Laue diffraction patterns of a silicon steel sample were recorded with white X-ray beams. A grain image of silicon steel was obtained with a sample position scan. The reflected X-ray energy was also measured at three sample positions to analyze the lattice constant of the sample crystal grain.

  20. Transmission X-ray microscopy for full-field nano-imaging of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    ANDREWS, JOY C; MEIRER, FLORIAN; LIU, YIJIN; MESTER, ZOLTAN; PIANETTA, PIERO

    2010-01-01

    Imaging of cellular structure and extended tissue in biological materials requires nanometer resolution and good sample penetration, which can be provided by current full-field transmission X-ray microscopic techniques in the soft and hard X-ray regions. The various capabilities of full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) include 3D tomography, Zernike phase contrast, quantification of absorption, and chemical identification via X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. These techniques are discussed and compared in light of results from imaging of biological materials including microorganisms, bone and mineralized tissue and plants, with a focus on hard X-ray TXM at ≤ 40 nm resolution. PMID:20734414