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Sample records for allegheny mountain tunnel

  1. Acid rain and atmospheric chemistry at Allegheny Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.R.; Brachaczek, W.W.; Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Japar, S.M.; Norbeck, J.M.; Keeler, G.J.

    1987-07-01

    Rain chemistry was measured in August 1983 on Allegheny Mountain and Larel Hill in southwester Pennsylvania. The average composition approximated an H/sub 2/SO/sub 5//HNO/sub 3/ mixture with a volume-weighted average pH of 3.5 and an SO/sub 4//sup 2 -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ mole ratio of 1.8. There was very little undissociated (weak) acidity and very little S(IV). The acidic rains were associated with air masses traversing SO/sub 2/ source regions west of the sites; stagnation and intervening precipitation were important influences. The geographic scale for a halving of rain SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ concentration downwind of SO/sub 2/ sources was approx.440 km. Scavenging ratios were inferred for SO/sub 2/, aerosol SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and HNO/sub 3/. On average about half of the rain SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ resulted from scavenging of SO/sub 2/, the rest from scavenging of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The rain H/sup +/ was attributed about 25% to HNO/sub 3/, 55% to scavenging of SO/sub 2/, and 20% to scavenging of aerosol acid SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Cumulative deposition totals in rain were compared with deposition in fog and with dry deposition in the same experiment. A crude acid-deposition budget was calculated as follows: 47%, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in rain; 23%, SO/sub 2/ dry deposition without dew; 16%, HNO/sub 3/ in rain; 11%, HNO/sub 3/ dry deposition without dew; 2%, HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in fog and dew; 0.5%, aerosol dry deposition without dew. 86 references, 4 figures, 8 tables.

  2. Bat activity in harvested and intact forest stands in the allegheny mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, S.F.; Menzel, M.A.; Edwards, J.W.; Ford, W.M.; Menzel, J.M.; Chapman, B.R.; Wood, P.B.; Miller, K.V.

    2004-01-01

    We used Anabat acoustical monitoring devices to examine bat activity in intact canopy forests, complex canopy forests with gaps, forests subjected to diameter-limit harvests, recent deferment harvests, clearcuts and unmanaged forested riparian areas in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia in the summer of 1999. We detected eight species of bats, including the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Most bat activity was concentrated in forested riparian areas. Among upland habitats, activity of silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) and hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) was higher in open, less cluttered vegetative types such as recent deferment harvests and clearcuts. Our results suggest that bat species in the central Appalachians partially segregate themselves among vegetative conditions based on differences in body morphology and echolocation call characteristics. From the standpoint of conserving bat foraging habitat for the maximum number of species in the central Appalachians, special emphasis should be placed on protecting forested riparian areas.

  3. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation.

  4. View of Flume Tunnel #3 through Purple Mountain, showing flume ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Flume Tunnel #3 through Purple Mountain, showing flume entering into the tunnel. Looking south - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Tunnel No. 3, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  5. TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.P.; Hansmire, W.H. |

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is a scientific endeavor to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain for the first long-term, high-level nuclear waste repository in the United States. The current status of this long-term project from the construction perspective is described. A key element is construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Tunnel, which is being excavated with a 7.6 m (25 ft) diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM). Development of the ESF may include the excavation of over 15 km (9.3 mi) of tunnel varying in size from 3.0 to 7.6 m (10 to 25 ft). Prior to construction, extensive constructability reviews were an interactive part of the final design. The intent was to establish a constructable design that met the long-term stability requirements for radiological safety of a future repository, while maintaining flexibility for the scientific investigations and acceptable tunneling productivity.

  6. Inherent agricultural constraints in Allegheny Plateau soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    World population increases demand increased agricultural production. This can be accomplished through improved cultivars and production techniques or increased use of previously marginal agricultural regions. In the Allegheny Plateau (AP) region of the Appalachian Mountains, acid soils with toxic ...

  7. TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, G.E.; Gowring, I.M.

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is a scientific endeavor to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain for the first long term, high level nuclear waste repository in the United States. Status of this long-term project form the construction perspective is described. A key element is construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which is being excavated with a 7. 6 m(25 ft) diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM). Development of the ESF may include the excavation of over 15 km (9.3 mi) of tunnel varying in size from 3 to 7.6 m(10 to 25 ft). Prior to construction, extensive constructibility reviews were an interactive part of the final design. Intent was to establish a constructible design that met the long-term stability requirements for radiological safety of a future repository while maintaining flexibility for the scientific investigations and acceptable tunneling productivity.

  8. Tunnel boring machine applications; Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, K.K.; McDonald, R.; Saunders, R.S.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports that characterization of Yucca Mountain for a potential repository requires construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Mechanical excavating methods have been proposed for construction of the ESF as they offer a number of advantages over drilling and blasting at the Yucca Mountain site, including; less ground disturbance and therefore a potential for less adverse effects on the integrity of the site, creation of a more stable excavation cross section requiring less ground support, and an inherently safer and cleaner working environment. The tunnel boring machine (TBM) provides a proven technology for excavating the welded and unwelded Yucca Mountain tuffs. The access ramps and main underground tunnels form the largest part of the ESF underground construction work, and have been designed for excavation by TBM.

  9. Tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Progress and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Rogers, D.J.; Wightman, W.D.

    1996-06-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is the US`s effort to confirm the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. A key part of the site characterization project is the construction of a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel for in-depth geologic and other scientific investigations. The work is governed in varying degrees by the special requirements for nuclear quality assurance, which imposes uncommon and often stringent limitations on the materials which can be used in construction, the tunneling methods and procedures used, and record-keeping for many activities. This paper presents the current status of what has been learned, how construction has adapted to meet the requirements, and how the requirements were interpreted in a mitigating way to meet the legal obligations, yet build the tunnel as rapidly as possible. With regard to design methodologies and the realities of tunnel construction, ground support with a shielded Tunnel Boring Machine is discussed. Notable lessons learned include the need for broad design analyses for a wide variety of conditions and how construction procedures affect ground support.

  10. A tunnel boring system for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Short, S.N.

    1994-12-31

    Design of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) tunnel boring machine (TBM) and backup began in June of 1993, with fabrication, machining and light assembly proceeding through to the end of the year. The original specifications for the project were contained in the request for quote for the YMP TBM and in Construction & Tunneling Services proposal document. As with all complex custom assignments, much of the finer details of the definition of the final scope of delivery was concurrent with the design effort itself. The summation of this effort is described in this paper. The major technical scope of the machine delivery is defined by the parameters listed in TABLE 1. Within the confines of the installed power and design excavation rates, the final product has been tailored to suit the particular needs of the project.

  11. System safety analysis of the Yucca Mountain tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G.; Booth, L.; Eisler, L.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the tunnel boring machine to be used at Yucca Mountain. This analysis required three steps to complete the risk evaluation: hazard/scenario identification, consequence assessment, and frequency assessment. The result was a `risk evaluation` of the scenarios identified in this analysis in accordance with MIL-STD-882C. The risk assessment in this analysis characterized the accident scenarios associated with the TBM in terms of relative risk and included recommendations for mitigating all identified risks.

  12. MISTY ECHO tunnel dynamics experiment data report; Volume 2, Appendices: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

    1992-04-01

    Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

  13. MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

    1992-04-01

    Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

  14. 77 FR 51512 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Warren, Pennsylvania. The... conducted: Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee members will solicit and consider project proposals...

  15. Application of quality assurance controls to TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), a 7.62-meter diameter tunnel is being constructed using a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). This tunnel, which may form a portion of a permanent high-level nuclear waste repository, is being constructed under the auspices of a nuclear quality assurance (QA) program. The YMP nuclear QA program applies to items and activities determined to be important to radiological safety, waste isolation, and potential interactions with the environment. The items and activities determined to be important have been assigned a quality assurance classification. This paper focuses on the items (rockbolts, steel sets, and shotcrete) and quality affecting activities involved in providing ground support and excavating the tunnel. Typical activities that have been assigned QA classifications include TBM maintenance, control of water used in the tunnel during construction, and control of diesel emissions in the tunnel. The paper concludes that the key to the successful implementation of nuclear QA requirements for tunneling at Yucca Mountain was the assignment of personnel with the appropriate mix of tunneling and nuclear experience.

  16. 76 FR 38109 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Marienville, Pennsylvania....

  17. 76 FR 50993 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Warren, Pennsylvania....

  18. 76 FR 45227 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Clarendon, Pennsylvania....

  19. 76 FR 50994 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Clarendon, Pennsylvania....

  20. 76 FR 23275 - Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Allegheny Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Clarendon, Pennsylvania....

  1. A tunnel runs through it: an inside view of the Tualatin Mountains, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Ken; Peterson, Gary L.; Beeson, Marvin H.; Wells, Ray E.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Duvall, Alison; Blakely, Richard J.; Burns, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Tualatin Mountains form a northwest-striking ridge about 350 m high that separates Portland, Oregon, from the cities of the Tualatin Valley to the west. Known informally as the Portland Hills, the ridge is a late Cenozoic anticline, bounded by reverse faults that dip toward the anticlinal axis. The anticline is a broad, open fold consisting chiefly of Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group, with remnants of Miocene-Pliocene Troutdale Formation and Pleistocene basalt of the Boring Volcanic Field on the flanks of the anticline. Anticlinal structures similar to the Tualatin Mountains are characteristic of the northern Willamette Valley, where the structures accommodate margin-parallel shortening of the Cascadia fore arc. Global Positioning System (GPS) results indicate that the shortening is due to the northward motion of Oregon at several millimeters per year with respect to stable North America. Some of the uplifts may contain active faults, but the structures are poorly exposed and are overlain by thick Pleistocene loess and Missoula flood deposits. Between 1993 and 1998, construction of the 3-mile-long (4500-m-long) TriMet MAX Light Rail tunnel through the Tualatin Mountains provided an unusual opportunity to investigate the geological structure and history of the Tualatin Mountains. This report is a collaborative effort among the tunnel geologists and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document the geologic story and quantify late Cenozoic and Quaternary deformation rates of the Tualatin Mountains.

  2. 77 FR 21522 - Boundary Establishment for the Allegheny National Wild and Scenic River, Allegheny National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... River, Allegheny National Forest, Warren, Forest, and Venango Counties, PA AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... contacting Operations Staff Officer Jim Seyler, Allegheny National Forest, 4 Farm Colony Drive, Warren, PA or..., Warren, PA 16365. A detailed legal description is available upon request. The Allegheny Wild and...

  3. Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train entering tunnel. Allegheny tunnel at right; Gallitzin Tunnel (Haer no. PA-516) at left. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Tunnel, Beneath Allegheny Mountain, east of Railroad Street, Gallitzin, Cambria County, PA

  4. Apportionment of NMHC tailpipe vs non-tailpipe emissions in the Fort McHenry and Tuscarora mountain tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, Alan W.; Fujita, Eric M.; Pierson, William R.; Wittorff, David N.

    Measurements of on-road emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were made in the Fort McHenry Tunnel (Baltimore) and Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel (Pennsylvania) during the summer of 1992. Measurements were made during 11 one-hour periods in the Fort McHenry Tunnel and during 11 one-hour periods in the Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel. The observed light-duty fleets were quite new, with a median model year of approximately 1989. Speciated NMHC values were obtained from analyses of canister and Tenax samples, and light-duty speciated emission factors were calculated for the two tunnels. Fuel samples were collected in the area around the tunnels for use in constructing headspace and liquid fuel profiles for the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. Profiles of tailpipe emissions were obtained from the literature. The CMB was used to apportion tailpipe from non-tailpipe emissions. Non-tailpipe sources were found to constitute approximately 15% of the light-duty NMHC emissions. The Federal automotive emission-rate models, MOBILE4.1 and MOBILE5, underpredicted non-tailpipe emissions, assigning approximately 9% and 6.5%, respectively, to non-tailpipe sources. In terms of total absolute emissions, MOBILE5 predictions were approximately a factor of 2 greater than MOBILE4.1 predictions. Both MOBILE4.1 and MOBILE5 underestimated the NMHC emissions in the Fort McHenry Tunnel and overpredicted the NMHC emissions in the Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel. In all cases, the MOBILE models underestimated the absolute value of the non-tailpipe emissions. The ability of the MOBILE models to account for observed emissions when conditions are more variable than those studies in the Fort McHenry and Tuscarora Mountain tunnels is still an open question.

  5. Landsliding in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Reginald Peter; Pomeroy, John S.; Davies, William E.

    1975-01-01

    Man should proceed with caution if modifications such as loading, excavation, or changes of the water regime are contemplated for slopes in Allegheny County, especially those slopes described on the map as highly sensitive to disturbance by man. Features indicative of unstable slope conditions include: cracks in buildings, yard walls, and pools; doors and windows that jam; fences and other linear features bowed out of line; tilted trees and utility poles; cracks and steplike ground features; hummocky ground; and water seeps. Geologic factors related to the landsliding process include rock types, layering, fracturing, and attitude; nature of soil cover; permeability of rocks and soils; and steepness of slope.

  6. Lessons from the Allegheny bankruptcy.

    PubMed

    Burns, L R

    2000-02-01

    On July 21, 1998, the nonprofit Allegheny Health, Education, and Research Foundation (AHERF) filed for bankruptcy, with $1.3 billion in debt and 65,000 creditors. The Pittsburgh-based organization had pursued an aggressive strategy of acquiring physicians and hospitals in the Philadelphia area. Its dramatic collapse prompted the entry of a for-profit hospital chain into the Philadelphia market, as Tenet Healthcare Corp. purchased eight hospitals from AHERF at firesale prices. This Issue Brief chronicles the hows and whys of the nation's largest nonprofit health care failure, and analyzes its lessons for other struggling academic health centers.

  7. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  8. The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.M.; Newsom, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain.

  9. A Modeling Study Evaluating the Thermal-Hydrological Conditions In and Near Waste Emplacement Tunnels At Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer; N. Halecky; S.W> Webb; P.F. Peterson; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-10-11

    In heated tunnels such as those designated for emplacement of radioactive waste at the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, temperature gradients cause natural convection processes that may significantly influence the moisture conditions in the tunnels and in the surrounding fractured rock. Large-scale convection cells in the heated tunnels would provide an effective mechanism for turbulent mixing and axial transport of vapor generated from evaporation of pore water in the nearby formation. As a result, vapor would be transported from the elevated-temperature sections of the tunnels into cool end sections (where no waste is emplaced), would condense there, and subsequently drain into underlying rock units. To study these processes, we have developed a new simulation method that couples existing tools for simulating thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions in the fractured formation with a module that approximates turbulent natural convection in heated emplacement drifts. The new method simultaneously handles (1) the flow and energy transport processes in the fractured rock, (2) the flow and energy transport processes in the cavity, and (3) the heat and mass exchange at the rock-cavity interface. An application is presented studying the future TH conditions within and near a representative waste emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain. Particular focus is on the potential for condensation along the emplacement section, a possible result of heat output differences between individual waste packages.

  10. 77 FR 58371 - Allegheny Hydro No. 8, L.P., Allegheny Hydro No. 9, L.P., and U.S. Bank National Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Allegheny Hydro No. 8, L.P., Allegheny Hydro No. 9, L.P., and U.S. Bank National Association Allegheny Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On August 31, 2012, Allegheny Hydro No. 8, L.P., Allegheny Hydro No. 9,...

  11. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATIONS PROJECT TUNNEL BORING MACHINE (TBM) SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1997-02-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the tunnel boring machine (TBM) used in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. Since the TBM is an ''as built'' system, the M&O is conducting the System Safety Analysis during the construction or assembly phase of the TBM. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety Analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the TBM in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the system/subsystem/component design, (2) add safety features and capabilities to existing designs, and (3) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the TBM during normal operations, excluding hazards occurring during assembly and test of the TBM or maintenance of the TBM equipment.

  12. Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

  13. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-09-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO{sub 2} gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a ''high-temperature'' case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a ''low-temperature'' case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO{sub 2} exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO{sub 2} redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wallrock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the low-temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are

  14. Preliminary numerical modeling for the G-Tunnel welded tuff mining experiment; Yucca Mountain site characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, located in Southern Nevada, is to be considered as a potential site for a nuclear waste repository. Located in Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site, G-Tunnel has been the site of a series of experiments, part of whose purpose is to evaluate measurement techniques for rock mechanics before testing in the Exploratory Shaft. Rainier Mesa is composed of welded and nonwelded tuffs that have thermal and mechanical properties and stress states similar to those of tuffs expected to be encountered at Yucca Mountain. A series of finite element calculations were performed to aid in designing instrumentation for the experiments in G-Tunnel and later to correlate with measured data. In this report are presented the results of the preliminary finite element calculations performed in conjunction with experimental measurements of drift convergence, or closure, and rock mass relaxation zones made before, during, and after completing the welded tuff mining experiment in G-Tunnel. Tape extensometer measurements of drift convergences and measurements determined by multiple point borehole extensometers are compared with corresponding calculated values using linear elastic and jointed rock material models. 9 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Discrete-fracture modeling of thermal-hydrological processes at Yucca Mountain and the LLNL G-Tunnel heater test

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J.J.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1995-11-09

    An in situ heater test was performed at G-Tunnel, Nevada Nuclear Test Site, to investigate the thermal-hydrological response of unsaturated, fractured volcanic tuff under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. The NUFT flow and transport code was used to model the test using discrete-fracture and equivalent-continuum approaches. Nonequilibrium fracture flow and thermal buoyant gas-phase convection were found to be the likely causes for observed lack of condensate imbibition into the matrix. The potential repository at Yucca Mountain was also modeled. Disequilibrium fracture flow is predicted to occur for less than a hundred years after emplacement followed by a period of fracture-matrix equilibrium, during which the equivalent-continuum and discrete-fracture models give almost identical results.

  16. Mast and weather influences on population trends of a species of concern: The allegheny woodrat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manjerovic, M.B.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20-30 y. northern and western populations of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) have experienced large declines. whereas populations in the core of the range are assumed to be stable. We examined population trends at two study areas in northcentral West Virginia along the western ridge of the central Appalachian Mountains. Temperature and precipitation parameters along with mast production were examined to determine if these environmental variables impacted the population. Based on a 5 y dataset. our results indicate a yearly decrease in the overall population. with adult females most affected. Hard and soft mast availability related to adult female capture rates. whereas temperatures significantly affected juvenile. adult female and overall capture rates. Juvenile summer capture rates increased with warmer temperatures the preceding winter. Female summer capture rates decreased with warmer temperatures the preceding spring suggesting that effects of warming should be added as a potential threat to the Allegheny woodrat.

  17. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  18. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  19. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  20. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  1. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  2. Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound train entering tunnel. Westbound conrail locomotive emerging from tunnel. Allegheny tunnel at right; Gallitzin Tunnel (Haer no. PA-516) at left. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Tunnel, Beneath Allegheny Mountain, east of Railroad Street, Gallitzin, Cambria County, PA

  3. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  4. 77 FR 66791 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Allegheny County, PA (All Jurisdictions)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... proposed rulemaking at 76 FR 72661, proposing flood elevation determinations along one or more flooding... Allegheny County, PA (All Jurisdictions) AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Proposed... rule concerning proposed flood elevation determinations for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania...

  5. 40 CFR 81.230 - Allegheny Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allegheny Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.230 Allegheny Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Allegheny...

  6. Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound conrail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of west portal, looking due east. Eastbound conrail locomotive approaching tunnel in right foreground. Allegheny tunnel at right; Gallitzin Tunnel (Haer no. PA-516) at left. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Tunnel, Beneath Allegheny Mountain, east of Railroad Street, Gallitzin, Cambria County, PA

  7. Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chornack, M.P.; French, C.A.

    1989-12-31

    Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Allegheny Portage Railroad: Developing Transportation Technology. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eick, Brian; Wallner, Rick

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson that will help students discover the innovative technologies of the Allegheny Portage Railroad that can be used when teaching about early 19th-century expansion and industrialization. Expounds that students' skills in geography and history will be strengthened through map reading, examination of pictures, and analysis of…

  9. 75 FR 81469 - Safety Zone; Allegheny River, Pittsburgh, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Allegheny River, Pittsburgh, PA AGENCY... First Night Pittsburgh fireworks display that will occur in the city of Pittsburgh, PA. Under 5 U.S.C... First Night Pittsburgh fireworks display that will occur in the city of Pittsburgh, PA. Background...

  10. 76 FR 47993 - Safety Zone; Allegheny River; Pittsburgh, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Allegheny River; Pittsburgh, PA AGENCY... that will occur in the city of Pittsburgh, PA on August 6, 2011 (rain date August 7, 2011). Under 5 U.S... occur in the city of Pittsburgh, PA on August 6, 2011 (rain date August 7, 2011). Basis and Purpose...

  11. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  12. Calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, developed a validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates2 (RMA2) hydrodynamic model of parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) to help assess the effects of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) on the rivers. The hydrodynamic model was used to drive a water-quality model of the study area that was capable of simulating the transport and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria and chemical constituents under open-water conditions. The study area includes 14 tributary streams and parts of the Three Rivers where they enter and exit Allegheny County, an area of approximately 730 square miles (mi2). The city of Pittsburgh is near the center of the county, where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the headwaters of the Ohio River. The Three Rivers are regulated by a series of fixed-crest dams, gated dams, and radial (tainter) gates and serve as the receiving waters for tributary streams, CSOs, and SSOs. The RMA2 model was separated into four individual segments on the basis of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigational pools in the study area (Dashields; Emsworth; Allegheny River, Pool 2; and Braddock), which were calibrated individually using measured water-surface slope, velocity, and discharge during high- and low-flow conditions. The model calibration process included the comparison of water-surface elevations at five locations and velocity profiles at more than 80 cross sections in the study area. On the basis of the calibration and validation results that included water-surface elevations and velocities, the model is a representative simulation of the Three Rivers flow patterns for discharges ranging from 4,050 to 47,400 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on the Allegheny River, 2,550 to 40,000 ft3/s on the Monongahela River, and 10,900 to 99,000 ft3/s on the Ohio River. The Monongahela River was

  13. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) use of rock drainage channels on reclaimed mines in southern West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chamblin, H.D.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) currently receive protected status throughout their range due to population declines. Threats associated with habitat fragmentation (e.g., introduced predators, disease, loss of connectivity among subpopulations and habitat loss) may explain why Allegheny woodrats are no longer found in many areas where they existed just 25 y ago. In southern West Virginia, surface coal mining is a major cause of forest fragmentation. Furthermore, mountaintop mining, the prevalent method in the region, results in a loss of rock outcrops and cliffs within forested areas, typical habitat of the Allegheny woodrat To determine the extent that Allegheny woodrats make use of reclaimed mine land, particularly rock drainages built during reclamation, we sampled 24 drainage channels on reclaimed surface mines in southern West Virginia, collected habitat data at each site and used logistic regression to identify habitat variables related to Allegheny woodrat presence. During 187 trap nights, 13 adult, 2 subadult and 8 juvenile Allegheny woodrats were captured at 13 of the 24 sites. Percent of rock as a groundcover and density of stems >15 cm diameter-at-breast-height (DBH) were related to Allegheny woodrat presence and were significantly greater at sites where Allegheny woodrats were present than absent. Sites where Allegheny woodrats were present differed substantially from other described habitats in West Virginia, though they may simulate boulder piles that occur naturally. Our findings suggest the need for additional research to examine the dynamics between Allegheny woodrat populations inhabiting rock outcrops in forests adjacent to mines and populations inhabiting constructed drainage channels on reclaimed mines. However, if Allegheny woodrats can use human-created habitat, our results will be useful to surface mine reclamation and to other mitigation efforts where rocky habitats are lost or disturbed.

  14. 77 FR 71115 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania... Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) Rules and Regulations, Article XXI, Air Pollution Control to... State submittal are available at the Allegheny County Health Department, Bureau of Environmental...

  15. 76 FR 76490 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC and Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc.-Acquisition Exemption-Pennsylvania...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Surface Transportation Board PPL Susquehanna, LLC and Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc.-- Acquisition Exemption--Pennsylvania Department of Transportation PPL Susquehanna, LLC, and Allegheny Electric... acquisition of the Line came to light in North Shore R.R.--Acquis. & Operation Exemption--PPL Susquehanna,...

  16. 75 FR 73064 - Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI; Allegheny 7 Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI; Allegheny 7 Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing... 19, 2010. On May 18, 2010, Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI, and Allegheny 7 Hydro, LLC filed applications... Allegheny River Lock & Dam No. 7 Projects Lock Hydro Friends Fund XLI's project (Project No....

  17. 5. VIEW OF TUNNEL OUTLET AND CHANNEL, LOOKING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF TUNNEL OUTLET AND CHANNEL, LOOKING SOUTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Farmers Lake Tunnel, Ashley National Forest, 5.7 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  18. 3. VIEW OF TUNNEL INTAKE, WITH LOG TRASH RACK, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF TUNNEL INTAKE, WITH LOG TRASH RACK, LOOKING SOUTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Farmers Lake Tunnel, Ashley National Forest, 5.7 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  19. ALLEGHENY FRONT AND HICKORY CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, PENNSYLVANIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Girol, Vaughn P.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral-resource survey the Allegheny Front and Hickory Creek Roadless Areas, Pennsylvania, have a substantiated potential for oil resources, a probable potential for gas resources, and little likelihood for the occurrence of coal and metallic mineral resources. The oil and gas in the Upper Devonian rocks are found in stratigraphic traps, that commonly are not evident from surface indications. The only sure method to determine if the Upper Devonian sandstones contain oil or gas at a specific site is to drill through the sequence and test the more favorable zones.

  20. 203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel have minimum height of 13, which accommodates most large recreational vehicles. This tunnel has the lowest clearance at 11-3. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  1. Coseismic deformation of the Wrights tunnel during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake: A key to understanding 1906 fault slip and 1989 surface ruptures in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Ponti, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Wrights tunnel is an abandoned railroad tunnel that crosses the San Andreas fault in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains in the vicinity of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The tunnel was damaged and deformed during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and a plot showing postearthquake measurements made in the tunnel is given by Lawson [1908]. The amount of offset shown on this plot (1.5 m) has been used in several studies as being representative of the amount of fault offset along this segment of the San Andreas fault in 1906. Our historical research shows that different observers reported different amounts of fault offset in the tunnel and that the 1.5 m given on the plot is not a surveyed measurement. In addition, the plot of the tunnel has been interpreted in several previous studies as evidence of a broad (1.5 km) zone of faulting beneath Summit Ridge. Our analysis shows that this plot need not indicate a broad zone of deformation. Our historical research and modeling of the tunnel measurements indicate that faulting was confined to a zone less than 400 m wide and that 60-85% of the coseismic slip occurred across a single fault plane. There is no evidence for offset across a second shear zone beneath Summit Ridge in 1906. This implies that surface fractures reported on Summit Ridge in 1906 were not associated with significant deformation of the tunnel, implying that they were shallow, surficial features. By analogy, the very similar fractures that occurred on Summit Ridge in 1989 were also probably the result of shallow gravitational, rather than deep-seated tectonic, processes. Our modeling also indicates that total coseismic, near-surface slip across the San Andreas fault zone in the Wrights tunnel in 1906 was at least 1.7-1.8 m.

  2. 4. VIEW FROM MIDDLE ADIT OF WAWONA TUNNEL AT HWY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW FROM MIDDLE ADIT OF WAWONA TUNNEL AT HWY. 120. TUNNEL #1 IS IN LOWER CENTER OF IMAGE. - Big Oak Flat Road Tunnel No. 1, Through mountain spur on New Big Oak Flat Road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  3. A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Allegheny Front and Hickory Creek Roadless Areas, Allegheny National Forest, Warren County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickling, N.L.; Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Adrian, Betty M.

    1983-01-01

    A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Allegheny Front and Hickory Creek Roadless Areas, Warren County, Pennsylvania, was made by members of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to test for indistinct or unexposed mineral deposits that might be recognized by geochemical halos. Analyses using semiquantitative emission spectrography and atomic absorption for 32 elements were performed on 21 stream-sediment samples and 31 bedrock samples from the Allegheny Front tract, and on 23 stream-sediment samples and 6 bedrock samples from the Hickory Creek tract. Bedrock samples analyzed are primarily sandstone, siltstone and shale. Neither major chemical anomalies nor obviously anomalous chemical-element concentrations related to mineralized bedrock were indicated in the geochemical survey. Metallic mineral deposits were not identified in the study area during the survey, which is consistent with other studies reported in the literature for the surrounding region. The lithologic units exposed in the roadless areas do not commonly host metallic deposits in the surrounding region, and the probability is low that such deposits occur in the roadless areas.

  4. 77 FR 66606 - Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. and the Connecticut Bank and Trust Company, National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. and the Connecticut Bank and Trust Company, National Association; Notice of Application for Partial Transfer of License, and...

  5. Transport of Radon Gas into a Tunnel at Yucca Mountain-Estimating Large-Scale Fractured Tuff Hydraulic Properties and Implications for the Operation of the Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect

    A. Unger; S. Finsterle; G. Bodvarsson

    2003-06-06

    Radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a tunnel (the Exploratory Studies Facility-ESF) at Yucca Mountain to ensure worker safety. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured tuffs. This objective was examined by developing a numerical model, based upon the characteristics of the ESF and the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) tuff unit, capable of predicting radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation conditions. The model was used to address two specific issues. First, it was used to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractures in the TSw at the length scale of the ESF and extending tens of meters into the TSw, which surrounds the ESF. Second, the model was used to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations exceeding a specified level within the ESF. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the ESF is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations being propagated down the ESF along with ventilated air flow and the slight suction induced by the ventilation exhaust fans at the South Portal of the ESF. These pressure fluctuations are dampened in the TSw fracture continuum according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the ESF drops rapidly, formation gases from the TSw are pulled into the ESF, resulting in an increase in radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentrations measured in the ESF and gas-phase pressure fluctuations in the TSw yielded concurrent estimates of TSw fracture permeability and porosity of l x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} and 0.00034, respectively. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the current ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability of radon gas concentrations exceeding a specified level.

  6. Maryland: Mountains to the Sea. A Gallery Class, Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. Dept. of Education.

    The "Maryland: Mountains to the Sea" exhibit (National Aquarium in Baltimore) consists of four exhibits and eight graphics panels. The exhibits are an Allegheny pond and a salt marsh which are both partially open, Assateague beach which includes birds, and the continental shelf. A variety of Maryland pond and ocean fish, crabs, and water birds are…

  7. Fecal-Indicator Bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and Selected Tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Fulton, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were determined in 1,027 water-quality samples collected from July 2001 through August 2005 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period) and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 24-hour period) conditions in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (locally referred to as the Three Rivers) and selected tributaries in Allegheny County. Samples were collected at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers and at eight sites on four tributaries to the Three Rivers having combined sewer overflows. Water samples were analyzed for three fecal-indicator organisms fecal coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a cross-section composite sample at each site. Concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci were detected in 98.6, 98.5, and 87.7 percent of all samples, respectively. The maximum fecal-indicator bacteria concentrations were collected from Sawmill Run, a tributary to the Ohio River; Sawmill Run at Duquesne Heights had concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci of 410,000, 510,000, and 180,000 col/100 mL, respectively, following a large storm. The samples collected in the Three Rivers and selected tributaries frequently exceeded established recreational standards and criteria for bacteria. Concentrations of fecal coliform exceeded the Pennsylvania water-quality standard (200 col/100 mL) in approximately 63 percent of the samples. Sample concentrations of E. coli and enterococci exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) water-quality criteria (235 and 61 col/100 mL, respectively) in about 53 and 47 percent, respectively, of the samples. Fecal-indicator bacteria were most strongly correlated with streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. These correlations most frequently were observed in samples collected from tributary sites. Fecal

  8. Mechanical tunnel excavation in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, P.E.

    1991-12-31

    The Technical Review Board for the US high-level radioactive waste facility at Yucca Mountain has recommended maximum use of {open_quotes}the most modern mechanical excavation techniques...in order to reduce disturbance to the rock walls and to achieve greater economy of time and cost.{close_quotes} Tunnels for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain can be economically constructed with mechanical excavation equipment. This paper presents the results of mechanical excavation of a tunnel in welded tuff, similar to the tuffs of Yucca Mountain. These results are projected to excavation of emplacement drifts in Yucca Mountain using a current state-of-the-art tunnel boring machine (TBM).

  9. Metropolitan reform in Allegheny County: the local failure of National Urban Reform Advocacy, 1920-1929.

    PubMed

    Glass, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    During the 1920-1929 period, the Civic Club of Allegheny County supported political consolidation of the county's municipalities and townships. Civic Club leaders sought boundary reform to tackle perceived social problems and political inefficiencies in the Pittsburgh region. This policy was aligned with a national network of Progressive urban reformers, some of whom guided the Civic Club's plans. These reform efforts culminated in the 1929 Metropolitan Charter, which was rejected by Allegheny County voters. Traditional explanations of this failed vote emphasize the high threshold for success of the charter. However, such accounts ignore the apparent disjunction between the national perception of regional problems and the local reception of recommended solutions. Reform advocates were unable to adapt national Progressive theories to the local context of Allegheny County. This article first describes the national network of Progressive Era research that prescribed metropolitan solutions for urban problems in cities such as Pittsburgh. The article then examines attempts by the Civic Club of Allegheny County to introduce these theories to Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The failure of the 1929 Metropolitan Charter is reevaluated, and the implications of these events for current proponents of metropolitanism and political reform are discussed.

  10. 76 FR 6612 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Missouri 4, LLC; Allegheny 4 Hydro, LLC; Three Rivers Hydro, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ...; Project No. 13782-000] Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Missouri 4, LLC; Allegheny 4 Hydro, LLC; Three Rivers Hydro, LLC; Notice Announcing Filing Priority for Preliminary Permit Applications January 28, 2011... Rivers Hydro, LLC--Project No. 13782-000 2. FFP Missouri 4, LLC--Project No. 13750-000 3. Allegheny...

  11. 76 FR 81923 - Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company; Notice of Amendment To Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company; Notice of Amendment To Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on December 20, 2011, Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company...

  12. 76 FR 79678 - Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company; Notice of Petition For Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company; Notice of Petition For Declaratory Order Take notice that on December 14, 2011, pursuant to Rule 207 of the Rules of Practice and...

  13. 77 FR 71139 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Allegheny County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... oxides (NO X ) emissions from glass melting furnaces to the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD... related definitions for controlling NO X emissions from glass melting furnaces. The SIP revision is...

  14. Allegheny National Forest, CCC Camp ANF1 , The camp’s main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Allegheny National Forest, CCC Camp ANF-1 , The camp’s main entrance is located at the intersection of Duhring Road (ANF 131) and ANF 124, Pennsylvania, with the interior site road known as Trail Ride Drive., Marienville, Forest County, PA

  15. Aligning Civic Engagement with the Strategic Goals of an Institution: Focus on Allegheny College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stephanie; Weisman, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    The Values, Ethics, and Social Action (VESA) minor at Allegheny College has been an academic program since 1999. This article describes the unique strengths of VESA and some of the institutional and conceptual challenges faced by the program and presents details of practices employed to meet these challenges in order to sustain this community…

  16. A Study of Continuing Legal Education of Allegheny County Bar Association Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Benjamin George

    Legal education needs and preferences of lawyers in the Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Bar Association were surveyed, with attention to such factors as motivation and lawyer characteristics. A pretested 40-item questionnaire was sent to all 2,218 members. Findings included the following: (1) felt needs pertained to trial work, real property law,…

  17. Passing on a Culture: West Virginia Traditional Musical Heritage and the Allegheny Echoes Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Leila Ryland

    2010-01-01

    Allegheny Echoes is a summer programme of instruction and performance of music and poetry held in Marlinton, WV. The Bing Brothers learned their traditional music from the Hammons family of Pocahontas County, WV, in an informal setting of friendship and collaboration. The Hammons family was recorded in the 1970s by Alan Jabbour and others; the…

  18. 76 FR 55471 - Pittsburgh & West Virginia Railroad-Abandonment Exemption-in Allegheny County, PA; Wheeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... County, PA; Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway Company-- Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Allegheny County, PA Pittsburgh & West Virginia Railroad (PWV) and Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway Company (WLE... Corp.--Acquisition & Operation Exemption--Lines of Norfolk & Western Railway, FD 31591 et al....

  19. Fleas (Siphonaptera) of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) in West Virginia with comments on host specificity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castleberry, S.B.; Castleberry, N.L.; Wood, P.B.; Ford, W.M.; Mengak, M.T.

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has indicated fewer host-specific ectoparasites on woodrats of the eastern United States as compared to western woodrat species. The Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) is a species of conservation concern that is associated with rocky habitats in the Appalachian and Interior Highland regions in the eastern United States. We examined Allegheny woodrat flea parasites in the core of the distribution to further elucidate patterns of ectoparasite host specificity in woodrats of the eastern United States. Of 346 fleas collected from 62 Allegheny woodrats, all but 1 were identified as Orchopeas pennsylvanicus. The single exception was a male Epitedia cavernicola, which represents only the second collection of this species from West Virginia. Unlike the eastern woodrat (Neotoma floridana), which hosts a variety of generalist flea parasites, Allegheny woodrats in our study were host to only 2 flea species, both of which are host specific to woodrats. We suggest that flea host specificity may be related to the specific habitat requirements of this species.

  20. Chemical quality of surface water in the Allegheny River basin, Pennsylvania and New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarren, Edward F.

    1967-01-01

    The Allegheny River is the principal source of water to many industries and to communities in the upper Ohio River Valley. The river and its many tributaries pass through 19 counties in northwestern and western Pennsylvania. The population in these counties exceeds 3 million. A major user of the Allegheny River is the city of Pittsburgh, which has a population greater than The Allegheny River is as basic to the economy of the upper Ohio River Valley in western Pennsylvania as are the rich deposits of bituminous coal, gas, and oil that underlie the drainage basin. During the past 5 years many streams that flow into the Allegheny have been low flowing because of droughts affecting much of the eastern United States. Consequently, the concentration of solutes in some streams has been unusually high because of wastes from coal mines and oil wells. These and other water-quality problems in the Allegheny River drainage basin are affecting the economic future of some areas in western Pennsylvania. Because of environmental factors such as climate, geology, and land and water uses, surface-water quality varies considerably throughout the river basin. The natural quality of headwater streams, for example, is affected by saltwater wastes from petroleum production. One of the streams most affected is Kinzua Creek, which had 2,900 parts per million chloride in a sample taken at Westline on September 2, 1959. However, after such streams as the Conewango, Brokenstraw, Tionesta, Oil, and French Creeks merge with the Allegheny River, the dissolved-solids and chloride concentrations are reduced by dilution. Central segments of the main river receive water from the Clarion River, Redbank, Mahoning, and Crooked Creeks after they have crossed the coal fields of west-central Pennsylvania. At times, therefore, these streams carry coal-mine wastes that are acidic. The Kiskiminetas River, which crosses these coal fields, discharged sulfuric acid into the Allegheny at a rate of 299 tons a

  1. 78 FR 12750 - FirstEnergy Solutions Corp., Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on February 15, 2013, pursuant to section 206 of the... Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC (Complainants) filed a formal complaint against PJM Interconnection,...

  2. 78 FR 58533 - FirstEnergy Generation, LLC, Allegheny Energy Supply Company, LLC, and Green Valley Hydro, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Company, LLC, and Green Valley Hydro, LLC, Seneca Generation, LLC, Lake Lynn Generation, LLC, All Dams... Locations P-2280-017 FirstEnergy Seneca Generation, Kinzua Pumped Allegheny River, Generation, LLC....

  3. Health status indicators for the year 2000: projections for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, C A; Zucconi, S L

    1993-01-01

    A consensus set of health status indicators was released in July 1991 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for use by public health officials at the Federal, State, and local levels in identifying and monitoring issues of public health importance. These health status indicators have been projected for the Year 2000 in Allegheny County, PA, with linear regression analyses of historical data. Indications are that mortality rates for black infants, breast cancer mortality, suicide, lung cancer mortality, incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and the number of measles cases likely will not meet the year 2000 targets in Allegheny County. These data will prove useful in monitoring progress towards the year 2000 objectives and provide comparative data for other geographic areas of the United States with similar demographic characteristics. PMID:8265755

  4. Effects of high salinity wastewater discharges on unionid mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kathleen Patnode,; Hittle, Elizabeth A.; Robert Anderson,; Lora Zimmerman,; Fulton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of high salinity wastewater (brine) from oil and natural gas drilling on freshwater mussels in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, during 2012. Mussel cages (N = 5 per site) were deployed at two sites upstream and four sites downstream of a brine treatment facility on the Allegheny River. Each cage contained 20 juvenile northern riffleshell mussels Epioblasma torulosa rangiana). Continuous specific conductance and temperature data were recorded by water quality probes deployed at each site. To measure the amount of mixing throughout the entire study area, specific conductance surveys were completed two times during low-flow conditions along transects from bank to bank that targeted upstream (reference) reaches, a municipal wastewater treatment plant discharge upstream of the brine-facility discharge, the brine facility, and downstream reaches. Specific conductance data indicated that high specific conductance water from the brine facility (4,000–12,000 µS/cm; mean 7,846) compared to the reference reach (103–188 µS/cm; mean 151) is carried along the left descending bank of the river and that dilution of the discharge via mixing does not occur until 0.5 mi (805 m) downstream. Juvenile northern riffleshell mussel survival was severely impaired within the high specific conductance zone (2 and 34% at and downstream of the brine facility, respectively) and at the municipal wastewater treatment plant (21%) compared to background (84%). We surveyed native mussels (family Unionidae) at 10 transects: 3 upstream, 3 within, and 4 downstream of the high specific conductance zone. Unionid mussel abundance and diversity were lower for all transects within and downstream of the high conductivity zone compared to upstream. The results of this study clearly demonstrate in situ toxicity to juvenile northern riffleshell mussels, a federally endangered species, and to the native unionid mussel assemblage located downstream of a brine discharge to the

  5. The allegheny general modification of the Harvard Breast Cosmesis Scale for the retreated breast.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Mark; Julian, Thomas B; Kim, Yongbok; Werts, E Day; Parda, David

    2009-10-01

    The use of brachytherapy--and to a lesser extent, external-beam radiotherapy--in the management of locally recurrent breast cancer following ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) followed by repeat breast-conservation surgery and irradiation is currently an area of intense study. The current cosmetic scoring system is inadequate to score the outcome resulting from retreatment because it does not account for the cosmetic effect of the initial treatment. We propose a modification of the scale for patients who undergo retreatment--the Allegheny General Modification of the Harvard/NSABP/RTOG scoring scale.

  6. Lithostratigraphy of Upper Devonian Scherr-Foreknobs and Lockhaven Formations near Allegheny front of central Pennsylvanian

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, A.G.; McGhee, G.R. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Five well-exposed sections (at Madley, New Baltimore, Altoona, Milesburg, and Lockhaven) of Upper Devonian marine strata were measured and analyzed to refine lithologic and temporal correlations along the Allegheny Front of Pennsylvania. The members of the Scherr and Foreknobs formations (Minnehaha Springs, Mallow, Briery Gap, Blizzard, Pound, and Red Lock) are recognized as far north as Altoona. Farther north at Milesburg and Lockhaven, the lithology of the upper parts of the Lockhaven Formation are markedly different from the contiguous Foreknobs Formation, but the Minnehaha Springs member of the basal Scherr and lower-middle Lockhaven Formations is recognized in all sections studied. The Minnehaha Springs member (a 50 to 100-ft, resistant, medium-gray to red-gray sandy silt unit) is considered to be the result of a brief sea level lowering and is therefore nearly isochronous. The isochronous nature of the Minnehaha Springs member is substantiated by biostratigraphic data; therefore, it is considered the most reliable datum for correlating the sections of this study. The lithologic information of the six measured sections was augmented by 38 wells logs of oil and gas wells of the region. From the combined lithologic data, three generalized lithofacies cross sections were generated. These cross sections clearly indicate that: (1) the strike of the paleoshoreline was nearly parallel with the Allegheny Front; (2) a major delta lobe existed in central Pennsylvania during the Late Devonian; but (3) the size and influence of the delta on depositional environments was not constant through space and time.

  7. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) captive propagation to promote recovery of declining populations.

    PubMed

    Smyser, Timothy J; Swihart, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    The Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) is endemic to the eastern United States with local distributions restricted to rocky habitats within deciduous forests. Over the last 40 years, woodrats have declined precipitously due to an array of human-mediated pressures. There is growing interest in the captive propagation of woodrats as a tool to promote in situ conservation, but their solitary social structure, territorial behavior, and low fecundity present challenges for the attainment of levels of ex situ reproduction sufficient to support reintroduction programs. In 2009 we established a captive breeding program with 12 wild-caught individuals (4.8) collected from Indiana and Pennsylvania. Restricting breeding to wild-caught individuals, over 26 months we produced 19 litters comprised of 43 pups (26.17), of which 40 (24.16) survived to weaning. In sum, wild-caught individuals readily habituated to the captive environment and the low fecundity of woodrats was offset by high survival rates for both adults and juveniles. Therefore, when managed appropriately, captive Allegheny woodrat populations should be capable of supporting the release of surplus individuals to augment in situ conservation measures. PMID:24391017

  8. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) captive propagation to promote recovery of declining populations.

    PubMed

    Smyser, Timothy J; Swihart, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    The Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) is endemic to the eastern United States with local distributions restricted to rocky habitats within deciduous forests. Over the last 40 years, woodrats have declined precipitously due to an array of human-mediated pressures. There is growing interest in the captive propagation of woodrats as a tool to promote in situ conservation, but their solitary social structure, territorial behavior, and low fecundity present challenges for the attainment of levels of ex situ reproduction sufficient to support reintroduction programs. In 2009 we established a captive breeding program with 12 wild-caught individuals (4.8) collected from Indiana and Pennsylvania. Restricting breeding to wild-caught individuals, over 26 months we produced 19 litters comprised of 43 pups (26.17), of which 40 (24.16) survived to weaning. In sum, wild-caught individuals readily habituated to the captive environment and the low fecundity of woodrats was offset by high survival rates for both adults and juveniles. Therefore, when managed appropriately, captive Allegheny woodrat populations should be capable of supporting the release of surplus individuals to augment in situ conservation measures.

  9. 76 FR 4892 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXIX, FFP Missouri 3, LLC, Allegheny 3 Hydro, LLC, Three Rivers Hydro...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXIX, FFP Missouri 3, LLC, Allegheny 3 Hydro, LLC, Three Rivers Hydro, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing January 20, 2011. On May 18, 2010..., Pennsylvania.\\1\\ The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXIX, for Project No. 13740-000,...

  10. 77 FR 38271 - Voluntary Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B Verosol USA, Inc. Kennedy Township, Allegheny...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Subzone 33B at the Verosol USA, Inc., plant in Kennedy Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (Board Order 416, 54 FR 164, 1/4/89); Whereas, the Regional Industrial Development Corporation of Southwestern... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Voluntary Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 33B Verosol USA, Inc....

  11. 77 FR 9225 - Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc., et al. v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Organization of PJM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc., et al. v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Organization of PJM States, Inc., et al. v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on... required by section 18.17.4 of the Amended and Restated Operating Agreement of PJM Interconnection,...

  12. 5. Abandoned mule trail tunnel. 1 mile from intersection with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Abandoned mule trail tunnel. 1 mile from intersection with Newfound Gap Road looking SSE. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Clingmans Dome Road, Between Newfound Gap Road & Clingmans Dome, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  13. 2. View of west tunnel portal and stream on Laurel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of west tunnel portal and stream on Laurel Creek Road looking ENE. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Cades Cove Road & Laurel Creek Road, From Townsend Wye to Cades Cove, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. Comparison of Skylab and Landsat Lineaments with Joint Orientations in Northcentral Pennsylvania. [on Allegheny Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Kowalik, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The histogram peaks of lineaments mapped from Skylab photograph at a scale of 1:517,000 lie subparallel, within 20 deg, to major shale joints and coal cleats on part of the Allegheny Plateau. The Landsat lineament, mapped at 1:989,000 are biased by illumination and scan line directions. While there is an illumination bias in the Skylab photograph, its direction does not coincide with the main transverse lineament trend, thus providing an independent assessment of the illumination direction bias. The coincidence in direction regardless of scale of the linear features suggests a mechanical relationship between joints, fracture traces, and lineaments which is more consistent with a tensional model than a shear model of origin.

  15. Assessment of freshwater mussels in the Allegheny River at Foxburg, Pennsylvania, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    The upper reaches of the Allegheny River are a high-quality resource that supports populations of a number of endangered species. Two endangered species of freshwater mussel, the northern riffleshell, Epioblasma torulosa rangiana, and clubshell, Pleurobema clava, are present in this river reach. Prior to a bridge-replacement project at the Allegheny River at Foxburg, Pa. (river mile 86.2), a mussel survey was conducted to determine if either of the protected endangered species are present and to assess the quality of the mussel bed at this site. Shore and near-shore searches followed by SCUBA diving transects determined that a mussel bed is present at this location. The freshwater-mussel community consists of at least 14 species and includes both endangered species. Substrate type, stream velocity, and channel morphology combined with results from the transect searches documented that the mussel bed is largely limited to the east side of the river. A two-stage sampling design was employed to estimate the overall mussel abundance within the bed. Twelve 4-m2 (square meter) cells were sampled with four 0.25-m2 quadrants per cell. The mean population density within the mussel bed is 8.4 mussel per square meter. The overall mussel population in the survey area is 225,567 individuals (95-percent confidence interval, 135,973 to 374,195). River-bed scour and acid mine drainage appear to limit mussel distribution in the center and left section of the channel. Overall, a healthy and diverse mussel bed exists at this site.

  16. Stream ecosystem response to limestone treatment in acid impacted watersheds of the allegheny plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClurg, S.E.; Petty, J.T.; Mazik, P.M.; Clayton, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration programs are expanding worldwide, but assessments of restoration effectiveness are rare. The objectives of our study were to assess current acid-precipitation remediation programs in streams of the Allegheny Plateau ecoregion of West Virginia (USA), identify specific attributes that could and could not be fully restored, and quantify temporal trends in ecosystem recovery. We sampled water chemistry, physical habitat, periphyton biomass, and benthic macroinvertebrate and fish community structure in three stream types: acidic (four streams), naturally circumneutral (eight streams), and acidic streams treated with limestone sand (eight streams). We observed no temporal trends in ecosystem recovery in treated streams despite sampling streams that ranged from 2 to 20 years since initial treatment. Our results indicated that the application of limestone sand to acidic streams was effective in fully recovering some characteristics, such as pH, alkalinity, Ca2+, Ca:H ratios, trout biomass and density, and trout reproductive success. However, recovery of many other characteristics was strongly dependent upon spatial proximity to treatment, and still others were never fully recovered. For example, limestone treatment did not restore dissolved aluminum concentrations, macroinvertebrate taxon richness, and total fish biomass to circumneutral reference conditions. Full recovery may not be occurring because treated streams continue to drain acidic watersheds and remain isolated in a network of acidic streams. We propose a revised stream restoration plan for the Allegheny Plateau that includes restoring stream ecosystems as connected networks rather than isolated reaches and recognizes that full recovery of acidified watersheds may not be possible. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Allegheny and Susquehanna Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004--2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Coalbed methane, which is sometimes extracted using the same technique, is commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and is frequently developed in clusters of wells across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Allegheny County and Susquehanna County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  18. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  19. Christmas Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Christmas Mountains     View Larger ... of New Brunswick. Located above image center are the Christmas Mountains, a region of old-growth forest nestled in a remote ... date:  Mar 8, 2001 Images:  Christmas Mountains location:  Canada ...

  20. Massanutten Mountain, Virginia, USA (Anaglyph)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Massanutten Mountain lies in the Shenandoah Valley of northern Virginia. Rock layers in the mountain are folded downward in an overall 'U' shape (called a syncline) which accounts for its peculiar double ridge shape with a highly elongated valley between. The ridges have formed because they are capped with a sandstone layer which is resistant to weathering and erosion. Limestones and shales are less resistant and form the lowlands and valleys. The north and south forks of the Shenandoah River flank Massanutten Mountain and display unusually pronounced meander patterns. Other layered sedimentary rocks form other ridgeline patterns in the Allegheny Mountains, to the upper left. But the igneous and metamorphic (crystalline) rocks of the Blue Ridge Mountains erode into a very different topographic pattern to the southeast. This small area provides an excellent example rock type, geologic structure, and fluvial (stream) processes all influencing landform development.

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary elevation model from data acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C

  1. Ground-water quality and geochemistry of aquifers associated with coal in the Allegheny and Monongahela formations, southeastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Razem, A.C.; Sedam, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Ground water from aquifers associated with coal beds in the Allegheny and Monongahela Formations in southeastern Ohio is predominantly a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type. Sodium bicarbonate type water is less common. Isolated areas of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate types also are present. The water is predominantly very hard, and has a median hardness concentration of 258 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate and a median dissolved-solids concentration of 436 milligrams per liter. Few wells contain water with dissolved-solids concentrations in excess of 1,000 milligrams per liter. Bicarbonate concentration in ground water was found to be significantly different among coals, whereas concentrations of bicarbonate, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, manganese, and strontium were significantly different between ground water in the Allegheny and Monongahela Formations. Many constituents are significantly correlated, but few correlation coefficients are high. The presence of sulfate or iron is attributed to the kinetic mechanism operating during the oxidation of pyrite. The position along the sulfide or ferrous-iron oxidation pathways controls the reaction products of pyrite found in solution, and the formation of either the sulfate of iron constituents. The availability and rate of diffusion of oxygen in the formations exerts control on the water quality. Discriminant-function analysis correctly classifies 89 percent of the observations into the Allegheny or Monongahela Formations. As a verifications, 39 of 41 observations from another study were correctly classified by formation. The differences in water chemistry between the Allegheny and the Monongahela Formations are gradational and are attributed the oxidation of iron sulfide. The diffusion and availability of oxygen, which controls the chemical reaction, is regulated by the porosity and permeability of the rock with respect to oxygen and the presence or absence of carbonates, which controls the

  2. A Top Pilot Tunnel Preconditioning Method for the Prevention of Extremely Intense Rockbursts in Deep Tunnels Excavated by TBMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanqing; Feng, Xiating; Zhou, Hui; Qiu, Shili; Wu, Wenping

    2012-05-01

    The headrace tunnels at the Jinping II Hydropower Station cross the Jinping Mountain with a maximum overburden depth of 2,525 m, where 80% of the strata along the tunnels consist of marble. A number of extremely intense rockbursts occurred during the excavation of the auxiliary tunnels and the drainage tunnel. In particular, a tunnel boring machine (TBM) was destroyed by an extremely intense rockburst in a 7.2-m-diameter drainage tunnel. Two of the four subsequent 12.4-m-diameter headrace tunnels will be excavated with larger size TBMs, where a high risk of extremely intense rockbursts exists. Herein, a top pilot tunnel preconditioning method is proposed to minimize this risk, in which a drilling and blasting method is first recommended for the top pilot tunnel excavation and support, and then the TBM excavation of the main tunnel is conducted. In order to evaluate the mechanical effectiveness of this method, numerical simulation analyses using the failure approaching index, energy release rate, and excess shear stress indices are carried out. Its construction feasibility is discussed as well. Moreover, a microseismic monitoring technique is used in the experimental tunnel section for the real-time monitoring of the microseismic activities of the rock mass in TBM excavation and for assessing the effect of the top pilot tunnel excavation in reducing the risk of rockbursts. This method is applied to two tunnel sections prone to extremely intense rockbursts and leads to a reduction in the risk of rockbursts in TBM excavation.

  3. Effects of the summer heat wave of 1988 on daily mortality in Allegheny County, PA.

    PubMed

    Ramlow, J M; Kuller, L H

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied total mortality in Allegheny County, PA, during the summer of 1988. A heat wave occurred in July of 1988, with daily maximum temperatures near or above 90 degrees Fahrenheit on 15 consecutive days. During that period there were a total of 694 deaths from all causes in the county, compared with an expected 587 deaths (P less than .01). All 107 excess deaths were of persons ages 65 or older, with the majority (78) occurring to persons older than age 75. Daily mortality was most closely correlated with average temperature from the previous day (R = .49, P less than .01), suggesting the cumulative effects of successive high daytime and night-time temperatures on susceptible persons. Evaluation of a possible effect on mortality of high ambient ozone levels detected in early July suggested that ozone did not contribute to excess mortality during the heat wave. Comparison of the 1988 heat wave with a less intense hot spell of 1973 indicated that excess mortality was less than would have been expected in 1988. The authors speculate that increased public awareness and the wider use of air conditioning over the years may have reduced the lethality of periods of extreme summer temperatures in urban areas. Further research is needed to evaluate this hypothesis completely. Public health officials should continue to monitor weather forecasts for predictions of extended periods of unusual heat and should warn the public to take suitable precautions during such periods. PMID:2113688

  4. Water quality in the Allegheny and Monongahela River basins, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, and Maryland, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert M.; Beer, Kevin M.; Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Clark, Mary E.; McAuley, Steven D.; Sams, James I.; Williams, Donald R.

    2000-01-01

    Major influences and findings for ground water quality, surface water quality, and biology in the Allegheny and Monongahela River basins are described and illustrated. Samples were collected in a variety of media to determine trace elements, sulfate, pesticides, nitrate, volatile organic compounds, organochlorine compounds, and radon-222. This report discusses the influences of several land-use practices, such as coal mining, urbanization, agriculture, and forestry. The report also includes a summary of a regional investigation of water quality and quality invertebrates in the Northern and Central Appalachian coal regions.

  5. Stone Mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the part of the rock outcrop dubbed Stone Mountain at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A Patch of Stone (Figure credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS)

    The colorless square in this color image of the martian rock formation called Stone Mountain is one portion of the rock being analyzed with tools on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The square area is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. Stone Mountain is located within the rock outcrop on Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  6. Atlas Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These are the Anti-Atlas Mountains, part of the Atlas Mountain range in southern Morocco, Africa. The region contains some of the world's largest and most diverse mineral resources, most of which are still untouched. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on June 22, 2001. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  7. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  8. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm. Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and ... difficult. Often, the cause is having a smaller carpal tunnel than other people do. Other causes include ...

  9. The Panther Mountain circular structure, a possible buried meteorite crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachsen, Y. W.; Wright, S. F.; Revetta, F. A.; Duneen, R. J.

    Panther Mountain, located near Phoenicia, New York, is part of the Catskill Mountains, which form the eastern end of the Allegheny Plateau in New York. It is a circular mass defined physiographically by an anomalous circular drainage pattern produced by Esopus Creek and its tributary Woodland Creek. The circular valley that rings the mountain is fracture-controlled; where bedrock is exposed, it shows a joint density 5 to 10 times greater than that on either side of the valley. Where obscured by alluvial valley fill, the bedrock's low seismic velocity suggests that this anomalous fracturing is continuous in the bedrock underlying the rim valley. North-south and east-west gravity and magnetic profiles were made across the structure. Terrane-corrected, residual gravity profiles show an 18-mgal negative anomaly, and very steep gradients indicate a near-surface source. Several possible explanations of the gravity data were modeled. We conclude that the Panther Mountain circular structure is probably a buried meteorite crater that formed contemporaneously with marine or fluvial sedimentation during Silurian or Devonian time. An examination of drill core and cuttings in the region is underway to search for ejecta deposits and possible seismic and tsunami effects in the sedimentary section. Success would result in both dating the impact and furnishing a chronostratigraphic marker horizon.

  10. The Panther Mountain circular structure, a possible buried meteorite crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isachsen, Y. W.; Wright, S. F.; Revetta, F. A.; Duneen, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Panther Mountain, located near Phoenicia, New York, is part of the Catskill Mountains, which form the eastern end of the Allegheny Plateau in New York. It is a circular mass defined physiographically by an anomalous circular drainage pattern produced by Esopus Creek and its tributary Woodland Creek. The circular valley that rings the mountain is fracture-controlled; where bedrock is exposed, it shows a joint density 5 to 10 times greater than that on either side of the valley. Where obscured by alluvial valley fill, the bedrock's low seismic velocity suggests that this anomalous fracturing is continuous in the bedrock underlying the rim valley. North-south and east-west gravity and magnetic profiles were made across the structure. Terrane-corrected, residual gravity profiles show an 18-mgal negative anomaly, and very steep gradients indicate a near-surface source. Several possible explanations of the gravity data were modeled. We conclude that the Panther Mountain circular structure is probably a buried meteorite crater that formed contemporaneously with marine or fluvial sedimentation during Silurian or Devonian time. An examination of drill core and cuttings in the region is underway to search for ejecta deposits and possible seismic and tsunami effects in the sedimentary section. Success would result in both dating the impact and furnishing a chronostratigraphic marker horizon.

  11. Mechanical excavator performance in Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdemir, L.; Hansen, F.D.

    1991-01-01

    A research effort of four phases is in progress at the Colorado School of Mines. The overall program will evaluate the cutability of welded tuff and other lithologies likely to be excavated at Yucca Mountain in the site characterization process. Several mechanical systems are considered with emphasis given to the tunnel boring machine. The research comprises laboratory testing, linear drag bit and disc cutter tests and potentially large-scale laboratory demonstrations to support potential use of a tunnel boring machine in welded tuff. Preliminary estimates of mechanical excavator performance in Yucca Mountain tuff are presented here. As phases of the research project are completed, well quantified estimates will be made of performance of mechanical excavators in the Yucca Mountain tuffs. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Fecal-indicator bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July-September 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Buckwalter, Theodore F.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine the concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) in Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, Pa. Water-quality samples and river-discharge measurements were collected from July to September 2001 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period), mixed-, and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 6-hour period) conditions at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers in Allegheny County. Water samples were collected weekly to establish baseline conditions and during successive days after three wet-weather events. Water samples were analyzed for fecal-indicator organisms including fecal-coliform (FC) bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Water samples were collected by the USGS and analyzed by the ACHD Laboratory. At each site, left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a composite sample (discharge-weighted sample representative of the channel cross section as a whole) at each site. Fecal-indicator bacteria reported in bank and composite samples were used to evaluate the distribution and mixing of bacteria-source streams in receiving waters such as the Three Rivers. Single-event concentrations of enterococci, E. coli, and FC during dry-weather events were greater than State and Federal water-quality standards (WQS) in 11, 28, and 28 percent of the samples, respectively; during mixed-weather events, concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were greater than WQS in 28, 37, and 43 percent of the samples, respectively; and during wet-weather events, concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were greater than WQS in 56, 71, and 81 percent of samples, respectively. Single-event, wet-weather concentrations exceeded those during dry-weather events for all sites except the Allegheny River at

  13. Detailed gravity mapping of the Panther Mountain circular structure, Catskill Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Isachsen, Y.W. ); Revetta, F.A. )

    1993-03-01

    The Panther Mountain circular structure is located in the Catskill Mountains near the eastern edge of the Allegheny Plateau where depth through the sedimentary section to basement is about 3200 m. The structure is distinguished from the rest of the Plateau only by its physiography. It is a circular mountain mass, 10 km in diameter, defined by an anomalous annular drainage pattern formed by Esopus Creek and its tributary Woodland Creek. Because of pervasive fluvial cross bedding in the sedimentary pile, the authors were unable to determine whether the structure is slightly domical, sightly basinal, or unwarped. North-south and east-west gravity profiles were next made and modeled to look for a subsurface explanation for the structure. The only computed profiles that matched the measured values were those for a shallowly-buried meteorite crater with its underlying breccia lens, lying beneath the Panther Mountain. Renewed interest in the structure led them to make 125 new gravity measurements, in a study that is continuing. Gravity values are corrected using the International Gravity Formula of 1967 and densities of 2.67 and 2.50 gms/cm[sup 3]. Terrain corrections were computed using an inner radius of .895 km and an outer radius of 166.70 km. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly was separated into its regional and residual components to obtain a third order residual gravity map for computer modeling. The residual gravity map confirms the earlier detected gravity low and leaves the buried meteorite crater model as a viable model.

  14. Tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Austefjord, Magnus Wiger; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Wang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are recently discovered thin membranous tubes that interconnect cells. During the last decade, research has shown TNTs to be diverse in morphology and composition, varying between and within cell systems. In addition, the discovery of TNT-like extracellular protrusions, as well as observations of TNTs in vivo, has further enriched our knowledge on the diversity of TNT-like structures. Considering the complex molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of TNTs, as well as their different functions in intercellular communication, it is important to decipher how heterogeneity of TNTs is established, and to address what roles the compositional elements have in the execution of various functions. Here, we review the current knowledge on the morphological and structural diversity of TNTs, and address the relation between the formation, the structure, and the function of TNTs. PMID:24778759

  15. The Development of a Strategic Plan To Provide a Multisite Electronic Engineering Technology Program at the Community College of Allegheny County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Pearly

    A project was undertaken to develop a strategic plan to implement a multisite electronic engineering technology (EET) program at Pennsylvania's Community College of Allegheny County. Specifically, the project sought to determine how electronic communication technologies could provide a virtual learning community for the program; appropriate plans…

  16. Hoosac tunnel geothermal heat source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-10

    The Hoosac Rail Tunnel has been analyzed as a central element in a district heating system for the City of North Adams. The tunnel has been viewed as a collector of the earth's geothermal heat and a seasonal heat storage facility with heat piped to the tunnel in summer from existing facilities at a distance. Heated fluid would be transported in winter from the tunnel to users who would boost the temperature with individual heat pumps. It was concluded the tunnel is a poor source of geothermal heat. The maximum extractable energy is only 2200 million BTU (20000 gallons of oil) at 58/sup 0/F. The tunnel is a poor heat storage facility. The rock conductivity is so high that 75% of the heat injected would escape into the mountain before it could be recaptured for use. A low temperature system, with individual heat pumps for temperature boost could be economically attractive if a low cost fuel (byproduct, solid waste, cogeneration) or a cost effective seasonal heat storage were available.

  17. Magnificent Mountains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Heather

    2004-01-01

    One way to increase awareness of endangered national heritage is to teach youth the importance of the land through the study of selected works of art. This article describes a lesson, in which students will study the work of Thomas Moran and create a mountain range collage. A short biography of Thomas Moran is included.

  18. SANDIA MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Kness, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations in the Sandia Mountains in New Mexico indicate that a small part of the area has a probable mineral-resource potential. Most of the mineral occurrences are small barite-fluorite veins that occur along faults on the eastern slope of the range. The barite veins in the Landsend area and in the Tunnel Spring area are classed as having a probable mineral-resource potential. Fluorite veins which occur at the La Luz mine contain silver-bearing galeana and the area near this mine is regarded as having a probable resource potential for silver. No energy resources were identified in this study.

  19. Construction monitoring activities in the ESF starter tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pott, J.; Carlisle, S.

    1994-05-01

    In situ design verification activities am being conducted in the North Ramp Starter Tunnel of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility. These activities include: monitoring the peak particle velocities and evaluating the damage to the rock mass associated with construction blasting, assessing the rock mass quality surrounding the tunnel, monitoring the performance of the installed ground support, and monitoring the stability of the tunnel. In this paper, examples of the data that have been collected and preliminary conclusions from the data are presented.

  20. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. Inspection of a hydropower tunnel using remotely operated vehicles (ROV): A 5-year case study

    SciTech Connect

    Hosko, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Since commercial operation in 1988, the 21 MW Raystown Hydroelectric Project, William F. Matson Generating Station in central Pennsylvania, has used several different methods to inspect the condition of the 283-meter (930-foot) long, 3.65-meter (12-foot) diameter, concrete-lined tunnel. These inspections have been required to meet the FERC license conditions and the separate Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District and the Licensee, Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc., of Harrisburg, PA. Since the tunnel and connected 168-meter (550-foot) long steel penstock are the only water passage to the two-unit generating plant, any intrusive inspection requires an outage, thus the optimal inspection technique minimizes the plant downtime. Inspections have included a lengthy and costly dewatered tunnel walk through, an underwater inspection using commercial divers and hand-held video, and most recently three annual inspections using three different types of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) supplied by vendor services. Each inspection concentrated on the examination of the condition of the tunnel concrete, including radial cracks and condition of construction joints, longitudinal crack propagation, aggregate erosion and concrete patch condition. Use of a computerized database program for mapping will also be discussed as a useful tool. This paper details experience with each of these methods with an emphasis on lessons learned and applications for the hydro industry.

  2. Mountains: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the lessons from "Mountain: A Global Resource" that were developed by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and The Mountain Institute for use by NCSS members and their students. Provides an overview that introduces the mountains, mountain cultures, historical perceptions, and the geographical importance of mountains. (CMK)

  3. Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Wind Tunnel #2, building interior. Reinforced concrete foundation for Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT) under construction. The tank and contents weighed about 100 tons. Negative on roll #1 of copy negatives returned by National Archives on 70mm film rolls.

  4. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Underside of the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The compressors are to the left. Balance detail - entrance view of wind tunnel #2. The photographer was probably shooting film for Dr. Joseph Ames' Wilbur Wright Memorial Lecture given to the Royal Aeronautical Society on May 31, 1923.

  5. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  6. 2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE SEEN THROUGH SWITCHYARD IN BACKGROUND. 165MM LENS. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  7. Effects of Coal-Mine Drainage on Stream Water Quality in the Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins-Sulfate Transport and Trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sams, James I.; Beer, Kevin M.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers transported a sulfate load of 1.2 million and 1.35 million tons, respectively, to the Ohio River at Pittsburgh. The Monongahela River Basin had a sulfate yield of 184 tons per square mile per year compared to 105 tons per square mile per year for the Allegheny River Basin. Within the large Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins, the subbasins with the highest sulfate yields in tons per square mile per year were those of Redstone Creek (580), Blacklick Creek (524), Conemaugh River (292), Buffalo Creek (247), Stonycreek River (239), Two Lick Creek (231), Dunkard Creek (212), and Loyalhanna Creek (196). These basins have been extensively mined. The sulfate yields of Brokenstraw and Conewango Creeks, which are outside the area underlain by coal and thus contain no coal mines, were 25 and 24 tons per square mile per year, respectively. Within the Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins, seven sites showed significant trends in sulfate concentration from 1965 to 1995. Dunkard Creek and Stonycreek River show significant upward trends in sulfate concentration. These trends appear to be related to increases in coal production in the two basins from 1965 to 1995. Blacklick Creek at Josephine and Loyalhanna Creek at Loyalhanna Dam show significant downward trends in sulfate concentration between 1965 and 1995. Blacklick Creek had a 50-percent decrease in sulfate concentration. Coal production in the Blacklick Creek Basin, which reached its peak at almost 4 million tons per year in the 1940's, dropped to less than 1 million tons per year by 1995. In the Loyalhanna Creek Basin, which had a 41-percent decrease in sulfate concentration, coal-production rates dropped steadily from more than 1.5 million tons per year in the 1940's to less than 200,000 tons per year in 1995.

  8. Current and Potential Future Bromide Loads from Coal-Fired Power Plants in the Allegheny River Basin and Their Effects on Downstream Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Good, Kelly D; VanBriesen, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    The presence of bromide in rivers does not affect ecosystems or present a human health risk; however, elevated concentrations of bromide in drinking water sources can lead to difficulty meeting drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations. Recent attention has focused on oil and gas wastewater and coal-fired power plant wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater bromide discharges. Bromide can be added to coal to enhance mercury removal, and increased use of bromide at some power plants is expected. Evaluation of potential increases in bromide concentrations from bromide addition for mercury control is lacking. The present work utilizes bromide monitoring data in the Allegheny River and a mass-balance approach to elucidate bromide contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources under current and future scenarios. For the Allegheny River, the current bromide is associated approximately 49% with oil- and gas-produced water discharges and 33% with coal-fired power plants operating wet FGD, with 18% derived from natural sources during mean flow conditions in August. Median wet FGD bromide loads could increase 3-fold from 610 to 1900 kg/day if all plants implement bromide addition for mercury control. Median bromide concentrations in the lower Allegheny River in August would rise to 410, 200, and 180 μg/L under low-, mean-, and high-flow conditions, respectively, for the bromide-addition scenario. PMID:27538590

  9. Current and Potential Future Bromide Loads from Coal-Fired Power Plants in the Allegheny River Basin and Their Effects on Downstream Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Good, Kelly D; VanBriesen, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    The presence of bromide in rivers does not affect ecosystems or present a human health risk; however, elevated concentrations of bromide in drinking water sources can lead to difficulty meeting drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations. Recent attention has focused on oil and gas wastewater and coal-fired power plant wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater bromide discharges. Bromide can be added to coal to enhance mercury removal, and increased use of bromide at some power plants is expected. Evaluation of potential increases in bromide concentrations from bromide addition for mercury control is lacking. The present work utilizes bromide monitoring data in the Allegheny River and a mass-balance approach to elucidate bromide contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources under current and future scenarios. For the Allegheny River, the current bromide is associated approximately 49% with oil- and gas-produced water discharges and 33% with coal-fired power plants operating wet FGD, with 18% derived from natural sources during mean flow conditions in August. Median wet FGD bromide loads could increase 3-fold from 610 to 1900 kg/day if all plants implement bromide addition for mercury control. Median bromide concentrations in the lower Allegheny River in August would rise to 410, 200, and 180 μg/L under low-, mean-, and high-flow conditions, respectively, for the bromide-addition scenario.

  10. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants associated with oil and natural gas exploration and production activity in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

    PubMed

    Pekney, Natalie J; Veloski, Garret; Reeder, Matthew; Tamilia, Joseph; Rupp, Erik; Wetzel, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities generate emissions from diesel engines, compressor stations, condensate tanks, leaks and venting of natural gas, construction of well pads, and well access roads that can negatively impact air quality on both local and regional scales. A mobile, autonomous air quality monitoring laboratory was constructed to collect measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants associated with oil and natural gas E&P activities. This air-monitoring laboratory was deployed to the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania for a campaign that resulted in the collection of approximately 7 months of data split between three monitoring locations between July 2010 and June 2011. The three monitoring locations were the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF) area in Elk County, which is downwind of the Sackett oilfield; the Bradford Ranger Station (BRS) in McKean County, which is downwind of a large area of historic oil and gas productivity; and the U.S. Forest Service Hearts Content campground (HC) in Warren County, which is in an area relatively unimpacted by oil and gas development and which therefore yielded background pollutant concentrations in the ANF. Concentrations of criteria pollutants ozone and NO2 did not vary significantly from site to site; averages were below National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas (ethane, propane, butane, pentane) were highly correlated. Applying the conditional probability function (CPF) to the ethane data yielded most probable directions of the sources that were coincident with known location of existing wells and activity. Differences between the two impacted and one background site were difficult to discern, suggesting the that the monitoring laboratory was a great enough distance downwind of active areas to allow for sufficient dispersion with background air such that the localized

  11. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants associated with oil and natural gas exploration and production activity in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

    PubMed

    Pekney, Natalie J; Veloski, Garret; Reeder, Matthew; Tamilia, Joseph; Rupp, Erik; Wetzel, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities generate emissions from diesel engines, compressor stations, condensate tanks, leaks and venting of natural gas, construction of well pads, and well access roads that can negatively impact air quality on both local and regional scales. A mobile, autonomous air quality monitoring laboratory was constructed to collect measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants associated with oil and natural gas E&P activities. This air-monitoring laboratory was deployed to the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania for a campaign that resulted in the collection of approximately 7 months of data split between three monitoring locations between July 2010 and June 2011. The three monitoring locations were the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF) area in Elk County, which is downwind of the Sackett oilfield; the Bradford Ranger Station (BRS) in McKean County, which is downwind of a large area of historic oil and gas productivity; and the U.S. Forest Service Hearts Content campground (HC) in Warren County, which is in an area relatively unimpacted by oil and gas development and which therefore yielded background pollutant concentrations in the ANF. Concentrations of criteria pollutants ozone and NO2 did not vary significantly from site to site; averages were below National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas (ethane, propane, butane, pentane) were highly correlated. Applying the conditional probability function (CPF) to the ethane data yielded most probable directions of the sources that were coincident with known location of existing wells and activity. Differences between the two impacted and one background site were difficult to discern, suggesting the that the monitoring laboratory was a great enough distance downwind of active areas to allow for sufficient dispersion with background air such that the localized

  12. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  13. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  14. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  15. Resonance enhanced tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Yoshimura, M.

    2000-12-01

    Time evolution of tunneling in thermal medium is examined using the real-time semiclassical formalism previously developed. Effect of anharmonic terms in the potential well is shown to give a new mechanism of resonance enhanced tunneling. If the friction from environment is small enough, this mechanism may give a very large enhancement for the tunneling rate. The case of the asymmetric wine bottle potential is worked out in detail.

  16. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  17. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  18. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  19. Micromachined Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Stephen B.; Kaiser, William J.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    Separation of tunneling electrodes adjusted by varying electrostatic force. Major components of tunneling transducer formed on two silicon chips by microfabrication techniques. Use of electrostatic deflection reduces sensitivity of transducer to thermal drift and simplifies design. Sensitivity suitable for applications in which larger acceleration-sensing instruments required.

  20. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  1. Maps showing mines, quarries, prospects, and exposures in the Cheat Mountain Roadless Area, Randolph County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behum, Paul T.; Hammack, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    Physiographically, the Cheat Mountain Roadless Area is in the Allegheny Mountain section of the Appalachian Plateaus province and is situated at the eastern edge of the Appalachian coal region. Cheat Mountain, a northeast-trending ridge, is bordered on the west by the right fork of Files Creek and on the east by Shavers Fork and its tributaries. Most of the area occupies an elevated plateau capped by resistant sandstone and conglomerate. Altitudes range form 2,320 ft on Lime Kiln Run to more than 3,900 ft on Cheat Mountain. The topography ranges from relatively flat in the uplands to very steep in the canyons along tributaries of Shavers Fork. The area is heavily forested with vegetation varying from mixed hardwoods on the western slope of Cheat Mountain to thickets of conifers in the uplands. Hemlocks are sparsely interspersed and red spruce, the dominant tree at higher elevations prior to logging in the mid 1920's, is again reforesting upland areas. Rhododendron and laurel flourish in moist protected areas along drainage courses and in coves.

  2. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Underside of the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The compressors are to the left. Circular screened cone is shown. The photographer was probably shooting film for Dr. Joseph Ames' Wilbur Wright Memorial Lecture given to the Royal Aeronautical Society on May 31, 1923.

  3. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  4. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Equipment used for pressurizing the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT): The VDT tunnel is on the right; the compressors are on the left. Figure 4 in the NACA Technical Report 227 (Part 2) identifies each piece of equipment visible in this diagram. Immediately visible in the lower left corner is the Booster Compressor. In the right rear (behind the tunnel) is Primary Compressor No. 1. (Primary Compressor No. 2 is not visible.) From NACA TR 227 (Part 2):'The air is compressed in two or three stages, according to the terminal pressure in the tank. A two-stage primary compressor is used up to a terminal pressure of about seven atmospheres. For pressures above this a booster compressor is used in conjunction with the primary compressor. The booster compressor may be used also as an exhauster when it is desired to operate the tunnel at pressures below that of the atmosphere. The primary compressors are driven by 250-horsepower synchronous motors and the booster compressor by a 150-horsepower squirrel-cage induction motor.' Jerome Hunsaker wrote in 'Forty Years of Aeronautical Research': 'In June 1921, the executive committee [of the NACA] decided to build a new kind of wind tunnel. Utilizing compressed air, it would allow for *scale effects in aerodynamic model experiments. This tunnel represented the first bold step by the NACA to provide its research personnel with the novel, often complicated, and usually expensive equipment necessary to press forward the frontiers of aeronautical science. It was designed by Dr. Max Munk, formerly of G*ttingen.' Eastman Jacobs wrote in an article in a 1927 article for Aviation that: 'The tunnel is inclosed (sic) within a steel shell, so that the density of the air inside may be increased by pumping air into the shell to a pressure of 300 lb. per sq. in. A 250 hp. motor, driving a propeller, circulates the air, drawing it through the five-foot test section at a velocity of about fifty miles per hour. The model is mounted in the throat of

  5. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  6. Occurrence and trends in the concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria and the relation to field water-quality parameters in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and selected tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001–09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Koerkle, Edward H.; McCoy, Jamie L.; Zarr, Linda F.

    2016-01-21

    A total of 1,742 water samples were collected at 52 main-stem and tributary sites. Quantifiable concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) were reported in 1,667 samples, or 97.0 percent of 1,719 samples; concentrations in 853 samples (49.6 percent) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recreational water-quality criterion of 235 colonies per 100 milliliters (col/100 mL). Quantifiable concentrations of fecal coliform (FC) bacteria were reported in 1,693 samples, or 98.8 percent of 1,713 samples; concentrations in 780 samples (45.5 percent) exceeded the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania water contact criterion of 400 col/100 mL. Quantifiable concentrations of enterococci bacteria were reported in 912 samples, or 87.5 percent of 1,042 samples; concentrations in 483 samples (46.4 percent) exceeded the EPA recreational water-quality criterion of 61 col/100 mL. The median percentage of samples in which bacteria concentrations exceeded recreational water-quality standards across all sites with five or more samples was 48 for E. coli, 43 for FC, and 75 for enterococci. E. coli, FC, and enterococci concentrations at main-stem sites had significant positive correlations with streamflow under all weather conditions, with rho values ranging from 0.203 to 0.598. Seasonal Kendall and logistic regression were evaluated to determine whether statistically significant trends were present during the period 2001–09. In general, Seasonal Kendall tests for trends in E. coli and FC bacteria were inconclusive. Results of logistic regression showed no significant trends in dry-weather exceedance of the standards; however, significant decreases in the likelihood that wet-weather E. coli and FC bacteria concentrations will exceed EPA recreational standards were found at the USGS streamgaging station Allegheny River at 9th Street Bridge. Nonparametric correlation analysis, including Spearman’s rho and the paired Prentice-Wilcoxon test, was used to screen for associations

  7. Respiratory risks in tunnel construction workers.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, G; Cupelli, V; Montalti, M; Pristera, M; Baldasseroni, A; Giuliano, G

    2004-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are frequent in tunnel construction workers. A group of 144 subjects randomly selected from the population of 2516 workers engaged in the construction of the railway tunnel under the Appennine Mountains, from Bologna to Firenze was investigated. A group of 69 males comparable for age, living area and habits was studied as a control group. Assessment of air pollutants (NO, NO2, SO2, total dust, silica %) was carried out by means of fixed monitoring stations as well as personal monitors. All the subjects included in the study were examined with a standardised protocol which included physical examination, lung function tests (before and after shift work) and a questionnaire to college respiratory symptoms. Low concentrations of environmental pollutants were evidenced. Significantly lower values of FEV1 and PEF were determined in the worker group pared to controls. A significant decrease in respiratory parameters was shown after shift work. Variables capable of influencing the decrease in parameters include smoking habits, work activity, presence of cough and expectoration, period of the year (spirometries resulted worse in the winter time). Significantly lower values of FEV1 and PEF were evidenced in the workers compared to controls. In spite of the present low work environmental exposure conditions, some physiologic parameters appear altered in tunnel construction workers. This may depend on a variety of noxious agents present in the working environment.

  8. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... through NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine are investigating the effects of acupuncture on pain, loss of median nerve function, and changes in the brain associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, a ...

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recognition tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-07-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules.

  10. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  11. Channel-tunnels.

    PubMed

    Koronakis, V; Andersen, C; Hughes, C

    2001-08-01

    TolC and its many homologues comprise an alpha-helical transperiplasmic tunnel embedded in the bacterial outer membrane by a contiguous beta-barrel channel, providing a large exit duct for diverse substrates. The 'channel-tunnel' is closed at its periplasmic entrance, but can be opened by an 'iris-like' mechanism when recruited by substrate-engaged proteins in the cytosolic membrane.

  12. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  13. Geohydrologic data and models of Rainier Mesa and their implications to Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Cook, N.G.W.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Carnahan, C.L.; Javandel, I.; Tsang, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    The geohydrologic data collected at Rainier Mesa provide the only extensive observations in tunnels presently available on flow and transport in tuff units similar to those of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This information can, therefore, be of great value in planning the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) testing in underground drifts at Yucca Mountain. In this paper, we compare the geohydrologic characteristics of tuff units of these two sites and summarize the hydrochemical data indicating the presence of nearly meteoric water in Rainier Mesa tunnels. A simple analytic model is used to evaluate the possibility of propagating transient pulses of water along fractures or faults through the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff unit to reach the tunnel beds below. The results suggest that fast flow could occur without significant mixing between meteoric fracture water and matrix pore water. The implications of these findings on planning for the ESF Calico Hills study at Yucca Mountain are discussed.

  14. Effects of surface coal mining and reclamation on ground water in small watersheds in the Allegheny Plateau, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberle, Michael; Razem, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrologic effects of surface coal mining in unlimited areas is difficult to predict, partly because of a lack of adequate data collected before and after mining and reclamation. In order to help provide data to assess the effects of surface mining on the hydrology of small basins in the coal fields of the eastern United States, the U.S. Bureau of Mines sponsored a comprehensive hydrologic study at three sites in the Ohio part of the Eastern Coal Province. These sites are within the unqlaciated part of the Allegheny Plateau, and are representative of similar coal-producing areas in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. The U.S. Geological Survey was responsible for the ground-water phase of the study. The aquifer system at each watershed consisted of two localized perched aquifers (top and middle) above a deeper, more regional aquifer. The premining top aquifer was destroyed by mining in each case, and was replaced by spoils during reclamation. The spoils formed new top aquifers that were slowly becoming resaturated at the end of the study period. Water levels in the aquifers were about the same after reclamation as before mining, although levels rose in a few places. It appears that the underclay at the base of the new top aquifers at all three sites prevents significant downward leakage from the top aquifers to lower except in places where the layer may have been damaged during mining. Water in the top aquifers is a calcium sulfate type, whereas calcium bicarbonate type water predominated before mining. The median specific conductance of water in the new top aquifers was about 5 times greater than that of the original top aquifers in two of the watersheds, and 1 1/2 times the level of the original top aquifers in the third. Concentrations of dissolved sulfate, iron, and manganese in the top aquifers before mining generally did not exceed U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water limits, but generally exceeded these limits after

  15. The Impact of Commercially Treated Oil and Gas Produced Water Discharges on Bromide Concentrations and Modeled Brominated Trihalomethane Disinfection Byproducts at two Downstream Municipal Drinking Water Plants in the Upper Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2010, a dramatic increase in the levels of total trihalomethane (THM) and the relative proportion of brominated species were observed in finished water at several Western Pennsylvania water utilities (PDW) using the Allegheny River as their raw water supply. An increase in br...

  16. The impact of commercially treated oil and gas produced water discharges on bromide concentrations and modeled brominated trihalomethane disinfection byproducts at two downstream municipal drinking water plants in the upper Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Landis, Matthew S; Kamal, Ali S; Kovalcik, Kasey D; Croghan, Carry; Norris, Gary A; Bergdale, Amy

    2016-01-15

    In 2010, a dramatic increase in the levels of total trihalomethane (THM) and the relative proportion of brominated species was observed in finished water at several Pennsylvania water utilities (PDW) using the Allegheny River as their raw water supply. An increase in bromide (Br(-)) concentrations in the Allegheny River was implicated to be the cause of the elevated water disinfection byproducts. This study focused on quantifying the contribution of Br(-) from a commercial wastewater treatment facility (CWTF) that solely treats wastes from oil and gas producers and discharges into the upper reaches of the Allegheny River, and impacts on two downstream PDWs. In 2012, automated daily integrated samples were collected on the Allegheny River at six sites during three seasonal two-week sampling campaigns to characterize Br(-) concentrations and river dispersion characteristics during periods of high and low river discharges. The CWTF discharges resulted in significant increases in Br(-) compared to upstream baseline values in PDW raw drinking water intakes during periods of low river discharge. During high river discharge, the assimilative dilution capacity of the river resulted in lower absolute halide concentrations, but significant elevations Br(-) concentrations were still observed at the nearest downstream PDW intake over baseline river levels. On days with active CWTF effluent discharge the magnitude of bromide impact increased by 39 ppb (53%) and 7 ppb (22%) for low and high river discharge campaigns, respectively. Despite a declining trend in Allegheny River Br(-) (2009-2014), significant impacts from CWTF and coal-fired power plant discharges to Br(-) concentrations during the low river discharge regime at downstream PDW intakes was observed, resulting in small modeled increases in total THM (3%), and estimated positive shifts (41-47%) to more toxic brominated THM analogs. The lack of available coincident measurements of THM, precursors, and physical parameters

  17. The impact of commercially treated oil and gas produced water discharges on bromide concentrations and modeled brominated trihalomethane disinfection byproducts at two downstream municipal drinking water plants in the upper Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Landis, Matthew S; Kamal, Ali S; Kovalcik, Kasey D; Croghan, Carry; Norris, Gary A; Bergdale, Amy

    2016-01-15

    In 2010, a dramatic increase in the levels of total trihalomethane (THM) and the relative proportion of brominated species was observed in finished water at several Pennsylvania water utilities (PDW) using the Allegheny River as their raw water supply. An increase in bromide (Br(-)) concentrations in the Allegheny River was implicated to be the cause of the elevated water disinfection byproducts. This study focused on quantifying the contribution of Br(-) from a commercial wastewater treatment facility (CWTF) that solely treats wastes from oil and gas producers and discharges into the upper reaches of the Allegheny River, and impacts on two downstream PDWs. In 2012, automated daily integrated samples were collected on the Allegheny River at six sites during three seasonal two-week sampling campaigns to characterize Br(-) concentrations and river dispersion characteristics during periods of high and low river discharges. The CWTF discharges resulted in significant increases in Br(-) compared to upstream baseline values in PDW raw drinking water intakes during periods of low river discharge. During high river discharge, the assimilative dilution capacity of the river resulted in lower absolute halide concentrations, but significant elevations Br(-) concentrations were still observed at the nearest downstream PDW intake over baseline river levels. On days with active CWTF effluent discharge the magnitude of bromide impact increased by 39 ppb (53%) and 7 ppb (22%) for low and high river discharge campaigns, respectively. Despite a declining trend in Allegheny River Br(-) (2009-2014), significant impacts from CWTF and coal-fired power plant discharges to Br(-) concentrations during the low river discharge regime at downstream PDW intakes was observed, resulting in small modeled increases in total THM (3%), and estimated positive shifts (41-47%) to more toxic brominated THM analogs. The lack of available coincident measurements of THM, precursors, and physical parameters

  18. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  19. View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and walkway of metal grating, side tunnel to tank 3 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Diesel Purification Plant, North Road near Pierce Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Aorto-ventricular tunnel.

    PubMed

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-10-08

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta.

  1. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Günter; Schmalhorst, Jan; Thomas, Andre; Hütten, Andreas; Yuasa, Shinji

    In magnetoelectronic devices large opportunities are opened by the spin dependent tunneling resistance, where a strong dependence of the tunneling current on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the electrodes is found. Within a short time, the amplitude of the resistance change of the junctions increased dramatically. We will cover Al-O and MgO based junctions and present highly spin-polarized electrode materials such as Heusler alloys. Furthermore, we will give a short overview on applications such as read heads in hard disk drives, storage cells in MRAMs, field programmable logic circuits and biochips. Finally, we will discuss the currently growing field of current induced magnetization switching.

  2. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman's original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  3. Eliminating Wind Tunnel Flow Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Undesirable vortexes near floor in small wind tunnels suppressed by simple device that alters flow pattern there. Air is injected along floor and interacts with backflow from wind-tunnel model. Results in smoother, more correct air-flow and to more-reliable wind-tunnel data.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  5. Modeling unsaturated-zone flow at Rainier Mesa as a possible analog for a future Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    Rainier Mesa is structurally similar to Yucca Mountain, and receives precipitation similar to the estimated long-term average for Yucca Mountain. Tunnels through the unsaturated zone at Rainier Mesa have encountered perched water and, after the perched water was drained, flow in fractures and faults. Although flow observations have been primarily qualitative, Rainier Mesa hydrology is a potential analog for Yucca Mountain hydrology in a wetter climate. In this paper, a groundwater flow model that has been used in the performance assessment of Yucca Mountain--the weeps model--is applied to Rainier Mesa. The intent is to gain insight in both Rainier Mesa and the weeps flow model.

  6. Quiet wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, P. W.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive technique suppresses background noise generated by pores in wind tunnel wall lining and makes aerodynamic data more accurate and reliable. Porous walls are covered with wire-mesh screen. Screen offers smoother surface to airflow and damps vortexes and resonance caused by wall perforations; yet it provides enough open area for perforations to cancel shock waves generated by model.

  7. Propeller Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    This picture shows a general view of the Propeller Research Tunnel engine room under construction. Workmen were installing the two submarine diesel engines that would power the PRT. The room was constructed of concrete with corrugated metal siding and roofing with the intention of making the engine room as fireproof as possible.

  8. Prions tunnel between cells.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2009-03-01

    Prions are abnormal isoforms of host proteins that are the infectious agents in certain mammalian neurodegenerative diseases. How prions travel from their peripheral entry sites to the brain where they cause disease is poorly understood. A new study finds that tunnelling nanotubes are important for the intercellular transfer of prions during neuroinvasion.

  9. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, James Leo; Dagum, Alexander B.

    1992-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a very common hand problem usually presenting with nighttime pain, numbness, and loss of dexterity. Controversy arises over the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of results. Nighttime splinting will improve the symptoms in some patients. If this fails, excellent results can be achieved with surgical decompression of the median nerve in the carpal canal. PMID:21221355

  11. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  12. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  13. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  14. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, robert C; Drollinger, Harold; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16

  15. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Roberrt C; Drollinger, Harold

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16

  16. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  17. Techniques For Mass Production Of Tunneling Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Podosek, Judith A.; Reynolds, Joseph K.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Vote, Erika C.; Kaiser, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for mass production of tunneling electrodes developed from silicon-micromachining, lithographic patterning, and related microfabrication processes. Tunneling electrodes named because electrons travel between them by quantum-mechanical tunneling; tunneling electrodes integral parts of tunneling transducer/sensors, which act in conjunction with feedback circuitry to stabilize tunneling currents by maintaining electrode separations of order of 10 Angstrom. Essential parts of scanning tunneling microscopes and related instruments, and used as force and position transducers in novel microscopic accelerometers and infrared detectors.

  18. Using noble gases to investigate mountain-front recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, A.H.; Solomon, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Mountain-front recharge is a major component of recharge to inter-mountain basin-fill aquifers. The two components of mountain-front recharge are (1) subsurface inflow from the mountain block (subsurface inflow), and (2) infiltration from perennial and ephemeral streams near the mountain front (stream seepage). The magnitude of subsurface inflow is of central importance in source protection planning for basin-fill aquifers and in some water rights disputes, yet existing estimates carry large uncertainties. Stable isotope ratios can indicate the magnitude of mountain-front recharge relative to other components, but are generally incapable of distinguishing subsurface inflow from stream seepage. Noble gases provide an effective tool for determining the relative significance of subsurface inflow, specifically. Dissolved noble gas concentrations allow for the determination of recharge temperature, which is correlated with recharge elevation. The nature of this correlation cannot be assumed, however, and must be derived for the study area. The method is applied to the Salt Lake Valley Principal Aquifer in northern Utah to demonstrate its utility. Samples from 16 springs and mine tunnels in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains indicate that recharge temperature decreases with elevation at about the same rate as the mean annual air temperature, but is on average about 2??C cooler. Samples from 27 valley production wells yield recharge elevations ranging from the valley elevation (about 1500 m) to mid-mountain elevation (about 2500 m). Only six of the wells have recharge elevations less than 1800 m. Recharge elevations consistently greater than 2000 m in the southeastern part of the basin indicate that subsurface inflow constitutes most of the total recharge in this area. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Patterns of fault displacement and strain at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Alan P.; Ferrill, David A.; Sims, Darrell W.; Franklin, Nathan; Waiting, Deborah J.

    2004-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the sole candidate site for underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The mountain is composed of Tertiary (12.8-11.6 Ma) volcanic tuff, cut by west-dipping normal faults that divide the mountain into north-trending, east-dipping cuestas. Geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has focused on mapping lithostratigraphic units, faults (including single plane, small-displacement surfaces of discontinuity, and large-displacement fault zones), and fractures (quasi-planar zones that have experienced loss of cohesion, including joints, partially mineralized joints, veins, and small-displacement faults). Faults and fractures are important to repository design because they affect seismic hazard, rockfall, and fluid transmissivity in the surrounding rock mass. Geologic maps and detailed studies of rock pavements and tunnel walls reveal that faults and fractures within Yucca Mountain are not uniform in orientation or intensity. We investigate two aspects of distributed deformation arising from fault displacement patterns at Yucca Mountain. First, fault-parallel strains (elongation parallel to cutoff lines where stratigraphic horizons intersect fault planes) develop as a result of lateral fault displacement gradients. Using existing data, we analyze the likely state of strain in fault blocks at Yucca Mountain. Second, fault-strike-perpendicular strains can develop where two normal faults propagate past each other. A component of the total strain is distributed into the surrounding rock to produce synthetic layer dip or a network of smaller faults and fractures. We find that small-scale faulting and fracturing at Yucca Mountain is variable and is strongly controlled by larger scale fault system architecture.

  20. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  1. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  2. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  3. On tunneling across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  4. Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel: In this aerial photograph of construction in the early 1950s, the return air passages are shown in the rear, center. This area was later covered with walls and a roof so that upon completion of the facility, it was not visible from the exterior. Three air storage spheres and the cooling tower are at the extreme right of the building. The spheres store dry air at 150 pounds per square inch. The cooling tower dissipates heat from coolers that control the test air temperature. One of many research facilities at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is used for experimental investigations at supersonic speeds.

  5. Light tunneling in clouds.

    PubMed

    Nussenzveig, H Moyses

    2003-03-20

    Solar radiation, traveling outside cloud water droplets, excites sharp resonances and surface waves by tunneling into the droplets. This effect contributes substantially to the total absorption (typically, of the order of 20%) and yields the major contribution to backscattering, producing the meteorological glory. Usual computational practices in atmospheric science misrepresent resonance contributions and cannot be relied on in the assessment of possible anomalies in cloud absorption.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  7. Evaluating tunnel kiln performance

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, K.R.; Carty, W.M.; Ninos, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Process improvements in the production of whitewares provide the potential for substantial savings for manufacturers. A typical whiteware manufacturer incurs an annual defective product loss of {approximately}$20 million when accounting for raw materials, energy, labor and waste disposal. Reduction in defective product loss of 1% could result in a savings in excess of $1 million annually. This study was designed to establish benchmarks for two conventional tunnel kilns used to bisque-fire dinnerware at Buffalo China Inc. (Buffalo, NY). The benchmark was established by assessing the current conditions and variability of the two tunnel kilns as a function of the fracture strength of sample bars that were made from production body. Sample bars were fired in multiple locations in both kilns to assess the conditions and variability of firing within each kiln. Comparison of strength results between the two kilns also was assessed. These comparisons were accomplished through applied statistical analysis, wherein significant statistical variations were identified and isolated for both tunnel kilns. The statistical methods and tools used in this analysis are readily accessible to manufacturers, thus allowing implementation of similar analysis, or benchmarking, in-house.

  8. Ferroelectric tunnel memristor.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Lu, H; Ryu, S; Bark, C-W; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y; Gruverman, A

    2012-11-14

    Strong interest in resistive switching phenomena is driven by a possibility to develop electronic devices with novel functional properties not available in conventional systems. Bistable resistive devices are characterized by two resistance states that can be switched by an external voltage. Recently, memristors-electric circuit elements with continuously tunable resistive behavior-have emerged as a new paradigm for nonvolatile memories and adaptive electronic circuit elements. Employment of memristors can radically enhance the computational power and energy efficiency of electronic systems. Most of the existing memristor prototypes involve transition metal oxide resistive layers where conductive filaments formation and/or the interface contact resistance control the memristive behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of memristor that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction, where the tunneling conductance can be tuned in an analogous manner by several orders of magnitude by both the amplitude and the duration of the applied voltage. The ferroelectric tunnel memristors exhibit a reversible hysteretic nonvolatile resistive switching with a resistance ratio of up to 10(5) % at room temperature. The observed memristive behavior is attributed to the field-induced charge redistribution at the ferroelectric/electrode interface, resulting in the modulation of the interface barrier height. PMID:23039785

  9. Ferroelectric tunnel memristor.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Lu, H; Ryu, S; Bark, C-W; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y; Gruverman, A

    2012-11-14

    Strong interest in resistive switching phenomena is driven by a possibility to develop electronic devices with novel functional properties not available in conventional systems. Bistable resistive devices are characterized by two resistance states that can be switched by an external voltage. Recently, memristors-electric circuit elements with continuously tunable resistive behavior-have emerged as a new paradigm for nonvolatile memories and adaptive electronic circuit elements. Employment of memristors can radically enhance the computational power and energy efficiency of electronic systems. Most of the existing memristor prototypes involve transition metal oxide resistive layers where conductive filaments formation and/or the interface contact resistance control the memristive behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of memristor that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction, where the tunneling conductance can be tuned in an analogous manner by several orders of magnitude by both the amplitude and the duration of the applied voltage. The ferroelectric tunnel memristors exhibit a reversible hysteretic nonvolatile resistive switching with a resistance ratio of up to 10(5) % at room temperature. The observed memristive behavior is attributed to the field-induced charge redistribution at the ferroelectric/electrode interface, resulting in the modulation of the interface barrier height.

  10. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  11. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  12. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  13. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect. PMID:20659880

  14. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 212. Walker DH, Blaton LS. Rickettsia rickettsii and other spotted fever group rickettsiae (Rocky ...

  15. TBM performance prediction in Yucca Mountain welded tuff from linear cutter tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.

    1992-11-01

    This paper discusses performance prediction which were developed for tunnel boring machines operating in welded tuff for the construction of the experimental study facility and the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The predictions were based on test data obtained from an extensive series of linear cutting tests performed on samples of Topopah String welded tuff from the Yucca Mountain Project site. Using the cutter force, spacing, and penetration data from the experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration were estimated for a 25 ft diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM) operating in welded tuff. The result show that the Topopah Spring welded tuff (TSw2) can be excavated at relatively high rates of advance with state-of-the-art TBMs. The result also show, however, that the TBM torque and power requirements will be higher than estimated based on rock physical properties and past tunneling experience in rock formations of similar strength.

  16. Thrombosis at mountain altitudes.

    PubMed

    Cucinell, S A; Pitts, C M

    1987-11-01

    Victims of high-altitude pulmonary edema often have clots obstructing the pulmonary vessels. This, together with an apparent high incidence of thrombophlebitis and cerebral emboli at altitude suggests that mountain travel may predispose to hypercoagulability. A critical analysis of the available data suggests that, although thrombosis may be a late event complicating various forms of mountain sickness, the laboratory techniques of characterizing hypercoagulability are not sufficient to define and characterize the mechanism.

  17. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  18. Rocky Mountain acidification study

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.H.; Galloway, J.N.; Schofield, C.; McFee, W.; Johnson, R.; McCarley, S.; Dise, N.; Herzog, D.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of this report were to determine the sensitivity of watersheds characteristic of the Rocky Mountain Region and the relationship of watershed sensitivity to geology and soils; to evaluate the extent of current acidification and the potential for increasing acidification with increasing deposition of nitrate and sulfate; to evaluate the results of the preceding in terms of impacts on fish populations; and to develop recommendations for assessment of future trends in both changing water chemistry and impacts on fish populations. Areas selected for study included the Rocky Mountain National Ppark and Yellowstone National Park, exemplifying two different geologic types that are representative of a large portion of the Rocky Mountain region. Rocky Mountain National Park is primarily underlain by granite and Yellowstone National Park by volcanic materials. Sensitivity is primarily determined by bedrock geology and varies inversely with elevation. High-elevation lakes and streams in the central Rocky Mountain region are very sensitive to acidic deposition. With respect to fish populations there is currently no evidence of chronic acidification and thus no apparent impact on fisheries. However, the very low base cation concentration observed in the headwater drainages of Rocky Mountain National Park suggests extreme sensitivity to acidification. Waters in volcanic areas such as Yellowstone National Park are generally of high alkalinity and do not represent potentially sensitive habitats. 109 references, 31 figures, 24 tables.

  19. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. PMID:24741323

  20. Orbiter Model in Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineer holding a replica of the proposed Liquid Booster Module, observes the testing of a small Space Shuttle orbiter model at 14 Wind Tunnel at MSFC. 14 Wind Tunnel is a trisonic wind tunnel, which is capable of running subsonic, transonic, and supersonic. It is used to test the integrity of rockets and launch vehicles in launch and reentry environments. The Wind Tunnel was used to test rockets and launch vehicles from the Jupiter C through the Saturn family up to the current Space Shuttle and will be used to test future advanced launch vehicles.

  1. Geochemical study of acid mine drainage of the Big Lick Tunnel area, Williamstown, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Tollin, S. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    Acid mine drainage in the anthracite region of Pennsylvania continues to be a significant environmental problem. This study examines the acid mine outflow from the Big Lick Tunnel, north of Williamstown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The tunnel drains abandoned mines on the north side of the Big Lick Mountain. Mining ceased in the area circa 1940, and the tunnel has been in operation since that time. The water, soil and stream bed sediment geochemistry has been studied to determine their changes in chemistry over distance. The pH, TDS and metal concentrations were the primary focus. Metal concentrations were determined using an ICP unit. Data indicates the pH of the outflow to range between 6.7 and 7.3 Fe and Mn concentrations are as high as 9.7 ppb. Extensive metal precipitation ( yellow boy'') occurs within the tunnel and for several hundred meters from the mouth of the tunnel. The combination of near neutral pH and high metal concentration suggest that the drainage is in contact with highly alkaline materials prior to discharge from the tunnel. The geology of the area does not suggest bedrock as the possible source of alkaline material. One hypothesis is that the acidic water is reacting with the concrete tunnel and being neutralized. Data also suggests that the Fe precipitates much quicker than the Mn, resulting in a zonation between Fe-rich and Mn-rich sediments along the length of the drainage.

  2. View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at left of image to Launch Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  4. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  5. Retrofitting tunnel kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Significant benefits can be achieved by retrofitting tunnel kilns. The decision-making process to do so starts with evaluating short- and long-term goals. Plant goals can influence tradeoffs in burner sizing, burner choice and control scheme. The evaluation includes consideration of increased production, reduced breakage during heating and cooling, improved quality, ability to quickly change products, reduced fuel use, reduced energy consumption and/or improved control. The efforts in one area affect performance in other areas. For example, reduced fuel use implies reduced energy consumption. Regardless of the priority of the goals, the first step is an evaluation of the existing burners.

  6. Virtual-detector approach to tunnel ionization and tunneling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling times in atomic ionization are studied theoretically by a virtual detector approach. A virtual detector is a hypothetical device that allows one to monitor the wave function's density with spatial and temporal resolution during the ionization process. With this theoretical approach, it becomes possible to define unique moments when the electron enters and leaves with highest probability the classically forbidden region from first principles and a tunneling time can be specified unambiguously. It is shown that neither the moment when the electron enters the tunneling barrier nor when it leaves the tunneling barrier coincides with the moment when the external electric field reaches its maximum. Under the tunneling barrier as well as at the exit the electron has a nonzero velocity in the electric field direction. This nonzero exit velocity has to be incorporated when the free motion of the electron is modeled by classical equations of motion.

  7. Early Childhood: Funnels and Tunnels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowlkes, Mary Anne

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using funnels and tunnels in combination with water, blocks, transportation toys, and other materials to help teach preschoolers to make predictions. Many examples are included for using funnels to understand properties of liquids and for using tunnels to predict order. (DH)

  8. Sensitivity and Reproducibility of a Family-level Macroinvertebrate Index used to Assess Acid Mine Impacts on Streams in the Western Allegheny Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    We report on the performance of a family-level multimetric index, the MAIS (Macroinvertebrate Aggregate Index for Streams) for assessing acid mine impaired (AMD) sites in the Western Allegheny Plateau (Ohio). Two sampling protocols were compared, one utilizing three collection techniques (kick net, dip net and Surber samples), the other using two (kick and dip net). Including Surber samples tended to increase the MAIS score, changing the classification of four out of 52 sampling events (7.7%), but substantially increased processing time. MAIS scores were positively correlated with water pH (R = -0.77) and other indicators of AMD (acidity, sulfates, conductivity, total Al, total Mn). MAIS scores at some sites were consistent over 2-3 years of repeated sampling, others were more variable. Nineteen of the 26 sites that were sampled multiple times were categorized the same each year (73%), whereas 7 were classified differently in at least one year (27%). Since rainfall, flow regime and disturbance events varied over the three years, we cannot identify whether this variation reflects sampling error or actual changes in the assemblages at each site. Nevertheless, a benefit of repeated, annual evaluation is a statistically strong baseline condition against which future changes can be assessed.

  9. Tunneling in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar

    2002-03-01

    It has been said that Thomas Edison's greatest invention was that of the "Research Laboratory" as a social institution. My greatest discovery was when I learned at 29 years of age that it was possible to work in such an institution and get paid for doing research. I had become interested in physics, gotten a job at General Electric Research Laboratory and found a great mentor in John C. Fischer, who besides instructing me in physics told me that sooner or later we all would become historians of science. I guess for me that time is now, because I have been asked to tell you about my second greatest discovery: Tunneling in superconductors. My great fortune was to be at the right place at the right time, where I had access to outstanding and helpful (not necessary an oxymoron) physicists. Hopefully I will be able to convey to you some of the fun and excitement of that area in this recollection. If you become real interested you may find a written version in my Nobel Prize talk: "Electron Tunneling and Superconductivity" Les Prix Nobel en 1973 or Science 183, 1253-1258 1974 or Reviews of Modern Physics 46 (2), 245-250 1974

  10. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  11. Two tunnels to inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the formation via tunneling of inflating (false-vacuum) bubbles in a true-vacuum background, and the reverse process. Using effective potentials from the junction condition formalism, all true- and false-vacuum bubble solutions with positive interior and exterior cosmological constant, and arbitrary mass are catalogued. We find that tunneling through the same effective potential appears to describe two distinct processes: one in which the initial and final states are separated by a wormhole (the Farhi-Guth-Guven mechanism), and one in which they are either in the same hubble volume or separated by a cosmological horizon. In the zero-mass limit, the first process corresponds to the creation of an inhomogenous universe from nothing, while the second mechanism is equivalent to the nucleation of true- or false-vacuum Coleman-De Luccia bubbles. We compute the probabilities of both mechanisms in the WKB approximation using semiclassical Hamiltonian methods, and find that--assuming both process are allowed--neither mechanism dominates in all regimes.

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chammas, M

    2014-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest entrapment neuropathy and is due to combined compression and traction on the median nerve at the wrist. It is often idiopathic. Although spontaneous resolution is possible, the usual natural evolution is slow progression. Diagnosis is mainly clinical depending on symptoms and provocative tests. An electromyogram is recommended preoperatively and in cases of work-related disease. Medical treatment is indicated early on or in cases with no deficit and consists of steroid injection in the canal or a night splint in neutral wrist position. Surgical treatment is by section of the flexor retinaculum and is indicated in resistance to medical treatment, in deficit or acute cases. Mini-invasive techniques such as endoscopic and mini-open approaches to carpal tunnel release with higher learning curves are justified by the shorter functional recovery time compared to classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon's preference, patient information, stage of severity, etiology and availability of material. Results are satisfactory in 90% of cases. Nerve recovery depends on the stage of severity as well as general patient factors. Recovery of force takes about 2-3 months after the disappearance of 'pillar pain'. This operation has a benign reputation with a 0.2-0.5% reported neurovascular complication rate.

  13. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  14. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Baum, H; Lüdecke, D K; Herrmann, H D

    1986-01-01

    50 patients with acromegaly and carpal tunnel syndrome have been examined electrophysiologically before and after transnasal operation of the pituitary adenoma. 32 of the 50 patients (64%) had symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 13 of them had neurological deficits. 28 of the examined patients had pathological neurographical findings only. About 1 week post-operatively DL was decreased in 43%; in 10 out of 13 patients with neurological deficits DL decreased. GH was normalized in 80% and reduced to 5-10 micrograms/l in a further 10%. The investigation did not show whether the carpal tunnel syndrome only depended on a GH increase or on other factors also such as e.g., on the duration of symptoms or tissue changes. None of the patients had the transversal carpal ligament operated on. The coincidence between acromegaly and carpal tunnel syndrome was 64%. In 3 cases the carpal tunnel syndrome was the leading sign to the diagnosis of acromegaly.

  16. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates.

  17. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Tian, B B; Wang, J L; Fusil, S; Liu, Y; Zhao, X L; Sun, S; Shen, H; Lin, T; Sun, J L; Duan, C G; Bibes, M; Barthélémy, A; Dkhil, B; Garcia, V; Meng, X J; Chu, J H

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  18. Seismic monitoring of the Yucca Mountain facility

    SciTech Connect

    Garbin, H.D.; Herrington, P.B.; Kromer, R.P.

    1997-08-01

    Questions have arisen regarding the applicability of seismic sensors to detect mining (re-entry) with a tunnel boring machine (TBM). Unlike cut and blast techniques of mining which produce impulsive seismic signals, the TBM produces seismic signals which are of long duration. (There are well established techniques available for detecting and locating the sources of the impulsive signals.) The Yucca Mountain repository offered an opportunity to perform field evaluations of the capabilities of seismic sensors because during much of 1996, mining there was progressing with the use of a TBM. During the mining of the repository`s southern branch, an effort was designed to evaluate whether the TBM could be detected, identified and located using seismic sensors. Three data acquisition stations were established in the Yucca Mountain area to monitor the TBM activity. A ratio of short term average to long term average algorithm was developed for use in signal detection based on the characteristics shown in the time series. For location of the source of detected signals, FK analysis was used on the array data to estimate back azimuths. The back azimuth from the 3 component system was estimated from the horizontal components. Unique features in the timing of the seismic signal were used to identify the source as the TBM.

  19. WILSON MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromfield, Calvin S.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The Wilson Mountains Wilderness consists of about 68 sq mi in the San Miguel Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Based on a mineral survey two areas in the wilderness have a probable mineral-resource potential. One area is on the east margin of the area in the Trout Lake mining district, and the other is near the center of the area, the Mount Wilson mining district. Both areas have had a modest base and (or) precious metal production from narrow veins and have a probable potential for the occurrence of similar deposits. Of more significance is a probable mineral-resource potential for disseminated copper mineralization in the Mount Wilson mining district.

  20. Himalayan Mountain Range, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Snow is present the year round in most of the high Himalaya Mountain Range (33.0N, 76.5E). In this view taken at the onset of winter, the continuous snow line can be seen for hundreds of miles along the south face of the range in the Indian states of Punjab and Kashmir. The snow line is at about 12,000 ft. altitude but the deep Cenab River gorge is easily delineated as a break along the south edge of the snow covered mountains. '

  1. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  2. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  3. Electromagnetics for Detecting Shallow Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, I.

    2006-05-01

    Detecting tunnels by geophysical means, even very shallow ones, has been difficult, to say the least. Despite heavy R&D funding from the military since the early 70s, geophysicists have not produced tools that are simple and practical enough to meet the military needs. The initial interest and R&D funding on the subject perhaps started with the Vietcong tunnels in the 60s. Tunnels in the Korean DMZ, first found in the mid 70s, sharply escalated the R&D spending. During the 90s, covert tunnels along the US-Mexico border have kept the topic alive but at a minimal funding level. Most recent interest appears to be in the terrorism-related shallow tunnels, more or less anywhere in the regions of conflict. Despite the longstanding effort in the geophysical community under heavy public funding, there is a dearth of success stories where geophysicists can actually claim to have found hitherto unknown tunnels. For instance, geophysics has not discovered a single tunnel in Vietnam or in Korea! All tunnels across the Korean DMZ were found from human intelligence. The same is true to all illicit tunnels found along the southwestern border. The tunnels under discussion are clandestine, which implies that the people who built them do not wish others to succeed in finding them. The place around the tunnel, therefore, may not be the friendliest venue for surveyors to linger around. The situation requires tools that are fast, little noticeable, and hardly intrusive. Many geophysical sensors that require ground contacts, such as geophones and electrodes that are connected by a myriad of cables, may not be ideal in this situation. On the other hand, a sensor that can be carried by vehicle without stopping, and is nothing obviously noticeable to bystanders, could be much more acceptable. Working at unfriendly environment also requires forgoing our usual practices where we collect data leisurely and make pretty maps later. To be useful, geophysical tools must be able to process

  4. Tunneling electroresistance effect in ferroelectric tunnel junctions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Gruverman, A; Wu, D; Lu, H; Wang, Y; Jang, H W; Folkman, C M; Zhuravlev, M Ye; Felker, D; Rzchowski, M; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y

    2009-10-01

    Using a set of scanning probe microscopy techniques, we demonstrate the reproducible tunneling electroresistance effect on nanometer-thick epitaxial BaTiO(3) single-crystalline thin films on SrRuO(3) bottom electrodes. Correlation between ferroelectric and electronic transport properties is established by direct nanoscale visualization and control of polarization and tunneling current. The obtained results show a change in resistance by about 2 orders of magnitude upon polarization reversal on a lateral scale of 20 nm at room temperature. These results are promising for employing ferroelectric tunnel junctions in nonvolatile memory and logic devices. PMID:19697939

  5. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al2O3/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  6. Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    The outside pressure shell for the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The shell, or 'tank' as it was called, was built in the Newport News Shipyard and traveled by barge to Langley. The tank could withstand a working pressure of 21 atmospheres. Elton Miller described it in NACA TR No. 227 (pp. 411-412): 'It is built of steel plates lapped and riveted according to the usual practice in steam boiler construction, although, because of the size of the tank and the high working pressure, the construction is unusually heavy. There is a cylindrical body portion of 2-1/8 inch (53.98 millimeters) steel plate with hemispherical ends 1-1/4 inches (31.75 millimeters) in thickness.'

  7. The Strongest Mountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monnes, Colleen

    2004-01-01

    The article describes an activity for the author's fifth-grade students called "build the strongest mountain." To them, it was not a lesson--it was a challenge. To the author, it was an activity that turned a run-of-the-mill Earth science unit into a terrific opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge of erosion and develop…

  8. Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This is a compilation of petrographic slides detailing the microstructure and petrographic character of the tuff deposits associated with the Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. It describes crystal structures, clay alterations, and mineral associations. The paper contains a description of the petrographic thin-sections but contains no narrative or conclusions of what the slides suggest with regards to the facility.

  9. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  10. Rocky Mountain High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes Colorado's Eagle Rock School, which offers troubled teens a fresh start by transporting them to a tuition- free campus high in the mountains. The program encourages spiritual development as well as academic growth. The atmosphere is warm, loving, structured, and nonthreatening. The article profiles several students' experiences at the…

  11. Rocky Mountain Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutkiewicz, Jody Steiner, Ed.

    This publication features articles detailing the state of educational programs in the Rocky Mountain area. The articles address: 1) the impact of physical geography on culture, education, and lifestyle; 2) the education of migrant and/or agricultural workers and their children; 3) educational needs of children in rural areas; 4) outdoor education;…

  12. DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An…

  13. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  14. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Jefferies, Sharon; Howe, A. Scott; Howard, Robert; Mary, Natalie; Watson, Judith; Lewis, Ruthan

    2016-01-01

    When the first human visitors on Mars prepare to return to Earth, they will have to comply with stringent planetary protection requirements. Apollo Program experience warns that opening an EVA hatch directly to the surface will bring dust into the ascent vehicle. To prevent inadvertent return of potential Martian contaminants to Earth, careful consideration must be given to the way in which crew ingress their Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel that eliminates extravehicular activity (EVA) ingress is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications, such as rover to habitat transfer, once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The study team began by identifying the minimum set of functional requirements needed for the tunnel to perform its primary mission, as this would presumably be the simplest design, with the lowest mass and volume. This Minimum Functional Tunnel then becomes a baseline against which various tunnel design concepts and potential alternatives can be traded, and aids in assessing the mass penalty of increased functionality. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mass of a single-mission tunnel is about 237 kg, not including mass growth allowance.

  15. Spin tunneling in conducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovsky, A.

    1998-12-31

    Different tunneling mechanisms in conventional and half-metallic ferromagnetic tunnel junctions are analyzed within the same general method. Direct tunneling is compared with impurity-assisted, surface state assisted, and inelastic contributions to a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Theoretically calculated direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to experimentally observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. The authors find that tunneling via resonant defect states in the barrier radically decreases the TMR (down to 4% with Fe-based electrodes), and a resonant tunnel diode structure would give a TMR of about 8%. With regards to inelastic tunneling, magnons and phonons exhibit opposite effects: one-magnon emission generally results in spin mixing and, consequently, reduces the TMR, whereas phonons are shown to enhance the TMR. The inclusion of both magnons and phonons reasonably explains an unusually bias dependence of the TMR. The model presented here is applied qualitatively to half-metallics with 100% spin polarization, where one-magnon processes are suppressed and the change in resistance in the absence of spin-mixing on impurities may be arbitrarily large. Even in the case of imperfect magnetic configurations, the resistance change can be a few 1,000%. Examples of half-metallic systems are CrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and CrO{sub 2}/RuO{sub 2}, and an account of their peculiar band structures is presented. The implications and relation of these systems to CMR materials, which are nearly half-metallic, are discussed.

  16. Digital mountains: toward development and environment protection in mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaobo

    2007-06-01

    Former studies on mountain system are focused on the department or subject characters, i.e. different department and branches of learning carry out researches only for their individual purposes and with individual characters of the subject of interests. As a whole, their investigation is lacking of comprehensive study in combination with global environment. Ecological environment in mountain regions is vulnerable to the disturbance of human activities. Therefore, it is a key issue to coordinate economic development and environment protection in mountain regions. On the other hand, a lot of work is ongoing on mountain sciences, especially depending on the application of RS and GIS. Moreover, the development of the Digital Earth (DE) provides a clue to re-understand mountains. These are the background of the emergence of the Digital Mountains (DM). One of the purposes of the DM is integrating spatial related data and information about mountains. Moreover, the DM is a viewpoint and methodology of understanding and quantifying mountains holistically. The concept of the DM is that, the spatial and temporal data related to mountain regions are stored and managed in computers; moreover, manipulating, analyzing, modeling, simulating and sharing of the mountain information are implemented by utilizing technologies of RS, GIS, GPS, Geo-informatic Tupu, computer, virtual reality (VR), 3D simulation, massive storage, mutual operation and network communication. The DM aims at advancing mountain sciences and sustainable mountain development. The DM is used to providing information and method for coordinating the mountain regions development and environment protection. The fundamental work of the DM is the design of the scientific architecture. Furthermore, construct and develop massive databases of mountains are the important steps these days.

  17. Dual-Element Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1994-01-01

    Improved micromachined tunneling accelerometer contains two deflecting transducer elements: One an elastically supported proof mass having relatively low resonant frequency; other cantilever tunneling transducer that tracks displacement of proof mass and has relatively high resonant frequency ({sup a} 10 kHz). Deflection voltage generated by circuit like described in "Wideband Feedback Circuit for Tunneling Sensor" (NPO-18866). Accelerometers of this type suited for underwater acoustic measurements, detecting vibrations associated with malfunctions in vehicles, detecting seismic signals, monitoring and controlling vibrations in structures, and other applications.

  18. Langley Spin Tunnel - Free Flight Tunnel - and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    Model shop for NACA Spin Tunnel and Free Flight Tunnel. Dynamically and geometrically accurate models with movable control surfaces are made here by men whose training as toy model makers is producing valuable results. The models are used for study of the stability and control of aircraft which is an essential basis for safety. Photograph published in Winds of Change, a 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 10), by James Schultz.

  19. The distribution of radon in tunnels with different geological characteristics in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Song, Bo; Zheng, Baoshan; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xue

    2010-05-01

    In China, as the economy is developing and the population is expanding, some underground buildings have been used as supermarkets, restaurants and entertainment places. Tunnels in mountains are one type of underground building, and the radon ((222)Rn) level in tunnels is an important issue. Radon levels in different type tunnels appear to differ, and relatively higher levels of (222)Rn are associated with particular types of bedrock. The (222)Rn levels in tunnels in five different geological characteristics were analyzed. Those built in granite had the highest (222)Rn levels with a geometric mean (GM) of 280Bqm(-3), while those built in limestone (GM: 100Bqm(-3)) and andesitic porphyry (GM: 96Bqm(-3)) were lower. The sequence of (222)Rn concentrations was: granite>tuff>quartz sandstone>limestone>andesitic porphyry, and the (222)Rn in granite was statistically significantly higher than in limestone and andesitic porphyry. Tunnels built in granite, tuff, quartz sandstone, limestone tended to have higher (222)Rn concentrations in summer than in winter, while the reverse tendency was true in andesitic porphyry tunnels. Only the difference in limestone was statistically significant.

  20. Pre-construction geologic section along the cross drift through the potential high-level radioactive waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Day, W.C.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Juan, C.S.; Drake, R.M. II

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Site Characterization effort for the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, tunnels excavated by tunnel boring machines provide access to the volume of rock that is under consideration for possible underground storage of high-level nuclear waste beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Exploratory Studies Facility, a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel, has been excavated, and a 2.8-km-long, 5-m-diameter Cross Drift will be excavated in 1998 as part of the geologic, hydrologic and geotechnical evaluation of the potential repository. The southwest-trending Cross Drift branches off of the north ramp of the horseshoe-shaped Exploratory Studies Facility. This report summarizes an interpretive geologic section that was prepared for the Yucca Mountain Project as a tool for use in the design and construction of the Cross Drift.

  1. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  2. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not

  3. Performance predictions for mechanical excavators in Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.; Neil, D.; Friant, J.

    1992-09-01

    The performances of several mechanical excavators are predicted for use in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain: Tunnel boring machines, the Mobile Miner, a roadheader, a blind shaft borer, a vertical wheel shaft boring machine, raise drills, and V-Moles. Work summarized is comprised of three parts: Initial prediction using existing rock physical property information; Measurement of additional rock physical properties; and Revision of the initial predictions using the enhanced database. The performance predictions are based on theoretical and empirical relationships between rock properties and the forces-experienced by rock cutters and bits during excavation. Machine backup systems and excavation design aspects, such as curves and grades, are considered in determining excavator utilization factors. Instanteous penetration rate, advance rate, and cutter costs are the fundamental performance indicators.

  4. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  5. Tunnel construction for a desertron

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterberger, H.; Huson, F.R.

    1983-03-27

    The tunnel in this model of construction is 3-1/2 feet wide by 5 feet high. It is assumed that the tunnel contains a rail system and guidance system for: (1) An enclosed car used for transport of 2 people and some tools. (2) A magnet mover. This robot could pick up a magnet and transport it at about 10 miles per hour. (3) An alignment robot. The alignment robot would intercept E.M. waves (microwaves, lasers) to determine its position in the tunnel. Then workers could come along inside the tunnel hoop and nail it together and to the floor. The trench would then be back-filled with a 1 foot berm on top. A rail system would be installed and a support stand for the magnet.

  6. Icing Research Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Icing Research Tunnel Test Section NASA technician measuring ice deposits on an airfoil after completing a test at the Lewis Research Center. NASA Lewis is now known as John H. Glean Research Center at Lewis Field.

  7. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  8. Guidelines for tunneling in enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Christopher C.; Ross Anderson, J. L.; Dutton, P. Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Summary Here we extend the engineering descriptions of simple, single-electron-tunneling chains common in oxidoreductases to quantify sequential oxidation-reduction rates of two-or-more electron cofactors and substrates. We identify when nicotinamides may be vulnerable to radical mediated oxidation-reduction and merge electron-tunneling expressions with the chemical rate expressions of Eyring. The work provides guidelines for the construction of new artificial oxidoreductases inspired by Nature but adopting independent design and redox engineering. PMID:20460101

  9. Quantum tunneling in flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Schwartz-Perlov, Delia; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2009-12-01

    We identify instantons representing vacuum decay in a 6-dimensional toy model for string theory flux compactifications, with the two extra dimensions compactified on a sphere. We evaluate the instanton action for tunneling between different flux vacua, as well as for the decompactification decay channel. The bubbles resulting from flux tunneling have an unusual structure. They are bounded by two-dimensional branes, which are localized in the extra dimensions. This has important implications for bubble collisions.

  10. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  11. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome and frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes ‘nuisance’ symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe however it can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review will discuss the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. Carpal tunnel syndrome has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which will be briefly discussed. However, there is a growing body of evidence for an association between carpal tunnel syndrome and various occupational factors, which will also be discussed. Management of carpal tunnel syndrome, conservative and surgical will be described. Finally, we will discuss the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:26612240

  12. Streamflow and water-quality monitoring in response to young-of-year smallmouth bass (micropterus dolomieu) mortality in the Susquehanna River and major tributaries, with comparisons to the Delaware and Allegheny Rivers, Pennsylvania, 2008-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, Jeffrey J.; Crawford, J. Kent

    2012-01-01

    For the critical period of each year, dissolved oxygen in the Susquehanna River at station C8 typically was 1.5 to 3.0 mg/L lower than in the Delaware River at station C1 and the Allegheny River at station C10. Median daily maximum water temperatures during the critical period of each year ranged from 1.6 to 2.7°C warmer at station C8 than at stations C1 and C10.

  13. Notoedric mange in two free-ranging mountain lions (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Houston, Robin S; Riley, Seth P D; Poppenga, Robert; Odani, Jenee; Boyce, Walter

    2007-04-01

    Two mountain lions (Puma con-color) were found dead in the Simi Hills area of southern California (Ventura County). Postmortem examination and toxicological analyses indicated that the cause of death was anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication. In addition, both lions had marked alopecia and skin crusts, caused by Notoedres cati. The diagnosis of notoedric mange was confirmed by histology and direct examination of mites obtained from skin scrapings of the two animals. Histologically, the affected skin showed acanthotic epidermis with parakeratosis and parasitic tunnels in the stratum corneum. This is the first report of the pathological changes associated with notoedric mange in free-ranging mountain lions.

  14. Notoedric mange in two free-ranging mountain lions (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Houston, Robin S; Riley, Seth P D; Poppenga, Robert; Odani, Jenee; Boyce, Walter

    2007-04-01

    Two mountain lions (Puma con-color) were found dead in the Simi Hills area of southern California (Ventura County). Postmortem examination and toxicological analyses indicated that the cause of death was anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication. In addition, both lions had marked alopecia and skin crusts, caused by Notoedres cati. The diagnosis of notoedric mange was confirmed by histology and direct examination of mites obtained from skin scrapings of the two animals. Histologically, the affected skin showed acanthotic epidermis with parakeratosis and parasitic tunnels in the stratum corneum. This is the first report of the pathological changes associated with notoedric mange in free-ranging mountain lions. PMID:17495313

  15. Yucca Mountain repository approved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    At a quiet White House ceremony on 23 July, U.S. President George W. Bush signed into law House Joint Resolution 87, which approves the site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the development of a repository for disposing of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.White House spokesman Ari Fleischer called the signing “an important step forward on the way to a comprehensive policy for dealing with our nation's nuclear waste.”

  16. Tunneling in strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Marianna

    Tunneling studies of strongly correlated materials provide information about the nature of electronic correlations, which is vital for investigation of emergent materials at the microscopic level. In particular, scanning tunneling spectroscopy/microscopy (STS/STM) studies have made major contributions to understanding cuprate superconductors (66), yet there is a sense that huge STM data arrays contain much more precious information to be extracted and analyzed. One of the most pressing questions in the field is how to improve the data analysis, so as to extract more information from STM data. A dominant trend in STM data analysis has been to interpret the data within a particular microscopic model, while using only basic data analysis tools. To decrease the reliance of the STM data interpretation on particular microscopic models, further advances in data analysis methods are necessary. In Chapter 2 of this Thesis, we discuss how one can extract information about the phase of the order parameter from STM data. We show that symmetrized and anti-symmetrized correlators of local density of states give rise to observable coherence factor effects. In Chapter 3, we apply this framework to analyze the recent scanning tunneling experiments on an underdoped cuprate superconductor Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2 by T. Hanaguri et al. (60). In Chapter 4, we propose a model for nodal quasiparticle scattering in a disordered vortex lattice. Recently, scanning tunneling studies of a Kondo lattice material URu2Si2 became possible (117). If it proves possible to apply scanning tunneling spectroscopy to Kondo lattice materials, then remarkable new opportunities in the ongoing investigation may emerge. In Chapter 5, we examine the effect of co-tunneling to develop a theory of tunneling into a Kondo lattice. We find that the interference between the direct tunneling and the co-tunneling channels leads to a novel asymmetric lineshape, which has two peaks and a gap. The presence of the peaks suggests

  17. Differential Hydrogeological Effects of Draining Tunnels Through the Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, Valentina; Gargini, Alessandro; Goldscheider, Nico; Piccinini, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    Water inflows are a major challenge in tunnelling and particularly difficult to predict in geological settings consisting of heterogeneous sedimentary rock formations with complex tectonic structure. For a high-speed railway line between Bologna and Florence (Italy), a series of seven railway tunnels was drilled through turbiditic formations, ranging from pelitic rocks with thin arenitic layers over sequences including thick-bedded sandstone to calcareous rocks showing chemical dissolution phenomena (karstification). The tunnels were built as draining tunnels and caused significant impacts, such as drying of springs and base-flow losses at mountain streams. A comprehensive hydrological monitoring programme and four multi-tracer test were done, focusing on four sections of the tunnel system. The tracer tests delivered unprecedented data on groundwater flow and transport in turbiditic aquifers and made it possible to better characterize the differential impacts of tunnel drainage along a geological gradient. The impact radius is 200 m in the thin-bedded sequences but reaches 2.3-4.0 km in calcareous and thick-bedded arenitic turbidites. Linear flow velocities, as determined from the peaks of the tracer breakthrough curves, range from 3.6 m/day in the thin-bedded turbidites to 39 m/day in the calcareous rocks (average values from the four test sites). At several places, discrete fault zones were identified as main hydraulic pathways between impacted streams and draining tunnels. This case shows that ignoring the hydrogeological conditions in construction projects can cause terrible damage, and the study presents an approach to better predict hydraulic impacts of draining tunnels in complex sedimentary rock settings.

  18. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition. PMID:27234206

  19. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition.

  20. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula. PMID:24224758

  1. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  2. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Final Report summarizes the work carried out by a unique Government/Industry partnership during the period of June 1994 through May 1996. The objective of this partnership was to plan, design, build and activate 'world class' wind tunnel facilities for the development of future-generation commercial and military aircraft. The basis of this effort was a set of performance goals defined by the National Facilities Study (NFS) Task Group on Aeronautical Research and Development Facilities which established two critical measures of improved wind tunnel performance; namely, higher Reynolds number capability and greater productivity. Initial activities focused upon two high-performance tunnels (low-speed and transonic). This effort was later descoped to a single multipurpose tunnel. Beginning in June 1994, the NWTC Project Office defined specific performance requirements, planned site evaluation activities, performed a series of technical/cost trade studies, and completed preliminary engineering to support a proposed conceptual design. Due to budget uncertainties within the Federal government, the NWTC project office was directed to conduct an orderly closure following the Systems Design Review in March 1996. This report provides a top-level status of the project at that time. Additional details of all work performed have been archived and are available for future reference.

  3. Mountain Weather and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piaget, A.

    As Barry says in his preface, this is the first book dealing with mountain weather and climate worldwide and represents a review of all publications on the subject. As a matter of fact, this approach is not the best because information is not always extensively presented. It looks like a colorful stone mosaic, where a lot of stones are missing. Barry says in his introduction that the studies were ‘often viewed only in the context of a particular local problem.’

  4. Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric project

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Hydropower regulations, particularly those which must be met during the pre-construction phase, have become considerably more extensive and complicated over the last few years. This article, which outlines the pre-construction phase of the Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric project, provides a good example of the steps developers should be prepared to take before construction commences. The Department of Energy is funding $750,000 of the project's $1,200,000 budget to gain meaningful and reliable information for the public regarding the development and operation of an inexpensive, low head, domestically manufactured cross-flow turbine. To satisfy their requirements several studies and reports are being prepared for the DOE.

  5. The exploratory studies facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain - Description and status

    SciTech Connect

    Simecka, W.B.; Replogle, J.M.; Mckenzie, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will be a 25 kilometer underground network of inclined ramps, tunnels, and test alcoves. It will serve as an underground laboratory for the execution of a testing program conceived to assess the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site to host a potential high level nuclear waste repository. This paper contains a description of the ESF, a summary of the major types of tests currently planned, and a report on the current status of the ongoing design and construction activities. The ESF is being designed and constructed in phases. Currently, the Detailed Design, or {open_quotes}Title II Design{close_quotes} is centered on the second of ten major design packages. Construction has begun on excavation of the {open_quotes}starter tunnel{close_quotes} for a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) expected to begin operation in late FY 1994. The EFS program will provide information critical to the evaluation of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository site, and will house a suite of state-of-the-art tests designed to gather this information. The ESF is a one of a kind opportunity to examine, in minute detail, all facets of a sites` geology; its thermal, mechanical, and hydrologic properties; and to study the linkages between these properties.

  6. Human impacts to mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2006-09-01

    Mountain streams are here defined as channel networks within mountainous regions of the world. This definition encompasses tremendous diversity of physical and biological conditions, as well as history of land use. Human effects on mountain streams may result from activities undertaken within the stream channel that directly alter channel geometry, the dynamics of water and sediment movement, contaminants in the stream, or aquatic and riparian communities. Examples include channelization, construction of grade-control structures or check dams, removal of beavers, and placer mining. Human effects can also result from activities within the watershed that indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water, sediment, and contaminants into the channel. Deforestation, cropping, grazing, land drainage, and urbanization are among the land uses that indirectly alter stream processes. An overview of the relative intensity of human impacts to mountain streams is provided by a table summarizing human effects on each of the major mountainous regions with respect to five categories: flow regulation, biotic integrity, water pollution, channel alteration, and land use. This table indicates that very few mountains have streams not at least moderately affected by land use. The least affected mountainous regions are those at very high or very low latitudes, although our scientific ignorance of conditions in low-latitude mountains in particular means that streams in these mountains might be more altered than is widely recognized. Four case studies from northern Sweden (arctic region), Colorado Front Range (semiarid temperate region), Swiss Alps (humid temperate region), and Papua New Guinea (humid tropics) are also used to explore in detail the history and effects on rivers of human activities in mountainous regions. The overview and case studies indicate that mountain streams must be managed with particular attention to upstream/downstream connections, hillslope

  7. Other cryogenic wind tunnel projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The first cryogenic tunnel was built in 1972. Since then, many cryogenic wind-tunnel projects were started at aeronautical research centers around the world. Some of the more significant of these projects are described which are not covered by other lecturers at this Special Course. Described are cryogenic wind-tunnel projects in five countries: China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center); England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and Royal Aerospace Establishment-Bedford); Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy); United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and NASA Langley); and U.S.S.R. (Central Aero-Hydronamics Institute (TsAGI), Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ITAM), and Physical-Mechanical Institute at Kharkov (PMI-K).

  8. Other Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The first cryogenic tunnel was built at the NASA Langley Research Center in 1972. Since then, many cryogenic wind-tunnels have been built at aeronautical research centers around the world. In this lecture some of the more interesting and significant of these projects that have not been covered by other lecturers at this Special Course are described. In this lecture authors describe cryogenic wind-tunnel projects at research centers in four countries: China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center); England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and Defence Research Agency - Bedford); Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy); and United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and NASA Langley).

  9. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work.

    PubMed

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome, and it frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes 'nuisance' symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe, CTS can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review discusses the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. CTS has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which are briefly discussed. There is a growing body of evidence for an association between CTS and various occupational factors, which is also explored. Management of CTS, conservative and surgical, is described. Finally, the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines are discussed.

  10. Tunnelling in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Artem; Novoselov, Kostya; Geim, Andre; Eaves, Laurence; Falko, Vladimir

    When graphene and other conductive two-dimensional (2D) materials are separated by an atomically thin insulating 2D crystal, quantum mechanical tunnelling leads to appreciable current between two 2D conductors due to the overlap of their wavefunctions. These tunnel devices demonstrate interesting physics and potential for applications: such effects as resonant tunnelling, negative differential conductance, light emission and detection have already been demonstrated. In this presentation we will outline the current status and perspectives of tunnelling transistors based on 2D materials assembled into van der Waals heterostructures. Particularly, we will present results on mono- and bilayer graphene tunnelling, tunnelling in 2D crystal-based quantum wells, and tunnelling in superconducting 2D materials. Such effects as momentum and chirality conservation, phonon- and impurity-assisted tunnelling will also be discussed. Finally, we will ponder the implications of discovered effects for practical applications.

  11. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers.

    PubMed

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S; Amin, Mohammad H; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-07

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive.

  12. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    PubMed Central

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  13. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive.

  14. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  15. Mountains and Tropical Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, Z.; Goodman, P. J.; Krasting, J. P.; Malyshev, S.; Russell, J. L.; Stouffer, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observed tropical convection exhibits zonal asymmetries that strongly influence spatial precipitation patterns. The drivers of changes to this zonally-asymmetric Walker circulation on decadal and longer timescales have been the focus of significant recent research. Here we use two state-of-the-art earth system models to explore the impact of earth's mountains on the Walker circulation. When all land-surface topography is removed, the Walker circulation weakens by 33-59%. There is a ~30% decrease in global, large-scale upward vertical wind velocities in the middle of the troposphere, but only minor changes in global average convective mass flux, precipitation, surface and sea-surface temperatures. The zonally symmetric Hadley circulation is also largely unchanged. Following the spatial pattern of changes to large-scale vertical wind velocities, precipitation becomes less focused over the tropics. The weakening of the Walker circulation, but not the Hadley circulation, is similar to the behavior of climate models during radiative forcing experiments: in our simulations, the weakening is associated with changes in vertical wind velocities, rather than the hydrologic cycle. These results indicate suggest that mountain heights may significantly influence the Walker circulation on geologic time scales, and observed changes in tropical precipitation over millions of years may have been forced by changes in tropical orography.

  16. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2003-08-05

    This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

  17. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  18. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810... Information and Regulations § 177.810 Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive) materials... through any urban vehicular tunnel used for mass transportation....

  19. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  20. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  1. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  2. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810... Information and Regulations § 177.810 Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive) materials... through any urban vehicular tunnel used for mass transportation....

  3. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  4. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  5. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  6. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  7. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810... Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive) materials, nothing contained in parts 170-189 of... tunnel used for mass transportation....

  8. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  9. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  10. Selenite transport in unsaturated tuff from Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1994-04-01

    Direct measurements of unsaturated selenite retardation coefficients and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were obtained on two tuff samples from Yucca Mountain using the UFA{trademark} technology. The retardation factor for the selenite species was only 2.5 in both Yucca Mountain vitric member at 62.6% saturation and zeolitized nonwelded tuff from G-tunnel at 52.8% saturation with respect to J-13 well water from the Nevada Test Site contaminated with selenium at 1.31 mg/l (ppm). In batch tests on the same material using 1.2 mg/l (ppm), the average K{sub d} was determined to be 13, giving retardation factors higher than the UFA column breakthrough tests by an order of magnitude. The difference could result from preferential flow paths in the UFA column as might occur in the field or differences in residence times between the two types of test. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivities during the experiments were 2.49 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s for the Yucca Mountain vitric member and 1.16 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s for the zeolitized nonwelded tuff.

  11. A Seamless Ubiquitous Telehealthcare Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lin, Bor-Shing; Yu, Chu; Hu, Shun-Hsiang; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields. PMID:23917812

  12. Aorta-right atrial tunnel.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, Cheemalapati; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary-cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure.The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass.Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2).

  13. A seamless ubiquitous telehealthcare tunnel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lin, Bor-Shing; Yu, Chu; Hu, Shun-Hsiang; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2013-08-02

    Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields.

  14. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  15. SCALING: Wind Tunnel to Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnels have wide-ranging functionality, including many applications beyond aeronautics, and historically have been the major source of information for technological aerodynamics/aeronautical applications. There are a myriad of scaling issues/differences from flight to wind tunnel, and their study and impacts are uneven and a function of the particular type of extant flow phenomena. Typically, the most serious discrepancies are associated with flow separation. The tremendous ongoing increases in numerical simulation capability are changing and in many aspects have changed the function of the wind tunnel from a (scaled) "predictor" to a source of computational calibration/validation information with the computation then utilized as the flight prediction/scaling tool. Numerical simulations can increasingly include the influences of the various scaling issues. This wind tunnel role change has been occurring for decades as computational capability improves in all aspects. Additional issues driving this trend are the increasing cost (and time) disparity between physical experiments and computations, and increasingly stringent accuracy requirements.

  16. Spinoff from Wind Tunnel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Douglas Juanarena, a former NASA Langley instrument design engineer, found a solution to the problem of long, repetitive tunnel runs needed to measure airflow pressures. Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) replaced mechanical systems with electronic sensors. Juanarena licensed the NASA-patented technology and now manufactures ESP modules for research centers, aerospace companies, etc.

  17. Tunnel Vision in Environmental Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Discusses problem-solving styles in environmental management and the specific deficiencies in these styles that might be grouped under the label "tunnel vision," a form of selective attention contributing to inadequate problem-formulation, partial solutions to complex problems, and generation of additional problems. Includes educational…

  18. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Mary, Natalie; Howe, A. Scott; Jeffries, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    How Mars surface crews get into their ascent vehicle has profound implications for Mars surface architecture. To meet planetary protection protocols, the architecture has get Intravehicular Activity (IVA)-suited crew into a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) without having to step outside into the Mars environment. Pushing EVA suit don/doff and EVA operations to an element that remains on the surface also helps to minimize MAV cabin volume, which in turn can reduce MAV cabin mass. Because the MAV will require at least seven kilograms of propellant to ascend each kilogram of cabin mass, minimal MAV mass is desired. For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The "Minimum Functional Tunnel" is a conceptual design that performs a single function. Having established this baseline configuration, the next step is to trade design options, evaluate other applications, and explore alternative solutions.

  19. The recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kern, B C; Brock, M; Rudolph, K H; Logemann, H

    1993-01-01

    Sixteen out of 720 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who had undergone surgery since 1979 were reoperated for a "recurrence" (2.2%). Twelve of these patients had been originally operated on in our department. Thus, our own recurrence rate is 1.7%. Three patients deteriorated following surgery, 6 had an unsatisfactory improvement, and in 7 the symptoms recurred after initial improvement. Eight of the reoperated patients had a predisposing disease (terminal renal insufficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, acromegaly). In 10 of the 16 cases the initial operation had been carried out by surgeons in the first three years of training. Reoperation revealed incomplete splitting of the transverse carpal ligament in 10 cases, compression of the median nerve by the scar in 4, injury of the muscular branch in 1, and an anatomical variant as cause of incomplete decompression in 1 patient. "Recurrences" after carpal tunnel surgery are predominantly due to inadequacies of the first procedure. A remarkable number of patients (50%) has predisposing diseases. Interfascicular or epineural neurolysis and complete exposure and neurolysis of the median nerve and its branches is necessary only in cases of recurrence. Their omission at the first surgery does not result in an increased recurrence rate. Our observations indicate that the number of operations for recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome can probably be reduced when the first operation is performed with care and experience. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a systemic disease are particularly at risk.

  20. Tunneling in the SIS Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu.; Kohandel, M.

    2000-09-01

    We discuss the effects caused by the layered structure of high temperature superconductors (HTS). We use the layered S-N model to obtain the tunneling current of the SIS structure. The current-voltage characteristic is calculated in the limit cases when dI/dV is proportional to the state density of HTS.

  1. A seamless ubiquitous telehealthcare tunnel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lin, Bor-Shing; Yu, Chu; Hu, Shun-Hsiang; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2013-08-01

    Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields. PMID:23917812

  2. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  3. Geology at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    Both advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Critics believe that there is sufficient geological evidence to rule the site unsuitable for further investigation. Some advocates claim that there is insufficient data and that investigations are incomplete, while others claim that the site is free of major obstacles. We have expanded our efforts to include both the critical evaluations of existing geological and geochemical data and the collection of field data and samples for the purpose of preparing scientific papers for submittal to journals. Summaries of the critical reviews are presented in this paper.

  4. Tunneling time, what is its meaning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, C. R.; Orlando, G.; Vampa, G.; Brabec, T.

    2015-03-01

    The tunnel time ionization dynamics for bound systems in laser fields are investigated. Numerical analysis for a step function switch-on of the field allows for the tunnel time to be defined as the time it takes the ground state to develop the under-barrier wavefunction components necessary to achieve the static field ionization rate. A relation between the tunnel time and the Keldysh time is established. The definition of the tunnel time is extended to time varying fields and experimental possibilities for measuring the tunnel time are discussed.

  5. Aeroelastic instability stoppers for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A mechanism for diverting the flow in a wind tunnel from the wing of a tested model is described. The wing is mounted on the wall of a tunnel. A diverter plate is pivotally mounted on the tunnel wall ahead of the model. An actuator fixed to the tunnel is pivotably connected to the diverter plate, by plunger. When the model is about to become unstable during the test the actuator moves the diverter plate from the tunnel wall to divert maintaining stable model conditions. The diverter plate is then retracted to enable normal flow.

  6. ESTIMATES OF CLOUD WATER DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM SITES IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY, Whitetop Mountain, VA, and Clingrnan's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). ...

  7. Ventilation design for Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jurani, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, located in Southern Nevada approximately 160 km northwest of Las Vegas, is currently the site of intensive surface-based and underground investigations. The investigations are required to determine if the site is suitable for long term isolation of the Nation`s high level nuclear waste inventory. A major component of the program is the Exploratory Studies Facility, or ESF. The ESF, when completed, will consist of approximately 25,600 meters of tunnels and drifts. The network of tunnels and drifts will house and support a wide array of testing programs conceived to provide physical information about the site. Information on geologic, geomechanical, and hydrologic data will be used in the repository design if the site is found suitable. Besides a few special requirements, the general ESF ventilation criteria during construction are similar to that of commercial tunneling and mining operations. The minimum air velocity at the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) and other active mining faces is 0.51 meter per second (m/s) (100 feet per minute [fpm]). Airways, estimated leakages and ventilation controls are converted into equivalent resistances for input to mine ventilation network computer simulations. VNETPC Version 3.1 computer software is used to generate the ventilation models for optimized system design and component selection. Subsequently, actual performance of the ventilation system will be verified and validated to comply with applicable nuclear regulatory quality assurance requirements. Dust control in the ESF is dependent on effective dust collection, enclosure, and airflow dilution. Minimum use of water, as feasible, is necessary to avoid adding moisture to the potential repository horizon. The limitation of water use for test drilling and TBM operation, and the rigid compliance with applicable federal and state regulations, make the ESF a ventilation design challenge.

  8. 2. 'Tunnel No 6 West End, Front Elevation, Sectional Elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'Tunnel No 6 West End, Front Elevation, Sectional Elevation on Centerline of Portal,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, 1910. Tunnel 6, which today would be Tunnel 20, was daylighted and no longer exists. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 23 (HAER No. CA-198), Tunnel 24 (HAER No. CA-200), Tunnel 25 (HAER No. CA-201), Tunnel 27 (HAER No. CA-203), Tunnel 28 (HAER No. CA-204), and Tunnel 29 (HAER No. CA-205). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  9. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  10. 27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Bell Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Bell Mountain viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  12. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozark Mountain. 9.108... Ozark Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ozark Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Ozark Mountain...

  13. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  14. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  15. 27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Bell Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Bell Mountain viticultural area...

  16. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozark Mountain. 9.108... Ozark Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ozark Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Ozark Mountain...

  17. 27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Bell Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Bell Mountain viticultural area...

  18. 27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Bell Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Bell Mountain viticultural area...

  19. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  20. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ozark Mountain. 9.108... Ozark Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ozark Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Ozark Mountain...

  1. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  2. 27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Bell Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Bell Mountain viticultural area...

  3. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  4. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  5. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  6. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  7. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozark Mountain. 9.108... Ozark Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ozark Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Ozark Mountain...

  8. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozark Mountain. 9.108... Ozark Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ozark Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Ozark Mountain...

  9. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat.

    PubMed

    Mead, J I; Martin, P S; Euler, R C; Long, A; Jull, A J; Toolin, L J; Donahue, D J; Linick, T W

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  10. Geography and Weather: Mountain Meterology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogil, H. Michael; Collins, H. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Provided are 26 ideas to help children explore the effects of mountains on the weather. Weather conditions in Nepal and Colorado are considered separately. Nine additional sources of information are listed. (CW)

  11. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  12. Extinction of Harrington's Mountain Goat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  13. The Dilemma of Mountain Roads

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountain roads and trails are proliferating throughout developing Southeast Asia with severe but largely unrecognized long-term consequences related to effects of landslides and surface erosion on communities and downstream resources.

  14. Mid-pacific mountains revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, Loren W.; Kellogg, James N.; Nemoto, Kenji

    1985-06-01

    The Mid-Pacific Mountains are guyots whose volcanic pedestals have been constructed on a broad basement plateau, the flanks of which are downfaulted. Edifice construction may have been controlled by an orthogonal system of intersecting faults trending roughly ENE and NNW. Low amplitude gravity anomalies observed over the Mid-Pacific Mountains indicate complete Airy-Heiskanen isostatic compensation, crustal thickening, and eruption on thin elastic lithosphere. Tholeiites of the Mid-Pacific Mountains resemble lavas of Iceland and the Galapagos Islands. The orthogonal fault system, low gravity anomalies, and lava chemistry of the Mid-Pacific Mountains can be explained by eruption on or near a great ENE-trending rift system.

  15. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  16. Harmonic multiplication using resonant tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollner, T. C. L. G.; Brown, E. R.; Goodhue, W. D.; Correa, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of resonant-tunneling diodes as varistors for harmonic multiplication. It is shown that efficient odd-harmonic conversion is possible and that even harmonics do not appear because of the antisymmetry of the current-voltage (I-V) curve. It is also shown that, with the proper choice of resonant-tunneling structure and pump amplitude, most of the harmonic output power can be confined to a single odd-harmonic frequency. Fifth-harmonic multiplication was demonstrated with an output at 21.75 GHz and a power conversion efficiency of 0.5 percent, and a fifth-harmonic efficiency of 2.7 percent was achieved in a circuit simulation using an improved I-V curve.

  17. Fermion tunneling from dynamical horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Criscienzo, R.; Vanzo, L.

    2008-06-01

    The instability against emission of fermionic particles by the trapping horizon of an evolving black hole is analyzed and confirmed using the Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method. This method automatically selects one special expression for the surface gravity of a changing horizon. The results also apply to point masses embedded in an expanding universe. As a bonus of the tunneling method, we gain the insight that the surface gravity still defines a temperature parameter as long as the evolution is sufficiently slow that the black-hole pass through a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states, and that black holes should be semi-classically unstable even in a hypothetical world without bosonic fields.

  18. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.Y.; Wu, H.W.; Yang, H. E-mail: iverwu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a function of θ due to the rotation.

  19. Variable density turbulence tunnel facility.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, E; Bewley, G P; Nobach, H; Sinhuber, M; Xu, H

    2014-09-01

    The Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen, Germany, produces very high turbulence levels at moderate flow velocities, low power consumption, and adjustable kinematic viscosity between 10(-4) m(2)/s and 10(-7) m(2)/s. The Reynolds number can be varied by changing the pressure or flow rate of the gas or by using different non-flammable gases including air. The highest kinematic viscosities, and hence lowest Reynolds numbers, are reached with air or nitrogen at 0.1 bar. To reach the highest Reynolds numbers the tunnel is pressurized to 15 bars with the dense gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Turbulence is generated at the upstream ends of two measurement sections with grids, and the evolution of this turbulence is observed as it moves down the length of the sections. We describe the instrumentation presently in operation, which consists of the tunnel itself, classical grid turbulence generators, and state-of-the-art nano-fabricated hot-wire anemometers provided by Princeton University [M. Vallikivi, M. Hultmark, S. C. C. Bailey, and A. J. Smits, Exp. Fluids 51, 1521 (2011)]. We report measurements of the characteristic scales of the flow and of turbulent spectra up to Taylor Reynolds number R(λ) ≈ 1600, higher than any other grid-turbulence experiment. We also describe instrumentation under development, which includes an active grid and a Lagrangian particle tracking system that moves down the length of the tunnel with the mean flow. In this configuration, the properties of the turbulence are adjustable and its structure is resolvable up to R(λ) ≈ 8000.

  20. New treatment of quantum tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defendi, Antonio; Roncadelli, Marco

    1994-04-01

    We explore the implications of the recently proposed Langevin quantization for quantum tunneling, working within the semiclassical approximation. As far as we can see, the present treatment is simpler and more straightforward than the path integral approach. In fact, no extra trick is needed and the correct result follows at once - as a consequence of general principles - from the representation of the propagator supplied by the Langevin quantization. Further applications of the strategy discussed in this Letter are pointed out.

  1. Electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei

    2013-02-01

    This article discusses the historical aspects related to the understanding of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and its diagnosis, highlighting observations about this disease that have yet to be challenged. This is followed by a discussion regarding the use of electrodiagnostic testing as a diagnostic tool for CTS, as well as the author's approach to making the diagnosis of CTS. Finally, conclusions about future directions in the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder are presented.

  2. Referral guidelines: carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laws, E R

    1997-07-15

    The contribution on the postoperative management and rehabilitation of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should be carefully considered by every surgeon. The operation is simply not over when the last stitch goes in; careful postoperative management is quite important if one is to obtain optimal surgical results. The principles outlined here are valuable and help to explain the occasional poor outcome. We have become convinced that the use of a dorsal splint in the 1st week to 10 days following surgery is a helpful measure. It is designed to prevent the median nerve from prolapsing forward and becoming adherent to or trapped by the edges of the severed transverse carpal ligament. With regard to surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It is exceedingly important to continue producing outcome studies showing that our interventions really do eliminate the problem and allow people to return to productive work. Templates for outcome assessment are under development by the Outcomes Committee of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and also by the American College of surgeons. Hopefully, they can be applied to the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The following segment represents some suggested referral guidelines for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The present differential diagnosis, methods of confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate indications for considering surgery. These guidelines have been reviewed by the various authors who have contributed to this issue of Neurosurgical Focus and other colleagues in neurosurgery, orthopedics, plastic surgery, neurology, and occupational therapy. It is hoped that they will be a reasonable start in our efforts to inform referring physicians as to the nature of median thenar neuropathy and its overall management.

  3. Neurolysis for failed tarsal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yalcinkaya, Merter; Ozer, Utku Erdem; Yalcin, M Burak; Bagatur, A Erdem

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the causes of failure after tarsal tunnel release and the operative findings in the secondary interventions and the outcomes. The data from 8 patients who had undergone revision surgery for failed tarsal tunnel release at least 12 months earlier were evaluated retrospectively. Only the patients with idiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome were included, and all had unilateral symptoms. Neurophysiologic tests confirmed the clinical diagnosis of failed tarsal tunnel release in all patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed varicose veins within the tarsal tunnel in 1 patient (12.5%) and tenosynovitis in another (12.5%). Open tarsal tunnel release was performed in all patients, and the tibialis posterior nerve, medial and lateral plantar nerves (including the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve), and medial calcaneal nerve were released in their respective tunnels, and the septum between the tunnels was resected. The outcomes were assessed according to subjective patient satisfaction as excellent, good, fair, or poor. During revision surgery, insufficient release of the tarsal tunnel, especially distally, was observed in all the patients, and fibrosis of the tibialis posterior nerve was present in 1 (12.5%). The outcomes according to subjective patient satisfaction were excellent in 5 (62.5%), good in 2 (25%), and fair in 1 (12.5%). The fair outcome was obtained in the patient with fibrosis of the nerve. Insufficient release of the tarsal tunnel was the main cause of failed tarsal tunnel release. Releasing the 4 distinct tunnels and permitting immediate mobilization provided satisfactory results in patients with failed tarsal tunnel release. PMID:25128912

  4. Uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, E.

    1987-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains, a major continental range, extend approximately 3,000 kilometers, vary from less than 50 to more than 400 kilometers wide, and have elevations of up to 4,500 meters. Earth scientists have generally defined the stratigraphy of the range and recognize that uplift of the region occurred after the Jurassic period but still know very little about the processes that effected uplift. Unlike other major mountain chains, the Transantarctic Mountains show no evidence of thrusting, folding, regional metamorphism, and andesitic volcanism associated with their uplift. The objectives during austral summer 1987-1988 are to map the uplift geometry of the Transantarctic Mountains using erosion surfaces (pre-Devonian Kukir peneplain) and widespread terrace levels as datum planes and to determine the uplift rates for the mountain range using fission-track dating of apatites. Presently, fission-track dating provides only quantitative data on the initiation time, amount, and rate of uplift. Through research, the authors hopes to extend data from Victoria Land through 1,600 kilometers of the Transantarctic Mountains. This study also has implications for the glacial history of Antarctica, because the uplift occurred during the inception, growth, and subsequent fluctuations of the east and west antarctic ice sheets. It will also add to our understanding of the nature of the East-West Antarctic boundary and to the knowledge of the sedimentation history in the Ross embayment and the basins beneath polar plateau.

  5. Io: Mountains and crustal extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is argued that there is good reason to conclude that mountains on Io, like those on Earth, are subject to growth and decay. The decay of mountains will be assisted by the ability of SO sub 2 to rot silicate rock and by explosive escape of sub-surface SO sub 2 from aquifers (Haemus Mons is seen to be covered by bright material, presumably fallout from a SO sub 2 rich plume which had been active on the mountain flanks). On the west side of the massif at 10 degrees S, 270 degrees W a rugged surface consists of long ridges running perpendicular to the downslope direction, suggesting tectonic denudation with crustal blocks sliding down the mountain flank. Tectonic denudation may be assisted, as in the case of the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana by overloading mountain flanks with volcanic products. The surfaces of some massifs exhibit a well developed, enigmatic corrugated terrain, consisting of complex ridge systems. Ridges may bifurcate, anastomose to form closed depressions and form concentric loops. Taken together, observations of morphology, heat flux, surface deposits and styles of volcanism may point to the existence of lithosphere domains with distinct compositions and tectonic regimes.

  6. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  7. Water jet assisted tunnel boring

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdemir, L.

    1984-06-21

    Mechanical tunnel boring has experienced significant growth over the last two decades. Improved machine design and performance coupled with a better understanding of factors affecting boreability have contributed to a dramatic increase in the number of machine bored tunnels. Today, tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are finding widespread application in various sectors of underground construction industry, both civil and mining. Most of the hard rock formations considered unsuited to mechanical boring only a few years ago are now excavated with TBMs with favorable economics compared to conventional drill and blast methods. Despite the advancements accomplished, TBMs need further improvements in design and operation to exend their capabilities and to reduce excavation costs, particularly in hard, abrasive rocks. The design of TBMs has presently reached a state where no additional major breakthroughs are anticipated in the near future. The cutter material appears to be the major obstacle to achieving further performance improvements. The amount of load which the cutters can sustain with acceptable levels of wear is the limiting factor determining the magnitude of the power that can be placed on a TBM. In fact, most present day TBMs can generate more thrust and torque than the individual cutters are capable of supporting.

  8. Models for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Model requirements, types of model construction methods, and research in new ways to build models are discussed. The 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel was in operation for 16 years and many 2-D airfoil pressure models were tested. In addition there were airfoil models dedicated to transition detection techniques and other specialized research. There were also a number of small 3-D models tested. A chronological development in model building technique is described which led to the construction of many successful models. The difficulties of construction are illustrated by discussing several unsuccessful model fabrication attempts. The National Transonic Facility, a newer and much larger tunnel, was used to test a variety of models including a submarine, transport and fighter configurations, and the Shuttle Orbiter. A new method of building pressure models was developed and is described. The method is centered on the concept of bonding together plates with pressure channels etched into the bond planes, which provides high density pressure instrumentation with minimum demand on parent model material. With care in the choice of materials and technique, vacuum brazing can be used to produce strong bonds without blocking pressure channels and with no bonding voids between channels. Using multiple plates, a 5 percent wing with 96 orifices was constructed and tested in a transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Samples of test data are presented and future applications of the technology are suggested.

  9. The optimum hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, L. L.; Cary, A., Jr.; Voisinet, R. L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of existing hypersonic wind tunnels in the U.S. are assessed to form a basis for recommendations for a new, costly facility which would provide data for modeling the hypervelocity aerodynamics envisioned for the new generation of aerospace vehicles now undergoing early studies. Attention is given to the regimes, both entry and aerodynamic, which the new vehicles will encounter, and the shortcomings of data generated for the Orbiter before flight are discussed. The features of foreign-gas, impulse, aeroballistic range, arc-heated and combustion-heated facilities are examined, noting that in any hypersonic wind tunnel the flow must be preheated to prevent liquefaction upon expansion in the test channel. The limitations of the existing facilities and the identification of the regimes which must be studied lead to a description of the characteristics of an optimum hypersonic wind tunnel, including the operations and productivity, the instrumentation, the nozzle design and the flow quality. Three different design approaches are described, each costing at least $100 million to achieve workability.

  10. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  11. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    PubMed

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  12. Natural Barriers of the Geosphere at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, H.; Kotra, J.; Mohanty, S.; Winterle, J.

    2005-05-01

    Geological repositories designed to isolate high-level radioactive waste need natural and engineered barriers that prevent or slow the release of radioactive elements into the accessible environment to acceptable regulatory limits. Under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) regulations, a barrier is any material, structure, or feature that prevents or substantially reduces the rate of movement of water or radionuclides from the repository to the accessible environment. In 1982, Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act which directed the NRC to include multiple barriers in regulating geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Accordingly, as provided in 10 CFR Part 63, the NRC's regulations for Yucca Mountain require a repository to include multiple barriers to ensure the system is robust and not wholly dependent on any single barrier. Any potential license application to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain must identify the multiple barriers (both natural and engineered), describe the capabilities of each barrier, and provide the technical bases for the capabilities of the barriers. The NRC believes that understanding the capability of the repository's component barriers improves understanding of the overall system. The objective of this paper is to discuss potential natural barriers of the geosphere at Yucca Mountain and describe the NRC regulatory requirements for such barriers. To better understand the natural barriers of the geosphere, it helps to divide the barriers into groups of features and their associated processes. Natural barriers, i.e., barriers not constructed by man, ideally include processes that delay the transport of radionuclides from reaching the accessible environment or limit the amount of water that can seep from a ground surface to the depth of an underground repository. Natural barriers at Yucca Mountain may include: topographic influences on precipitation runoff; soil and plants influences on evaporation and

  13. Effects of diesel exhaust on the microbiota within a tuffaceous tunnel system

    SciTech Connect

    Haldeman, D.L.; Lagadinos, T.; Amy, P.S.; Hersman, L.; Meike, A.

    1996-08-01

    The abundance and distribution of microbiota that may be impacted by diesel and diesel exhaust were investigated from three depths into the walls and invert (floor) of U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, a potential geological analog of Yucca Mountain. Enumerations included total cell counts, and numbers of aerobic heterotrophic, sulfate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, and diesel-degrading bacteria. Additionally, the disappearance of total petroleum hydrocarbons was determined in microcosms containing subsurface materials that were amended with diesel fuel. Results revealed that microbes capable of utilizing diesel and diesel combustion products were present in the subsurface in both the walls and the invert of the tunnel. The abundance of specific bacterial types in the tunnel invert, a perturbed environment, was greater than that observed in the tunnel wall. Few trends of microbial distribution either into the tunnel wall or the invert were noted with the exception of aerobic heterotrophic abundance which increased with depth into the wall and decreased with depth into the invert. No correlation between microbiota and a specific introduced chemical species have yet been determined. The potential for microbial contamination of the tunnel wall during sampling was determined to be negligible by the use of fluorescently labeled latex spheres (1{mu}m in dia.) as tracers. Results indicate that additional investigations might be needed to examine the microbiota and their possible impacts on the geology and geochemistry of the subsurface, both indigenous microbiota and those microorganisms that will likely be introduced by anthropogenic activity associated with the construction of a high-level waste repository.

  14. Porewater pressure control on subglacial soft sediment remobilization and tunnel valley formation: A case study from the Alnif tunnel valley (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravier, Edouard; Buoncristiani, Jean-François; Guiraud, Michel; Menzies, John; Clerc, Sylvain; Goupy, Bastien; Portier, Eric

    2014-05-01

    In the eastern part of the Moroccan Anti-Atlas Mountains, the Alnif area exposes a buried Ordovician glacial tunnel valley (5 km wide, 180 m deep) cut into preglacial marine sediments. The preglacial sedimentary sequence, deposited in a marine environment, is characterized by a typical "layer-cake" configuration of permeable (sand) and impermeable (clays and early-cemented sandstones) layers. At the base of the tunnel valley, a discontinuous and fan-shaped glacial conglomeratic unit 10 to 15 m thick occurs, erosively deposited over preglacial marine sediments. The conglomeratic unit is composed of preglacial intraclasts embedded within a sandy matrix. Both preglacial and glacial sediments display soft-sediment deformation structures related to fluctuating porewater pressure and strain rates, including ball structures, clastic dykes, fluted surfaces, turbate structures, folds and radial extensional normal faults. Kinematics and relative chronology of these deformation structures allow the role of porewater pressure in the process of tunnel valley genesis on soft beds to be understood. The tunnel valley formed through multi-phased episodes of intense hydrofracturing of the preglacial bed due to overpressure development promoted by ice sheet growth over the study area, and configuration of the substratum. Transport of the resulting conglomerate composed of preglacial intraclasts and fluidized sand occurred through subglacial pipes. The brecciated material is deposited in subglacial cavities, forming fans of massive sandy conglomerate infilling the base of the tunnel valley. The conglomeratic unit is partially reworked by meltwater and exhibits intense soft-sediment deformations, due to episodes of ice-bed coupling and decoupling.

  15. 1. West portal of Tunnel 26, contextual view to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 26, contextual view to northeast from atop Tunnel 25 (HAER CA-201), with Tunnel 27 (HAER CA-203) visible in distance, 210mm lens. View is along new line, with original Central Pacific Transcontinental line crossing over the top above Tunnel 26. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 26, Milepost 133.29, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  16. Inspection and rehabilitation of tunnels across faults

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Schmidt, B.

    1995-12-31

    The inspection and rehabilitation of tunnels that cross faults is unique because they usually are in use and have a large variety of alternative lining types including bare rock, concrete, or steel often coated with accumulations of dirt, grime, algae and other minerals. Inspection methods are important including what to look for, how to clean the inner tunnel lining surfaces, non-destructive testing, coring, soundings, air quality detection and protection, ventilation, lightning, etc. Rehabilitation of tunnels crossing faults requires a practiced knowledge of underground design and construction practices. The most common methods of rehabilitation include grouting and concreting. The Variety of water, wastewater, transit, and highway tunnels in California provide ample examples of tunnels, new and old, that cross active faults. This paper will address specific methods of tunnel inspection and maintenance at fault crossings and give examples of relevant highway, transit, water, and wastewater projects and studies in California to demonstrate the discussions presented.

  17. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  18. Dust control at Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Kissell, F.; Jurani, R.; Dresel, R.; Reaux, C.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes actions taken to control silica dust at the Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facility, a tunnel located in Southern Nevada that is part of a scientific program to determine site suitability for a potential nuclear waste repository. The rock is a volcanic tuff containing significant percentages of both quartz and cristobalite. Water use for dust control was limited because of scientific test requirements, and this limitation made dust control a difficult task. Results are reported for two drifts, called the Main Loop Drift and the Cross Drift. In the Main Loop Drift, dust surveys and tracer gas tests indicated that air leakage from the TBM head, the primary ventilation duct, and movement of the conveyor belt were all significant sources of dust. Conventional dust control approaches yielded no significant reductions in dust levels. A novel alternative was to install an air cleaning station on a rear deck of the TBM trailing gear. It filtered dust from the contaminated intake air and discharged clean air towards the front of the TBM. The practical effect was to produce dust levels below the exposure limit for all TBM locations except close to the head. In the Cross Drift, better ventilation and an extra set of dust seals on the TBM served to cut down the leakage of dust from the TBM cutter head. However, the conveyor belt was much dustier than the belt in the main loop drift. The problem originated with dirt on the bottom of the belt return side and much spillage from the belt top side. Achieving lower dust levels in hard rock tunneling operations will require new approaches as well as a more meticulous application of existing technology. Planning for dust control will require specific means to deal with dust that leaks from the TBM head, dust that originates with leaky ventilation systems, and dust that comes from conveyor belts. Also, the application of water could be more efficient if automatic controls were used to adjust the water flow

  19. Wind-Tunnel/Flight Correlation, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W. (Editor); Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Wind-tunnel/flight correlation activities are reviewed to assure maximum effectiveness of the early experimental programs of the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Topics included a status report of the NTF, the role of tunnel-to-tunnel correlation, a review of past flight correlation research and the resulting data base, the correlation potential of future flight vehicles, and an assessment of the role of computational fluid dynamics.

  20. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. We demonstrate successful tunneling, charge, and spin transport with a fluorinated graphene tunnel barrier on a graphene channel. We show that while spin transport stops short of room temperature, spin polarization efficiency values are the highest of any graphene spin devices. We also demonstrate that hydrogenation of graphene can also be used to create a tunnel barrier. We begin with a four-layer stack of graphene and hydrogenate the top few layers to decouple them from the graphene transport channel beneath. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies. The measured spin polarization efficiencies for hydrogenated graphene are higher than most oxide tunnel barriers on graphene, but not as high as with fluorinated graphene tunnel barriers. However, here we show that spin transport persists up to room temperature. Our results for the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barriers are compared with fluorinated tunnel barriers and we discuss the

  1. Method of fabrication of Josephson tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Michikami, O.; Katoh, Y.; Takenaka, H.; Tanabe, K.; Yoshii, S.

    1983-11-01

    There is disclosed a method of fabrication of a Josephson tunnel junction device. A surface of a base electrode of Nb or Nb compound is subjected to sputter cleaning and then to plasma oxidation in an atmosphere of a diluent gas and oxygen to form thereon an oxide layer serving as a tunnel barrier. A counter electrode is then formed on the oxide layer to provide the Josephson tunnel junction.

  2. Observation of density-induced tunneling.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Meinert, Florian; Mark, Manfred J; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of bosonic atoms in a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice and report on the first direct observation of density-induced tunneling. We show that the interaction affects the time evolution of the doublon oscillation via density-induced tunneling and pinpoint its density and interaction dependence. The experimental data for different lattice depths are in good agreement with our theoretical model. Furthermore, resonances caused by second-order tunneling processes are studied, where the density-induced tunneling breaks the symmetric behavior for attractive and repulsive interactions predicted by the Hubbard model.

  3. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report.

  4. Observation of density-induced tunneling.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Meinert, Florian; Mark, Manfred J; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of bosonic atoms in a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice and report on the first direct observation of density-induced tunneling. We show that the interaction affects the time evolution of the doublon oscillation via density-induced tunneling and pinpoint its density and interaction dependence. The experimental data for different lattice depths are in good agreement with our theoretical model. Furthermore, resonances caused by second-order tunneling processes are studied, where the density-induced tunneling breaks the symmetric behavior for attractive and repulsive interactions predicted by the Hubbard model. PMID:25415904

  5. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion. PMID:27447504

  6. Constructing the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Kalia, H.N.; Replogle, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is constructing an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), approximately 160 km (100 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This facility is being used to obtain geological, hydrological, geomechanical, thermomechanical and geochemical information to characterize, Yucca Mountain as a potential site to isolate High-Level Radioactive Waste from the accessible environment. The ESF, when completed, will consist of two ramps from surface (North and South ramp) to the potential repository horizon formations, a drift connecting the two ramps, test alcoves, and above and below ground operational support facilities. The ramps and connecting drift are being mined by a 7.62 m (25 ft) diameter, fully shielded, Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). This paper describes the current status of the construction of the ESF and test alcoves. At the time of this writing, the following has been accomplished: North Ramp excavation is complete; four test alcoves have been excavated and are in use for scientific experiments; the excavation has reached the potential repository horizon; the drift connecting the two ramps is being excavated, and the excavation of a test alcove for thermal testing is in progress. The mining operations are ahead of schedule, and to date March 26, 1996, the TBM has excavated over 4623 m(15,160 ft.) without any major breakdowns or accidents. The average advance for a three shift (two mining shifts) production day has been 33.46 m (110 ft.). Maximum advance for a week was 218.3 m (716 ft.). An Alpine Miner (AM 75) roadheader is being used to excavate test alcoves. The major ground support system consists of Supper Swellex rock bolts, steel sets as required, Williams rock bolts and channels, and welded wire fabric. Various sections of the tunnel have been instrumented, and the entire excavation has been geologically mapped. To date, the site conditions have been those predicted.

  7. TRM performance prediction in Yucca Mountain welded tuff from linear cutter tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.

    1992-12-31

    Performance predictions were developed for tunnel boring machines operating in welded tuff for the construction of the experimental study facility and the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The predictions were based on test data obtained from an extensive series of linear cutting tests performed on samples of Topopah Spring welded tuff from the Yucca Mountain Project site. Using the cutter force, spacing, and penetration data from the experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration were estimated for a 25 ft diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM) operating in welded tuff. Guidelines were developed for the optimal design of the TBM cutterhead to achieve high production rates at the lowest possible excavation costs. The results show that the Topopah Spring welded tuff (TSw2) can be excavated at relatively high rates of advance with state-of-the-art TBMs. The results also show, however, that the TBM torque and power requirements will be higher than estimated based on rock physical properties and past tunneling experience in rock formations of similar strength.

  8. Surgical efficacy of carpal tunnel release for carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly: report of four patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, N; Masuko, T; Ishikawa, J; Minami, A

    2005-12-01

    Although carpal tunnel syndrome is frequent in acromegaly, few acromegalics will be encountered by most hand surgeons. This paper considers the treatment of four cases of acromegaly in whom carpal tunnel syndrome arose, to discuss aspects of management of carpal tunnel syndrome in this patient group.

  9. Sourcebook of locations of geophysical surveys in tunnels and horizontal holes including results of seismic-refraction surveys: Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Area 16, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.D.; Kibler, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic refraction surveys have been obtained sporadically in tunnels in zeolitized tuff at the Nevada Test Site since the late 1950's. Commencing in 1967 and continuing to date (1982), extensive measurements of shear- and compressional-wave velocities have been made in five tunnel complexes in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas and in one tunnel complex in Shoshone Mountain. The results of these surveys to 1980 are compiled in this report. In addition, extensive horizontal drilling was initiated in 1967 in connection with geologic exploration in these tunnel complexes for sites for nuclear weapons tests. Seismic and electrical surveys were conducted in the majority of these holes. The type and location of these tunnel and borehole surveys are indexed in this report. Synthesis of the seismic refraction data indicates a mean compressional-wave velocity near the nuclear device point (WP) of 23 tunnel events of 2430 m/s (7970 f/s) with a range of 1846 to 2753 m/s (6060 to 9030 f/s). The mean shear-wave velocity of 17 tunnel events is 1276 m/s (4190 f/s) with a range of 1140 to 1392 m/s (3740 to 4570 f/s). Experience indicates that these velocity variations are due chiefly to the extent of fracturing and (or) the presence of partially saturated rock in the region of the survey.

  10. Sourcebook of locations of geophysical surveys in tunnels and horizontal holes, including results of seismic refraction surveys, Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Area 16, Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.; Kibler, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic refraction surveys have been obtained sporadically in tunnels in zeolitized tuff at the Nevada Test Site since the late 1950's. Commencing in 1967 and continuing to date (1982), .extensive measurements of shear- and compressional-wave velocities have been made in five tunnel complexes in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas and in one tunnel complex in Shoshone Mountain. The results of these surveys to 1980 are compiled in this report. In addition, extensive horizontal drilling was initiated in 1967 in connection with geologic exploration in these tunnel complexes for sites for nuclear weapons tests. Seismic and electrical surveys were conducted in the majority of these holes. The type and location of these tunnel and borehole surveys are indexed in this report. Synthesis of the seismic refraction data indicates a mean compressional-wave velocity near the nuclear device point (WP) of 23 tunnel events of 2,430 m/s (7,970 f/s) with a range of 1,846-2,753 m/s (6,060-9,030 f/s). The mean shear-wave velocity of 17 tunnel events is 1,276 m/s (4,190 f/s) with a range of 1,140-1,392 m/s (3,740-4,570 f/s). Experience indicates that these velocity variations are due chiefly to the extent of fracturing and (or) the presence of partially saturated rock in the region of the survey.

  11. Construction of the exploratory studies facility at Yucca Mountain - North Ramp

    SciTech Connect

    Kalia, H.N.; Repogle, J.M.; McNeely, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office of the US Department of Energy is constructing an Exploratory Studies Facility, approximately 160 km (100 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This facility will be used to gather geological, hydrological, geomechanical, thermomechanical, and geochemical information to characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site to isolate High-Level Radioactive Waste from the accessible environment. The Exploratory Studies Facility, when completed shall consist of two ramps from the surface, a connecting drift, underground test areas and below ground operational support facilities. The ramps and connecting drift are being mined by a 7.62 m (25 ft) diameter Tunnel Boring Machine. This machine was fabricated for the Department of Energy by Construction Tunneling Services, Inc; of Kent, Washington. This paper describes the current status of the concentration of the North Ramp at Yucca Mountain. At the time of this writing, the North Ramp had advanced to a distance of about 517 m (1700 ft). With the exception of some minor problems through Bow Ridge fault, the excavation has progressed as expected.

  12. Mountaineer`s gas facilities decision support system

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    Mountaineer Gas Co. of Charleston, W.Va., is justifiably proud of its capacity to combine electronic maps with a full database of information about its facilities and customers, and use that mix to make the decisions required in operating a gas company with better information and more quickly. Determining when a pipeline needs replacement or repair used to take several days at Mountaineer. With the new system in place, the decision can be made in a matter of minutes. The paper describes the system and its development, then discusses adding customer information as the next step.

  13. Help Students Tunnel Their Way to Math and Writing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMath, Russ

    1987-01-01

    A teacher describes how a cardboard box tunnel was used to capitalize on children's fascination with boxes. The finished tunnel offers opportunities for honing math and writing skills. Layouts for tunnels and related activities are suggested. (MT)

  14. 4. East portal of Tunnel 25, view to southwest from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. East portal of Tunnel 25, view to southwest from west end of Tunnel 26 (HAER CA-202), 135mm lens. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 25, Milepost 133.09, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  15. View of Irving Flume Tunnel #1 showing the steel flume ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Irving Flume Tunnel #1 showing the steel flume with trestles leading into concrete tunnel. Looking south - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Flume Tunnel No. 1, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  16. 1. West portal of Tunnel 17, contextual view to northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 17, contextual view to northeast, 135mm lens. The tunnel penetrates the toe of Dorris Hill, which rises to the left. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 17, Milepost 408, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  17. 1. West portal of Tunnel 22, contextual view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 22, contextual view to the northwest, 135mm lens. Tunnel 22 pierces a ridge separating Oakridge from Westfir. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 22, Milepost 581.85, Oakridge, Lane County, OR

  18. 1. West portal of Tunnel 25, contextual view to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 25, contextual view to northeast from Tunnel 24 (HAER CA-200), 135mm lens. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 25, Milepost 133.09, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  19. 340. Caltrans, Photographer October 14, 1935 "TUNNEL WEST PORTAL"; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    340. Caltrans, Photographer October 14, 1935 "TUNNEL - WEST PORTAL"; VIEW OF TUNNEL - WEST PORTAL' UNDER CONSTRUCTION SHOWING EXCAVATION OF TUNNEL AFTER POUR. 5-1669 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome as a result of spontaneous bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Jarrahnejad, Payam; Balakrishnan, Anila; Huettner, William C

    2008-01-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity following trauma. A rare occurence of spontaneous bleeding into the carpal tunnel, presenting as acute carpal tunnel syndrome, is presented. PMID:19721797

  1. NORTHERN END OF VIADUCT WHERE IT ENTERS BATTERY STREET TUNNEL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERN END OF VIADUCT WHERE IT ENTERS BATTERY STREET TUNNEL. LAKE UNION VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. TUNNEL PROCEEDS IN CUT AND COVER FASHION DIRECTLY BENEATH BATTERY STREET. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  2. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  3. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST): 120-Foot Truss hoisting, one and two point suspension. In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  4. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    How crews get into or out of their ascent vehicle has profound implications for Mars surface architecture. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hatches and Airlocks have the benefit of relatively low mass and high Technology Readiness Level (TRL), but waste consumables with a volume depressurization for every ingress/egress. Perhaps the biggest drawback to EVA hatches or Airlocks is that they make it difficult to keep Martian dust from being tracked back into the ascent vehicle, in violation of planetary protection protocols. Suit ports offer the promise of dust mitigation by keeping dusty suits outside the cabin, but require significant cabin real estate, are relatively high mass, and current operational concepts still require an EVA hatch to get the suits outside for the first EVA, and back inside after the final EVA. This is primarily because current designs don't provide enough structural support to protect the suits from ascent/descent loads or potential thruster plume impingement. For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel is an attractive option. By pushing spacesuit don/doff and EVA operations to an element that remains on the surface, ascended vehicle mass and dust can be minimized. What's more, retractable tunnels provide operational flexibility by allowing surface assets to be re-configured or built up over time. Retractable tunnel functional requirements and design concepts being developed as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) work will add a new ingress/egress option to the surface architecture trade space.

  5. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Modified propeller and spinner in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project

  6. Quantum tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Ranjan Majhi, Bibhas

    2008-06-01

    Hawking radiation as tunneling by Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond semiclassical approximation is analysed. We compute all quantum corrections in the single particle action revealing that these are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We show that a simple choice of the proportionality constants reproduces the one loop back reaction effect in the spacetime, found by conformal field theory methods, which modifies the Hawking temperature of the black hole. Using the law of black hole mechanics we give the corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law following from the modified Hawking temperature. Some examples are explicitly worked out.

  7. Fermion tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2009-02-01

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond the semiclassical approximation prescribed in R. Banerjee and B. R. Majhi, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 06 (2008) 09510.1088/1126-6708/2008/06/095 for the scalar particle, Hawking radiation as tunneling of the Dirac particle through an event horizon is analyzed. We show that, as before, all quantum corrections in the single particle action are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We also compute the modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. Finally, the coefficient of the logarithmic correction to entropy is shown to be related with the trace anomaly.

  8. Davies Critical Point and Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Hoseong

    2012-04-01

    From the point of view of tunneling, the physical meaning of the Davies critical point of a second-order phase transition in the black hole thermodynamics is clarified. At the critical point, the nonthermal contribution vanishes so that the black hole radiation is entirely thermal. It separates two phases: one with radiation enhanced by the nonthermal contribution, the other suppressed by the nonthermal contribution. We show this in both charged and rotating black holes. The phase transition is also analyzed in the cases in which emissions of charges and angular momenta are incorporated.

  9. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anastopoulos, Charis Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-15

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines ‘classical’ time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems. -- Highlights: •Present a general methodology for deriving temporal probabilities in tunneling systems. •Treatment applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. •Derive a new expression for tunneling time. •Identify new time parameters relevant to tunneling. •Propose a resolution of the superluminality paradox in tunneling.

  10. Stress changes ahead of an advancing tunnel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abel, J.F.; Lee, F.T.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumentation placed ahead of three model tunnels in the laboratory and ahead of a crosscut driven in a metamorphic rock mass detected stress changes several tunnel diameters ahead of the tunnel face. Stress changes were detected 4 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into nearly elastic acrylic, 2??50 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into concrete, and 2 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into Silver Plume Granite. Stress changes were detected 7??50 diameters ahead of a crosscut driven in jointed, closely foliated gneisses and gneissic granites in an experimental mine at Idaho Springs, Colorado. These results contrast markedly with a theoretical elastic estimate of the onset of detectable stress changes at 1 tunnel diameter ahead of the tunnel face. A small compressive stress concentration was detected 2 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in acrylic, 1.25 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in concrete, and 1 diameter ahead of the model tunnel in granite. A similar stress peak was detected about 6 diameters ahead of the crosscut. No such stress peak is predicted from elastic theory. The 3-dimensional in situ stress determined in the field demonstrate that geologic structure controls stress orientations in the metamorphic rock mass. Two of the computed principal stresses are parallel to the foliation and the other principal stress is normal to it. The principal stress orientations vary approximately as the foliation attitude varies. The average horizontal stress components and the average vertical stress component are three times and twice as large, respectively, as those predicted from the overburden load. An understanding of the measured stress field appears to require the application of either tectonic or residual stress components, or both. Laboratory studies indicate the presence of proportionately large residual stresses. Mining may have triggered the release of strain energy, which is controlled by geologic structure. ?? 1973.

  11. 10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE AUXILIARY STRUCTURES. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  12. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2014-01-27

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  13. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in

  14. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project exploratory studies facilities construction status

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, J.N.; Leonard, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    This paper discusses the progress to date on the construction planning and development of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF). The purpose of the ESF is to determine early site suitability and to characterize the subsurface of the Yucca Mountain site to assess its suitability for a potential high level nuclear waste repository. The present ESF configuration concept is for two main ramps to be excavated by tunnel boring machines (TBM) from the surface to the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff Formation. From the main ramps, slightly above Topopah Spring level, supplemental ramps will be penetrated to the Calico Hills formation below the potential repository. There will be exploratory development drifts driven on both levels with the Main Test Area being located on the Topopah Spring level, which is the level of the proposed repository. The Calico Hills formation lies below the Topopah Spring member and is expected to provide the main geo-hydrologic barrier between the potential repository and the underlying saturated zones in the Crater Flat Tuff.

  15. Epidote from the Zard Mountains, Kharan, Balochistan, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Lowers, Heather; Betterton, William K.

    2013-01-01

    The authors received two unusual crystals of epidote from Rock Currier, Jewel Tunnel Imports, in 2012. The mineral specimens were collected at Zard Mountain (Zard Koh), in the central part of the Ruskoh Mountains (Rusk Koh), west of Kharan, Balochistan, Pakistan (written communication, Rock Currier, 2013). The epidote locality was most likely discovered in 2010. These epidote crystals were unusual in both form and composition. The large crystals were flat tabular and pseudohexagonal in shape which is an uncommon crystal form for a monoclinic mineral (fig. 1). Other specimens from the same locality have been described as pseudo-octahedral in shape. The two crystals range in size from 5.5 to 6.5 centimeters (2.2 to 2.6 inches) and are slightly magnetic. The epidote crystals have a core matrix that resembles a weathered igneous rock. Some micro brown- to reddish-titanite crystals were observed under a binocular microscope on the surface and core areas of the crystals (figs. 2 and 3). Other minerals observed in the core areas include feldspar, biotite, and quartz. The crystals display evidence of cluster-growth with points of attachment to other crystals. The epidotes were most likely collected in pockets of a weathered igneous-skarn deposit.

  16. WHITE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. If mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significanlty, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  17. White Mountain Wilderness, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Segerstrom, K.; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey made during 1971-1973, the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. In mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significantly, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  18. BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  19. Bush decides on Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Yucca Mountain in Nevada will be the U.S. long-term geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste, President George W. Bush announced on 15 February. Bush endorsed a formal recommendation by Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Spencer Abraham, which followed more than 20 years of scientific study. The decision, which the state of Nevada is challenging in the U.S. Congress, allows the government's plans for the repository to proceed to the licensing phase.The plan calls for Yucca Mountain to accept a total of 84,900 metric tons of radioactive waste from temporary storage facilities at 131 sites in 39 states.

  20. Yearly report, Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, J.N.

    1992-09-30

    We proposed to (1) Develop our data logging and analysis equipment and techniques for analyzing seismic data from the Southern Great Basin Seismic Network (SGBSN), (2) Investigate the SGBSN data for evidence of seismicity patterns, depth distribution patterns, and correlations with geologic features (3) Repair and maintain our three broad band downhole digital seismograph stations at Nelson, nevada, Troy Canyon, Nevada, and Deep Springs, California (4) Install, operate, and log data from a super sensitive microearthquake array at Yucca Mountain (5) Analyze data from micro-earthquakes relative to seismic hazard at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Virtual Processes and Quantum Tunnelling as Fictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Richard T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that virtual processes are dispensable fictions. The argument proceeds by a comparison with the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling. Building on an analysis of Levy-Leblond and Balibar, it is argued that, although the phenomenon known as quantum tunnelling certainly occurs and is at the basis of many paradigmatic quantum…

  2. Prediction of swelling rocks strain in tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsapour, D.; Fahimifar, A.

    2016-05-01

    Swelling deformations leading to convergence of tunnels may result in significant difficulties during the construction, in particular for long term use of tunnels. By extracting an experimental based explicit analytical solution for formulating swelling strains as a function of time and stress, swelling strains are predicted from the beginning of excavation and during the service life of tunnel. Results obtained from the analytical model show a proper agreement with experimental results. This closed-form solution has been implemented within a numerical program using the finite element method for predicting time-dependent swelling strain around tunnels. Evaluating effects of swelling parameters on time-dependent strains and tunnel shape on swelling behavior around the tunnel according to this analytical solution is considered. The ground-support interaction and consequent swelling effect on the induced forces in tunnel lining is considered too. Effect of delay in lining installation on swelling pressure which acting on the lining and its structural integrity, is also evaluated. A MATLAB code of " SRAP" is prepared and applied to calculate all swelling analysis around tunnels based on analytical solution.

  3. Object-Based Attention and Cognitive Tunneling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarmasz, Jerzy; Herdman, Chris M.; Johannsdottir, Kamilla Run

    2005-01-01

    Simulator-based research has shown that pilots cognitively tunnel their attention on head-up displays (HUDs). Cognitive tunneling has been linked to object-based visual attention on the assumption that HUD symbology is perceptually grouped into an object that is perceived and attended separately from the external scene. The present research…

  4. Scheme for accelerating quantum tunneling dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khujakulov, Anvar; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    We propose a scheme of the exact fast forwarding of standard quantum dynamics for a charged particle. The present idea allows the acceleration of both the amplitude and the phase of the wave function throughout the fast-forward time range and is distinct from that of Masuda and Nakamura [Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 1135 (2010), 10.1098/rspa.2009.0446], which enabled acceleration of only the amplitude of the wave function on the way. We apply the proposed method to the quantum tunneling phenomena and obtain the electromagnetic field to ensure the rapid penetration of wave functions through a tunneling barrier. Typical examples described here are (1) an exponential wave packet passing through the δ -function barrier and (2) the opened Moshinsky shutter with a δ -function barrier just behind the shutter. We elucidate the tunneling current in the vicinity of the barrier and find a remarkable enhancement of the tunneling rate (tunneling power) due to the fast forwarding. In the case of a very high barrier, in particular, we present the asymptotic analysis and exhibit a suitable driving force to recover a recognizable tunneling current. The analysis is also carried out on the exact acceleration of macroscopic quantum tunneling with use of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which accommodates a tunneling barrier.

  5. Scanning scene tunnel for city traversing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiang Yu; Zhou, Yu; Milli, Panayiotis

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a visual representation named scene tunnel for capturing urban scenes along routes and visualizing them on the Internet. We scan scenes with multiple cameras or a fish-eye camera on a moving vehicle, which generates a real scene archive along streets that is more complete than previously proposed route panoramas. Using a translating spherical eye, properly set planes of scanning, and unique parallel-central projection, we explore the image acquisition of the scene tunnel from camera selection and alignment, slit calculation, scene scanning, to image integration. The scene tunnels cover high buildings, ground, and various viewing directions and have uniformed resolutions along the street. The sequentially organized scene tunnel benefits texture mapping onto the urban models. We analyze the shape characteristics in the scene tunnels for designing visualization algorithms. After combining this with a global panorama and forward image caps, the capped scene tunnels can provide continuous views directly for virtual or real navigation in a city. We render scene tunnel dynamically by view warping, fast transmission, and flexible interaction. The compact and continuous scene tunnel facilitates model construction, data streaming, and seamless route traversing on the Internet and mobile devices.

  6. Scanning scene tunnel for city traversing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiang Yu; Zhou, Yu; Milli, Panayiotis

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a visual representation named scene tunnel for capturing urban scenes along routes and visualizing them on the Internet. We scan scenes with multiple cameras or a fish-eye camera on a moving vehicle, which generates a real scene archive along streets that is more complete than previously proposed route panoramas. Using a translating spherical eye, properly set planes of scanning, and unique parallel-central projection, we explore the image acquisition of the scene tunnel from camera selection and alignment, slit calculation, scene scanning, to image integration. The scene tunnels cover high buildings, ground, and various viewing directions and have uniformed resolutions along the street. The sequentially organized scene tunnel benefits texture mapping onto the urban models. We analyze the shape characteristics in the scene tunnels for designing visualization algorithms. After combining this with a global panorama and forward image caps, the capped scene tunnels can provide continuous views directly for virtual or real navigation in a city. We render scene tunnel dynamically by view warping, fast transmission, and flexible interaction. The compact and continuous scene tunnel facilitates model construction, data streaming, and seamless route traversing on the Internet and mobile devices. PMID:16509375

  7. Tunnelling from non-localised initial states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowcock, Peter; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    An approach for calculating tunneling amplitudes from a nonlocalized initial state is presented. Generalizing the matching conditions and equations of motion to allow for complex momentum permits a description of tunneling in the presence of so-called classical motion. Possible applications of the method are presented.

  8. Enhancing metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes via defect enhanced direct tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Alimardani, Nasir; Conley, John F.

    2014-08-25

    Metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes with dissimilar work function electrodes and nanolaminate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} bilayer tunnel barriers deposited by atomic layer deposition are investigated. This combination of high and low electron affinity insulators, each with different dominant conduction mechanisms (tunneling and Frenkel-Poole emission), results in improved low voltage asymmetry and non-linearity of current versus voltage behavior. These improvements are due to defect enhanced direct tunneling in which electrons transport across the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} via defect based conduction before tunneling directly through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, effectively narrowing the tunnel barrier. Conduction through the device is dominated by tunneling, and operation is relatively insensitive to temperature.

  9. Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Temperature Related Effects in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Useinov, Arthur; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2016-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs). The electron tunnel transport through NP was simulated in range of double barrier approach, which was integrated into the model of the magnetic point-like contact. The resonant TMR conditions and temperature impact were explored in detail. Moreover, the possible reasons of the temperature induced resonant conditions were discussed in the range of the lead-tunneling cell (TC)-lead model near Kondo temperature. We also found that redistribution of the voltage drop becomes crucial in this model. Furthermore, the direct tunneling plays the dominant role and cannot be omitted in the quantum systems with the total tunneling thickness up to 5-6nm. Hence, Coulomb blockade model cannot explain Kondo-induced TMR anomalies in nanometer-sized tunnel junctions.

  10. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzyme Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Yuan; Murray, Christopher J.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1989-03-01

    Primary and secondary protium-to-tritium (H/T) and deuterium-to-tritium (D/T) kinetic isotope effects for the catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) at 25 degrees Celsius have been determined. Previous studies showed that this reaction is nearly or fully rate limited by the hydrogen-transfer step. Semiclassical mass considerations that do not include tunneling effects would predict that kH/kT = (kD/kT)3.26, where kH, kD, and kT are the rate constants for the reaction of protium, deuterium, and tritium derivatives, respectively. Significant deviations from this relation have now been observed for both primary and especially secondary effects, such that experimental H/T ratios are much greater than those calculated from the above expression. These deviations also hold in the temperature range from 0 to 40 degrees Celsius. Such deviations were previously predicted to result from a reaction coordinate containing a significant contribution from hydrogen tunneling.

  11. Hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Cha, Y; Murray, C J; Klinman, J P

    1989-03-10

    Primary and secondary protium-to-tritium (H/T) and deuterium-to-tritium (D/T) kinetic isotope effects for the catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) at 25 degrees Celsius have been determined. Previous studies showed that this reaction is nearly or fully rate limited by the hydrogen-transfer step. Semiclassical mass considerations that do not include tunneling effects would predict that kH/kT = (kD/kT)3.26, where kH, kD, and kT are the rate constants for the reaction of protium, deuterium, and tritium derivatives, respectively. Significant deviations from this relation have now been observed for both primary and especially secondary effects, such that experimental H/T ratios are much greater than those calculated from the above expression. These deviations also hold in the temperature range from 0 to 40 degrees Celsius. Such deviations were previously predicted to result from a reaction coordinate containing a significant contribution from hydrogen tunneling.

  12. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Wing and nacelle set-up in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The NACA conducted drag tests in 1931 on a P3M-1 nacelle which were presented in a special report to the Navy. Smith DeFrance described this work in the report's introduction: 'Tests were conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel on a five to four geared Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine mounted in a P3M-1 nacelle. In order to simulate the flight conditions the nacelle was assembled on a 15-foot span of wing from the same airplane. The purpose of the tests was to improve the cooling of the engine and to reduce the drag of the nacelle combination. Thermocouples were installed at various points on the cylinders and temperature readings were obtained from these by the power plants division. These results will be reported in a memorandum by that division. The drag results, which are covered by this memorandum, were obtained with the original nacelle condition as received from the Navy with the tail of the nacelle modified, with the nose section of the nacelle modified, with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached to the engine, with a Type G ring developed by the N.A.C.A., and with a Type D cowling which was also developed by the N.A.C.A.' (p. 1)

  13. Rocky Mountain futures: An ecological perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, Jill S.

    2002-01-01

    The United Nations has proclaimed 2002 as the International Year of Mountains to increase international awareness of the global importance of mountain ecosystems. The case-based multidisciplinary approach of this book constitutes an important new model for understanding the implications of land-use practices and economic activity on mountains, and will serve a vital role in improving decisionmaking both in the Rocky Mountains and in other parts of the world that face similar challenges.

  14. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site is operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a storage unit located on the Hanford Site. The unit consists of two earth-covered railroad tunnels that are used for storage of process equipment (some containing dangerous waste) removed from the PUREX Plant. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railroad cars and remotely transferred into the tunnels for long-term storage. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and serves as a co-operator of the PUREX Storage Tunnels, the waste management unit addressed by this permit application. This appendix contains Tunnel 1 Construction Specifications, HWS-5638, consisting of 49 pages.

  15. High Surface Area Tunnels in Hexagonal WO₃.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wanmei; Yeung, Michael T; Lech, Andrew T; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chain; Li, Tianqi; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Jun; Kaner, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    High surface area in h-WO3 has been verified from the intracrystalline tunnels. This bottom-up approach differs from conventional templating-type methods. The 3.67 Å diameter tunnels are characterized by low-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherms with nonlocal density functional theory fitting, transmission electron microscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. These open and rigid tunnels absorb H(+) and Li(+), but not Na(+) in aqueous electrolytes without inducing a phase transformation, accessing both internal and external active sites. Moreover, these tunnel structures demonstrate high specific pseudocapacitance and good stability in an H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the high surface area created from 3.67 Å diameter tunnels in h-WO3 shows potential applications in electrochemical energy storage, selective ion transfer, and selective gas adsorption.

  16. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  17. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  18. The path decomposition expansion and multidimensional tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Assa; Kivelson, S.

    This paper consists of two main topics. (i) The path decomposition expansion: a new path integral technique which allows us to break configuration space into disjoint regions and express the dynamics of the full system in terms of its parts. (ii) The application of the PDX and semiclassical methods for solving quantum-mechanical tunneling problems in multidimensions. The result is a conceptually simple, computationally straightforward method for calculating tunneling effects in complicated multidimensional potentials, even in cases where the nature of the states in the classically allowed regions is nontrivial. Algorithms for computing tunneling effects in general classes of problems are obtained.In addition, we present the detailed solutions to three model problems of a tunneling coordinate coupled to a phonon. This enables us to define various well-controlled approximation schemes, which help to reduce the dimensions of complicated tunneling calculations in real physical systems.

  19. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  20. Carpal tunnel syndrome among ski manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, S; Demers, P A; Miller, M; Longstreth, W T; Rosenstock, L

    1991-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common disorder marked by pain and dysesthesias of the upper extremities. As a test of the hypothesis that carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with occupational risk factors, jobs at a ski assembly plant were classified as repetitive and nonrepetitive. The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among 106 employees with repetitive jobs was compared with that among 67 employees with nonrepetitive jobs. The data collection included a questionnaire, a physical examination, and the measurement of distal sensory latencies of the median and ulnar nerves. Carpal tunnel syndrome was present in either or both hands in 15.4% of those workers with repetitive jobs, but only in 3.1% of those workers with nonrepetitive jobs (crude prevalence ratio 4.92, 95% confidence interval 1.17-20.7). The conclusion was drawn that carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with jobs requiring frequent and sustained hand work.

  1. Air quality inside a tunnel tube and in the vicinity of the tunnel portals

    SciTech Connect

    Pucher, K.; Zwiener, K.

    1997-12-31

    Due to the continually growing number of motor vehicles more and more roads are reaching the limits of their capability. This has led to slowly moving traffic and longer persisting traffic blockages. In cities and conurbation centers especially this leads to complete traffic chaos. The pollutant emissions of vehicles that only move very little mostly lead to high pollutant burdens also and in some circumstances to poor air quality. Therefore in more and more cities one is attempting to get traffic moving again through efficient road tunnels and underground lines and thereby also reduce the pollutant emission. Typical examples of such developments are the Central Artery Tunnel Project in Boston, the planned Ringroad tunnel in Stockholm and the Ringtunnel projects in Paris. Tunnel constructions and underground lines in densely built-up areas are also planned in many small cities. For all these tunnel projects the following points concerning the air quality are to be observed. On the one hand, a tunnel construction can accommodate traffic and thereby reduce the traffic blockages in the vicinity of the tunnel, so long as no additional traffic is attracted. This would therefore lead to a reduction of the pollutant burden and also to an improvement in the air quality in large areas of further surroundings of the tunnel construction. On the other hand, at the portals of the tunnel, alongside mobile pollutant sources from vehicles travelling on the already existing road, a stationary pollutant source of the tunnel ventilation flowing out from the tunnel portal also results. It is then to be investigated how high the emerging pollutant concentrations will be at the portal of the planned tunnel and how these pollutants will disseminate. In this report therefore, the air quality in the tunnel as well as in the vicinity of the tunnel portals will be more closely dealt with.

  2. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    S. Levy

    2000-08-07

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than

  3. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  4. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  5. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  6. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  7. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  8. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  9. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  10. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  11. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  12. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  13. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  14. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  15. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  16. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  17. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  18. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  19. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  20. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  1. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  2. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  3. Resonant tunneling dynamics and the related tunneling time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi; Huang, Hai; Lu, Xiang-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    In close analogy with optical Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer, we rederive the transmission and reflection coefficients of tunneling through a rectangular double barrier (RDB). Based on the same analogy, we also get an analytic finesse formula for its filtering capability of matter waves, and with this formula, we reproduce the RDB transmission rate in exactly the same form as that of FP interferometer. Compared with the numerical results obtained from the original finesse definition, we find the formula works well. Next, we turn to the elusive time issue in tunneling, and show that the "generalized Hartman effect" can be regarded as an artifact of the opaque limit βl → ∞. In the thin barrier approximation, phase (or dwell) time does depend on the free inter-barrier distance d asymptotically. Further, the analysis of transmission rate in the neighborhood of resonance shows that, phase (or dwell) time could be a good estimate of the resonance lifetime. The numerical results from the uncertainty principle support this statement. This fact can be viewed as a support to the idea that, phase (or dwell) time is a measure of lifetime of energy stored beneath the barrier. To confirm this result, we shrink RDB to a double Dirac δ-barrier. The landscape of the phase (or dwell) time in k and d axes fits excellently well with the lifetime estimates near the resonance. As a supplementary check, we also apply phase (or dwell) time formula to the rectangular well, where no obstacle exists to the propagation of particle. However, due to the self-interference induced by the common cavity-like structure, phase (or dwell) time calculation leads to a counterintuitive "slowing down" effect, which can be explained appropriately by the lifetime assumptions.

  4. Mountain Heritage, Revised Edition (1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, B. B., Ed.

    Written by West Virginia scholars, this resource book consists of 12 chapters and is designed to: (1) produce understanding and appreciation of West Virginians' cultural heritage, and (2) aid in developing cultural educational programs. Beginning with man's entry into the mountain wilderness, the contents progressively move through his cultural…

  5. Gearing Up for Mountain Biking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Examines the gear system of a mountain bike to discover any redundancy in the many gear settings available to the cyclist. Suggests a best strategy for changing up through the gears on a typical 21-gear system and an adjustment to the available gears that would result in a smoother change. (Author/ASK)

  6. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  7. The Mountaineer-Malaysia Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    A 26-day summer field course of West Virginia University's (WVU) Recreation and Parks Department took students to Malaysia's mountains and rainforests to observe how Malaysians are managing national parks, problem elephants, and population pressures on parks. The adventure provided powerful learning experiences. Further exchanges between WVU and…

  8. Quantitative risk assessment modeling for nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Qu, Xiaobo; Wang, Xinchang; Yuanita, Vivi; Wong, Siew Chee

    2011-03-01

    Urban road tunnels provide an increasingly cost-effective engineering solution, especially in compact cities like Singapore. For some urban road tunnels, tunnel characteristics such as tunnel configurations, geometries, provisions of tunnel electrical and mechanical systems, traffic volumes, etc. may vary from one section to another. These urban road tunnels that have characterized nonuniform parameters are referred to as nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels. In this study, a novel quantitative risk assessment (QRA) model is proposed for nonhomogeneous urban road tunnels because the existing QRA models for road tunnels are inapplicable to assess the risks in these road tunnels. This model uses a tunnel segmentation principle whereby a nonhomogeneous urban road tunnel is divided into various homogenous sections. Individual risk for road tunnel sections as well as the integrated risk indices for the entire road tunnel is defined. The article then proceeds to develop a new QRA model for each of the homogeneous sections. Compared to the existing QRA models for road tunnels, this section-based model incorporates one additional top event-toxic gases due to traffic congestion-and employs the Poisson regression method to estimate the vehicle accident frequencies of tunnel sections. This article further illustrates an aggregated QRA model for nonhomogeneous urban tunnels by integrating the section-based QRA models. Finally, a case study in Singapore is carried out.

  9. Air Pollution in Road Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Waller, R. E.; Commins, B. T.; Lawther, P. J.

    1961-01-01

    As a part of a study of pollution of the air by motor vehicles, measurements have been made in two London road tunnels during periods of high traffic density. The concentrations of smoke and polycyclic hydrocarbons found there are much higher than the average values in Central London, but they are of the same order of magnitude as those occurring during temperature inversions on winter evenings when smoke from coal fires accumulates at a low level. An attempt has been made to relate the concentration of each pollutant to the type and amount of traffic. Both diesel and petrol vehicles make some contribution to the amounts of smoke and polycyclic hydrocarbons found in the tunnels, but in the case of smoke, fluoranthene, 1: 2-benzpyrene, pyrene, and 3: 4-benzpyrene, the concentrations appear to be more closely related to the density of diesel traffic than to that of petrol traffic. The concentrations of lead and carbon monoxide have also been determined, and these are very closely related to the density of petrol traffic. During the morning and evening rush hours the mean concentration of carbon monoxide was just over 100 p.p.m. and peak values up to 500 p.p.m. were recorded at times. Oxides of nitrogen were determined in some of the experiments and there was always much more nitric oxide than nitrogen dioxide. Eye irritation was experienced but its cause was not investigated. The concentration of pollution in the tunnels does not appear to be high enough to create any special hazards for short-term exposures. The amosphere at peak periods may become very dirty and unpleasant and the concentration of carbon monoxide would be sufficient to produce some effect over a period of several hours' continuous exposure. The total emission of pollution from road vehicles must still be small in comparison with that from coal fires, but the effect of traffic on the concentration of smoke, polycyclic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and lead in the air of city streets deserves

  10. Geology of the Henry Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, G.K.

    1877-01-01

    If these pages fail to give a correct account of the structure of the Henry Mountains the fault is mine and I have no excuse. In all the earlier exploration of the Rocky Mountain Region, as well as in much of the more recent survey, the geologist has merely accompanied the geographer and has had no voice in the determination of either the route or the rate of travel. When the structure of a mountain was in doubt he was rarely able to visit the points which should resolve the doubt, but was compelled to turn regretfully away. Not so in the survey of the Henry Mountains. Geological exploration had shown that they were well disposed for examination, and that they promised to give the key to a type of structure which was at best obscurely known; and I was sent by Professor Powell to make a study of them, without restriction as to my order or method. I was limited only in time, the snow stopping my work two months after it was begun. Two months would be far too short a period in which to survey a thousand square miles in Pennsylvania or Illinois, but among the Colorado Plateaus it proved sufficient. A few comprehensive views from mountain tops gave the general distribution of the formations, and the remainder of the time was spent in the examination of the localities which best displayed the peculiar features of the structure. So thorough was the display and so satisfactory the examination, that in preparing my report I have felt less than ever before the desire to revisit the field and prove my conclusions by more extended observation.

  11. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Supporting the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T A; Sun, Y; Hao, Y

    2006-01-31

    The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermal-hydrologic (TH) conditions within emplacement tunnels (drifts) and in the adjoining host rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is the proposed site for a radioactive waste repository in the U.S. Because these predictions are used in the performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain repository, they must address the influence of variability and uncertainty of the engineered- and natural-system parameters that significantly influence those predictions. Parameter-sensitivity studies show that the MSTHM predictions adequately propagate the influence of parametric variability and uncertainty. Model-validation studies show that the influence of conceptual-model uncertainty on the MSTHM predictions is insignificant compared to that of parametric uncertainty, which is propagated through the MSTHM.

  12. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L; Mondello, Tracy A

    2011-12-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological parameters at the hook of hamate. The results showed that the cross-sectional area (CSA) at the level of the hook of hamate increased, on average, by 9.2% and 14.8% at 100 and 200 mmHg, respectively. The increased CSA was attained by a shape change of the cross section, displaying increased circularity. The increase in CSA was mainly attributable to the increase of area in the carpal arch region formed by the transverse carpal ligament. The narrowing of the carpal arch width was associated with an increase in the carpal arch. We concluded that the carpal tunnel is compliant to accommodate physiological variations of the carpal tunnel pressure, and that the increase in tunnel CSA is achieved by increasing the circularity of the cross section.

  13. SSX MHD plasma wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael R.; Schaffner, David A.

    2015-06-01

    A new turbulent plasma source at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) facility is described. The MHD wind tunnel configuration employs a magnetized plasma gun to inject high-beta plasma into a large, well-instrumented, vacuum drift region. This provides unique laboratory conditions approaching that in the solar wind: there is no applied background magnetic field in the drift region and has no net axial magnetic flux; the plasma flow speed is on the order of the local sound speed (M ~ 1), so flow energy density is comparable to thermal energy density; and the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure is of order unity (plasma β ~ 1) so thermal energy density is also comparable to magnetic energy density. Results presented here and referenced within demonstrate the new capabilities and show how the new platform is proving useful for fundamental plasma turbulence studies.

  14. Quantitative tunneling spectroscopy of nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    First, Phillip N; Whetten, Robert L; Schaaff, T Gregory

    2007-05-25

    The proposed goals of this collaborative work were to systematically characterize the electronic structure and dynamics of 3-dimensional metal and semiconducting nanocrystals using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). This report describes progress in the spectroscopic work and in the development of methods for creating and characterizing gold nanocrystals. During the grant period, substantial effort also was devoted to the development of epitaxial graphene (EG), a very promising materials system with outstanding potential for nanometer-scale ballistic and coherent devices ("graphene" refers to one atomic layer of graphitic, sp2 -bonded carbon atoms [or more loosely, few layers]). Funding from this DOE grant was critical for the initial development of epitaxial graphene for nanoelectronics

  15. Langley Field wind tunnel apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    The difficulties experienced in properly holding thin tipped or tapered airfoils while testing on an N.P.L. type aerodynamic balance even at low air speeds, and the impossibility of holding even solid metal models at the high speeds attainable at the National Advisory Committee's wind tunnel, necessitated the design of a balance which would hold model airfoils of any thickness and at speeds up to 150 m.p.h. In addition to mechanical strength and rigidity, it was highly desirable that the balance readings should require a minimum amount of correction and mathematical manipulation in order to obtain the lift and drag coefficients and the center of pressure. The balance described herein is similar to one in use at the University of Gottingen, the main difference lying in the addition of a device for reading the center of pressure directly, without the necessity of any correction whatsoever. Details of the design and operation of the device are given.

  16. Tunneling magnetoresistance of silicon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-05-01

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a silicon chain sandwiched between nickel electrodes was examined by using first-principles density functional theory. The relative orientation of the magnetization in a parallel-alignment (PA) configuration of two nickel electrodes enhanced the current with a bias less than 0.4 V compared with that in an antiparallel-alignment configuration. Consequently, the silicon chain-nickel electrodes yielded good TMR characteristics. In addition, there was polarized spin current in the PA configuration. The spin polarization of sulfur atoms functioning as a linking bridge between the chain and nickel electrode played an important role in the magnetic effects of the electric current. Moreover, the hybridization of the sulfur 3p orbital and σ-conjugated silicon 3p orbital contributed to increasing the total current.

  17. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  18. Quantum tunneling with global charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. )

    1994-10-15

    We investigate quantum tunneling in the theory of a complex scalar field with a global U(1) symmetry when the charge density of the initial configuration does not vanish. We discuss the possible final configurations and set up the Euclidean path integral formalism to find the bubble nucleation and to study the bubble evolution. For the stationary path, or the bounce solution, in the Euclidean time, the phase variable becomes pure imaginary so that the charge density remains real. We apply this formalism to examples when the initial charge density is small. While the phase transition considered here occurs in zero temperature, the bubble dynamics is richly complicated, involving conserved charge, the sound wave, and the supersonic bubble wall.

  19. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-01

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  20. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  1. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  2. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  3. Tunneling of a heavily damped macroscopic variable

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    The author studied the effect of damping upon fluxoid transitions in simple microfabricated circuits consisting of an inductor and small-area Josephson tunnel junctions. In order to provide an easily characterized source of damping, the tunnel junctions were fabricated with low-inductance resistive shunts across them. To keep tunneling from being suppressed to unreachably low temperatures, the samples were designed to exhibit tunneling at high temperatures in the absence of damping. This was achieved by having junction areas of approximately 0.1 ..mu../sup 2/, which pushes the characteristic time scales to over 10/sup 12/ s/sup -1/. Tunneling was unambiguously observed at 2K in the unshunted samples. The temperature where thermal activation won over tunneling in determining the escape rate was suppressed by an order of magnitude in the shunted samples, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The predicted T/sup 2/ dependence of the exponent of the tunneling rate upon temperature was also clearly observed in the data. At temperatures where thermal activation dominates the escape-rate quantum corrections to the escape rate are predicted. Analysis of these effects upon the data is complicated by the high frequencies involved. Although the data does not constitute a clear test of these corrections, it seems clear that simple thermal activation without quantum corrections does not suffice to explain it.

  4. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastopoulos, Charis; Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-01

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines 'classical' time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems.

  5. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  6. Distance metrics for heme protein electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christopher C; Chobot, Sarah E; Page, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that distance is the principal parameter that sets the order of magnitude for electron-tunneling rates in proteins. However, there continue to be varying ways to measure electron-tunneling distances in proteins. This distance uncertainty blurs the issue of whether the intervening protein medium has been naturally selected to speed or slow any particular electron-tunneling reaction. For redox cofactors lacking metals, an edge of the cofactor can be defined that approximates the extent in space that includes most of the wavefunction associated with its tunneling electron. Beyond this edge, the wavefunction tails off much more dramatically in space. The conjugated porphyrin ring seems a reasonable edge for the metal-free pheophytins and bacteriopheophytins of photosynthesis. For a metal containing redox cofactor such as heme, an appropriate cofactor edge is more ambiguous. Electron-tunneling distance may be measured from the conjugated heme macrocycle edge or from the metal, which can be up to 4.8 A longer. In a typical protein medium, such a distance difference normally corresponds to a approximately 1000 fold decrease in tunneling rate. To address this ambiguity, we consider both natural heme protein electron transfer and light-activated electron transfer in ruthenated heme proteins. We find that the edge of the conjugated heme macrocycle provides a reliable and useful tunneling distance definition consistent with other biological electron-tunneling reactions. Furthermore, with this distance metric, heme axially- and edge-oriented electron transfers appear similar and equally well described by a simple square barrier tunneling model. This is in contrast to recent reports for metal-to-metal metrics that require exceptionally poor donor/acceptor couplings to explain heme axially-oriented electron transfers.

  7. Some deep caves in Biokovo Mountain (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of 3 caves explored more than 1000 meters in depth in the Dinaric karst area in Croatia, has been in progress for a considerable period of time. These are complex speleological features situated in the longest mountain range of the Dinaric karst, i.e. at the Northern Velebit mountain range. In fact, these caves have been studied for over two decades now. The first one is a cave system of Lukina jama (Luke's Cave) - Trojama cave, which has been investigated until the depth of 1421 meters (Jalžić, 2007; Šmida, 1993). Its total length is 3731 meters and a new expedition will soon continue to investigate this pit through speleodiving in siphons. The second greatest cave by depth is Slovačka jama (Slovak Cave), 1320 meters in depth, with cave chanals measuring 5677 meters in total length. The third greatest cave by depth is the Cave system of Velebita, reaching down to 1026 m in depth, with the chanal length of 3176 meters (Bakšić, 2006a; 2006b). However, another 3 speleological sites, which can rightly be added to those deeper than 1000 m, have recently been discovered. These are three caverns that were discovered during construction of the Sveti Ilija Tunnel that passes through Mt. Biokovo, in the Dinaric karst area. These caverns undoubtedly point to the link with the ground surface, while the rock overburden above the tunnel in the zone where the caverns were discovered ranges from 1250 and 1350 meters. Bats from the ground surface were found in the caverns and, according to measurements, they are situated in the depth from 200 and 300 meters below the tunnel level. This would mean that the depth of these newly found caves ranges from 1450 and 1650 m, when observed from the ground surface. There are several hundreds of known caves in Biokovo, and the deepest ones discovered so far are Jama Mokre noge (Wet Feet Cave) 831 m in depth, and Jama Amfora (Amphora Cave) 788 m in depth (Bockovac, 1999; Bakšić & all, 2002; Lacković & all, 2001

  8. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation.

  9. Other cryogenic wind-tunnel projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Following the development of the cryogenic wind tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center in 1972, a large number of cryogenic wind-tunnel projects have been undertaken at various research establishments around the world. Described in this lecture are cryogenic wind-tunnel projects in China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center), England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, Royal Aircraft Establishment - Bedford, and University of Southampton), Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy), Sweden (Rollab), and the United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and NASA Langley).

  10. A wind tunnel database using RIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, W. O., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Engineering data base development which has become increasingly widespread to industry with the availability of data management systems is examined. A large data base was developed for wind tunnel data and related model test information, using RIM as the data base manager. The arrangement of the wind tunnel data into the proper schema for the most efficient database utilization is discussed. The FORTRAN interface program of RIM is used extensively in the loading phases of the data base and by the users. Several examples to illustrate how the Wind Tunnel Data base might be searched for specific data items and test information using RIM are presented.

  11. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome - anatomical and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Iskra, Tomasz; Mizia, Ewa; Musial, Agata; Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common and widely known of the entrapment neuropathies in which the body's peripheral nerves are compressed. Common symptoms of CTS involve the hand and result from compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. In general, CTS develops when the tissues around the median nerve irritate or compress on the nerve along its course through the carpal tunnel, however often it is very difficult to determine cause of CTS. Proper treatment (conservative or surgical) usually can relieve the symptoms and restore normal use of the wrist and hand.

  13. Water tunnel flow visualization using a laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, C.; Curry, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Laser systems for flow visualization in water tunnels (similar to the vapor screen technique used in wind tunnels) can provide two-dimensional cross-sectional views of complex flow fields. This parametric study documents the practical application of the laser-enhanced visualization (LEV) technique to water tunnel testing. Aspects of the study include laser power levels, flow seeding (using flourescent dyes and embedded particulates), model preparation, and photographic techniques. The results of this study are discussed to provide potential users with basic information to aid in the design and setup of an LEV system.

  14. Wind tunnel pressurization and recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pejack, Edwin R.; Meick, Joseph; Ahmad, Adnan; Lateh, Nordin; Sadeq, Omar

    1988-01-01

    The high density, low toxicity characteristics of refrigerant-12 (dichlorofluoromethane) make it an ideal gas for wind tunnel testing. Present limitations on R-12 emissions, set to slow the rate of ozone deterioration, pose a difficult problem in recovery and handling of large quantities of R-12. This preliminary design is a possible solution to the problem of R-12 handling in wind tunnel testing. The design incorporates cold temperature condensation with secondary purification of the R-12/air mixture by adsorption. Also discussed is the use of Freon-22 as a suitable refrigerant for the 12 foot wind tunnel.

  15. 43 CFR 3832.41 - What is a tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What is a tunnel site? 3832.41 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.41 What is a tunnel site? A tunnel site is a subsurface right-of-way under Federal...

  16. 30 CFR 77.213 - Draw-off tunnel escapeways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Draw-off tunnel escapeways. 77.213 Section 77... Surface Installations § 77.213 Draw-off tunnel escapeways. When it is necessary for a tunnel to be closed... tunnel to a safe location on the surface; and, if the escapeway is inclined more than 30 degrees from...

  17. Westfacing portals within Open Cut No. 2 (South Bergen Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West-facing portals within Open Cut No. 2 (South Bergen Tunnel on right, North Bergen Tunnel see HAER No. NJ-136) on left), from within the opposite portal of the South Bergen Tunnel, looking east - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, South Bergen Tunnel, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  18. 30 CFR 77.213 - Draw-off tunnel escapeways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Draw-off tunnel escapeways. 77.213 Section 77... Surface Installations § 77.213 Draw-off tunnel escapeways. When it is necessary for a tunnel to be closed... tunnel to a safe location on the surface; and, if the escapeway is inclined more than 30 degrees from...

  19. Eastfacing portals within Open Cut No. 1 (South Bergen Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East-facing portals within Open Cut No. 1 (South Bergen Tunnel see HAER No. NJ-137 on left, North Bergen Tunnel on right), from the North Bergen Tunnel tracks, looking east - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, North Bergen Tunnel, Through Bergen Hill from Prospect Street at Ogden Avenue to John F. Kennedy Boulevard at Beacon Avenue, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  20. 30 CFR 77.213 - Draw-off tunnel escapeways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Draw-off tunnel escapeways. 77.213 Section 77... Surface Installations § 77.213 Draw-off tunnel escapeways. When it is necessary for a tunnel to be closed... tunnel to a safe location on the surface; and, if the escapeway is inclined more than 30 degrees from...

  1. 1. West portal of Tunnel 27 in distance, contextual view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 27 in distance, contextual view to northeast looking past Tunnel 26 (HAER CA-202) from atop east portal of Tunnel 25 (HAER CA-201), 380mm lens. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 27, Milepost 133.9, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  2. 1. West portal of Tunnel 34, contextual view to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 34, contextual view to northeast from inside east end of Tunnel 33 (Cape Horn Tunnel), 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 34, Milepost 145.4, Colfax, Placer County, CA

  3. 43 CFR 3832.41 - What is a tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is a tunnel site? 3832.41 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.41 What is a tunnel site? A tunnel site is a subsurface right-of-way under Federal...

  4. 30 CFR 77.213 - Draw-off tunnel escapeways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Draw-off tunnel escapeways. 77.213 Section 77... Surface Installations § 77.213 Draw-off tunnel escapeways. When it is necessary for a tunnel to be closed... tunnel to a safe location on the surface; and, if the escapeway is inclined more than 30 degrees from...

  5. 1. West portal of Tunnel 23, contextual view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 23, contextual view to the west-northwest, 380mm lens. Tunnel 22 pierces the toe of Lookout Point. Note that the tracks have been realigned toward the Willamette River to bypass Tunnel 23. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 23, Milepost 584.5, Westfir, Lane County, OR

  6. 30 CFR 77.213 - Draw-off tunnel escapeways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Draw-off tunnel escapeways. 77.213 Section 77... Surface Installations § 77.213 Draw-off tunnel escapeways. When it is necessary for a tunnel to be closed... tunnel to a safe location on the surface; and, if the escapeway is inclined more than 30 degrees from...

  7. Eastfacing portals within Open Cut No. 2 (South Bergen Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East-facing portals within Open Cut No. 2 (South Bergen Tunnel on left, North Bergen Tunnel see HAER No. NJ-136 on right), from the South Bergen Tunnel tracks, looking west - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, South Bergen Tunnel, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  8. Westfacing portals within Open Cut No. 1 (South Bergen Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West-facing portals within Open Cut No. 1 (South Bergen Tunnel see HAER No. NJ-137 on left, North Bergen Tunnel on right), from the North Bergen Tunnel tracks, looking west - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, North Bergen Tunnel, Through Bergen Hill from Prospect Street at Ogden Avenue to John F. Kennedy Boulevard at Beacon Avenue, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  9. 4. East portal of Tunnel 22, view to the eastsoutheast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. East portal of Tunnel 22, view to the east-southeast, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the depth of water within the tunnel, a sympton of the spring-laden slope above the tunnel that led to its eventual abandonment. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 23, Milepost 584.5, Westfir, Lane County, OR

  10. 47 CFR 15.211 - Tunnel radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... surrounding earth and/or water. (b) Any intentional or unintentional radiator external to the tunnel, mine or... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tunnel radio systems. 15.211 Section 15.211... Tunnel radio systems. An intentional radiator utilized as part of a tunnel radio system may operate...

  11. 47 CFR 15.211 - Tunnel radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... surrounding earth and/or water. (b) Any intentional or unintentional radiator external to the tunnel, mine or... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tunnel radio systems. 15.211 Section 15.211... Tunnel radio systems. An intentional radiator utilized as part of a tunnel radio system may operate...

  12. 47 CFR 15.211 - Tunnel radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... surrounding earth and/or water. (b) Any intentional or unintentional radiator external to the tunnel, mine or... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tunnel radio systems. 15.211 Section 15.211... Tunnel radio systems. An intentional radiator utilized as part of a tunnel radio system may operate...

  13. 47 CFR 15.211 - Tunnel radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... surrounding earth and/or water. (b) Any intentional or unintentional radiator external to the tunnel, mine or... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tunnel radio systems. 15.211 Section 15.211... Tunnel radio systems. An intentional radiator utilized as part of a tunnel radio system may operate...

  14. 47 CFR 15.211 - Tunnel radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surrounding earth and/or water. (b) Any intentional or unintentional radiator external to the tunnel, mine or... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tunnel radio systems. 15.211 Section 15.211... Tunnel radio systems. An intentional radiator utilized as part of a tunnel radio system may operate...

  15. Pressure-morphology relationship of a released carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L; Gabra, Joseph N; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-04-01

    We investigated morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the TCL has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system, and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. Carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p < 0.001), with an increase of >62 mm(2) at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width also significantly changed with carpal tunnel pressure (p < 0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact TCL. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the TCL helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery.

  16. POND MOUNTAIN AND POND MOUNTAIN ADDITION ROADLESS AREAS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, W.R.; Bitar, Richard

    1984-01-01

    As a result of a mineral study of the Pond Mountain Roadless Areas, Tennessee, a probable potential for the occurrence of tin, niobium, and tungsten resource with associated beryllium, molybdenum, zinc, and fluorite was identified in rocks of Precambrian age particularly in the southeastern part of the area. Detailed geologic mapping and geochemical sampling of the soils and rocks in the area of Precambrian rocks is recommended to identify and delimit the areas of potential resources of tin, niobium, and tungsten.

  17. Best Practices Case Study: Pine Mountain Builders - Pine Mountain, GA

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-01

    Case study of Pine Mountain Builders who worked with DOE’s IBACOS team to achieve HERS scores of 59 on 140 homes built around a wetlands in Georgia. The team used taped rigid foam exterior sheathing and spray foam insulation in the walls and on the underside of the attic for a very tight 1.0 to 1.8 ACH 50 building shell.

  18. The Interaction Between Shield, Ground and Tunnel Support in TBM Tunnelling Through Squeezing Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramoni, M.; Anagnostou, G.

    2011-01-01

    When planning a TBM drive in squeezing ground, the tunnelling engineer faces a complex problem involving a number of conflicting factors. In this respect, numerical analyses represent a helpful decision aid as they provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of key parameters. The present paper investigates the interaction between the shield, ground and tunnel support by means of computational analysis. Emphasis is placed on the boundary condition, which is applied to model the interface between the ground and the shield or tunnel support. The paper also discusses two cases, which illustrate different methodical approaches applied to the assessment of a TBM drive in squeezing ground. The first case history—the Uluabat Tunnel (Turkey)—mainly involves the investigation of TBM design measures aimed at reducing the risk of shield jamming. The second case history—the Faido Section of the Gotthard Base Tunnel (Switzerland)—deals with different types of tunnel support installed behind a gripper TBM.

  19. High Magnetoresistance in Fully Epitaxial Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with a Semiconducting GaOx Tunnel Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Norihiro; Doko, Naoki; Takada, Tetsuro; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    We fabricate magnetic tunnel junctions with fully epitaxial Fe (001 )/GaOx(001 )/Fe (001 ) structure, where the GaOx is a wide band-gap semiconductor with a cubic spinel-type crystal structure. Tunneling magnetoresistance ratios up to 92% (125%) are observed at room temperature (20 K), which evidently indicates the existence of a spin-polarized coherent tunneling. The observed MR ratio is the highest among the reported magnetic tunnel junctions with a semiconducting tunnel barrier and ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Such a single-crystalline semiconductor tunnel barrier that shows a high MR ratio is an essential building block for a vertical-type spin field-effect transistor.

  20. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.