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Sample records for allegheny county health

  1. Landsliding in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Reginald Peter; Pomeroy, John S.; Davies, William E.

    1975-01-01

    Man should proceed with caution if modifications such as loading, excavation, or changes of the water regime are contemplated for slopes in Allegheny County, especially those slopes described on the map as highly sensitive to disturbance by man. Features indicative of unstable slope conditions include: cracks in buildings, yard walls, and pools; doors and windows that jam; fences and other linear features bowed out of line; tilted trees and utility poles; cracks and steplike ground features; hummocky ground; and water seeps. Geologic factors related to the landsliding process include rock types, layering, fracturing, and attitude; nature of soil cover; permeability of rocks and soils; and steepness of slope.

  2. 77 FR 66791 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Allegheny County, PA (All Jurisdictions)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Allegheny County, PA (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Proposed... rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania...

  3. Allegheny County, PA: Mobilizing To Reduce Juvenile Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsia, Heidi M.

    Juvenile crime and its immediate and long-term economic and human costs have become a national concern. Programs to prevent and reduce delinquency have developed across the country and one such program in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (which includes Pittsburgh) is described in this bulletin. The Allegheny program exemplifies a large-scale,…

  4. 77 FR 71115 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ...: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to... Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) Rules and Regulations, Article XXI, Air Pollution Control to... Control Act. EPA is approving these revisions in accordance with the requirements of the Clean Air...

  5. 77 FR 71139 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... oxides (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces to the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD... related definitions for controlling NO X emissions from glass melting furnaces. The SIP revision is...

  6. Calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, developed a validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates2 (RMA2) hydrodynamic model of parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) to help assess the effects of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) on the rivers. The hydrodynamic model was used to drive a water-quality model of the study area that was capable of simulating the transport and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria and chemical constituents under open-water conditions. The study area includes 14 tributary streams and parts of the Three Rivers where they enter and exit Allegheny County, an area of approximately 730 square miles (mi2). The city of Pittsburgh is near the center of the county, where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the headwaters of the Ohio River. The Three Rivers are regulated by a series of fixed-crest dams, gated dams, and radial (tainter) gates and serve as the receiving waters for tributary streams, CSOs, and SSOs. The RMA2 model was separated into four individual segments on the basis of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigational pools in the study area (Dashields; Emsworth; Allegheny River, Pool 2; and Braddock), which were calibrated individually using measured water-surface slope, velocity, and discharge during high- and low-flow conditions. The model calibration process included the comparison of water-surface elevations at five locations and velocity profiles at more than 80 cross sections in the study area. On the basis of the calibration and validation results that included water-surface elevations and velocities, the model is a representative simulation of the Three Rivers flow patterns for discharges ranging from 4,050 to 47,400 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on the Allegheny River, 2,550 to 40,000 ft3/s on the Monongahela River, and 10,900 to 99,000 ft3/s on the Ohio River. The Monongahela River was

  7. A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Allegheny Front and Hickory Creek Roadless Areas, Allegheny National Forest, Warren County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickling, N.L.; Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Adrian, Betty M.

    1983-01-01

    A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Allegheny Front and Hickory Creek Roadless Areas, Warren County, Pennsylvania, was made by members of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to test for indistinct or unexposed mineral deposits that might be recognized by geochemical halos. Analyses using semiquantitative emission spectrography and atomic absorption for 32 elements were performed on 21 stream-sediment samples and 31 bedrock samples from the Allegheny Front tract, and on 23 stream-sediment samples and 6 bedrock samples from the Hickory Creek tract. Bedrock samples analyzed are primarily sandstone, siltstone and shale. Neither major chemical anomalies nor obviously anomalous chemical-element concentrations related to mineralized bedrock were indicated in the geochemical survey. Metallic mineral deposits were not identified in the study area during the survey, which is consistent with other studies reported in the literature for the surrounding region. The lithologic units exposed in the roadless areas do not commonly host metallic deposits in the surrounding region, and the probability is low that such deposits occur in the roadless areas.

  8. 75 FR 81555 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ...; Allegheny County's Adoption of Control Techniques Guidelines for Large Appliance and Metal Furniture; Flat... Regulations, Article XXI, Air Pollution Control, and meets the requirement to adopt Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) for sources covered by EPA's Control Techniques Guidelines (CTG) standards...

  9. A Study of Continuing Legal Education of Allegheny County Bar Association Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Benjamin George

    Legal education needs and preferences of lawyers in the Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Bar Association were surveyed, with attention to such factors as motivation and lawyer characteristics. A pretested 40-item questionnaire was sent to all 2,218 members. Findings included the following: (1) felt needs pertained to trial work, real property law,…

  10. 77 FR 71117 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking... regulation to control nitrogen oxides (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces to the Allegheny County... Pennsylvania regulations and related definitions for controlling NO X emissions from glass melting...

  11. Environmental geology, Allegheny County and vicinity, Pennsylvania; description of a program and its results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Reginald Peter

    1977-01-01

    Past land-use practices, including mining, in Allegheny County, Pa., have resulted in three principal environmental problems, exclusive of air and water contamination. They are flooding, landsliding, and subsidence over underground mines. In 1973, information was most complete relative to flooding and least complete relative to landsliding. Accordingly, in July 1973, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) entered into an agreement by which the USGS undertook studies chiefly aimed at increasing knowledge of landsliding and mine subsidence relative to land use, but having other ramifications as well, as part of a larger ARC 'Land-use and physical-resource analysis' (LUPRA) program. The chief geographic focus was Allegheny County, but adjacent areas were included in some investigations. Resulting products, exclusive of this report, are: 1. Forty-three provisional maps of landslide, distribution and susceptibility and of land modified by man in Allegheny County, 1:24,000 scale, 7? -minute quadrangle format, released to open files. 2. Four USGS Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps of Allegheny County showing (a) bedrock, MF685A; (b) susceptibility to landsliding, MF-685B ; (c) coal-mining features, MF-685C; and (d) zones that can be affected by flooding, landsliding and undermining, MF-685D; all at the scale of 1:50,000. 3. Two MF maps showing coal-mining activity and related information and sites of recorded mine-subsidence events, and one MF map classifying land surface by relative potentiality of mine subsidence, in Allegheny, Washington, and Westmoreland Counties, Pa., at a scale of 1:125,000--MF-693A through MF-693C. 4. A companion report to the Allegheny County map of susceptibility to landsliding--USGS Circular 728. 5. Five MF maps, largely in chart form, describing interaction of the shallow ground-water regime with mining-related problems, landsliding, heavy storm precipitation, and other features and processes, largely

  12. Fecal-Indicator Bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and Selected Tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Fulton, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were determined in 1,027 water-quality samples collected from July 2001 through August 2005 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period) and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 24-hour period) conditions in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (locally referred to as the Three Rivers) and selected tributaries in Allegheny County. Samples were collected at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers and at eight sites on four tributaries to the Three Rivers having combined sewer overflows. Water samples were analyzed for three fecal-indicator organisms fecal coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a cross-section composite sample at each site. Concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci were detected in 98.6, 98.5, and 87.7 percent of all samples, respectively. The maximum fecal-indicator bacteria concentrations were collected from Sawmill Run, a tributary to the Ohio River; Sawmill Run at Duquesne Heights had concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci of 410,000, 510,000, and 180,000 col/100 mL, respectively, following a large storm. The samples collected in the Three Rivers and selected tributaries frequently exceeded established recreational standards and criteria for bacteria. Concentrations of fecal coliform exceeded the Pennsylvania water-quality standard (200 col/100 mL) in approximately 63 percent of the samples. Sample concentrations of E. coli and enterococci exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) water-quality criteria (235 and 61 col/100 mL, respectively) in about 53 and 47 percent, respectively, of the samples. Fecal-indicator bacteria were most strongly correlated with streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. These correlations most frequently were observed in samples collected from tributary sites. Fecal

  13. The Allegheny initiative for mental health integration for the homeless: integrating heterogeneous health services for homeless persons.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Adam J; Montlack, Melissa L; Freyder, Paul; Johnson, Diane; Bui, Thuy; Williams, Jennifer

    2007-03-01

    The Allegheny Initiative for Mental Health Integration for the Homeless (AIM-HIGH) was a 3-year urban initiative in Pennsylvania that sought to enhance integration and coordination of medical and behavioral services for homeless persons through system-, provider-, and client-level interventions. On a system level, AIM-HIGH established partnerships between several key medical and behavioral health agencies. On a provider level, AIM-HIGH conducted 5 county-wide conferences regarding homeless integration, attended by 637 attendees from 72 agencies. On a client level, 5 colocated medical and behavioral health care clinics provided care to 1986 homeless patients in 4084 encounters, generating 1917 referrals for care. For a modest investment, AIM-HIGH demonstrated that integration of medical and behavioral health services for homeless persons can occur in a large urban environment.

  14. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Allegheny and Susquehanna Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004--2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Coalbed methane, which is sometimes extracted using the same technique, is commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and is frequently developed in clusters of wells across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Allegheny County and Susquehanna County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  15. Underrepresentation of heroin involvement in unintentional drug overdose deaths in Allegheny County, PA.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Kristen J; Janssen, Jennifer K; Williams, Karl E

    2014-11-01

    Drugs contributing to overdose deaths are listed on death certificates, but their validity is rarely studied. To assess the accuracy of "morphine" and "codeine" listings on death certificates for unintentional overdose deaths in Allegheny County, PA, investigative and laboratory reports were reviewed. Deaths were reclassified as heroin-related if documentation showed 6-monoacetylmorphine in blood or urine, "stamp bags" or drug paraphernalia at scene, history of heroin use, or track marks. Deaths were considered morphine-related if notes indicated morphine use, prescription, or morphine at scene, or codeine-related if the codeine blood level exceeded morphine. Of 112 deaths with morphine but not heroin listed on the death certificate, 74 met heroin criteria and 21 morphine criteria. Of 20 deaths with both morphine and heroin listed, only one met morphine criteria. Of 34 deaths with codeine listed, only five were attributed to codeine. Consideration of patient history, death scene evidence, and expanded toxicology testing may improve the accuracy of death certificate drug listings.

  16. Collective Bargaining Agreement Between the Community College of Allegheny County and the American Federation of Teachers. Local 2067 AFL-CIO. October 1, 1972 through August 31, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the Community College of Allegheny County and the American Federation of Teachers for the period from October 1, 1972 through August 31, 1974 is contained in this document. Included in the articles of the agreement are sections covering grievance procedures, management rights, academic freedom, renewals…

  17. The Development of a Strategic Plan To Provide a Multisite Electronic Engineering Technology Program at the Community College of Allegheny County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Pearly

    A project was undertaken to develop a strategic plan to implement a multisite electronic engineering technology (EET) program at Pennsylvania's Community College of Allegheny County. Specifically, the project sought to determine how electronic communication technologies could provide a virtual learning community for the program; appropriate plans…

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Resin Disposal, Jefferson Borough, Allegheny County, PA. (First remedial action), June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-28

    The 26-acre Resin Disposal site is an inactive industrial landfill and former coal strip mining area in Jefferson Borough, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The site overlies a bedrock aquifer, a source of non-potable ground water. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses source control, as well as preventing migration of contaminated ground water in the Pittsburgh Coal Formation. The primary contaminants of concern affecting soil, debris, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and other organics including napthalene, PAHs and phenols. The selected remedial action for the site includes capping the landfill with a multi-layer cap, and upgrading the landfill dike; relocating a sanitary sewer; installing a new oil/water separator for leachate treatment, and implementing institutional controls, including deed restrictions. The estimated present worth cost for this remedial action is $4,348,000.

  19. National Dam Inspection Program. Butler’s Lake Dam (NDI Number PA-01067, PennDER Number 2-29) Ohio River Basin, Drennen Branch, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    PENNSYLVANIA 15216 MAY 1981 81 7 0 o 7 OHIO RIVER BASIN BUTLER’S LAKE DAM ALLEGHENY COUNTY, COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA NDI NO. PA 01067 PennDER NO. 2...been affected by small country banks. F1 )1’u nt Vemnur FPm Pmm Bun Vs PPm PIpw pm ’ c-AMST f ~.Indt / t0s. 3 0 -(Fran PPw PmPm c/ 13 vthedale...STRUCTURE CONTOUR MAP1975 DATE: MAY 1981 BUTLER’S LAKE DAM SCALE: 1"-:2000’ NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM I GEOLOGIC DR: JF ICK: j ACKENI4EIL & ASSOCIATES

  20. Occurrence and trends in the concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria and the relation to field water-quality parameters in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and selected tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001–09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Koerkle, Edward H.; McCoy, Jamie L.; Zarr, Linda F.

    2016-01-21

    A total of 1,742 water samples were collected at 52 main-stem and tributary sites. Quantifiable concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) were reported in 1,667 samples, or 97.0 percent of 1,719 samples; concentrations in 853 samples (49.6 percent) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recreational water-quality criterion of 235 colonies per 100 milliliters (col/100 mL). Quantifiable concentrations of fecal coliform (FC) bacteria were reported in 1,693 samples, or 98.8 percent of 1,713 samples; concentrations in 780 samples (45.5 percent) exceeded the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania water contact criterion of 400 col/100 mL. Quantifiable concentrations of enterococci bacteria were reported in 912 samples, or 87.5 percent of 1,042 samples; concentrations in 483 samples (46.4 percent) exceeded the EPA recreational water-quality criterion of 61 col/100 mL. The median percentage of samples in which bacteria concentrations exceeded recreational water-quality standards across all sites with five or more samples was 48 for E. coli, 43 for FC, and 75 for enterococci. E. coli, FC, and enterococci concentrations at main-stem sites had significant positive correlations with streamflow under all weather conditions, with rho values ranging from 0.203 to 0.598. Seasonal Kendall and logistic regression were evaluated to determine whether statistically significant trends were present during the period 2001–09. In general, Seasonal Kendall tests for trends in E. coli and FC bacteria were inconclusive. Results of logistic regression showed no significant trends in dry-weather exceedance of the standards; however, significant decreases in the likelihood that wet-weather E. coli and FC bacteria concentrations will exceed EPA recreational standards were found at the USGS streamgaging station Allegheny River at 9th Street Bridge. Nonparametric correlation analysis, including Spearman’s rho and the paired Prentice-Wilcoxon test, was used to screen for associations

  1. 77 FR 51512 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Warren, Pennsylvania. The... conducted: Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee members will solicit and consider project proposals...

  2. Public health. A tale of two counties.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, S; Wright, J; Grice, D

    2001-02-22

    The development of primary care trusts requires health authority public health departments to work in new ways. Reviews of the public health function in two counties found widely varying views. A common understanding of organisations' responsibilities is crucial when developing public health in primary care. Public health networks can play a key role. Significant investment in training is required.

  3. 76 FR 23275 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Clarendon, Pennsylvania....

  4. 76 FR 50993 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Warren, Pennsylvania....

  5. 76 FR 38109 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Marienville, Pennsylvania....

  6. 76 FR 45227 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Clarendon, Pennsylvania....

  7. Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  8. Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  9. Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  10. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  11. Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of selected headwater streams along the Allegheny Front, Blair County, Pennsylvania, July 2011–September 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Low, Dennis J.; Brightbill, Robin A.; Eggleston, Heather L.; Chaplin, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-29

    Biotic health was characterized at 10 of 12 stream sites; the two sites excluded were established late in the study period (May 2013) for refinement of water quality in the headwaters of Poplar Run and the location of Marcellus Formation gas wells. On the basis of the Maryland Index of Biotic Integrity (MdIBI) for fish assemblages, 8 of 10 streams can be considered in fair health. Tipton Run had the highest MdIBI score (3.75) and the greatest number of native species. South Poplar Run had the lowest MdIBI score (1.75); pollution tolerant blacknose dace was dominant. On the basis of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection macroinvertebrate index of biotic integrity, 9 of 10 streams were characterized as attaining, with scores as high as 88.9 at Tipton Run. Only Sugar Run was characterized as impaired, with a score of 40.4.

  12. Passing on a Culture: West Virginia Traditional Musical Heritage and the Allegheny Echoes Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Leila Ryland

    2010-01-01

    Allegheny Echoes is a summer programme of instruction and performance of music and poetry held in Marlinton, WV. The Bing Brothers learned their traditional music from the Hammons family of Pocahontas County, WV, in an informal setting of friendship and collaboration. The Hammons family was recorded in the 1970s by Alan Jabbour and others; the…

  13. Allegheny National Forest, CCC Camp ANF1 , The camp’s main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Allegheny National Forest, CCC Camp ANF-1 , The camp’s main entrance is located at the intersection of Duhring Road (ANF 131) and ANF 124, Pennsylvania, with the interior site road known as Trail Ride Drive., Marienville, Forest County, PA

  14. Fecal-indicator bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July-September 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Buckwalter, Theodore F.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine the concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) in Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, Pa. Water-quality samples and river-discharge measurements were collected from July to September 2001 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period), mixed-, and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 6-hour period) conditions at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers in Allegheny County. Water samples were collected weekly to establish baseline conditions and during successive days after three wet-weather events. Water samples were analyzed for fecal-indicator organisms including fecal-coliform (FC) bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Water samples were collected by the USGS and analyzed by the ACHD Laboratory. At each site, left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a composite sample (discharge-weighted sample representative of the channel cross section as a whole) at each site. Fecal-indicator bacteria reported in bank and composite samples were used to evaluate the distribution and mixing of bacteria-source streams in receiving waters such as the Three Rivers. Single-event concentrations of enterococci, E. coli, and FC during dry-weather events were greater than State and Federal water-quality standards (WQS) in 11, 28, and 28 percent of the samples, respectively; during mixed-weather events, concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were greater than WQS in 28, 37, and 43 percent of the samples, respectively; and during wet-weather events, concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were greater than WQS in 56, 71, and 81 percent of samples, respectively. Single-event, wet-weather concentrations exceeded those during dry-weather events for all sites except the Allegheny River at

  15. Returns on Investment in California County Departments of Public Health

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the average return on investment for the overall activities of county departments of public health in California. Methods. I gathered the elements necessary to estimate the average return on investment for county departments of public health in California during the period 2001 to 2008–2009. These came from peer-reviewed journal articles published as part of a larger project to develop a method for determining return on investment for public health by using a health economics framework. I combined these elements by using the standard formula for computing return on investment, and performed a sensitivity analysis. Then I compared the return on investment for county departments of public health with the returns on investment generated for various aspects of medical care. Results. The estimated return on investment from $1 invested in county departments of public health in California ranges from $67.07 to $88.21. Conclusions. The very large estimated return on investment for California county departments of public health relative to the return on investment for selected aspects of medical care suggests that public health is a wise investment. PMID:27310339

  16. Chemical quality of surface water in the Allegheny River basin, Pennsylvania and New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarren, Edward F.

    1967-01-01

    The Allegheny River is the principal source of water to many industries and to communities in the upper Ohio River Valley. The river and its many tributaries pass through 19 counties in northwestern and western Pennsylvania. The population in these counties exceeds 3 million. A major user of the Allegheny River is the city of Pittsburgh, which has a population greater than The Allegheny River is as basic to the economy of the upper Ohio River Valley in western Pennsylvania as are the rich deposits of bituminous coal, gas, and oil that underlie the drainage basin. During the past 5 years many streams that flow into the Allegheny have been low flowing because of droughts affecting much of the eastern United States. Consequently, the concentration of solutes in some streams has been unusually high because of wastes from coal mines and oil wells. These and other water-quality problems in the Allegheny River drainage basin are affecting the economic future of some areas in western Pennsylvania. Because of environmental factors such as climate, geology, and land and water uses, surface-water quality varies considerably throughout the river basin. The natural quality of headwater streams, for example, is affected by saltwater wastes from petroleum production. One of the streams most affected is Kinzua Creek, which had 2,900 parts per million chloride in a sample taken at Westline on September 2, 1959. However, after such streams as the Conewango, Brokenstraw, Tionesta, Oil, and French Creeks merge with the Allegheny River, the dissolved-solids and chloride concentrations are reduced by dilution. Central segments of the main river receive water from the Clarion River, Redbank, Mahoning, and Crooked Creeks after they have crossed the coal fields of west-central Pennsylvania. At times, therefore, these streams carry coal-mine wastes that are acidic. The Kiskiminetas River, which crosses these coal fields, discharged sulfuric acid into the Allegheny at a rate of 299 tons a

  17. Government Spending In Health And Nonhealth Sectors Associated With Improvement In County Health Rankings.

    PubMed

    McCullough, J Mac; Leider, Jonathon P

    2016-11-01

    There is little evidence to demonstrate the impact on local health outcomes of spending that occurs outside the health care sector. We leveraged novel data from the US Census Bureau to measure the independent impact of a community's health and nonhealth expenditures on a broad measure of overall health-the County Health Rankings-over time. Using lagged longitudinal models that accounted for correlations of health outcomes and expenditures within counties, we found significant positive associations between expenditures and County Health Rankings for seven of the fourteen expenditure categories examined: community health care and public health, public hospitals, fire protection, K-12 education, corrections, libraries, and housing and community development. These areas of social spending have modest but detectable positive associations with population health, whether or not they primarily target health. Achieving improved health outcomes through a culture-of-health ethos should involve the consideration of public expenditures in both health and other social service areas.

  18. Albany-Laramie Counties Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Albany-Laramie Counties area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general…

  19. Carson-Washoe County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Carson-Washoe County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  20. 76 FR 47993 - Safety Zone; Allegheny River; Pittsburgh, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... involves establishing, disestablishing, or changing Regulated Navigation Areas and security or safety zones... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Allegheny River; Pittsburgh, PA AGENCY... safety zone on the Allegheny River from mile marker 5.7 to mile marker 5.9 (the parking area on...

  1. Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage and Health Status Among Farmworkers, Sonoma County, California, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Jenny; Hill, Jana; Katz, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Sonoma County Farmworker Health Survey (FHS) was conducted to describe the health and well-being of adult farmworkers in Sonoma County, California, and to identify preventable health disparities for this population. Methods From September 2013 through January 2014, venue-based and convenience sampling were used to survey 293 farmworkers aged 18 years or older. The questions included self-rated general health, diabetes and hypertension, and body mass index. To identify disparities between surveyed farmworkers and Sonoma County residents overall, age-adjusted prevalence estimates were developed by using indirect standardization to the adult (≥18 years) Sonoma County sample from the California Health Interview Survey for 2011–2012. Results Surveyed farmworkers were mostly male (91%) and Latino or Hispanic (95%), and 54% had an educational attainment of 8th grade or less. Most (81%) farmworkers reported their families earned less than $30,000 in 2012. After adjusting for age, 30% of farmworkers had US-based health insurance as compared with the 86% of Sonoma County adults in 2011–2012 (P < .001), and 15% of farmworkers reported ever being diagnosed with diabetes after adjusting for age as compared with 5% of Sonoma County adults (P = .002). After adjusting for age, 44% of farmworkers reported poor or fair health in general as compared with 13% of Sonoma County adults (P < .001). Conclusion We identified significant health disparities between Sonoma County farmworkers and Sonoma County adults overall. Additional research and new health policies are necessary to eliminate these health disparities and to facilitate farmworker access to the health care system. PMID:27032988

  2. Ranking community health status to stimulate discussion of local public health issues: the Wisconsin County Health Rankings.

    PubMed

    Peppard, Paul E; Kindig, David A; Dranger, Elizabeth; Jovaag, Amanda; Remington, Patrick L

    2008-02-01

    United Health Foundation's America's Health Rankings, which ranks the states from "least healthy" to "healthiest," receives wide press coverage and promotes discussion of public health issues. The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute used the United Health Foundation's model to develop the Wisconsin County Health Rankings ("Health Rankings") from existing county-level data. The institute first released the rankings in 2004. A survey of the Wisconsin county health officers indicated that they intend to use the rankings for needs assessment, program planning, and discussion with county health boards. The institute implemented many of the health officers' suggestions for improvement of the rankings in subsequent editions. The methods employed to create the rankings should be applicable in other states.

  3. Health Needs Survey: Indiana County, Pennsylvania, Summer 1975. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osgood, Mary H.

    In July and August 1975, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 347 adults living in Indiana County, Pennsylvania to gather information on the health services needed, physician extenders (i.e., nurse practitioners and physician's assistants), adequate health care for everyone, and regular health habits of the population. The sample included…

  4. Health Education Program. Kanawha County Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanawha County Schools, Charleston, WV.

    A task force, after a 2-year study, recommended a curriculum on health education which would meet the specific needs of both teachers and students. This teacher developed curriculum guide is comprised of five units on: human growth and development, diseases, nutrition, personal hygiene, drug education, safety and first aid. Each unit contains a…

  5. Health InfoNet of Jefferson County: collaboration in consumer health information service.

    PubMed

    Smith, K H

    2001-01-01

    Health InfoNet of Jefferson County is a new collaborative consumer health information service of the Jefferson County public libraries and the UAB Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. Working with the input and cooperation of local voluntary health agencies, health care professionals and other health information providers, the intent is to improve the efficiency with which consumers might access such information while avoiding duplication of effort on the part of the information providers. Various considerations in InfoNet's mission include providing service not only to established library and Internet users, but also those on the other side of the "digital divide" as well as those with low literacy skills or English as a second language. The role of health care professionals in guiding their patients to the best consumer health information resources is emphasized.

  6. RESPIRATORY HEALTH OF RURAL AND FARM WOMEN IN THE KEOKUK COUNTY RURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RESPIRATORY HEALTH OF RURAL AND FARM WOMEN IN THE KEOKUK COUNTY RURAL HEALTH STUDY
    Allison L. Naleway*, Nancy L. Sprince?, Erik R. Svendsen?, Ann M. Stromquist?, James A. Merchant?
    *Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI; ?University of Iowa Co...

  7. Map of coal-mining features, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, W.E.; Pomeroy, J.S.; Kohl, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    This map is one result of a series of studies sponsored by the Appalachian Regional Commission as part of a larger U.S. Geological Survey program of environmental analysis of a part of southwestern Pennsylvania. The map summarizes surface features resulting from coal mining. The distribution of surface features is largely from 1973, 1:12,000 scale aerial photographs verified by field reconnaissance in 1973 and 1974. Supplementary interpretations relative to surface subsidence were done using 1939 aerial photographs.

  8. 75 FR 60865 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-Allegheny Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-- Allegheny Casualty Company... INFORMATION: The underwriting limitation for Allegheny Casualty Company (NAIC 13285), which was listed in...

  9. Allegheny college hosts neuroscience and humanities summer institute.

    PubMed

    Macel, Emily M

    2004-01-01

    The Neuroscience and Humanities Summer Institute, hosted by Allegheny College, opened doors of opportunity, perception, and creativity for faculty and students across the nation. Offered first in 2002, and a second time in June of 2004, this weeklong event was designed to provide a medium for fostering development of interdisciplinary courses linking neuroscience and the humanities (e.g., the fine arts, philosophy and language). During the Institute, participants attended presentations by Allegheny faculty introducing the six courses of this type that they have developed starting in 2000, lectures by guest speakers, workshops, and discussion modules. Participants were encouraged to gather ideas about Allegheny's neuroscience and humanities courses and formulate specific plans to take back to their schools. These opportunities and experiences resulted in the formation of valuable connections and the development of ideas around the links between neuroscience and humanities.

  10. County workforce, reimbursement, and organizational factors associated with behavioral health capacity in health centers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily; Ku, Leighton; Smith, Shelagh; Lardiere, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This study describes on-site behavioral health treatment capacity in health centers in 2007 and examines whether capacity was associated with health center characteristics, county-level behavioral health workforce, and same-day billing restrictions. Cross-sectional data from the 2007 Area Resource File and Uniform Data System were linked with data on Medicaid same-day billing restrictions. Mental health treatment capacity was common; almost four in five health centers provided on-site mental health services. Additional services such as crisis counseling (20 %), treatment from a psychiatrist (29 %), and substance abuse treatment were offered by fewer health centers (51 % provide on-site services and only 20 % employ substance abuse specialists). In multivariate analysis, larger health centers, health centers located in counties with a larger behavioral health workforce per capita, and those located in the West and Northeast were more likely to have behavioral health capacity. Same-day billing restrictions were associated with lower odds of substance use treatment capacity and providing 24 hr crisis counseling services.

  11. 75 FR 81469 - Safety Zone; Allegheny River, Pittsburgh, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ...-2010-1082 and are available online by going to http://www.regulations.gov , inserting USCG-2010-1082 in.... 2064; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1. 0 2. Add Sec. 165.T08-1082 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T08-1082 Safety Zone; Allegheny River, Pittsburgh, PA. (a) Location. The following...

  12. The effects of racial heterogeneity on mental health: A study of detained youth across multiple counties.

    PubMed

    Lau, Katherine S L; Aalsma, Matthew C; Holloway, Evan D; Wiehe, Sarah E; Vachon, David D

    2015-09-01

    A majority of detained adolescents experience mental health and substance use problems. Limited research has examined the interaction between the race/ethnicity of an individual youth and county-level racial heterogeneity on adolescent mental health outcomes. Participants were identified through a statewide mental health screening project that took place in detention centers across 11 different counties in a Midwestern state during January 1, 2008, to May 10, 2010. A total of 23,831 detained youth (ages 11-18 years), identified as non-Hispanic White (46.6%), Black (43.5%), or Hispanic (9.8%), completed a mental health screener that assessed problems in alcohol/drug use, depression-anxiety, anger-irritability, trauma, somatic complaints, and suicide ideation. Census data were gathered to determine the racial heterogeneity of each county and other county-level variables. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to test the independent and interactive effects of youth race/ethnicity and county-level variables (including racial heterogeneity of the county) on adolescent mental health. Independent of other community characteristics, as county-level racial heterogeneity increased, mental health problems among detained youth decreased. In future research on the development and persistence of mental health problems in detained youth, both community and individual-level factors should be considered.

  13. Addressing the social determinants of health through the Alameda County, California, place matters policy initiative.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Katherine; Desautels, Alexandra; Flournoy, Rebecca; Carson, Keith; Drenick, Teresa; Fujii, Darlene; Lee, Anna; Luginbuhl, Jessica; Mena, Mona; Shrago, Amy; Siegel, Anita; Stahl, Robert; Watkins-Tartt, Kimi; Willow, Pam; Witt, Sandra; Woloshin, Diane; Yamashita, Brenda

    2013-11-01

    In Alameda County, California, significant health inequities by race/ethnicity, income, and place persist. Many of the county's low-income residents and residents of color live in communities that have faced historical and current disinvestment through public policies. This disinvestment affects community conditions such as access to economic opportunities, well-maintained and affordable housing, high-quality schools, healthy food, safe parks, and clean water and air. These community conditions greatly affect health. At the invitation of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies' national Place Matters initiative, Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson's Office and the Alameda County Public Health Department launched Alameda County Place Matters, an initiative that addresses community conditions through local policy change. We describe the initiative's creation, activities, policy successes, and best practices.

  14. Non-Psychiatric Services Provided in a Mental Health Unit in a County Jail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Diane S.

    2002-01-01

    Examines mental health service provision by social workers in a county jail through a retrospective review of 359 mentally ill jail inmates' health and mental health records. Of the non-psychiatric, mental health services provided beyond initial assessment, housing placement evaluations and follow-up sessions were the most frequent. Suggestions…

  15. Comparative Analysis of Health Care Needs among Children with Special Health Care Needs in Ohio's Metropolitan and Appalachian Counties.

    PubMed

    Earley, Elizabeth; Asti, Lindsey; Chisolm, Deena

    2015-08-01

    The study assessed whether children with special health care needs (CSHCN) living in Appalachian Ohio have differential health care utilization, unmet needs, and health outcomes compared with CSHCN in Ohio's metropolitan counties using a statewide Ohio survey. Based on this survey, an estimated 28% of children in Appalachian Ohio counties have special health care needs compared with 25% of children in metropolitan counties. In Appalachia, CSHCN are poorer and more likely to have Medicaid than their metropolitan counterparts, but had no reported significant differences in health outcomes or unmet needs. Data suggested a trend toward higher use of emergency department care and inpatient services and lower use of well-child visits but these differences did not reach significance. We conclude that CSHCN in Appalachian and metropolitan areas face similar levels of health status and unmet needs but results suggest a need for additional research on access to primary care services.

  16. A Tale of Two Counties: Expanding Health Insurance Coverage for Children in California

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Embry M; Hughes, Dana

    2006-01-01

    During difficult economic times, many California counties have expanded health insurance coverage for low-income children. These Children's Health Initiatives (CHIs) enroll children in public programs and provide new health insurance, Healthy Kids, for those ineligible for existing programs. This article describes the policy issues in implementing the Santa Clara and San Mateo County CHIs, as well as the children's enrollment levels and utilization of services. These CHIs are among the first of the thirty California counties planning or implementing such initiatives. Their success depends on leadership from county agencies that have not traditionally worked closely together, as well as the development of a diverse public and private funding base. This effort to provide universal coverage for all children is important to national policymakers desiring similar goals. PMID:16953809

  17. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) use of rock drainage channels on reclaimed mines in southern West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chamblin, H.D.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) currently receive protected status throughout their range due to population declines. Threats associated with habitat fragmentation (e.g., introduced predators, disease, loss of connectivity among subpopulations and habitat loss) may explain why Allegheny woodrats are no longer found in many areas where they existed just 25 y ago. In southern West Virginia, surface coal mining is a major cause of forest fragmentation. Furthermore, mountaintop mining, the prevalent method in the region, results in a loss of rock outcrops and cliffs within forested areas, typical habitat of the Allegheny woodrat To determine the extent that Allegheny woodrats make use of reclaimed mine land, particularly rock drainages built during reclamation, we sampled 24 drainage channels on reclaimed surface mines in southern West Virginia, collected habitat data at each site and used logistic regression to identify habitat variables related to Allegheny woodrat presence. During 187 trap nights, 13 adult, 2 subadult and 8 juvenile Allegheny woodrats were captured at 13 of the 24 sites. Percent of rock as a groundcover and density of stems >15 cm diameter-at-breast-height (DBH) were related to Allegheny woodrat presence and were significantly greater at sites where Allegheny woodrats were present than absent. Sites where Allegheny woodrats were present differed substantially from other described habitats in West Virginia, though they may simulate boulder piles that occur naturally. Our findings suggest the need for additional research to examine the dynamics between Allegheny woodrat populations inhabiting rock outcrops in forests adjacent to mines and populations inhabiting constructed drainage channels on reclaimed mines. However, if Allegheny woodrats can use human-created habitat, our results will be useful to surface mine reclamation and to other mitigation efforts where rocky habitats are lost or disturbed.

  18. A health assessment of refugee children from former Yugoslavia in Tarrant County.

    PubMed

    Podgore, John K; René, Antonio; Sandhu, Raghbir; Marshall, Muriel

    2003-06-01

    This study was conducted to provide an assessment of the health status and health care utilization of children from former Yugoslavia living in Tarrant County. In addition, an assessment of barriers and problems encountered by these families in obtaining health care for their children was presented. One hundred thirteen households of refugee families arriving in Tarrant County from 1998 through 2000 participated by answering a 79-item health information questionnaire. The results revealed that most of the refugee families had no regular health care provider to assure continuity of medical care. Lack of access to dental care and inappropriate utilization of hospital emergency facilities were also identified as problems. Insufficient understanding of health insurance issues and inability to access health information were additional problems. Local and state health care agencies may help to improve health care delivery for these and future refugee children by addressing these problem areas.

  19. The "Health Belief Model" Applied to Two Preventive Health Behaviors Among Women from a Rural Pennsylvania County. AE & RS 115.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Mary E.

    In order to test the usefulnes of the Health Belief Model (a model designed to measure health practices, attitudes, and knowledge), a survey of Potter County, Pennsylvania was conducted, and 283 responses from adult females without chronic illnesses were analyzed. The dependent variables employed were regulating diet and getting regular exercise.…

  20. Palm Beach County Health Department Migrant Project, Annual Progress Report, 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Health Dept., West Palm Beach, FL.

    Information about the Palm Beach County Health Department Migrant Project for 1972 is presented in this annual progress report. Information on services provided by the Project as prescribed by the Migrant Health Branch is included. Major topics include program objectives, relationships and contributions, staff orientation and training, a general…

  1. An Analysis of North Carolina's Rural Health Problems as Perceived by County Rural Development Panels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Vance E., Comp.

    A State Task Force on Rural Health was formed (January 1973) by the State Rural Development Committee to identify and analyze major rural health problems in North Carolina and to recommend alleviation strategies. The Task Force submitted open-ended questionnaires to members of the County Rural Development Panels to secure their perceptions of…

  2. ALLEGHENY FRONT AND HICKORY CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, PENNSYLVANIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Girol, Vaughn P.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral-resource survey the Allegheny Front and Hickory Creek Roadless Areas, Pennsylvania, have a substantiated potential for oil resources, a probable potential for gas resources, and little likelihood for the occurrence of coal and metallic mineral resources. The oil and gas in the Upper Devonian rocks are found in stratigraphic traps, that commonly are not evident from surface indications. The only sure method to determine if the Upper Devonian sandstones contain oil or gas at a specific site is to drill through the sequence and test the more favorable zones.

  3. Nutrition Program Boosts Dental Health of Orange County Migrant Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Anne; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In Orange County, California, 76 migrant preschool children and 45 parents participated in a 7-week pilot program concerned with preventing dental disease by encouraging good dental habits and healthy food choices. Parent questionnaires revealed that the most remarkable program-related change was a decrease in consumption of sugary foods for over…

  4. Mental Health Work in a County Jail: A Heuristic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gacono, Carl B.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the San Luis Obispo County Jail Treatment program, which included crisis management, psychiatric services, substance abuse counseling, Graduate Equivalency Diploma preparation, vocation counseling, and postrelease counseling and referral. Data from 73 offenders indicated the approach was effective in lowering the immediate recidivism…

  5. Implementing a School-Based Health Center: The Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivette, Paul S.; Thompson-Drew, Corliss

    2003-01-01

    Traces the inception and implementation of school-based health centers in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County (NC) school system. Discusses the challenges that arose during implementation, along with the opportunities to enhance the provision of comprehensive services for children. Notes that SBHCs provide an opportunity for school psychologists to…

  6. A National Study of the Association between Food Environments and County-Level Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, Melissa; Brown, Cheryl; Dukas, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This national, county-level study examines the relationship between food availability and access, and health outcomes (mortality, diabetes, and obesity rates) in both metro and non-metro areas. Methods: This is a secondary, cross-sectional analysis using Food Environment Atlas and CDC data. Linear regression models estimate relationships…

  7. HARRISBURG TRI-COUNTY HEALTH MANPOWER SURVEY REPORT. PRELIMINARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RATNER, MURIEL

    THE HARRISBURG AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE COOPERATED WITH TWO HOSPITALS IN A SURVEY OF THE AREA'S NEEDS FOR HEALTH TECHNICIANS. DATA, COLLECTED BY QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEYS OF DOCTORS AND DENTISTS AND BY INTERVIEWS WITH ADMINISTRATORS OF HOSPITALS, NURSING HOMES AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, INDICATED THAT (1) A 60-PERCENT INCREASE IN HEALTH MNAPOWER…

  8. Current and Potential Future Bromide Loads from Coal-Fired Power Plants in the Allegheny River Basin and Their Effects on Downstream Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Good, Kelly D; VanBriesen, Jeanne M

    2016-09-06

    The presence of bromide in rivers does not affect ecosystems or present a human health risk; however, elevated concentrations of bromide in drinking water sources can lead to difficulty meeting drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations. Recent attention has focused on oil and gas wastewater and coal-fired power plant wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater bromide discharges. Bromide can be added to coal to enhance mercury removal, and increased use of bromide at some power plants is expected. Evaluation of potential increases in bromide concentrations from bromide addition for mercury control is lacking. The present work utilizes bromide monitoring data in the Allegheny River and a mass-balance approach to elucidate bromide contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources under current and future scenarios. For the Allegheny River, the current bromide is associated approximately 49% with oil- and gas-produced water discharges and 33% with coal-fired power plants operating wet FGD, with 18% derived from natural sources during mean flow conditions in August. Median wet FGD bromide loads could increase 3-fold from 610 to 1900 kg/day if all plants implement bromide addition for mercury control. Median bromide concentrations in the lower Allegheny River in August would rise to 410, 200, and 180 μg/L under low-, mean-, and high-flow conditions, respectively, for the bromide-addition scenario.

  9. Evaluation of Planning for Fish and Wildlife at Corps of Engineers Reservoirs, Allegheny Reservoir Project, Pennsylvania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    various sources,* including the Pennsylvania Cam Cmission (MOC) the Vomsylvents fish Cam.sou ( PIC ), the New York Deparmet of ComservatLon (KWD), the...of the grass pic - kerel and the redaide dace) have been previously - collected from this portion of the river. Not of these are comon inhabitants of...Allegheny National Forest, USFS, porn . Comm., 1981). Average annual warnuater angling man-day use on Allegheny Lake was esti- mated at approximately 166,700

  10. Implementing a mental health and primary care partnership program in Placer County, California.

    PubMed

    Nover, Cynthia Helen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness are at an increased risk for developing co-morbid chronic physical illnesses, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This article is a descriptive piece about an intervention to decrease physical health risks in this population through a partnership effort between a primary care clinic and mental health agency in rural Placer County, California. The project was conducted as a part of the CalMEND Pilot Collaborative to Integrate Primary Care and Mental Health Services, which took place in five California counties in 2010-2011. A description of the program elements, conceptual models, key measures, and the process of program implementation is provided. Benefits were observed in areas of quality assurance, intra- and inter-agency teamwork, and access to adequate primary care for this population.

  11. Building community disaster resilience: perspectives from a large urban county department of public health.

    PubMed

    Plough, Alonzo; Fielding, Jonathan E; Chandra, Anita; Williams, Malcolm; Eisenman, David; Wells, Kenneth B; Law, Grace Y; Fogleman, Stella; Magaña, Aizita

    2013-07-01

    An emerging approach to public health emergency preparedness and response, community resilience encompasses individual preparedness as well as establishing a supportive social context in communities to withstand and recover from disasters. We examine why building community resilience has become a key component of national policy across multiple federal agencies and discuss the core principles embodied in community resilience theory-specifically, the focus on incorporating equity and social justice considerations in preparedness planning and response. We also examine the challenges of integrating community resilience with traditional public health practices and the importance of developing metrics for evaluation and strategic planning purposes. Using the example of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project, we discuss our experience and perspective from a large urban county to better understand how to implement a community resilience framework in public health practice.

  12. Barriers to information access among county health department employees.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jacqueline; Rockoff, Maxine; Bakken, Suzanne; Caldwell, Michael

    2007-10-11

    As part of a study to explore information use, 137 public health employees responded to the question: What are the main barriers that you face in accessing information you need to do your job? 74% of employees indicated 154 barriers. Of these 65% were related to technology or resources. Fewer barriers related to time (24%) and communication (13%). Efforts to address resource and technology barriers could improve how information is used by public health employees.

  13. Using Bayesian influence diagrams to assess organizational performance in 4 California county health departments, April-July 2009.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Louise K; Scheinert, Steve; Yeo, Jungwon; Schuh, Russell; Duran, Luis; Potter, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    A Bayesian influence diagram is used to analyze interactions among operational units of county health departments. This diagram, developed using Bayesian network analysis, represents a novel method of analyzing the internal performance of county health departments that were operating under the simultaneous constraints of budget cuts and increased demand for services during the H1N1 threat in California, April-July 2009. This analysis reveals the interactions among internal organizational units that degrade performance under stress or, conversely, enable a county health department to manage heavy demands effectively.

  14. Supportive supervision for medicines management in government health facilities in Kiambu County, Kenya: a health workers’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agoro, Oscar Otieno; Osuga, Ben Onyango; Adoyo, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Effective supportive supervision is widely recognized as essential for optimal management of medicines in government health facilities and also in contributing towards improved access and utilization of health services. This study sought to examine the extent supportive supervision for medicines management in government health facilities from a health worker perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was done targeting health workers managing medicines in government health facilities in Kiambu County. One hundred and thirty eight respondents took part in the study which explored the quality of supportive supervision from a health worker's perspective, and also examined the factors influencing their contentment with the level of supervision received. A statistical analysis was done using SPSS 21 and Excel 2013. Results Supervisory visits from all levels of health management were not regularly done, standard checklists were not routinely used, and action plans irregularly developed and followed up. Only 54 (38.6%) respondents were satisfied with the levels of supportive supervision that they received, with satisfaction significantly differing across the professional cadres, χ2 (12, n = 138) = 29.762, p = .003; across the different tiers of health facilities, rs (138) = 0.341, p < .001; and with the education levels of the respondents, rs (138) = 0.381, p < .001. Conclusion The study concluded that supportive supervision for medicines management that government health facilities received was still inadequate, and health workers were dissatisfied with the level of supervision that they received. The study recommends a review of the support supervision policy at the county level to address the unearthed inefficiencies and improve supervision for medicines management in government health facilities. PMID:27386033

  15. Imperial County baseline health survey potential impact of geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, M.

    1981-06-01

    The survey purpose, methods, and statistical methods are presented. Results are discussed according to: area differences in background variables, area differences in health variables, area differences in annoyance reactions, and comparison of symptom frequencies with age, smoking, and drinking. Included in appendices are tables of data, enumeration forms, the questionnaire, interviewer cards, and interviewer instructions. (MHR)

  16. Assessing health literacy in rural settings: a pilot study in rural areas of Cluj County, Romania.

    PubMed

    Pop, Oana M; Brînzaniuc, Alexandra; Sirlincan, Emanuela O; Baba, Catalin O; Chereches, Razvan M

    2013-12-01

    Health literacy improves knowledge and builds skills to help individuals make appropriate decisions regarding their health. Over the past 20 years, several studies have described associations between health literacy and health outcomes. With respect to Romania, evidence is scarce on the level of health literacy, as well as on its determinants. Thus, the objectives of this study were to briefly screen functional health literacy levels in a sample of rural inhabitants, to assess the relationship between health literacy and reported health status, as well as to explore health literacy determinants within this population. Data were collected between September-November 2010, in four villages in Cluj County, Romania, using a cross-sectional survey. The mean age of respondents in the sample was 56 years, with roughly half of respondents being retired. The brief screening of health literacy suggested inadequate to marginal levels within the sample. Significant associations were observed between health literacy score and education, and self-perceived health status, whereas the relationship between health literacy and gender, and the presence of a chronic disease was not statistically significant. Limited health literacy has been shown to be common in people who rated their health as poor, those who attended only middle school, and individuals lacking basic information about their body. In order to minimize the adverse effects of low health literacy on health and health outcomes, efforts should be invested in identifying and addressing the health needs of adults with low and marginal health literacy, especially in underserved areas such as rural and remote settings, where access to health-related information is limited.

  17. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants associated with oil and natural gas exploration and production activity in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

    PubMed

    Pekney, Natalie J; Veloski, Garret; Reeder, Matthew; Tamilia, Joseph; Rupp, Erik; Wetzel, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities generate emissions from diesel engines, compressor stations, condensate tanks, leaks and venting of natural gas, construction of well pads, and well access roads that can negatively impact air quality on both local and regional scales. A mobile, autonomous air quality monitoring laboratory was constructed to collect measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants associated with oil and natural gas E&P activities. This air-monitoring laboratory was deployed to the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania for a campaign that resulted in the collection of approximately 7 months of data split between three monitoring locations between July 2010 and June 2011. The three monitoring locations were the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF) area in Elk County, which is downwind of the Sackett oilfield; the Bradford Ranger Station (BRS) in McKean County, which is downwind of a large area of historic oil and gas productivity; and the U.S. Forest Service Hearts Content campground (HC) in Warren County, which is in an area relatively unimpacted by oil and gas development and which therefore yielded background pollutant concentrations in the ANF. Concentrations of criteria pollutants ozone and NO2 did not vary significantly from site to site; averages were below National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas (ethane, propane, butane, pentane) were highly correlated. Applying the conditional probability function (CPF) to the ethane data yielded most probable directions of the sources that were coincident with known location of existing wells and activity. Differences between the two impacted and one background site were difficult to discern, suggesting the that the monitoring laboratory was a great enough distance downwind of active areas to allow for sufficient dispersion with background air such that the localized

  18. Narratives of Stress in Health Meanings of African Americans in Lake County, Indiana.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mohan; Sastry, Shaunak; Dillard, Sydney; Kumar, Rati; Anaele, Agaptus; Collins, William; Roberson, Calvin; Dutta, Uttaran; Jones, Christina; Gillespie, Tony; Spinetta, Christine

    2016-08-02

    Across the life course, African Americans bear an unequal burden of disease compared to other racial groups. In spite of the widespread acknowledgment of racial health disparities, the voices of African Americans, their articulations of health and their local etiologies of health disparities are limited. In this article, we highlight the important role of communication scholarship to understand the everyday enactment of health disparities. Drawing upon the culture-centered approach (CCA) to co-construct narratives of health with African Americans residents of Lake County, Indiana, we explore the presence of stress in the everyday narratives of health. These narratives voice the social and structural sources of stress, and articulate resistive coping strategies embedded in relationship to structures.

  19. Bringing Global Health Home: The Case of Global to Local in King County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam; Siddiqui, Fareeha

    The article describes the experience of testing successful global health interventions in the cities of SeaTac and Tukwila, Washington-2 very diverse, underserved communities outside of Seattle that experience significant health disparities compared with surrounding areas in King County. Topics covered include an overview of the partnership that established Global to Local, the process of engaging Seattle-based global health institutions in identifying global health strategies to test, identifying communities experiencing health disparities that might benefit from global health-inspired interventions, engaging those local communities to understand the perceived drivers of poor health outcomes, tailoring global interventions to the local context, launching programs, and the successes and challenges that have emerged throughout this process. Global health strategies that were tested and are reported on in the article include the use of community health workers to support chronic disease prevention and management, partnering with and building the capacity of local organizations and institutions, linking public health and primary care by addressing the social determinants of health in a primary care and community setting, and using mobile phones to transform practices for managing type 2 diabetes. The paper concludes that based on the early learnings of this approach, there is value in looking to tested and proven global health strategies to address health disparities in underserved communities in the United States and calls for further exploration of this approach by other actors.

  20. [Public health in Orhei County--realities and opportunities].

    PubMed

    Cărăuşu, Elena Mihaela; Stirbate, P; Indrei, L L

    2011-01-01

    Orhei District Hospital has 420 beds located in 17 wards. Providing beds in 2010 is 39.2 to 10 000 people compared with 47.7 in 2008, but it is still more than the regional average for the country- 32.6. Rotation bed, the lethality rate of hospitalization of people have not changed in the previous year. The average duration of treatment and average bed occupancy rose in 2010 compared with 2009, but the bed occupancy rate is still small--about 60%. Share divergence diagnostic is lower than the previous year--this is a good indicator of quality. Enough old equipment is still an issue for the District Hospital Orhei. Making an analysis of the distinctive features of health care evaluations, where resources are expressed by the cost and the results are expressed as effects on health, we conclude that it is necessary to change the conceptual aspects regarding health care financing. For redress the economic and financial situation, is proposed following strategy: 1. Reduced costs for hotel accommodation, by introducing "a day hospital". This system implies investigation and medical advice, and writing medication without the patient to remain hospitalized for a long time (for cases that do not require prolonged hospitalization) 2. Reducing costs the necessary material resources with, the introduction of electronic auction. 3. Introducing the concept of health management, need for hospital management, better management the four types of resources available (human resources, material resources, financial resources, time). 4. Increasing managerial capacity, through a competitive selection manager, will be combine short-term planning and the long-term strategy (more flexible) to raise the efficiency of medical care. In this respect spaces allocated section of Pulmonology, will be reassembled in geriatric beds, and the space available, will be outsourced of other persons (individuals or corporate person), under the law where they will earn additional income. It is noted that

  1. The Florida Department of Health and the Florida Association of County Health Department Business Administrators: a model of successful collaboration to sustain operational excellence.

    PubMed

    Napier, Michael J; Street, Phillip; Wright, Robin; Kouba, James Michael; Ciereck, Christina; Dillon, Matthew J; Dollar, Rosemary C; Parizek, William A; Stapp, Charles Philip; Dickinson, Ross

    2004-01-01

    The Florida Association of County Health Department Business Administrators, Inc., is an organization of public health business professionals working collaboratively with the state's department of health administrative offices in promoting best practices throughout local county health departments. This article discusses a number of joint initiatives, past and present, that are benefiting public health services in Florida. In addition, mentoring and training, contract management, cost allocation, and financial reporting, among others, are "hot button" topics of interest to all states in promoting improved administration of their public health programs.

  2. What predicts recovery orientation in county departments of mental health? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy T; Mahoney, Christine B; Adams, Neal; Felton, Mistique; Pareja, Candy

    2010-09-01

    In this pilot study we examined the determinants of recovery orientation among employees and influential stakeholders in a sample of 12 county departments of mental health in California. A two-level hierarchical linear model with random intercepts was estimated. Analyses show that recovery orientation has a U-shaped relationship with the age of staff/influential stakeholders and is negatively related to the difference between the desired level of adhocracy and the current level of adhocracy. Recovery orientation is positively related to the education level of staff/influential stakeholders, satisfying transformational leadership outcomes, and larger mental health budgets per capita. Policy implications are discussed.

  3. The University of Washington's Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program and Public Health-Seattle & King County partnership.

    PubMed

    House, Peter J; Hartfield, Karen; Nicola, Bud; Bogan, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program, a 2-year in-residence MPH degree program in the University of Washington School of Public Health, has partnered with Public Health-Seattle & King County (PHSKC) since 2002 to create a mutually beneficial set of programs to improve teaching and address community-based public health problems in a practice setting. The COPHP program uses a problem-based learning approach that puts students in small groups to work on public health problems. Both University of Washington-based and PHSKC-based faculty facilitate the classroom work. In the first year for students, COPHP, in concert with PHSKC, places students in practicum assignments at PHSKC; in the second year, students undertake a master's project (capstone) in a community or public health agency. The capstone project entails taking on a problem in a community-based agency to improve either the health of a population or the capacity of the agency to improve population health. Both the practicum and the capstone projects emphasize applying classroom learning in actual public health practice work for community-based organizations. This partnership brings PHSKC and COPHP together in every aspect of teaching. In essence, PHSKC acts as the "academic health department" for COPHP. There are detailed agreements and contracts that guide all aspects of the partnership. Both the practicum and capstone projects require written contracts. The arrangements for getting non-University of Washington faculty paid for teaching and advising also include formal contracts.

  4. Public health assessment for east Multnomah County, ground water contamination, Gresham, Multnomah County, Oregon, region 10. Cerclis No. ORD987185030. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The proposed East Mulnomah County Groundwater Contamination National Priorities List (NPL) Site is east of Portland, Oregon. Numerous environmental investigations indicate that the groundwater within the proposed NPL site has been contaminated with various chlorinated organic solvents. Because of the complex hydrogeology within the proposed NPL site, it is not possible to determine precisely when each well became contaminated. Based on the available information, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) concludes that the proposed East Multnomah County Groundwater Contamination NPL Site is a public health hazard (past, current, and future). ATSDR representatives made this determination because one contaminated drinking water well has been and is being used by two households.

  5. 77 FR 790 - FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM...) Rules of Practice and Procedures, 18 CFR 385.206, FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy...

  6. 75 FR 73064 - Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI; Allegheny 7 Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI; Allegheny 7 Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing... 19, 2010. On May 18, 2010, Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI, and Allegheny 7 Hydro, LLC filed applications, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of hydropower at...

  7. Changes in use of county public health services following implementation of Alabama's immigration law.

    PubMed

    White, Kari; Blackburn, Justin; Manzella, Bryn; Welty, Elisabeth; Menachemi, Nir

    2014-11-01

    Several states have enacted legislation restricting undocumented immigrants' access to publicly funded health benefits not protected by federal law. Using electronic health records from 140,856 county health department visits, we assessed the monthly change in Latino patients' visits compared to non-Latinos 12 months before and after implementation of Alabama's immigration law. We used ICD-9 diagnosis codes to determine whether visits included services exempt under the law: immunizations, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and communicable diseases, and family planning. Differences between groups in the mean percent change were assessed with t-tests. Among children younger than 18 years, there were no significant differences by ethnicity. Visits among Latino adults decreased by 28% for communicable diseases, 25% for STIs, and 13% for family planning; this was significantly different from changes among non-Latino adults (p <.05). State-level legislation may reduce immigrants' access to protected benefits, which could adversely affect the broader public's health.

  8. [Diagnosis of the health of a diabetic population in the county of Priorato in Tarragona province].

    PubMed

    Hernández, J M; Costa, B

    1991-10-01

    A health diagnosis made over a two-year period in the basic health area of Falset is described (17 municipalities with populations between 39 and 2,603 inhabitants, making-up a total reference population of 7,283 habitants) in relation to the diabetic population of the Priorato county in Catalunya. This county is geographically heterogeneous, with semi-arid hilly landscape, with poor communications, a farming population and a notoriously hostile climate. The population pyramid, inclined towards progressive aging of the population, is evidence of a major migration from the country. By means of continuous education of health personnel, updating of information sources, improvement of registration systems, and final evaluation, the outlines of an action plan is worked out with a view to the organisation of diabetic care in this rural context. A total of 226 diabetics were counted: 15 type 1 (6.2%), and 211 type II (93.8%). The incidence of diagnosed diabetes in the basic health area is 3.1% (1.4% to 10.33%). The average age of the patients was 65.6 years with a preponderance of women (146 = 64.6%). In 92 patients (40.2%) the evolution time was less than 5 years. The insulinisation rate was calculated at 26.1%. The typical diabetic patient is a retired person or a housewife (87.8), with primary of elementary education (82.7%), supported by the family.

  9. Evaluation of "Live for Life", a health promotion programme in the County of Skaraborg, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lingfors, H; Lindstrom, K; Persson, L; Bengtsson, C; Lissner, L

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To evaluate a health promotion programme, combining a population and individual based strategy, in the County of Skaraborg, Sweden, with special attention to outcome.
DESIGN—The evaluation was subdivided into structure, process and outcome. The evaluation procedure as a total is described here, but the results presented refer only to outcome. In order to study the potential effect of the individually based health examination, 35 year old subjects who had participated five years previously were in 1994-1996 compared with 35 year old subjects who had not participated before, and compared with their own values five years earlier. The results during 1995-1996 were compared with those of 1989-1990 for corresponding ages in order to study the effect of, particularly, the population based strategy.
SETTING—The County of Skaraborg in the south western part of Sweden with about 270 000 inhabitants. In addition to population strategy, involving the total county, men and women aged 30 and 35 years were invited to an individually based examination.
MAIN RESULTS—Factors related to body weight increased during the study period, while other factors mostly changed in the direction wanted. As a whole the changes were rather modest. There were favourable changes in lifestyle variables, for example, concerning smoking and dietary habits.
CONCLUSIONS—There were beneficial effects from the health promotion programme, but there is a need for continuous improvement of methods of intervention referred to lifestyle.


Keywords: evaluation; screening; prevention; primary health care; ischaemic heart disease PMID:11238584

  10. Acid rain and atmospheric chemistry at Allegheny Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.R.; Brachaczek, W.W.; Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Japar, S.M.; Norbeck, J.M.; Keeler, G.J.

    1987-07-01

    Rain chemistry was measured in August 1983 on Allegheny Mountain and Larel Hill in southwester Pennsylvania. The average composition approximated an H/sub 2/SO/sub 5//HNO/sub 3/ mixture with a volume-weighted average pH of 3.5 and an SO/sub 4//sup 2 -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ mole ratio of 1.8. There was very little undissociated (weak) acidity and very little S(IV). The acidic rains were associated with air masses traversing SO/sub 2/ source regions west of the sites; stagnation and intervening precipitation were important influences. The geographic scale for a halving of rain SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ concentration downwind of SO/sub 2/ sources was approx.440 km. Scavenging ratios were inferred for SO/sub 2/, aerosol SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and HNO/sub 3/. On average about half of the rain SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ resulted from scavenging of SO/sub 2/, the rest from scavenging of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The rain H/sup +/ was attributed about 25% to HNO/sub 3/, 55% to scavenging of SO/sub 2/, and 20% to scavenging of aerosol acid SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Cumulative deposition totals in rain were compared with deposition in fog and with dry deposition in the same experiment. A crude acid-deposition budget was calculated as follows: 47%, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in rain; 23%, SO/sub 2/ dry deposition without dew; 16%, HNO/sub 3/ in rain; 11%, HNO/sub 3/ dry deposition without dew; 2%, HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in fog and dew; 0.5%, aerosol dry deposition without dew. 86 references, 4 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Influence of Urbanization Level and Gross Domestic Product of Counties in Croatia on Access to Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Bagat, Mario; Drakulić, Velibor; Sekelj Kauzlarić, Katarina; Vlahušić, Andro; Bilić, Ivica; Matanić, Dubravka

    2008-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of counties’ urbanization level and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita on the access to health care. Methods Counties were divided in two groups according to the urbanization level and GDP per capita in purchasing power standards. The number of physicians per 100 000 inhabitants, the number of physicians in hospitals in four basic specialties, physicians’ workload, average duration of working week, the average number of insurants per general practice (GP) team, and the number of inhabitants covered by one internal medicine outpatient clinic were compared between predominantly urban and predominantly rural counties, and between richer and poorer counties. Our study included only GP teams and outpatients’ clinics under the contract with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance. Data on physicians were collected from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance, the Croatian Institute for Public Health, and the Croatian Medical Chamber. Data on the contracts with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and health care services provided under these contracts were obtained from the database of the Institute, while population and gross domestic product data were obtained from the Database of the Croatian Institute for Statistics. World Health Organization Health for All Database was used for the international comparison of physician’s data. Results There was no significant difference in the total number of physicians per 100 000 inhabitants between predominantly urban and predominantly rural counties (206.9 ± 41.0 vs 175.4 ± 30.3; P = 0.067, t test) nor between richer and poorer counties (194.5 ± 49.8 vs 187.7 ± 25.3; P = 0.703, t test). However, there were significantly fewer GPs per 100 000 inhabitants in rural than urban counties (49.0 ± 5.5 vs 56.7 ± 4.6; P = 0.003, t test). GPs in rural counties had more insurants than those

  12. After-school programs for health promotion in rural communities: Ashe County Middle School 4-H After-School Program.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael B; Miller, Jennifer L; Blackburn, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Rural youth have a higher risk for lower health and developmental outcomes, often facing numerous constraints (eg, poor socioeconomic conditions, lower levels of social support, fewer recreational programs and facilities, and inadequate transportation). After-school programs have the potential to effectively deliver health-promoting activities but often face significant challenges in these areas. Ashe County is a rural community in the Appalachian region of North Carolina. Ashe County is economically depressed and its youth population has many poor health and developmental indicators. However, with more than 20 years of sustained activity, one important community resource trying to address disparities in youth health and development is the Ashe County 4-H After-School Program. To successfully overcome inherent challenges, the program has positioned itself as essential to community development, supported and retained qualified personnel, and cultivated a network of key partners to continue its efforts to provide essential youth programs for this rural community.

  13. Hazard-Ranking of Agricultural Pesticides for Chronic Health Effects in Yuma County, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Sugeng, Anastasia J.; Beamer, Paloma I.; Lutz, Eric A.; Rosales, Cecilia B.

    2013-01-01

    With thousands of pesticides registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, it not feasible to sample for all pesticides applied in agricultural communities. Hazard-ranking pesticides based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize community-specific pesticide hazards. This study applied hazard-ranking schemes for cancer, endocrine disruption, and reproductive/developmental toxicity in Yuma County, Arizona. An existing cancer hazard-ranking scheme was modified, and novel schemes for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity were developed to rank pesticide hazards. The hazard-ranking schemes accounted for pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential based on chemical properties of each pesticide. Pesticides were ranked as hazards with respect to each health effect, as well as overall chronic health effects. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides for overall chronic health effects were maneb, metam sodium, trifluralin, pronamide, and bifenthrin. The relative pesticide rankings were unique for each health effect. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides differed from those most heavily applied, as well as from those previously detected in Yuma homes over a decade ago. The most hazardous pesticides for cancer in Yuma County, Arizona were also different from a previous hazard-ranking applied in California. Hazard-ranking schemes that take into account pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize pesticides of greatest health risk in agricultural communities. This study is the first to provide pesticide hazard-rankings for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential. These hazard-ranking schemes can be applied to other agricultural communities for prioritizing community-specific pesticide hazards to target decreasing health risk. PMID:23783270

  14. Hazard-ranking of agricultural pesticides for chronic health effects in Yuma County, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Sugeng, Anastasia J; Beamer, Paloma I; Lutz, Eric A; Rosales, Cecilia B

    2013-10-01

    With thousands of pesticides registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, it not feasible to sample for all pesticides applied in agricultural communities. Hazard-ranking pesticides based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize community-specific pesticide hazards. This study applied hazard-ranking schemes for cancer, endocrine disruption, and reproductive/developmental toxicity in Yuma County, Arizona. An existing cancer hazard-ranking scheme was modified, and novel schemes for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity were developed to rank pesticide hazards. The hazard-ranking schemes accounted for pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential based on chemical properties of each pesticide. Pesticides were ranked as hazards with respect to each health effect, as well as overall chronic health effects. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides for overall chronic health effects were maneb, metam-sodium, trifluralin, pronamide, and bifenthrin. The relative pesticide rankings were unique for each health effect. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides differed from those most heavily applied, as well as from those previously detected in Yuma homes over a decade ago. The most hazardous pesticides for cancer in Yuma County, Arizona were also different from a previous hazard-ranking applied in California. Hazard-ranking schemes that take into account pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize pesticides of greatest health risk in agricultural communities. This study is the first to provide pesticide hazard-rankings for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential. These hazard-ranking schemes can be applied to other agricultural communities for prioritizing community-specific pesticide hazards to target decreasing health risk.

  15. Longitudinal study of rural health workforce in five counties in China: research design and baseline description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The village doctors have served rural residents for many decades in China, and their role in rural health system has been highly praised in the world; unfortunately, less attention has been paid to the health workforce during the ambitious healthcare reform in recent years. Therefore, we conducted a longitudinal study to explore the current situation and track the future evolution of the rural healthcare workforce. Methods The self-administered structured Village Clinic Questionnaire and Village Doctor Questionnaire, which were modified from the official questionnaires of the Ministry of Health, were constructed after three focus groups, in-depth interviews in Hebei Province, and a pilot survey in Sichuan Province. Using a stratified multistage cluster sampling process, we gathered baseline data for a longitudinal survey of village doctors, village clinics from Changshu County, Liyang County, Yongchuan District, Mianzhu County, and Jingning County in China in 2011. Well-trained interviewers and strict procedures were employed to ensure the quality of this survey. Descriptive and correlation analyses were performed with Stata 12.0. Results After four months of surveying, 1,982 Village Doctor Questionnaires were collected, and the response rate was 88.1%. There were 1,507 (76.0%) male and 475 (24.0%) female doctors, with an average age of 51.3 years. The majority of village doctors (58.5%) practiced both western medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine, and 91.2% of the doctors received their education below college level. Their practice methods were not correlated with education level (P = 0.43), but closely related to the way they obtained their highest degree (that is, prior to starting work or as on-the-job training) (P < 0.01). The mean income of the village doctors was 1,817 (95% CI 1,733 to 1,900) RMB per month in 2011; only 757 (41.3%) doctors had pensions, and the self-reported expected pension was 1,965 RMB per month. Conclusions Village doctors

  16. Public health assessment for Starr Property, Enfield, Hartford County, Connecticut, Region 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-15

    The Starr Property is a State designated Superfund site in the town of Enfield, Connecticut in Hartford County. The site represents an indeterminant public health hazard. Surface soil, subsurface soil, ground water, surface water and sediments have been contaminated with cyanide as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and some volatile organic compounds. The most significant exposures are occurring to people who trespass on the site and are involved in dirt bike riding that disturbs contaminated soils. Migration of contaminants off-site appears to be limited to ambient air, and surface water run-off. Groundwater may also be a potential route for migration of contaminants offsite.

  17. Local Tobacco Control: Application of the Essential Public Health Services Model in a County Health Department’s Efforts to Put It Out Rockland

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, Una; Chanler, Shelley; Ferrara, Maryanne; Alleyne, Oscar; Facelle, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In 2000, Rockland County, a small suburban county north of New York City, dedicated $1 million of its Master Settlement Agreement funds to a comprehensive tobacco control program, Put It Out Rockland. Developed and implemented by the county health department, this program used an essential public health services model and an ongoing financial investment, within the context of strong statewide tobacco control efforts, to lower adult smoking rates to 9.7% and to reduce both smoking among youths and exposure to secondhand smoke over the ensuing decade. By combining state funds and local dollars for a total of $6.75 cost per capita, this comprehensive effort yielded 11 000 fewer smokers and translated to a potential savings of more than $24 million for the county. PMID:24028263

  18. Utilizing health ambassadors to improve type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease outcomes in Gadsden County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Suther, Sandra; Battle, Arrie M; Battle-Jones, Felecia; Seaborn, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Minority racial and ethnic groups are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. These groups also experience more severe complications from diabetes and have higher mortality rates as a result of the disease, such as cardiovascular disease, amputation and kidney failure. Underserved rural ethnically disparate populations benefit from health education outreach efforts that are conveyed and translated by specially-trained community health ambassadors. Project H.I.G.H. (Helping Individuals Get Healthy) was developed to target the priority areas of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Utilizing trained community health ambassadors, CDC's The Road to Health Toolkit as well as New Beginnings: A Discussion Guide for Living Well with Diabetes was used as a model for a community-based educational program. The overall goal of Project H.I.G.H was to implement and evaluate: (1) a coordinated, behavior-focused, family-centered, community-based educational program and; (2) a client service coordination effort resulting in improved health outcomes (BMI, Glucose Levels, BP) for individuals with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Gadsden County, Florida. Overall, Project H.I.G.H. was very successful in its first year at motivating participants to delay or prevent diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease or at the very least to start taking better care of their health.

  19. 77 FR 66606 - Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. and the Connecticut Bank and Trust Company, National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. and the Connecticut Bank and Trust Company, National Association; Notice of Application for Partial Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On June...

  20. Fleas (Siphonaptera) of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) in West Virginia with comments on host specificity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castleberry, S.B.; Castleberry, N.L.; Wood, P.B.; Ford, W.M.; Mengak, M.T.

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has indicated fewer host-specific ectoparasites on woodrats of the eastern United States as compared to western woodrat species. The Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) is a species of conservation concern that is associated with rocky habitats in the Appalachian and Interior Highland regions in the eastern United States. We examined Allegheny woodrat flea parasites in the core of the distribution to further elucidate patterns of ectoparasite host specificity in woodrats of the eastern United States. Of 346 fleas collected from 62 Allegheny woodrats, all but 1 were identified as Orchopeas pennsylvanicus. The single exception was a male Epitedia cavernicola, which represents only the second collection of this species from West Virginia. Unlike the eastern woodrat (Neotoma floridana), which hosts a variety of generalist flea parasites, Allegheny woodrats in our study were host to only 2 flea species, both of which are host specific to woodrats. We suggest that flea host specificity may be related to the specific habitat requirements of this species.

  1. Implementation of mass media community health education: the Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project.

    PubMed

    Dignan, M; Bahnson, J; Sharp, P; Beal, P; Smith, M; Michielutte, R

    1991-09-01

    The Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project (FCP) is a community-based health education project funded by the National Cancer Institute. The target population includes around 25 000 black women age 18 and older who reside in Forsyth County, North Carolina. The overall goal of the program is to prevent mortality from cervical cancer by promoting Pap smears and return for follow-up care when needed. Based on the principles of social marketing, a plan to reach the target population with mass media educational messages through electronic and print channels was developed. Guided by marketing objectives, the target population was divided into relatively discrete segments. The segments included church attenders, patients in waiting rooms of public and selected health providers, female students at local colleges, shoppers, viewers of radio and television, newspaper readers, and business owners and managers. Introduction of the program was based on strategies developed for reaching the target population in each segment with television, radio and print mass media messages. Qualitative assessment of the mass media developed by the program indicated that all forms of communication helped to increase awareness of the program.

  2. Health assessment for York County Solid Waste Landfill, York County, Hopewell Township, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980830715. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-26

    The York County Waste Landfill site is an active unlined landfill which has been in operation since November 1974. Environmental contamination on-site consists of 1,2-dichloroethane (28 ppb), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (11 ppb), methylene chloride (12 ppb), trichlorofluoromethane (8 ppb), dichlorodifluoromethane (68 ppb), toluene (5 ppb), methyl ethyl ketone (140 ppb), acetone (170 ppb), and tetrachloroethylene (12 ppb) in groundwater. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater.

  3. Child health care utilisation in families with young or single mothers in a Swedish county.

    PubMed

    Wallby, Thomas; Modin, Bitte; Hjern, Anders

    2013-03-01

    Young age and lone parenthood are risk factors for impaired health among mothers and their children. Due to the higher risks of negative influences on physical and mental health, young and single mothers should be of special concern to the Child Health Services (CHS). In the present study, we investigated consumption patterns of child health care services among young and single mothers in Uppsala County, Sweden to study whether they are reached by the universal CHS program and if selective or indicative measures were administered in daily CHS practice. Register data on CHS contacts and socio-demographic indicators were collected for 10692 infants, born in 1998-2006. Results show small differences in contact pattern and immunization status, between children of young versus older, and single versus cohabiting mothers. However, both young (RR 0.64) and single (RR 0.80) mothers had significantly lower rates of participation in parental group. The CHS were consequently successful in implementing the universal preventive child health programme for all families, including families with young or single mothers. There was no indication, however, of an established selective preventive strategy aimed at these high risk families. Programs for strengthening the support provided to vulnerable families by the CHS are needed.

  4. The Fresno County Refugee Health Volunteer Project: a case study in cross-cultural health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Rowe, D R; Spees, H P

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1979, Fresno County received a 2nd dramatic influx of Southeast Asian refugees. There are now approximately 20,000 of these refugees, including the largest population of Hmong in the US. This community includes about 2000 Cambodian, 14,000 Hmong, and 4000 Lowland Lao. Altogether, Southeast Asian refugees comprise nearly 10% of the population of Fresno. These demographics provide the backdrop for significant problems in health care service delivery. Some barriers include: 1) stress, loss, dislocation, poverty, illness, and unemployment that are part of the refugee experience; 2) language differences; 3) cultural isolation; and 4) cultural beliefs and practices whose spiritual, wholistic, and natural forms of care often run contrary to the West's scientific, specialized, and technological treatment modalities. The Health Department began to recognize some difficulties related to health services for refugees and developed a strategy to combat these. This strategy was named the Refugee Health Volunteer Project and its goal was to enable individuals, families, and community groups to better meet their own health care needs. Goals were to be met by 1st creating a community-based health promotion network to 1) identify health needs, 2) communicate health information, 3) train community health volunteers, and 4) build a greater capacity for self-care that would last beyond the end of the program. The program's goal would also be met by overcoming the access problems with the service system by 1) communicating community-identified needs, 2) identifying specific barriers in the service system, 3) initiating broad participation among service providers in designing more accessible approaches to service delivery, and 4) improving coordination between service providers. Significant progress has been made in a very short time. The Project demonstrates that a fairly common, bureaucratic organization can be responsive to extremely unique community needs. The project is

  5. Water resources of Indiana County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.R.; McElroy, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Indiana County, west-central Pennsylvania, is a major producer of coal and natural gas. Water managers and residents are concerned about the effects of mining and natural gas exploration on the surface- and ground-water resources of the county. This study assesses the quality and quantity of water in Indiana County. Ground- and surface-water sources are used for public supplies that serve 61 percent of the total population of the county. The remaining 39 percent of the population live in rural areas and rely on cisterns and wells and springs that tap shallow aquifers. Most of the county is underlain by rocks of Middle to Upper Pennsylvanian age. From oldest to youngest, they are the Allegheny Group, the Glenshaw Formation, the Casselman Formation, and the Monongahela Group. Almost all the coals mined are in the Allegheny Group and the Monongahela Group. Ground water in Indiana County flows through fractures in the rock. The size and extent of the fractures, which are controlled by lithology, topography, and structure, determine the sustained yield of wells. Topography has a significant control over the yields of wells sited in the Allegheny Group. Properly sited wells in the Glenshaw Formation may have yields adequate for municipal, commercial, or industrial uses. The Casselman Formation yields adequate amounts of water for domestic use. Yield of the Monongahela Group is small, and the water may not be of suitable quality for most uses. Yields of hilltop wells may be marginal, but valley wells may yield sufficient amounts for large-volume users. Data on the other rock units are sparse to nonexistent. Few wells in the county yield more than 40 gallons per minute. Most of the wells that do are in valleys where alluvial deposits are extensive enough to be mapable. Short-term water-level fluctuations are variable from well to well. Seasonal water-level fluctuations are controlled by time of year and amount of precipitation. The quality of water from the Casselman

  6. LGBT health and vaccinations: Findings from a community health survey of Lexington-Fayette County, Kentucky, USA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff; Poole, Asheley; Lasley-Bibbs, Vivian; Johnson, Mark

    2016-04-07

    Data on adult immunization coverage at the state level and for LGBT Americans in particular are sparse. This study reports the results of a 2012 Lexington-Fayette County, Kentucky, community health assessment's results asking about eight adult vaccinations among 218 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) respondents. Researchers collected data using an online survey distributed through LGBT social media, posters, and LGBT print media. The LGBT sample largely matches the demographics of the county as a whole except this group reports higher level of education and fewer uninsured individuals. Among LGBT respondents, immunization prevalence reaches 68.0% (annual Influenza), 65.7% (Hepatitis B), 58.8% (Chickenpox/Varicella), 55.9% (Hepatitis A), 41.2% (Smallpox), and 25.8% (Pneumonia). Among respondents who are currently within the recommended 19-26 years age range for the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, the LGBT females are less likely to report receiving the vaccine (15.4%) compared to the national coverage percentage of 34.5%. Males, however, are more likely to have received the vaccine (10.3%) than the national percentage of 2.3%. The small number of LGBT seniors in the study report a much higher prevalence of the Shingles (Herpes Zoster) vaccines than for U.S. seniors 60 and older (71.4% compared to 20.1% nationally). LGBT respondents report higher percentages of adult vaccination.

  7. Effects of General Medical Health on Alzheimer Progression: the Cache County Dementia Progression Study

    PubMed Central

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Han, Dingfen; Mielke, Michelle M.; Forrester, Sarah N.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.; Corcoran, Chris D.; Green, Robert C.; Norton, Maria C.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several observational studies suggested a link between health status and rate of decline among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We sought to quantify the relationship in a population-based study of incident AD, and to compare global comorbidity ratings to counts of comorbid conditions and medications as predictors of AD progression. Methods Design Case-only cohort study arising from population-based longitudinal study of memory and aging. Setting Cache County, Utah Participants 335 individuals with incident AD followed for up to 11 years. Measurements Patient descriptors included sex, age, education, dementia duration at baseline, and APOE genotype. Measures of health status made at each visit included the GMHR (General Medical Health Rating), number of comorbid medical conditions, and number of non-psychiatric medications. Dementia outcomes included the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating – sum of boxes (CDR-sb), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Results Health Status tended to fluctuate over time within individuals. None of the baseline medical variables (GMHR, comorbidities, non-psychiatric medications) were associated with differences in rates of decline in longitudinal linear mixed effects models. Over time, low GMHR ratings, but not comorbidities or medications, were associated with poorer outcomes (MMSE: β=−1.07 p=0.01; CDR-sb: β=1.79 p<0.001; NPI: β=4.57 p=0.01) Conclusions Given that time-varying GMHR, but not baseline GMHR, was associated with the outcomes, there is likely a dynamic relationship between medical and cognitive health. GMHR is a more sensitive measure of health than simple counts of comorbidities or medications. Since health status is a potentially modifiable risk factor, further study is warranted. PMID:22687143

  8. The "sugar pack" health marketing campaign in Los Angeles County, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Barragan, Noel C; Noller, Ali J; Robles, Brenda; Gase, Lauren N; Leighs, Michael S; Bogert, Suzanne; Simon, Paul A; Kuo, Tony

    2014-03-01

    As part of a comprehensive approach to combating the obesity epidemic, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health launched the "Sugar Pack" health marketing campaign in fall 2011. Carried out in three stages, the campaign sought to educate and motivate the public to reduce excess calorie intake from sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. The primary Sugar Pack creative concepts provided consumers with information about the number of sugar packs contained in sugary drinks. Data from formative market research as well as lessons from previous campaigns in other U.S. jurisdictions informed the development of the materials. These materials were disseminated through a multipronged platform that included paid outdoor media on transit and billboards and messaging using social media (i.e., Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and sendable e-cards). Initial findings from a postcampaign assessment indicate that the Sugar Pack campaign reached broadly into targeted communities, resulting in more than 515 million impressions. Lessons learned from the campaign suggest that employing health marketing to engage the public can lead to increased knowledge, favorable recognition of health messages, and self-reported intention to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, potentially complementing other obesity prevention strategies in the field.

  9. RACISM IN ORGANIZATIONS: THE CASE OF A COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Derek M.; Childs, Erica L.; Eng, Eugenia; Jeffries, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    Racism is part of the foundation of U.S. society and institutions, yet few studies in community psychology or organizational studies have examined how racism affects organizations. This paper proposes a conceptual framework of institutional racism, which describes how, in spite of professional standards and ethics, racism functions within organizations to adversely affect the quality of services, the organizational climate, and staff job satisfaction and morale. Grounded in systems theory and organizational empowerment, the framework is based on data that describe how racism was made manifest in a county public health department. The findings highlight the importance of understanding how organizations are influenced by external forces and can negatively affect clients, communities, and their own staff members. PMID:18852826

  10. Promoting Evidence-Based Decision Making in a Local Health Department, Pueblo City–County, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Nevin-Woods, Christine; Proud, Sylvia; Brownson, Ross C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based decision making (EBDM) is an effective strategy for addressing population health needs. Assessing and reducing barriers to using EBDM in local health departments may improve practice and provide insight into disseminating EBDM principles among public health practitioners. Community Context Administrative leaders at the Pueblo City–County Health Department, Pueblo, Colorado, used a systematic approach for implementing EBDM. Research partners engaged staff to understand factors that increase or deter its use. Methods A survey was distributed to staff members at baseline to identify gaps in administrative and individual practice of EBDM. In-depth interviews were also conducted with 11 randomly selected staff members. Results were shared with staff and administration, after which activities were implemented to improve application of EBDM. A follow up survey was administered 1 year after the initial assessment. Outcome Survey data showed evidence of progress in engaging and educating staff members, and data showed improved attitudes toward EBDM (ie, several items showed significant improvement from baseline to follow-up). For example, staff members reported having the necessary skills to develop evidence-based interventions (73.9%), the ability to effectively communicate information on evidence-based strategies to policy makers (63.0%), access to current information on improving EBDM processes (65.2%), and a belief that evidence-based interventions are designed to be self-sustaining (43.5%). Interpretation Within a local health department in which leaders have made EBDM a priority, addressing the culture and climate of the department may build EBDM. Future research may provide insight into tailoring EBDM within and across local health departments. PMID:26111156

  11. Potential health impacts of heavy-metal exposure at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, John S; Hu, Stephen C; Drake, K David; Jim, Rebecca

    2009-02-01

    The potential impact of exposure to heavy metals and health problems was evaluated at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, USA. Observed versus expected mortality was calculated for selected conditions in the County and exposed cities. Excess mortality was found for stroke and heart disease when comparing the exposed County to the state but not when comparing the exposed cities to the nonexposed rest of the County. However, sample sizes in the exposed area were small, population emigration has been ongoing, and geographic coding of mortality data was incomplete. In an exposed community, 62.5% of children under the age of 6 years had blood lead levels exceeding 10 microg/dl. The relationships between heavy-metal exposure and children's health and chronic disease in adults are suggestive that a more thorough investigation might be warranted. A number of possible environmental and health studies are suggested, including those focusing on possible central nervous system impacts. Unfortunately, the exposed population is dispersing. One lesson learned at this site is that health studies need to be conducted as soon as possible after an environmental problem is identified to both study the impact of the most acute exposures and to maximize study sample size-including those exposed to higher doses-and minimize the loss of individuals to follow-up.

  12. The Impact of a Community-Based Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative: Evaluation Findings from "Steps to Health King County"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheadle, Allen; Bourcier, Emily; Krieger, James; Beery, William; Smyser, Michael; Vinh, Diana V.; Lessler, Dan; Alfonsi, Lorrie

    2011-01-01

    "Steps to Health King County" ("Steps KC"; Seattle, Washington) was one of 40 community-level initiatives funded in 2003 as part of the "Steps to a HealthierUS" initiative. "Steps KC" goals included reducing the impact of chronic diseases through a comprehensive, coordinated approach and reducing health…

  13. Child Health and Well-Being in Miami-Dade County: 2007 Baseline Survey Results. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Laura; Guzman, Lina; Vandivere, Sharon; Atienza, Astrid; Rivers, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In January through April 2007, the Children's Trust sponsored a population-based survey of parents of children ages birth through 17 in Miami-Dade County to provide a baseline of data on child health and well-being, and to discern unmet needs for services in the Trust's primary impact areas and strategic investments. The survey was conducted by…

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen among women receiving prenatal care at the Palm Beach County Health Department.

    PubMed

    Malecki, J M; Guarin, O; Hulbert, A; Brumback, C L

    1986-03-01

    Pregnant women receiving prenatal care at the maternity clinics of the Palm Beach County Health Department were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen. Routine screening of pregnant women for the antigen is discussed. The results of this study indicate the need for routine screening of our medically indigent pregnant population.

  15. Demographic Norms for Metropolitan, Nonmetropolitan and Rural Counties. Mental Health Demographic Profile System Working Paper No. 24, July 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Harold F.; And Others

    Utilizing 1970 census statistics for metropolitan, nonmetropolitan, rural, and "all" counties, this paper presents the selected percentile values for the 130 statistics (social indicators) in the Mental Health Demographic Profile System (the MHDPS is a system which allows the delineation of residential areas with common social rank, life…

  16. 78 FR 13007 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Chemical and Control of Volatile 10/20/1995 11/14/2002 67 FR 68935 Polymer Manufacturing--Fugitive Organic Compound Emissions. Fugitive Emissions from Synthetic Organic Chemical Polymer and Resin Manufacturing... nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) satisfies the RACT requirements set forth...

  17. 77 FR 71140 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it... is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic... placed on the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available...

  18. 78 FR 34584 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Standard AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving a... for public inspection during normal business hours at the Air Protection Division, U.S....

  19. 75 FR 81480 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Wood Paneling; Paper, Film, and Foil Surface Coating Processes; and Revisions to Definitions and an Existing Regulation AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY:...

  20. Public health assessment for Clarke Road Municipal Solid Waste Landfill, Waynesboro, Burke County, Georgia, Region 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-21

    The Burke County Clarke Road Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWL) opened in 1975 and is still in operation. This landfill has two areas which accept waste, one cell for municipal and the other for construction and demolition waste. The Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) and the consultant for Burke County, Tribble and Richardson, Inc. (T and R) collected drinking-water well samples on May 12, 1997, at seven residences in the vicinity of the landfill. EPD asked the Georgia Division of Public Health (GDPH) to conduct a public health investigation at the Clarke Road MSWL in Waynesboro, Georgia. EPD is concerned about possible adverse health effects caused by past, present, and future exposure to environmental contamination from the landfill. GDPH classifies this site as no apparent public health hazard. Discussions of exposure pathways, specific contaminants, and conclusions about the risk posed to residents near the landfill are included in this document.

  1. The impact of new health insurance coverage on undocumented and other low-income children: lessons from three California counties.

    PubMed

    Howell, Embry; Trenholm, Christopher; Dubay, Lisa; Hughes, Dana; Hill, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Three California counties (Los Angeles, San Mateo, and Santa Clara) expanded health insurance coverage for undocumented children and some higher income children not covered by Medi-Cal (Medicaid) or Healthy Families (SCHIP). This paper presents findings from evaluations of all three programs. Results consistently showed that health insurance enrollment increased access to and use of medical and dental care, and reduced unmet need for those services. After one year of enrollment the programs also improved the health status of children, including reducing the percentage of children who missed school due to health.

  2. Mast and weather influences on population trends of a species of concern: The allegheny woodrat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manjerovic, M.B.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20-30 y. northern and western populations of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) have experienced large declines. whereas populations in the core of the range are assumed to be stable. We examined population trends at two study areas in northcentral West Virginia along the western ridge of the central Appalachian Mountains. Temperature and precipitation parameters along with mast production were examined to determine if these environmental variables impacted the population. Based on a 5 y dataset. our results indicate a yearly decrease in the overall population. with adult females most affected. Hard and soft mast availability related to adult female capture rates. whereas temperatures significantly affected juvenile. adult female and overall capture rates. Juvenile summer capture rates increased with warmer temperatures the preceding winter. Female summer capture rates decreased with warmer temperatures the preceding spring suggesting that effects of warming should be added as a potential threat to the Allegheny woodrat.

  3. Ice Atlas 1985 - 1986. Monongahela River, Allegheny River, Ohio River, Illinois River and Kankakee River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    V 0 1m =1 uvydae aury1,18 Belevlle oo Sufc MAPUNTS( MArea concentration MAP NITS(in 2 x 106) (%/) Oppen water 24.97 NA Solid ice cover 0.00 NA Solid...January 28, 1986 ideo Ta-pe 14 Lock and Dam #3 Pool.- Allegheny River: 1/1 / New Kensington Bridge 19- Lock and Dam #2 Pool Surface MArea

  4. Effects of Long-Term Dust Exposure on Human Respiratory System Health in Minqin County, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyu; Li, Sheng; Wang, Shigong; Shang, Kezheng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of long-term sand dust exposure on human respiratory health. Dust events break out frequently in Minqin County, northwest China, whereas Pingliang City, northwest China, is rarely influenced by dust events. Therefore, Minqin and Pingliang were selected as sand dust exposure region and control area, respectively. The incidence of respiratory system diseases and symptoms was determined through a structured respiratory health questionnaire (ATS-DLD-78-A) and personal interviews. The subjects comprised 728 farmers (Minqin, 424; Pingliang, 304) aged 40 years or older, who had nondocumented occupational history to industrial dust exposure. Prevalences (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI]) of chronic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, and chronic cough increased 9.6% (3.141, 1.776-5.555), 7.5% (2.468, 1.421-4.286), and 10.2% (1.787, 1.246-2.563) in Minqin comparison with Pingliang, respectively, and the differences were significant (p <.01).

  5. [Computer usage among primary health care physicians in the Vukovar-Srijem County].

    PubMed

    Iveković, Hrvoje

    2002-01-01

    A survey was carried out, aiming at identification of the current usage of computers among primary health care physicians of the Vukovar-Srijem County. The results indicated poor knowledge and practice concerning the computer usage among examinees: 58% of the responders are not aware of the possibilities of computer usage in a GP office and 82% have not had an opportunity to see the software specialised for usage at GP offices. The results obtained from this survey indicate that none of the examinees use computer during daily routine work at the GP office. Only 26% of the examinees have got a computer, and use it at home, mostly for text processing. The Internet is used actively by 8% of examinees. Lack of education and equipment have been identified as main obstacles in the process of introducing computers to GP offices. Positive attitude towards computer usage has been identified, representing an important stimulus towards a more active role of the health centres management in solving this problem.

  6. Health assessment for New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD981021157. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-09

    The New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, has been proposed for the National Priorities List by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The burn pit is part of an active airport and was used from 1968-1979 for fire-training exercises. Aviation fuel, waste oil, and petroleum tank bottoms were burned and extinguished with water, carbon dioxide, or dry chemicals. Samples from the pit and soil adjacent to the pit, where pit contents were drained, showed the presence of heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Investigation of the site has been limited to the pit and surrounding soil. Groundwater is close to land surface in the area and may be affected. Groundwater is used for domestic purposes within a 3-mile radius of the site. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

  7. DDT, DDD, and DDE in soil of Xiangfen County, China: Residues, sources, spatial distribution, and health risks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Pan, Li-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Tao, Shi-Yang; Zhao, Long; Qin, Xiao-Peng; Sun, Zai-Jin; Hou, Hong; Zhou, Yong-Zhang

    2016-11-01

    We collected and analyzed 128 surface soil samples from Xiangfen County for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE). Total DDT concentrations (DDTs; sum of p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDT) ranged from ND to 427.81 ng g(-1) (dry weight, dw), with a mean of 40.26 ng g(-1) (dw). Among the three compounds, p,p'-DDD was the most dominant. The DDTs in Xiangfen County soils mainly originated from historical DDT use, but there were also new inputs likely related to dicofol use. The DDTs in Xiangfen County soils were mainly degraded under anaerobic conditions, and direct degradation to DDD was the main degradation route. Regions with relatively high concentrations of DDTs were mainly located in North and South Xiangfen County. In these regions, many soil samples contained p,p'-DDT as the predominant pollutant, suggestive of extensive new inputs of DDT. A health risk assessment revealed that there are no serious long-term health impacts of exposure to DDTs in soil, for adults or children.

  8. Culturally Competent Diabetes Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans: The Starr County Border Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon A.; Dougherty, James R.; Garcia, Alexandra A.; Kouzekanani, Kamiar; Hanis, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine in Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes the effects of a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention. Research Design and Methods A prospective, randomized, repeated measures study was conducted on the Texas-Mexico border in Starr County. 256 randomly selected persons with type 2 diabetes were: (1) between 35 and 70 years of age; (2) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after the age of 35 years; and (3) accompanied by a family member or friend. The intervention consisted of 52 contact hours over 12 months and was provided by bilingual Mexican American nurses, dietitians, and community workers. The intervention involved : (1) 3 months of weekly instructional sessions on nutrition, self-monitoring of blood glucose, exercise, and other self-care topics; and (2) 6 months of biweekly support group sessions to promote behavior changes. The approach was culturally competent in terms of language, diet, social emphasis, family participation, and incorporation of cultural health beliefs. Indicators of metabolic control (HbA1c and FBS), diabetes knowledge, and diabetes-related health beliefs. Results Experimental groups showed significantly lower levels of HbA1c and FBS at 6 months and at 12 months and higher diabetes knowledge scores. At 6 months, the mean HbA1c of the experimental subjects was 1.4% below the mean of the control group; however, the mean level of the experimental subjects was still high (over 10%). Conclusions This study confirms the effectiveness of culturally competent diabetes self-management education on improving health outcomes of Mexican Americans, particularly for those individuals with HbA1c levels above 10%. PMID:11815493

  9. Factors associated with adequate weekly reporting for disease surveillance data among health facilities in Nairobi County, Kenya, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Mwatondo, Athman Juma; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Maina, Caroline; Makayotto, Lyndah; Mwangi, Moses; Njeru, Ian; Arvelo, Wences

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Kenya adopted the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy in 1998 to strengthen disease surveillance and epidemic response. However, the goal of weekly surveillance reporting among health facilities has not been achieved. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of adequate reporting and factors associated with IDSR reporting among health facilities in one Kenyan County. Methods Health facilities (public and private) were enrolled using stratified random sampling from 348 facilities prioritized for routine surveillance reporting. Adequately-reporting facilities were defined as those which submitted >10 weekly reports during a twelve-week period and a poor reporting facilities were those which submitted <10 weekly reports. Multivariate logistic regression with backward selection was used to identify risk factors associated with adequate reporting. Results From September 2 through November 30, 2013, we enrolled 175 health facilities; 130(74%) were private and 45(26%) were public. Of the 175 health facilities, 77 (44%) facilities classified as adequate reporting and 98 (56%) were reporting poorly. Multivariate analysis identified three factors to be independently associated with weekly adequate reporting: having weekly reporting forms at visit (AOR19, 95% CI: 6-65], having posters showing IDSR functions (AOR8, 95% CI: 2-12) and having a designated surveillance focal person (AOR7, 95% CI: 2-20). Conclusion The majority of health facilities in Nairobi County were reporting poorly to IDSR and we recommend that the Ministry of Health provide all health facilities in Nairobi County with weekly reporting tools and offer specific trainings on IDSR which will help designate a focal surveillance person. PMID:27303581

  10. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-477-1755, Cumberland County Homemaker Home Health Aid Service, Bridgeton, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, M.; Liveright, T.

    1986-12-01

    Following a request from the manager of the Cumberland County Home Health Aid Service, Bridgeton, New Jersey, the facility was investigated for hazards related to previous incineration of plastic hospital syringes. The syringes were composed of polypropylene and butyl rubber, and investigations were aimed at determining symptoms related to exposure to the pyrolysis products carbonmonoxide, formaldehyde, acrolein, and crotonaldehyde; other possible factors (dust, ventilation); and wipe samples. Observations revealed probable recirculation of pyrolysis products into office areas, as well as a significant dust burden. Initial symptoms reported involved respiratory and mucous membrane irritation. Continuing symptoms included throat irritation, eye irritation, and rhinitis. The authors conclude that, in spite of negative wipe tests, the workers have probably had continued exposure due to the adherence of irritants onto dust particles. Recommendations include removal of all unnecessary mobile objects and cleaning of remaining objects with a HEPA filtering vacuum, complete cleaning of the entire building with mild detergent, and removal of all materials stored there by the hospital, since their presence would be a continued source of production and dissemination of dust.

  11. Health assessment for Olmsted County Sanitary Landfill, Oronoco Township, Minnesota, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MND000874354. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-27

    Olmsted County Sanitary Landfill is listed on the National Priorities List. The landfill is in Olmsted County in southeastern Minnesota and was owned and operated by the City of Rochester. The landfill accepted much hazardous material, including electroplating sludge, asbestos, transformers, and paint and solvents. By 1984, ground water under the landfill was heavily contaminated with leachate from the pile. Representative contamination found in the monitoring wells include 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, chloroform, methylene chloride, tetrahydrofuran, methyl ethyl ketone, chloromethane, ethylbenzene, toluene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, dichlorobenzene, benzene, and xylenes. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via the ground water.

  12. Public health assessment for Preferred Plating Corporation, Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York, Region 2. Cerclis No. NYD980768774. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-15

    The Preferred Plating Corporation Site, which is on the United States Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List, is in East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York. The site presented a public health hazard in the past because of documented human exposures to chromium in non-residentual private wells including a small U.S. Army base. Currently, the site presents no apparent public health hazard as long as the planned remedial measures are taken. Subsurface soil underneath the building on-site is contaminated with volatile organic compounds and metals and groundwater on-site is contaminated with metals. The subsurface soil serves as a continuing source of contamination to the groundwater.

  13. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, American Chemical Services Inc. , Griffith, Lake County, Indiana, Region 5. Cerclis No. IND016360265. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-29

    Using the available information, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) concludes that the American Chemical Services NPL site is a indeterminate public health hazard. Extensive on-site subsurface soil and groundwater contamination have been found at the American Chemical Services National Priorities List (NPL) site in Griffith, Lake County, Indiana. Groundwater contamination has migrated off site, but has not infiltrated local residential wells.

  14. Effects of high salinity wastewater discharges on unionid mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kathleen Patnode,; Hittle, Elizabeth A.; Robert Anderson,; Lora Zimmerman,; Fulton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of high salinity wastewater (brine) from oil and natural gas drilling on freshwater mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, during 2012. Mussel cages (N = 5 per site) were deployed at two sites upstream and four sites downstream of a brine treatment facility on the Allegheny River. Each cage contained 20 juvenile northern riffleshell mussels Epioblasma torulosa rangiana). Continuous specific conductance and temperature data were recorded by water quality probes deployed at each site. To measure the amount of mixing throughout the entire study area, specific conductance surveys were completed two times during low-flow conditions along transects from bank to bank that targeted upstream (reference) reaches, a municipal wastewater treatment plant discharge upstream of the brine-facility discharge, the brine facility, and downstream reaches. Specific conductance data indicated that high specific conductance water from the brine facility (4,000–12,000 µS/cm; mean 7,846) compared to the reference reach (103–188 µS/cm; mean 151) is carried along the left descending bank of the river and that dilution of the discharge via mixing does not occur until 0.5 mi (805 m) downstream. Juvenile northern riffleshell mussel survival was severely impaired within the high specific conductance zone (2 and 34% at and downstream of the brine facility, respectively) and at the municipal wastewater treatment plant (21%) compared to background (84%). We surveyed native mussels (family Unionidae) at 10 transects: 3 upstream, 3 within, and 4 downstream of the high specific conductance zone. Unionid mussel abundance and diversity were lower for all transects within and downstream of the high conductivity zone compared to upstream. The results of this study clearly demonstrate in situ toxicity to juvenile northern riffleshell mussels, a federally endangered species, and to the native unionid mussel assemblage located downstream of a brine discharge to the

  15. Integrated Health Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Suxian County, South China.

    PubMed

    Song, Daping; Zhuang, Dafang; Jiang, Dong; Fu, Jingying; Wang, Qiao

    2015-06-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess soil heavy metal contamination and the potential risk for local residents in Suxian county of Hunan Province, southern China. Soil, rice and vegetable samples from the areas near the mining industrial districts were sampled and analyzed. The results indicate that the anthropogenic mining activities have caused local agricultural soil contamination with As, Pb, Cu and Cd in the ranges of 8.47-341.33 mg/kg, 19.91-837.52 mg/kg, 8.41-148.73 mg/kg and 0.35-6.47 mg/kg, respectively. GIS-based mapping shows that soil heavy metal concentrations abruptly diminish with increasing distance from the polluting source. The concentrations of As, Pb, Cu and Cd found in rice were in the ranges of 0.02-1.48 mg/kg, 0.66-5.78 mg/kg, 0.09-6.75 mg/kg, and up to 1.39 mg/kg, respectively. Most of these concentrations exceed their maximum permissible levels for contaminants in foods in China. Heavy metals accumulate to significantly different levels between leafy vegetables and non-leafy vegetables. Food consumption and soil ingestion exposure are the two routes that contribute to the average daily intake dose of heavy metals for local adults. Moreover, the total hazard indices of As, Pb and Cd are greater than or close to the safety threshold of 1. Long-term As, Pb and Cd exposure through the regular consumption of the soil, rice and vegetables in the investigated area poses potential health problems to residents in the vicinity of the mining industry.

  16. Tractor overturn concerns in Iowa: perspectives from the Keokuk county rural health study.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, W T; Madsen, M D; Rautiainen, R; Kelly, K M; Zwerling, C; Taylor, C D; Reynolds, S J; Stromquist, A M; Burmeister, L F; Merchant, J A

    2006-02-01

    Agriculture remains one of the most hazardous industries in the U.S., with tractor overturns producing the greatest number of agricultural machinery-related fatalities. Rollover protective structures (ROPS) and seatbelts effectively reduce tractor overturn deaths. However, a large proportion of tractors in use in American agriculture are older tractors without ROPS and seatbelts. This article describes the tractor-related responses from participants in a population-based study conducted in Keokuk County, Iowa. This study was designed to measure rural and agricultural adverse health and injury outcomes and their respective risk factors. Questionnaires were partially developed from well-documented national surveys. Questions about agricultural machinery use, presence of safety equipment on the machinery, work practices, and attitudes about farm safety were included. Study participants on farms who owned tractors had an average of 3.1 tractors with an average age of 27 years. Only 39% of the 665 tractors had ROPS. Tractor age was associated with the presence of ROPS; 84% of tractors manufactured after 1984 were ROPS-equipped, whereas only 3% of tractors manufactured before 1960 were ROPS-equipped. ROPS-equipped tractors were significantly more common on larger farms and households with higher income. Only 4% of the farmers reported that their tractors had seatbelts and they wore them when operating their tractors. The results of this study support the findings of other studies, which indicate that many older tractors without ROPS and seatbelts remain in use in American agriculture. Until a dramatic reduction in the number of tractors in the U.S. operated without ROPS and seatbelts is achieved, the annual incidence of 120 to 130 deaths associated with tractor overturns will persist.

  17. Integrated Health Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Suxian County, South China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Daping; Zhuang, Dafang; Jiang, Dong; Fu, Jingying; Wang, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess soil heavy metal contamination and the potential risk for local residents in Suxian county of Hunan Province, southern China. Soil, rice and vegetable samples from the areas near the mining industrial districts were sampled and analyzed. The results indicate that the anthropogenic mining activities have caused local agricultural soil contamination with As, Pb, Cu and Cd in the ranges of 8.47–341.33 mg/kg, 19.91–837.52 mg/kg, 8.41–148.73 mg/kg and 0.35–6.47 mg/kg, respectively. GIS-based mapping shows that soil heavy metal concentrations abruptly diminish with increasing distance from the polluting source. The concentrations of As, Pb, Cu and Cd found in rice were in the ranges of 0.02–1.48 mg/kg, 0.66–5.78 mg/kg, 0.09–6.75 mg/kg, and up to 1.39 mg/kg, respectively. Most of these concentrations exceed their maximum permissible levels for contaminants in foods in China. Heavy metals accumulate to significantly different levels between leafy vegetables and non-leafy vegetables. Food consumption and soil ingestion exposure are the two routes that contribute to the average daily intake dose of heavy metals for local adults. Moreover, the total hazard indices of As, Pb and Cd are greater than or close to the safety threshold of 1. Long-term As, Pb and Cd exposure through the regular consumption of the soil, rice and vegetables in the investigated area poses potential health problems to residents in the vicinity of the mining industry. PMID:26114243

  18. State of spirituality-infused mental health services in Los Angeles County wellness and client-run centers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Subica, Andrew M; Kim, Min Ah; Van Nguyen, Kevin; Lim, Caroline S; Mancuso, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Spiritual coping is associated with positive mental health outcomes for individuals with serious mental illness, yet spirituality-infused services are seldom offered in public sector mental health agencies. The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health introduced a policy addressing spirituality in 2012. This study explored the breadth and degree to which spirituality-infused activities were being offered in 53 Los Angeles wellness and recovery centers after the policy was widely disseminated. More than 98 % of the centers offered options for spirituality-infused activities; one-third offered spirituality-focused groups. Los Angeles's progress may guide implementation of spirituality-infused services in other state or local public mental health systems.

  19. Health Care–Associated Infection Outbreak Investigations in Outpatient Settings, Los Angeles County, California, USA, 2000−2012

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Laura; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Terashita, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Health care services are increasingly delivered in outpatient settings. However, infection control oversight in outpatient settings to ensure patient safety has not improved and literature quantifying reported health care–associated infection outbreaks in outpatient settings is scarce. The objective of this analysis was to characterize investigations of suspected and confirmed outbreaks in outpatient settings in Los Angeles County, California, USA, reported during 2000–2012, by using internal logs; publications; records; and correspondence of outbreak investigations by characteristics of the setting, number, and type of infection control breaches found during investigations, outcomes of cases, and public health responses. Twenty-eight investigations met the inclusion criteria. Investigations occurred frequently, in diverse settings, and required substantial public health resources. Most outpatient settings investigated had >1 infection control breach. Lapses in infection control were suspected to be the outbreak source for 16 of the reviewed investigations. PMID:26196293

  20. Ecosystem Health Assessment at County-Scale Using the Pressure-State-Response Framework on the Loess Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Delin; Hao, Shilong

    2016-12-22

    Assessing ecosystem health is helpful to determine reasonable eco-environmental restoration and resource management strategies. Based on a pressure-state-response (PSR) framework, a set of comprehensive indicators including natural, social and economic aspects was proposed and applied for assessing the ecosystem health of Yuanzhou County, Loess Plateau, Ningxia Province, China. The basic data used to calculate the values of the assessment indicators include Landsat TM image and socio-economic data, and remote sensing (RS) and the geographic information system (GIS) were used to process image data. The results showed that the ecosystem health conditions of most townships in Yuanzhou County were at the moderately healthy level, three townships were at the healthy level, and only two townships were at the unhelathy level; the areas (percentage) at the unhealthy, moderately healthy and healthy levels were 443.91 km² (12.66%), 2438.75 km² (69.54%) and 624.50 km² (17.81%), respectively. The results could provide useful information for local residents and the government to take measures to improve the health conditions of their township ecosystem.

  1. Ecosystem Health Assessment at County-Scale Using the Pressure-State-Response Framework on the Loess Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Delin; Hao, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Assessing ecosystem health is helpful to determine reasonable eco-environmental restoration and resource management strategies. Based on a pressure-state-response (PSR) framework, a set of comprehensive indicators including natural, social and economic aspects was proposed and applied for assessing the ecosystem health of Yuanzhou County, Loess Plateau, Ningxia Province, China. The basic data used to calculate the values of the assessment indicators include Landsat TM image and socio-economic data, and remote sensing (RS) and the geographic information system (GIS) were used to process image data. The results showed that the ecosystem health conditions of most townships in Yuanzhou County were at the moderately healthy level, three townships were at the healthy level, and only two townships were at the unhelathy level; the areas (percentage) at the unhealthy, moderately healthy and healthy levels were 443.91 km2 (12.66%), 2438.75 km2 (69.54%) and 624.50 km2 (17.81%), respectively. The results could provide useful information for local residents and the government to take measures to improve the health conditions of their township ecosystem. PMID:28025518

  2. Health assessment for Broward County Landfill (Aka Davie Landfill), Davie, Broward County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD980602288. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Broward Count Landfill (aka Davie Landfill, South Broward Landfill, and Broward County Solid Waste Disposal Facility), which began operations in 1964, is located 10 miles southwest of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The site consists of a 48-acre solid waste landfill, a 68-acre sanitary landfill and a 4-acre sludge lagoon. The solid waste landfill was used to dispose of the municipal solid waste being incinerated at the on-site incinerator. Ammonia, chlorides, sulfate, nitrates, and iron were found in the surface water (borrow pits) on-site. Sludge from the lagoon was found to contain cyanide. Soils on-site have been contaminated with a variety of compounds related to previous landfill activities. The groundwater on-site and downgradient of the site shows elevated levels of sulfate, chloride, lead, and ammonia. Benzene, vinyl chloride, and some unidentified compounds have been detected in monitoring wells and private wells to the south of the landfill. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via on-site ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact exposures to contaminants present in soil, groundwater, surface water, sediments, and air and off-site ingestion, inhalation, and direct contact exposures to contaminants present in groundwater.

  3. Health assessment for Del Norte County Pesticide Storage Area, Cresent City, Del Norte County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD000626176. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-18

    The Del Norte County Pesticide Storage Area is located northwest of Cresent City, California. The site soils and ground water were contaminated with a myriad of pesticides and herbicides. The data also indicated an elevated concentration of chromium was present on-site and off-site; however, it does not appear to be related to the activities involving the use of the site as a pesticide storage area. The site was included on the National Priorities List in 1983. The storage area operated from 1970 until 1981, accepting containers from local agricultural and forestry-related industries. The intended use of the site was as an interim or emergency storage area for pesticide containers which had been triple rinsed and punctured prior to coming to the site. There were 9 private wells monitored within 0.50 miles of the site and the results indicated these wells were not contaminated by site contaminants. This site is of public health concern because of the potential for exposure to pesticides, herbicides, and chromium at concentrations of health concern.

  4. Lithostratigraphy of Upper Devonian Scherr-Foreknobs and Lockhaven Formations near Allegheny front of central Pennsylvanian

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, A.G.; McGhee, G.R. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Five well-exposed sections (at Madley, New Baltimore, Altoona, Milesburg, and Lockhaven) of Upper Devonian marine strata were measured and analyzed to refine lithologic and temporal correlations along the Allegheny Front of Pennsylvania. The members of the Scherr and Foreknobs formations (Minnehaha Springs, Mallow, Briery Gap, Blizzard, Pound, and Red Lock) are recognized as far north as Altoona. Farther north at Milesburg and Lockhaven, the lithology of the upper parts of the Lockhaven Formation are markedly different from the contiguous Foreknobs Formation, but the Minnehaha Springs member of the basal Scherr and lower-middle Lockhaven Formations is recognized in all sections studied. The Minnehaha Springs member (a 50 to 100-ft, resistant, medium-gray to red-gray sandy silt unit) is considered to be the result of a brief sea level lowering and is therefore nearly isochronous. The isochronous nature of the Minnehaha Springs member is substantiated by biostratigraphic data; therefore, it is considered the most reliable datum for correlating the sections of this study. The lithologic information of the six measured sections was augmented by 38 wells logs of oil and gas wells of the region. From the combined lithologic data, three generalized lithofacies cross sections were generated. These cross sections clearly indicate that: (1) the strike of the paleoshoreline was nearly parallel with the Allegheny Front; (2) a major delta lobe existed in central Pennsylvania during the Late Devonian; but (3) the size and influence of the delta on depositional environments was not constant through space and time.

  5. Pathways to Health: Association Between Trail Use, Weight Status, and Self-Rated Health Among Adults in Greenville County, South Carolina, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kaczynski, Andrew T.; Clennin, Morgan N.; Reed, Julian A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined associations between adults’ use of a prominent rail-trail and their weight status and self-rated health. In 2014, a random-digit-dial survey of Greenville County, South Carolina, residents (n = 639) was used to collect data on trail use, height and weight, self-rated health, and demographics. Trail users were half as likely to be overweight or obese as trail nonusers (odds ratio [OR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33–0.95). Similarly, trail users were significantly more likely to report high self-rated health than were trail nonusers (OR = 1.83; 95% CI, 1.13–2.97). Findings suggest that trail use is associated with healthier weight status and higher self-rated health and supports the development, maintenance, and promotion of trail resources. PMID:27978409

  6. 77 FR 20019 - FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM... Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.206 and 206(h), FirstEnergy Solutions Corp. (FirstEnergy Solutions)...

  7. 78 FR 12750 - FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM... sections 206 and 306 of the Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824(e) and 825(e), FirstEnergy Solutions Corp....

  8. 76 FR 6612 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Missouri 4, LLC; Allegheny 4 Hydro, LLC; Three Rivers Hydro, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 13746-000; Project No. 13750-000; Project No. 13776-000; Project No. 13782-000] Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Missouri 4, LLC; Allegheny 4 Hydro, LLC;...

  9. 77 FR 9225 - Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc., et al. v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Organization of PJM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc., et al. v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Organization of PJM States, Inc., et al. v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on... required by section 18.17.4 of the Amended and Restated Operating Agreement of PJM Interconnection,...

  10. 78 FR 58533 - FirstEnergy Generation, LLC, Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC, and Green Valley Hydro, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project Nos. 2280-017, 2343-084, 2459-245, 2516-057, 2517-036, 3494- 091, 3671-086, 2391-046, 2425-052, and 2509-046] FirstEnergy Generation, LLC, Allegheny Energy...

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-194-1779, Dade County Fire Department, Miami, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.A.

    1987-02-01

    An investigation was made of potential exposures to hazardous wastes (solvents) used for starting practice fires at the Dade County Fire Department aircraft fire training facility at Opa-Locka Airport, Dade County, Florida. Used solvents donated by waste handlers or local industries had been used to start practice fires. Laboratory analysis of the soil and ground water samples taken from the burn pits revealed the presence of several common industrial solvents. The only suspected carcinogen identified was dichlorobenzene. Other potential carcinogens identified included methylene chlroide and perchloroethylene. The author recommends that the practice of using unknown solvents to help start practice fires be eliminated.

  12. Culturally Competent Diabetes Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans: The Starr County Border Health Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sharon A.; Garcia, Alexandra A.; Kouzekanani, Kamiar; Hanis, Craig L.

    2002-01-01

    In a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention in Starr County, Texas, bilingual Mexican American nurses, dieticians, and community workers provided weekly instruction on nutrition, self-monitoring, exercise and other self-care topics. A biweekly support group promoted behavior change. Interviews and examinations with 256 Mexican…

  13. The Effect of New Insurance Coverage on the Health Status of Low-Income Children in Santa Clara County

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Embry M; Trenholm, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine whether providing health insurance coverage to undocumented children affects the health of those children. Data Sources/Study Setting The data come from a survey of 1235 parents of enrollees in the new insurance program (“Healthy Kids”) in Santa Clara County, California. The survey was conducted from August 2003 to July 2004. Study Design Cross-sectional study using a group of children insured for one year as the study group (N = 626) and a group of newly insured children as the comparison group (N = 609). Regression analysis is used to adjust for differences in the groups according to a range of characteristics. Data Collection Parents were interviewed by telephone in either English or Spanish (most responded in Spanish). The response rate was 89 percent. Principal Findings The study group—who were children continuously insured by Healthy Kids for one year—were significantly less likely to be in fair/poor health and to have functional impairments than the comparison group of newly insured children (15.9 percent versus 28.5 percent and 4.5 percent versus 8.4 percent, respectively). Impacts were largest among children who enrolled for a specific medical reason (such as an illness or injury); indeed, the impact on functional limitations was evident only for this subgroup. The study group also had fewer missed school days than the comparison group, but the difference was significant only among children who did not enroll for a medical reason. Conclusions Health insurance coverage of undocumented children in Santa Clara County was associated with significant improvements in children's health status. The size of this association could be overstated, since the comparison sample included some children who enrolled because of an illness or other temporary health problem that would have improved even without insurance coverage. However, even after limiting the study sample to children who did not enroll for a medical reason, a significant

  14. Surveying Local Health Departments and County Emergency Management Offices on Cooling Centers as a Heat Adaptation Resource in New York State.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Seema G; Lin, Shao; Sheridan, Scott C; Lu, Yi; Graber, Nathan; Primeau, Michael; Rafferty, Claudine Jones; Hwang, Syni-An

    2017-02-01

    Local agencies in New York State (NYS) set up cooling centers to provide relief from summer-time heat especially for people with limited access to air-conditioning. We aimed to determine cooling center locations in NYS, and explore county agencies' involvement in organizing and promoting utilization of cooling centers. We conducted a survey among county health and emergency preparedness offices in NYS (excluding NYC) and explored official county websites. We identified 377 cooling centers, mostly in metropolitan areas of NYS. Although 47 % of counties listed locations online, only 29 % reported locations via survey. Radio (90 %) and internet (84 %) were popular for information dissemination. Air-conditioning was available at all indoor cooling center facilities. Cooling centers in 13 % of the counties were accessible by either public transportation or shuttles arranged by the facility. About 38 % counties do not consider cooling centers important in their region or promote informal cooling centers. More than a third of New York counties had neither cooling centers nor plans to establish a cooling center as extreme heat was not perceived as a threat in their region.

  15. Public health assessment for Syosset Landfill, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, New York, Region 2. Cerclis No. NYD000511360. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-19

    The Syosset Landfill site is an inactive landfill in the Town of Oyster Bay, Syosset, Nassau County, New York. The site is an indeterminate public health hazard. The available data do no indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contamination that would be expected to cause adverse health effects. Exposures from ingesting contaminated drinking water from a downgradient public supply well may have occurred, however, data are not available to determine the full extent of groundwater contamination present during operation of the well. The concern exists due to the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including vinyl chloride, benzene and tetrachloroethene in soil gas, and the generation of methane which could migrate to inhabited on-site areas and/or off the site and accumulate in closed buildings, such as Town of Oyster Bay Maintenance facilities, adjacent homes, and the school.

  16. Public health assessment for Sandoval Zinc Company, Sandoval, Marion County, Illinois, Region 5: CERCLIS number ILD053980454. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-10

    The Sandoval Zinc site occupies about 13 acres southeast of Sandoval in Marion County, Illinois. It is an abandoned primary and secondary zinc smelter that was next to a coal mining operation. Smelting waste may have been transported off the site and used as fill in Sandoval and other nearby communities. Airborne emissions occurred during regular operations and accidental fires. Surface water runoff transported wastes from the site into adjacent ditches, creeks, ponds, and farm properties. Overall, the Sandoval Zinc site poses no apparent public health hazard to most of the population in Sandoval. The site may be a public health hazard to preschool children with excessive hand-to-mouth activity exposed to residential surface soils with high levels of lead. However, blood sample results from children in a day care near the site did not show elevated levels of lead.

  17. Health assessment for Rockaway Township Wells, Rockaway Township, Morris County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD980654214. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-20

    The Rockaway Township Wells in Morris County, New Jersey have experienced contamination with volatile organic chemicals in the past. Because the wells served a population of approximately 12,500 persons, a potential threat to the public health existed. The addition of a treatment system in 1980 to remove volatile organics substantially reduced the exposure to the community. Continued and frequent monitoring of the raw and treated water from the wells must be maintained to ensure the efficacy of treatment. On the basis of the information reviewed, the Rockaway Township Well Site is a potential public health concern. Since human exposure to on-site/off-site contaminants has occurred in the past, the population of Rockaway Township served by the wells is being considered for inclusion in a large-scale epidemiologic study of the effects of drinking water contamination.

  18. Public health assessment for Solitron Microwave, Port Salerno, Martin County, Florida, Region 4, CERCLIS number FLD045459526. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-31

    Solitron Microwave, on Cove Road in Port Salerno, Martin County, Florida, covers approximately 20 acres. On-site surface water, sediment, soil and groundwater are contaminated with metals and organic chemicals. Off-site groundwater is contaminated with metals and organic chemicals. In this public health assessment, the authors evaluate the potential for illnesses to be caused by exposure to contaminated surface soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Off-site groundwater and on-site soil are completed exposure pathways. On-site groundwater is a potential exposure pathway. Surface water and sediment are not completed exposure pathways. Currently the site is a potential public health hazard because people could be exposed in the future to contaminated on-site groundwater.

  19. Public health assessment for United Creosoting Company, Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980745574. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-17

    The United Creosoting National Priorities (NPL) list site is on Hilbig Road at Second Street, in Conroe, Montgomery County, Texas. The site was used for production of pressure treated creosoted wood products from 1946 until 1972. ATSDR completed a health assessment for the site in January 1986. The addendum to the health assessment evaluates the 1984 and 1985 environmental sampling data in more detail and also evaluates additional environmental sampling data collected in 1990. Contaminated soils and ground water have been detected both in industrial and residential portions of the original site vicinity. The primary contaminants of concern are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, and chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/dibenzofurans (CDD/CDFs). The populations at greatest risk of exposure are workers involved with remediation activities and residents of Tanglewood East subdivision. Exposures to contaminated soil through skin contact and ingestion may have occurred in the past.

  20. Public health assessment for modern sanitation landfill, York, York County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980539068. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-22

    The Modern Landfill, National Priorities List (NPL) site, is located adjacent to Prospect Road approximately 8 miles west of the City of York in Windsor and Lower Windsor Townships, York County, Pennsylvania. On-site and off-site groundwater were found to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds. Some businesses and private homes maintained wells. Nearby residents are concerned about potential exposure to contaminants through their drinking water. Modern Landfill is currently operating a waste treatment facility that treats contaminated groundwater and leachate from the site. Exposure to contaminated air represents a completed exposure pathway for on-site workers. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's (ATSDR) Health Activities Recommendation Panel has evaluated the site for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

  1. Bat activity in harvested and intact forest stands in the allegheny mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, S.F.; Menzel, M.A.; Edwards, J.W.; Ford, W.M.; Menzel, J.M.; Chapman, B.R.; Wood, P.B.; Miller, K.V.

    2004-01-01

    We used Anabat acoustical monitoring devices to examine bat activity in intact canopy forests, complex canopy forests with gaps, forests subjected to diameter-limit harvests, recent deferment harvests, clearcuts and unmanaged forested riparian areas in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia in the summer of 1999. We detected eight species of bats, including the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Most bat activity was concentrated in forested riparian areas. Among upland habitats, activity of silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) and hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) was higher in open, less cluttered vegetative types such as recent deferment harvests and clearcuts. Our results suggest that bat species in the central Appalachians partially segregate themselves among vegetative conditions based on differences in body morphology and echolocation call characteristics. From the standpoint of conserving bat foraging habitat for the maximum number of species in the central Appalachians, special emphasis should be placed on protecting forested riparian areas.

  2. Comparison of Skylab and Landsat Lineaments with Joint Orientations in Northcentral Pennsylvania. [on Allegheny Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Kowalik, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The histogram peaks of lineaments mapped from Skylab photograph at a scale of 1:517,000 lie subparallel, within 20 deg, to major shale joints and coal cleats on part of the Allegheny Plateau. The Landsat lineament, mapped at 1:989,000 are biased by illumination and scan line directions. While there is an illumination bias in the Skylab photograph, its direction does not coincide with the main transverse lineament trend, thus providing an independent assessment of the illumination direction bias. The coincidence in direction regardless of scale of the linear features suggests a mechanical relationship between joints, fracture traces, and lineaments which is more consistent with a tensional model than a shear model of origin.

  3. Assessment of freshwater mussels in the Allegheny River at Foxburg, Pennsylvania, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    The upper reaches of the Allegheny River are a high-quality resource that supports populations of a number of endangered species. Two endangered species of freshwater mussel, the northern riffleshell, Epioblasma torulosa rangiana, and clubshell, Pleurobema clava, are present in this river reach. Prior to a bridge-replacement project at the Allegheny River at Foxburg, Pa. (river mile 86.2), a mussel survey was conducted to determine if either of the protected endangered species are present and to assess the quality of the mussel bed at this site. Shore and near-shore searches followed by SCUBA diving transects determined that a mussel bed is present at this location. The freshwater-mussel community consists of at least 14 species and includes both endangered species. Substrate type, stream velocity, and channel morphology combined with results from the transect searches documented that the mussel bed is largely limited to the east side of the river. A two-stage sampling design was employed to estimate the overall mussel abundance within the bed. Twelve 4-m2 (square meter) cells were sampled with four 0.25-m2 quadrants per cell. The mean population density within the mussel bed is 8.4 mussel per square meter. The overall mussel population in the survey area is 225,567 individuals (95-percent confidence interval, 135,973 to 374,195). River-bed scour and acid mine drainage appear to limit mussel distribution in the center and left section of the channel. Overall, a healthy and diverse mussel bed exists at this site.

  4. Stream ecosystem response to limestone treatment in acid impacted watersheds of the allegheny plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClurg, S.E.; Petty, J.T.; Mazik, P.M.; Clayton, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration programs are expanding worldwide, but assessments of restoration effectiveness are rare. The objectives of our study were to assess current acid-precipitation remediation programs in streams of the Allegheny Plateau ecoregion of West Virginia (USA), identify specific attributes that could and could not be fully restored, and quantify temporal trends in ecosystem recovery. We sampled water chemistry, physical habitat, periphyton biomass, and benthic macroinvertebrate and fish community structure in three stream types: acidic (four streams), naturally circumneutral (eight streams), and acidic streams treated with limestone sand (eight streams). We observed no temporal trends in ecosystem recovery in treated streams despite sampling streams that ranged from 2 to 20 years since initial treatment. Our results indicated that the application of limestone sand to acidic streams was effective in fully recovering some characteristics, such as pH, alkalinity, Ca2+, Ca:H ratios, trout biomass and density, and trout reproductive success. However, recovery of many other characteristics was strongly dependent upon spatial proximity to treatment, and still others were never fully recovered. For example, limestone treatment did not restore dissolved aluminum concentrations, macroinvertebrate taxon richness, and total fish biomass to circumneutral reference conditions. Full recovery may not be occurring because treated streams continue to drain acidic watersheds and remain isolated in a network of acidic streams. We propose a revised stream restoration plan for the Allegheny Plateau that includes restoring stream ecosystems as connected networks rather than isolated reaches and recognizes that full recovery of acidified watersheds may not be possible. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Socioeconomic factors and parity of access to robotic surgery in a county health system.

    PubMed

    Tatebe, Leah Carey; Gray, Regan; Tatebe, Ken; Garcia, Fernando; Putty, Bradley

    2017-02-28

    Equal access to novel surgical technologies remains a policy concern as hospitals adopt robotic surgery with increasing prevalence. This study sought to determine whether socioeconomic factors influence access to robotic surgery. All laparoscopic and robotic fundoplications and paraesophageal hernia repairs performed by a surgical group over 6 years at a county and two neighboring private hospitals were identified. Robotic use by hospital setting, age, gender, reported ethnicity, estimated income, insurance payer, and diagnosis were examined. Of 418 patients identified, 180 (43%) presented to the county hospital, where subjects were younger (51.1 versus 56.2 years, p < 0.001) with lower estimated income ($50,289 versus $62,959, p < 0.001). In the county setting, there was no difference in reported ethnicity (p = 0.169), estimated income (p = 0.081), or insurance payer (p = 0.535) between groups treated laparoscopically versus robotically. There was no difference in the treatment groups by estimated income in the private hospital setting (p = 0.308). Overall higher estimated income and insurance payer were associated with a higher chance of undergoing robotic procedures (p < 0.001). Presence of a paraesophageal hernia was associated with increased chance of undergoing robotic therapy in all comparisons (p < 0.001). No disparity in access to robotic surgery offered in the county hospital was observed based on age, gender, reported ethnicity, estimated income, or insurance payer. Patients with higher income and private insurers were more likely to present to the private hospital setting where robotics is utilized more often. The presence of a paraesophageal hernia was a significant factor in determining robotic therapy in both settings.

  6. Health assessment for Publicker Industries Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD981939200. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-12

    The Publicker Industries, Inc. (Publicker) site is on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Publicker is located in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. About 3,500 persons reside within 1 mile of Publicker. The area surrounding Publicker is primarily industrial. Across the Delaware River in New Jersey, ground water is used by several community water systems to supply about 100,000 persons with potable water. Based on the information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has concluded that this site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible fire or explosion at the site. This site is also a potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. As noted in the Human Exposure Pathways Section, human exposure to organic chemical contaminants may occur via ingestion of, inhalation of, and dermal contact with soils, ground water, sediments, and air. Additional information is needed to evaluate more fully the releases, migration, and resulting levels of contaminants at points of potential human exposure.

  7. An Innovative Project Breaks Down Barriers to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable Young Children in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Crall, James J; Illum, Jackie; Martinez, Ana; Pourat, Nadereh

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high rate of untreated tooth decay, many young children in California under six years of age have never been to a dentist. Numerous and complex barriers to access to oral health care for young children exist, and a multifaceted approach is required to improve receipt of preventive and treatment services that could improve the oral health of this population. This policy brief describes the UCLA-First 5 LA 21st Century Dental Homes Project, which was designed to improve oral health care for young children in 12 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinic sites with co-located dental and primary care services and its accessibility in their service areas throughout Los Angeles County. The project funded infrastructure and staffing, provided technical assistance to improve operations, trained clinical personnel to provide oral health care to young children, implemented a quality improvement learning collaborative, trained parents and child care providers in oral hygiene and healthy habits, and disseminated information to promote effective policies. Early data on the project indicated twofold increases in delivery of both diagnostics and treatment visits for young children, and a threefold increase in preventive services for young children during the program.

  8. The impact of a community-based chronic disease prevention initiative: evaluation findings from Steps to Health King County.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Allen; Bourcier, Emily; Krieger, James; Beery, William; Smyser, Michael; Vinh, Diana V; Lessler, Dan; Alfonsi, Lorrie

    2011-06-01

    Steps to Health King County (Steps KC; Seattle, Washington) was one of 40 community-level initiatives funded in 2003 as part of the Steps to a HealthierUS initiative. Steps KC goals included reducing the impact of chronic diseases through a comprehensive, coordinated approach and reducing health disparities due to chronic illness. Steps KC intervention activities took place on two levels: the overall Steps KC collaborative and individual funded programs. Collaborative-level activities included policy and systems change initiatives and efforts to better integrate the funded-program organizations. The funded programs ranged from group health promotion programs to intensive case management. Steps KC was successful in creating a large, diverse community collaborative and funding 14 separate programs that reached approximately 8,000 community residents with medium- and high-intensity programs of demonstrated effectiveness. Systems change initiatives within school districts and government agencies led to a greater institutional emphasis on health promotion and on partnership with communities to address health inequities.

  9. Effects of Nativity, Length of Residence, and County-Level Foreign-Born Density on Mental Health Among Older Adults in the U.S

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunha; Kim, Giyeon

    2016-01-01

    Using the 2004–2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data that are linked to county-level data from the Area Health Resources Files, this study examined whether the healthy immigrant effect applies to mental health of foreign-born older adults. Additionally, testing a protective ethnic density effect on older foreign-born individuals’ mental health, this study examined how the percentage of foreign-born population in the county affected the relationship between older adults’ immigration status (U.S.-nativity and length of residence in the U.S.) and their mental health status. The sample included 29,011 individuals (level-1) from 920 counties (level-2) across 50 states and D.C. Using the Mental Component Summary of the Short-Form 12, the Kessler Index (K-6), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), U.S.-born individuals (n = 24,225), earlier immigrants (≥15 years in the U.S.; n = 3866), and recent immigrants (<15 years in the U.S.; n = 920) were compared. The results indicate that recent immigrants showed worse mental health on all three measures compared with U.S.-born individuals and on the K-6 and PHQ-2 compared with earlier immigrants. Higher county-level foreign-born densities were associated with worse mental health status of individuals. However, the significant interactions found in the full conditional multilevel models indicated that the high foreign-born density functioned as a risk factor for worse mental health only among recent immigrants but not among the U.S.-born. In conclusion, the results revealed the vulnerability of older recent immigrants, especially those living in the counties with high foreign-born densities. PMID:26910461

  10. Effects of Nativity, Length of Residence, and County-Level Foreign-Born Density on Mental Health Among Older Adults in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunha; Kim, Giyeon; Lee, Sungkyu

    2016-12-01

    Using the 2004-2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data that are linked to county-level data from the Area Health Resources Files, this study examined whether the healthy immigrant effect applies to mental health of foreign-born older adults. Additionally, testing a protective ethnic density effect on older foreign-born individuals' mental health, this study examined how the percentage of foreign-born population in the county affected the relationship between older adults' immigration status (U.S.-nativity and length of residence in the U.S.) and their mental health status. The sample included 29,011 individuals (level-1) from 920 counties (level-2) across 50 states and D.C. Using the Mental Component Summary of the Short-Form 12, the Kessler Index (K-6), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), U.S.-born individuals (n = 24,225), earlier immigrants (≥15 years in the U.S.; n = 3866), and recent immigrants (<15 years in the U.S.; n = 920) were compared. The results indicate that recent immigrants showed worse mental health on all three measures compared with U.S.-born individuals and on the K-6 and PHQ-2 compared with earlier immigrants. Higher county-level foreign-born densities were associated with worse mental health status of individuals. However, the significant interactions found in the full conditional multilevel models indicated that the high foreign-born density functioned as a risk factor for worse mental health only among recent immigrants but not among the U.S.-born. In conclusion, the results revealed the vulnerability of older recent immigrants, especially those living in the counties with high foreign-born densities.

  11. [Effects of land use structure change on regional ecological health--taking Shapingba County as an example].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wei, Chaofu; Gao, Ming; Luo, Guanglian; Jiang, Wei

    2005-12-01

    Land resource is the carrier for the exchange of matter, energy and information flows, while the change velocity and the intensity of land use has strong effects on the ecological processes such as matter circulation, energy flow, and biologic diversity. Land use structure change will alter the type, area, and spatial distribution of ecosystem, and in the meantime, result in the changes of regional ecological health. Employing the principles and methods of landscape ecology, and through endowing relative ecological value to land use type, this paper analyzed the charaeteristics of recent 10 years land use change in Shapingba County of Chongqing, and discussed the effects of land use change on regional ecological health, aimed to provide scientific references for land use planning and sustainable land resource utilization. The results indicated that transformation often occurred among different land use types, and the land use structure in each transformation phase differed quite obviously. Under different land use structure, there was a great disparity in relative ecological value of sub-ecosystems, which played various roles in regional ecological health. In general, the regional relative ecological value embodied both increase and decrease. In the future, the relative ecological value of sub-ecosystem would represent three tendencies, i.e., increase first and decrease then, continuous decrease, and continuous increase. The situation of regional ecological health would gradually become better.

  12. Public health assessment for Stoker Company, Imperial, Imperial County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CAD066635442. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    Stoker Company is a pesticide dealer and crop dusting loading facility located in the County of Imperial, approximately 25 miles from the Mexican border. The 26-acre site is barren with no vegetation. Operations at the facility, beginning in 1966, have caused the surface soil over much of the site to be contaminated with pesticides. Some of the contaminated surface soil has blown off-site and impacted nearby surface soil and surface water. This preliminary public health assessment evaluated the potential for adverse health effects to occur in five populations identified as being impacted by contaminants. The impacted populations include: (1) on-site workers; (2) the family formerly living on the neighboring D K property; (3) the D K Duck Hunting Club members; (4) individuals using untreated surface water for drinking and/or other domestic purposes; and (5) individuals living or working near crop dusting operations. Based on this assessment, Stoker Company is considered to pose a public health hazard because long-term exposure to site-related contaminants may cause adverse health effects.

  13. Health assessment for Carter Lee Lumber Company, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND016395899. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-06

    The Carter Lee Lumber Company (the site), located at 1621 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, has been selling lumber products since 1873. About 1971, Carter Lee bought 2-3 acres of land behind its original property from the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. Louis Railway Corporation, a subsidiary of Penn Central. According to Carter Lee, the railway company, in addition to other unknown individuals, dumped unknown quantities of liquid wastes from tank trucks and railroad cars onto the ground and into a 14-foot deep trench on the property. Surface soil samples were collected in July 1985 by EPA from the trench area where dumping was alleged to have occurred. These samples were contaminated with heavy metals and PHAs at low levels. No sub-surface samples were taken. No air monitoring has been performed. No ground-water samples have been taken. No samples for possible surface water runoff have been taken. Based on the information reviewed, the Indiana State Board of Health has concluded that this site is of potential health concern because of the potential risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects.

  14. Public Health Surveillance Strategies for Mass Gatherings: Super Bowl XLIX and Related Events, Maricopa County, Arizona, 2015.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Aurimar; Berisha, Vjollca; Goodin, Kate; Pogreba-Brown, Kristen; Levy, Craig; McKinney, Benita; Koski, Lia; Imholte, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Super Bowl XLIX took place on February 1, 2015, in Glendale, Arizona. In preparation for this event and associated activities, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) developed methods for enhanced surveillance, situational awareness, and early detection of public health emergencies. Surveillance strategies implemented from January 22 to February 6, 2015, included enhanced surveillance alerts; animal disease surveillance; review of NFL clinic visits; syndromic surveillance for emergency room visits, urgent care facilities, and hotels; real-time onsite syndromic surveillance; all-hazards mortality surveillance; emergency medical services surveillance, review of poison control center reports; media surveillance; and aberration detection algorithms for notifiable diseases. Surveillance results included increased influenzalike illness activity reported from urgent care centers and a few influenza cases reported in the NFL clinic. A cyanide single event exposure was investigated and determined not to be a public health threat. Real-time field syndromic surveillance documented minor injuries at all events and sporadic cases of gastrointestinal and neurological (mostly headaches) disease. Animal surveillance reports included a cat suspected of carrying plague and tularemia and an investigation of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a backyard chicken flock. Laboratory results in both instances were negative. Aberration detection and syndromic surveillance detected an increase in measles reports associated with a Disneyland exposure, and syndromic surveillance was used successfully during this investigation. Coordinated enhanced epidemiologic surveillance during Super Bowl XLIX increased the response capacity and preparedness of MCDPH to make informed decisions and take public health actions in a timely manner during these mass gathering events.

  15. What does it take? California county funding requests for recovery-oriented full service partnerships under the Mental Health Services Act.

    PubMed

    Felton, Mistique C; Cashin, Cheryl E; Brown, Timothy T

    2010-10-01

    The need to move mental health systems toward more recovery-oriented treatment modes is well established. Progress has been made to define needed changes but evidence is lacking about the resources required to implement them. The Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) in California was designed to implement more recovery-oriented treatment modes. We use data from county funding requests and annual updates to examine how counties budgeted for recovery-oriented programs targeted to different age groups under MHSA. Findings indicate that initial per-client budgeting for Full Services Partnerships under MHSA was maintained in future cycles and counties budgeted less per client for children. With this analysis, we begin to benchmark resource allocation for programs that are intended to be recovery-oriented, which should be evaluated against appropriate outcome measures in the future to determine the degree of recovery-orientation.

  16. Rapid assessment of the needs and health status of older adults after Hurricane Charley--Charlotte, DeSoto, and Hardee Counties, Florida, August 27-31, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-09-17

    On August 13, 2004, Hurricane Charley, a Category 4 storm with sustained winds of 145 mph, made landfall at a Gulf of Mexico barrier island in Florida, resulting in an estimated 31 deaths statewide and extensive property damage in Charlotte, DeSoto, and Hardee counties. The Florida Department of Health (FLDOH) requested that CDC conduct a rapid needs assessment of older adults (i.e., aged >/=60 years) because this vulnerable age group constitutes a substantial proportion of the population in the most severely affected counties (Charlotte County [43% older adult residents of 141,627 total population], DeSoto County [24% of 32,209], and Hardee County [18% of 36,938]). This report summarizes the findings and recommendations from three rapid needs assessments in these Florida counties. Older adult residents experienced disruptions in both quality-of-life status and medical care for preexisting conditions (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and physical disabilities). On the basis of these findings, recommendations were provided to FLDOH for immediate use in deploying resources for response to Hurricane Charley and in planning responses to future disasters.

  17. Modifying effect of the County Level Health Indices on Cardiopulmonary Effects Associated with Wildfire Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Aims: Socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiopulmonary health and some studies suggest SES may be an effect modifier for health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. We investigated the synergistic impact of health disparities on ...

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-001-1995, Broward County Library, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Gupta, S.; Sinks, T.

    1989-11-01

    In response to a request from the Director of Libraries in Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, an evaluation was undertaken of possible poor air quality in the Main Library Building (SIC-8231). The building was eight stories high, and about 300 county employees worked in the building. Soon after the building was opened in April of 1984, workers began to complain of eye and upper airway irritation, difficulty in breathing and headaches. Particularly on the fifth floor, where government documents were housed, the employees suffered allergy-like symptoms. Some documents had visible growths of mold on their covers. The building had repeated problems with the heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, and numerous rainwater leaks occurred. All air samples collected for viable aerosols contained very low counts of mold, and no thermophilic or mesophilic actinomycetes were found. Formaldehyde was found in air samples at levels from less than 0.01 to 0.07 parts per million. Measurements were taken of temperature, relative humidity, and carbon-dioxide. The carbon-dioxide measurements in some places in the library approached the point which indicated that inadequate quantities of fresh air were being distributed to an occupied space. The study concluded that the employees' symptoms were not the result of exposure to molds released through the ventilation system.

  19. Public health assessment for Arrowhead Refinery Company, St. Louis County, Hermantown, Minnesota, Region 5. Cerclis No. MND980823975. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-23

    The Arrowhead Refinery National Priorities List (NPL) site is located in St. Louis County about 8 miles northwest of Duluth in Hermantown, Minnesota. Prior to 1945 the 10 acre site was used for retinning milk cans and then was converted to recycling waste oil. Samples taken from the site during two large scale investigations have shown a variety of contaminants present in soil, sediment, groundwater and in a natural lagoon containing waste sludge. The sludge has been found to be very corrosive, with high concentrations of metals as well as toxic and carcinogenic organic compounds. Monitoring of air quality on and near the site has not been done. However, odors apparently from the oily sludge have been detected off-site. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and MDH consider the site to be a public health hazard.

  20. Health assessment for GBF, Inc. , Dump, Antioch, Contra Costa County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD980498562. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-18

    The GBF, Inc., Dump site was proposed for the National Priorities List by Update 7. The site is located in Antioch, Contra Costa County, California. The site is currently being operated as a sanitary landfill, but it was used previously for the disposal of chemical wastes. On-site groundwater is contaminated with high concentrations of volatile organic compounds. The extent of off-site groundwater contamination has not been determined. Although the area surrounding the site is serviced by a public water system, several private wells located downgradient of the landfill are used for potable and nonpotable purposes. No contamination of private wells has been reported. Ambient air monitoring at the site has not detected concentrations of air contaminants that pose significant health concerns.

  1. Health assessment for Sapp Battery Salvage, Jackson County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD980602882. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-11

    Changes to the calculation of acceptable soil levels (ASL) for priority heavy metals at the Sapp Battery National Priorities List site in Jackson County are discussed. Original calculations assumed that the most sensitive population for exposure would be small children in the area and that as a result of hand-to-mouth behavior, a 15 kg child might ingest 1 gram of contaminated soil per day. Recommended maximum contaminant levels of 20 micrograms/l of drinking water and an assumed soil ingestion of 1 gram will result in a calculated ASL of 80 mg/kg (ppm) for lead. Modifications to the ASLs for cadmium and antimony are required due to the change in the assumption of soil ingestion. By setting clean-up standards to these ASL values, persons possibly coming into daily contact with the Sapp Battery site will not be expected to suffer short- or long-term detriments to health.

  2. Health assessment for Welsh Landfill, Honeybrook, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980829527. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-24

    The Welsh Landfill site (AKA Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill) National Priorities List site is located near the top of Welsh Mountain, Honey Brook Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The landfill was operated as an unpermitted solid waste disposal facility from 1963-1977 and is currently operated as a waste transfer station. Environmental pathways for the migration of site-contaminants to off-site areas include those associated with groundwater and surface and subsurface soil. Human exposure to site contaminants may occur through ingestion and dermal contact with contaminated groundwater, dusts or volatilized contaminants. The proposed remediation of the site by EPA should eliminate or significantly reduce the potential for the completion of human exposure pathways to site contaminants by capping the site and supplying public water to affected residences. This site is considered a public health hazard because of past exposure to site contaminants by individuals.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of the Validity of US State- and County-Level Social Capital Measures and Their Associations with Population Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Kim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this study were to validate a number of available collective social capital measures at the US state and county levels, and to examine the relative extent to which these social capital measures are associated with population health outcomes. Measures of social capital at the US state level included aggregate indices based on the…

  4. School-Based Intervention for Nutrition Promotion in Mi Yun County, Beijing, China: Does a Health-Promoting School Approach Improve Parents' Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviour?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Dongxu; Stewart, Donald; Chang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess whether the school-based nutrition programme using the health-promoting school (HPS) framework was effective to improve parents' knowledge, attitudes and behaviour (KAB) in relation to nutrition in rural Mi Yun County, Beijing. Design/methodology/approach: A cluster-randomised intervention trial…

  5. Ground-water quality and geochemistry of aquifers associated with coal in the Allegheny and Monongahela formations, southeastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Razem, A.C.; Sedam, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Ground water from aquifers associated with coal beds in the Allegheny and Monongahela Formations in southeastern Ohio is predominantly a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type. Sodium bicarbonate type water is less common. Isolated areas of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate types also are present. The water is predominantly very hard, and has a median hardness concentration of 258 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate and a median dissolved-solids concentration of 436 milligrams per liter. Few wells contain water with dissolved-solids concentrations in excess of 1,000 milligrams per liter. Bicarbonate concentration in ground water was found to be significantly different among coals, whereas concentrations of bicarbonate, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, manganese, and strontium were significantly different between ground water in the Allegheny and Monongahela Formations. Many constituents are significantly correlated, but few correlation coefficients are high. The presence of sulfate or iron is attributed to the kinetic mechanism operating during the oxidation of pyrite. The position along the sulfide or ferrous-iron oxidation pathways controls the reaction products of pyrite found in solution, and the formation of either the sulfate of iron constituents. The availability and rate of diffusion of oxygen in the formations exerts control on the water quality. Discriminant-function analysis correctly classifies 89 percent of the observations into the Allegheny or Monongahela Formations. As a verifications, 39 of 41 observations from another study were correctly classified by formation. The differences in water chemistry between the Allegheny and the Monongahela Formations are gradational and are attributed the oxidation of iron sulfide. The diffusion and availability of oxygen, which controls the chemical reaction, is regulated by the porosity and permeability of the rock with respect to oxygen and the presence or absence of carbonates, which controls the

  6. Using the PACE EH model to mobilize communities to address local environmental health issues--a case study in Island County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Higman, Keith; Servatius, Celine; Webber, Whitney L; McDonald, Tim

    2007-01-01

    The Island County Environmental Health Initiative (ICEHI) is a demonstration project in the use of the Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health (PACE EH) to build capacity in the 10 essential services of environmental health. The PACE EH methodology systematically applies the 10 essential services of environmental health through the completion of 13 tasks derived from a community-based environmental health assessment process. The ICEHI has successfully engaged community members, identified environmental health issues important to the community, and led to the implementation of action plans aimed at reducing environmental health risks through use of community resources. This paper describes the methodology utilized by the ICEHI to address locally important environmental health issues so that other local and state environmental health agencies may replicate the process in their communities.

  7. Public health assessment for Spickler Landfill, Spencer, Marathon County, Wisconsin, Region 5. Cerclis No. WID980902969. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-19

    Spickler Landfill is a former landfill located in the southwestern corner of Marathon County, Wisconsin, three miles northwest of the City of Marshfield. Spickler Landfill posed a public health hazard in the past because people who worked on the site or lived nearby probably inhaled asbestos dust particles when waste materials were received at the site. After the site stopped receiving waste the site posed an indeterminate public health hazard because inhalation of asbestos around the site may have continued because poor site maintenance, an inadequate landfill cap, and on-site excavations permitted asbestos-based waste material to come to the surface. Currently the Spickler Landfill poses no public health hazard. Groundwater is contaminated around the site from chemicals in the landfill, but contamination has not reached any nearby private wells. Methane landfill gas is being produced at the site and has been found at explosive levels in some monitoring locations immediately adjacent to the site. Leachate seeped to the surface at one location and flows away from the site. This seep provides a potential surface water pathway for contaminants to be carried from the site.

  8. Health assessment for Colesville Municipal Landfill Colesville, Broome County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980768691

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-19

    The Colesville Landfill is an inactive municipal landfill which received about 68,500 gallons of drummed industrial wastes between 1973 and 1975. The 113-acre site is located in a rural region of Broome County, New York, approximately one mile north of the Hamlet of Doraville, within the Town of Colesville. In 1983, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were found in drinking water supplies of homes near the landfill property. Subsequent site investigations led to the closure of the landfill in December 1984. The Colesville Landfill was accepted to the National Priorities List in June 1986. A Remedial Investigation of the landfill area was completed in 1988 and identified ground water as the primary mechanism for off-site migration of contaminants. Existing and potential human exposure routes include: ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption of VOCs in potable water; direct contact with soil, surface water and stream sediments; direct contact and inhalation of contaminants in surficial leachate seeps and ingestion of wild animals (e.g., deer and turkey) which may have been exposed to site contaminants. Based on the information reviewed, the Colesville Landfill is a public health hazard because of the risk to human health from past exposures and possible future exposures to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health impacts.

  9. Preparedness of County Referral Health Facilities in Implementing Adolescent Friendly Health Services: A Case Study of Mama Lucy Kibaki Hosptal

    PubMed Central

    Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi; Mwaura-Tenembergen, Wanja; Adoyo, Maureen; Kiilu, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Health service delivery is a key pillar of the health system management .The World Health Organization recently emphasized the need to develop adolescent -friendly health services to improve the care provided to young people throughout the world. However, there is limited peer reviewed literature on this subject therefore necessitating assessment of whether the existing health facilities are prepared to implement the adolescent friendly health services. Adolescent friendly health services remains a relatively new and sensitive area mainly due to restrictive norms and policies guiding the services. After International Conference on Population and Development in 1994, countries started implementing adolescent friendly health services. The Government of Kenya together with partners in an attempt to address the health challenges came up with the Adolescent package of care (APOC) in 2013 whose guidelines were finalized in November 2014 and released for use by service providers . Despite this package of care, there is still ineffective staff capacity in relation to skills and knowledge gap of health professionals, training needs, health resources as well as health system factors that can affect implementation of AFHS. The study explored ways of mitigating or addressing the barriers to implementation of these services. The study used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to collect data. The study utilized survey research adapting descriptive cross sectional design and semi-structured questionnaire to interview 348 health care providers and 472 adolescents in Mam Lucy Kibaki Hospital from 3rd May 2014 to 16 June 2014 .The key informants were mainly nurses, clinical officers and Medical doctors who were working at the health service delivery area at the time of study and were interviewed using an interview guide. The managers at the hospital were interviewed using an in-depth interview guide while the adolescents were interviewed through interview guide and focused

  10. Public health assessment addendum for Letterkenny Army Depot, USA Letterkenny Southeast Area, Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PA6213820503 and USA Letterkenny, Property Disposal Office Area, Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. CERCLIS No. PA2210090054. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Letterkenny Army Depot (Letterkenny) is five miles north of Chambersburg, in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. The US Army Depot consists of two National Priorities List (NPL) sites: USA Letterkenny Southeast Area (hereafter referred to as the SE Area) and USA Letterkenny - Property Disposal Office Area (hereafter referred to as the PDO Area). A public health assessment of those combined sites was released by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry on September 30, 1988 (Appendix 1). The previous public health assessment combined discussion of both NPL sites due to similar contaminants and pathways. Since the release of the previous public health assessment, new environmental, community health concerns, and health outcome data have become available, warranting this addendum.

  11. Building Economic Security Today: making the health-wealth connection in Contra Costa county's maternal and child health programs.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Padmini; Dailey, Dawn E; Young, Maria-Elena D; Lam, Carrie; Pies, Cheri

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, maternal and child health professionals have been seeking approaches to integrating the Life Course Perspective and social determinants of health into their work. In this article, we describe how community input, staff feedback, and evidence from the field that the connection between wealth and health should be addressed compelled the Contra Costa Family, Maternal and Child Health (FMCH) Programs Life Course Initiative to launch Building Economic Security Today (BEST). BEST utilizes innovative strategies to reduce inequities in health outcomes for low-income Contra Costa families by improving their financial security and stability. FMCH Programs' Women, Infants, and Children Program (WIC) conducted BEST financial education classes, and its Medically Vulnerable Infant Program (MVIP) instituted BEST financial assessments during public health nurse home visits. Educational and referral resources were also developed and distributed to all clients. The classes at WIC increased clients' awareness of financial issues and confidence that they could improve their financial situations. WIC clients and staff also gained knowledge about financial resources in the community. MVIP's financial assessments offered clients a new and needed perspective on their financial situations, as well as support around the financial and psychological stresses of caring for a child with special health care needs. BEST offered FMCH Programs staff opportunities to engage in non-traditional, cross-sector partnerships, and gain new knowledge and skills to address a pressing social determinant of health. We learned the value of flexible timelines, maintaining a long view for creating change, and challenging the traditional paradigm of maternal and child health.

  12. Projected Allied Health and Nursing Training Needs for a Seven-County Area in West Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Charles L.; And Others

    This report describes a project that developed and field tested a model for projecting state-wide manpower needs in the allied health and nursing occupations in West Virginia and presents projections made for sixteen allied health and nursing occupations in the Charleston area. The content of the report is presented in three sections. The first…

  13. Estimating Impaired Waters on a County Level for Public Health Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the population-level impact of water quality on health can be difficult. Water quality data are measured at a watershed level and health data are organized at different levels of aggregation. To address this discrepancy and enable the consideration of water quality for ...

  14. Substance Abuse among Health-Care Professionals in Rutherford and Surrounding Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sherri Reid; Heritage, Jeannette G.

    Drug abuse is a serious problem in today's work force. It is found in every occupation, from the entry-level employee to the chief executive officer. Among health care professionals alcohol is the number-one substance abused, prescription drugs are second, and cocaine is third. Substance abuse among health-care professionals in Rutherford,…

  15. Using County-Level Public Health Data to Prioritize Medical Education Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, Walton, II; Schootman, Mario; Asaro, Philip; Yan, Yan; Hagen, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical education topics might be locally prioritized using public health data on health outcomes and risk factors unrelated to quality of care. Methods: The Missouri Information for Community Assessment (MICA) supplied preventable hospitalization rates (PHRs) for asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, heart…

  16. Public health assessment for golden strip septic tank, Greenville County, Simpsonville, South Carolina, Region 4. Cerclis No. SCD980799456. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-29

    Golden Strip Septic Tank Services, Inc. (GSST), is a 55-acre tract of farm land located near the town of Simpsonville, Greenville County, South Carolina. These lagoons received industrial wastes from a number of facilities from the adjoining five counties between 1960 and 1975. The wastes included inks, caustics, textile dyes, spin finish oil, septic tank wastes, metal plating liquids, dyestuff wastewater, electroplating sludge, and electroplating wastewater from a number of facilities from the adjoining five counties. Site-related contaminants identified as being of concern include organic compounds, pesticides, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), and metals. Contaminants of concern were detected in on-site soil, surface water and sediments in the lagoons, in the lagoon wastes, and groundwater. The GSST site is classified as being an indeterminate public health hazard due to data gaps identified. Additional sampling is needed to better characterize the extent of contaminant migration and to evaluate the likelihood and possible extent of exposure.

  17. Health assessment for petitioned preliminary public health assessment, Global Landfill, Old Bridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD063160667. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-26

    Located in the Old Bridge Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, the Global Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) site is situated along a tidal marsh. The 57.5-acre NPL site has about 2,400,000 cubic yards of municipal solid, bulky, vegetative, and industrial wastes. Global Landfill generates significant amounts of leachate and landfill gas. On-site environmental monitoring of leachate, surface and ground water, and soil gas indicates there is significant contamination of the environment at the Global Landfill NPL site. Based on available information, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) concludes that the Global Landfill NPL site is an indeterminate public health hazard because most of the on- and off-site data are not appropriate for determining possible health impacts for the site. Because airborne contaminants may be migrating into nearby residential areas, air monitoring is needed at the landfill and in residential areas to determine whether significant human exposure is occurring. As described in the public health assessment, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (NJDEPE) is planning a number of remedial activities. When those corrective actions are complete, the potential for human exposure to Global Landfill NPL site-related contaminants should be reduced, provided operable unit 1 is appropriately designed and maintained.

  18. Combining the benefits of decision science and financial analysis in public health management: a county-specific budgeting and planning model.

    PubMed

    Fos, Peter J; Miller, Danny L; Amy, Brian W; Zuniga, Miguel A

    2004-01-01

    State public health agencies are charged with providing and overseeing the management of basic public health services on a population-wide basis. These activities have a re-emphasized focus as a result of the events of September 11, 2001, the subsequent anthrax events, and the continuing importance placed on bioterrorism preparedness, West Nile virus, and emerging infectious diseases (eg, monkeypox, SARS). This has added to the tension that exists in budgeting and planning, given the diverse constituencies that are served in each state. State health agencies must be prepared to allocate finite resources in a more formal manner to be able to provide basic public health services on a routine basis, as well as during outbreaks. This article describes the use of an analytical approach to assist financial analysis that is used for budgeting and planning in a state health agency. The combined benefits of decision science and financial analysis are needed to adequately and appropriately plan and budget to meet the diverse needs of the populations within a state. Health and financial indicators are incorporated into a decision model, based on multicriteria decision theory, that has been employed to acquire information about counties and public health programs areas within a county, that reflect the impact of planning and budgeting efforts. This information can be used to allocate resources, to distribute funds for health care services, and to guide public health finance policy formulation and implementation.

  19. Public health assessment for Jennison Wright Corporation, Granite City, Madison County, Illinois, Region 5. CERCLIS Number ILD006282479; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Jennison-Wright Corporation (J-W) is a National Priorities List (NPL) site in Madison County, Illinois, in the northern section of granite City. The J-W facility engaged in wood treatment of railroad ties and wood blocks using creosote, pentachlorophenol, and zinc naphthanate. Soil contamination also exists off the site from runoff, disposal, and air deposition. Based on available information, the J-W site is considered a public health hazard because of the risk to human health resulting from past, present, and future exposure to soil contaminants. The reason for this conclusion is exposure to soil contaminants originating from on- and off-site areas, including dermal exposure in heavily contaminated enfenced off-site areas and the increase in cancer risk from exposure to these soil contaminants. Future concerns include contaminated groundwater migration and subsequent exposure through ingestion and inhalation of contaminants from the site. Substances of concern include creosote and coal tar and their associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, dioxins, and furans.

  20. Public health assessment for Plymouth Avenue Landfill, Deland, Volusia County, Florida, Region 4. Cerclis No. FLD984167569. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Plymouth Avenue Landfill is about 1.75 miles west of the City of DeLand in rural western Volusia County, Florida. From 1971 to 1988 it was a Class I landfill and received all types of nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste. From June 1978 to October 1980, the landfill reportedly received 4,500 gallons per week of process waste slurry from the Brunswick Corporation. The authors selected the following contaminants of concern: barium, chromium, 1,2-dichloroethene, iron, nitrate, sulfate, and vinyl chloride. Ingestion of ground water is a past completed human exposure pathway. Concentrations of the contaminants of concern found so far are unlikely to have caused illness in the nearby residents. Analysis of water samples has been inadequate, however, to assess the public health threat from ingestion of sulfate, giardia, or vinyl chloride. Based on the information currently available, the authors classify the public health hazard at this landfill as indeterminate. Groundwater sampling is needed to determine the extent of vinyl chloride contamination.

  1. Thrust fault zones in the Allegheny Plateau of north-central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohn, Howard A.; Purdy, Terri L.

    1979-01-01

    Field investigations in the Williamsport Valley identify lineaments found on Landsat III images, have shown the presence of six discrete fault zones that strike subparallel to the trend of the Appalachian folds. These zones range from 0.5 to 1.75 km in width and from at least 10 km to more than 50 km in length. The individual thrust faults within each zone occur in 'staircase-type' folds and are at a low angle to bedding. Although each individual fault may have 0nly centimeters to displacement, many of these individual faults appear to exist within the six zones. We believe that the stress that produced that Valley and Ridge folds to the south was largely dissipated in faulting in the Williamsport Valley. This dissipation of the stress would explain the presence of only broad open folds to the north on the Allegheny Plateau. The extreme faulting in the Williamsport Valley along with the unique 'staircase' and 'reverse staircase' structures may result in fracture porosity traps at depth.

  2. mHealth Series: mHealth project in Zhao County, rural China – Description of objectives, field site and methods

    PubMed Central

    van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Li, Ye; Wang, Wei; Du, Xiaozhen; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Li; Majeed, Azeem; Rudan, Igor; Zhang, Yanfeng; Car, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Background We set up a collaboration between researchers in China and the UK that aimed to explore the use of mHealth in China. This is the first paper in a series of papers on a large mHealth project part of this collaboration. This paper included the aims and objectives of the mHealth project, our field site, and the detailed methods of two studies. Field site The field site for this mHealth project was Zhao County, which lies 280 km south of Beijing in Hebei Province, China. Methods We described the methodology of two studies: (i) a mixed methods study exploring factors influencing sample size calculations for mHealth–based health surveys and (ii) a cross–over study determining validity of an mHealth text messaging data collection tool. The first study used mixed methods, both quantitative and qualitative, including: (i) two surveys with caregivers of young children, (ii) interviews with caregivers, village doctors and participants of the cross–over study, and (iii) researchers’ views. We combined data from caregivers, village doctors and researchers to provide an in–depth understanding of factors influencing sample size calculations for mHealth–based health surveys. The second study, a cross–over study, used a randomised cross–over study design to compare the traditional face–to–face survey method to the new text messaging survey method. We assessed data equivalence (intrarater agreement), the amount of information in responses, reasons for giving different responses, the response rate, characteristics of non–responders, and the error rate. Conclusions This paper described the objectives, field site and methods of a large mHealth project part of a collaboration between researchers in China and the UK. The mixed methods study evaluating factors that influence sample size calculations could help future studies with estimating reliable sample sizes. The cross–over study comparing face–to–face and text message survey data collection

  3. Proximity to Natural Gas Wells and Reported Health Status: Results of a Household Survey in Washington County, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Lamers, Vanessa; Trufan, Sally J.; Holford, Theodore R.; Dziura, James D.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Kane, Michael J.; Reif, John S.; Weiss, Theresa R.; Stowe, Meredith H.

    2014-01-01

    of specific air and water exposures, is warranted. Citation: Rabinowitz PM, Slizovskiy IB, Lamers V, Trufan SJ, Holford TR, Dziura JD, Peduzzi PN, Kane MJ, Reif JS, Weiss TR, Stowe MH. 2015. Proximity to natural gas wells and reported health status: results of a household survey in Washington County, Pennsylvania. Environ Health Perspect 123:21–26; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307732 PMID:25204871

  4. Environmental Assessment and Environmental Baseline Survey for the Lease Acquisition of T-Ramp Property from Allegheny County Airport Authority

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-09

    following steps for decontamination were applied to all equipment coming into contact with the sampling medium (Note: solvents and/or nitric acid were...HNO3 Nitric Acid HQ Headquarters HSA Hollow stem auger ICE I.C.E. Service Group, Inc. IAP ARS Pittsburgh International Airport Air Reserve... CORROSIVE HAZARDOUS WASTE. THESE CAUSTIC OR ACID SOLUTIONS BECOME CONTAMINATED AND MUST BE PGH INTL AIRPORT AIR RESERVE STA (Continued

  5. Isotopic evidence of enhanced carbonate dissolution at a coal mine drainage site in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Shikha; Sack, Andrea; Adams, James P.; Vesper, Dorothy; J Capo, Rosemary C.; Hartsock, Angela; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to determine the sources and fate of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in the circumneutral pH drainage from an abandoned bituminous coal mine in western Pennsylvania. The C isotope signatures of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) were intermediate between local carbonate and organic C sources, but were higher than those of contemporaneous Pennsylvanian age groundwaters in the region. This suggests a significant contribution of C enriched in {sup 13}C due to enhanced carbonate dissolution associated with the release of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} from pyrite oxidation. The Sr isotopic signature of the drainage was similar to other regional mine waters associated with the same coal seam and reflected contributions from limestone dissolution and cation exchange with clay minerals. The relatively high δ{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and δ{sup 18}O{sub SO4} isotopic signatures of the mine drainage and the presence of presumptive SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria suggest that SO{sub 4} reduction activity also contributes C depleted in {sup 13}C isotope to the total DIC pool. With distance downstream from the mine portal, C isotope signatures in the drainage increased, accompanied by decreased total DIC concentrations and increased pH. These data are consistent with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} dissolution of carbonate rocks, enhanced by cation exchange, and C release to the atmosphere via CO{sub 2} outgassing.

  6. First trimester exposure to ambient air pollution, pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes in Allegheny County, PA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Roberts, James M; Catov, Janet M; Talbott, Evelyn O; Ritz, Beate

    2013-04-01

    Despite numerous studies of air pollution and adverse birth outcomes, few studies have investigated preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, two pregnancy disorders with serious consequences for both mother and infant. Relying on hospital birth records, we conducted a cohort study identifying 34,705 singleton births delivered at Magee-Women's Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA between 1997 and 2002. Particle (<10 μm-PM10; <2.5 μm-PM2.5) and ozone (O3) exposure concentrations in the first trimester of pregnancy were estimated using the space-time ordinary Kriging interpolation method. We employed multiple logistic regression estimate associations between first trimester exposures and preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, preterm delivery, and small for gestational age (SGA) infants. PM2.5 and O3 exposures were associated with preeclampsia (adjusted OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.96-1.39 per 4.0 μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5; adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.89-1.42 per 16.8 ppb increase in O3), gestational hypertension (for PM2.5 OR = 1.11, 95 % CI = 1.00-1.23; for O3 OR = 1.12, 95 % CI = 0.97-1.29), and preterm delivery (for PM2.5 ORs = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.01-1.20; for O3 ORs = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.01-1.50). Smaller 5-8 % increases in risk were also observed for PM10 with gestational hypertension and SGA, but not preeclampsia. Our data suggest that first trimester exposure to particles, mostly PM2.5, and ozone, may increase the risk of developing preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, as well as preterm delivery and SGA.

  7. 78 FR 57680 - Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Allegheny County, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... intent to file an offer of financial assistance (OFA) has been received, this exemption will be effective..., Chicago, IL 60606. If the verified notice contains false or misleading information, the exemption is void..., if any, of the abandonment on the environment and historic resources. OEA will issue an...

  8. National Dam Safety Program. Panama Dam (Inventory Number NY 784) Allegheny River Basin Chautauqua County. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-22

    4 ----- 104 - r- -4---4 f-p M.0 W% r- m .0Q0il1 3 : : : C4 m041 &4’ - a -z 1D C>h co 3 (pm f l- nIp4 4. ’rr ~ -n a.. a.£ a.. *m -m m. a-. 4. 4y in a.l...mm.IS4.ft In 0 .0 4.0 -4 a 0 I 0 4o 44 .0 4a 0 4 44 0 .0 f .4.44~ ..4 . ... 4.44...4 3 5 0U EZWE 0 t Z ’ . . . .. 4t . . .4LO 000.. .0 ~ m r ~ 4 .44.4

  9. Public health assessment for Jackson Township Landfill, Jackson Township, Ocean County, New Jersey, Region 2. Cerclis No. NJD980505283. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-13

    The Jackson Township Landfill is a former municipal waste landfill located in Ocean County, New Jersey. Site-related contamination currently poses an indeterminate public health hazard since insufficient data exist for some environmental media to which humans may be exposed. Environmental data indicate that the former landfill continues to impact underlying ground water quality. Surface water, sediments, and air have been minimally impacted by former landfill activities. The landfill also poses a public health hazard because site information indicates that past human exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water has occurred at levels that may result in adverse health effects.

  10. Public health assessment for Pomona Oaks Well Contamination, Galloway Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, Region 2. Cerclis No. NJD980769350. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-24

    The Pomona Oaks Well Contamination site is a residential community consisting of approximately 200 single family homes. In 1982, residents complained to the Atlantic County Health Department (ACHD) regarding foul tasting well water, and subsequent investigation by the ACHD, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) confirmed ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds (most notably; benzene, 1,2-dichloroethane) at concentrations exceeding standards for drinking water. The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) consider the Pomona Oaks site to have presented a public health hazard based upon past exposure.

  11. Health assessment for Packaging Corporation of America, Filer City, Manistee County, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794747. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-10

    Packaging Corporation of America is listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Filer City, Stronach Township, Manistee County, Michigan. The Packaging Corporation of America (PCA) and its prior owner, American Box Board Company (ABBCo), have operated a neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulping mill in Filer City for the production of corrugated medium for corrugated boxes. Seepage lagoons operated from 1951 through 1974, receiving a total of 7.2 billion gallons of waste materials. Inorganic chemicals detected in lagoon sediments in 1986 include (with maximum concentrations in ppm): aluminum, 6,250; barium, 633; cadmium, 33; calcium, 228,000; chromium, 29; copper, 173; iron, 25,900; lead, 128; magnesium, 11,300; manganese, 2,200; mercury, 2.5; nickel, 20; potassium, 8,940; sodium, 74,300; vanadium, 15; and zinc, 2,080. A similar profile of inorganics was found in subsurface soils and ground water in 1987. Arsenic and cadmium were also detected off-site in high concentrations in a monitoring well sample from 1981. Organic chemicals were also detected in the ground water in the 1987 sampling. These included (maximum concentrations in ppb); 2-butanone, 1,700; tetrachloroethene, 18; chloroform, 8.7; bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, 10; phenol, 70,000; 2-methylphenol, 6,200; 4-methylphenol, 16,000; and benzoic acid, 240,000. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to heavy metals and organic chemicals may occur via ground water contamination.

  12. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the…

  13. Wellness Programs Promote Health in Jefferson County and Centennial School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Patrick J.

    1986-01-01

    This bulletin examines wellness programs and what they mean to Oregon educators. The opening sections describe what is meant by "wellness" and trace the growth of wellness programs in Oregon to the annual Seaside Health Education Conference. To illustrate how wellness programs operate, the next two sections describe how two Oregon school…

  14. Status of Oregon's Children: 2002 County Data Book. Special Focus: Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children First for Oregon, Portland.

    This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of Oregons children, focusing on child health, nutrition, and child safety. This statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators of child well-being: (1) child care supply; (2) third grade reading proficiency; (3) third grade math proficiency; (4) juvenile arrests; (5) suicide attempts;…

  15. Presence of a Community Health Center and Uninsured Emergency Department Visit Rates in Rural Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rust, George; Baltrus, Peter; Ye, Jiali; Daniels, Elvan; Quarshie, Alexander; Boumbulian, Paul; Strothers, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Context: Community health centers (CHCs) provide essential access to a primary care medical home for the uninsured, especially in rural communities with no other primary care safety net. CHCs could potentially reduce uninsured emergency department (ED) visits in rural communities. Purpose: We compared uninsured ED visit rates between rural…

  16. Creating an occupational therapy Level II fieldwork experience in a county jail setting.

    PubMed

    Provident, Ingrid M; Joyce-Gaguzis, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    Although occupational therapy services have been rendered in prisons historically, only one occupational therapy program currently exists in a county jail: the Allegheny County Jail Project (ACJ Project). The offenders who populate county jails experience occupational deprivation. The participants of the ACJ Project have benefited from occupational therapy intervention that was initiated during incarceration and continued following their release from jail in order to help them resume productive life roles and to reduce the reoccurrence of engagement in criminal behaviors (recidivism rate). As of June 2003, the ACJ Project has successfully affected the lifestyle patterns of its participants and overall public safety by helping 63% of participants secure gainful employment and by helping 91.8% of participants maintain their freedom after prison. The purpose of this report is to describe the process and benefits of implementing fieldwork opportunities for Level II occupational therapy students in a best practice occupational therapy program in a nontraditional environment: a county jail.

  17. Public health assessment for US Defense General Supply Center, Richmond, Chesterfield County, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VA3971520751. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-21

    Defense General Supply Center (DGSC), south of Richmond, Virginia in Chesterfield County, is a military supply distribution center. The facility currently manages and furnishes military general supplies to the Armed Forces and several federal civilian agencies. Contaminants, primarily volatile organic chemicals, in groundwater and surface water have migrated to adjoining communities. A well survey was conducted in March 1987 by the Chesterfield County Health District, part of the Virginia Health Department. Some private wells were sampled at the time of the survey in the Rayon Park area, adjacent to the National Guard Area on DGSC, and the water contained contaminants at levels above regulatory limits. Because of those levels, 21 private wells in the community of Rayon Park were replaced with an alternate water supply in 1987. Because of infrequent exposure to low levels of VOCs in those wells, adverse health effects are not likely. Citizens have expressed concerns about contamination to installation officials and representatives of state and local health departments. They are also concerned about possible adverse health effects associated with past use of contaminated groundwater and on-going monitoring efforts being conducted by DGSC. Those concerns are evaluated in the Public Health Implications section of the public health assessment.

  18. National Weather Service, Emergency Medical Services, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UCSD and California EPA Collaboration on Heat Health Impact and Public Notification for San Diego County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardy, A. O.; Corcus, I.; Guirguis, K.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued official heat alerts in the form of either a heat advisory or excessive heat warning product to the public and core partners for many years. This information has traditionally been developed through the use of triggers for heat indices which combine humidity and temperature. The criteria typically used numeric thresholds and did not consider impact from a particular heat episode, nor did it factor seasonality or population acclimation. In 2013, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego in collaboration with the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, of the California Environmental Protection Agency and the NWS completed a study of heat health impact in California, while the NWS San Diego office began modifying their criteria towards departure from climatological normal with much less dependence on humidity or heat index. The NWS changes were based on initial findings from the California Department of Public Health, EpiCenter California Injury Data Online system which documents heat health impacts. Results from the UCSD study were finalized and published in 2014; they supported the need for significant modification of the traditional criteria. In order to better understand the impacts of heat on community health, medical outcome data were provided by the County of San Diego Emergency Medical Services Branch, which is charged by the County's Public Health Officer to monitor heat-related illness and injury daily from June through September. The data were combined with UCSD research to inform the modification of local NWS heat criteria and establish trigger points to pilot new procedures for the issuance of heat alerts. Finally, practices and procedures were customized for each of the county health departments in the NWS area of responsibility across extreme southwest California counties in collaboration with their Office of Emergency Services. The end result of the

  19. Public health assessment for MRI Corporation, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS Number FLD088787585

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-28

    MRI site in Tampa, Florida, was proposed to the National Priorities List (NPL) on June 14, 1996 and listed on the NPL December 23, 1996. It was a chemical detinning plant, between 1979 and 1986, located in a sparsely populated industrial area of east Tampa. This public health assessment evaluates the potential for health effects from exposure to on-site soils, sediment, and groundwater. Off-site contamination was not addressed due to lack of data. Since public access is restricted by a fence and undeveloped land surrounding the site, contact with on-site soils is an incomplete exposure pathway. The area around the site is mostly undeveloped or industrial; therefore, public access to contaminated sediments are minimal. Groundwater at the site is contaminated with cyanide and lead, but currently on one is drinking the groundwater at the site.

  20. Report of Block Field Experience at Jefferson County Department of Health Bureau of Nutrition, Birmingham, Alabama.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    area is Alabama’s leading retail and wholesale trade center. It is also the state’s center for finance, education, manufacturing, health care, research...care centers. Others may be increasing as a result of increased sexual activity among teenagers or adults . 04E -"-Ee •-r .""• 7 7-11- Table 2 Number...include the Director, a Nutrition Services Coordinator (Assistant Director), a Training Coordinator, a Community Coordinator, an Education Coordinator

  1. Capital relations and health: mediating and moderating effects of cultural, economic, and social capitals on mortality in Alameda County, California.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry; Patterson, Andrew C

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by Bourdieu's theories on various forms of capital, conversions among them, and the fields (social spaces) delineated by possession of them, the authors investigate distinct and interconnected effects of cultural, economic, and social capitals on risk of mortality. Using 35 years of longitudinal data from the Alameda County Study (n = 6,157), they created discrete-time hazard models to predict all-cause mortality from educational attainment (institutionalized cultural capital), household income (economic capital), and different forms of personal ties (social capital). The results show that education, income, having three or more close friends, regularity of church attendance, and participation in social/recreational groups were all negatively and significantly associated with risk of mortality. Income mediated a significant portion of the education effect. None of the personal ties variables mediated the effects of education or income. Relative composition of the sum total of education and income did not have an effect. Lastly, examination of statistical interactions between capitals determined that protective effects of church attendance and participation in community betterment groups applied only to non-wealthy people. These findings speak to the structure of the U.S. social space within which health-delimiting relationally defined social classes may be made manifest.

  2. Urban-rural differences in excess mortality among high-poverty populations: evidence from the Harlem Household Survey and the Pitt County, North Carolina Study of African American Health.

    PubMed

    Geronimus, Arline T; Colen, Cynthia G; Shochet, Tara; Ingber, Lori Barer; James, Sherman A

    2006-08-01

    Black youth residing in high-poverty areas have dramatically lower probabilities of surviving to age 65 if they are urban than if they are rural. Chronic disease deaths contribute heavily. We begin to probe the reasons using the Harlem Household Survey (HHS) and the Pitt County, North Carolina Study of African American Health (PCS). We compare HHS and PCS respondents on chronic disease rates, health behaviors, social support, employment, indicators of health care access, and health insurance. Chronic disease profiles do not favor Pitt County. Smoking uptake is similar across samples, but PCS respondents are more likely to quit. Indicators of access to health care and private health insurance are more favorable in Pitt County. Findings suggest rural mortality is averted through secondary or tertiary prevention, not primary. Macroeconomic and health system changes of the past 20 years may have left poor urban Blacks as medically underserved as poor rural Blacks.

  3. Water quality in the Allegheny and Monongahela River basins, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, and Maryland, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert M.; Beer, Kevin M.; Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Clark, Mary E.; McAuley, Steven D.; Sams, James I.; Williams, Donald R.

    2000-01-01

    Major influences and findings for ground water quality, surface water quality, and biology in the Allegheny and Monongahela River basins are described and illustrated. Samples were collected in a variety of media to determine trace elements, sulfate, pesticides, nitrate, volatile organic compounds, organochlorine compounds, and radon-222. This report discusses the influences of several land-use practices, such as coal mining, urbanization, agriculture, and forestry. The report also includes a summary of a regional investigation of water quality and quality invertebrates in the Northern and Central Appalachian coal regions.

  4. 77 FR 37665 - Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Allegheny Storage Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... the existing Wolf Run Compressor Station in Lewis County, West Virginia; and 1.8 miles of 16-inch... requests authorization to construct pipeline facilities in Maryland, Ohio, West Virginia, and...

  5. Public health assessment for Rowe industries groundwater contamination, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS NYD981486954. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-16

    The Rowe Industries Site, which is on the National Priorities List, is in Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York. On-site subsurface soils and on and off site surface water, sediments, and groundwater are contaminated with volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). A potential public health threat exists for residents of houses adjacent to the site whose homes may be accumulating volatile organic vapor levels from contaminated soil gas. Based on the information reviewed, the site currently poses an indeterminate public health hazard. There is a potential for further exposure to contaminated media through ingestion, dermal absorption and inhalation if no remedial actions are taken.

  6. Public health assessment for Odessa Superfund Site (a/k/a Sprague Road Groundwater Plume) Ector, Ector County, Texas, Region 6: CERCLIS number TX0001407444. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-28

    The Sprague Road Groundwater Plume National Priorities List site, consists of three plumes of chromium contaminated water just outside the northern city limits of Odessa, Ector County, Texas. The chromium in the groundwater is a public health hazard to people who continue to use the chromium-contaminated water wells for drinking. Chromium in soil at Leigh Metal Plating Inc. presents a potential public health hazard. Although this facility is surrounded by a fence, access to the site is not entirely restricted. There is a five-foot pit on the National Chromium Corporation site that could present a physical hazard to children trespassing on the site.

  7. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.

    In June 1975, 47 men and 43 women living on commercial farms in Fulton County, Pennsylvania were interviewed regarding their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 39% of all adults living on commercial farms in the county. A commercial farm was defined as one that…

  8. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.

    In June 1975, 62 men and 64 women living on commercial farms in Juniata County, Pennsylvania were interviewed regarding their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 22% of all adults living on commercial farms in the county. A commercial farm was defined as one that…

  9. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.

    In June 1975, 53 men and 56 women living on commercial farms in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania were interviewed regarding their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 23% of all adults living on commercial farms in the county. A commercial farm was defined as…

  10. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Butler County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.; Taranto, Angelo A.

    In July and August 1975, 17 men and 63 women living in rural areas in Butler County, Pennsylvania were interviewed as to their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 12% of all adults living on commercial farms and 5% of all rural nonfarm adults in the county. A…

  11. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 82-056-1186, Monroe County Incinerator, Key Largo, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.; Hickey, J.L.S.

    1982-09-01

    On November 24, 1981, NIOSH received a request concerned with possible biohazards from the handling of hospital waste (human body parts, blood-contaminated bedding and wearing apparel, syringes, and operating room waste) at the incinerator. Interviews with several incinerator operators and general laborers did not reveal any incident of human body parts being seen or spilled from bags. Blood had been observed leaking from bags onto truckbeds and the incinerator floor. The State Epidemiologist was contacted and found to be aware of the concern for worker exposure to infectious waste as it was being handled by personnel outside hospitals and health care units. The 1982 Florida Legislature adopted a bill providing regulation of infectious waste disposal. The act requires that each hospital and ambulatory surgical center properly identify, segregate, and separate infectious from solid waste, and that any transporter of infectious waste be notified of the existence and location of such waste. No immediate biohazard at the incinerator was identified during the survey; however, worker exposure to infectious wastes due to breakage of the bags because of mishandling is possible. There was no indication of unburned infectious wastes in the grate ash. The bill enacted by the 1982 Florida Legislature should be strictly observed by persons delivering wastes, and incinerator managers should reject any waste not properly bagged and marked.

  12. Background air concentrations of Cr(VI) in Hudson County, New Jersey: implications for setting health-based standards for Cr(VI) in soil.

    PubMed

    Scott, P K; Finley, B L; Harris, M A; Rabbe, D E

    1997-05-01

    An accurate measure of "background" airborne Cr(VI) concentrations will be necessary to derive site-specific health-based Cr(VI) soil concentrations at sites containing chromite ore processing residues (COPR) in Hudson County, NJ. To date, no such data have been collected in New Jersey. This paper describes an air sampling program designed to measure background concentrations of Cr(VI) in Hudson County and compare those concentrations with the air sampling results obtained previously at 30 COPR sites in Hudson County. Background airborne Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 3.8 ng/m3 with an arithmetic mean of 1.2 ng/m3. Comparisons of the airborne Cr(VI) concentrations previously measured at 30 COPR sites indicated that more than two-thirds of the sites had mean airborne Cr(VI) concentrations that were not statistically significantly greater than background. Our findings suggest that, in general, vehicle disturbance is required for significant soil suspension to occur at these sites. Since airborne Cr(VI) concentrations at many of these sites are close to background, it is critical that background airborne Cr(VI) levels be considered when deriving health-based soil standards at the COPR sites.

  13. Mitochondrial genomic variation associated with higher mitochondrial copy number: the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mitochondria are essential organelles and are the location of cellular respiration, which is responsible for the majority of ATP production. Each cell contains multiple mitochondria, and each mitochondrion contains multiple copies of its own circular genome. The ratio of mitochondrial genomes to nuclear genomes is referred to as mitochondrial copy number. Decreases in mitochondrial copy number are known to occur in many tissues as people age, and in certain diseases. The regulation of mitochondrial copy number by nuclear genes has been studied extensively. While mitochondrial variation has been associated with longevity and some of the diseases known to have reduced mitochondrial copy number, the role that the mitochondrial genome itself has in regulating mitochondrial copy number remains poorly understood. Results We analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from 1007 individuals randomly selected from the Cache County Study on Memory Health and Aging utilizing the inferred evolutionary history of the mitochondrial haplotypes present in our dataset to identify sequence variation and mitochondrial haplotypes associated with changes in mitochondrial copy number. Three variants belonging to mitochondrial haplogroups U5A1 and T2 were significantly associated with higher mitochondrial copy number in our dataset. Conclusions We identified three variants associated with higher mitochondrial copy number and suggest several hypotheses for how these variants influence mitochondrial copy number by interacting with known regulators of mitochondrial copy number. Our results are the first to report sequence variation in the mitochondrial genome that causes changes in mitochondrial copy number. The identification of these variants that increase mtDNA copy number has important implications in understanding the pathological processes that underlie these phenotypes. PMID:25077862

  14. National Dam Inspection Program, Big Beaver Dam (Pa No Name Number 14, NDI Number PA 00258, PennDER Number 4-11), Ohio River Basin, Tributary of Clark’s Run, Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    the Allegheny Group , Pennsylvanian System. These members consist of cyclic sequences of shale, sandstone, limestone, and coal. It is estimated that the...4, GEOLOGIC MAP Blg Beaver Dom NDI No. PA 00258 Beaver County c Reproduced from Greater Pittsburgh Region Geologic Map. -A% 0 4 Compiled by W. R...Wagner and others, 1975 N Scale: One Inch Equals Approximately Two Miles See Legend, Next Page GEOLOGY MAP LEGEND GROUP FORMATION DESCRIPTION Alluvium

  15. The topography of poverty in the United States: a spatial analysis using county-level data from the Community Health Status Indicators project.

    PubMed

    Holt, James B

    2007-10-01

    Socioeconomic and health-related data at the county level are now available through the Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) database. These data are useful for assessing the health of communities and regions. Users of the CHSI data can access online reports and an online mapping application for visualizing patterns in various community-related measures. It also is possible to download these data to conduct local analyses. This paper describes a spatial analysis of poverty in the United States at the county level for 2000. Spatial statistical techniques in a geographic information system were used to quantify significant spatial patterns, such as concentrated poverty rates and spatial outliers. The analysis revealed significant and stark patterns of poverty. A distinctive north-south demarcation of low versus high poverty concentrations was found, along with isolated pockets of high and low poverty within areas in which the predominant poverty rates were opposite. This pattern can be described as following a continental poverty divide. These insights can be useful in explicating the underlying processes involved in forming such spatial patterns that result in concentrated wealth and poverty. The spatial analytic techniques are broadly applicable to socioeconomic and health-related data and can provide important information about the spatial structure of datasets, which is important for choosing appropriate analysis methods.

  16. 78 FR 54651 - Sole Source Cooperative Agreement Award to the National Association of County and City Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... responsibilities to achieve community health resilience and strengthen health care, public health, and emergency... (LHDs) to enhance national health security, foster community health resilience, and strengthen health... resilience. ASPR seeks to partner with LHDs and health officials which play a critical role in...

  17. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... preferred... Read More Executive Director | Dogwood Village of Orange County US - VA - Orange, Executive Director Dogwood Village of Orange County Health and Rehabilitation and Senior Living, a ...

  18. Health assessment for Rhinehart (Aka Winchester) Tire Fire National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Frederick County, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980831796. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-17

    The Rhinehart (aka Winchester) Tire Fire Site is located near the town of Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia. In October 1983, a fire was started in the tires disposed of on the site. Hot oil was released from the melting and pyrolysis of the tires. This oil made its way to Massey Run, a nearby surface water body. The fire was brought under control within a few days, but continued to smolder for six months. The migration of the oil and the residue from the fire have contaminated the site. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds may occur via ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption of contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediments and soils.

  19. Public health assessment for Upper Deerfield Township Sanitary Landfill, Upper Deerfield Township, Cmberland County, New Jersey, Region 2. Cerclis No. NJD980761399. addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-14

    The Upper Deerfield Township Landfill (UDTL) consists of 14 acres in a 23 acre site belonging to Upper Deerfield Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey, located amidst a rural farming district. This public health assessment Addendum considers the site to have constituted a public health hazard in the past due to exposure to contaminated residential well water. A groundwater monitoring program is to be implemented by Upper Deerfield Township. Currently, the site poses an indeterminant hazard because of the possible migration off-site of soil gas toward homes adjacent to the site. The Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) determined that those persons exposed to benzene, through the consumption of contaminated drinking water, should be considered for the ATSDR benzene subregistry.

  20. Public health assessment for Wyckoff Company/Eagle Harbor, Eagle Harbor Operable Units, Bainbridge Island, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248295. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor site is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located on the east side of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, Washington. The harbor has become contaminated with heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the many years of ship repair and painting as well as from the application of creosote, pentachlorophenol, and other wood preservatives to pilings. The Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) states that the major human health concern is consumption of clam meat contaminated with PAHs. The public health assessment has determined that exposure to contaminants found in Eagle Harbor sediments, shellfish, fish, and crab is a health hazard for those people who ignore warnings.

  1. Self-reported use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits to purchase soda in a public health center population: Los Angeles County, California, 2012.

    PubMed

    Barragan, Noel; Gase, Lauren; Butler, Rebecca; Smith, Lisa; Simon, Paul; Kuo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    To better inform local program planning for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health used self-reported data from a public health center population to examine the prevalence of benefits used to purchase soda. We performed statistical analyses, including multivariable regression modeling, using data from a local health and nutrition examination survey. The survey response rate was 69% (n=1,503). More than one-third of survey participants reported receiving, or living in a household where someone receives, nutrition assistance benefits. When asked, 33% (n=170) reported using these benefits to purchase soda "sometimes" and 18% (n=91) reported "often" or "always," suggesting that the use of program benefits to purchase soda was not uncommon in this subpopulation. These findings have meaningful policy and planning implications, as they contribute to ongoing dialogue about strategies for optimizing nutrition among SNAP recipients.

  2. Health assessment for Harvey and Knott Drum National Priorities List (NPL) Site, New Castle County, Delaware, Region 3. CERCLIS No. DED980713093. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Harvey Knott Drum National Priorities List site, located near Kirkwood in New Castle County, Delaware, is an inactive landfill that had received sanitary, municipal and industrial wastes. Contaminants released from the site include heavy metals and organic compounds and have entered groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface waters. The principal concern is that contaminated groundwater may migrate to off-site domestic, public, and agricultural water supply wells. Also, contaminants in off-site surface water and sediments pose some concern for recreational use and consumption of fish. Off-site contaminated soils near the west property line may be a threat to persons that trespass into that area. The site is of potential health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects.

  3. Public health assessment for reilly tar and chemical, St. Louis park, Hennepin County, Minnesota, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MND980609804. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-09

    The Reilly Tar and Chemical Corporation Site (Site) is listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities List. The Site is located in the city of St. Louis Park, in eastern Hennepin County, Minnesota. The spilling of coal tar and creosote on-Site, and the discharge of contaminated wastewater off-Site during plant operations resulted in the contamination of soil and area aquifers with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenolic compounds. Local residents use municipal water drawn from aquifers contaminated with low levels of PAHs. Exposure to these compounds may occur via ingestion of and dermal contact with potable water. The data and information developed in the public health assessment have been evaluated by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Health Activities Recommendation Panel for follow-up health actions.

  4. Health assessment for Burrows Sanitation Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Hartford, Van Buren County, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980410617. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-29

    The Burrows Sanitation Landfill is a National Priorities List site located in a rural area approximately one mile northeast of the City of Hartford, Van Buren County, Michigan. The contaminants found at the site consist of chromium, lead, and nickel in the ground water, surface soils, surface waters, and sediments. There are three residences within 300 feet of the site boundary. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to nickel and chromium may be occurring via ingestion of and direct contact with surface soils. However, proposed remediation measures should adequately prevent future exposure to these contaminants.

  5. Public health assessment for east tenth street (FMC Corporation-Marcus Hook Plant), Marcus Hook, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD987323458. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-29

    The Earth 10th Street Site, a former rayon/cellophane manufacturing facility, lies about 1/3 mile northwest of the Delaware River in Marcus Hook, Delaware County, Pennyslvania. As a result of past industrial activities at the site, on-site groundwater and soils are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and metals. On-site soils are also contaminated with asbestos and several on-site buildings contain asbestos which can become friable and airborne. Overall, the site is identified as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  6. Comparison of Health-Related Measures of Two Groups of Adolescents in a Rural Southeastern County in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Charles D.; Hensarling, Robert W.; Angel, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline values on physiological parameters for 7-11 graders (n = 146) in a rural area of Alabama and to examine whether differences existed among the adolescents in the county. Design: Descriptive. Setting: Many adolescents in the southern portion of the United States suffer disproportionately…

  7. Public health assessment for Adams County Quincy landfills 2 and 3, Quincy, Adams County, Illinois, Region 5. Cerclis No. ILD980607055. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-28

    Since the completion of remedial activities at the site, the Quincy landfill 2 and 3 site poses no apparent public health hazard. No one is currently exposed to contamination at the site. Any past exposure would not have been at levels of health concern. Based on current conditions, IDPH recommends that the Quincy Landfill 2 and 3 participating respondents group: Encourage the homeowner 1/2 mile west of the site to connect to Mill Creek Public Water supply and to seal the private well to eliminate possible exposure to site-related contaminants in groundwater; provide groundwater containment and treatment if groundwater cleanup levels are not met and maintained; continue proper maintenance of the leachate collection system and tank; maintain the landfill cap, particularly to address any erosion that occurs; and maintain a 6-foot-high security fence around the perimeter of the site to prevent trespassing.

  8. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project — A Community-Level, Public Health Initiative to Build Community Disaster Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Eisenman, David; Chandra, Anita; Fogleman, Stella; Magana, Aizita; Hendricks, Astrid; Wells, Ken; Williams, Malcolm; Tang, Jennifer; Plough, Alonzo

    2014-01-01

    Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR), a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest–posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports. PMID:25153472

  9. Trace Elements Contamination and Human Health Risk Assessment in Drinking Water from the Agricultural and Pastoral Areas of Bay County, Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Turdi, Muyessar; Yang, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Tap water samples were collected from 180 families in four agricultural (KYR: Keyir, KRW: Kariwak, YTR: Yatur, DW: Dawanqi) and two pastoral areas (B: Bulong and Y: Yangchang) in Bay County, Xinjiang, China, and levels of seven trace elements (Cd, Cr, As Ni, Pb, Zn, Se) were analyzed using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to assess potential health risks. Remarkable spatial variations of contamination were observed. Overall, the health risk was more severe for carcinogenic versus non-carcinogenic pollutants due to heavy metal. The risk index was greater for children overall (Cr > As > Cd and Zn > Se for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic elements, respectively). The total risk index was greater in agricultural areas (DW > KYR > YTR > KRW > B > Y). Total risk indices were greater where well water was the source versus fountain water; for the latter, the total health risk index was greater versus glacier water. Main health risk factors were Cr and As in DW, KYR, YTR, KRW, and B, and Zn, Cr, and As in the Y region. Overall, total trace element–induced health risk (including for DW adults) was higher than acceptable (10−6) and lower than priority risk levels (10−4) (KYR, YTR, KRW, Y, and B). For DW children, total health risk reached 1.08 × 10−4, higher than acceptable and priority risk levels (10−4). PMID:27669274

  10. Health assessment for Celanese Fibers Operation (CFO) NPL (National Priorities List) Site, Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD003446721. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-20

    The Celanese Fibers Operation (CFO) is located nearly Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina. Contaminants of concern at the site include benzene, trichloroethene (TCE), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, arsenic, and chromium. The major contaminant migration pathways are groundwater and soil. Contaminants in the groundwater, with the exception of TCE, reportedly have not reached private well supplies in the area. Approximately 475 people live within one mile of the site. Populations at special risk from contaminants found on the CFO site are children and the elderly. The Number 3 School, New Hope Church, and Children's Home are all located within one mile of the site. The CFO site, in its present state of contamination, does not pose an imminent public health risk; however, if contaminants found in the groundwater beneath the site reach the private wells in the area and are consumed, this exposure may cause a public health risk.

  11. Public health assessment for JIS Landfill, South Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey, Region 2. Cerclis No. NJD97400998. addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-25

    The Jones Industrial Services (JIS) Landfill site is an approximately eleven acre landfill located on a 24 acre site in South Brunswick Town, Middlesex County, New Jersey. The landfill records document that sludges, solvents, pesticides, and industrial wastes, some of which are toxic and/or hazardous substances were accepted at the landfill from the 1960`s through the early 1970`s. On-site and off-site soil and groundwater is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and heavy metals. The landfill may have posed a public health hazard in the past, since the site information indicates that human exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals in domestic drinking water wells may have occurred. However, available data do not indicate that humans are presently being exposed to contaminants at levels expected to cause adverse health effects.

  12. Public health assessment for north Penn-area 1, Souderton, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD096834494. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-12

    The North Penn Area 1 site, a National Priorities List (NPL) site, is located in the Borough of Souderton, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Gentle, Cleaners, Inc., one of the parties potentially responsible for the site contamination, has been in business since 1953 and used tetrachloroethene (PCE) from 1953 to 1983 in dry cleaning operations. At present, groundwater is the only medium that is known to be contaminated. Enviromental data for surface soil, surface water, sediment, and air do not exist. Past, present, and future completed exposure pathways for volatile organic compounds such as PCE and TCE in groundwater exist for nearby residents. The site is considered an indeterminate public health hazard because limited data are available; however, data that are available do not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contaminants that would be expected to cause any adverse health effects.

  13. Public health assessment for Genzale Plating Company, Franklin Square, Nassau County, New York, Region 2. Cerclis No. NYD002050110. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-16

    The Genzale Plating CompAny, Inc. is located at 288 New Hyde Park Road in the Hamlet of Franklin Square, Nassau County, New York. The area surrounding the site is predominantly residential. Subsurface soils and, to a lesser extent, near surface soils (0-2 feet) at the Genzale site have elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds and metals. The groundwater beneath the site is contaminated with VOCs and metals. Elevated levels of metals were found in the water of an off-site, downgradient, groundwater monitoring well and both metals and VOCs were detected in a downgradient inactive irrigation well. The site poses an indeterminate public health hazard. The available data do not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contamination that would be expected to cause adverse health effects. However, data or information are not available for all environmental media to which humans may be exposed.

  14. Acute Health Effects Among Military Personnel Participating in the Cleanup of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill, 2007, in Taean County, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Gwack, Jin; Lee, Ju Hyung; Kang, Young Ah; Chang, Kyu-jin; Lee, Moo Sik; Hong, Jee Young

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to investigate acute health effects and its related factors among military personnel participating in the cleanup of the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in Taean county, Korea. Methods We collected data on acute symptoms during the cleanup and their predictors using a self-administered questionnaire to 2624 military personnel. Selfreported symptoms included six neurologic symptoms, five respiratory symptoms, two dermatologic symptoms, three ophthalmic symptoms, and three general symptoms. Independent variables were demographic factors (gender, age, education level, and rank), health behavioral factors (smoking history and usage of the personal protective equipment such as masks and gloves), and occupational history such as where and for how long individuals participated in cleanup. Results The duration of work days was significantly associated with 17 acute symptoms except for itchiness and red skin.Working in Taean county also increased the risk of most acute symptoms except headache and back pain. In regard to personal protective equipment, wearing masks was mainly related to the development of respiratory symptoms such as sore throat and wearing other protective equipment was related to the development of sore throat, back pain, headache, and cough. Military personnel younger than 25 years reported 4.66 times more hot flushing and 5.39 times more itchiness than those older than 25 years. Conclusion It should be emphasized that for early-stage cleanup the number of workers should be minimized, sufficient personal protective equipment with approved quality for blocking noxious gas should be supplied, and systematic health care for the workers should be provided. Health effects could be diminished by providing adequate education regarding the appropriate use of protective equipment, especially to nonprofessionals such as residents and volunteers. To make disaster response expeditious, a national and regional preparedness

  15. Vulnerability-Based Spatial Sampling Stratification for the National Children’s Study, Worcester County, Massachusetts: Capturing Health-Relevant Environmental and Sociodemographic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Timothy J.; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Yelena; Aupont, Onesky; Wang, Yangyang; Raj, Ann; Zimmerman, Paula; Goble, Robert; Taylor, Octavia; Churchill, Linda; Lemay, Celeste; McLaughlin, Thomas; Felice, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Background The National Children’s Study is the most ambitious study ever attempted in the United States to assess how environmental factors impact child health and development. It aims to follow 100,000 children from gestation until 21 years of age. Success requires breaking new interdisciplinary ground, starting with how to select the sample of > 1,000 children in each of 105 study sites; no standardized protocol exists for stratification of the target population by factoring in the diverse environments it inhabits. Worcester County, Massachusetts, like other sites, stratifies according to local conditions and local knowledge, subject to probability sampling rules. Objectives We answer the following questions: How do we divide Worcester County into viable strata that represent its health-relevant environmental and sociodemographic heterogeneity, subject to sampling rules? What potential does our approach have to inform stratification at other sites? Results We developed a multivariable, vulnerability-based method for spatial sampling consisting of two descriptive indices: a hazards/stressors exposure index (comprising three proxy variables), and an adaptive capacity/sociodemographic character index (five variables). Multivariable, health-relevant stratification at the start of the study may improve detection power for environment–child health associations down the line. Eighteen strata capture countywide heterogeneity in the indices and have optimal relative homogeneity within each. They achieve comparable expected birth counts and conform to local concepts of space. Conclusion The approach offers moderate to high potential to inform other sites, limited by intersite differences in data availability, geodemographics, and technical capacity. Energetic community engagement from the start promotes local stratification coherence, plus vital researcher–community trust and co-ownership for sustainability. PMID:20211802

  16. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.; Taranto, Angelo A.

    In July and August 1975, 138 rural residents of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania were interviewed as to their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes regarding the prevention of cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents were selected by interviewing an adult living on a commercial farm (a farm that either sold $10,000 or more produce per year or the…

  17. Public health assessment for GCL Tie and Treating, Sidney, Delaware County, New York, Region 2: CERCLIS Number NYD981566417. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-27

    GCL Tie and Treating (GCL) is a two-acre inactive sawmill and wood-treating plant in the Village of Sidney, Delaware County, New York. Because of past exposure, the site posed a public health hazard. Past remedial measures have minimized the potential for exposure to physical hazards and contaminants at the site. Currently, the site poses no apparent public health hazard although additional investigation and possibly remediation are needed to ensure that future exposures do not occur. Groundwater at the site boundaries is contaminated. Elevated levels of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons are present in soil in the area north of the GCL property fence line. Access to this area by the public is currently unrestricted. Although there is no evidence of use currently, future use of the site is uncertain. The ATSDR`s Health Activities Recommendations Panel has evaluated the site to determine appropriate follow-up health actions. The panel determined that no other follow-up health actions are indicated at this time.

  18. Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, Arthur

    2015-03-04

    The Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative represented a comprehensive and collaborative approach to promoting and implementing energy efficiency improvements. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. The ultimate goal of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative was to implement a total of 1,067 residential energy efficiency retrofits with a minimum 15% estimated energy efficiency savings per unit. Program partners included: United States Department of Energy, Allegheny Power, and Private Industry Council of Westmoreland-Fayette, Fayette County Redevelopment Authority, and various local partners. The program was open to any Fayette County residents who own their home and meet the prequalifying conditions. The level of assistance offered depended upon household income and commitment to undergo a BPI – Certified Audit and implement energy efficiency measures, which aimed to result in at least a 15% reduction in energy usage. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. Additionally, the program had components that involved recruitment and training for employment of persons in the energy sector (green jobs), as well as marketing and implementation of a commercial or community facilities component. The residential component of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative involved a comprehensive approach, providing assistance to low- moderate- and market-rate homeowners. The initiative will also coordinate activities with local utility providers to further incentivize energy efficiency improvements among qualifying homeowners. The commercial component of Fayette County’s Better Building Initiative involved grants

  19. Effects of Coal-Mine Drainage on Stream Water Quality in the Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins-Sulfate Transport and Trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sams, James I.; Beer, Kevin M.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers transported a sulfate load of 1.2 million and 1.35 million tons, respectively, to the Ohio River at Pittsburgh. The Monongahela River Basin had a sulfate yield of 184 tons per square mile per year compared to 105 tons per square mile per year for the Allegheny River Basin. Within the large Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins, the subbasins with the highest sulfate yields in tons per square mile per year were those of Redstone Creek (580), Blacklick Creek (524), Conemaugh River (292), Buffalo Creek (247), Stonycreek River (239), Two Lick Creek (231), Dunkard Creek (212), and Loyalhanna Creek (196). These basins have been extensively mined. The sulfate yields of Brokenstraw and Conewango Creeks, which are outside the area underlain by coal and thus contain no coal mines, were 25 and 24 tons per square mile per year, respectively. Within the Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins, seven sites showed significant trends in sulfate concentration from 1965 to 1995. Dunkard Creek and Stonycreek River show significant upward trends in sulfate concentration. These trends appear to be related to increases in coal production in the two basins from 1965 to 1995. Blacklick Creek at Josephine and Loyalhanna Creek at Loyalhanna Dam show significant downward trends in sulfate concentration between 1965 and 1995. Blacklick Creek had a 50-percent decrease in sulfate concentration. Coal production in the Blacklick Creek Basin, which reached its peak at almost 4 million tons per year in the 1940's, dropped to less than 1 million tons per year by 1995. In the Loyalhanna Creek Basin, which had a 41-percent decrease in sulfate concentration, coal-production rates dropped steadily from more than 1.5 million tons per year in the 1940's to less than 200,000 tons per year in 1995.

  20. Effectiveness of Kenya's Community Health Strategy in delivering community-based maternal and newborn health care in Busia County, Kenya: non-randomized pre-test post test study

    PubMed Central

    Wangalwa, Gilbert; Cudjoe, Bennett; Wamalwa, David; Machira, Yvonne; Ofware, Peter; Ndirangu, Meshack; Ilako, Festus

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality ratio and neonatal mortality rate trends in Kenya have remained unacceptably high in a decade. In 2007, the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation adopted a community health strategy to reverse the poor health outcomes in order to meet Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. It aims at strengthening community participation and its ability to take action towards health. The study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the strategy in improving maternal and neonatal health outcomes in Kenya. Methods Between 2008 and 2010, the African Medical and Research Foundation implemented a community-based maternal and newborn care intervention package in Busia County using the community health strategy approach. An interventional, non-randomized pre-test post test study design was used to evaluate change in essential maternal and neonatal care practices among mothers with children aged 0 - 23 months. Results There was statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in attendance of at least four antenatal care visits (39% to 62%), deliveries by skilled birth attendants (31% to 57%), receiving intermittent preventive treatment (23% to 57%), testing for HIV during pregnancy (73% to 90%) and exclusive breastfeeding (20% to 52%). Conclusion The significant increase in essential maternal and neonatal care practices demonstrates that, community health strategy is an appropriate platform to deliver community based interventions. The findings will be used by actors in the child survival community to improve current approaches, policies and practice in maternal and neonatal care. PMID:23467438

  1. Genetic analysis of invasive Aedes albopictus populations in Los Angeles County, California and its potential public health impact.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Daibin; Lo, Eugenia; Hu, Renjie; Metzger, Marco E; Cummings, Robert; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Fujioka, Kenn K; Sorvillo, Teresa E; Kluh, Susanne; Healy, Sean P; Fredregill, Chris; Kramer, Vicki L; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is an anthropophilic aggressive daytime-biting nuisance and an efficient vector of certain arboviruses and filarial nematodes. Over the last 30 years, this species has spread rapidly through human travel and commerce from its native tropical forests of Asia to every continent except Antarctica. In 2011, a population of Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) was discovered in Los Angeles (LA) County, California. To determine the probable origin of this invasive species, the genetic structure of the population was compared against 11 populations from the United States and abroad, as well as preserved specimens from a 2001 introduction into California using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) gene. A total of 66 haplotypes were detected among samples and were divided into three main groups. Aedes albopictus collected in 2001 and 2011 from LA County were genetically related and similar to those from Asia but distinct from those collected in the eastern and southeastern United States. In view of the high genetic similarities between the 2001 and 2011 LA samples, it is possible that the 2011 population represents in part the descendants of the 2001 introduction. There remains an imperative need for improved surveillance and control strategies for this species.

  2. Public health assessment for Packaging Corporation of America, Filer City, Manistee County, Michigan, Region 5, Cerclis No. MID980794747. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-19

    The Packaging Corporation of America site located in Stronach Township, Manistee County, Michigan, was the site of eight lagoons used from 1951 to 1974 for the disposal of liquid wastes from a Packaging Corporation of America corrugated cardboard plant in nearby Filer City, Michigan. Wastes from the lagoons have seeped into the groundwater and produced a plume of discolored groundwater (black water), that contains organic chemicals and heavy metals, that extends from the site to nearby Manistee Lake. The site poses an indeterminate public health hazard under current conditions, since actual surface material has not been sampled. Based on the results of shallow sub-surface soil samples, trespassers are not likely to experience significant exposure to the chemicals on the site.

  3. Health assessment for Burnt Fly Bog National Priorities List Site, Marlboro, Monmouth County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD980504997. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-24

    The Burnt Fly Bog site, a National Priorities List site, is located near Marlboro, Monmouth County, New Jersey in the fringe area of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. The major contaminants at the site are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead. Both of these contaminants have been found in all environmental media at the site. Exposure to contaminants may occur from contact with soil, sediment, water, air, or biota from the site. In order to protect the public health, access to contaminated areas should not be permitted except for properly-protected remedial workers. Because of the potential for ground-water contamination, private well owners surrounding the site should be advised to connect to the public water system. In addition, the consumption of game animals, berries, fish, and other biota from Burnt Fly Bog should be discouraged unless it can be determined that they are free of contamination.

  4. Public-health assessment for Wausau Ground-water Contamination, Wausau, Marathon County, Wisconsin, Region 5. CERCLIS No. WID980993521. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Wausau Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site comprises part of the well field serving the City of Wausau in north-central Wisconsin, Marathon County. Contamination of city ground water was discovered in 1982. Sources of contamination include two sites on the west side of the Wisconsin River, and two sites on the east side. Minimizing the levels of VOCs in the water supply depends on the continued efficient operation of the equipment at the water treatment plant, the volume of contaminated water used, the level of pollution in the water as it comes into the plant, and the ability to blend treated water with uncontaminated water. Other ways residents could possibly be exposed to contamination from the site include breathing air near volatile organic compound (VOC) stripper towers at the water treatment plant, touching the water or sediments of Bos Creek, or touching contaminated soil at the Wausau Chemical property. These sources of contamination are not expected to cause health effects.

  5. Sentinel Health Events (Occupational): analysis of death certificates among residents of Nassau County, NY between 1980-82 for occupationally related causes of death.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, J P; Gerber, L M

    1990-01-01

    Death certificates for residents of Nassau County, New York dying between 1980 and 1982 were examined for causes of death defined as Sentinel Health Events (Occupational) (SHE(O]. Of 16,193 deaths from all causes, 2,286 (14.1 percent) were identified as SHE(O) deaths; 142 (6.2 percent) of these were matched for occupational and/or industry, 13 (9.2 percent) of which required no further match [corrected] because the cause of death was inherently related to the occupation or industry. Malignant neoplasms of the trachea, bronchus, or lung were the most frequently occurring SHE(O), accounting for 60 percent of all SHE(O) deaths and 81 percent of matched SHE(O) deaths. The construction industry was associated with the vast majority of such deaths. PMID:2297057

  6. Indivisible. Good Schools=Health Economy. Poor Academic Achievement=Increased Unemployment. A Longitudinal Pilot Study on the Relationship between Job Growth and School Performance in 15 of Illinois' Largest Counties. A Report to Cook County Assessor Thomas Hynes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Charles L.; Sufritz, Erica

    This longitudinal study indicates that educational reform and economic performance are indivisible. The first part of the study examines job growth or decline by type of job between 1972 and 1985 by county and ranks the counties based on their performance during the 13-year period. The second part of the study examines the relationship between the…

  7. Understanding land use, livelihoods, and health transitions among Tibetan nomads: a case from Gangga Township, Dingri County, Tibetan Autonomous Region of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianchu; Yang, Yong; Li, Zhuoqing; Tashi, Nyima; Sharma, Rita; Fang, Jing

    2008-06-01

    Tibetan nomads in the Tibetan Autonomous Region of China have experienced profound transitions in recent decades with important implications for land use, livelihoods, and health development. The change from being traditional nomads to agropastoralists engaged in permanent agriculture, a sedentary village life (known as "sedentarization"), has been associated with a remarkable change in diet and lifestyle, decline in spatial mobility, increase in food production, and emerging infectious and noncommunicable diseases. The overarching response of the government has been to emphasize infrastructure and technological solutions. The local adaptation strategies of Tibetan nomads through maintaining balanced mobile herding, reindeer husbandry, as well as off-farm labor and trade could address both the cause of environmental degradation and improve the well-being of local people. Drawing on transdisciplinary, preliminary field work in Gangga Township of Dingri County in the foothills of Mt. Everest, we identify pertinent linkages between land use and health, and spatial and temporal mismatch of livelihoods and health care services, in the transition to sedentary village life. We suggest emerging imperatives in Ecohealth to help restore Tibetan livelihoods in transition to a sedentary lifestyle.

  8. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, Escambia Brunswick Wood (a/k/a Brunswick Wood Preserving), Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, Region 4. CERCLIS Number GAD981024466; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-09

    Brunswick Wood Preserving (BWP) is in Brunswick, Glynn County, in eastern Georgia. Both owners of the site manufactured wooden poles and pilings, which were treated with creosote and solutions of pentachlorophenate. This activity, as well as improper storage and disposal practices, lead to the contamination of several environmental media with chromated copper arsenate (CCA), pentachlorophenol (PCP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH`s), and dioxin. The site is categorized as an indeterminant public health hazard based upon data reviewed and observations made by ATSDR. This conclusion category was selected because the extent and magnitude of groundwater contamination and the extent of contamination in Burnett Creek have not been fully characterized. Data reviewed for this public health assessment does not indicate that exposure to chemicals at levels of concern is occurring.

  9. Health assessment for Chemform, Inc. Site, Pompano Beach, Broward County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD080174402. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-27

    In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List (NPL). Health Assessments are also prepared for non-NPL sites in response to requests from States and individuals. In this report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available to ATSDR that is relevant to a determination of potential risks to public health.

  10. Crises and Resilience at the Frontline—Public Health Facility Managers under Devolution in a Sub-County on the Kenyan Coast

    PubMed Central

    Nyikuri, Mary; Tsofa, Benjamin; Barasa, Edwine; Okoth, Philip; Molyneux, Sassy

    2015-01-01

    Background Public primary health care (PHC) facilities are for many individuals the first point of contact with the formal health care system. These facilities are managed by professional nurses or clinical officers who are recognised to play a key role in implementing health sector reforms and facilitating initiatives aimed at strengthening community involvement. Little in-depth research exists about the dimensions and challenges of these managers’ jobs, or on the impact of decentralisation on their roles and responsibilities. In this paper, we describe the roles and responsibilities of PHC managers–or ‘in-charges’ in Kenya, and their challenges and coping strategies, under accelerated devolution. Methods The data presented in this paper is part of a wider set of activities aimed at understanding governance changes under devolution in Kenya, under the umbrella of a ‘learning site’. A learning site is a long term process of collaboration between health managers and researchers deciding together on key health system questions and interventions. Data were collected through seven formal in depth interviews and observations at four PHC facilities as well as eight in depth interviews and informal interactions with sub-county managers from June 2013 to July 2014. Drawing on the Aragon framework of organisation capacity we discuss the multiple accountabilities, daily routines, challenges and coping strategies among PHC facility managers. Results PHC in-charges perform complex and diverse roles in a difficult environment with relatively little formal preparation. Their key concerns are lack of job clarity and preparedness, the difficulty of balancing multidirectional accountability responsibilities amidst significant resource shortages, and remuneration anxieties. We show that day-to-day management in an environment of resource constraints and uncertainty requires PHC in-charges who are resilient, reflective, and continuously able to learn and adapt. We

  11. Assessment of Malaria Reporting and Epidemic Preparedness Systems in Health Facilities in Eldoret West District, Uasin Gishu County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kirinyet, Ruth C.; Juma, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The most important factor in reducing the impact of an epidemic is a timely response with implementation of effective control measures at the point of detection. This study sought to assess the malaria reporting and epidemic preparedness systems of health facilities in Eldoret West District, Kenya. A cross-sectional study design was adapted. A census technique was used to select all the forty five health facilities in the district comprising of government, mission and non-governmental facilities. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used for data collection and analysis done using Stata. Categorical variables were summarized as frequencies and corresponding percentages. The overall reporting rate was 91.7% for all the health facilities. Only 15 health facilities (33%) plotted malaria trend lines for number of cases of malaria. Malaria epidemics were reported within 24 hours in 22 health facilities but they lacked the appropriate supplies to respond to confirmed cases or epidemics. The overall malaria reporting completeness rate was above 90% implying that the malaria surveillance system was generally good. Concerted efforts by concerned stakeholders should ensure improvement of malaria epidemic preparedness system in all health facilities and provision of information to health personnel on malaria outbreak response strategies. PMID:28299154

  12. Health assessment for Mid-America Tanning Company, Sergeant Bluff, Woodbury County, Iowa, Region 7. CERCLIS No. IAD085824688. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-08

    The Mid-America Tanning Company (MAT) Site is proposed to be listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priorities List (NPL). Mid-America Tanning, now U.S. Tanning, is an animal hide processing plant located on 98.7 acres approximately five miles south of Sergeant Bluff, Woodbury County, Iowa. From June 1978 to the present, use of chromium has been extended to the entire process, which involves the treatment of approximately 1000 hides per day. The process utilizes trivalent chromium and produces waste sludge and liquids that are treated on-site at the company wastewater treatment facility. Based on the available information, this site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the likelihood of exposure to hazardous substances via groundwater, surface water and soil. Further environmental characterization and sampling of the site and impacted off-site areas during the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) should be conducted to address the environmental and human exposure pathways discussed above and to further define the extent of contamination at the site.

  13. Health assessment for Anniston Army Depot, Bynum, Calhoun County, Alabama, Region 4. CERCLIS No. AL3210020027. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-29

    The Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) facility, which occupies 15,200 acres in northeast Alabama, was originally an ammunition storage depot. Contaminants of concern include trichloroethylene (TCE), cis- and trans-dichloroethylene, methylene chloride, metals, and phenol in groundwater. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

  14. Public health assessment for Willow Run Sludge Lagoon, Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID981089246

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-26

    The Willow Run Sludge Lagoon site was proposed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in January 1987, but a 1990 reevaluation of the site indicated that it did not qualify for the NPL. On September 30, 1988, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepared a Preliminary Health Assessment for the Fort Motor (Willow Run) Sludge Lagoon Site. ATSDR concluded that the site was of potential public health concern because of the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface soil, surface water, air and biota, with exposure potentially occurring through ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact. In October 1993, the Michigan Department of Public Health (MDPH)2 prepared a consulation on the potential health hazards from the contamination in and near the creek. The consultation concluded that the contaminant levels in the sediments in the creek and the WRSL pose a public health threat through direct contact, that the individuals who may have been exposed to these sediments cannot be identified, and that there is insufficient data available to evaluate health threats through consumption of fish or contact with other surface materials on the site.

  15. Newcomers health in Brantford and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk: perspectives of newcomers and service providers.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Bharati

    2013-10-01

    The Canadian government's plan to support a balanced distribution of immigrants throughout the nation has contributed to newcomers' dispersion to small town communities and rural areas. However, very little work has examined the health experiences of immigrants settling in smaller urban and rural regions. Even less literature exists on the perspectives of service providers working with newcomers in Canada's urban-rural communities. This paper focuses on a part of a larger Community-based study on 'Newcomer Settlement and Integration in Education, Training, Employment, Health and Social Support' in Brantford--a middle-sized urban/rural region in Ontario, Canada--and discusses the findings in the health domain. Data were generated from 212 service providers and 237 newcomers using both qualitative and quantitative research tools. Newcomers identified several barriers in accessing mental and/or physical health services including lack of culturally appropriate services and discrimination. The striking differences between newcomers' and service providers' responses to the survey questionnaires bring to light cultural variations between the newcomers' and the service providers' perceptions of 'health'. The findings reinforce the need for including newcomers in developing more inclusive and culturally-appropriate health services and programs.

  16. Patterns of internet use and mental health of high school students in Istria County, Croatia: cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bezinović, Petar; Roviš, Darko; Rončević, Nena; Bilajac, Lovorka

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine associations between different forms of internet use and a number of psychological variables related to mental health in adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out on a representative sample of students (N = 1539) from all high schools in the region of Istria in Croatia (14-19 years). The associations between four factors of internet use and nine mental health indicators were analyzed using canonical correlation analysis. Results The four canonical functions suggested a significant association between different types of internet use and specific indicators of mental health (P < 0.001). Problematic internet use, more typical among boys, was associated with general aggressive behavior and substance abuse (P < 0.001). Experiences of harassment, more typical among girls, were associated with health complaints, symptoms of depression, loneliness, and fear of negative evaluation (P < 0.001). Using the internet for communication and entertainment was associated with better relationships with peers (P < 0.001), while use of the internet for academic purposes was associated with conscientiousness (P < 0.001). Conclusion The results suggest that different patterns of internet use are significantly associated with specific sets of positive and negative mental health indicators. The data support the assumption that internet use can have both positive and adverse effects on the mental health of youth. PMID:26088855

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-065-2206, Somerset County Assistance Office Building, Somerset, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Piacitelli, C.

    1992-04-01

    In response to a request from the superintendent of the office, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Somerset County Assistance Office Building (SIC-8399), Somerset, Pennsylvania. Employees had complained of eye and skin irritation and fatigue, particularly during afternoon hours. Temperature and humidity measurements were generally in accordance with recommendations. Mold growth was not found. Levels of airborne contaminants were very low and not expected to cause the symptoms which the workers had reported. The carbon-dioxide (124389) level was such that it would be expected to cause complaints of air quality. When the investigation was conducted, the ventilation system was only partially operative. However, even when the system was in full operation, the measurements indicated that the supply of outdoor air to the building was well below recommended rates for office complexes. The author concludes that the complaints may have been due to substandard ventilation and exposure to cigarette smoke. The author recommends that more outside air be provided to the building and smoking be restricted to certain specified areas of the building.

  18. Public health assessment for Raymark Industries, Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, Region 1. Cerclis No. CTD001186618. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-25

    Raymark Industries, Inc. operated in Stratford, Connecticut from 1919-1989. The Raymark facility site posed a public health hazard to workers because of likely exposures to soil containing many compounds including volatile organic compounds, lead, asbestos and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Workers may also have been exposed to airborne asbestos. Workers were also likely exposed to a variety of compounds during manufacturing operations that likely required the handling of these materials and chemicals. The site poses a health threat to people who trespass at the site. In addition, a health threat could exist at the site for workers or on-site personnel if current or future activities disturb contamination and precautions are not taken to prevent exposures for occurring.

  19. Public health assessment for Popile, Incorporated, El Dorado, Union County, Arkansas, Region 6. Cerclis No. ARD008052508. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-14

    The Popile, Inc. site is located on South West Avenue about 3/4 mile south of El Dorado, Arkansas. Previous studies and environmental sampling indicate that chemicals such as creosote and pentachlorophenol that were used in wood treatment operations on the site, and waste materials, such as sludges and wastewater from the site operations, have contaminated site soils and groundwater with a number of contaminants, including VOCs, PAHs, phenols (primarily pentachlorophenol), furans/dioxins, and metals. The Popile, Inc. site poses an indeterminate public health hazard because available information is insufficient to determine whether past exposures to site contaminants may have occurred at levels that could have resulted in adverse health conditions. Based on the present level of contaminants in on-site groundwater, the site could pose a public health hazard in the future if the site is developed for residential and/or commercial/industrial activities and on-site wells are used for drinking water purposes.

  20. Public health assessment for Onondaga Lake, Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, Region 2. Cerclis No. NYD986913580. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-24

    The Onondaga Lake site is described as Onondaga lake and any source that may be contributing to its contamination (e.g., hazardous waste sites discharging contaminants directly or indirectly via surface or groundwater into Ononaga Lake). The site is contaminated with many chemicals, including mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), petroleum hydrocarbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Based on the information reviewed, the Onondaga Lake site is a public health hazard. Fish from the site are contaminated with mercury and PCBs at levels which have a high risk of adverse health effects. The presence of fecal bacteria is an indicator of potential contamination by other microorganisms that can produce disease. Fecal bacteria contamination of the lake poses a potential health hazard to recreational users, particularly swimmers.

  1. Public health assessment for New Bedford Site, New Bedford, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Region 1. Cerclis No. MAD980731335. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-21

    New Bedford Harbor drains the Acushnet River into Buzzards Bay in southeastern Massachusetts. Extensive polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and heavy metal contamination have been detected in the estuary that drains the river, a portion of which is exposed as a mudflat at low tide. This contamination has also been detected in sediment sampled from the remainder of the harbor. Based on the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is of public health hazard because of the risk to human health resulting from ongoing exposure to PCBs via ingestion of contaminated fish within harbor waters and dermal contact with PCB-contaminated sediments.

  2. Public health assessment for Old Southington Landfill, Southington, Hartford County, Connecticut, Region 1. Cerclis No. CTD980670806. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-09

    The Old Southington Landfill (OSL) is located in Southington, Connecticut. Various contaminants of concern, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals, and pesticides have been found in ground water and soil. Based on the physical hazards associated with the methane contamination of indoor air in commercial facilities, the site is a public health hazard.

  3. Health assessment for Precision Plating, Vernon, Tolland County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD051316313. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-18

    Precision Plating is located in the Hillside Industrial Park, in Vernon, Connecticut. Its operations consist of the chrome plating of metal parts and fixtures. In the winter of 1979, a snowplowing accident ruptured a tank and three drums containing chromium wastes. Wells at the Hillside Industrial Park and the adjacent High Manor Mobile Home Park were subsequently contaminated with chromium (for the purposes of the document the word contamination means any chromium levels above background). Based on the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is an indeterminate public health hazard. Recommendations are made to assure that exposures of employees at the industrial park are limited from non-potable water sources. In addition, follow-up monitoring and sampling are recommended to identify the flow and migration of chromium contamination and identify any potentially affected populations. Appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities has also been evaluated. It is recommended that an environmental health education program to advise the public health professional and the local medical community of the nature and possible consequences of exposure to chromium at the Precision Plating site be performed.

  4. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, Shaffer Equipment Company, Minden, Fayette County, West Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. WVD981038300. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Shaffer Equipment Company (SEC) site, located in Fayette County, Minden, West Virginia constructed electrical substations for area coal mines from the period 1970 to 1984. The site is approximately one acre and has one building (SEC Equipment Building) that served as both a warehouse and office. Electrical equipment such as transformers, switches, circuit breakers, and capacitors were stored on the site. Dielectric oils that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were found in on- and off-site soils and sediments. Because PCBs are on site and PCB-contaminated oils reportedly were burned as starter fuel in the warehouse/office building, on- and off-site soil samples and on-site sediment samples were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-furans (PCDFs). One present potential pathway of exposure that has been identified as past, present, and future concerns involve trespassers onto the SEC site, children playing in yards and Arbuckle Creek, on-site workers in the SEC Equipment Building, and persons that eat snapping turtles from the area.

  5. Public health assessment for Penta Wood Products Incorporated, Siren, Burnett County, Wisconsin, Region 5. Cerclis No. WID006176945. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-02

    Penta Wood Products Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) site is a part of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Public Health Assesment Enhancement Initiative. This document indicates what actions the DOH and ATSDR have taken to address the elements required by Section 104(I)(6)(A) of the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended (42 U.S.C. 9604(I)(6)(A)). Those elements are: (1) Nature and extent of contamination; (2) Potential pathways of human exposure; (3) Demographics (size and susceptibility of nearby populations); (4) Health hazards of the site; and (5) Comparison of morbidity and mortality data. In addition, this document indicates how the DOH and ATSDR provided earlier, specifically targeted evaluations. DOH`s future plans at this site are also presented in this document.

  6. Health assessment for American Lake Gardens, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980833065. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The American Lake Gardens site is on the National Priorities List. Two areas within the site are the areas of primary contamination; the northeast section's contamination is believed to have come from the closed landfill (now a golf course) on McChord AFB, and the southwest section's contamination from Fort Lewis. Both Fort Lewis and McChord AFB are NPL sites. The environmental contamination on-site consists of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (530 ppb), trichloroethylene (260 ppb), methylene chloride (38 ppb), tetrachloroethylene (52 ppb), benzene (6 ppb), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (18 ppb) in ground water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water (from private wells still in use) and surface water.

  7. Using agency-wide dashboards for data monitoring and data mining: the Solano County Health and Social Services Department.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The Director needed accessible data on critical program areas in order to monitor changes presenting potential negative impacts. The Research, Evaluation and Planning division spearheaded the Dashboard featuring the seven program areas (Employment & Eligibility, Child Welfare Services, Mental Health, Public Health, Older Disabled Adult Services, Substance Abuse, and the Special Investigations Bureau), and three administrative units. Deputy Directors specified several key areas that their divisions were mandated to report or viewed as important for monitoring. The Dashboard enables Directors to communicate internally and externally about program results, strengths and growth areas, as well as track progress in relationship to strategic plan initiatives and intervene in areas needing improvement. Executive team members identify critical areas for improvement and the Assistant Director for Research and Evaluation implements corrective action through the Quality Assurance Committee. Agency lessons relate to the importance of automation, data interpretation, and team members' understanding of the indicators, related practice strategies, and contextual factors.

  8. Public health assessment for Ossineke groundwater contamination, Ossineke, Alpena County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID980794440. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-07

    The Ossineke Ground-water Contamination site is listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Priorites List (NPL). A plume of contamination including benzene, toluene, xylenes, and other gasoline components has been found in the groundwater, and is attributed to spills from a gas station and possibly to leaking underground tanks. A nearby laundromat, which has reported spills and leaks of tetrachloroethylene, could also be a source of groundwater, surface water, and soil contamination. The contamination in the groundwater did pose a public health hazard in the past and could potentially in the future if the groundwater was used for portable purposes. All wells that are known to have used the contaminated aquifer in or near the contaminant plume have been replaced. Presently, the site poses no apparent public health hazard under current conditions.

  9. Public health assessment for Florida Petroleum Reprocessors, Davie, Broward County, Florida, Region 4: CERCLIS number FLD984184127. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-13

    The Florida Petroleum Reprocessors (FPR) Site in Davie, Florida was listed on National Priorities List on March 27, 1998. Between 1978--1992, it was a waste oil transfer station. The groundwater, soil and sediments are contaminated with volatile organic chemicals, metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Currently, this site poses an indeterminate public health hazard because of contaminated groundwater. In the past, the site posed a public health hazard because private wells in the northern part of the site were contaminated. As a result, these residents are at an increased risk of cancer and non-cancer illnesses from household use of 1,1-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride contaminated groundwater. It is unknown if there are private wells south of FPR property; however, the contamination is moving south, people could be exposed in the future.

  10. Health assessment for Revere Textile Prints Corporation, Sterling, Windam County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD004532610. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Revere Textile Prints Corporation (RTP) Site is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List. Over 1,500 drums leaked contaminants such as dyes, paints, solvents, and metals on the ground. Preliminary on-site sampling results have identified toluene, 1,1,2 trichloroethylene, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, ethane, and methanol (1,500 ppb) in groundwater. On-site surface water sampling results have detected 1,1,2 trichloroethylene and magnesium. Monitoring well water results identified calcium, magnesium, manganese, and antimony. On-site sampling results have identified ethyl benzene, xylene, and barium. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances. Exposure is possible through ingestion and direct contact with contaminated groundwater, surface water, and soil.

  11. Health assessment for Keystone Sanitation Landfill, Union Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD054142781. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-11

    The Keystone Sanitation Landfill site is a former farm which began receiving municipal waste and industrial construction debris in September 1966. The still active site is situated on a ridge, and runoff leaves the site from all directions. The environmental contamination on-site consists of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, benzene, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, chromium, lead, and N-nitrosodiphenylamine in groundwater. The environmental contamination off-site consists of tetrachloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene in surface water; and lead, vinyl chloride, and 1,2-dichloroethylene in private wells. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via groundwater, soil, and surface water.

  12. Health assessment for Carrol and Dubies, Port Jervis, Orange County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD010968014. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-31

    The Carrol and Dubies site is located in the Neversink River Valley, one mile northeast of the City of Port Jervis, New York. The site was listed in Update 7 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL). The site consists of five inactive lagoons which were used for disposal of septic tank wastes. Two of the lagoons received industrial wastes between 1971 and 1979. Two additional lagoons received septic tank wastes after 1979 until early 1989. Based on information reviewed, the site is judged to be an indeterminate public health hazard because the limited data do not indicate that humans are being exposed or have been exposed to levels of contamination that would be expected to cause adverse health effects. However, data or information are not available for all environmental media to which humans may be exposed. Human exposure to volatile organic compounds and metals may be occurring via direct consumption of contaminated groundwater. Limited data are available about the extent of groundwater contamination and about contamination in the sediments of the former lagoons. This site is not being considered for follow-up health activities at this time.

  13. Health assessment for Neal's Dump, Spencer, Owen County, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND980794549. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-18

    Neal's Dump (the site) is located four miles south of Spencer, Indiana, on Pottersville Road. The site is 1/2 acre in size and 20 feet deep. Neal's Dump served as a waste disposal site from approximately 1958 to the early seventies. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Bloomington, Indiana, disposed of an unknown amount of capacitors, rage, and sawdust contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The contaminated soil on-site has been found to contain very high levels of PCBs. In November 1980, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collected soil samples at Neal's Dump. Results indicated a high concentration of PCBs. Several other organic contaminants have been found on-site. There are several environmental pathways of concern. The migration of PCBs off-site via contaminated groundwater potentially contaminate private residential wells. Also of concern is potential surface water contamination. Additional pathways include contamination of fish and other wildlife from surface water run-off or direct contact with contaminated sediments and soils and wind-driven contaminated soil. This site is of public health concern because a risk to human health exists from exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects.

  14. Health assessment for Pester Refinery, El Dorado, Butler County, Kansas, Region 7. CERCLIS No. KSD000829846. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-16

    The Pester Refinery site has been proposed for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The site, located in the vicinity of an active oil refinery, is known as a burn pond; it had been used as a retention basin for storm water and for disposal of separator sludge from the adjacent refinery. The site is in a mainly rural area, although the town of El Dorado is within a 3-mile radius. Demographic data are not available. Past disposal practices have resulted in contamination of on- and off-site groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, and sludge. Based on information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that this site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects. As noted in the Human Exposure Pathways Section, human exposure to heavy metals may be occurring and may have occurred in the past via ingestion of and dermal contact with contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, and sludge. Recommendations are made concerning additional monitoring, determination of groundwater and surface water use in the area, surface water protection, and worker protection during hazardous waste activities.

  15. Does the ``National Free Health Care'' have financial sustainability in China? A case of Shenmu County, Shaanxi Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    The most populous country in the world, China needs more health care. Shenmu's practices show that National Free Health Care (NFHC) system has played an active role in fulfilling the citizen's needs of health care, and alleviating the difficulties in affording the medical costs and seeing doctors. But NFHC system needs substantial financial supporting. It is worth in-depth discussing and reflecting on whether the NFHC system suits China's national conditions. The paper establishes the population age structure forecasting model and NFHC financial burden model by decomposition methodology and actuarial modelling. And it finds than the financial burden of NFHC system in Shenmu will be increased from 256.64 million Yuan to 656.04 million Yuan in 2013-2020, with the growth rate 12.45%. Meanwhile, the percentage of the financial burden in government's annual revenue is less than 2% in 2013-2020, NFHC system has financial sustainability in Shenmu. According to the successful experience abroad and the calculated results in Shenmu, to extend the NFHC system to the whole of China has financial sustainability and realistic possibility.

  16. Health assessment for Goose Farm National Priorities List (NPL) site, Plumsted Township, Ocean County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD980530109. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Goose Farm National Priorities List Site is located in Plumsted Township, Ocean County, New Jersey. Both solid and liquid wastes in bulk, 55-gallon drums, 5-gallon pails, and lab packs were disposed at the site in a 15-foot deep pit from the mid-1940s to the mid-1970s. On-site and off-site media are contaminated with a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid/base neutral compounds, and semi-volatile compounds. Environmental media that have been contaminated are surface water, ground water, and subsurface soils. On-site soil, contaminated with PCBs above 5 parts per million, is currently being excavated and disposed in an approved off-site facility. The selected remedial alternative should reduce the potential for further off-site migration of contaminants. Over time, the remediation should mitigate the contamination at the Goose Farm Site, thus protecting the health of the human population in the area.

  17. A Pilot Study of Changes in Environmental Knowledge and Behaviors among Head Start Employees and Parents Following Environmental Health Training in Webb County, TX.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Amber B; Rincon, Rudy; Perales, Roger; Hollingsworth, Ryan; Miller, Claudia; McDonald, Thomas J; Cizmas, Leslie

    2016-02-01

    Head Start centers in Webb County, Texas primarily serve low-income Hispanic families disproportionately affected by environmental exposures. A total of 560 parents and employees attended environmental trainings. Pre- and post-assessments measured whether the trainings were effective at improving related knowledge and behaviors. A total of 152 parents and 94 employees signed consent forms. Only the 64 parents and 50 employees who completed all questionnaires were included in the data analysis. Paired t tests and McNemar tests found significant improvements in knowledge and behaviors related to multiple environmental topics (p < 0.05). Mean scores out of eleven for knowledge before and immediately after were 9.69 (95 % CI 9.44, 9.94) and 10.58 (95 % CI 10.42, 10.74), respectively. Mean scores out of ten for behavior before and 1 month after training were 8.00 (95 % CI 7.71, 8.29) and 9.29 (95 % CI 9.10, 9.48), respectively. This pilot study found improved knowledge and behaviors following environmental health training.

  18. Lack of Measles Transmission to Susceptible Contacts from a Health Care Worker with Probable Secondary Vaccine Failure - Maricopa County, Arizona, 2015.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jefferson; Klein, Ron; Popescu, Saskia; Rose, Karen; Kretschmer, Melissa; Carrigan, Alice; Trembath, Felicia; Koski, Lia; Zabel, Karen; Ostdiek, Scott; Rowell-Kinnard, Paula; Munoz, Esther; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Sylvester, Tammy

    2015-08-07

    On January 23, 2015, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) was notified of a suspected measles case in a nurse, a woman aged 48 years. On January 11, the nurse had contact with a patient with laboratory-confirmed measles associated with the Disneyland theme park-related outbreak in California. On January 21, she developed a fever (103°F [39.4°C]), on January 23 she experienced cough and coryza, and on January 24, she developed a rash. The patient was instructed to isolate herself at home. On January 26, serum, a nasopharyngeal swab, and a urine specimen were collected. The following day, measles infection was diagnosed by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing of the nasopharyngeal swab and urine specimen and by detection of measles-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of her symptoms and laboratory results, the patient was considered to be infectious.

  19. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, Union Carbide (Byers Warehouse), St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri, Region 7. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-04

    In response to a petition from a St. Joseph, Missouri resident, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted a public health assessment of the Union Carbide (Byers Warehouse) site in St. Joseph, Missouri. The basement of Byers Warehouse was used by Vulcan Chemicals to store ethylene dibromide (EDB), chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride (CCI4). The first and second floors were used by Union Carbide to store 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyproprionic acid (2,4,5-TP). The Byers Warehouse (Union Carbide) Petition site is not a current public health hazard. That conclusion is based on the complete removal of the toxic substances stored in the warehouse, and the lack of any current or future completed exposure pathways. Past storage of herbicides and other chemical products represented a public health hazard.

  20. Public health assessment for Tutu Wellfield, St. Thomas, St. Thomas County, Virgin Islands. Cerclis No. VID982272569. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-14

    The Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site is in east-central St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Island. Twenty-two wells in the Turpentine Run Basin contain at minimum a trace of volatile organic contaminants. Volatile and chlorinated hydrocarbons including benzene; toluene; 1,2-trans-dichloroethene (DCE); trichloroethene (TCE); and tetrachloroethene (PCE) were detected in several of the wells. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, poses a public health hazard for past, present, and possible future ingestion of contaminated groundwater.

  1. Public health assessment for revere Textile Prints Corporation, Sterling, Windham County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD004532610. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-15

    The Revere Textiles Prints Corp. is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated Superfund site in the town of Sterling, Connecticut. The site represents no apparent public health hazard for chemical contamination. Some contamination of groundwater, soils, surface water and sediments have been detected however no completed exposure pathways have been identified and contaminant concentrations are low. Metals including antimoy, arsenic, copper, lead and vanadium have been detected in groundwater monitoring wells on site. Follow up sampling of monitoring wells using a method to reduce sampling generated particles in the water resulted in lower concentrations of all these metals.

  2. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  3. Factors influencing knowledge on completion of treatment among TB patients under directly observed treatment strategy, in selected health facilities in Embu County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ndwiga, Joshua Muriuki; Kikuvi, Gideon; Omolo, Jared Odhiambo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) promotes the Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) strategy as the standard to increase adherence to Tuberculosis (TB) medication. However, cases of retreatment and Multi Drug Resistant continue to be reported in many parts of Kenya. This study sought to determine the factors influencing the completion of tuberculosis medication among TB patients in Embu County, Kenya. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on a population of tuberculosis patients under DOT attending selected TB treatment clinics in Embu County, in Kenya. One hundred and forty TB patients interviewed within a period of 3 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 and included Bivariate and Multivariate Analysis. The level of significance was p≤ 0.05. Results The male and female participants were 61.4% and 38.6% respectively. The mean age of the respondents was 35±31.34-39.3 years. For the majority (52%) of the participants, the highest level of education was primary education. The unemployed participants formed the highest number of the respondent in the study (73%). The majorities (91.4%0) of the respondents were under the home-based DOT strategy (91.4%, 95% C.I: 85.5-95.5). Bivariate analysis using Chi-square showed that the level of education (p=0.003), patients feeling uncomfortable during supervision (p=0.01), and knowledge regarding the frequency of taking medication (p=0.004) were all significantly associated with knowledge regarding the importance of completion of medication. However, none of these factors was significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusion Most participants did not know the importance of completion of medication. TB programs should come up with better ways to educate TB patients on the importance of supervision and treatment completion during the treatment of TB. The education programs should focus on influencing the attitudes of patients and creating awareness about the importance of treatment

  4. Assessment of School-Based Quasi-Experimental Nutrition and Food Safety Health Education for Primary School Students in Two Poverty-Stricken Counties of West China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minxue; Hu, Ming; Sun, Zhenqiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies on nutrition and food safety education intervention for students in remote areas of China were reported. The study aimed to assess the questionnaire used to measure the knowledge, attitude and behavior with respect to nutrition and food safety, and to evaluate the effectiveness of a quasi-experimental nutrition and food safety education intervention among primary school students in poverty-stricken counties of west China. Methods Twelve primary schools in west China were randomly selected from Zhen’an of Shaanxi province and Huize of Yunnan province. Six geographically dispersed schools were assigned to the intervention group in a nonrandom way. Knowledge, attitude and behavior questionnaire was developed, assessed, and used for outcome measurement. Students were investigated at baseline and the end of the study respectively without follow-up. Students in intervention group received targeted nutrition and food safety lectures 0.5 hour per week for two semesters. Item response theory was applied for assessment of questionnaire, and a two-level difference-in-differences model was applied to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. Results The Cronbach’s alpha of the original questionnaire was 0.84. According to item response model, 22 knowledge items, 6 attitude items and 8 behavior items showed adequate discrimination parameter and were retained. 378 and 478 valid questionnaires were collected at baseline and the end point. Differences of demographic characteristics were statistically insignificant between the two groups. Two-level difference-in-differences models showed that health education improved 2.92 (95% CI: 2.06–3.78) and 2.92 (95% CI: 1.37–4.47) in knowledge and behavior scores respectively, but had no effect on attitude. Conclusion The questionnaire met the psychometric standards and showed good internal consistence and discrimination power. The nutrition and food safety education was effective in improving the knowledge

  5. Public health assessment for Dover Chemical Corporation, Dover, Tuscarawas County, Ohio, Region 5. Cerclis No. OHD004210563. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-09

    The Dover Chemical Company site poses a public health hazard because of the possibility of past exposure to dioxin and BHC contaminated soil and dust and because of the potential for exposure to several chemicals in drinking water supplies. The available data do not indicate that people are currently being exposed to contaminated soil, dust, or water at levels that would adversely effect their health. People could be exposed to chemicals above levels of concern if ongoing remediation (pump and treating groundwater) and monitoring of the well field fails to detect chemicals entering the water supply. There is a potential for people eating fish caught in the lagoon and in Sugar Creek to be exposed to site-related chemicals, but the data are insufficient to determine the risk of exposure. There is also a potential for people to be exposed to dioxin by eating contaminated vegetables grown in gardens near the site. However, there are no environmental monitoring data to determine the risk of exposure.

  6. Health assessment for Liquid Gold-Richmond, Richmond, Contra Costa County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT000646208. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-05

    The Liquid Gold-Richmond site is on the National Priorities List. The site consists of approximately 18 acres of a 29-acre property currently owned by Southern Pacific Transportation, which is located partially on and adjacent to tidal marsh areas and the San Francisco Bay. The environmental contamination (maximum concentrations reported) on-site consists of lead (280 ppm), zinc (510 ppm), and phenols (18 ppm) in surface soil; lead (3,650 ppm), chromium (50 ppm), nickel (97 ppm), and zinc (3,300 ppm) in subsurface soil; and lead (16 ppm), nickel (1.6 ppm), chromium (2.4 ppm), and zinc (24 ppm) in ground water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated ground water. In addition, off-site migration of surface migration of surface water, soil, and sediment could adversely impact the fish and shellfish areas adjacent to the site.

  7. Health assessment for Savanna Army Depot, Savanna, Carroll County, Illinois, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IL0213820376. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Savanna Army Depot Activity (SADA) is on the National Priorities List. The 13,000-acre facility is an Army munitions plant engaged in munitions renovation and loading, and demolition and burning. About 20 areas within the facility have been identified as potential sources of hazardous waste. The environmental contamination on-site (maximum concentrations reported) consists of chloroform (20 ppb), trinitrotoluene or TNT (29 percent), trinitrobenzene or TNB (2,770 ppb), 2,6-dinitrotoluene or 2,6-DNT (1,400 ppb), 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (300,000 ppb), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (94,200 ppb) in sediment; TNB (1,400 ppb), TNT (314 ppb), 2,4-DNT (113 ppb), trichloroethylene or TCE (20 ppb), chloroform (20 ppb), and nickel (185 ppb) in ground water; TNT (50 percent), 2,4-DNT (673 ppb), and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine or RDX (12,300 ppb), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs (greater than 59,000,000 ppb) in soil; and RDX (36,900 ppb) and TNT (16,600 ppb) in surface water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water, surface water, soil, sediment, and air.

  8. Health assessment for Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc. , Portsmouth, Portsmouth County, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD990710410. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-02

    The Atlantic Wood Industries, Inc., site is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priorities List (NPL). The 50-acre site is the location of a wood processing plant which used pentachlorophenol and creosote in its process. The environmental contamination on-site consists of naphthalene (46 ppm), phenol (3.1 ppm), phenanthrene (316 ppm), and pentachlorophenol (13 ppm) in groundwater; and pentachlorophenol (15,000 ppm), phenanthrene (56,000 ppm), naphthalene (1,450 ppm), and phenol (5.1 ppm) in soil. The environmental pathways of concern are contaminated surface water, soil, sediment, and air. Off-site groundwater may be contaminated also, which indirectly may impact human populations. The human exposure pathways of concern are ingestion and dermal contact with surface water, soil, and sediment; and inhalation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on the available information, this site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via surface water, soil, sediment, and air.

  9. Public health assessment for Re-Solve, Incorporated, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Region 1: CERCLIS number MAD980520621. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-05-25

    The Re-Solve National Priorities List (NPL) site is a 6-acre area situated in the town of Dartmouth, Massachusetts. During the years 1956-1980 the Re-Solve Company distilled industrial solvents on-site. Waste materials from this process were disposed of by burning solvents in four on-site lagoons and spreading waste oils in various portions of the site. Elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in soils throughout the site in 1981, and it was added to the NPL in December 1982. This site is characterized as a past and present public health hazard primarily due to the likely past and present exposure to PCBs through the consumption of PCB contaminated fish and eels from area water bodies. Based upon results of fish sampling that detected PCBs in area eel, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health issued and updated an advisory in 1986 and 1994 recommending that people not eat the fish and eel caught in these affected waters. The potentially exposed population; therefore, include area fishers who may be consuming contaminated fish or eel.

  10. Public health assessment for American Anodco Incorporated, Ionia, Ionia County, Michigan. Region 5. Cerclis No. MID006029102. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-07

    The American Anodco, Inc. site, a former anodizing facility, is located in the industrial zone area in the eastern part of the City of Ionia, Michigan. The waste water in seepage lagoons at this site was allowed to seep into the ground and the lagoons were filled with clean soils in 1987. There is some evidence that groundwater at the site is contaminated with arsenic, boron, nitrate and nitrite, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and traces of tetrachloroethylene. There may be some potential health risk to the public if groundwater at this site is used for drinking and other household purposes in the future. Monitoring well OW-6 should be sampled again to confirm the concentration of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, if any, present in water from the well.

  11. Health assessment for Nutmeg Valley Road, Wolcott, New Haven County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980669261. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-30

    The Nutmeg Valley Road National Priorities List (NPL) site is an industrialized area located on the border of Waterbury and Wolcott, Connecticut. Surface soils at industrial/commercial properties within the site have been contaminated with heavy metals, volatile organics, and cyanide. Area groundwater has been shown to contain volatile organics and cyanide. Critical to the public health assessment is the individual consideration of 41 businesses and 31 residential properties contained within the site. A public water system has been extended to areas within the site. Potential exposure pathways of concern consist of ingestion of contaminated groundwater, inhalation of vapors and aerosols formed by industrial or domestic uses of contaminated groundwater, dermal absorption of contaminated groundwater by hygienic and recreational uses, ingestion and inhalation of contaminated soil particulates, and dermal absorption from contact with contaminated soils and sludges.

  12. Public health assessment for Munisport landfill, North Miami, Dade County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD084535442. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-28

    The Munisport Landfill site is an inactive landfill in, and owned by, the City of North Miami, Florida. The site is an urban area adjacent to the Oleta River Recreational Area, a state mangrove preserve, and Biscayne Bay. Soil, sediments, surface water, and ground water are contaminated. The authors selected ammonia, benzene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, carbon disulfide, chloromethane, coliform bacteria, dieldrin, lead, methylene chloride, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), styrene, vanadium, and zinc as contaminants of concern. Accidentally ingesting contaminated soil and surface water, and breathing contaminated smoke are completed human exposure pathways. Children who swam in the landfill lakes risked bacterial and viral infections. Based on the available data, the authors categorize the Munisport Landfill site as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  13. National Dam Safety Program. Conewango Creek Watershed Project Site 33 (Inventory Number NY 581), Allegheny River Basin, Chautauqua County, New York, Phase 1 Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-10

    Albany, NY 12233 14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If dlllernt from Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of this report) Department of the Army 26...mechanism mounted I on the top of the riser structure controls the flow through the reservoir drain. The auxiliary spillway is in a cut section and has a... control when the reservoir is between elevation 1483.7 and 1509.1. Reservoir levels between elevation 1509.1 and 1511.6 are discharged through the

  14. National Dam Safety Program. Warner Dam, Chautauqua Lake Outlet (Inventory Number NY 750) Allegheny River Basin, Chautauqua County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-30

    tA37 a rpled t, 72> Sld h e la lv aie IS a c opdaw: fritifes A I). tail1* . cotac it th .416. 9.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Al -lakot ~lb cPcv or~ oota E SIO

  15. Assessment of Characteristics and Remedial Alternatives for Abandoned Mine Drainage: Case Study at Staple Bend Tunnel Unit of Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, Cambria County, Pennsylvania, 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Al2O3 + SiO2). The white surface coating on the slag samples consisted of ettringite, gypsum, and calcite, which are common minerals in portland cement...substantial silicon (SiO2 = 32.79 wt%), aluminum ( Al2O3 = 13.12 wt%), manganese (MnO = 0.68 wt%), and titanium ( TiO2 = 0.44 wt%) (table 4). Minor elements...demonstrated with cubitainer tests, an anoxic limestone drain ( ALD ) was indicated as inappropriate for any AMD source at the test site because all had

  16. Digital analysis of Potomac River Basin ERTS imagery: Sedimentation levels at the Potomac-Anacostia confluence and strip mining in Allegheny County, Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, J. S.; Macleod, N. H.

    1973-01-01

    Two simple algorithms for classification of sedimentation levels in water and for delineation of active strip mines are in use as part of the development of a more general resource management information system. ERTS MSS CCT's are processed so that each pixel in each channel is geographically referenced and can be accessed individually during whole frame, multi-channel analysis or partial frame analysis. The sedimentation analysis clearly separates classes representing the turbid Anacostia water, the less disturbed Potomac (really), and mud flats resulting from effluent of a major sewage treatment plant. Mud flats of organic or mineral origin are easily distinguished.

  17. The Impact of Commercially Treated Oil and Gas Produced Water Discharges on Bromide Concentrations and Modeled Brominated Trihalomethane Disinfection Byproducts at two Downstream Municipal Drinking Water Plants in the Upper Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2010, a dramatic increase in the levels of total trihalomethane (THM) and the relative proportion of brominated species were observed in finished water at several Western Pennsylvania water utilities (PDW) using the Allegheny River as their raw water supply. An increase in br...

  18. Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train entering tunnel. Allegheny tunnel at right; Gallitzin Tunnel (Haer no. PA-516) at left. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Tunnel, Beneath Allegheny Mountain, east of Railroad Street, Gallitzin, Cambria County, PA

  19. Public health assessment for Forest Waste Products, Otisville, Genesee County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID980410740. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-18

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) placed the Forest Waste Disposal site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. Drummed industrial waste was deposited on the site in this period. In three separate actions, sludge and residue waste from a chemical fire, roofing materials contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and cattle feed contaminated with polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) were deposited on the site. Nine small lagoons on the site were also used for disposal of liquid industrial wastes. Investigation, found contamination with volatile organic chemicals and heavy metals in the soils on the site, in the groundwater beneath it, and in the sediment and water in the lagoons. The site poses an indeterminate public health hazard because, although there is no indication of exposure at levels of concern, uncertainty exists involving the large number of buried drums alleged to be on the site. In addition, there is an unknown potential for exposure to various organic chemicals present in the wastes, soil, and groundwater at the site.

  20. Public health assessment for Folkertsma refuse, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID980609366. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-16

    The Folkertsma Refuse site was listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List (NPL) in March, 1989. The site, located in Walker, Michigan, a northwest suburb of Grand Rapids, was used from 1965 to 1972 as an industrial landfill, accepting primarily foundry wastes. In 1984, sediments in ditches on the site were found to be contaminated with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and inorganic chemicals. A Remedial Investigation (RI) conducted by the U.S. EPA at the site confirmed the presence of elevated concentrations of PAHs and inorganic chemicals in the landfilled materials, surface material at the landfill, and sediments on and near the site. The detected concentrations of these chemicals are of possible public health concern should exposure occur through direct contact, incidental ingestion, or inhalation of fugitive dust. The ground water and surface water at the site have been found to be contaminated with metals and PAHs, though there is no evidence that the water is used for any purpose or that the contamination in the water has spread off the site.

  1. The impact of commercially treated oil and gas produced water discharges on bromide concentrations and modeled brominated trihalomethane disinfection byproducts at two downstream municipal drinking water plants in the upper Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Landis, Matthew S; Kamal, Ali S; Kovalcik, Kasey D; Croghan, Carry; Norris, Gary A; Bergdale, Amy

    2016-01-15

    In 2010, a dramatic increase in the levels of total trihalomethane (THM) and the relative proportion of brominated species was observed in finished water at several Pennsylvania water utilities (PDW) using the Allegheny River as their raw water supply. An increase in bromide (Br(-)) concentrations in the Allegheny River was implicated to be the cause of the elevated water disinfection byproducts. This study focused on quantifying the contribution of Br(-) from a commercial wastewater treatment facility (CWTF) that solely treats wastes from oil and gas producers and discharges into the upper reaches of the Allegheny River, and impacts on two downstream PDWs. In 2012, automated daily integrated samples were collected on the Allegheny River at six sites during three seasonal two-week sampling campaigns to characterize Br(-) concentrations and river dispersion characteristics during periods of high and low river discharges. The CWTF discharges resulted in significant increases in Br(-) compared to upstream baseline values in PDW raw drinking water intakes during periods of low river discharge. During high river discharge, the assimilative dilution capacity of the river resulted in lower absolute halide concentrations, but significant elevations Br(-) concentrations were still observed at the nearest downstream PDW intake over baseline river levels. On days with active CWTF effluent discharge the magnitude of bromide impact increased by 39 ppb (53%) and 7 ppb (22%) for low and high river discharge campaigns, respectively. Despite a declining trend in Allegheny River Br(-) (2009-2014), significant impacts from CWTF and coal-fired power plant discharges to Br(-) concentrations during the low river discharge regime at downstream PDW intakes was observed, resulting in small modeled increases in total THM (3%), and estimated positive shifts (41-47%) to more toxic brominated THM analogs. The lack of available coincident measurements of THM, precursors, and physical parameters

  2. Full disclosure of financial costs and options to patients: the roles of race, age, health insurance, and usual source for care.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Arbelaez, Jose J; Dixon, Bruce W

    2004-02-01

    The objective was to identify factors associated with financial discussions and financial disclosure of medical costs within a low-income urban community. The method used was a cross-sectional community-based survey in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The survey was conducted door-to-door and at area food pantries. Two hundred and twenty six adults were interviewed. Overall, 76.1% reported having a usual source for care and 73.0% had health insurance. Thirty nine and four tenths percent reported having been asked about their ability to pay for health services; this was more common among African Americans (OR 5.2; 95% CI 1.73-15.84), those with no health insurance (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.01-17.89), and those less than 45 years old (OR:2.9; 95% CI 1.03-8.28). Only 10.6% reported being told how much a health visit would cost. Overall, 30.1% reported their provider made payment allowances for medical bills, with white respondents 2.5 times more likely and those persons identifying an ambulatory site for care 2.6 times more likely to report this. Overall, 30.5% reported being referred to a collection agency for unpaid medical bills; this was 2.4 times more common among those individuals identifying a non-ambulatory usual site for care. Significant race and socio-economic disparities exist in discussions about and access to financial resources to pay for medical care. Expanding the availability of financial assistance is critical to improving access to health care.

  3. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  4. A Blend of Ethanol and (-)-α-Pinene were Highly Attractive to Native Siricid Woodwasps (Siricidae, Siricinae) Infesting Conifers of the Sierra Nevada and the Allegheny Mountains.

    PubMed

    Erbilgin, Nadir; Stein, Jack D; Acciavatti, Robert E; Gillette, Nancy E; Mori, Sylvia R; Bischel, Kristi; Cale, Jonathan A; Carvalho, Carline R; Wood, David L

    2017-02-01

    Woodwasps in Sirex and related genera are well-represented in North American conifer forests, but the chemical ecology of native woodwasps is limited to a few studies demonstrating their attraction to volatile host tree compounds, primarily monoterpene hydrocarbons and monoterpene alcohols. Thus, we systematically investigated woodwasp-host chemical interactions in California's Sierra Nevada and West Virginia's Allegheny Mountains. We first tested common conifer monoterpene hydrocarbons and found that (-)-α-pinene, (+)-3-carene, and (-)-β-pinene were the three most attractive compounds. Based on these results and those of earlier studies, we further tested three monoterpene hydrocarbons and four monoterpene alcohols along with ethanol in California: monoterpene hydrocarbons caught 72.3% of all woodwasps. Among monoterpene hydrocarbons, (+)-3-carene was the most attractive followed by (-)-β-pinene and (-)-α-pinene. Among alcohols, ethanol was the most attractive, catching 41.4% of woodwasps trapped. Subsequent tests were done with fewer selected compounds, including ethanol, 3-carene, and ethanol plus (-)-α-pinene in both Sierra Nevada and Allegheny Mountains. In both locations, ethanol plus (-)-α-pinene caught more woodwasps than other treatments. We discussed the implications of these results for understanding the chemical ecology of native woodwasps and invasive Sirex noctilio in North America. In California, 749 woodwasps were caught, representing five species: Sirex areolatus Cresson, Sirex behrensii Cresson, Sirex cyaneus Fabricius, Sirex longicauda Middlekauff, and Urocerus californicus Norton. In West Virginia 411 woodwasps were caught representing four species: Sirex edwardsii Brullé, Tremex columba Linnaeus, Sirex nigricornis F., and Urocerus cressoni Norton.

  5. County by County in Ohio Genealogy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khouw, Petta; And Others

    The State Library of Ohio's genealogy collection of over 8,000 items is listed by county. Within each county listing the sources are designated as atlases, cemetery and death records, census records (the majority from the 1800's), family-church-Bible records, marriage records, or county and township histories. Vital records consist of material…

  6. New Mexico: Bernalillo County, Albuquerque (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Bernalillo County Office of Environmental Health (BCEH) will help the South Valley neighborhood reduce health risks attributed to benzene and heavy metal exposures by conducting an environmental assessment of gasoline stations and auto dismantlers,

  7. On the Season, a Report of a Public Health Project Conducted Among Negro Migrant Agricultural Workers in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Robert H.; Northcutt, Travis J., Jr.

    A 5-year project to develop public health services for migrant workers was initiated in Florida in 1956. The project staff consisted of 8 public health personnel: 2 public health nurses, a public health educator, a public health nutritionist, a medical social worker, a part-time sanitarian, a liaison worker, and a secretary. Two practicing…

  8. SOUTH SANTA CLARA COUNTY MIGRANT TREATMENT CLINIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SKILLICORN, STANLEY A.

    IN THE SUMMER OF 1965, A MIGRANT HEALTH CLINIC WAS STARTED IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. THE CLINIC DIFFERS FROM THE PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT'S CLINICS BY OFFERING TREATMENT AND MEDICATION, INSTEAD OF ONLY PREVENTIVE SERVICES. THE ENTIRE STAFF, FROM DOCTORS TO BABY-SITTERS, VOLUNTEERS ITS TIME, AND THE CLINIC IS NOW OPEN…

  9. Public health assessment for Richardson Flat Tailings, Park City, Summit County, Utah, Region 8. Cerclis No. UTD980952840. Addendum. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-03

    The document is an addendum to the preliminary public health assessment prepared for the Richardson Flat Tailings site by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in July 1990 (PB90-260092). ATSDR's Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) has evaluated the data and information developed in the Richardson Flat Tailings Public Health Assessment. The panel determined that, because of the apparent lack of past and present public health hazards and community health concerns, no follow-up health activities are indicated at this time.

  10. Health-related conditions and depression in elderly mexican american and non-Hispanic white residents of a United States-Mexico border county: moderating effects of educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Briones, David F; Heller, Peter L; Carcoba, Luis M; Weisman, Henry W; Ledger, Elizabeth M; Escamilla, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of "high" levels of depressive symptomatology and 13 health-related medical conditions in elderly Mexican American (MA) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) residents of El Paso County, Texas. We analyzed the extent to which depressive symptoms in this population are associated with these conditions. Elderly MA residents possessed a higher prevalence of current depression, a relatively unique health-related condition profile, and were more likely to experience a set of conditions that impede participation in daily life-conditions that we found to be strongly associated with high depressive symptomatology in the elderly. After adjusting for educational attainment, using multiple regression analyses, depression was not associated with ethnicity and only six of the health related conditions showed significant differences between MA and NHW subjects. We believe these results provide an important insight into the mechanism of health-related conditions and depressive symptomatology in a large sample of elderly MAs; and how conditions typically attributed to MA ethnicity may in actuality be an artifact of socioeconomic status variables such as educational-attainment.

  11. Public health assessment for Alcoa (Point Comfort)/Lavaca Bay, Point Comfort, Calhoun County, Texas, Region 6. Cerclis No. TXD008123168. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The ALCOA (Point Comfort)/Lavaco Bay National Priorities List (NPL) site is in Calhoun County, Texas, approximately 1.5 miles south of Point Comfort and four miles northeast of Port Lavaca. Fish sampling data indicate that levels of mercury in fish are elevated. Mercury has been detected throughout the site in surface soil, shallow groundwater, air, bay sediments, fish and crabs. Other contaminants, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and lead, have been detected in shallow groundwater. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been detected in a limited number of sediment, fish, and oyster samples.

  12. Public health assessment for US Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, New London County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980906515. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-26

    The New London Submarine Base was divided by the town boundaries of Groton to the south and Ledyard to the north in New London County, Connecticut. In 1983, the Navy identified 16 potential source areas of environmental contamination during their investigations. The submarine base was listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List in August 1990 because of the potential for on-base groundwater contamination to migrate to off-base residential wells that are close to the New London Submarine Base.

  13. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Center, Inc. for provision of services in Gwinnett County, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  14. Williamsburg County Human Resources Campus (WCHRC): Planning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Eddie D.; And Others

    Investigating the feasibility of a human resources campus designed to locate all Williamsburg County (a rurally disadvantaged South Carolina county) health and social service agencies in one consolidated area, project objectives were to investigate: agency characteristics; ownership, management, and financing aspects of the campus concept;…

  15. Chronic Disease Disparities by County Economic Status and Metropolitan Classification, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Kristina A.; Self-Brown, Shannon; Roblin, Douglas W.; Barker, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Racial/ethnic disparities have been studied extensively. However, the combined influence of geographic location and economic status on specific health outcomes is less well studied. This study’s objective was to examine 1) the disparity in chronic disease prevalence in the United States by county economic status and metropolitan classification and 2) the social gradient by economic status. The association of hypertension, arthritis, and poor health with county economic status was also explored. Methods We used 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. County economic status was categorized by using data on unemployment, poverty, and per capita market income. While controlling for sociodemographics and other covariates, we used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the relationship between economic status and hypertension, arthritis, and self-rated health. Results Prevalence of hypertension, arthritis, and poor health in the poorest counties was 9%, 13%, and 15% higher, respectively, than in the most affluent counties. After we controlled for covariates, poor counties still had a higher prevalence of the studied conditions. Conclusion We found that residents of poor counties had a higher prevalence of poor health outcomes than affluent counties, even after we controlled for known risk factors. Further, the prevalence of poor health outcomes decreased as county economics improved. Findings suggest that poor counties would benefit from targeted public health interventions, better access to health care services, and improved food and built environments. PMID:27584875

  16. Hurricane exposure and county fetal death rates, utilization of a county environmental quality index for confounding control.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of natural disasters on public health are a rising concern, with increasing severity of disaster events. Many disaster studies utilize county-level analysis, however most do not control for county level environmental factors. Hurricane exposure during pregnancy could ...

  17. Public health assessment for T. H. Agriculture and Nutrition (Montgomery), Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, Region 4. Cerclis No. ALD007454085. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-28

    The T.H. Agriculture and Nutrition/Montgomery Plant (THAN) National Priorities List (NPL) site is an industrial facility in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama. Two different properties comprise the THAN site. On-site groundwater, subsurface soils, shallow soils, sediments, and surface water are contaminated. Some contaminants of concern were found in off-site monitoring and domestic water wells. Surface water, shallow soils, and sediment found off-site have been contaminated. The authors found no evidence to suggest that a completed exposure pathway exists for contaminants of concern to reach the Twin Lakes community. Also, the evidence indicates that fish caught in the ponds are not a completed human exposure pathway.

  18. The Adequacy of Health Care Among the Indian and Spanish Populations in Polk, Lincoln, Benton, Linn and Southwestern Portion of Marion Counties. A Public Opinion Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GMA Research Corp., Portland, OR.

    A bilingual and bicultural organization, CISCO (Chicano-Indian Study Center of Oregon) assists students to escape the poverty cycle through vocational training, academic programs, and general guidance counseling. A major CISCO goal is to provide vocational training in the health care industry in conjunction with a program meeting the health needs…

  19. A Nationwide Population-Based Study Identifying Health Disparities Between American Indians/Alaska Natives and the General Populations Living in Select Urban Counties

    PubMed Central

    Castor, Mei L.; Smyser, Michael S.; Taualii, Maile M.; Park, Alice N.; Lawson, Shelley A.; Forquera, Ralph A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Despite their increasing numbers, little is known about the health of American Indians/Alaska Natives living in urban areas. We examined the health status of American Indian/Alaska Native populations served by 34 federally funded urban Indian health organizations. Methods. We analyzed US census data and vital statistics data for the period 1990 to 2000. Results. Disparities were revealed in socioeconomic, maternal and child health, and mortality indicators between American Indians/Alaska Natives and the general populations in urban Indian health organization service areas and nationwide. American Indians/Alaska Natives were approximately twice as likely as these general populations to be poor, to be unemployed, and to not have a college degree. Similar differences were observed in births among mothers who received late or no prenatal care or consumed alcohol and in mortality attributed to sudden infant death syndrome, chronic liver disease, and alcohol consumption. Conclusions. We found health disparities between American Indians/Alaska Natives and the general populations living in selected urban areas and nationwide. Such disparities can be addressed through improvements in health care access, high-quality data collection, and policy initiatives designed to provide sufficient resources and a more unified vision of the health of urban American Indians/Alaska Natives. PMID:16571711

  20. Water resources of Grant and Hot Spring Counties, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halberg, Henry N.; Bryant, Charles T.; Hines, Marion S.

    1968-01-01

    In Grant and Hot Spring Counties the Ouachita, Saline, and Caddo Rivers yield large quantities of soft, good-quality water. Small streams in southeastern Hot Spring County and some of the small streams in the Ouachita Mountains have relatively high base flow; in Grant County small streams yield little water during dry periods. At times, sewage and mine drainage pollute the Ouachiba River from the Garland County line to a point a few miles below Lake Catherine. At low flow, Hurricane Creek water is unfit for most uses. The Sparta Sand, the principal aquifer, yields as much as 8.50 gpm of soft water in Grant County. The Carrizo Sand and Cane River Formation are potentially important aquifers in Grant County and southeastern Hot Spring County. The Wilcox Group yields as much as 300 gpm of fresh water in southeastern Hot Spring County and southwestern Grant County; in the rest of Grant County its water is brackish. The alluvium along .the principal streams and ,the consolidated rocks of the Ouachita Mountains yield small quantities of water that vary in quality from place to place. Some of .the water from the alluvium has high nitrate content and may be a hazard to health.

  1. Streamflow and water-quality monitoring in response to young-of-year smallmouth bass (micropterus dolomieu) mortality in the Susquehanna River and major tributaries, with comparisons to the Delaware and Allegheny Rivers, Pennsylvania, 2008-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, Jeffrey J.; Crawford, J. Kent

    2012-01-01

    For the critical period of each year, dissolved oxygen in the Susquehanna River at station C8 typically was 1.5 to 3.0 mg/L lower than in the Delaware River at station C1 and the Allegheny River at station C10. Median daily maximum water temperatures during the critical period of each year ranged from 1.6 to 2.7°C warmer at station C8 than at stations C1 and C10.

  2. Public health assessment for Ripon City Landfill, Ripon, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, Region 5. Cerclis No. WID980610190. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-30

    The Ripon FF/NN Superfund Site is an abandoned landfill that operated from 1967 to 1983. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have migrated from the landfill to the groundwater near the site. Leachate from the landfill has seeped to the surface and into a depression adjacent to the site. A public health hazard could exist in the future if contaminated groundwater migrated to other private wells and were present at levels of health concern. Future exposures to the leachate seeps on-site pose an indeterminant public health hazard.

  3. 2. HEALTH CENTER OFFICE SOUTH BACK AND EAST SIDE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HEALTH CENTER OFFICE SOUTH BACK AND EAST SIDE, FROM PASSAGE BEHIND COURTHOUSE, CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. - Lancaster County Center, Health Center Office, 4845 Cedar Avenue, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Public health assessment for Rowe Industries Groundwater Contamination, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York, Region 2: CERCLIS Number NYD981486954. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    The public health assessment was developed to address specific concerns that the community surrounding the Rowe Industries Groundwater Contamination National Priorities List (NPL) site has brought to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry`s (ATSDR) attention.

  5. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company (Portland), Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009020603. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-13

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting site is located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ATSDR considers the site to have been a public health hazard for former plant workers because of past ingestion exposure to arsenic, creosote, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans at levels of public health concern. The site also poses an ongoing and future public health hazard because people might encounter hazardous chemicals along the shoreline on or near the site at levels that can damage the skin, as was reported to have happened to two boys. Finally, dioxin levels would pose a public health hazard if people subsist on crayfish and suckers contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  6. Surveillance study of health effects associated with cleanup of a hazardous waste site, Ralph Gray Trucking Company (a/k/a Westminster Tract Number 2633), Westminster, Orange County, California, Region 9: CERCLIS number CAD981995947

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshiko, S.; Underwood, M.C.; Smith, D.; DeLorenze, G.; Neuhaus, J.

    1999-04-01

    Excavation of a Superfund site, the Ralph Gray Truncking Company located in Westminster Orange County, California was anticipated to release sulfur dioxide and other chemicals. The California Department of Health Services, under cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, conducted a surveillance study to assess whether illnesses were associated with cleanup activities. A panel primarily composed of more sensitive persons (n = 36) was selected to report daily respiratory symptoms and odors. Exposures included sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) measurements and daily tonnage of waste removed. Analysis used Conditional Likelihood Regression and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) methods. Levels of SO{sub 2} were generally higher than usual ambient air, at times exceeding levels which can cause health effects among asthmatics in laboratory settings. Wheeze and cough were significantly associated with tonnage of waste removed, especially on days when the highest amounts of waste were removed. Upper respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with SO{sub 2}, and weak relationships were found with nausea and burning nose and SO{sub 2}.

  7. The Fairfax County Family Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Betsy Lindeman

    The Fairfax County Family Literacy Curriculum is designed to be used in a multi-level adult English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) family literacy class. There are four modules to choose from: Introductory (self, family, and community); Government (schools and community); Health (medicine and stress); and Consumerism (shopping and making a…

  8. Preventing community-wide transmission of Cryptosporidium: a proactive public health response to a swimming pool-associated outbreak--Auglaize County, Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Cope, J R; Prosser, A; Nowicki, S; Roberts, M W; Roberts, J M; Scheer, D; Anderson, C; Longsworth, A; Parsons, C; Goldschmidt, D; Johnston, S; Bishop, H; Xiao, L; Hill, V; Beach, M; Hlavsa, M C

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of recreational water-associated outbreaks in the United States has significantly increased, driven, at least in part, by outbreaks both caused by Cryptosporidium and associated with treated recreational water venues. Because of the parasite's extreme chlorine tolerance, transmission can occur even in well-maintained treated recreational water venues (e.g. pools) and a focal cryptosporidiosis outbreak can evolve into a community-wide outbreak associated with multiple recreational water venues and settings (e.g. childcare facilities). In August 2004 in Auglaize County, Ohio, multiple cryptosporidiosis cases were identified and anecdotally linked to pool A. Within 5 days of the first case being reported, pool A was hyperchlorinated to achieve 99·9% Cryptosporidium inactivition. A case-control study was launched to epidemiologically ascertain the outbreak source 11 days later. A total of 150 confirmed and probable cases were identified; the temporal distribution of illness onset was peaked, indicating a point-source exposure. Cryptosporidiosis was significantly associated with swimming in pool A (matched odds ratio 121·7, 95% confidence interval 27·4-∞) but not with another venue or setting. The findings of this investigation suggest that proactive implementation of control measures, when increased Cryptosporidium transmission is detected but before an outbreak source is epidemiologically ascertained, might prevent a focal cryptosporidiosis outbreak from evolving into a community-wide outbreak.

  9. Health assessment for Boise Cascade (BC) National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Fridley, Anoka County, Minnesota, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MND053417515. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    Boise Cascade is a 183-acre National Priorities List Site located in Anoka County, Fridley, Minnesota. The site was used by the Minnesota and Ontario Paper Company, which operated a plant for the treatment of wood with chemical preservatives (reportedly creosote and pentachlorophenol) between approximately 1921-1961. The site was used for wood storage and for the disposal of plant waste. Present owners of the site include Onan Corporation, which owns 133 acres. Approximately 3,000 people live within 4,000 feet of the site. Sampling and analysis of on-site soil and ground water revealed a number of contaminants commonly associated with wood-treating operations including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and pentachlorophenol. The highest levels of contaminants were found on the Onan property. Remediation was completed in 1986. Remedial actions included excavating and disposing of contaminated soil, placing clean fill in excavated areas, extracting and treating contaminated ground water, surrounding the site with a security fence, and monitoring of air, ground water, and surface water within the site vicinity.

  10. Preventing Community-wide Transmission of Cryptosporidium: A Proactive Public Health Response to a Swimming Pool–Associated Outbreak — Auglaize County, Ohio, USA

    PubMed Central

    Cope, J.R.; Prosser, A.; Nowicki, S.; Roberts, M.W.; Scheer, D.; Anderson, C.; Longsworth, A.; Parsons, C.; Goldschmidt, D.; Johnston, S.; Bishop, H.; Xiao, L.; Hill, V.; Beach, M.; Hlavsa, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The incidence of recreational water–associated outbreaks in the United States has significantly increased, driven, at least in part, by outbreaks both caused by Cryptosporidium and associated with treated recreational water venues. Because of the parasite's extreme chlorine tolerance, transmission can occur even in well-maintained treated recreational water venues, (e.g., pools) and a focal cryptosporidiosis outbreak can evolve into a community-wide outbreak associated with multiple recreational water venues and settings (e.g., child care facilities). In August 2004 in Auglaize County, Ohio, multiple cryptosporidiosis cases were identified and anecdotally linked to Pool A. Within 5 days of the first case being reported, Pool A was hyperchlorinated to achieve 99.9% Cryptosporidium inactivition. A case-control study was launched to epidemiologically ascertain the outbreak source 11 days later. A total of 150 confirmed and probable cases were identified; the temporal distribution of illness onset was peaked, indicating a point-source exposure. Cryptosporidiosis was significantly associated with swimming in Pool A (matched odds ratio 121.7, 95% confidence interval 27.4–∞) but not with another venue or setting. The findings of this investigation suggest that proactive implementation of control measures, when increased Cryptosporidium transmission is detected but before an outbreak source is epidemiologically ascertained, might prevent a focal cryptosporidiosis outbreak from evolving into a community-wide outbreak. PMID:25907106

  11. Hancock County Awards Gala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Gene Goldman (left), deputy director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, accepts an Award of Excellence from Jack Zink, executive director of the Hancock County Port and Harbor Commission, during the 2008 Annual Hancock County Awards Gala. The Award of Excellence was presented to recognize Stennis Space Center's contribution to NASA's 50 years of excellence in space exploration.

  12. Public health assessment for Vega Baja Solid Waste Disposal, Rio Abajo Ward/La Trocha, Vega Baja County, Puerto Rico, Region 2: CERCLIS Number PRD980512669. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The Vega Baja Waste Disposal Site is a public health hazard because long-term exposure to lead in soil in some yards cause harmful effects in children. Children and especially preschool children who live in yards with elevated levels of soil lead might be exposed to small amounts of lead when they accidentally swallow soil and dust that cling to their hands. The level of lead in garden vegetables from the site is not a public health threat. It is safe for residents to grow and eat garden vegetables. ATSDR recommends that EPA prevent long-term exposure to lead-contaminated soil where lead levels are consistently elevated. ATSDR also recommends that EPA consult with ATSDR officials to ensure that Superfund activities to stop exposure to lead-contaminated soil at the site continues to be protective of public health.

  13. Public-health assessment for Arctic Surplus, Fairbanks, Fairbanks North Star County, Alaska, Region 10. CERCLIS No. AKD980988158. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-22

    Located in the southeast quadrant of Fairbanks, Alaska, the Arctic Surplus National Priorities List (NPL) site consists of salvaged material and scrap which have accumulated for more than 40 years. Operations at the site (1946 to 1976) have resulted in localized soil contamination with chlordane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan homologues (compounds of similar structure), and lead. Some surface soil lead contamination has been detected just beyond the site fence line. In addition, friable asbestos is found on-site. Remediation of the site has removed most of the localized on-site soil contamination and asbestos. The Arctic Surplus site is considered a public health hazard because of the potential for exposure to lead through ingestion of water from residential wells, and because of the past exposures of workers to asbestos, lead, and PCB's on-site. ATSDR determined that a community health investigation is needed to help address community concerns about cancer and other health outcomes.

  14. Chester County ground-water atlas, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludlow, Russell A.; Loper, Connie A.

    2004-01-01

    Chester County encompasses 760 square miles in southeastern Pennsylvania. Groundwater- quality studies have been conducted in the county over several decades to address specific hydrologic issues. This report compiles and describes water-quality data collected during studies conducted mostly after 1990 and summarizes the data in a county-wide perspective. In this report, water-quality constituents are described in regard to what they are, why the constituents are important, and where constituent concentrations vary relative to geology or land use. Water-quality constituents are grouped into logical units to aid presentation: water-quality constituents measured in the field (pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen), common ions, metals, radionuclides, bacteria, nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds.Waterquality constituents measured in the field, common ions (except chloride), metals, and radionuclides are discussed relative to geology. Bacteria, nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds are discussed relative to land use. If the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) or Chester County Health Department has drinkingwater standards for a constituent, the standards are included. Tables and maps are included to assist Chester County residents in understanding the water-quality constituents and their distribution in the county. Ground water in Chester County generally is of good quality and is mostly acidic except in the carbonate rocks and serpentinite, where it is neutral to strongly basic. Calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate are major constituents of these rocks. Both compounds have high solubility, and, as such, both are major contributors to elevated pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and the common ions. Elevated pH and alkalinity in carbonate rocks and serpentinite can indicate a potential for scaling in water heaters and household plumbing. Low pH and low alkalinity in the schist, quartzite, and

  15. Exploring potential use of internet, E-mail, and instant text messaging to promote breast health and mammogram use among immigrant Hispanic women in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Dang, Catherine M; Estrada, Sylvia; Bresee, Catherine; Phillips, Edward H

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of death in Hispanic women (HW). Internet, e-mail, and instant text messaging may be cost-effective in educating HW about breast health and in reducing breast cancer mortality. We surveyed 905 HW women attending a free health fair about their technology use, acculturation, insurance status, mammography use, and breast cancer knowledge. Data were analyzed by t test or χ(2) tests. Mean age was 51.9 ± 14.2 years (range, 18 to 88 years). Ninety-two per cent were foreign-born. Most had completed some high school (39%) or elementary (38%) education. Most (62%) were uninsured. The majority spoke (67%) and read (66%) only Spanish. Only 60 per cent of HW older than 40 years had a recent mammogram. HW older than 40 years who had not had a recent mammogram were younger (mean 54.9 ± 10.8 vs 58 ± 10.4 years) and less likely to have health insurance (25 vs 44%; P < 0.001). Most HW never use the Internet (58%) or e-mail (64%). However, 70 per cent have mobile phones (66% older than 40 years), and 65 per cent use text messaging daily (58% older than 40 years, P = 0.001). In fact, 45 per cent wish to receive a mammogram reminder by text. Text messaging may be an inexpensive way to promote breast health and screening mammography use among uninsured HW.

  16. Integrated satellite imaging and syndromic surveillance reveal health effects of smoke from wildfires in rural eastern North Carolina counties in the summer of 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Wildfire smoke often impacts rural areas without air quality monitors, limiting assessment of health impacts. A 2008 wildfire in Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge produced massive quantities of smoke affecting eastern NC, a rural area with limited air quality moni...

  17. A Follow-Up Study of Mortality, Health Conditions and Associated Disabilities of People with Intellectual Disabilities in a Swedish County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustavson, K.-H.; Umb-Carlsson, O.; Sonnander, K.

    2005-01-01

    Background: In the planning of services and health care for individuals with intellectual disability (ID), information is needed on the special requirements for habilitation and medical service and associated disabilities. Material and Methods: An unselected consecutive series of 82 adult persons with ID was studied. The medical examination…

  18. Challenges in responding to the ebola epidemic - four rural counties, Liberia, August-November 2014.

    PubMed

    Summers, Aimee; Nyenswah, Tolbert G; Montgomery, Joel M; Neatherlin, John; Tappero, Jordan W; T, Nyenswah; M, Fahnbulleh; M, Massaquoi

    2014-12-19

    The first cases of Ebola virus disease (Ebola) in West Africa were identified in Guinea on March 22, 2014. On March 30, the first Liberian case was identified in Foya Town, Lofa County, near the Guinean border. Because the majority of early cases occurred in Lofa and Montserrado counties, resources were concentrated in these counties during the first several months of the response, and these counties have seen signs of successful disease control. By October 2014, the epidemic had reached all 15 counties of Liberia. During August 27-September 10, 2014, CDC in collaboration with the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare assessed county Ebola response plans in four rural counties (Grand Cape Mount, Grand Bassa, Rivercess, and Sinoe, to identify county-specific challenges in executing their Ebola response plans, and to provide recommendations and training to enhance control efforts. Assessments were conducted through interviews with county health teams and health care providers and visits to health care facilities. At the time of assessment, county health teams reported lacking adequate training in core Ebola response strategies and reported facing many challenges because of poor transportation and communication networks. Development of communication and transportation network strategies for communities with limited access to roads and limited means of communication in addition to adequate training in Ebola response strategies is critical for successful management of Ebola in remote areas.

  19. H.R. 2389, County Schools Revitalization Act of 1999 and H.R. 1185, Timber-Dependent Counties Stabilization Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health of the Committee on Resources, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Sixth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Resources.

    This Congressional report provides testimony addressing the following two House bills: HR 2389 which restores stability and predictability to the annual payments made to States and counties containing National Forest System lands and public domain lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management for use by the counties of the benefit of public…

  20. Public health assessment for Grand Traverse Overall Supply Company, Greilickville, Leelanau County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID017418559. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-21

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) placed the Grand Traverse Overall Supply site on the National Priorities List (NPL) on September 8, 1983. From 1953 through 1977, GTOS disposed of waste water from the process in a dry well and four lagoons on their property. Since 1977, they have used the township sewer system. In 1978, tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene or PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were found in the water in wells serving a school adjacent to GTOS and several nearby residences. The soil around the dry well was excavated and taken off-site for disposal. The lagoons were filled in, and covered with gravel or grass. The site currently poses no apparent public health hazard. Trace amounts of PCE in well water have been detected in the most recent testing, however, the amounts are below the level of public health concern.

  1. Public health assessment for GBF and Pittsburg dumps, Antioch, Contra Costa County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CAD980498562. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-17

    The GBF/Pittsburg Landfill(s) site received municipal waste from the mid 1940s until March 1992. During the 1960s and 1970s, hazardous solid and liquid wastes including heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenols, acids, phosphorus ordnance, and medical waste were also disposed of at the site. Exposure to airborne contaminants to on-site workers and nearby community members did occur in the past, but data are not available to evaluate those exposures. The site currently poses no apparent public health hazard, and conditions are not expected to change in the future. The potential for inhalation exposure from releases of contaminated soil gas does exist, but those possible exposures would be below levels of health concern. No other potential present or future completed exposure pathways have been identified.

  2. Health assessment for Jones Sanitation Landfill (Jones Septic Site), Hyde Park, Dutchess County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980534556. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-07

    The Jones Sanitation Landfill, also known as the Jones Septic Site, is listed on the National Priorities List. From the early 1960s through 1979 the site accepted industrial liquid wastes and sludges. The site now accepts only septic waste collected by commercial firms. Results of environmental sampling indicate that the contaminants of concern at the site include inorganics (e.g., chromium, copper, lead, cadmium, mercury), oil and grease wastes, and several volatile organic chemicals including: 1,1-dichloroethylene; trichloroethylene; trichloroethene, acetone; 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene; chloroform; methylene chloride; and perhaps pentachlorophenol. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via the above-named human exposure pathways.

  3. Public health assessment for Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA), Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, Region 9: CERCLIS number CA9800013030. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-05

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located in Pasadena, California, northeast of Interstate 210. As a result of former site activities, chemicals, primarily volatile organic compounds (VOC) and perchlorate (a component of solid rocket fuel), used at JPL have been released to soil and groundwater. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted site visits in 1997 to assess the potential for public health hazards. During these visits, ATSDR identified two pathways where people could potentially be exposed to site-related contaminants: (1) exposure to contaminated groundwater and (2) exposure to contaminated soil. ATSDR also identified the following primary community concerns: (1) future groundwater and drinking water quality and (2) increased incidence of Hodgkin`s disease. ATSDR determined that VOC-contaminated groundwater does not present a past, present, or future public health to JPL employees or nearby residents. ATSDR also determined that exposure, if any, to contaminated soils associated with the JPL site and in the Arroyo Secco near the JPL boundary is unlikely to cause either short-term or long-term adverse health effects to employees and the public.

  4. Public-health assessment for American Creosote Works Inc. , Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD008161994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-29

    The American Creosote Works, Inc., National Priorities List (NPL) site, is near Pensacola Bay in Pensacola, Florida. American Creosote operated a wood preserving business from 1902 until 1981. Soils, buried sludge, ground water, sediments, and air are contaminated with numerous of chemicals including; pentachlorophenol, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and benzene. Children trespassing on the site are likely to be exposed to pentachlorophenol, PAHs, and PCDDs/PCDFs in the soil via incidental ingestion and may suffer chloracne, liver damage, and an increased risk of cancer. Incidental ingestion of off-site soil by children may also increase their risk of chloracne and liver damage, but actual health effects depend on the frequency and duration of the exposure. Inhalation of benzene in the on-site air may increase the lifetime risk of cancer for children and other site trespassers. The site is a public health hazard due to the risk of adverse health effects from long term exposure to hazardous chemicals in the air, soil, and ground water.

  5. Health assessment for Velsicol Chemical Corporation (St. Louis Plant Site), Gratiot County, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID000722439. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-18

    The Velsicol Chemical Corporation (Velsicol) site is currently listed on the National Priorities List. More than 60 contaminants were found throughout the site, but polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) is the contaminant that caused the most concern. Phenols, calcium, magnesium, sodium (as chloride or bromium salts) and PBB were present in wastes. Soil samples collected had the following maximum concentrations (parts per million - ppm); PBB, 1,100; phenol, 4.2; lead, 11,100; hexabromebenzene, 56; 2,3-dibromo-1-propanol phosphate, 4,700; and dimethylaminoethylchloride hydrochloride (DMAE), 53. On-site ground water samples contained the following maximum concentrations (ppm): PBB, 0.013; chloride, 82,000; sulfate, 650; phenol, 1.2; DMAE, 20 and carbon tetrachloride, 0.080. Of various species of fish carp had the highest maximum PBB concentrations. Wildlife (mice, earthworms, a raccoon and ducks) in the area were found to be contaminated with PBB and/or DDT. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible human exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse human health effects over time. Occupational exposure to many harmful contaminants, including PBB and DDT, has occurred and exposure to the general population may possibly still be occurring via ingestion of contaminated fish and wildlife.

  6. BETTER HEALTH FOR MIGRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    THIS ISSUE OF "FLORIDA HEALTH NOTES" DISCUSSES FLORIDA'S MIGRANTS AND THE MIGRANT HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH AND THE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE DISCUSSED--THEIR HOUSING AND SANITATION FACILITIES, THEIR LONG WORKING HOURS AND LOW WAGES, THEIR SUMMER MIGRATION PATTERNS, THEIR HEALTH…

  7. Public health assessment for petitioned Phelps Dodge Corp Douglas Reduction Works, Douglas, Cochise County, Arizona, Region 9. Cerclis No. AZD008397143. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    The Phelps-Dodge site, a former copper-smelting operation just outside Douglas and possibly Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico. This site contributed to lead-contaminated surface soils in residential areas in Douglas. Exposure to the lead-contaminated soils may have contributed and/or caused elevated blood levels in children living in both Douglas, AZ and Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico. Past emissions from the smelter included arsenic, lead, sulfur dioxide, inhalable particulate matter, and other heavy metals. The levels detected by air monitoring were elevated above health guidelines.

  8. Garrett County Aids AID

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Garrett County, Maryland volunteered to act as a pre-overseas learning laboratory for AID (Agency for International Development) interns who practiced data collection and planning techniques with the help of local citizenry. (JC)

  9. Public health assessment for Newport Naval Education/Training Center Middletown, Newport County, Rhode Island, Region 1. CERCLIS No. RI6170085470. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-06

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC) is an indeterminate public health hazard. Five areas at NETC are being investigated under the remedial investigation/feasibility study: McAllister Point Landfill, Melville North Landfill, Tank Farm Four, Tank Farm Five, and the Old Fire Fighting Training Area. Contaminants of concern have been detected in groundwater, surface soil, subsurface soil, and sediment at NETC. Contaminants of concern in that area include metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Potential pathways of exposure to contaminated surface soil and sediment were identified. In addition, there could be future exposure to contaminated groundwater and subsurface soil in areas, such as Melville North Landfill, that are scheduled for development. The food chain is also a potentially complete pathway. The extent of contamination of shellfish must be further characterized before the health implications of exposure to those potential pathways can be evaluated. Contaminants of concern identified in the potential pathways include metals, PAHs, PCBs, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides.

  10. Public health assessment for tri-cities Barrel Company, Inc. , Fenton, Broome County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980509285. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-18

    The Tri-Cities Barrel Company, Inc., facility was included on the original New York State Registry of Hazardous Waste Sites in June 1980 when it was discovered that hazardous waste had been discharged to ground surface and to unlined lagoons. This site was later placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). Four monitoring wells were drilled and sampled during a preliminary site investigation. The on-site contamination of groundwater was documented by sampling of monitoring wells in 1986. One private well near the site showed low levels of ethylbenzene, meta-xylene and ortho-xylene; it is not clear, however, if this was related to the site. A second sample was taken from this well in 1990 and did not detect any contaminants. Since the preliminary report, additional waste lagoons have been identified and the site was expanded to include the entire 13 acres owned by the Tri-Cities Barrel Company. A remedial investigation is currently ongoing. Based on information reviewed, this site is an indeterminate public health hazard because the extent of contamination in groundwater has not been defined and contamination in areas north of I-88 has not been confirmed or defined. The primary health concern associated with exposure to chemicals at the site comes from their potential to cause cancer in humans or animals.

  11. Health assessment for Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill, Honey Brook, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980829527. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-02

    The Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill site in Honey Brook, Pennsylvania was an unpermitted residential and commercial refuse disposal facility that operated from 1963 to sometime in the 1980s. After 1977, the landfill continued to operate in defiance of legal action to support a closure plan. Various investigations conducted in the 1980s revealed that industrial and hazardous waste had been accepted by the site. The environmental contamination on-site consists of copper, lead, 1,2-dichloropropane, toluene, chloroform and methylene chloride in drummed wastes; and mercury, toluene, dichlorofluoromethane, methylene chloride, trichlorofluoromethane, 5-methyl-2-hexanone, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene in groundwater. One time sampling indicated the presence of volatile compounds in air (hydrogen chloride and chloroform). The environmental contamination off-site consists of cadmium in sediment; and chloromethane, chloroform, xylenes, dichlorofluoromethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, p-cresol, toluene, methyl isobutyl ketone, di-n-butyl phthalate, lead, mercury, and zinc in residential well water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, and airborne gases, vapors, and particulate.

  12. Hydrogeologic framework of LaSalle County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Bailey, Clinton R.

    2016-10-28

    Water-supply needs in LaSalle County in northern Illinois are met by surface water and groundwater. Water-supply needs are expected to increase to serve future residential and mining uses. Available information on water use, geology, surface-water and groundwater hydrology, and water quality provides a hydrogeologic framework for LaSalle County that can be used to help plan the future use of the water resources.The Illinois, Fox, and Vermilion Rivers are the primary surface-water bodies in LaSalle County. These and other surface-water bodies are used for wastewater disposal in the county. The Vermilion River is used as a drinking-water supply in the southern part of the county. Water from the Illinois and Fox Rivers also is used for the generation of electric power.Glacial drift aquifers capable of yielding sufficient water for public supply are expected to be present in the Illinois River Valley in the western part of the county, the Troy Bedrock Valley in the northwestern part of the county, and in the Ticona Bedrock Valley in the south-central part of the county. Glacial drift aquifers capable of yielding sufficient water for residential supply are present in most of the county, although well yield often needs to be improved by using large-diameter wells. Arsenic concentrations above health-based standards have been detected in some wells in this aquifer. These aquifers are a viable source for additional water supply in some areas, but would require further characterization prior to full development.Shallow bedrock deposits comprising the sandstone units of the Ancell Group, the Prairie du Chien Group, dolomite of the Galena and Platteville Groups, and Silurian-aged dolomite are utilized for water supply where these units are at or near the bedrock surface or where overlain by Pennsylvanian-aged deposits. The availability of water from the shallow bedrock deposits depends primarily on the geologic unit analyzed. All these deposits can yield sufficient water for

  13. Public health assessment for mcchord air force base (wash rack/treatment) region 10, Cerclis No. WA8570024200 and American Lake Gardens/McChord Air Force Base (a/k/a McChord Air Force Base Area `D`) Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980833065. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-11

    McChord Air Force Base (McCAFB), an active aircraft station covering 4,616 acres, is approximately 7 miles south of Tacoma, in Pierce County, Washington. In 1983, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in private well water at an off-base residential area in the northeast corner of the American Lake Garden Tract (ALGT). Based on the available information, ATSDR has concluded that the 65 sites at McCAFB are no apparent public health hazard; however, if in the future contaminants from the soil and groundwater migrate off-site or towards the base supply wells via the groundwater, then a public health hazard could exist.

  14. Health assessment for Revere Chemical Company National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Revere, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD051395499. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-20

    The Revere Chemical Company site was operated from the late 1960s until 1972 as an acid, metal, and plating waste processing facility. It is suspected of also accepting organic solvent waste. The environmental contamination on-site consists of chromium, mercury, lead, arsenic, and cadmium in the surface water of tributaries on the site boundaries; benzoic acid in the sediment; diethylhexylphthalate in the fire pond; trans-1,2-dichloroethylene and 2-butanone in a production well; chromium, nickel, diethylhexylphthalate, and arsenic in soil. Off-site environmental contamination consists of chromium, lead, arsenic, and nickel in the surface water of the tributaries; chromium, lead, hexachlorobenzene, benzoic acid, di-n-octylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, and total polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment; and diethylhexylphthalate, nickel, lead, and arsenic in residential well water. Even though removal operations were carried out in 1984, subsequent data collections have shown significant contamination present in surface water, soil, and sediment both on- and off-site. Arsenic and nickel levels exceed water quality criteria. Soil and sediment off-site are contaminated with lead and chromium and would be considered a public health concern should they be in areas where children come in contact with them. In addition, the levels of contamination in surface water and sediment may adversely impact edible aquatic organisms making them unfit for human consumption.

  15. Health assessment for Union Pacific Railroad, Kerr McGee tie point, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, Region 10. CERCLIS No. ORD009049412. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    Since approximately 1922, The Dalles, Oregon has served as the location of a large wood treatment facility. The facility was owned by Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) until 1987 when the structures and equipment were purchased by Kerr McGee Corporation. The site has been operated by the UPRR, Forest Products Treating Co., J. H. Baxter Company, and now, Kerr McGee. The UPRR assumes all responsibility for on-site contamination resulting from past wood treatment activities. These activities consisted of pressure treating wood ties with pentachlorophenol, creosote, metals and other potentially hazardous compounds. Contamination at the site from spills and past disposal practices has been demonstrated. Work is continuing on further characterizing and understanding the extent of contamination, the potential fate and transport of the contaminants, and the need for site remediation. The site is considered an indeterminate public health concern because of the potential for human exposure via ingestion of contaminated groundwater and inhalation of on-site and near site airborne contaminants.

  16. Public health assessment for Weldon Spring quarry/plant/pits (USDOE) St. Charles, St. Charles County, Missouri, region 7. Cerclis No. MO3210090004. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (chemical plant site), is a former uranium processing facility located in eastern Missouri on the property of the former U.S. Army Weldon Spring Ordnance Works. Surface water, soil, sludge, sediment, and groundwater within the chemical plant site contain chemical and radioactive contaminants. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) reviewed on-site chemical exposure information and site conditions. ATSDR also prepared several Health Consultations on chemical and radioactive contaminants in areas on and off the DOE chemical plant site. ATSDR also reviewed on-site and off-site radiological exposure information and conditions. The exposure scenarios ATSDR evaluated include: trespassers swimming in quarry or raffinate pits; reservists performing field activities in the training area; anglers fishing, hunters haunting, and hikers hiking in the conservation areas; residents drinking from off-site private wells; staff and students attending the Francis Howell High School; and consumers of crops (e.g., corn) grown in conservation areas.

  17. 77 FR 34300 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Revision to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... revision pertains to the Air Pollution Control portion of the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD....regulations.gov , including any personal information provided, unless the comment includes information claimed... docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that...

  18. Appendix C: A comparative study of small scale remotely sensed data for monitoring clearcutting in hardwood forests. M.S. Thesis; [Allegheny National Forest, Pennsylvania and the Adirondacks, New York

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafker, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Manual photointerpretation techniques were used to analyze images acquired by high altitude aircraft, the Skylab multispectral and Earth terrain camera (ETC), the LANDSAT multispectral scanner, and the LANDSAT-3 return beam vidicon camera. A color-additive viewer, and digital image analysis were also used on the LANDSAT MSS imagery. The value of each type of remotely sensed data was judged by the ease and accuracy of clearcut identification, and by the amount of detail discernible, especially regarding revegetation. Results of a site study in the Allegheny National Forest, Pennsylvania indicate that high altitude aerial photography, especially color infrared photography acquired during the growing season, is well suited for identifying clearcuts and assessing revegetation. Although photographs acquired with Skylab's ETC also yielded good results, only incomplete inventories of clearcuts could be made using LANDSAT imagery. Results for the Adirondack region of New York State were similar for the aircraft and satellite photography, but even less satisfactory for the LANDSAT imagery.

  19. The Alameda County Study: A Systematic, Chronological Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housman, Jeff; Dorman, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This study is a systematic review of the Alameda County study findings and their importance in establishing a link between lifestyle and health outcomes. A systematic review of literature was performed and data indicating important links between lifestyle and health were synthesized. Although initial studies focused on the associations between…

  20. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Fayette and Lycoming Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.; Gillenwater, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Fayette County and Lycoming County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  1. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Greene and Tioga Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Fisher, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in the area of Pennsylvania. Coalbed methane, which is sometimes extracted using the same technique, is commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and is frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Greene County and Tioga County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics are also used to quantify these changes and are included in this publication.

  2. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Lackawanna and Wayne Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, L.E.; Slonecker, E.T.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Lackawanna County and Wayne County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  3. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Armstrong and Indiana Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Armstrong County and Indiana County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  4. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Beaver and Butler Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Slonecker, E. Terry; Milheim, Lesley E.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Beaver County and Butler County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  5. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Somerset and Westmoreland Counties, Pennsylvania,2004--2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, L.E.; Slonecker, E.T.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Somerset County and Westmoreland County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  6. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Sullivan and Wyoming Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Sullivan County and Wyoming County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  7. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Bradford and Washington Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.; Marr, D.A.; Fisher, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in the area of Pennsylvania. Coalbed methane, which is sometimes extracted using the same technique, is often located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and is frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Bradford County and Washington County, Pennsylvania, between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is used to quantify these changes and are included in this publication.

  8. Heavy metals health risk assessment for population via consumption of vegetables grown in old mining area; a case study: Banat County, Romania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    complex THQ parameter use in health risk assessment of heavy metals provides a better image than using only a simple parameter (contents of metals in soils and vegetables). PMID:22017878

  9. Crisis & commitment: 150 years of service by Los Angeles county public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Michael R; Tranquada, Robert E

    2007-04-01

    The Los Angeles County University of Southern California Medical Center will open soon, replacing the county's current 74-year-old facility with a modern, although smaller, facility. Los Angeles County has provided hospital care to the indigent since 1858, during which time, the operation of public hospitals has shifted from a state-mandated welfare responsibility to a preeminent part of the county's public health mission. As this shift occurred, the financing of Los Angeles County hospitals changed from primarily county support to state and federal government sources, particularly Medicaid. The success of the new hospital will depend on whether government leaders at all levels provide the reforms needed to help the county and its partners stabilize its funding base.

  10. 43. VIEWERS PLAN (NO. 1591 JULY TERM 1931) (Sheet 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. VIEWERS PLAN (NO. 1591 JULY TERM 1931) (Sheet 1 of 2 sheets), May 27, 1931 - West End-North Side Bridge, Spanning Ohio River, approximately 1 mile downstream from confluence of Monongahela & Allegheny rivers, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  11. 46. HANDRAILING, DETAILS TYPE 'B' (Sheet 12 of 14 sheets), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. HANDRAILING, DETAILS TYPE 'B' (Sheet 12 of 14 sheets), April 5, 1932 - West End-North Side Bridge, Spanning Ohio River, approximately 1 mile downstream from confluence of Monongahela & Allegheny rivers, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  12. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  13. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, West Pullman Iron and Metal (a/k/a West Pullman/Victory Heights), Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, Region 5: CERCLIS number ILD005428651. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The West Pullman/Victory Heights/Maple Park site consists of two abandoned industrial properties. The Navistar International Transportation Corporation (Navistar) property is commonly called International Harvester (IH) and the NL Industries, Incorporated property is commonly called Dutch Boy (DB). These industries were active from the early part of this century until the early 1980s when the factories were closed and abandoned. Currently, for people trespassing on the site, both the Dutch Boy and the International Harvester properties represent a potential public health hazard. Limited data are available to assess potential off-site exposures to site-related contaminants, and therefore, exposure to off-site contaminants from the International Harvester and Dutch Boy properties is classified as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  14. Health.

    PubMed Central

    Hare, R M

    1986-01-01

    Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment is then suggested, and used to shed light on some problems about mental illness and to compare and contrast it with physical illness and with political and other deviancies which are not illnesses. PMID:3806628

  15. Ground-water resources data for Baldwin County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Moreland, Richard S.; Clark, Amy E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for 237 wells were collected, and water-levels in 223 wells in Baldwin and Escambia Counties were measured. Long-term water water-level data, available for many wells, indicate that ground-water levels in most of Baldwin County show no significant trends for the period of record. However, ground-water levels have declined in the general vicinity of Spanish Fort and Daphne, and ground-water levels in the Gulf Shores and Orange Beach areas are less than 5 feet above sea level in places. The quality of ground water generally is good, but problems with iron, sulfur, turbidity, and color occur. The water from most private wells in Baldwin County is used without treatment or filtration. Alabama public- health law requires that water from public-supply wells be chlorinated. Beyond that, the most common treatment of ground water by public-water suppliers in Baldwin County consists of pH adjustment, iron removal, and aeration. The transmissivity of the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer was determined at 10 locations in Baldwin County. Estimates of transmissivity ranged from 700 to 5,400 feet squared per day. In general, aquifer transmissivity was greatest in the southeastern part of the county, and least in the western part of the county near Mobile Bay. A storage coefficient of 1.5 x 10-3 was determined for the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer near Loxley.

  16. Groundwater management and protection, McMinn County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    McMinn County in Tennessee relies heavily on groundwater as a source of potable water. Part of the public water supply for Athens Utilities is groundwater. About 40 percent of the county`s residents rely on private wells for domestic water supply. The groundwater is produced, primarily, in aquifers of fractured limestone with solution channels. The geohydrology of McMinn County makes groundwater protection an important issue. This report represents the results of a cooperative effort to address both immediate and long-term needs for groundwater protection. A three-phased approach is used to suggest specific actions that would help safeguard public health and future economic growth of the county. Phase 1 involves a technical committee to assist local governments on groundwater-related matters, investigation of specific measures for wellhead protection in McMinn County, and public education. Phase 2 focuses on gaining additional technical information through fracture/lineament tracing for the entire county using aerial photography and computerizing the groundwater data which resides in many paper files of the many federal, state, and local governments. Phase 3 suggests a dye tracer and/or aquifer testing for Ingleside Spring to refine the initially identified wellhead protection area.

  17. Westchester County Employers Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Marcia M.

    The Westchester County Employers Survey was done in May 2003 in order learn more about employee training needs, how they accomplished these needs, and how it would be possible for the Westchester Community College to fulfill these needs. Out of the 639 surveys sent, 145 were returned in a satisfactory format, which produces a 22.6% return rate.…

  18. [City and County Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Judith O.; And Others

    Six papers presented at the Institute were concerned with city and county records. They are: "EWEB and Its Records," which discusses the history, laws and records of the Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB);""Police Records: Eugene, Oregon," classifies police records, other than administrative, into three general…

  19. Humboldt County Employer Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Dave

    A project was undertaken in Humboldt County to collect information from large and small businesses in the areas of agriculture, mining, manufacturing, transportation, wholesale and retail, finance, services, and public information with respect to their employee requirements and needs. In all, 451 firms were surveyed to determine the size of the…

  20. Library Needs of County and County-Wide Groups in Nassau County, New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javelin, Muriel C.

    A study, conducted under a grant from Title I of the Library Services and Construction Act, was undertaken to determine: (1) the present level of library service in county and county-wide departments, agencies, and organizations in Nassau County, (2) what additional services are needed, and (3) how these services can best be achieved. Data were…

  1. National Dam Safety Program. Conewango Creek Dam (Site 16A), (Inventory Number N.Y. 557), Allegheny River Basin, Conewango Creek Watershed, Cattaraugus County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-18

    Classification ofThe hazard potential classification for this dam is HIGH because stream in the event of dam failure . Section 5 of this report presents more...AIpI 0 -t On:~ Wh i:- 30 3T’ OF~ <.% ~ ~ 5v coIO jrIc# r ’I, If~O t Plo . Qo Pin (’" CC’ . - ItVI q,~cuo cr o t. it., I plO$ tq I *l c .a 0n...LSECTIONAtAA SEC TION C C SOIL CONSERVATIO10N SFR \\"ICE ERVOýKIR DRAININ (LLEHr1 B-2 w. AI "IL .. / ..6’- -• ×IG- O ’ -. _ _ .._-_ ’ -M 1 -’ - .- IS I

  2. National Dam Safety Program. Elm Creek Dam (Dam Number 16), (Inventory Number N.Y. 593), Conewango Creek Watershed, Allegheny River Basin, Cattaraugus County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-18

    C) \\ , Ii6 G .~ravel / -I \\\\ C)C / --- \\l / 1 / .1 C I- I-,- \\e Site- ~1 ) ’- N ’--AP p. G . I \\\\>-.. POPE ~ lIN OLA ROAD CHTAPPROD t, -f...m aSd. ~. * t .s :1 Wlt to . . D . 3 1... rI.r 5 4. ~ O~ 11.4 gr . (454I, flow 5S. - Si Go.2 1 "r) dousel- !ISO 1.m bola %,it ~ 77 an.ve - hig Is on...MA> o. Ism. %wmt to .stosted, .csT 2. -14 . .r. p.w 1 . - r. I. (WC; wonev. 0. . 2, .5 sw *a--~ bola - .11(0: 5.0 8.0 Slty frowIl (45%) time - 0111

  3. Survey of chiropractic in Dade County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R B; Butler, R

    1982-06-01

    This survey of the members of the Dade County Chiropractic Society of Miami, Florida was initiated with the encouragement and under the supervision of the Dade County Health Systems Agency (HSA). The purpose of the survey was to obtain information relative to the inclusion of chiropractic into future health planning to be conducted by the HSA. The survey was divided into a "Physicians Survey" obtaining information on location, office hours, gross income, total patient visits and type of practice of the doctor, and a "Patient Survey" obtaining information on age, sex, ethnic origin, residence, and payment source of the patients. Clinical information on initial complaints, diagnoses, treatment, referrals, and amount of care was also obtained. It was found that chiropractors work an average of 31.7 hours per week with a gross annual income of $74,750.00 (1979). The male-female distribution of patients was equal and the average patient age was 43.4 years. Anglocaucasian category comprised 80.2% of the patient sample. Nearly 50% of all chiropractic patients pay for services rendered out of their own pocket. Of the primary diagnosis, 81.3% related to the spine. The study concludes that the practice of chiropractic in Dade County is very similar to the practice of chiropractic in general.

  4. Unconsolidated Aquifers in Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.

    2000-01-01

    Unconsolidated aquifers consisting of saturated sand and gravel are capable of supplying large quantities of good-quality water to wells in Tompkins County, but little published geohydrologic inform ation on such aquifers is available. In 1986, the U.S.Geological Survey (USGS) began collecting geohydrologic information and well data to construct an aquifer map showing the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins county. Data sources included (1) water-well drillers. logs; (2) highway and other construction test-boring logs; (3) well data gathered by the Tompkins County Department of Health, (4) test-well logs from geohydrologic consultants that conducted projects for site-specific studies, and (5) well data that had been collected during past investigations by the USGS and entered into the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. In 1999, the USGS, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Department of Planning, compiled these data to construct this map. More than 600 well records were entered into the NWIS database in 1999 to supplement the 350 well records already in the database; this provided a total of 950 well records. The data were digitized and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) coverage so that well locations could be plotted on a map, and well data could be tabulated in a digital data base through ARC/INFO software. Data on the surficial geology were used with geohydrologic data from well records and previous studies to delineate the extent of aquifers on this map. This map depicts (1) the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins County, and (2) locations of wells whose records were entered into the USGS NWIS database and made into a GIS digital coverage. The hydrologic information presented here is generalized and is not intended for detailed site evaluations. Precise locations of geohydrologic-unit boundaries, and a description of the hydrologic conditions within the units, would require additional detailed, site

  5. Dental Screening and Education Among Cambodian, Lowland Lao, and Hmong Refugees in Fresno County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Donald R.; Jackson, Sidney

    1988-01-01

    Ascertains the dental health needs of the following refugee groups in Fresno County, California: (1) Cambodians; (2) lowland Lao; and (3) Hmong. Discusses successful health marketing and educational strategies aimed at these groups. A Dental Screening program instructed community health specialists, provided dental health education, and performed…

  6. Crack cocaine use among persons with tuberculosis--Contra Costa County, California, 1987-1990.

    PubMed

    1991-07-26

    From January 1, 1987, through June 30, 1990, 44 cases of tuberculosis (TB) occurred among residents of Contra Costa County, California, who were known to use crack cocaine. To investigate a possible association between crack cocaine use and TB, local health officials conducted a retrospective study of TB cases among residents of Contra Costa County.

  7. Homeless Families, Children, and Youth in Stanislaus County--Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boley, Ellen

    The homeless crisis in America is a complex issue with no "quick fixes." In Stanislaus County, California, it seems that there are many programs operating in isolation of one another. Approximately 5% of the county's population is homeless. Homeless persons have survival needs for food and clothing, hygiene, health care, affordable…

  8. West Virginia Kids Count Data Book: 1994 County Profiles of Child Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Task Force on Children, Youth and Families, Charleston.

    This report provides information on 12 indicators of child and adolescent health, education, and economic status in West Virginia at the state and county level. The report includes a state profile, a minority profile, and 55 county profiles. Each of the indicators is discussed on a state-wide basis. The bulk of the report consists of 1-page county…

  9. Implementation Study of the Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Sandra; Karlstrom, Mikael; Haywood, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida, was an ambitious and innovative effort to improve the school readiness of low-income children in Palm Beach County by identifying needs early and providing early intervention services to support physical, cognitive, and emotional health and development. Services were delivered to…

  10. 77 FR 44560 - Revisions to the Nevada State Implementation Plan, Washoe County Air Quality District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the Nevada State Implementation Plan, Washoe County Air Quality... approve revisions to the Washoe County District Board of Health (WCDBOH) portion of the Nevada State Implementation Plan (SIP) that EPA expects to be submitted by the Nevada Division of Environmental...

  11. Behavioral and Community Correlates of Adolescent Pregnancy and Chlamydia Rates in Rural Counties in Minnesota1

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Enns, Eva; Blauer-Peterson, Cori; Farris, Jill; Kahn, Judith; Kulasingam, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identifying co-occurring community risk factors, specific to rural communities, may suggest new strategies and partnerships for addressing sexual health issues among rural youth. We conducted an ecological analysis to identify the county-level correlates of pregnancy and chlamydia rates among adolescents in rural (nonmetropolitan) counties in Minnesota. Methods Pregnancy and chlamydia infection rates among 15–19 year-old females were compared across Minnesota’s 87 counties, stratified by rural/urban designations. Regression models for rural counties (n=66) in Minnesota were developed based on publicly available, county-level information on behaviors and risk exposures to identify associations with teen pregnancy and chlamydia rates in rural settings. Findings Adolescent pregnancy rates were higher in rural counties than in urban counties. Among rural counties, factors independently associated with elevated county-level rates of teen pregnancy included inconsistent contraceptive use by 12th-grade males, fewer 12th graders reporting feeling safe in their neighborhoods, more 9th graders reporting feeling overweight, fewer 12th graders reporting 30 min of physical activity daily, high county rates of single parenthood, and higher age-adjusted mortality (P < .05 for all associations). Factors associated with higher county level rates of chlamydia among rural counties were inconsistent condom use reported by 12th-grade males, more 12th graders reporting feeling overweight, and more 12th graders skipping school in the past month because they felt unsafe. Conclusions This ecologic analysis suggests that programmatic approaches focusing on behavior change among male adolescents, self-esteem, and community health and safety may be complementary to interventions addressing teen sexual health in rural areas; such approaches warrant further study. PMID:25344773

  12. 77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan...

  13. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D. )

    1988-12-01

    The Mono County Board of Supervisors approved the issuance of a use-permit for the Mammoth-Pacific II geothermal power plant. The power plant will be a binary, air-cooled, 10-megawatt, net, project. An appeal was filed by the California Department of Fish and Game, and the permit will not take effect until this appeal is resolved. Mono County also issued a project use-permit to proposers of Bonneville Pacific Corporations Mammoth Chance Geothermal Project, also a 10-megawatt, net, binary and air-cooled project. The permit was appealed by the Sierra Club, Cal-Trout, and the California Department of Fish and Game. Now, a subsequent EIR must be prepared for public review and comment. The subsequent EIR will address the issue of cumulative impacts and will include a discussion of new information.

  14. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1987-07-01

    In May 1987, the Mono County Energy Management Department recommended that a two-year moratorium be placed on geothermal power production projects on private lands within the Mono-Long Valley KGRA. The intent of the proposed moratorium was to allow for the collection and evaluation of hydrologic monitoring data in the Long Valley Caldera. Now, to still achieve this end, the Energy Management Department will suggest that mitigation measures and project-specific monitoring requirements be implemented via the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) documentation and the county use permit process. The monitoring data will provide important information to Mono County decision-makers regarding potential adverse impacts from geothermal production on such local resources as Hot Creek Gorge, the Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, and Hot Creek, itself. The Mammoth/Chance Geothermal Project is the proposed construction and operation of a 10 megawatt, net, geothermal binary-cycle power plant and production- and injection-well field by Bonneville Pacific Corporation. The project is currently under environmental review, pursuant to CEQA requirements. The Mono County Energy Management Director is providing assistance to the Town of Mammoth Lakes on its California Energy Commission (CEC) grant-funded resource assessment project. The grant of $220,000 provides for the drilling of at least two temperature-gradient wells (exploratory wells) within the town limits. If a geothermal resource is detected and found to provide adequate flows at a suitable temperature, the Town of Mammoth Lakes will proceed in the development of a geothermal space-heating system to provide heat to such users as the Centinela Mammoth Hospital, Mammoth elementary and high schools, the Gateway Industrial Park, and future residential development projects.

  15. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    On February 9, 1988, the Mono County Board of Supervisors voted to approve Bonneville Pacific Corporation's Mammoth Chance Geothermal Project. The project is an air-cooled, binary, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The Mono County Board of Supervisors issued a project use-permit with vigorous and stringent conditions. Specific emphasis was placed on the establishment of a monitoring program designed to detect the effects of geothermal development on the springs at the Hot Creek Fish Hatchery and Hot Creek Gorge. On October 5, 1987, the Mono County Planning Commission granted a use-permit to Mammoth Pacific for its Mammoth Pacific II Project, a binary, air-cooled, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The issuance of the use-permit instigated an appeal by the Sierra Club. That appeal was heard on February 22, 1988, At the end of the testimony, the Board of Supervisors voted to uphold the appeal of the Sierra Club, thereby denying the project by a vote of 3 to 2. The main areas of concern voiced by the majority of the Board included potential hydrologic impacts to Hot Creek Gorge and Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, visual impacts, and impacts to mule deer migration and survival. One of the options now available to Mammoth Pacific is to request that the project be denied without prejudice. This would allow Mammoth Pacific to return to the Board immediately with additional material regarding its concerns.

  16. [Guizhou County censured for poor planned parenthood work].

    PubMed

    1980-04-28

    According to Guizhou Ribao, Zhijin County has done a very poor job of planned parenthood work. The county's natural population growth rate in the more than 10 years before the gang of 4 were smashed was over 30/1000. The work was grasped in 1977, and the growth rate that year fell to 18.1/1000. However the rate rose again to 26.64/1000 in 1979, 120% more than the planned target. The general office of the Guizhou Provinical CCP Committee has issued a circular criticizing the county's renewed high population growth in 1979. The situation remains very unsatisfactory this year. Why are the planned parenthood problems so serious in this county? The main reason is that the county CCP committee has failed to gain a sufficient understanding of the importance of the work, and has not grasped it as a major affair. For a long time the committee has gone no further than issuing general calls. Many leading cadres do not like planned parenthood. Many leading cadres in the provincial organs have taken the lead in producing an excessive number of children. A deputy secretary of the county CCP committee who already had 4 children had a 5th last year. The wife of the director of the county CCP committee's organization department works in the county planned parenthood office. She had her 5th child in 1977. The director of the Public Health Bureau, who already had 7 children, remarried last year and has now produced an 8th. In addition, the county CCP committee has failed to commend and reward certain people who have practiced planned parenthood. The county has not issued a single 1 child pledge certificate. On the contrary, cadres who have an excess number of children have actually been promoted. The problems in planned parenthood work in Zhijin County have yet to be solved. It is hoped that the county CCP committee and the departments concerned will rapidly organize forces and take decisive action to put things right and do a good job of planned parenthood work.

  17. The Tennessee Department of Health WORKshops on Use of Secondary Data for Community Health Assessment, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Omohundro, Ellen; Boswell, Derrick; Evans, Dwayne; Ferranti, Lori B.

    2014-01-01

    Community health assessment is a core function of public health departments, a standard for accreditation of public health departments, and a core competency for public health professionals. The Tennessee Department of Health developed a statewide initiative to improve the processes for engaging county health departments in assessing their community’s health status through the collection and analysis of secondary data. One aim of the Tennessee Department of Health was to position county public health departments as trusted leaders in providing population data and engaging community stakeholders in assessments. The Tennessee Department of Health’s Division of Policy, Planning, and Assessment conducted regional 2-day training workshops to explain and guide completion of computer spreadsheets on 12 health topics. Participants from 93 counties extracted data from multiple and diverse sources to quantify county demographics, health status, and resources and wrote problem statements based on the data examined. The workshops included additional staff development through integration of short lessons on data analysis, epidemiology, and social-behavior theory. Participants reported in post-workshop surveys higher degrees of comfort in interpreting data and writing about their findings on county health issues, and they shared their findings with health, hospital, school, and government leaders (including county health council members) in their counties. Completion of the assessments enabled counties and the Tennessee Department of Health to address performance-improvement goals and assist counties in preparing to meet public health accreditation prerequisites. The methods developed for using secondary data for community health assessment are Tennessee’s first-phase response to counties’ request for a statewide structure for conducting such assessments. PMID:24384302

  18. Somerset County Renewable Energy Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Katula, Denise

    2014-05-07

    The County of Somerset, New Jersey, through the Somerset County Improvement Authority (SCIA), applied Federal funding through the U.S. Department of Energy to will apply project funds to buy-down the capital costs of equipment associated with the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at two sites owned by the County. This Renewable Energy Initiative allows the County to take advantage of clean renewable energy, without any adverse debt impacts, and at a price that results in operating budget savings beyond what is presently available in the marketplace. This project addressed the objectives of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by making the acquisition of renewable energy more affordable for the County, thereby, encouraging other counties and local units to develop similar programs and increase the deployment of solar energy technologies. The two sites that were funded by the DOE grant are part of a much larger, ambitious, and unique renewable energy project, described in the next section.

  19. Groundwater management and protection, McMinn County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    McMinn County in Tennessee relies heavily on groundwater as a source of potable water. Part of the public water supply for Athens Utilities is groundwater. About 40 percent of the county's residents rely on private wells for domestic water supply. The groundwater is produced, primarily, in aquifers of fractured limestone with solution channels. The geohydrology of McMinn County makes groundwater protection an important issue. This report represents the results of a cooperative effort to address both immediate and long-term needs for groundwater protection. A three-phased approach is used to suggest specific actions that would help safeguard public health and future economic growth of the county. Phase 1 involves a technical committee to assist local governments on groundwater-related matters, investigation of specific measures for wellhead protection in McMinn County, and public education. Phase 2 focuses on gaining additional technical information through fracture/lineament tracing for the entire county using aerial photography and computerizing the groundwater data which resides in many paper files of the many federal, state, and local governments. Phase 3 suggests a dye tracer and/or aquifer testing for Ingleside Spring to refine the initially identified wellhead protection area.

  20. Wind Energy Guide for County Commissioners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides county commissioners, planners, and other local county government officials with a practical overview of information required to successfully implement commercial wind energy projects in their county.

  1. Cluster of Ebola Virus Disease, Bong and Montserrado Counties, Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Nyenswah, Tolbert G.; Fallah, Mosaka; Calvert, Geoffrey M.; Duwor, Stanley; Hamilton, E. Dutch; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Arzoaquoi, Sampson; Dweh, Emmanuel; Burbach, Ryan; Dlouhy, Diane; Oeltmann, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Lack of trust in government-supported services after the death of a health care worker with symptoms of Ebola resulted in ongoing Ebola transmission in 2 Liberia counties. Ebola transmission was facilitated by attempts to avoid cremation of the deceased patient and delays in identifying and monitoring contacts. PMID:26079309

  2. Building a Model System of Developmental Services in Orange County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; Russ, Shirley; Regalado, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In 1998, California voters passed Proposition 10, the California Children and Families First Act, which provides for an excise tax on tobacco products to fund parent education, health and child care programs that promote early childhood development for 0-5s. Since the adoption of its first Strategic Plan (2000), the Orange County First 5…

  3. HOME ENVIRONMENT AND CHILDHOOD ASTHMA IN A RURAL IOWA COUNTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    HOME ENVIRONMENT AND CHILDHOOD ASTHMA IN A RURAL IOWA COUNTY
    Erik R. Svendsen*?, Stephen J. Reynolds*?, James A. Merchant*, Allison L. Naleway*?, Ann M. Stromquist*, Peter S. Thorne*.
    *University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA ?Current: USEPA RTP, NC ?Curre...

  4. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... to urban (Urban, 38.4%, High Poverty Rural 51.3%, Other Rural, 45%). Counties with high rates ... for information about oral health programs in my area? The Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors ( ...

  5. Mono County geothermal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Three geothermal projects have been proposed or are underway in Mono County, California. The Mammoth/Chance geothermal development project plans to construct a 10-MW geothermal binary power plant which will include 8 production and 3 injection wells. Pacific Lighting Energy Systems is also planning a 10-MW binary power plant consisting of 5 geothermal wells and up to 4 injection wells. A geothermal research project near Mammoth Lakes has spudded a well to provide a way to periodically measure temperature gradient, pressure, and chemistry of the thermal waters and to investigate the space-heating potential of the area in the vicinity of Mammoth Lakes. All three projects are briefly described.

  6. Menominee: Wisconsin's 72nd County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidemann, Wayne H.; Fuguitt, Glenn V.

    Menominee Indian Reservation became a county after the 1960 Census of Population; therefore, data for the county as a unit were distributed throughout the census publication and appeared as civil division tabulation. This 1963 report attempts to compile these data, as well as data from previous census publications, and present them in easily…

  7. A Conversation on Distressed Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jack; Baldwin, Fred D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999, 108 of Appalachia's 406 counties were "distressed," with high poverty and unemployment rates. Three experts on Appalachia (Ron Eller, Amy K. Glasmeier, Greg Bischak) discuss problems and potentials of these counties, focusing on the working poor, welfare reform, the utility of social indicators, the challenge of changing the…

  8. Frederick County Community Perception Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick Community Coll., MD.

    In 1997, Frederick Community College (FCC) in Maryland conducted a telephone survey of a random sample of 466 Frederick County residents to identify their perceptions of the college. In particular, the survey examined Frederick County residents' image of FCC, level of awareness of services and programs offered by FCC, and the types of services…

  9. Walking to Save a County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotnick, Karen

    1981-01-01

    Describes the 10-year history and accomplishments of the Walk to Save the County which has preserved more than 400 acres of Onondaga County, New York. Outlines organizational structure, promotional strategies, awards, and educational opportunities involved in this annual fund-raising hike by third- through eighth-grade students. (NEC)

  10. Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train entering tunnel. Westbound conrail locomotive emerging from tunnel. Allegheny tunnel at right; Gallitzin Tunnel (Haer no. PA-516) at left. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Tunnel, Beneath Allegheny Mountain, east of Railroad Street, Gallitzin, Cambria County, PA

  11. Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound conrail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound conrail locomotive approaching tunnel in right foreground. Allegheny tunnel at right; Gallitzin Tunnel (Haer no. PA-516) at left. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Tunnel, Beneath Allegheny Mountain, east of Railroad Street, Gallitzin, Cambria County, PA

  12. Hydrology of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2007-01-01

    Local water managers usually rely on information produced at the State and regional scale to make water-resource management decisions. Current assessments of hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County, Florida, commonly end at the boundaries of two water management districts (South Florida Water Management District and the Southwest Florida Water Management District), which makes it difficult for managers to determine conditions throughout the county. The last comprehensive water-resources assessment of Polk County was published almost 40 years ago. To address the need for current countywide information, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3?-year study in 2002 to update information about hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County and identify changes that have occurred. Ground-water use in Polk County has decreased substantially since 1965. In 1965, total ground-water withdrawals in the county were about 350 million gallons per day. In 2002, withdrawals totaled about 285 million gallons per day, of which nearly 95 percent was from the Floridan aquifer system. Water-conservation practices mainly related to the phosphate-mining industry as well as the decrease in the number of mines in operation in Polk County have reduced total water use by about 65 million gallons per day since 1965. Polk County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer system, which is unconfined and composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer system is underlain by the intermediate confining unit, which grades into the intermediate aquifer system and consists of up to two water-bearing zones composed of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a thick sequence of permeable limestone and dolostone, consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and

  13. Orange County Photovoltaic Project & Educational COmponent

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Renee

    2016-02-12

    Orange County Climate Change Education Center: The Climate Change Education Center, originally located within the Orange County Convention Center, served as a central place to inform and educate commercial and residential sectors of environmental, health, and economic benefits of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and greenhouse gas emission reductions. Grant funds were used to pay for the rent required to maintain a lease at the Convention Center, conduct five educational workshops, and for planned upgrades to the Center displays highlighting a number of energy efficiency and renewable energy projects implemented at the Orange County Convention Center and Downtown Orange County. An initial design concept for an upgraded Climate Change Education Center and educational displays was proposed. However, after the Convention Center determined the space occupied by the Climate Change Education Center; a feasibility study for relocation to the proposed area was conducted in October 2013. In December 2013, it was determined that the desired location of the for the Climate Change Education Center at the Orange County Extension Education Center provided too many construction challenges for relocation with too many building retrofits and access problems, including lack of access for loading and unloading exhibits as well as roof drainage relocations and sewer service connection issues. Another suitable location for relocating the Climate Change Education Center could not be located so the project was terminated. The Climate Change Education Center is no longer in existence in Orange County and has been eliminated. Grant funds were used to pay for marketing services for a state wide marketing program including solar & other renewable energy technologies for rebranding and developing marketing materials including web site design and updating. A website was maintained and updated the www.PowerUpGreenEnergy.com website (no longer in service). Sustainability Training for the

  14. Household hazardous waste disposal in Benton County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    McEvoy, J.W. ); Rossignol, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    Residents of Benton County, Oregon were studied to assess current and recent disposal practices for hazardous household wastes (HHW), plan for future HHW disposal programs, and guide educational and informational resource strategies that foster the safe disposal of HHW. The study results indicate that many Benton County residents dispose of their HHW by methods that may not protect human health and the environment. These methods include landfilling HHW, pouring HHW on the ground or into sewer/septic systems, and burning HHW. The study suggests that the most viable disposal system for HHW in Benton County is a permanent collection site within easy access (fewer than 10 miles) to potential users and funded by user fees.

  15. Somerset County Flood Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summer, William M.

    1998-01-01

    IntroductionThe timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the flood of August 2, 1973, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which six lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how unexpected and costly, especially in terms of human life, a flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin.Recognizing the need for detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Somerset County, installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. The availability of data provided by this system will improve the flood forecasting ability of the National Weather Service (NWS), and has assisted Somerset County and municipal agencies in planning and execution of flood-preparation and emergency evacuation procedures in the county.This fact sheet describes the Somerset County Flood Information System and identifies its benefits.

  16. 32 CFR 1602.10 - County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties, independent cities, and similar...

  17. Pet ownership in rural Northern California (El Dorado County).

    PubMed

    Franti, C E; Kraus, J F; Borhani, N O; Johnson, S L; Tucker, S D

    1980-01-15

    Demographic and economic aspects of pet ownership were studied in 488 households in El Dorado County, California, from May to July 1971. About 60% of households owned dogs or cats, and pet ownership was most prevalent (75%) in two small residential communities in the western end of the county. Among dogs, Poodle and German Shepherd Dog were the most popular breeds; about 36% of the females in the sample were spayed, but only 6% of the males were castrated. Approximately one third of all cats had been neutered. Reported use of veterinary services was higher for dogs (79%) than for cats (53%). The results of the survey indicated pet ownership is most likely to be found in households with children, where the head of household is employed, generally confirming findings from earlier surveys in Yolo, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties (all in northern California) and later surveys in Champaign County, Illinois, and Garland, Tex. Some community health findings were included for El Dorado County and nearby Yolo County. In these two counties, cancer was reported more frequently by adults without pets (3.9% of those greater than or equal to 65 years old) than by pet owners (1.8% of those greater than or equal to 65 years old). Among children less than 5 years old, "frequent diarrhea" was reported more commonly in homes without pets (9.5% vs 2.6%; P less than 0.01). On the other hand, pet-owning adults, 16 to 64 years of age, living in rural areas or areas with generally lower than average incomes reported "frequent headaches" (21%) more frequently than did adults without pets (17%; P less than 0.025%) who resided in the same areas.

  18. An Exploratory Study of the Comprehension, Retention and Action of the Denton County Older Population in Regards to Disaster Preparedness Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Rebekah P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to operationalize the responses from a sample of the community dwelling older population from Denton County, Texas on disaster preparedness education given by Denton County Health Department (DCHD) personnel. The goals and objectives were drawn from the Texas Public Health and Medical Emergency Management…

  19. Heart Disease Death Rates in Low Versus High Land Elevation Counties in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Hart, John

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on land elevation and cancer death rates in the U.S. revealed lower cancer death rates in higher elevations. The present study further tests the possible effect of land elevation on a diffident health outcome, namely, heart disease death rates. U.S. counties not overlapping in their land elevations according to their lowest and highest elevation points were identified. Using an ecological design, heart disease death rates for two races (black and white) corresponding to lower elevation counties were compared to heart disease death rates in higher land elevation counties using the two-sample t-test and effect size statistics. Death rates in higher land elevation counties for both races were lower compared to the death rates in lower land elevation counties (p < 0.001) with large effect sizes (of > 0.70). Since this is an observational study, no causal inference is claimed, and further research is indicated to verify these findings.

  20. Crisis & Commitment: 150 Years of Service by Los Angeles County Public Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cousineau, Michael R.; Tranquada, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The Los Angeles County University of Southern California Medical Center will open soon, replacing the county’s current 74-year-old facility with a modern, although smaller, facility. Los Angeles County has provided hospital care to the indigent since 1858, during which time, the operation of public hospitals has shifted from a state-mandated welfare responsibility to a preeminent part of the county’s public health mission. As this shift occurred, the financing of Los Angeles County hospitals changed from primarily county support to state and federal government sources, particularly Medicaid. The success of the new hospital will depend on whether government leaders at all levels provide the reforms needed to help the county and its partners stabilize its funding base. PMID:17329642

  1. Frederick County Green Homes Challenge

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Frederick County, Maryland, is an EPA Climate Showcase Community. EPA’s Climate Showcase Communities Program helps local governments and tribal nations pilot innovative, cost-effective and replicable community-based greenhouse gas reduction projects.

  2. MIGRANT HEALTH PROJECT, PENNSYLVANIA, 1966--ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT REPORT ON HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES FOR MIGRANTS, PROJECT GRANT 33, UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, A.L.; AND OTHERS

    HEALTH SERVICES WERE MADE AVAILABLE TO SOME 6176 SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS IN A FIFTEEN-COUNTY PROJECT AREA OF PENNSYLVANIA DURING 1966. THIS PROJECT IS AN EXTENSION AND EXPANSION OF A FOUR-COUNTY MIGRANT HEALTH PROGRAM BEGUN IN 1963. THE SERVICES PROVIDED BY THIS PROGRAM HAVE BEEN EXPANDED FROM OUT-PATIENT SERVICES TO INCLUDE DENTAL CARE,…

  3. Geothermal development plan: Yuma county

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

  4. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  5. View of the Warrington Avenue Bridge portal, inbound from Pittsburgh ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the Warrington Avenue Bridge portal, inbound from Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh & Castle Shannon Railroad, Warrington Avenue Bridge, Overbrook Trolley Line, Crossing Warrington Avenue, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  6. Elevation of Warrington Avenue Bridge, southbound of Warrington Avenue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of Warrington Avenue Bridge, southbound of Warrington Avenue - Pittsburgh & Castle Shannon Railroad, Warrington Avenue Bridge, Overbrook Trolley Line, Crossing Warrington Avenue, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  7. View of the Warrington Avenue Bridge portal, outbound from Pittsburgh ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the Warrington Avenue Bridge portal, outbound from Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh & Castle Shannon Railroad, Warrington Avenue Bridge, Overbrook Trolley Line, Crossing Warrington Avenue, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  8. Economic impact of hospital closure on small rural counties, 1984 to 1988: demonstration of a comparative analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Probst, J C; Samuels, M E; Hussey, J R; Berry, D E; Ricketts, T C

    1999-01-01

    Hospital closure in a rural community may affect the locale's economic prospects as well as the health of its residents. Studies of economic effects have primarily relied on modeling techniques rather than observation of actual change. This study demonstrates the use of a comparative analysis approach for estimating the economic effects of hospital closure on small rural counties. The experiences of 103 small rural counties at which a hospital closed between 1984 and 1988 was compared with a matched group of counties at which no closure took place. "Comparable" counties were selected based on seven scales measuring the similarity between a closure county and potential comparisons. Three scales examined population and economic characteristics in the year before closure; two scales measured change throughout a three-year period preceding closure; and two scales measured change throughout a five-year period preceding closure. Closure effects were measured through a multivariate analysis of the post-closure economic history of closure and comparison counties. The key assumption is that similar counties should have similar experiences over time. If an event occurs within some of these counties but not others, this event should have visible effects. Comparative analysis suggested that earned income in closure counties (excluding farming and mining income) was lower than in comparison counties subsequent to closure and that labor force growth was similarly affected. A comparative analysis approach produces results that parallel those obtained from economic modeling and should be considered for further research.

  9. Tract- and County-Level Income Inequality and Individual Risk of Obesity in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jessie X.; Wen, Ming; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We tested three alternative hypotheses regarding the relationship between income inequality and individual risk of obesity at two geographical scales: U.S. Census tract and county. Methods Income inequality was measured by Gini coefficients, created from the 2000 U.S. Census. Obesity was clinically measured in the 2003–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The individual measures and area measures were geo-linked to estimate three sets of multi-level models: tract only, county only, and tract and county simultaneously. Gender was tested as a moderator. Results At both the tract and county levels, higher income inequality was associated with lower individual risk of obesity. The size of the coefficient was larger for county-level Gini than for tract-level Gini; and controlling income inequality at one level did not reduce the impact of income inequality at the other level. Gender was not a significant moderator for the obesity-income inequality association. Conclusions Higher tract and county income inequality was associated with lower individual risk of obesity, indicating that at least at the tract and county levels and in the context of cross-sectional data, the public health goal of reducing the rate of obesity is in line with anti-poverty policies of addressing poverty through mixed-income development where neighborhood income inequality is likely higher than homogeneous neighborhoods. PMID:26680289

  10. The effects on population health status of using dedicated property taxes to fund local public health agencies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the United States, a dedicated property tax describes the legal authority given to a local jurisdiction to levy and collect a tax for a specific purpose. We investigated for an association of locally dedicated property taxes to fund local public health agencies and improved health status in the eight states designated as the Mississippi Delta Region. Methods We analyzed the difference in health outcomes of counties with and without a dedicated public health tax after adjusting for a set of control variables using regression models for county level data from 720 counties of the Mississippi Delta Region. Results Levying a dedicated public health tax for counties with per capita income above $28,000 is associated with improved health outcomes of those counties when compared to counties without a dedicated property tax for public health. Alternatively, levying a dedicated property tax in counties with lower per capita income is associated with poor health outcomes. Conclusions There are both positive and negative consequences of using dedicated property taxes to fund public health. Policymakers should carefully examine both the positive association of improved health outcomes and negative impact of taxation on poor populations before authorizing the use of dedicated local property tax levies to fund public health agencies. PMID:21672231

  11. California's county hospitals and the University of California graduate medical education system. Current issues and future directions.

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, W J; Pierce, K; Martin, D K

    1998-01-01

    California's county hospitals train 45% of the state's graduate medical residents, including 33% of residents in the University of California system. This paper describes the interrelationships of California's county hospitals and the University of California (UC) graduate medical education (GME) programs, highlighting key challenges facing both systems. The mission of California's county health care systems is to serve all who need health care services regardless of ability to pay. Locating UC GME programs in county hospitals helps serve the public missions of both institutions. Such partnerships enhance the GME experience of UC residents, provide key primary care training opportunities, and ensure continued health care access for indigent and uninsured populations. Only through affiliation with university training programs have county hospitals been able to run the cost-effective, quality programs that constitute an acceptable safety net for the poor. Financial stress, however, has led county hospitals and UC's GME programs to advocate for reform in both GME financing and indigent care funding. County hospitals must participate in constructing strategies for GME reform to assure that GME funding mechanisms provide for equitable compensation of county hospitals' essential role. Joint advocacy will also be essential in achieving significant indigent care policy reform. PMID:9614786

  12. Treating Ulster's rural poor: the county infirmaries of Armagh and Down 1766-1851.

    PubMed

    Beale, G M

    2002-11-01

    This paper considers the role of county infirmaries in providing health care for the inhabitants of two counties in south-east Ulster. It traces the establishment and management of these institutions from their beginnings shortly after the passing of the Infirmaries Act (1765) to the middle of the nineteenth century. From the available evidence, the accommodation, staff, patient numbers and diet of the infirmaries are considered and an assessment of their efficacy in offering a valuable service to their communities is discussed.

  13. 78 FR 27856 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... rule concerning Executive Order 12866 and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, Executive Orders 12372...

  14. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. VI; Programming School Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with programming school mental health in Vance and Franklin counties. Detailing both successes and failures, this booklet presents the following program activities: (1)…

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Colusa County Chamber of Commerce ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Colusa County Chamber of Commerce Booklet - Album of the 'County of Good Luck' Original: 1908 Re-photo: September 1940 - Hall of Records & County Jail, Colusa, Colusa County, CA

  16. Population substructure in Cache County, Utah: the Cache County study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Population stratification is a key concern for genetic association analyses. In addition, extreme homogeneity of ethnic origins of a population can make it difficult to interpret how genetic associations in that population may translate into other populations. Here we have evaluated the genetic substructure of samples from the Cache County study relative to the HapMap Reference populations and data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Results Our findings show that the Cache County study is similar in ethnic diversity to the self-reported "Whites" in the ADNI sample and less homogenous than the HapMap CEU population. Conclusions We conclude that the Cache County study is genetically representative of the general European American population in the USA and is an appropriate population for conducting broadly applicable genetic studies. PMID:25078123

  17. Somerset County Flood Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  18. Primary and secondary syphilis - Jefferson county, Alabama, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    2009-05-08

    In June 2006, the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) requested assistance from CDC to investigate and control a multiyear epidemic of syphilis in Jefferson County. The county had experienced a decrease in primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis cases, from 279 in 1995 to nine in 2002. By 2005, the incidence had begun to rise substantially, culminating with 238 cases in 2006 and 166 in 2007. Beginning in August 2006, CDC assisted the Jefferson County Department of Health (JCDH) in investigating the increase in cases and in planning control measures. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which found that the characteristics of cases during 2002-2004 differed substantially from cases during 2005-2007. Declines in U.S. syphilis rates, which reached their lowest point in 2000, led to optimism that syphilis elimination (defined as the absence of sustained syphilis transmission) in the United States was possible, and CDC's National Syphilis Elimination Plan was launched in 1999. Although increased U.S. syphilis rates in the early 2000s have been reported to be associated primarily with transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM), the findings from this investigation indicate reemergence of syphilis among women and heterosexual men in Jefferson County. Public health officials in other areas should remain alert for similar epidemiologic shifts. Public health departments should facilitate access to effective treatment in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics or other settings, consider selective screening in high-prevalence populations (e.g., in correctional settings), and ensure adequate partner notification and treatment.

  19. Geothermal development plan: Yuma County

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Yuma County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F), and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate (90/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C, 194/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F) temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated, although one resource area is located near Yuma, Arizona. One resource site is inferred to contain a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2 percent per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without advese affect on agriculture. Six firms were found in Yuma County which may be able to utilize geothermal energy for process heat needs. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

  20. Curriculum for Community Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Paula S.

    The Community Outreach Curriculum described in this paper is designed to prepare community health aides employed through the Outreach Department of Pima County (Arizona) Indian Health Inc., (PCIHI), which consists of two medical clinics on two separate reservations. The first sections of the paper describe PCIHI, provide a rationale for the…

  1. Migrant Health Program: New Jersey State Department of Health, 1971 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Health, Trenton.

    Project objectives and descriptions of 6 county migrant health projects are summarized and evaluated. The project services provided the migrant worker and his family included hospital, dental health, eye examination, nutrition, school health, maternal and child health, sanitation, and social services. Clinical and outreach activities in the…

  2. Public health week: marketing the concept of public health.

    PubMed

    Evans, C A; Margolis, L A

    1992-01-01

    The Public Health Programs and Services (PHP&S) Branch of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services began a strategic planning effort in January 1986 to meet new disease trends, curb rising health care costs, consolidate limited resources, and handle shifting demographics. A strategic plan was designed to assess the opportunities and challenges facing the agency over a 5-year horizon. Priority areas were recognized, and seven strategic directives were formulated to guide PHP&S in expanding public health services to a changing community. Health promotion was acknowledged as a critical target of the strategic planning process. Among the most significant results of the health promotion directive was the establishment of an annual Public Health Week in Los Angeles County. Beginning in 1988, 1 week per year was selected to enhance the community's awareness of public health programs and the leadership role PHP&S plays in providing these programs to nearly 9 million residents of Los Angeles County. Events in Public Health Week include a professional lecture series and the honoring of an outstanding public health activist and a media personality who has fostered health promotion. Other free community activities such as mobile clinics, screenings, and health fairs are held throughout the county. With intensive media coverage of Public Health Week, PHP&S has been aggressive in promoting its own services and accomplishments while also educating the community on vital wellness issues. The strategic methodology employed by PHP&S, with its emphasis on long-range proactive planning, is receiving national recognition and could be adopted by similar agencies wishing to enhance their image and develop unique health promotion projects in their communities.

  3. Public water supplies in Gloucester County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardt, William F.

    1963-01-01

    Gloucester County is in the southwestern part of New Jersey, below Camden, and is a part of the Lower Delaware River Valley. This area is attracting new industry and has shown a population increase of about 47 percent from 1950 to 1960, mostly urban. With the economic growth of the county, the availability and quality of water become increasingly important. The county is in the Coastal Plain of New Jersey. It is underlain by unconsolidated sands and clays of Quaternary, Tertiary, and Cretaceous age. The Raritan and Magothy Formations constitute the most important aquifers and yield more than 95 percent of the water pumped by the public water systems in the county. These formations are capable of yielding 1,400 gpm (gallons per minute) or more to large diameter wells. High yielding wells generally can be drilled anywhere in the county, although the formations are deeper toward the Atlantic Ocean. The Cohansey Sand, second most important aquifer, yields up to 800 gpm or more from large diameter wells. This aquifer is present only in the sparsely populated southeastern half of the county. The Wenonah Formation and Mount Laurel Sand are capable of yielding 100 to 200 gpm in certain areas. The overall chemical quality of the naturally occurring ground water is good. The water generally meets the U.S. Public Health Service's (1962) suggested limit for dissolved solids; however, in some areas, the water carries objectionable amounts of iron and nitrate in solution and has a low pH. Contamination of ground water by salt-water encroachment or by pollution from industrial activity or organic waste in densely populated areas should be prevented. The quality rather than the quantity of water may be the important factor in future ground-water developments. The 21 public water systems in Gloucester County pumped about 1.3 billion gallons of water during 1948 and some 2.7 billion gallons during 1959. This is slightly more than a hundred percent increase in pumpage in 12 year s

  4. Ground-water resources and geology of Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Joseph B.

    1975-01-01

    Good-quality water is available from the sand-and-gravel, Niagara, and sandstone aquifers in Waukesha County, Wis. As much as 15 gallons per minute (0.95 litres per second) can be obtained from wells almost everywhere in the county. Several hundred gallons per minute are available from aquifers in the glacial drift that fill bedrock valleys to thicknesses of 300 feet (91 metres) or more. Estimated well yields from much of the surficial outwash in western Waukesha County exceed 500 gallons per minute (31 litres per second). Estimated well yields from most of the Niagara aquifer, a dolomite as much as 325 feet (99 metres) thick in the eastern two-thirds of the county, exceed 50 gallons per minute (3.2 litres per second). The sandstone aquifer underlies the entire county and ranges in thickness from about 400 feet (120 metres) in the northwest corner to about 2,400 feet (730 metres) in the southeast corner. This aquifer yields more than 1,000 gallons per minute (63 litres per second) to wells over most of the county and is the principal source for municipal and subdivision water. Ground water in Waukesha County is of good quality and is suitable for most uses. Most of the water is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type, is very hard [more than 180 mg/l (milligrams per litre) hardness], and requires softening for some uses. The ground water locally contains iron and manganese concentrations that exceed the limits (0.3 and 0.05 mg/l, respectively) recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service (1962, p. 7). Water high in sulfate and dissolved solids (saline water) is present locally in the Niagara and sandstone aquifers. Water from one well contained excessive nitrate (more than 45 mg/l). With one exception, wells sampled at irregular intervals indicated no significant changes in their chemical characteristics with time. About 24.3 million gallons per day (1.06 cubic metres per second) of ground water was pumped in the county in 1970. Sixty-two percent was withdrawn from

  5. Archuleta County CO Lineaments

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Archuleta Lineaments Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer traces apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in the area around Pagosa springs in Archuleta County, Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids. Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and right-of-ways. These lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Note: This shape file was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and nature. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4132831.990103 m Left: 311979.997741 m Right: 331678.289280 m Bottom: 4116067

  6. Deforestation and malaria in Mâncio Lima County, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sarah H; Gangnon, Ronald; Silveira, Guilherme Abbad; Patz, Jonathan A

    2010-07-01

    Malaria is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the Amazon. We used malaria reports for health districts collected in 2006 by the Programa Nacional de Controle da Malaria to determine whether deforestation is associated with malaria incidence in the county (municipio) of Mancio Lima, Acre State, Brazil. Cumulative percent deforestation was calculated for the spatial catchment area of each health district by using 60 x 60-meter, resolution-classified imagery. Statistical associations were identified with univariate and multivariate general additive negative binomial models adjusted for spatial effects. Our cross-sectional study shows malaria incidence across health districts in 2006 is positively associated with greater changes in percentage of cumulative deforestation within respective health districts. After adjusting for access to care, health district size, and spatial trends, we show that a 4.2%, or 1 SD, change in deforestation from August 1997 through August 2001 is associated with a 48% increase of malaria incidence.

  7. Johnson County Business and Industry Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In fall 1982, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) conducted two surveys to determine the internal training needs of business and industry in Johnson County. One survey was mailed to the chief executives of some 2,000 businesses and industries, and another was distributed to about 2,000 employees of a large corporation in the county. Study…

  8. Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not…

  9. Once Distressed, Jackson County Moves On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1981, Jackson County, North Carolina, appeared on the first list of "distressed counties" in Appalachia. Since then, the rural county has made significant improvements by investing in its physical infrastructure (which also promotes tourism); fostering economic-development partnerships among governments, small businesses, and local…

  10. Low-Wage Counties Face Locational Disadvantages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Robert; Cromartie, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Small populations and remoteness are the most salient features of low-wage counties. These locational attributes coincide with fewer high-wage jobs, yet low wages within industries define low-wage counties more than industry composition. Although adults in low-wage counties have less education and labor force participation overall, the role played…

  11. Trouble Brewing in Orange County. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Orange County will soon face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that Orange County faces a total $41.2 billion liability for retiree benefits that are underfunded--including $9.4 billion for the county pension system and an estimated…

  12. 76 FR 13172 - Placer County Water Agency

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Placer County Water Agency Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with... Filed: February 23, 2011 d. Applicant: Placer County Water Agency e. Name of Project: Middle Fork... Manager, Placer County Water Agency, 144 Ferguson Road, Auburn, CA 95603; Telephone: (530) 823-4490....

  13. Description of water-resource-related data compiled for Harvey County, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    Site, construction, geologic, water-level, water- quality, water-withdrawal, and well-survey data for sites in Harvey County were compiled in cooper- ation with the Harvey County Health Department as part of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's Local Environmental Protection Program (LEPP). These data were entered into a relational data-base management system (RDBMS) to facilitate the analysis required to meet the LEPP goals of developing plans for nonpoint-source management and for public-water-supply protection. The data in the RDBMS are organized into digital data sets. The data sets contain the water- resource-related data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for 668 wells; by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for 1,636 wells, 6 public-water-supply systems, 6 streams, and 2 surface-water impoundments; by the Kansas State Board of Agriculture for 423 wells and 26 streams or impoundments; by well-drilling con- tractors and the Kansas Geological Survey for 126 wells; and by Harvey County for 89 wells. In addition, data on 761 wells and 133 sites without wells resulting from a survey of rural landowners and residents by Harvey County as a part of the LEPP are contained in another data set. The data in these 7 data sets are available from the Harvey County Health Department in Newton, Kansas. (USGS)

  14. Role of a child death review team in a small rural county in California.

    PubMed

    Keleher, Nancy; Arledge, Dawn N

    2011-02-01

    Humboldt County is one of California's most rural counties. Located in far Northern California, it is 6-7 h by car from the nearest major urban areas of San Francisco and Sacramento. In landmass it is one of the largest of the California counties, about the size of Rhode Island. In 1991, the Humboldt County Public Health Branch began a Fetal Infant Mortality Review programme. Because of the county's small size, the Fetal Infant Mortality Review process was combined with the review of child deaths through age 17. Responding to a high proportion of cases of child deaths due to unintentional injury, the team developed a workgroup to explore injury prevention strategies. Funding was identified to hire a coordinator who formed a Childhood Injury Prevention Program and developed a strategic plan. The plan prioritised both motor vehicle/traffic safety related injuries and general childhood injury. Funding was obtained for child passenger safety and youth safe driving programmes. The Childhood Injury Prevention Program also collaboratively addressed other injury prevention areas, including water safety. As a small, rural county in California, committed safety advocates from multiple agencies were able to utilise the child death review process to guide injury prevention efforts. Case reviews provided the motivation and quantitative and qualitative data to design programmes and implement interventions that addressed specific unintentional injuries causing child deaths and injuries in Humboldt County.

  15. County Differences in Mortality among Foreign-Born Compared to Native Swedes 1970-1999.

    PubMed

    Albin, Björn; Hjelm, Katarina; Ekberg, Jan; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2012-01-01

    Background. Regional variations in mortality and morbidity have been shown in Europe and USA. Longitudinal studies have found increased mortality, dissimilarities in mortality pattern, and differences in utilization of healthcare between foreign- and native-born Swedes. No study has been found comparing mortality among foreign-born and native-born Swedes in relation to catchment areas/counties. Methods. The aim was to describe and compare mortality among foreign-born persons and native Swedes during 1970-1999 in 24 counties in Sweden. Data from the Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare was used, and the database consisted of 723,948 persons, 361,974 foreign-born living in Sweden in 1970 and aged 16 years and above and 361,974 matched Swedish controls. Results. Latest county of residence independently explained higher mortality among foreign-born persons in all but four counties; OR varied from 1.01 to 1.29. Counties with a more rural structure showed the highest differences between foreign-born persons and native controls. Foreign-born persons had a lower mean age (1.0-4.3 years) at time of death. Conclusion. County of residence influences mortality; higher mortality is indicated among migrants than native Swedes in counties with a more rural structure. Further studies are needed to explore possible explanations.

  16. Fresno County Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Fresno County Office of Education and the Fresno Unified School District hosted the Mock Trial Competition. The state competition is sponsored by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, with cosponsorship from the California State Bar Association and the California Young Lawyer's Association. This…

  17. Kinship Care in Walton County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charon, Sara L.; Nackerud, Larry

    1996-01-01

    The quality of life of maltreated children placed with relatives was examined through interviews with nine families in Walton County (Georgia) who had taken in related children. Over half of the children had experienced some improvement in home life, school performance, and their physical and mental status. Kinship care families indicated needs…

  18. San Diego County Literacy Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, June; And Others

    The Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) database for San Diego County reported in this document includes demographic and reading appraisal data collected during 15 months through April 1990 for more than 60,000 students in 6 diverse programs. Some of the findings resulting from analysis of the database include the following: (1)…

  19. Somerset County Employer Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rephann, Terance J.

    Allegany Community College in Cumberland, Maryland, conducted an employer assessment survey of Somerset County businesses during the winter of 1995 in order to provide evaluation data for planning and curriculum development for the secondary and postsecondary educational institutions. The survey was mailed to 760 establishments, with a 29 percent…

  20. Geothermal development plan: Pima County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. H.; Goldstone, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    The Pima County Area Development evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. Four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 1000 C (2120 F) were identified. In addition, one area is identified as having a temperature of 1470 F (2970 F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in Tecson where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing sector and the existence of major copper mines provide opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. However, available water supplies are identified as a major constraing to projected growth. A regional energy analysis, future predictions for energy consumption, and energy prices are given. Potential geothermal users in Pima County are identified and projections of maximum economic geothermal utilization are given. One hundred fifteen firms in 32 industrial classes have some potential for geothermal use are identified. In addition, 26 agribusiness firms were found in the county.

  1. Hydrogeology of Wood County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batten, W.G.

    1989-01-01

    The average rate of ground·water pumpage in Wood County in 1985 was 9.7 million gallons per day. Of this rate, about 6 million gallons per day is pumped from municipal-supply wells in seven communities.An additional 1.08 million gallons per day is pumped for agricultural irrigation.

  2. Southern Nevada Library Services; Serving Lincoln County, Nye County, Esmeralda County through the Clark County Library District: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Phyllis I.

    An anecdotal review covers the first year of increased library service in Nye, Lincoln, and Esmeralda Counties, Nevada, under the Southern Nevada Library Services project funded by the Library Services and Construction Act. Using information from questionnaires and site visits, the extent of library services in each community in the area is…

  3. Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionWebb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and to

  4. Technician Training in Environmental Health Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert G.; Sherman, Alan

    1976-01-01

    The Environmental Health Science Technology Program was initiated by Middlesex County College in 1971 to provide the trained personnel needed by industry and government. Major areas needing environmental health technicians, the environmental health technology curriculum, and the on-the-job-training internship program are discussed. (BT)

  5. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Coverage Among Females Aged 11 to 17 in Texas Counties: An Application of Multilevel, Small Area Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Eberth, Jan M.; Hossain, Md Monir; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Zhang, Xingyou; Holt, James B.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Local data are often used to plan and evaluate public health interventions and policy. With increasingly fewer public resources to collect sufficient data to support direct estimation of local outcomes, methods for deriving small area estimates are vital. The purpose of this study is to describe the county-level geographic distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage among adolescent females in Texas using multilevel small area estimation. Methods Multilevel (individual, county, public health region) random-intercept logit models were fit to HPV vaccination data (≥1 dose Gardasil) from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using the parameter estimates from the final model, we simulated 10,000 data sets for each regression coefficient from the normal distribution and applied them to the logit model to estimate HPV vaccine coverage in each county. Results County-level coverage estimates ranged from 7% to 29%, compared with the state average of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.59–21.88). Many Southwestern border and metropolitan counties exhibited high coverage estimates. Low coverage estimates were noted in the Panhandle, Southeastern border region, and Northeast. Significant correlations were observed between HPV vaccination and Hispanic ethnicity, county poverty, and public health region poverty. Conclusion Harnessing the flexibility of multilevel small area models to estimate HPV vaccine coverage at the county level, we have provided data that may inform the development of health education programs/policies, the provision of health services, and the planning of new research studies. Additionally, we have provided a framework for modeling other health outcomes at the county level using national survey data. PMID:23481692

  6. Groundwater-Quality Assessment, Pike County, Pennsylvania, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    constituents introduced by human activities that pose a health risk or otherwise were of concern in groundwater in the county. The analyses included major ions, nutrients, selected trace metals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), selected organic wastewater compounds, gross alpha-particle and gross beta-particle activity, uranium, and radon-222. Analyses of the 20 samples were primarily for dissolved constituents, but six samples were analyzed for both dissolved and total metals. Results of the 2007 sampling indicated few water-quality problems, although concentrations of some constituents indicated influence of human activities on groundwater. No constituent analyzed exceeded any primary drinking-water standard or maximum contaminant level (MCL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Radon-222 levels were greater than, or equal to, the proposed MCL of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in water from 15 (75 percent) of the 20 wells. Radon-222 levels did not exceed the alternative MCL of 4,000 pCi/L in any groundwater sample. Radon-222 is naturally occurring, and the greatest concentrations (up to 2,650 pCi/L) were in water samples from wells in members of the Catskill Formation, a fractured-rock aquifer. The dissolved arsenic concentration of 3.9 micrograms per liter (ug/L) in one sample was greater than the health-advisory (HA) level of 2 ug/L but less than the MCL of 10 ug/L. Recommended or secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCLs) were exceeded for pH, dissolved iron, and dissolved manganese. In six samples analyzed for dissolved and total concentrations of selected metals, total concentrations commonly were much greater than dissolved concentrations of iron, and to a lesser degree, for arsenic, lead, copper, and manganese. Concentrations of iron above the SMCL of 300 ug/L may be more widespread in the county for particulate iron than for dissolved iron. The total arsenic concentration in one of the six samples was greater than the HA level of

  7. Bridging cultural chasms between providers and HIV-positive Haitians in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Potocky-Tripodi, Miriam; Dodge, Karen; Greene, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This article discusses special challenges faced by HIV-positive Haitian immigrants, one of the groups targeted by the Care System Assessment Demonstration Project in Palm Beach County, Florida. The article examines the following issues: structural health care access barriers; language and literacy; health beliefs and practices and their intersection with Western medicine; health care-seeking attitudes, emotions, and behaviors; bridging cultural chasms; and lessons learned.

  8. Prospective study of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension– and Mediterranean-style dietary patterns and age-related cognitive change: the Cache County Study on Memory, Health and Aging123

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Ronald G; Cutler, Adele; Quach, Anna; Bowles, Austin; Corcoran, Christopher; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Norton, Maria C; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Healthy dietary patterns may protect against age-related cognitive decline, but results of studies have been inconsistent. Objective: We examined associations between Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)– and Mediterranean-style dietary patterns and age-related cognitive change in a prospective, population-based study. Design: Participants included 3831 men and women ≥65 y of age who were residents of Cache County, UT, in 1995. Cognitive function was assessed by using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) ≤4 times over 11 y. Diet-adherence scores were computed by summing across the energy-adjusted rank-order of individual food and nutrient components and categorizing participants into quintiles of the distribution of the diet accordance score. Mixed-effects repeated-measures models were used to examine 3MS scores over time across increasing quintiles of dietary accordance scores and individual food components that comprised each score. Results: The range of rank-order DASH and Mediterranean diet scores was 1661–25,596 and 2407–26,947, respectively. Higher DASH and Mediterranean diet scores were associated with higher average 3MS scores. People in quintile 5 of DASH averaged 0.97 points higher than those in quintile 1 (P = 0.001). The corresponding difference for Mediterranean quintiles was 0.94 (P = 0.001). These differences were consistent over 11 y. Higher intakes of whole grains and nuts and legumes were also associated with higher average 3MS scores [mean quintile 5 compared with 1 differences: 1.19 (P < 0.001), 1.22 (P < 0.001), respectively]. Conclusions: Higher levels of accordance with both the DASH and Mediterranean dietary patterns were associated with consistently higher levels of cognitive function in elderly men and women over an 11-y period. Whole grains and nuts and legumes were positively associated with higher cognitive functions and may be core neuroprotective foods common to various healthy plant

  9. Enhancing community partnerships during a public health emergency: the school-located vaccination clinics model in Kanawha County, WV during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    Broad based community support is vital in developing a comprehensive national strategy to protect the public's health prior to, during and after a disaster such as pandemic influenza. When disaster strikes, the successful response is often dependent upon the degree of collaboration, coordination, and shared decision making occurring among a wide-ranging group of public and private stakeholders in the community. Since these preparedness and response activities must occur at a local level, the degree to which a certain community can become resilient after an event is directly dependent upon the success of the response activities. In order to protect its citizens, the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department (KCHD) led a comprehensive community based response to the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. By organizing a high level strategic team consisting of major community stakeholders, KCHD was able to develop broad based community support for its mitigation and countermeasure delivery strategies. The timely enhancement of the existing community partnerships enabled us to successfully conduct several response activities with local community support including school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics. We describe the process, results and challenges faced during our SLV clinics campaign which resulted in exceptionally high vaccination rates for school aged children compared to other jurisdictions across the nation. We also discuss how such partnerships can be sustained resulting in resilient communities and mention some strategies for those contemplating such partnerships in future public health emergency.

  10. Juvenile probation officers' mental health decision making.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Gail A; McReynolds, Larkin S; Whited, Andria L; Keating, Joseph M; Musabegovic, Hana; Huo, Yanling

    2008-09-01

    We reviewed case records for 583 juvenile delinquency intakes in four county juvenile probation offices; 14.4% were receiving mental health or substance use services at case opening, and 24.9% were newly identified during probation contact. Youths were significantly more likely to be newly identified if they were repeat offenders, if their probation officer knew more about mental health and if they resided in a county without a shortage of available mental health professionals. Probation officers were especially likely to underidentify internalizing disorders. Policy implications for promoting identification of mental health needs and improving linkage to community service providers are discussed.

  11. 76 FR 50994 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... finalize the list of projects put forth for final funding consideration. DATES: The meeting will be held... order to finalize the list of projects put forth for final funding consideration. Anyone who would...

  12. Assessment of household preparedness through training exercises--two metropolitan counties, Tennessee, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-09-14

    Public health emergency preparedness involves improving both workforce and household capacity to manage disasters. To improve preparedness at both levels, the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) formed a Rapid Assessment of Populations Impacted by Disasters (RAPID) team. In 2011, the team used Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) two-stage cluster sampling methodology to measure household preparedness for disasters or emergencies in two metropolitan counties. In the two counties, 23% and 31% of households reported being "well-prepared" to handle disasters or emergencies, 43% and 44% reported being "somewhat prepared," and 25% and 20% reported being "not at all prepared." As a result of this experience, RAPID teams were able to improve their methods, streamline processes, and create a better community assessment toolkit. To increase preparedness at both the community and workforce levels, public health departments should assess community preparedness to inform the planning process and provide field training and exercise opportunities for public health workers.

  13. Increasing health inequalities between women in and out of work - the impact of recession or policy change? A repeated cross-sectional study in Stockholm county, 2006 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The social insurance system in Sweden underwent extensive change between 2006 and 2010, with the overall aim of making people enter the labour market. At the same time, economic recession hit Sweden. Previous studies suggest that the economic recession particularly affected women. In light of these changes, the aim of this study is to investigate whether health inequalities between employed women and groups outside the labour market changed between 2006 and 2010. A second aim is to examine the explanatory weight of socio-demographic factors vs social and economic conditions. Methods Data consists of the Stockholm Public Health Surveys (SPHS) for 2006 and 2010. Women aged 18–64 were studied. Through logistic regression, levels of mental distress and limiting longstanding illness (LLI), were compared between four labour market groups; employed and unemployed, sickness absentees and disability pension recipients, at the two time points. Results Mental distress increased among women in all four labour market groups between 2006 and 2010. Differences in mental distress between those employed and groups outside the labour market also increased. These were explained primarily by social and economic conditions. Levels of LLI were unchanged except among the unemployed. The difference in LLI between the unemployed and the employed was mostly explained by social and economic conditions. In the other groups socio-demographic factors were more salient. For both health outcomes, the weight of social and economic conditions had increased in 2010 compared to 2006. Conclusions Results indicate that levels of mental distress increased in all groups, but more so among groups outside the labour market, possibly due to stricter eligibility criteria and lower benefit levels, which particularly affected their social and economic conditions. PMID:25063363

  14. Brookside Mills, Knox County, TN

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Brookside Mills, located in Knox County, TN, was a textile mill that was founded in 1885 and at its peak employed over 1,000 people. Its former uses included fabric weaving, dying, and sewing operations. It was at some point a department store, and during a portion of its history, coal was used as an energy source. Weaving operations continued in some form at the Brookside factory until 1969. In 1996 the buildings were demolished.

  15. Hudson County Community College Periodic Review Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson County Community Coll., Jersey City, NJ.

    Hudson County Community College (HCCC) serves Hudson County, New Jersey. Although the county is the smallest in the state, its 610,000 residents make up one of the most diverse counties in New Jersey. Approximately 40% of residents are Hispanic, 12% are African-American, 10% are Asian, and 35% are White. The county is also home to a growing Middle…

  16. 32. Photocopy of original drawing in possession of the County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Photocopy of original drawing in possession of the County Auditor, Johnson County, Iowa. PROFILE OF HIGHWAY BRIDGE OVER CEDAR RIVER AT SUTLIFF'S FERRY IN JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA, 1897. (RIGHT 1/4 OF DRAWING) PLAN OF APPROACH FOR SUTLIFF'S FERRY BRIDGE OVER CEDAR RIVER, JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA, 1897 - Sutliff's Ferry Bridge, Spanning Cedar River (Cedar Township), Solon, Johnson County, IA

  17. Local transmission of Plasmodium vivax malaria--Palm Beach County, Florida, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-09-26

    The majority of malaria cases diagnosed in the United States are imported, usually by persons who travel to countries where malaria is endemic. However, small outbreaks of locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria continue to occur. Despite certification of malaria eradication in the United States in 1970, 11 outbreaks involving 20 cases of probable locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria have been reported to CDC since 1992, including two reported in July 1996 from Palm Beach County, Florida (Palm Beach County Health Department, unpublished data, 1998). This report describes the investigation of seven cases of locally acquired Plasmodium vivax malaria that occurred in Palm Beach County during July-August 2003. In addition to considering malaria in the differential diagnosis for febrile patients with a history of travel to malarious areas, health-care providers also should consider malaria as a possible cause of fever among patients who have not traveled but are experiencing alternating fevers, rigors, and sweats with no obvious cause.

  18. 78 FR 60686 - Establishment of the Big Valley District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County Viticultural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County Viticultural Areas and Modification of the Red Hills Lake... the boundary of the established 31,250-acre Red Hills Lake County viticultural area in order to align... boundary based on USGS map markings. Big Valley District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County...

  19. Tourism Market Analysis: Cheyenne-Laramie County

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    of a study prepared by the U.S. Travel Data Center in 1981. It found that tourism substantially contributes to Wyoming employment and income. Tourist...of the annual total in the county. Economic Impact of Tourism in Laramie County The 1981 study by U.S. Travel Commission breaks out the economic...implications of tourism by county. The methodology used in estimating eco- nomic impact likely results in overstating its benefits since anyone traveling

  20. County and organizational predictors of depression symptoms among low-income nursing assistants in the USA.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Carles; Li, Yong; Xue, Xiaonan; Thompson, Theresa; Chung, Haejoo; O'Campo, Patricia

    2006-09-01

    Low-wage workers represent an ever-increasing proportion of the US workforce. A wide spectrum of firms demand low-wage workers, yet just 10 industries account for 70% of all low-paying jobs. The bulk of these jobs are in the services and retail sales industries. In health services, 60% of all workers are low-paid, with nursing aides, orderlies, personal attendants, and home care aides earning an average hourly wage of just 7.97 US dollars--a wage that keeps many of these workers hovering near or below the poverty line. Nursing assistants also tend to work in hazardous and grueling conditions. Work conditions are an important determinant of psychological well-being and mental disorders, particularly depression, in the workplace have important consequences for quality of life, worker productivity, and the utilization and cost of health care. In empirical studies of low-wage workers, county-level variables are of theoretical significance. Multilevel studies have recently provided evidence of a link between county-level variables and poor mental health among low-wage workers. To date, however, no studies have simultaneously considered the effect of county-and workplace-level variables. This study uses a repeated measures design and multilevel modeling to simultaneously test the effect of county-, organizational-, workplace-, and individual-level variables on depression symptoms among low-income nursing assistants employed in US nursing homes. We find that age and emotional strain have a statistically significant association with depression symptoms in this population, yet when controlling for county-level variables of poverty, the organizational-level variables used were no longer statistically significant predictors of depression symptoms. This study also contributes to current research methodology in the field of occupational health by using a cross-classified multilevel model to explicitly account for all variations in this three-level data structure, modeling and