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Sample records for allele repertoire increases

  1. Allelic exclusion of TCR α-chains upon severe restriction of Vα repertoire.

    PubMed

    Rybakin, Vasily; Westernberg, Luise; Fu, Guo; Kim, Hee-Ok; Ampudia, Jeanette; Sauer, Karsten; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J

    2014-01-01

    Development of thymocytes through the positive selection checkpoint requires the rearrangement and expression of a suitable T cell receptor (TCR) α-chain that can pair with the already-expressed β-chain to make a TCR that is selectable. That is, it must have sufficient affinity for self MHC-peptide to induce the signals required for differentiation, but not too strong so as to induce cell death. Because both alleles of the α-chain continue to rearrange until a positively-selectable heterodimer is formed, thymocytes and T cells can in principle express dual α-chains. However, cell-surface expression of two TCRs is comparatively rare in mature T cells because of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms termed "phenotypic allelic exclusion". We produced mice transgenic for a rearranged β-chain and for two unrearranged α-chains on a genetic background where endogenous α-chains could not be rearranged. Both Vα3.2 and Vα2 containing α-chains were efficiently positively selected, to the extent that a population of dual α-chain-bearing cells was not distinguishable from single α-chain-expressors. Surprisingly, Vα3.2-expressing cells were much more frequent than the Vα2 transgene-expressing cells, even though this Vα3.2-Vβ5 combination can reconstitute a known selectable TCR. In accord with previous work on the Vα3 repertoire, T cells bearing Vα3.2 expressed from the rearranged minilocus were predominantly selected into the CD8+ T cell subpopulation. Because of the dominance of Vα3.2 expression over Vα2 expressed from the miniloci, the peripheral T cell population was predominantly CD8+ cells. PMID:25500569

  2. Both the nature of KIR3DL1 alleles and the KIR3DL1/S1 allele combination affect the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire in the French population.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Katia; Willem, Catherine; Legrand, Nolwenn; Djaoud, Zakia; David, Gaëlle; Rettman, Pauline; Bressollette-Bodin, Céline; Senitzer, David; Esbelin, Julie; Cesbron-Gautier, Anne; Schneider, Thierry; Retière, Christelle

    2013-04-01

    NK-cell functions are regulated by many activating and inhibitory receptors including KIR3DL1. Extensive allelic polymorphism and variability in expression can directly alter NK-cell phenotype and functions. Here we investigated the KIR3DL1(+) NK-cell repertoire, taking into account the allelic KIR3DL1/S1 polymorphism, KIR3DL1 phenotype, and function. All 109 studied individuals possessed at least one KIR3DL1 allele, with weak KIR3DL1*054, or null alleles being frequently present. In KIR3DL1(high/null) individuals, we observed a bimodal distribution of KIR3DL1(+) NK cells identified by a different KIR3DL1 expression level and cell frequency regardless of a similar amount of both KIR3DL1 transcripts, HLA background, or KIR2D expression. However, this bimodal distribution can be explained by a functional selection following a hierarchy of KIR3DL1 receptors. The higher expression of KIR3DL1 observed on cord blood NK cells suggests the expression of the functional KIR3DL1*004 receptors. Thus, the low amplification of KIR3DL1(high) , KIR3DL1*004 NK-cell subsets during development may be due to extensive signaling via these two receptors. Albeit in a nonexclusive manner, individual immunological experience may contribute to shaping the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire. Together, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms regulating the KIR3DL1 NK-cell repertoire.

  3. Biased gene conversion skews allele frequencies in human populations, increasing the disease burden of recessive alleles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-10-01

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications.

  4. Testosterone increases repertoire size in an open-ended learner: an experimental study using adult male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Van Hout, Alain J-M; Pinxten, Rianne; Darras, Veerle M; Eens, Marcel

    2012-11-01

    Song in songbirds is a learned secondary sexual behavior, first acquired during a sensitive phase of juvenile development, which is affected by hormones such as testosterone (T). While the latter has received much attention, the potential involvement of T in the adult repertoire changes observed in a number of species is much less understood. Yet, this may prove essential to understand the role of song as a sexually selected trait. We therefore performed a T-implantation experiment during the non-breeding season (when T is basal), using adult male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), a songbird species in which song repertoire size (and composition) changes seasonally and increases with age. Repertoire size increased rapidly in T-males, but not in control males, indicating a role for T in repertoire size changes. This increase resulted from a lower proportion of dropped song types in T-males than in control males, while the proportion of added song types did not differ between both groups. Interestingly, the observed repertoire turnover (adding and removing song types from the repertoire) in both groups, suggests that elevated plasma T levels were not essential for changes in repertoire composition (contrary to repertoire size). Finally, T-males (but not control males) significantly increased their song rate, while neither group showed a significant change in their song bout length and phrase repetition rate. Taken together, our results suggest a role for T in adult song learning and provide new insights into the information content of repertoire size and song bout length as sexually selected traits. PMID:23036784

  5. Territory Tenure Increases with Repertoire Size in Brownish-Flanked Bush Warbler

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Canwei; Wei, Chentao; Zhang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    Song repertoire size is often cited as a classic example of a secondary sexual trait in birds. Models of sexual selection and empirical tests of their predictions have often related secondary sexual traits to longevity. However, the relationship between repertoire size and longevity is unclear. Using capture-mark-recapture studies in two populations of the brownish-flanked bush warbler Cettia fortipes, we found that males with a repertoire size of three maintained territory tenure for a longer duration than did males with a repertoire size of two. These results provide evidence that even a minimal difference in repertoire size can serve as a potential signal of territory tenure capability. PMID:25822524

  6. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  7. Collagen Specific T-Cell Repertoire and HLA-DR Alleles: Biomarkers of Active Refractory Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Tolusso, Barbara; Fedele, Anna Laura; Gremese, Elisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Nicolò, Chiara; Ria, Francesco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and associates with HLA-DRB1*04. The Collagen IIp261-273-specific T cell repertoire in the peripheral blood of DR4 + patients at the onset of the disease shows a restricted TCR-beta chain usage among which the most frequent is TRBV25. To define whether this group of DR4-restricted collagen-specific shared T cell could represent markers of active-severe disease and response to therapy, 90 subjects affected by early-RA were enrolled in the study; peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured with or without the human collagen II peptide p261-273 and were examined by immunoscope analysis for the usage of the previously identified shared TCR-beta chains. We report that the presence of T cells carrying rearrangement TRBV25 associated with HLA-DR haplotype and disease activity. HLA-DRB1* haplotypes 04–04, 04–01 and 04–11 were significantly associated with usage of TRBV25, higher disease activity at the onset of disease and poor response to DMARDs. Finally, the HLA-DRB1* haplotype appeared complementary with current serologic tools to predict good and poor responders in a treat to target strategy. The data reported here offer clues to predict the course of the disease and to foresee personalized treatments in RA patients. PMID:26844284

  8. Collagen Specific T-Cell Repertoire and HLA-DR Alleles: Biomarkers of Active Refractory Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Tolusso, Barbara; Fedele, Anna Laura; Gremese, Elisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Nicolò, Chiara; Ria, Francesco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and associates with HLA-DRB1*04. The Collagen IIp261-273-specific T cell repertoire in the peripheral blood of DR4 + patients at the onset of the disease shows a restricted TCR-beta chain usage among which the most frequent is TRBV25. To define whether this group of DR4-restricted collagen-specific shared T cell could represent markers of active-severe disease and response to therapy, 90 subjects affected by early-RA were enrolled in the study; peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured with or without the human collagen II peptide p261-273 and were examined by immunoscope analysis for the usage of the previously identified shared TCR-beta chains. We report that the presence of T cells carrying rearrangement TRBV25 associated with HLA-DR haplotype and disease activity. HLA-DRB1* haplotypes 04-04, 04-01 and 04-11 were significantly associated with usage of TRBV25, higher disease activity at the onset of disease and poor response to DMARDs. Finally, the HLA-DRB1* haplotype appeared complementary with current serologic tools to predict good and poor responders in a treat to target strategy. The data reported here offer clues to predict the course of the disease and to foresee personalized treatments in RA patients.

  9. Temporal regularity increases with repertoire complexity in the Australian pied butcherbird's song

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Hollis; Scharff, Constance; Rothenberg, David; Parra, Lucas C.; Tchernichovski, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Music maintains a characteristic balance between repetition and novelty. Here, we report a similar balance in singing performances of free-living Australian pied butcherbirds. Their songs include many phrase types. The more phrase types in a bird's repertoire, the more diverse the singing performance can be. However, without sufficient temporal organization, avian listeners may find diverse singing performances difficult to perceive and memorize. We tested for a correlation between the complexity of song repertoire and the temporal regularity of singing performance. We found that different phrase types often share motifs (notes or stereotyped groups of notes). These shared motifs reappeared in strikingly regular temporal intervals across different phrase types, over hundreds of phrases produced without interruption by each bird. We developed a statistical estimate to quantify the degree to which phrase transition structure is optimized for maximizing the regularity of shared motifs. We found that transition probabilities between phrase types tend to maximize regularity in the repetition of shared motifs, but only in birds of high repertoire complexity. Conversely, in birds of low repertoire complexity, shared motifs were produced with less regularity. The strong correlation between repertoire complexity and motif regularity suggests that birds possess a mechanism that regulates the temporal placement of shared motifs in a manner that takes repertoire complexity into account. We discuss alternative musical, mechanistic and ecological explanations to this effect. PMID:27703699

  10. Increasing the Chemical Potential of the Germ-Line Antibody Repertoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvetnick, Nora; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Han, Nianhe; Prudent, James; Schultz, Peter; Lerner, Richard

    1993-05-01

    To augment the chemical potential of the immunological repertoire, a metal ion-binding light chain has been introduced into the murine genome. Mice containing the transgene were subsequently immunized with a fluorescein conjugate. The transgenic light chain was found at a high frequency in the anti-fluorescein memory B-cell compartment. This general method should be applicable to other cofactors and small molecules and should lead to generation of antibodies with unique catalytic activities.

  11. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Wei, Jun; Winkler, Chris; Goncalves-Butruille, Marymar; Weers, Ben P; Cerwick, Sharon F; Dieter, Jo Ann; Duncan, Keith E; Howard, Richard J; Hou, Zhenglin; Löffler, Carlos M; Cooper, Mark; Simmons, Carl R

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays AR GOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer's modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer's female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance.

  12. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays ARGOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer’s modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer’s female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance. PMID:24218327

  13. T cell receptor genes in a series of class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones specific for a Plasmodium berghei nonapeptide: implications for T cell allelic exclusion and antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We report here the first extensive study of a T cell repertoire for a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. We have found that the T cell receptors (TCRs) carried by 28 H-2Kd-restricted CTL clones specific for a single Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite nonapeptide are highly diverse in terms of V alpha, J alpha, and J beta segments and aminoacid composition of the junctional regions. However, despite this extensive diversity, a high proportion of the TCRs contain the same V beta segment. These results are in contrast to most previously reported T cell responses towards class II MHC-peptide complexes, where the TCR repertoires appeared to be much more limited. In our study, the finding of a dominant V beta in the midst of otherwise highly diverse TCRs suggests the importance of the V beta segment in shaping the T cell repertoire specific for a given MHC-peptide complex. As an additional finding, we observed that nearly all clones have rearranged both TCR alpha loci. Moreover, as many as one-third of the CTL clones that we analyzed apparently display two productive alpha rearrangements. This argues against a regulated model of sequential recombination at the alpha locus and consequently raises the question of whether allelic exclusion of the TCR alpha chain is achieved at all. PMID:1836010

  14. Increasing Allele Detection by Altering the Quantity of Internal Lane Standard.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Jessica M; Michalik, Monnie; Dukes, Mary Jones; Wojtkiewicz, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic injection (EI) is the primary method used in forensic laboratories to load amplified PCR product in capillary electrophoresis for short tandem repeat (STR) fragment separation. Because all samples subjected to capillary electrophoresis use internal lane standard (ILS), this study investigated the consequence of varying the volume of ILS and its effects on allele peak heights and number of alleles detected. Results demonstrated that when the volume of ILS is reduced, the average peak height and number of alleles increased, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the detection method. Sizing anomalies were observed; however, they did not adversely affect accuracy and precision. The method developed in this study offers a simple and universal procedure to increase the alleles detected in forensic STR analysis. Reducing the volume of ILS to achieve greater sensitivity is applicable to all STR amplification kits and capillary electrophoresis instruments currently used in forensic DNA analysis. PMID:26390320

  15. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  16. Increased TNFA*2, but not TNFB*1, allele frequency in Spanish atopic patients.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Tellería, J J; Linares, P; Blanco-Quirós, A

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine involved in asthma and atopy. Increased TNF-alpha levels have been found in airway biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from asthmatic patients. Constitutional variations in the TNF-alpha secretion levels in vitro are associated with molecular polymorphisms located within and around the TNF loci. Our study objective was to investigate the association between atopy and two described di-allelic polymorphisms in the TNF locus: a G to A transition at position -308 in the 5'-promoter region of the TNFA gene (TNFA*1 and TNFA*2 alleles) and an Ncol restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the first intron of the TNFB gene (TNFB*1 and TNFB*2 alleles). The genetic study was performed in 65 unrelated atopic patients and 60 healthy controls. The regions of interest were amplified from genomic DNA using specific primers and polymerase chain reaction. SSP-PCR analysis for TNFA -308 polymorphism genotyping and endonuclease digestion analysis for the TNFB Ncol RFLP were used. The frequency of the TNFA*2 allele was significantly higher in atopic subjects compared to the control group (38.5% vs. 10.5%; chi2 = 32.06; p <0.0001). The TNFA*2 allele is associated with a higher risk for the development of atopy (risk ratio = 9.44; EF = 0.65; chi2 = 30.06 p <0.0005). On the other hand, no significant association between the TNFB alleles and atopy was found. In conclusion, the TNFA*2 allele could be also a genetic risk marker for the predisposition to atopy in our population, as has been reported in other studies. Either the TNFA gene itself or a linked gene on chromosome region 6p21, which has yet to be identified, is a candidate gene for susceptibility to atopy. PMID:10923589

  17. Myotonic Dystrophy: Increased expression of the normal allele in CDM infants muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Radvanyi, H.H.; Gourdon, G.; Junien, C. |

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder characterized by a highly variable clinical phenotype. The mutation has been identified as an unstable trinucleotide CTG repeat in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the myotonin-protein kinase (MT-PK) gene. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM), which represents the most severe phenotype, is exclusively maternally inherited. Recent studies, analysis by Northern blots and RT-PCR provided apparently conflicting results on the mutated allele expression in samples from congenitally affected children. The level of expression of the mutant allele depends on the extent of the repeat in the adult form and is no longer expressed when over 800-1300 repeats, whether in adult forms or in CDM. Could this decrease account for the late onset forms? However, the differences between the two phenotypes cannot be explained by the same mechanism. Alternatively, these differences could be due to differences in expression of the normal allele. We analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of the MT-PK gene in muscle samples from four CDM infants and two aged-matched normal controls. In two of these, the mutant allele (3.3 and 8 kb) was undetectable on Northern blots. We observed an increased expression of the MT-PK gene (10- to 20-fold) in tissues of severely affected congenital patients which can be attributed to the normal allele. Since expression of the normal allele is either normal or slightly decreased in the adult form, the dramatic increase in the congenital form could reflect a disturbance in muscle differentiation. Expression studies of MT-PK at different stages of development and, especially after the 20th week, are therefore required.

  18. SLAP deficiency increases TCR avidity leading to altered repertoire and negative selection of cognate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Friend, Samantha F; Peterson, Lisa K; Kedl, Ross M; Dragone, Leonard L

    2013-03-01

    How T cell receptor (TCR) avidity influences CD8(+) T cell development and repertoire selection is not yet fully understood. To fill this gap, we utilized Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP)-deficient mice as a tool to increase TCR avidity on double positive (DP) thymocytes. We generated SLAP(-/-) mice with the transgenic MHC class I-restricted TCR (OT-1) and SLAP(-/-) Vβ5 mice, expressing only the β-chain of the TCR OT-1 transgene, to examine the effects of increased TCR surface levels on CD8(+) T cell development and repertoire selection. In comparing SLAP(-/-) OT-1 and Vβ5 mice with wild-type controls, we performed compositional analysis and assessed thymocyte signaling by measuring CD5 levels. In addition, we performed tetramer and compositional staining to measure affinity for the cognate antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) peptide, presented by MHC. Furthermore, we quantified differences in α-chain repertoire in SLAP(-/-) Vβ5 mice. We have found that SLAP(-/-) OT-1 mice have fewer CD8(+) thymocytes but have increased CD5 expression. SLAP(-/-) OT-1 mice have fewer DP thymocytes expressing Vα2, signifying increased endogenous α-chain rearrangement, and more non-OVA-specific CD8(+) splenocytes upon tetramer staining. Our data demonstrate that SLAP(-/-) Vβ5 mice also have fewer OVA-specific cells and increased Vα2 usage in the peripheral Vβ5 CD8(+) T cells that were non-OVA-specific, demonstrating differences in α-chain repertoire. These studies provide direct evidence that increased TCR avidity in DP thymocytes enhances CD8(+) T cell negative selection deleting thymocytes with specificity for cognate antigen, an antigen the mature T cells may never encounter. Collectively, these studies provide new insights into how TCR avidity during CD8(+) T cell development influences repertoire selection.

  19. Allelic variation at a single gene increases food value in a drought-tolerant staple cereal.

    PubMed

    Gilding, Edward K; Frère, Celine H; Cruickshank, Alan; Rada, Anna K; Prentis, Peter J; Mudge, Agnieszka M; Mace, Emma S; Jordan, David R; Godwin, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    The production of adequate agricultural outputs to support the growing human population places great demands on agriculture, especially in light of ever-greater restrictions on input resources. Sorghum is a drought-adapted cereal capable of reliable production where other cereals fail, and thus represents a good candidate to address food security as agricultural inputs of water and arable land grow scarce. A long-standing issue with sorghum grain is that it has an inherently lower digestibility. Here we show that a low-frequency allele type in the starch metabolic gene, pullulanase, is associated with increased digestibility, regardless of genotypic background. We also provide evidence that the beneficial allele type is not associated with deleterious pleiotropic effects in the modern field environment. We argue that increasing the digestibility of an adapted crop is a viable way forward towards addressing food security while maximizing water and land-use efficiency.

  20. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  1. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ϵ4 Allele Is Associated with Increased Symptom Reporting Following Sports Concussion.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Victoria C; Arnett, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between genetic factors and outcome following brain injury has received increased attention in recent years. However, few studies have evaluated the influence of genes on specific sequelae of concussion. The purpose of this study was to determine how the ϵ4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene influences symptom expression following sports-related concussion. Participants included 42 collegiate athletes who underwent neuropsychological testing, including completion of the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS), within 3 months after sustaining a concussion (73.8% were evaluated within 1 week). Athletes provided buccal samples that were analyzed to determine the make-up of their APOE genotype. Dependent variables included a total symptom score and four symptom clusters derived from the PCSS. Mann-Whitney U tests showed higher scores reported by athletes with the ϵ4 allele compared to those without it on the total symptom score and the physical and cognitive symptom clusters. Furthermore, logistic regression showed that the ϵ4 allele independently predicted those athletes who reported physical and cognitive symptoms following concussion. These findings illustrate that ϵ4+ athletes report greater symptomatology post-concussion than ϵ4- athletes, suggesting that the ϵ4 genotype may confer risk for poorer post-concussion outcome. (JINS, 2016, 22, 89-94). PMID:26483005

  2. Increasing long-term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  3. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Erin M.; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P.; Zee, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Δ4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Δ4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance. PMID:20033295

  4. The distribution of MICA alleles in an Austrian population: evidence for increasing polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wenda, Sabine; Faé, Ingrid; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Nunes, José M; Mayr, Wolfgang R; Fischer, Gottfried F

    2013-10-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A (MICA) is located 46.4 Kb centromeric to HLA-B locus on chromosome 6; 84 alleles have been described so far. To assess the distribution of MICA alleles in an Austrian population, 322 unrelated Austrian blood donors have been typed for MICA by direct sequencing of amplified exons 2-5; sequencing of exon 6 and separating alleles by haplotype specific primers or by cloning was performed to resolve ambiguities. HLA-B was typed at low level resolution and linkage disequilibrium was determined. We observed 20 already known and four novel MICA alleles. MICA*008:01/04 was the most frequent allele (42%), followed by MICA*002:01 (11%) and MICA*009:01 (9%), three alleles (MICA*029, *067 and *068) were observed only once. No deviation from the Hardy Weinberg equilibrium was observed. Linkage disequilibrium between MICA and HLA-B alleles was observed, most extensively between MICA*008:01/04 and HLA-B*07. Our population data are in agreement with other European populations. The fact that four novel alleles have been observed indicates that the polymorphism of MICA is larger than currently estimated.

  5. Alleles that increase risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus are not associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Velayudhan, Latha; Hunter, Gillian; Newhouse, Stephen; Lin, Kuang; Fogh, Isabella; Tsolaki, Magda; Daniilidou, Makrina; Pritchard, Megan; Craig, David; Todd, Stephen; Johnston, Janet A; McGuinness, Bernadette; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Passmore, Peter A; Sims, Rebecca; Williams, Julie; Brayne, Carol; Stewart, Robert; Sham, Pak; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F

    2014-12-01

    Although epidemiological studies suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the biological basis of this relationship is not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic comorbidity between the 2 disorders and to investigate whether genetic liability to T2DM, estimated by a genotype risk scores based on T2DM associated loci, is associated with increased risk of LOAD. This study was performed in 2 stages. In stage 1, we combined genotypes for the top 15 T2DM-associated polymorphisms drawn from approximately 3000 individuals (1349 cases and 1351 control subjects) with extracted and/or imputed data from 6 genome-wide studies (>10,000 individuals; 4507 cases, 2183 controls, 4989 population controls) to form a genotype risk score and examined if this was associated with increased LOAD risk in a combined meta-analysis. In stage 2, we investigated the association of LOAD with an expanded T2DM score made of 45 well-established variants drawn from the 6 genome-wide studies. Results were combined in a meta-analysis. Both stage 1 and stage 2 T2DM risk scores were not associated with LOAD risk (odds ratio = 0.988; 95% confidence interval, 0.972-1.004; p = 0.144 and odds ratio = 0.993; 95% confidence interval, 0.983-1.003; p = 0.149 per allele, respectively). Contrary to expectation, genotype risk scores based on established T2DM candidates were not associated with increased risk of LOAD. The observed epidemiological associations between T2DM and LOAD could therefore be a consequence of secondary disease processes, pleiotropic mechanisms, and/or common environmental risk factors. Future work should focus on well-characterized longitudinal cohorts with extensive phenotypic and genetic data relevant to both LOAD and T2DM.

  6. Burden of risk alleles for Hypertension Increases Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Guido J.; Biffi, Alessandro; Devan, William; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Kissela, Brett; Hansen, Björn M.; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Elosua, Roberto; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; Ayres, Alison M.; Schwab, Kristin; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Rost, Natalia S.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Norrving, Bo; Tirschwell, David L.; Selim, Magdy; Brown, Devin L.; Silliman, Scott L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Broderick, Joseph P.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Roquer, Jaume; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Background and Purpose Genetic variation influences risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Hypertension (HTN) is a potent risk factor for ICH and several common genetic variants (SNPs) associated with blood pressure (BP) levels have been identified. We sought to determine whether the cumulative burden of BP-related SNPs is associated with risk of ICH and pre-ICH diagnosis of HTN. Methods Prospective multicenter case-control study in 2272 subjects of European descent (1025 cases and 1247 controls). Thirty-nine SNPs reported to be associated with BP levels were identified from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS catalog. Single-SNP association analyses were performed for the outcomes ICH and pre-ICH HTN. Subsequently, weighted and unweighted genetic risk scores were constructed using these SNPs and entered as the independent variable in logistic regression models with ICH and pre-ICH HTN as the dependent variables. Results No single SNP was associated with either ICH or pre-ICH HTN. The BP-based unweighted genetic risk score was associated with risk of ICH (odds ratio [OR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–1.21, p=0.01) and the subset of ICH in deep regions (OR=1.18, 95%CI 1.07–1.30, p=0.001), but not with the subset of lobar ICH. The score was associated with a history of HTN among controls (OR=1.17, 95%CI 1.04–1.31, p=0.009) and ICH cases (OR=1.15, 95%CI 1.01–1.31, p=0.04). Similar results were obtained when using a weighted score. Conclusion Increasing numbers of high blood pressure-related alleles are associated with increased risk of deep ICH as well as with clinically identified HTN. PMID:22933587

  7. Multiple heterologies increase mitotic double-strand break-induced allelic gene conversion tract lengths in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Sweetser, D B; Clikeman, J A; Khalsa, G J; Wheeler, S L

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous and double-strand break (DSB)-induced allelic recombination in yeast was investigated in crosses between ura3 heteroalleles inactivated by an HO site and a +1 frameshift mutation, with flanking markers defining a 3.4-kbp interval. In some crosses, nine additional phenotypically silent RFLP mutations were present at approximately 100-bp intervals. Increasing heterology from 0.2 to 1% in this interval reduced spontaneous, but not DSB-induced, recombination. For DSB-induced events, 75% were continuous tract gene conversions without a crossover in this interval; discontinuous tracts and conversions associated with a crossover each comprised approximately 7% of events, and 10% also converted markers in unbroken alleles. Loss of heterozygosity was seen for all markers centromere distal to the HO site in 50% of products; such loss could reflect gene conversion, break-induced replication, chromosome loss, or G2 crossovers. Using telomere-marked strains we determined that nearly all allelic DSB repair occurs by gene conversion. We further show that most allelic conversion results from mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA. Interestingly, markers shared between the sparsely and densely marked interval converted at higher rates in the densely marked interval. Thus, the extra markers increased gene conversion tract lengths, which may reflect mismatch repair-induced recombination, or a shift from restoration- to conversion-type repair. PMID:10511547

  8. The past, present, and future of immune repertoire biology - the rise of next-generation repertoire analysis.

    PubMed

    Six, Adrien; Mariotti-Ferrandiz, Maria Encarnita; Chaara, Wahiba; Magadan, Susana; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Mora, Thierry; Thomas-Vaslin, Véronique; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Boudinot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    T and B cell repertoires are collections of lymphocytes, each characterized by its antigen-specific receptor. We review here classical technologies and analysis strategies developed to assess immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TR) repertoire diversity, and describe recent advances in the field. First, we describe the broad range of available methodological tools developed in the past decades, each of which answering different questions and showing complementarity for progressive identification of the level of repertoire alterations: global overview of the diversity by flow cytometry, IG repertoire descriptions at the protein level for the identification of IG reactivities, IG/TR CDR3 spectratyping strategies, and related molecular quantification or dynamics of T/B cell differentiation. Additionally, we introduce the recent technological advances in molecular biology tools allowing deeper analysis of IG/TR diversity by next-generation sequencing (NGS), offering systematic and comprehensive sequencing of IG/TR transcripts in a short amount of time. NGS provides several angles of analysis such as clonotype frequency, CDR3 diversity, CDR3 sequence analysis, V allele identification with a quantitative dimension, therefore requiring high-throughput analysis tools development. In this line, we discuss the recent efforts made for nomenclature standardization and ontology development. We then present the variety of available statistical analysis and modeling approaches developed with regards to the various levels of diversity analysis, and reveal the increasing sophistication of those modeling approaches. To conclude, we provide some examples of recent mathematical modeling strategies and perspectives that illustrate the active rise of a "next-generation" of repertoire analysis.

  9. A novel type 2 diabetes risk allele increases the promoter activity of the muscle-specific small ankyrin 1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rengna; Lai, Shanshan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Hongfei; Cai, Zhenming; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Du, Hong; Chen, Huimei

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified Ankyrin-1 (ANK1) as a common type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility locus. However, the underlying causal variants and functional mechanisms remain unknown. We screened for 8 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ANK1 between 2 case-control studies. Genotype analysis revealed significant associations of 3 SNPs, rs508419 (first identified here), rs515071, and rs516946 with T2D (P < 0.001). These SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (r2 > 0.80); subsequent analysis indicated that the CCC haplotype associated with increased T2D susceptibility (OR 1.447, P < 0.001). Further mapping showed that rs508419 resides in the muscle-specific ANK1 gene promoter. Allele-specific mRNA and protein level measurements confirmed association of the C allele with increased small ANK1 (sAnk1) expression in human skeletal muscle (P = 0.018 and P < 0.001, respectively). Luciferase assays showed increased rs508419-C allele transcriptional activity in murine skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated altered rs508419 DNA-protein complex formation. Glucose uptake was decreased with excess sAnk1 expression upon insulin stimulation. Thus, the ANK1 rs508419-C T2D-risk allele alters DNA-protein complex binding leading to increased promoter activity and sAnk1 expression; thus, increased sAnk1 expression in skeletal muscle might contribute to T2D susceptibility. PMID:27121283

  10. The Linguistic Repertoire Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the relevance of poststructuralist approaches to the notion of a linguistic repertoire and introduces the notion of language portraits as a basis for empirical study of the way in which speakers conceive and represent their heteroglossic repertoires. The first part of the article revisits Gumperz's notion of a linguistic…

  11. Evidence that putative ADHD low risk alleles at SNAP25 may increase the risk of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L S; Kendall, K; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Williams, N M

    2009-10-01

    Synaptosomal Associated Protein 25 kDa (SNAP25) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia by numerous neuropathological studies and genetic variation at SNAP25 has been reported to be associated with ADHD. Expression levels of the putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene DTNBP1 has been shown to influence the levels of SNAP25 in vitro. We undertook directed mutation screening of SNAP25 in UK schizophrenic cases followed by direct association analysis of all variants identified and identified known exonic SNPs that showed evidence for association (rs3746544 P = 0.004 OR = 1.26, rs8636 P = 0.003 OR = 1.27), although these SNPs are highly correlated (r(2) > 0.99). We additionally genotyped a further 31 tag SNPs spanning the SNAP25 locus and identified several independent SNPs that were nominally associated with schizophrenia (strongest association at rs3787283, P = 0.006, OR = 1.25) however, due to the number of tests performed no SNP met experiment-wise significance (minimum permuted P-value = 0.1). Post hoc analysis revealed that the SNPs nominally associated with schizophrenia (rs3787283, rs3746544) were the same as those previously demonstrated to be associated with ADHD but with the opposite alleles, allowing the intriguing hypothesis that genetic variation at SNAP25 may be differentially associated with both schizophrenia and ADHD. PMID:19132710

  12. The gar2 and rga alleles increase the growth of gibberellin-deficient pollen tubes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Swain, Stephen M; Muller, Andrea J; Singh, Davinder P

    2004-02-01

    Ectopic expression in Arabidopsis of a pea (Pisum sativum) cDNA (2ox2) encoding a gibberellin (GA) 2-oxidase (PsGA2ox2), involved in the deactivation of biologically active GAs, has been used to establish a role for GAs in promoting pollen tube growth. One line, 35S:2ox2/28c, when homozygous for the transgene, exhibits a novel small fruit phenotype. The 28c transgene reduces pollen tube growth, and this results in a reduced number of fertilized seeds that are only present at the end of the silique nearest the stigma. To confirm that the 28c pollen tube phenotype is due to sense expression of the 2ox2 mRNA, a "hairpin" RNA interface silencing construct, designed to silence 2ox2 expression, has been used to restore pollen tube growth and fruit development. The interaction between 28c and other mutants with increased GA response has also been examined to provide further evidence that GAs play an important role in pollen tube growth. Based on the ability of mutant alleles to suppress the 35S:2ox2/28c phenotype, we define new roles for the gar2-1 and rga alleles in GA signaling during pollen tube elongation in addition to their previously established roles in vegetative tissues. In contrast to the constitutive GA response observed in internodes and leaves lacking RGA and GAI, the rga-2 gai-d5 mutant combination is only a partial suppressor of the 28c phenotype. Because the dominant dwarfing gai-1 allele reduces GA response in vegetative tissues, its effect on plant fertility has been examined. Although gai-1 reduces seed set, this appears to reflect defects in reproductive development other than pollen tube function. Finally, we show that the genetic background (Landsberg erecta or Columbia) modifies the 28c phenotype and that this effect is not due to the ER/er difference between these two ecotypes.

  13. NAL1 allele from a rice landrace greatly increases yield in modern indica cultivars.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daisuke; Trijatmiko, Kurniawan Rudi; Tagle, Analiza Grubanzo; Sapasap, Maria Veronica; Koide, Yohei; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Gannaban, Ritchel Bueno; Nishimura, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Seiji; Fukuta, Yoshimichi; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Slamet-Loedin, Inez Hortense; Ishimaru, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Nobuya

    2013-12-17

    Increasing crop production is essential for securing the future food supply in developing countries in Asia and Africa as economies and populations grow. However, although the Green Revolution led to increased grain production in the 1960s, no major advances have been made in increasing yield potential in rice since then. In this study, we identified a gene, SPIKELET NUMBER (SPIKE), from a tropical japonica rice landrace that enhances the grain productivity of indica cultivars through pleiotropic effects on plant architecture. Map-based cloning revealed that SPIKE was identical to NARROW LEAF1 (NAL1), which has been reported to control vein pattern in leaf. Phenotypic analyses of a near-isogenic line of a popular indica cultivar, IR64, and overexpressor lines revealed increases in spikelet number, leaf size, root system, and the number of vascular bundles, indicating the enhancement of source size and translocation capacity as well as sink size. The near-isogenic line achieved 13-36% yield increase without any negative effect on grain appearance. Expression analysis revealed that the gene was expressed in all cell types: panicles, leaves, roots, and culms supporting the pleiotropic effects on plant architecture. Furthermore, SPIKE increased grain yield by 18% in the recently released indica cultivar IRRI146, and increased spikelet number in the genetic background of other popular indica cultivars. The use of SPIKE in rice breeding could contribute to food security in indica-growing regions such as South and Southeast Asia.

  14. The APC I1307K allele conveys a significant increased risk for cancer.

    PubMed

    Leshno, Ari; Shapira, Shiran; Liberman, Eliezer; Kraus, Sarah; Sror, Miri; Harlap-Gat, Amira; Avivi, Doran; Galazan, Lior; David, Maayan; Maharshak, Nitsan; Moanis, Serhan; Arber, Nadir; Moshkowitz, Menachem

    2016-03-15

    This study is the first attempt to evaluate the association between the APC I1307K variant and overall cancer risk. It is unique in both its large sample size and in the reliability of data in the control group. The findings described in this article have major implications in terms of identifying asymptomatic individuals who are at increased risk to harbor cancer and therefore targeted to be enrolled in specific early detection and prevention programs. The prevalence of the APC I1307K missense mutation among Ashkenazi Jews is ∼ 6%. Carriers are at an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the association of this variant with non-colorectal cancers. Consecutive 13,013 healthy subjects who underwent screening at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center between 2006 and 2014 were enrolled. This population was supplemented with 1,611 cancer patients from the same institution. Demographics, medical history, and pathological data were recorded. Mortality data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's registry. The prevalence of APC I1307K in cancer patients and healthy subjects was compared. The APC I1307K variant was detected in 189 (11.8%) cancer patients compared to 614 (4.7%) healthy subjects, reflecting an adjusted age and sex odds ratio (OR) of 2.53 (p < 0.0001). History of two or more cancer types was associated with a positive carrier prevalence (OR = 4.38 p < 0.0001). Males had significantly increased carrier prevalence in lung, urologic, pancreatic, and skin cancers. The carrier prevalence among females was significantly higher only in breast and skin cancers. Female carriers developed cancer at a significantly older age compared to non-carriers (average 62.7 years vs. 57.8, respectively, p = 0.027), had better survival rates (HR = 0.58, p = 0.022) and overall increased longevity (average age of death 78.8 vs. 70.4 years, respectively, p = 0.003). In conclusion, the APC I1307K variant is a reliable marker for overall cancer risk

  15. Increased nicotine response in iPSC-derived human neurons carrying the CHRNA5 N398 allele

    PubMed Central

    Oni, Eileen N.; Halikere, Apoorva; Li, Guohui; Toro-Ramos, Alana J.; Swerdel, Mavis R.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Moore, Jennifer C.; Bello, Nicholas T.; Bierut, Laura J.; Goate, Alison; Tischfield, Jay A.; Pang, Zhiping P.; Hart, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation in nicotinic receptor alpha 5 (CHRNA5) has been associated with increased risk of addiction-associated phenotypes in humans yet little is known the underlying neural basis. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived from donors homozygous for either the major (D398) or the minor (N398) allele of the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs16969968, in CHRNA5. To understand the impact of these nicotinic receptor variants in humans, we differentiated these iPSCs to dopamine (DA) or glutamatergic neurons and then tested their functional properties and response to nicotine. Results show that N398 variant human DA neurons differentially express genes associated with ligand receptor interaction and synaptic function. While both variants exhibited physiological properties consistent with mature neuronal function, the N398 neuronal population responded more actively with an increased excitatory postsynaptic current response upon the application of nicotine in both DA and glutamatergic neurons. Glutamatergic N398 neurons responded to lower nicotine doses (0.1 μM) with greater frequency and amplitude but they also exhibited rapid desensitization, consistent with previous analyses of N398-associated nicotinic receptor function. This study offers a proof-of-principle for utilizing human neurons to study gene variants contribution to addiction. PMID:27698409

  16. The 2-repeat allele of the MAOA gene confers an increased risk for shooting and stabbing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C; Boutwell, Brian B

    2014-09-01

    There has been a great deal of research examining the link between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAOA gene and antisocial phenotypes. The results of these studies have consistently revealed that low activity MAOA alleles are related to antisocial behaviors for males who were maltreated as children. Recently, though, some evidence has emerged indicating that a rare allele of the MAOA gene-that is, the 2-repeat allele-may have effects on violence that are independent of the environment. The current study builds on this research and examines the association between the 2-repeat allele and shooting and stabbing behaviors in a sample of males drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analyses revealed that African-American males who carry the 2-repeat allele are significantly more likely than all other genotypes to engage in shooting and stabbing behaviors and to report having multiple shooting and stabbing victims. The limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered.

  17. Programming in the Zone: Repertoire Selection for the Large Ensemble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the great challenges ensemble directors face is selecting high-quality repertoire that matches the musical and technical levels of their ensembles. Thoughtful repertoire selection can lead to increased student motivation as well as greater enthusiasm for the music program from parents, administrators, teachers, and community members. Common…

  18. Increased risk of venous thrombosis by AB alleles of the ABO blood group and Factor V Leiden in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Most cases of a predisposition to venous thrombosis are caused by resistance to activated protein C, associated in 95% of cases with the Factor V Leiden allele (FVL or R506Q). Several recent studies report a further increased risk of thrombosis by an association between the AB alleles of the ABO blood group and Factor V Leiden. The present study investigated this association with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in individuals treated at the Hemocentro de Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil. A case-control comparison showed a significant risk of thrombosis in the presence of Factor V Leiden (OR = 10.1), which was approximately doubled when the AB alleles of the ABO blood group were present as well (OR = 22.3). These results confirm that the increased risk of deep vein thrombosis in the combined presence of AB alleles and Factor V Leiden is also applicable to the Brazilian population suggesting that ABO blood group typing should be routinely added to FVL in studies involving thrombosis. PMID:21637678

  19. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes.

  20. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L.; Chiang, Jennifer H.; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  1. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  2. Microsatellite allele 5 of MHC class I chain-related gene a increases the risk for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in latvians.

    PubMed

    Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Ghaderi, M; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is one of the most common chronic diseases. It is an autoimmune, polygenic disease, associated with several genes on different chromosomes. The most important gene is human leukocyte antigen (HLA), also known as major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which is located on chromosome 6p21.3. HLA-DQ8/DR4 and DQ2/DR3 are positively associated with IDDM and DQ6 is negatively associated with IDDM in most Caucasian populations. The MICA gene is located in the MHC class I region and is expressed by monocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. Sequence determination of the MICA gene identifies 5 alleles with 4, 5, 6, and 9 repetitions of GCT or 5 repetitions of GCT with 1 additional insertion (GGCT), and the alleles are referred to as A4, A5, A5.1, A6, and A9. Analysis of allele distribution among 93 Latvian IDDM patients and 108 healthy controls showed that allele A5 of MICA is significantly increased in IDDM patients [33/93 (35%)] compared to healthy controls [22/108 (20%)] (OR = 2.15; P = 0.016). In conclusion, we believe that MICA may play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of IDDM.

  3. Mutant Alleles of lptD Increase the Permeability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Define Determinants of Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria provide a particular challenge to antibacterial drug discovery due to their cell envelope structure. Compound entry is impeded by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer membrane (OM), and those molecules that overcome this barrier are often expelled by multidrug efflux pumps. Understanding how efflux and permeability affect the ability of a compound to reach its target is paramount to translating in vitro biochemical potency to cellular bioactivity. Herein, a suite of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were constructed in either a wild-type or efflux-null background in which mutations were engineered in LptD, the final protein involved in LPS transport to the OM. These mutants were demonstrated to be defective in LPS transport, resulting in compromised barrier function. Using isogenic strain sets harboring these newly created alleles, we were able to define the contributions of permeability and efflux to the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to a variety of antibiotics. These strains will be useful in the design and optimization of future antibiotics against Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26596941

  4. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  5. Fit to play: the fitness effect on physically challenging flute repertoire.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Jennifer A

    2011-03-01

    This case study was done to determine whether physical fitness plays a part in performing flute repertoire. Most repertoire allows performers the choice of where to breathe. However, there exists a "brute" repertoire where breathing is prescribed by the composer, which poses physical challenges for performers. The author contrasted pieces from traditional repertoire with Heinz Holliger's (t)air(e), which requires passages of breath-holding and measured inhalations. The author was tested for cardiovascular fitness (VO2max) and corresponded these levels to pulse rates while playing at baseline and 6 months after undertaking a physical fitness program. After the exercise program, expertise with standard repertoire combined with the unmeasured variables of resonance, openness of the chest and oral cavities, embouchure size, and air speed saw little improvement with increased fitness levels. However, when air regulation is out of the performer's control, the effect of cardiovascular training brought the "brute" repertoire into the same range of difficulty as the standard repertoire.

  6. Addition of the immunostimulatory oligonucleotide IMT504 to a seasonal flu vaccine increases hemagglutinin antibody titers in young adult and elder rats, and expands the anti-hemagglutinin antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Montaner, Alejandro Daniel; Denichilo, Analía; Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Fló, Juan; López, Ricardo Agustin; Pontoriero, Andrea; Savy, Vilma; Baumeister, Elsa; Frank, Ronald; Zorzopulos, Jorge; Elías, Fernanda

    2011-08-01

    Flu vaccines are partially protective in infants and elder people. New adjuvants such as immunostimulatory oligonucleotides (ODNs) are strong candidates to solve this problem, because a combination with several antigens has demonstrated effectiveness. Here, we report that IMT504, the prototype of a major class of immunostimulatory ODNs, is a potent adjuvant of the influenza vaccine in young adult and elderly rats. Flu vaccines that use virosomes or whole viral particles as antigens were combined with IMT504 and injected in rats. Young adult and elderly animals vaccinated with IMT504-adjuvated preparations reached antibody titers 20-fold and 15-fold higher than controls, respectively. Antibody titers remained high throughout a 120 day-period. Animals injected with the IMT504-adjuvated vaccine showed expansion of the anti-hemagglutinin antibody repertoire and a significant increase in the antibody titer with hemagglutination inhibition capacity when confronted to viral strains included or not in the vaccine. This indicates that the addition of IMT504 in flu vaccines may contribute to the development of significant cross-protective immune response against shifted or drifted flu strains. PMID:21793787

  7. Addition of the immunostimulatory oligonucleotide IMT504 to a seasonal flu vaccine increases hemagglutinin antibody titers in young adult and elder rats, and expands the anti-hemagglutinin antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Montaner, Alejandro Daniel; Denichilo, Analía; Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Fló, Juan; López, Ricardo Agustin; Pontoriero, Andrea; Savy, Vilma; Baumeister, Elsa; Frank, Ronald; Zorzopulos, Jorge; Elías, Fernanda

    2011-08-01

    Flu vaccines are partially protective in infants and elder people. New adjuvants such as immunostimulatory oligonucleotides (ODNs) are strong candidates to solve this problem, because a combination with several antigens has demonstrated effectiveness. Here, we report that IMT504, the prototype of a major class of immunostimulatory ODNs, is a potent adjuvant of the influenza vaccine in young adult and elderly rats. Flu vaccines that use virosomes or whole viral particles as antigens were combined with IMT504 and injected in rats. Young adult and elderly animals vaccinated with IMT504-adjuvated preparations reached antibody titers 20-fold and 15-fold higher than controls, respectively. Antibody titers remained high throughout a 120 day-period. Animals injected with the IMT504-adjuvated vaccine showed expansion of the anti-hemagglutinin antibody repertoire and a significant increase in the antibody titer with hemagglutination inhibition capacity when confronted to viral strains included or not in the vaccine. This indicates that the addition of IMT504 in flu vaccines may contribute to the development of significant cross-protective immune response against shifted or drifted flu strains.

  8. Control of grain protein contents through SEMIDWARF1 mutant alleles: sd1 increases the grain protein content in Dee-geo-woo-gen but not in Reimei.

    PubMed

    Terao, Tomio; Hirose, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A new possibility for genetic control of the protein content of rice grains was suggested by the allele differences of the SEMIDWARF1 (SD1) mutation. Two quantitative trait loci-qPROT1 and qPROT12-were found on chromosomes 1 and 12, respectively, using backcrossed inbred lines of Sasanishiki/Habataki//Sasanishiki///Sasanishiki. One of them, qPROT1, increased almost all grain proteins instead of only certain proteins in the recessive Habataki allele. Fine mapping of qPROT1 revealed that two gene candidates-Os01g0883800 and Os01g0883900-were included in this region. Os01g0883800 encoded Gibberellin 20 oxidase 2 as well as SD1, the dwarf gene used in the so-called 'Green Revolution'. Mutant analyses as well as sequencing analysis using the semi-dwarf mutant cultivars Dee-geo-woo-gen and Calrose 76 revealed that the sd1 mutant showed significantly higher grain protein contents than their corresponding wild-type cultivars, strongly suggesting that the high protein contents were caused by sd1 mutation. However, the sd1 mutant Reimei did not have high grain protein contents. It is possible to control the grain protein content and column length separately by selecting for sd1 alleles. From this finding, the genetic control of grain protein content, as well as the column length of rice cultivars, might be possible. This ability might be useful to improve rice nutrition, particularly in areas where the introduction of semi-dwarf cultivars is not advanced.

  9. VH replacement in primary immunoglobulin repertoire diversification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Amy; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Coffre, Maryaline; Hewitt, Susannah L; Jensen, Kari; Skok, Jane A; Rajewsky, Klaus; Koralov, Sergei B

    2015-02-01

    The genes encoding the variable (V) region of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) are assembled from V, D (diversity), and J (joining) elements through a RAG-mediated recombination process that relies on the recognition of recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking the individual elements. Secondary V(D)J rearrangement modifies the original Ig rearrangement if a nonproductive original joint is formed, as a response to inappropriate signaling from a self-reactive BCR, or as part of a stochastic mechanism to further diversify the Ig repertoire. VH replacement represents a RAG-mediated secondary rearrangement in which an upstream VH element recombines with a rearranged VHDHJH joint to generate a new BCR specificity. The rearrangement occurs between the cryptic RSS of the original VH element and the conventional RSS of the invading VH gene, leaving behind a footprint of up to five base pairs (bps) of the original VH gene that is often further obscured by exonuclease activity and N-nucleotide addition. We have previously demonstrated that VH replacement can efficiently rescue the development of B cells that have acquired two nonproductive heavy chain (IgH) rearrangements. Here we describe a novel knock-in mouse model in which the prerearranged IgH locus resembles an endogenously rearranged productive VHDHJH allele. Using this mouse model, we characterized the role of VH replacement in the diversification of the primary Ig repertoire through the modification of productive VHDHJH rearrangements. Our results indicate that VH replacement occurs before Ig light chain rearrangement and thus is not involved in the editing of self-reactive antibodies.

  10. Rare allele of OsPPKL1 associated with grain length causes extra-large grain and a significant yield increase in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Jianfei; Huang, Ji; Lan, Hongxia; Wang, Cailin; Yin, Congfei; Wu, Yunyu; Tang, Haijuan; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Grain size and shape are important components determining rice grain yield, and they are controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Here, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a major grain length QTL, qGL3, which encodes a putative protein phosphatase with Kelch-like repeat domain (OsPPKL1). We found a rare allele qgl3 that leads to a long grain phenotype by an aspartate-to-glutamate transition in a conserved AVLDT motif of the second Kelch domain in OsPPKL1. The rice genome has other two OsPPKL1 homologs, OsPPKL2 and OsPPKL3. Transgenic studies showed that OsPPKL1 and OsPPKL3 function as negative regulators of grain length, whereas OsPPKL2 as a positive regulator. The Kelch domains are essential for the OsPPKL1 biological function. Field trials showed that the application of the qgl3 allele could significantly increase grain yield in both inbred and hybrid rice varieties, due to its favorable effect on grain length, filling, and weight. PMID:23236132

  11. Preschoolers' Prosocial Repertoires: Parents' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergin, Christi A. C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two studies had parents describe the characteristics of the most prosocial two- and five-year olds they knew and rate the relative importance of each attribute in defining a child as prosocial. Results indicated more similarities than differences between the two age groups and suggested that research has underrepresented the rich repertoire of…

  12. MTMR3 risk allele enhances innate receptor-induced signaling and cytokines by decreasing autophagy and increasing caspase-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Amit; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2015-08-18

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by dysregulated host:microbial interactions and cytokine production. Host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical in regulating these interactions. Multiple genetic loci are associated with IBD, but altered functions for most, including in the rs713875 MTMR3/HORMAD2/LIF/OSM region, are unknown. We identified a previously undefined role for myotubularin-related protein 3 (MTMR3) in amplifying PRR-induced cytokine secretion in human macrophages and defined MTMR3-initiated mechanisms contributing to this amplification. MTMR3 decreased PRR-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and autophagy levels, thereby increasing PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, autocrine IL-1β secretion, NFκB signaling, and, ultimately, overall cytokine secretion. This MTMR3-mediated regulation required the N-terminal pleckstrin homology-GRAM domain and Cys413 within the phosphatase domain of MTMR3. In MTMR3-deficient macrophages, reducing the enhanced autophagy or restoring NFκB signaling rescued PRR-induced cytokines. Macrophages from rs713875 CC IBD risk carriers demonstrated increased MTMR3 expression and, in turn, decreased PRR-induced PtdIns3P and autophagy and increased PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, signaling, and cytokine secretion. Thus, the rs713875 IBD risk polymorphism increases MTMR3 expression, which modulates PRR-induced outcomes, ultimately leading to enhanced PRR-induced cytokines.

  13. MTMR3 risk allele enhances innate receptor-induced signaling and cytokines by decreasing autophagy and increasing caspase-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Amit; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by dysregulated host:microbial interactions and cytokine production. Host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical in regulating these interactions. Multiple genetic loci are associated with IBD, but altered functions for most, including in the rs713875 MTMR3/HORMAD2/LIF/OSM region, are unknown. We identified a previously undefined role for myotubularin-related protein 3 (MTMR3) in amplifying PRR-induced cytokine secretion in human macrophages and defined MTMR3-initiated mechanisms contributing to this amplification. MTMR3 decreased PRR-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and autophagy levels, thereby increasing PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, autocrine IL-1β secretion, NFκB signaling, and, ultimately, overall cytokine secretion. This MTMR3-mediated regulation required the N-terminal pleckstrin homology-GRAM domain and Cys413 within the phosphatase domain of MTMR3. In MTMR3-deficient macrophages, reducing the enhanced autophagy or restoring NFκB signaling rescued PRR-induced cytokines. Macrophages from rs713875 CC IBD risk carriers demonstrated increased MTMR3 expression and, in turn, decreased PRR-induced PtdIns3P and autophagy and increased PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, signaling, and cytokine secretion. Thus, the rs713875 IBD risk polymorphism increases MTMR3 expression, which modulates PRR-induced outcomes, ultimately leading to enhanced PRR-induced cytokines. PMID:26240347

  14. Allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, S.E.; Fearon, E.R.; Tersmette, K.W.F.; Enterline, J.P.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Yusuke; White, R. )

    1989-06-02

    Clinical and pathological associations with molecular genetic alterations were studied in colorectal carcinomas from 83 patients. Fractional allelic loss, a measure of allelic deletions throughout the genome, and allelic deletions of specific chromosomal arms (the short arm of 17 and long arm of 18) each provided independent prognostic information by multivariate analysis when considered individually with Dukes' classification. Distant metastasis was significantly associated with high fractional allelic loss and with deletions of 17p and 18q. Mutations of ras proto-oncogenes and deletions of 5q had no prognostic importance. Statistically significant associations were also found between allelic losses and a family history of cancer, left-sided tumor location, and absence of extracellular tumor mucin. Allelic deletion analysis thus identified subsets of colorectal carcinoma with increased predilection for distant metastasis and cancer-related death. Further studies may define a subset of genetic alterations that can be used clinically to help assess prognosis.

  15. The molecular evolution of the vertebrate behavioural repertoire

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    How the sophisticated vertebrate behavioural repertoire evolved remains a major question in biology. The behavioural repertoire encompasses the set of individual behavioural components that an organism uses when adapting and responding to changes in its external world. Although unicellular organisms, invertebrates and vertebrates share simple reflex responses, the fundamental mechanisms that resulted in the complexity and sophistication that is characteristic of vertebrate behaviours have only recently been examined. A series of behavioural genetic experiments in mice and humans support a theory that posited the importance of synapse proteome expansion in generating complexity in the behavioural repertoire. Genome duplication events, approximately 550 Ma, produced expansion in the synapse proteome that resulted in increased complexity in synapse signalling mechanisms that regulate components of the behavioural repertoire. The experiments demonstrate the importance to behaviour of the gene duplication events, the diversification of paralogues and sequence constraint. They also confirm the significance of comparative proteomic and genomic studies that identified the molecular origins of synapses in unicellular eukaryotes and the vertebrate expansion in proteome complexity. These molecular mechanisms have general importance for understanding the repertoire of behaviours in different species and for human behavioural disorders arising from synapse gene mutations. PMID:26598730

  16. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation.

  17. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiago L.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  18. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  19. Assigning and visualizing germline genes in antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    Frost, Simon D W; Murrell, Ben; Hossain, A S Md Mukarram; Silverman, Gregg J; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the germline genes involved in immunoglobulin rearrangements is an essential first step in the analysis of antibody repertoires. Based on our prior work in analysing diverse recombinant viruses, we present IgSCUEAL (Immunoglobulin Subtype Classification Using Evolutionary ALgorithms), a phylogenetic approach to assign V and J regions of immunoglobulin sequences to their corresponding germline alleles, with D regions assigned using a simple pairwise alignment algorithm. We also develop an interactive web application for viewing the results, allowing the user to explore the frequency distribution of sequence assignments and CDR3 region length statistics, which is useful for summarizing repertoires, as well as a detailed viewer of rearrangements and region alignments for individual query sequences. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of our method compared with sequence similarity-based approaches and other non-phylogenetic model-based approaches, using both simulated data and a set of evaluation datasets of human immunoglobulin heavy chain sequences. IgSCUEAL demonstrates the highest accuracy of V and J assignment amongst existing approaches, even when the reassorted sequence is highly mutated, and can successfully cluster sequences on the basis of shared V/J germline alleles.

  20. Using Lag Schedules to Strengthen the Intraverbal Repertoires of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Bethany P.; Betz, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the utility of using lag schedules of reinforcement to increase response variability of children with autism. However, little research has evaluated whether the lag schedule promotes variability from within an already-established repertoire or expands the current repertoire by promoting the use of new responses…

  1. Increased frequency of co-existing JAK2 exon-12 or MPL exon-10 mutations in patients with low JAK2(V617F) allelic burden.

    PubMed

    Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Pham, Ha T; Perkins, Sherrie L; Prchal, Josef T; Agarwal, Archana M; Salama, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of co-existing JAK2(V617F)/MPL and JAK2(V617F)/JAK2 exon-12 mutations has not been previously investigated in MPNs. Poor survival was reported in primary myelofibrosis with low JAK2(V617F) allelic burden. However, mutational status of JAK2 exon-12 or MPL were not reported in these patients. This study developed a cost-effective multiplex high resolution melt assay that screens for mutations in JAK2 gene exons-12 and -14 ((V617F)) and MPL gene exon-10. Co-existing mutations with JAK2(V617F) were detected in 2.9% (6/208; two JAK2 exon-12 and four MPL exon-10) patient specimens with known JAK2(V617F) (allelic-burden range: 0.1-96.8%). Co-existing mutations were detected in specimens with < 12% JAK2(V617F) allelic burden. Current WHO guidelines do not recommend further testing once JAK2(V617F) mutation is detected in MPNs. The findings, however, indicate that quantification of JAK2(V617F) allele burden may be clinically relevant in MPNs and in those with low allelic burden additional testing for JAK2 exon-12 and MPL exon-10 mutation should be pursued.

  2. Increased Risk of Psoriasis due to combined effect of HLA-Cw6 and LCE3 risk alleles in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Aditi; Lahiri, Anirudhya; Senapati, Swapan; Basu, Baidehi; Ghosh, Saurabh; Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Behra, Akhilesh; Sarkar, Somenath; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Chatterjee, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    HLA-Cw6 is one of the most associated alleles in psoriasis. Recently, Late Cornified Envelop 3 (LCE3) genes were identified as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis. Some population showed epistatic interaction of LCE3 risk variants with HLA-Cw6, while some population failed to show any association. We determined the associations of a 32.2 kb deletion comprising LCE3C-3B genes and three SNPs (rs1886734, rs4112788; rs7516108) at the LCE3 gene cluster among the psoriasis patients in India. All three SNPs at the LCE3 gene cluster failed to show any association. In contrary, for patients with HLA-Cw6 allele, all three SNPs and the LCE3C-3B deletion showed significant associations. While, all five LCE3 genes were upregulated in psoriatic skin, only LCE3A showed significant overexpression with homozygous risk genotype compared to the non-risk genotype. LCE3B also showed significant overexpression in patients with HLA-Cw6 allele. Moreover, LCE3A showed significantly higher expression in patients bearing homozygous risk genotype in presence of HLA-Cw6 allele but not in those having non-risk genotype, demonstrating the combined effect of HLA-Cw6 allele and risk associated genotype near LCE3A gene. Integration of genetic and gene expression data thus allowed us to identify the actual disease variants at the LCE3 cluster among the psoriasis patients in India. PMID:27048876

  3. Quantitative resistance affects the speed of frequency increase but not the diversity of the virulence alleles overcoming a major resistance gene to Leptosphaeria maculans in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Delourme, R; Bousset, L; Ermel, M; Duffé, P; Besnard, A L; Marquer, B; Fudal, I; Linglin, J; Chadœuf, J; Brun, H

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative resistance mediated by multiple genetic factors has been shown to increase the potential for durability of major resistance genes. This was demonstrated in the Leptosphaeria maculans/Brassica napus pathosystem in a 5year recurrent selection field experiment on lines harboring the qualitative resistance gene Rlm6 combined or not with quantitative resistance. The quantitative resistance limited the size of the virulent isolate population. In this study we continued this recurrent selection experiment in the same way to examine whether the pathogen population could adapt and render the major gene ineffective in the longer term. The cultivars Eurol, with a susceptible background, and Darmor, with quantitative resistance, were used. We confirmed that the combination of qualitative and quantitative resistance is an effective approach for controlling the pathogen epidemics over time. This combination did not prevent isolates virulent against the major gene from amplifying in the long term but the quantitative resistance significantly delayed for 5years the loss of effectiveness of the qualitative resistance and disease severity was maintained at a low level on the genotype with both types of resistance after the fungus population had adapted to the major gene. We also showed that diversity of AvrLm6 virulence alleles was comparable in isolates recovered after the recurrent selection on lines carrying either the major gene alone or in combination with quantitative resistance: a single repeat-induced point mutation and deletion events were observed in both situations. Breeding varieties which combine qualitative and quantitative resistance can effectively contribute to disease control by increasing the potential for durability of major resistance genes.

  4. A Review of Training Intraverbal Repertoires: Can Precision Teaching Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cihon, Traci M.

    2007-01-01

    Intraverbal behavior is common in conversation and academic and professional settings. Many individuals with disabilities fail to acquire intraverbal repertoires. Some individuals who do acquire intraverbal behavior fail to acquire responses that are functional and complete. Research has examined procedures to establish or increase intraverbal…

  5. Trans-ethnic fine-mapping of lipid loci identifies population-specific signals and allelic heterogeneity that increases the trait variance explained.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Waite, Lindsay L; Jackson, Anne U; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Buyske, Steven; Absher, Devin; Arnett, Donna K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Carty, Cara L; Cheng, Iona; Cochran, Barbara; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Dumitrescu, Logan; Eaton, Charles B; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Henderson, Brian E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Kim, Eric; Kinnunen, Leena; Komulainen, Pirjo; Lee, Wen-Jane; Le Marchand, Loic; Lin, Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Lingaas-Holmen, Oddgeir; Mitchell, Sabrina L; Narisu, Narisu; Robinson, Jennifer G; Schumacher, Fred; Stančáková, Alena; Sundvall, Jouko; Sung, Yun-Ju; Swift, Amy J; Wang, Wen-Chang; Wilkens, Lynne; Wilsgaard, Tom; Young, Alicia M; Adair, Linda S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Bůžková, Petra; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Francis S; Duggan, David; Feranil, Alan B; Ho, Low-Tone; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Juang, Jyh-Ming J; Kesäniemi, Antero Y; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, I-Te; Leppert, Mark F; Matise, Tara C; Moilanen, Leena; Njølstad, Inger; Peters, Ulrike; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rotter, Jerome I; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Boehnke, Michael; Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Yii-Der I; Kooperberg, Charles; Assimes, Themistocles L; Crawford, Dana C; Hsiung, Chao A; North, Kari E; Mohlke, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ~100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, in individuals of African American (n = 6,832), East Asian (n = 9,449), and European (n = 10,829) ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1 × 10(-4) in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies. PMID:23555291

  6. Praxis and Poiesis in Piano Repertoire Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dos Santos, Regina Antunes Teixeira; Hentschke, Liane

    2011-01-01

    The piano repertoire preparation of three undergraduate students at three different academic levels--the first, fifth and eighth semesters--was followed during an academic semester. A phenomenological approach was used to collect data in three stages: an introductory interview, observations of the repertoire under preparation and a final…

  7. Chromosome substitution lines (CS-B) revealed the presence of cryptic beneficial alleles in G. barbadense with potential to increase lint and seedcotton yield in Upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most promising opportunities to improve the genetic diversity of Upland cotton is from interspecific germplasm introgression from the other tetraploid species. The untapped potential of the beneficial alleles of the wild unadapted species has not been well utilized because of the paucit...

  8. Lineage Structure of the Human Antibody Repertoire in Response to Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; He, Jiankui; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; Sasaki, Sanae; He, Xiao-Song; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Zheng, Nai-ying; Huang, Min; Sullivan, Meghan; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Davis, Mark M.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The human antibody repertoire is one of the most important defenses against infectious disease, and the development of vaccines has enabled the conferral of targeted protection to specific pathogens. However, there are many challenges to measuring and analyzing the immunoglobulin sequence repertoire, such as the fact that each B cell contains a distinct antibody sequence encoded in its genome, that the antibody repertoire is not constant but changes over time, and the high similarity between antibody sequences. We have addressed this challenge by using high-throughput long read sequencing to perform immunogenomic characterization of expressed human antibody repertoires in the context of influenza vaccination. Informatic analysis of 5 million antibody heavy chain sequences from healthy individuals allowed us to perform global characterizations of isotype distributions, determine the lineage structure of the repertoire and measure age and antigen related mutational activity. Our analysis of the clonal structure and mutational distribution of individuals’ repertoires shows that elderly subjects have a decreased number of lineages but an increased pre-vaccination mutation load in their repertoire and that some of these subjects have an oligoclonal character to their repertoire in which the diversity of the lineages is greatly reduced relative to younger subjects. We have thus shown that global analysis of the immune system’s clonal structure provides direct insight into the effects of vaccination and provides a detailed molecular portrait of age-related effects. PMID:23390249

  9. CYP2D6*4 Allele Polymorphism Increases the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: Evidence from Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyuan; Xie, Yantong; Peng, Qiliu; He, Yu; Deng, Yan; Wang, Jian; Xie, Li; Zeng, Jie; Li, Shan; Qin, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Background Many epidemiological studies have been conducted to explore the association between a single CYP2D6 gene polymorphism and Parkinson’s disease (PD) susceptibility. However, the results remain controversial. Objectives To clarify the effects of a single CYP2D6 gene polymorphism on the risk of PD, a meta-analysis of all available studies relating to CYP2D6*4 polymorphism and the risk of PD was conducted. Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) up to September 1, 2013 was conducted. Data were extracted by two independent authors and pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Meta-regression, Galbraith plots, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and publication bias analysis were also performed. Results Twenty-two separate comparisons consisting of 2,629 patients and 3,601 controls were included in our meta-analysis. The pooled analyses showed a significant association between CYP2D6*4G/A polymorphism and PD risk in all of the comparisons (A vs. G allele: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.14–1.43, P = 0.001; AA vs. GG: OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.06–1.93, P = 0.018; AG vs. GG: OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.06–1.40, P = 0.006; AG+AA vs. GG: OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.10–1.44, P = 0.001; AA vs. AG+GG: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.02–1.83, P = 0.036). In subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, significant associations were also demonstrated in Caucasians but not in Asians. No significant association was found in subgroup analysis stratified by age of onset or disease form. Conclusions We concluded that the CYP2D6*4G/A polymorphism denotes an increased genetic susceptibility to PD in the overall population, especially in Caucasians. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm this association. PMID:24376807

  10. The Minor Allele of rs7574865 in the STAT4 Gene Is Associated with Increased mRNA and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lamana, Amalia; López-Santalla, Mercedes; Castillo-González, Raquel; Ortiz, Ana María; Martín, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 confers risk of developing autoimmune disorders. However, its functional significance remains unclear. Here we analyze how rs7574865 affects the transcription of STAT4 and its protein expression. Methods We studied 201 patients (80% female; median age, 54 years; median disease duration, 5.4 months) from PEARL study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected at each visit. IL-6 serum levels were measured by enzyme immune assay. The rs7574865 was genotyped using TaqMan probes. The expression levels of STAT4 mRNA were determined at 182 visits from 69 patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. STAT4 protein was assessed by western blot in 62 samples from 34 patients. To determine the effect of different variables on the expression of STAT4 mRNA and protein, we performed multivariate longitudinal analyses using generalized linear models. Results After adjustment for age, disease activity and glucocorticoid dose as confounders, the presence of at least one copy of the T allele of rs7574865 was significantly associated with higher levels of STAT4 mRNA. Similarly, TT patients showed significantly higher levels of STAT4 protein than GG patients. IL-6 induced STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients carrying at least one T allele of rs7574865 displayed lower levels of serum IL-6 compared to GG homozygous; by contrast the production of C-reactive protein was similar in both populations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the presence of the rs7574865 T allele enhances STAT4 mRNA transcription and protein expression. It may enhance the signaling of molecules depending on the STAT4 pathway. PMID:26569609

  11. Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Marcelo A. Fernandez; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Maiers, Martin; Klitz, William; Cano, Pedro; Mack, Steven; Single, Richard; Brautbar, Chaim; Israel, Shosahna; Raimondi, Eduardo; Khoriaty, Evelyne; Inati, Adlette; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Thomson, Glenys; Stastny, Peter; Cao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system shows extensive variation in the number and function of loci and the number of alleles present at any one locus. Allele distribution has been analysed in many populations through the course of several decades, and the implementation of molecular typing has significantly increased the level of diversity revealing that many serotypes have multiple functional variants. While the degree of diversity in many populations is equivalent and may result from functional polymorphism(s) in peptide presentation, homogeneous and heterogeneous populations present contrasting numbers of alleles and lineages at the loci with high-density expression products. In spite of these differences, the homozygosity levels are comparable in almost all of them. The balanced distribution of HLA alleles is consistent with overdominant selection. The genetic distances between outbred populations correlate with their geographical locations; the formal genetic distance measurements are larger than expected between inbred populations in the same region. The latter present many unique alleles grouped in a few lineages consistent with limited founder polymorphism in which any novel allele may have been positively selected to enlarge the communal peptide-binding repertoire of a given population. On the other hand, it has been observed that some alleles are found in multiple populations with distinctive haplotypic associations suggesting that convergent evolution events may have taken place as well. It appears that the HLA system has been under strong selection, probably owing to its fundamental role in varying immune responses. Therefore, allelic diversity in HLA should be analysed in conjunction with other genetic markers to accurately track the migrations of modern humans. PMID:22312049

  12. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  13. Consistent responses of human mothers to prelinguistic infants: the effect of prelinguistic repertoire size.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, M H; West, M J

    1999-03-01

    The salience of infants' vocal and visual cues was examined to evaluate the efficacy of prelinguistic vocalizations to guide adult behavior. A videotape, constructed of brief behavioral episodes from 3 infants with different-sized vocal repertoires, was played to 40 mothers of prelinguistic infants. Playback mothers' responses to the episodes were consistent, demonstrating that preverbal behavior elicits comparable reactions across unfamiliar receivers. The audio and video components of the infants' episodes were then recombined. As the vocal repertoire of the stimulus infants increased, changes in the audio component more often led playback mothers to change responses. Thus, playback mothers used vocalizations as cues as the infants' vocal repertoires became larger.

  14. Fit to play: the fitness effect on physically challenging flute repertoire.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Jennifer A

    2011-03-01

    This case study was done to determine whether physical fitness plays a part in performing flute repertoire. Most repertoire allows performers the choice of where to breathe. However, there exists a "brute" repertoire where breathing is prescribed by the composer, which poses physical challenges for performers. The author contrasted pieces from traditional repertoire with Heinz Holliger's (t)air(e), which requires passages of breath-holding and measured inhalations. The author was tested for cardiovascular fitness (VO2max) and corresponded these levels to pulse rates while playing at baseline and 6 months after undertaking a physical fitness program. After the exercise program, expertise with standard repertoire combined with the unmeasured variables of resonance, openness of the chest and oral cavities, embouchure size, and air speed saw little improvement with increased fitness levels. However, when air regulation is out of the performer's control, the effect of cardiovascular training brought the "brute" repertoire into the same range of difficulty as the standard repertoire. PMID:21442138

  15. Origin and evolution of the T cell repertoire after posttransplantation cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Kanakry, Christopher G.; Coffey, David G.; Towlerton, Andrea M.H.; Vulic, Ante; Storer, Barry E.; Chou, Jeffrey; Robins, Harlan S.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Warren, Edus H.

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) effectively prevents graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but its immunologic impact is poorly understood. We assessed lymphocyte reconstitution via flow cytometry (n = 74) and antigen receptor sequencing (n = 35) in recipients of myeloablative, HLA-matched allogeneic BM transplantation using PTCy. Recovering T cells were primarily phenotypically effector memory with lower T cell receptor β (TRB) repertoire diversity than input donor repertoires. Recovering B cells were predominantly naive with immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IGH) repertoire diversity similar to donors. Numerical T cell reconstitution and TRB diversity were strongly associated with recipient cytomegalovirus seropositivity. Global similarity between input donor and recipient posttransplant repertoires was uniformly low at 1–2 months after transplant but increased over the balance of the first posttransplant year. Blood TRB repertoires at ≥3 months after transplant were often dominated by clones present in the donor blood/marrow memory CD8+ compartment. Limited overlap was observed between the TRB repertoires of T cells infiltrating the skin or gastrointestinal tract versus the blood. Although public TRB sequences associated with herpesvirus- or alloantigen-specific CD8+ T cells were detected in some patients, posttransplant TRB and IGH repertoires were unique to each individual. These data define the immune dynamics occurring after PTCy and establish a benchmark against which immune recovery after other transplantation approaches can be compared. PMID:27213183

  16. Ability to develop broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies is not restricted by the germline Ig gene repertoire.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, Cathrine; Shrestha, Ram K; Lambson, Bronwen E; Jackson, Katherine J L; Wright, Imogen A; Naicker, Dshanta; Goosen, Mark; Berrie, Leigh; Ismail, Arshad; Garrett, Nigel; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Moore, Penny L; Travers, Simon A; Morris, Lynn

    2015-05-01

    The human Ig repertoire is vast, producing billions of unique Abs from a limited number of germline Ig genes. The IgH V region (IGHV) is central to Ag binding and consists of 48 functional genes. In this study, we analyzed whether HIV-1-infected individuals who develop broadly neutralizing Abs show a distinctive germline IGHV profile. Using both 454 and Illumina technologies, we sequenced the IGHV repertoire of 28 HIV-infected South African women from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) 002 and 004 cohorts, 13 of whom developed broadly neutralizing Abs. Of the 259 IGHV alleles identified in this study, approximately half were not found in the International Immunogenetics Database (IMGT). This included 85 entirely novel alleles and 38 alleles that matched rearranged sequences in non-IMGT databases. Analysis of the rearranged H chain V region genes of mAbs isolated from seven of these women, as well as previously isolated broadly neutralizing Abs from other donors, provided evidence that at least eight novel or non-IMGT alleles contributed to functional Abs. Importantly, we found that, despite a wide range in the number of IGHV alleles in each individual, including alleles used by known broadly neutralizing Abs, there were no significant differences in germline IGHV repertoires between individuals who do and do not develop broadly neutralizing Abs. This study reports novel IGHV repertoires and highlights the importance of a fully comprehensive Ig database for germline gene usage prediction. Furthermore, these data suggest a lack of genetic bias in broadly neutralizing Ab development in HIV-1 infection, with positive implications for HIV vaccine design. PMID:25825450

  17. Ability to develop broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies is not restricted by the germline immunoglobulin gene repertoire1

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Cathrine; Shrestha, Ram K.; Lambson, Bronwen E.; Jackson, Katherine J. L.; Wright, Imogen A.; Naicker, Dshanta; Goosen, Mark; Berrie, Leigh; Ismail, Arshad; Garrett, Nigel; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Moore, Penny L.; Travers, Simon A.; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The human immunoglobulin repertoire is vast, producing billions of unique antibodies from a limited number of germline immunoglobulin genes. The immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) is central to antigen binding and is comprised of 48 functional genes. Here we analyzed whether HIV-1 infected individuals who develop broadly neutralizing antibodies show a distinctive germline IGHV profile. Using both 454 and Illumina technologies we sequenced the IGHV repertoire of 28 HIV-infected South African women from the Center for the AIDS Programme of Research in South African (CAPRISA) 002 and 004 cohorts, 13 of whom developed broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of the 259 IGHV alleles identified in this study, approximately half were not found in the International Immunogenetics Database (IMGT). This included 85 entirely novel alleles and 38 alleles that matched rearranged sequences in non-IMGT databases. Analysis of the rearranged H chain V region genes of monoclonal antibodies isolated from 7 of the CAPRISA women and previously isolated broadly neutralizing antibodies from other donors provided evidence that at least 8 novel or non-IMGT alleles contributed to functional antibodies. Importantly, we found that despite a wide range in the number of IGHV alleles in each individual, including alleles used by known broadly neutralizing antibodies, there were no significant differences in germline IGHV repertoires between individuals who do and do not develop broadly neutralizing antibodies. This study reports novel IGHV repertoires and highlights the importance of a fully comprehensive immunoglobulin database for germline gene usage prediction. Furthermore, these data suggest a lack of genetic bias in broadly neutralizing antibody development in HIV-1 infection, with implications for HIV vaccine design. PMID:25825450

  18. DNA Subtraction of In Vivo Selected Phage Repertoires for Efficient Peptide Pathology Biomarker Identification in Neuroinflammation Multiple Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Sanchez, Karina; Vekris, Antonios; Petry, Klaus G.

    2016-01-01

    To streamline in vivo biomarker discovery, we developed a suppression subtractive DNA hybridization technique adapted for phage-displayed combinatorial libraries of 12 amino acid peptides (PhiSSH). Physical DNA subtraction is performed in a one-tube-all-reactions format by sequential addition of reagents, producing the enrichment of specific clones of one repertoire. High-complexity phage repertoires produced by in vivo selections in the multiple sclerosis rat model (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE) and matched healthy control rats were used to evaluate the technique. The healthy repertoire served as a physical DNA subtractor from the EAE repertoire to produce the subtraction repertoire. Full next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the three repertoires was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the subtraction technique. More than 96% of the clones common to the EAE and healthy repertoires were absent from the subtraction repertoire, increasing the probability of randomly selecting various specific peptides for EAE pathology to about 70%. Histopathology experiments were performed to confirm the quality of the subtraction repertoire clones, producing distinct labeling of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) affected by inflammation among healthy nervous tissue or the preferential binding to IL1-challenged vs. resting human BBB model. Combining PhiSSH with NGS will be useful for controlled in vivo screening of small peptide combinatorial libraries to discover biomarkers of specific molecular alterations interspersed within healthy tissues. PMID:26917946

  19. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire. PMID:20573403

  20. Human gut microbiota: repertoire and variations.

    PubMed

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Million, Matthieu; Hugon, Perrine; Armougom, Fabrice; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The composition of human gut microbiota and their relationship with the host and, consequently, with human health and disease, presents several challenges to microbiologists. Originally dominated by culture-dependent methods for exploring this ecosystem, the advent of molecular tools has revolutionized our ability to investigate these relationships. However, many biases that have led to contradictory results have been identified. Microbial culturomics, a recent concept based on a use of several culture conditions with identification by MALDI-TOF followed by the genome sequencing of the new species cultured had allowed a complementarity with metagenomics. Culturomics allowed to isolate 31 new bacterial species, the largest human virus, the largest bacteria, and the largest Archaea from human. Moreover, some members of this ecosystem, such as Eukaryotes, giant viruses, Archaea, and Planctomycetes, have been neglected by the majority of studies. In addition, numerous factors, such as age, geographic provenance, dietary habits, antibiotics, or probiotics, can influence the composition of the microbiota. Finally, in addition to the countless biases associated with the study techniques, a considerable limitation to the interpretation of studies of human gut microbiota is associated with funding sources and transparency disclosures. In the future, studies independent of food industry funding and using complementary methods from a broad range of both culture-based and molecular tools will increase our knowledge of the repertoire of this complex ecosystem and host-microbiota mutualism.

  1. Human Gut Microbiota: Repertoire and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Million, Matthieu; Hugon, Perrine; Armougom, Fabrice; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The composition of human gut microbiota and their relationship with the host and, consequently, with human health and disease, presents several challenges to microbiologists. Originally dominated by culture-dependent methods for exploring this ecosystem, the advent of molecular tools has revolutionized our ability to investigate these relationships. However, many biases that have led to contradictory results have been identified. Microbial culturomics, a recent concept based on a use of several culture conditions with identification by MALDI-TOF followed by the genome sequencing of the new species cultured had allowed a complementarity with metagenomics. Culturomics allowed to isolate 31 new bacterial species, the largest human virus, the largest bacteria, and the largest Archaea from human. Moreover, some members of this ecosystem, such as Eukaryotes, giant viruses, Archaea, and Planctomycetes, have been neglected by the majority of studies. In addition, numerous factors, such as age, geographic provenance, dietary habits, antibiotics, or probiotics, can influence the composition of the microbiota. Finally, in addition to the countless biases associated with the study techniques, a considerable limitation to the interpretation of studies of human gut microbiota is associated with funding sources and transparency disclosures. In the future, studies independent of food industry funding and using complementary methods from a broad range of both culture-based and molecular tools will increase our knowledge of the repertoire of this complex ecosystem and host-microbiota mutualism. PMID:23130351

  2. Biased T-Cell Antigen Receptor Repertoire in Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roessner, Karen; Trivedi, Harsh; Gaur, Lakshmi; Howard, Diantha; Aversa, John; Cooper, Sheldon M.; Sigal, Leonard H.; Budd, Ralph C.

    1998-01-01

    A common concern with many autoimmune diseases of unknown etiology is the extent to which tissue T-lymphocyte infiltrates, versus a nonspecific infiltrate, reflect a response to the causative agent. Lyme arthritis can histologically resemble rheumatoid synovitis, particularly the prominent infiltration by T lymphocytes. This has raised speculation about whether Lyme synovitis represents an ongoing response to the causative spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, or rather a self-perpetuating autoimmune reaction. In an effort to answer this question, the present study examined the repertoire of infiltrating T cells in synovial fluid from nine Lyme arthritis patients, before and after stimulation with B. burgdorferi. Using a highly sensitive and consistent quantitative PCR technique, a comparison of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) β-chain variable (Vβ) repertoires of the peripheral blood and synovial fluid showed a statistically significant increase in expression of Vβ2 and Vβ6 in the latter. This is remarkably similar to our previous findings in studies of rheumatoid arthritis and to other reports on psoriatic skin lesions. However, stimulation of synovial fluid T cells with B. burgdorferi provoked active proliferation but not a statistically significant increase in expression of any TCR Vβ, including Vβ2 and Vβ6. Collectively, the findings suggest that the skewing of the TCR repertoire of fresh synovial fluid in Lyme arthritis may represent more a synovium-tropic or nonspecific inflammatory response, similar to that occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, rather than a specific Borrelia reaction. PMID:9488400

  3. Expansion of stochastic expression repertoire by tandem duplication in mouse Protocadherin-α cluster

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Abe, Manabu; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Uchimura, Arikuni; Sakimura, Kenji; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Yagi, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Tandem duplications are concentrated within the Pcdh cluster throughout vertebrate evolution and as copy number variations (CNVs) in human populations, but the effects of tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster remain elusive. To investigate the effects of tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster, here we generated and analyzed a new line of the Pcdh cluster mutant mice. In the mutant allele, a 218-kb region containing the Pcdh-α2 to Pcdh-αc2 variable exons with their promoters was duplicated and the individual duplicated Pcdh isoforms can be disctinguished. The individual duplicated Pcdh-α isoforms showed diverse expression level with stochastic expression manner, even though those have an identical promoter sequence. Interestingly, the 5′-located duplicated Pcdh-αc2, which is constitutively expressed in the wild-type brain, shifted to stochastic expression accompanied by increased DNA methylation. These results demonstrate that tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster expands the stochastic expression repertoire irrespective of sequence divergence. PMID:25179445

  4. Natural antibody repertoires: development and functional role in inhibiting allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Kearney, John F; Patel, Preeyam; Stefanov, Emily K; King, R Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the effects of microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire. Neonatal exposure to conserved bacterial carbohydrates and phospholipids permanently reprograms the natural antibody repertoire directed toward these antigens by clonal expansion, alterations in clonal dominance, and increased serum antibody levels. These epitopes are present not only in bacterial cell walls, but also in common environmental allergens. Neonatal immunization with bacterial polysaccharide vaccines results in attenuated allergic airway responses to fungi-, house dust mite-, and cockroach-associated allergens in mouse models. The similarities between mouse and human natural antibody repertoires suggest that reduced microbial exposure in children may have the opposite effect, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for the hygiene hypothesis. We propose that understanding the effects of childhood infections on the natural antibody repertoire and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated immunoregulation observed in allergy models will lead to the development of prevention/interventional strategies for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25622195

  5. Co-regulation of a large and rapidly evolving repertoire of odorant receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Kambere, Marijo B; Lane, Robert P

    2007-01-01

    The olfactory system meets niche- and species-specific demands by an accelerated evolution of its odorant receptor repertoires. In this review, we describe evolutionary processes that have shaped olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene families in vertebrate genomes. We emphasize three important periods in the evolution of the olfactory system evident by comparative genomics: the adaptation to land in amphibian ancestors, the decline of olfaction in primates, and the delineation of putative pheromone receptors concurrent with rodent speciation. The rapid evolution of odorant receptor genes, the sheer size of the repertoire, as well as their wide distribution in the genome, presents a developmental challenge: how are these ever-changing odorant receptor repertoires coordinated within the olfactory system? A central organizing principle in olfaction is the specialization of sensory neurons resulting from each sensory neuron expressing only ~one odorant receptor allele. In this review, we also discuss this mutually exclusive expression of odorant receptor genes. We have considered several models to account for co-regulation of odorant receptor repertoires, as well as discussed a new hypothesis that invokes important epigenetic properties of the system. PMID:17903278

  6. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  7. Effect of decreasing the affinity of the class II-associated invariant chain peptide on the MHC class II peptide repertoire in the presence or absence of H-2M.

    PubMed

    Honey, Karen; Forbush, Katherine; Jensen, Peter E; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2004-04-01

    The class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) region of the invariant chain (Ii) directly influences MHC class II presentation by occupying the MHC class II peptide-binding groove, thereby preventing premature loading of peptides. Different MHC class II alleles exhibit distinct affinities for CLIP, and a low affinity interaction has been associated with decreased dependence upon H-2M and increased susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that decreased CLIP affinity alters the MHC class II-bound peptide repertoire, thereby promoting autoimmunity. To examine the role of CLIP affinity in determining the MHC class II peptide repertoire, we generated transgenic mice expressing either wild-type human Ii or human Ii containing a CLIP region of low affinity for MHC class II. Our data indicate that although degradation intermediates of Ii containing a CLIP region with decreased affinity for MHC class II do not remain associated with I-A(b), this does not substantially alter the peptide repertoire bound by MHC class II or increase autoimmune susceptibility in the mice. This implies that the affinity of the CLIP:MHC class II interaction is not a strong contributory factor in determining the probability of developing autoimmunity. In contrast, in the absence of H-2M, MHC class II peptide repertoire diversity is enhanced by decreasing the affinity of CLIP for MHC class II, although MHC class II cell surface expression is reduced. Thus, we show clearly, in vivo, the critical chaperone function of H-2M, which preserves MHC class II molecules for high affinity peptide binding upon dissociation of Ii degradation intermediates. PMID:15034026

  8. Carriers of the Complex Allele HFE c.[187C>G;340+4T>C] Have Increased Risk of Iron Overload in São Miguel Island Population (Azores, Portugal)

    PubMed Central

    Bulhões, Sara; Brilhante, Maria José; Pereirinha, Tânia; Cabral, Rita; Rego, Ana Catarina; Fraga, Cristina; Miguel, António G.; Brasil, Gracinda; Macedo, Paula; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload is associated with acquired and genetic conditions, the most common being hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type-I, caused by HFE mutations. Here, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study of 41 patients from the São Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal), six belonging to a family with HH type-I pseudodominant inheritance, and 35 unrelated individuals fulfilling the biochemical criteria of iron overload compatible with HH type-I. For this purpose, we analyzed the most common HFE mutations– c.845G>A [p.Cys282Tyr], c.187C>G [p.His63Asp], and c.193A>T [p.Ser65Cys]. Results revealed that the family’s HH pseudodominant pattern is due to consanguineous marriage of HFE-c.845G>A carriers, and to marriage with a genetically unrelated spouse that is a -c.187G carrier. Regarding unrelated patients, six were homozygous for c.845A, and three were c.845A/c.187G compound heterozygous. We then performed sequencing of HFE exons 2, 4, 5 and their intron-flanking regions. No other mutations were observed, but we identified the -c.340+4C [IVS2+4C] splice variant in 26 (74.3%) patients. Functionally, the c.340+4C may generate alternative splicing by HFE exon 2 skipping and consequently, a protein missing the α1-domain essential for HFE/ transferrin receptor-1 interactions. Finally, we investigated HFE mutations configuration with iron overload by determining haplotypes and genotypic profiles. Results evidenced that carriers of HFE-c.187G allele also carry -c.340+4C, suggesting in-cis configuration. This data is corroborated by the association analysis where carriers of the complex allele HFE-c.[187C>G;340+4T>C] have an increased iron overload risk (RR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.40−2.94, p<0.001). Therefore, homozygous for this complex allele are at risk of having iron overload because they will produce two altered proteins—the p.63Asp [c.187G], and the protein lacking 88 amino acids encoded by exon 2. In summary, we provide evidence that the complex allele HFE-c.[187C

  9. Vocal repertoire of the social giant otter.

    PubMed

    Leuchtenberger, Caroline; Sousa-Lima, Renata; Duplaix, Nicole; Magnusson, William E; Mourão, Guilherme

    2014-11-01

    According to the "social intelligence hypothesis," species with complex social interactions have more sophisticated communication systems. Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) live in groups with complex social interactions. It is likely that the vocal communication of giant otters is more sophisticated than previous studies suggest. The objectives of the current study were to describe the airborne vocal repertoire of giant otters in the Pantanal area of Brazil, to analyze call types within different behavioral contexts, and to correlate vocal complexity with level of sociability of mustelids to verify whether or not the result supports the social intelligence hypothesis. The behavior of nine giant otters groups was observed. Vocalizations recorded were acoustically and statistically analyzed to describe the species' repertoire. The repertoire was comprised by 15 sound types emitted in different behavioral contexts. The main behavioral contexts of each sound type were significantly associated with the acoustic variable ordination of different sound types. A strong correlation between vocal complexity and sociability was found for different species, suggesting that the communication systems observed in the family mustelidae support the social intelligence hypothesis.

  10. Vocal repertoire of the social giant otter.

    PubMed

    Leuchtenberger, Caroline; Sousa-Lima, Renata; Duplaix, Nicole; Magnusson, William E; Mourão, Guilherme

    2014-11-01

    According to the "social intelligence hypothesis," species with complex social interactions have more sophisticated communication systems. Giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) live in groups with complex social interactions. It is likely that the vocal communication of giant otters is more sophisticated than previous studies suggest. The objectives of the current study were to describe the airborne vocal repertoire of giant otters in the Pantanal area of Brazil, to analyze call types within different behavioral contexts, and to correlate vocal complexity with level of sociability of mustelids to verify whether or not the result supports the social intelligence hypothesis. The behavior of nine giant otters groups was observed. Vocalizations recorded were acoustically and statistically analyzed to describe the species' repertoire. The repertoire was comprised by 15 sound types emitted in different behavioral contexts. The main behavioral contexts of each sound type were significantly associated with the acoustic variable ordination of different sound types. A strong correlation between vocal complexity and sociability was found for different species, suggesting that the communication systems observed in the family mustelidae support the social intelligence hypothesis. PMID:25373985

  11. IgRepertoireConstructor: a novel algorithm for antibody repertoire construction and immunoproteogenomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Safonova, Yana; Bonissone, Stefano; Kurpilyansky, Eugene; Starostina, Ekaterina; Lapidus, Alla; Stinson, Jeremy; DePalatis, Laura; Sandoval, Wendy; Lill, Jennie; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of concentrations of circulating antibodies in serum (antibody repertoire) is a fundamental, yet poorly studied, problem in immunoinformatics. The two current approaches to the analysis of antibody repertoires [next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS)] present difficult computational challenges since antibodies are not directly encoded in the germline but are extensively diversified by somatic recombination and hypermutations. Therefore, the protein database required for the interpretation of spectra from circulating antibodies is custom for each individual. Although such a database can be constructed via NGS, the reads generated by NGS are error-prone and even a single nucleotide error precludes identification of a peptide by the standard proteomics tools. Here, we present the IgRepertoireConstructor algorithm that performs error-correction of immunosequencing reads and uses mass spectra to validate the constructed antibody repertoires. Availability and implementation: IgRepertoireConstructor is open source and freely available as a C++ and Python program running on all Unix-compatible platforms. The source code is available from http://bioinf.spbau.ru/igtools. Contact: ppevzner@ucsd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072509

  12. The VH and CH immunoglobulin genes of swine: implications for repertoire development.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Sun, J; Kacskovics, I; Brown, W R; Navarro, P

    1996-11-01

    Swine have the largest number of IgG subclass genes of all species so far studied but have a single gene for IgA which occurs in two allelic forms that differ in hinge length. Swine also have constant region genes for C mu and C epsilon, but lack a gene homologous to that which encodes IgD in rodents and primates, despite the otherwise high degree of sequence similarity of all other swine CH genes with those of humans. Swine have < 20 VH genes, a single JH and perhaps a limited number of DH segments. Newborn piglets show preferential VH and DH usage and may use gene conversion as a mechanism for expanding their antibody repertoire. Despite the close similarity of their Ig gene sequences to humans, swine belong to the group of animals that includes rabbits, chickens and cattle when classified on the basis of B cell development. This group, unlike rodents and humans, have a single VH family, use hindgut follicles early in life (rather than bone marrow throughout life) to diversify their antibody repertoire and probably all use gene conversion. It is proposed that IgD may serve a function in repertoire development in rodents and humans which is unnecessary in the chicken-lagomorph-artiodactyl group. The diversity of immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin genes among species justifies the quest of veterinary immunologists to define the system for their species of interest rather than making extrapolations from mouse and human immune systems.

  13. Increasing the Endoplasmic Reticulum Pool of the F508del Allele of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Leads to Greater Folding Correction by Small Molecule Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chung, W. Joon; Goeckeler-Fried, Jennifer L.; Havasi, Viktoria; Chiang, Annette; Rowe, Steven M.; Plyler, Zackery E.; Hong, Jeong S.; Mazur, Marina; Piazza, Gary A.; Keeton, Adam B.; White, E. Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Weissman, Allan M.; Denny, R. Aldrin; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules that correct the folding defects and enhance surface localization of the F508del mutation in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) comprise an important therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, compounds that rescue the F508del mutant protein to wild type (WT) levels have not been identified. In this report, we consider obstacles to obtaining robust and therapeutically relevant levels of F508del CFTR. For example, markedly diminished steady state amounts of F508del CFTR compared to WT CFTR are present in recombinant bronchial epithelial cell lines, even when much higher levels of mutant transcript are present. In human primary airway cells, the paucity of Band B F508del is even more pronounced, although F508del and WT mRNA concentrations are comparable. Therefore, to augment levels of “repairable” F508del CFTR and identify small molecules that then correct this pool, we developed compound library screening protocols based on automated protein detection. First, cell-based imaging measurements were used to semi-quantitatively estimate distribution of F508del CFTR by high content analysis of two-dimensional images. We evaluated ~2,000 known bioactive compounds from the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository in a pilot screen and identified agents that increase the F508del protein pool. Second, we analyzed ~10,000 compounds representing diverse chemical scaffolds for effects on total CFTR expression using a multi-plate fluorescence protocol and describe compounds that promote F508del maturation. Together, our findings demonstrate proof of principle that agents identified in this fashion can augment the level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident “Band B” F508del CFTR suitable for pharmacologic correction. As further evidence in support of this strategy, PYR-41—a compound that inhibits the E1 ubiquitin activating enzyme—was shown to synergistically enhance F508del rescue by C

  14. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  15. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  16. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-01

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  17. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M.; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Olshen, Richard A.; Boyd, Scott D.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood is able to escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. While all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells, but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important read-out to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  18. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection.

  19. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  20. The diversity of the HLA-E-restricted peptide repertoire explains the immunological impact of the Arg107Gly mismatch.

    PubMed

    Celik, Alexander A; Kraemer, Thomas; Huyton, Trevor; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E molecules are potent inhibitors of NK cell-mediated killing. Low in polymorphisms, two alleles are widely expressed among diverse populations: HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03. Both alleles are distinguished by one SNP resulting in the substitution Arg107Gly. Both alleles present a limited set of peptides derived from class I leader sequences physiologically; however, HLA-E*01:01 presents non-canonical peptides in the absence of HLA class I molecules. To further assess the functional differences between both alleles, we analyzed the peptide repertoire of HLA-E*01:03 by applying soluble HLA technology followed by mass-spectrometric peptide sequencing. HLA-E*01:03 restricted peptides showed a length of 9-17 amino acids and differed in their biophysical properties, no overlap in the peptide repertoire of both allelic variants could be observed; however, both alleles shared marginal peptides from the same proteomic content. Artificial APCs expressing empty HLA-E*01:01 or E*01:03 molecules were generated and stabilized using cognate HLA class I-derived peptide ligands to analyze the impact of residue 107 within the HLA-E heavy chain on the NKG2/CD94 receptor engagement. Differences in peptide stabilization could be translated to the density and half-life time of peptide-HLA-E molecules on the cell surface that subsequently impacted NK cell inhibition as verified by cytotoxicity assays. Taken together, these data illustrate functional differences of HLA-E allelic variants induced by a single amino acid. Furthermore, the function of HLA-E in pathophysiologic situations when the HLA processing machinery is interrupted seems to be more emphasized than previously described, implying a crucial role for HLA-E in tumor or viral immune episodes.

  1. Hybridization leads to sensory repertoire expansion in a gynogenetic fish, the Amazon molly (poecilia formosa): a test of the hybrid-sensory expansion hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sandkam, Benjamin A; Joy, Jeffrey B; Watson, Corey T; Gonzalez-Bendiksen, Pablo; Gabor, Caitlin R; Breden, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Expansions in sensory systems usually require processes such as gene duplication and divergence, and thus evolve slowly. We evaluate a novel mechanism leading to rapid sensory repertoire expansion: hybrid-sensory expansion (HSE). HSE occurs when two species with differently tuned sensory systems form a hybrid, bringing together alleles from each of the parental species. In one generation, a sensory repertoire is created that is the sum of the variance between parental species. The Amazon molly presents a unique opportunity to test the HSE hypothesis in a "frozen" hybrid. We compared opsin sequences of the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, to those of the parental species. Both parental species are homozygous at the RH2-1 locus and each of the four long wavelength sensitive loci, while P. formosa possess two different alleles at these loci; one matching each parental allele. Gene expression analysis showed P. formosa use the expanded opsin repertoire that was the result of HSE. Additionally, behavioral tests revealed P. formosa respond to colored stimuli in a manner similar or intermediate to the parental species P. mexicana and P. latipinna. Together these results strongly support the HSE hypothesis. Hybrid-sensory repertoire expansion is likely important in other hybrid species and in other sensory systems.

  2. Structural analysis of substitution patterns in alleles of human immunoglobulin VH genes.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Tania; Vargas-Madrazo, Enrique

    2005-05-01

    The diversity in repertoires of antibodies (Abs) needed in response to the antigen challenge is produced by evolutionary and somatic processes. The mechanisms operating at a somatic level have been studied in great detail. In contrast, neither the mechanisms nor the strategies of diversification at an evolutionary level have yet been understood in similar detail. Particularly, the substitution patterns in alleles of immunoglobulin genes (Igs) have not been systematically studied. Furthermore, there is a scarcity of studies which link the analysis at a genetic level of the diversification of repertoires with the structural consequences at the protein level of the changes in DNA information. For the purpose of systematically characterizing the strategies of evolutionary diversification through sequence variation at alleles, in this work, we built a database for all the alleles of the IGHV locus in humans reported until now. Based on these data, we performed diverse analyses of substitution patterns and linked these results with studies at the protein level. We found that the sequence diversification in different alleles does not operate with equal intensity for all V genes. Our studies, both of the number of substitutions and of the type of amino acid change per sub-segment of the V-REGION evidenced differences in the selective pressure to which these regions are exposed. The implications of these results for understanding the evolutionary diversification strategies, as well as for the somatic generation of antibody repertoires are discussed.

  3. Analysis of B Cell Repertoire Dynamics Following Hepatitis B Vaccination in Humans, and Enrichment of Vaccine-specific Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Galson, Jacob D.; Trück, Johannes; Fowler, Anna; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A.; Münz, Márton; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Reinhard, Claudia; van der Most, Robbert; Pollard, Andrew J.; Lunter, Gerton; Kelly, Dominic F.

    2015-01-01

    Generating a diverse B cell immunoglobulin repertoire is essential for protection against infection. The repertoire in humans can now be comprehensively measured by high-throughput sequencing. Using hepatitis B vaccination as a model, we determined how the total immunoglobulin sequence repertoire changes following antigen exposure in humans, and compared this to sequences from vaccine-specific sorted cells. Clonal sequence expansions were seen 7 days after vaccination, which correlated with vaccine-specific plasma cell numbers. These expansions caused an increase in mutation, and a decrease in diversity and complementarity-determining region 3 sequence length in the repertoire. We also saw an increase in sequence convergence between participants 14 and 21 days after vaccination, coinciding with an increase of vaccine-specific memory cells. These features allowed development of a model for in silico enrichment of vaccine-specific sequences from the total repertoire. Identifying antigen-specific sequences from total repertoire data could aid our understanding B cell driven immunity, and be used for disease diagnostics and vaccine evaluation. PMID:26844287

  4. Experimentally Testing the Hypothesis of a Limited Amino Acid Repertoire in Primitive Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanuma, S.; Nakajima, Y.; Yokobori, S.; Yamagishi, A.

    2013-11-01

    It has been argued that a fewer amino acids were used in primitive proteins and later the repertoire increased up to 20. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we restricted the amino acid usage of a reconstructed, ancestral protein to reduced sets.

  5. Use of Cultural Styles or Repertoires of Experience to Guide Instruction: What Difference Does It Make?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccleave, Anne; Eghan, Felicia

    2010-01-01

    Educators are seeking to meet student needs in increasingly diverse university classrooms. Two contrasting ways of responding to cultural difference are planning instruction on the basis of cultural styles or repertoires of culturally-based experiences (Gutierrez & Rogoff, 2003). Use of learning styles to address individual differences in learning…

  6. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  7. Application of circular consensus sequencing and network analysis to characterize the bovine IgG repertoire

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vertebrate immune systems generate diverse repertoires of antibodies capable of mediating response to a variety of antigens. Next generation sequencing methods provide unique approaches to a number of immuno-based research areas including antibody discovery and engineering, disease surveillance, and host immune response to vaccines. In particular, single-molecule circular consensus sequencing permits the sequencing of antibody repertoires at previously unattainable depths of coverage and accuracy. We approached the bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire with the objective of characterizing diversity of expressed IgG transcripts. Here we present single-molecule real-time sequencing data of expressed IgG heavy-chain repertoires of four individual cattle. We describe the diversity observed within antigen binding regions and visualize this diversity using a network-based approach. Results We generated 49,945 high quality cDNA sequences, each spanning the entire IgG variable region from four Bos taurus calves. From these sequences we identified 49,521 antigen binding regions using the automated Paratome web server. Approximately 9% of all unique complementarity determining 2 (CDR2) sequences were of variable lengths. A bimodal distribution of unique CDR3 sequence lengths was observed, with common lengths of 5–6 and 21–25 amino acids. The average number of cysteine residues in CDR3s increased with CDR3 length and we observed that cysteine residues were centrally located in CDR3s. We identified 19 extremely long CDR3 sequences (up to 62 amino acids in length) within IgG transcripts. Network analyses revealed distinct patterns among the expressed IgG antigen binding repertoires of the examined individuals. Conclusions We utilized circular consensus sequencing technology to provide baseline data of the expressed bovine IgG repertoire that can be used for future studies important to livestock research. Somatic mutation resulting in base insertions and

  8. An Annotated Guide and Interactive Database for Solo Horn Repertoire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schouten, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Given the horn's lengthy history, it is not surprising that many scholars have examined the evolution of the instrument from the natural horn to the modern horn and its expansive repertoire. Numerous dissertations, theses, and treatises illuminate specific elements of the horn's solo repertoire; however, no scholar has produced a…

  9. Is female preference for male repertoires due to sensory bias?

    PubMed Central

    Collins, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    There are several possible explanations for the female preference for male repertoires in birds. These males are older, and have better territories; thus there are functional reasons for females to prefer these males. However, there is an alternative explanation; females may habituate less quickly to song repertoires than single songs. I tested whether females have a non-functional, sensory bias for male song repertoires, by testing female preference for a repertoire in zebra finches (Taenopygia guttata), a species in which males possess a single stereotyped song. Females chose between a male repertoire of four different phrases created from the song phrase of one individual and that of one of those phrases repeated four times (natural zebra finch song). Females were also given a choice between the above repertoire and a song made from the phrases of four related males ('family' stimulus). I tested female preference by training females to press a button for presentation of a song stimulus, and counting the number of button presses. Females preferred the song repertoire to a single phrase song, and did not differentiate between the repertoire and song phrases from four males. Evidence from the Estrildidae indicates that having a single song is the ancestral state for zebra finches, so the preference is not ancestral.

  10. The Lymph Self-Antigen Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cristina C.; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The lymphatic fluid originates from the interstitial fluid which bathes every parenchymal organ and reflects the “omic” composition of the tissue from which it originates in its physiological or pathological signature. Several recent proteomic analyses have mapped the proteome-degradome and peptidome of this immunologically relevant fluid pointing to the lymph as an important source of tissue-derived self-antigens. A vast array of lymph-circulating peptides have been mapped deriving from a variety of processing pathways including caspases, cathepsins, MMPs, ADAMs, kallikreins, calpains, and granzymes, among others. These self peptides can be directly loaded on circulatory dendritic cells and expand the self-antigenic repertoire available for central and peripheral tolerance. PMID:24379811

  11. A quantifiably complete repertoire of C. elegans locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Schwarz, Roland; Branicky, Robyn; Schafer, William

    2014-03-01

    Visible phenotypes have played a critical role in understanding the molecular basis of behaviour in model organisms. However, most current descriptions of behaviour are based on manually identified events or a limited set of quantitative parameters. Here we report an extension of the concept of behavioural motifs to exhaustively catalogue C. elegans locomotion and derive a repertoire that is quantifiably complete. A repertoire learned for spontaneous behaviour in wild-type worms can be used to fit data from mutants or worms in different environmental conditions and provides a sensitive measure of phenotypic similarity. Repertoire comparison can also be used to assess inter-individual variation and the compositionality of behaviour, that is, the extent to which behavioural adaptation involves the creation of novel repertoire elements or the reuse of existing elements in novel sequences. Repertoire derivation is general, so that given a representation of posture, our approach will apply to other organisms.

  12. Allele variants of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin are globally transmitted and associated with colonization factors.

    PubMed

    Joffré, Enrique; von Mentzer, Astrid; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Oezguen, Numan; Savidge, Tor; Dougan, Gordon; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally. PMID:25404692

  13. Evaluation of the Antigen-Experienced B-Cell Receptor Repertoire in Healthy Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    IJspeert, Hanna; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A.; van Zessen, David; Pico-Knijnenburg, Ingrid; Driessen, Gertjan J.; Stubbs, Andrew P.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen recognition via their B cell receptor (BR), B cells migrate to the germinal center where they undergo somatic hypermutation (SHM) to increase their affinity for the antigen, and class switch recombination (CSR) to change the effector function of the secreted antibodies. These steps are essential to create an antigen-experienced BR repertoire that efficiently protects the body against pathogens. At the same time, the BR repertoire should be selected to protect against responses to self-antigen or harmless antigens. Insights into the processes of SHM, selection, and CSR can be obtained by studying the antigen-experienced BR repertoire. Currently, a large reference data set of healthy children and adults, which ranges from neonates to the elderly, is not available. In this study, we analyzed the antigen-experienced repertoire of 38 healthy donors (HD), ranging from cord blood to 74 years old, by sequencing IGA and IGG transcripts using next generation sequencing. This resulted in a large, freely available reference data set containing 412,890 IGA and IGG transcripts. We used this data set to study mutation levels, SHM patterns, antigenic selection, and CSR from birth to elderly HD. Only small differences were observed in SHM patterns, while the mutation levels increase in early childhood and stabilize at 6 years of age at around 7%. Furthermore, comparison of the antigen-experienced repertoire with sequences from the naive immune repertoire showed that features associated with autoimmunity such as long CDR3 length and IGHV4-34 usage are reduced in the antigen-experienced repertoire. Moreover, IGA2 and IGG2 usage was increased in HD in higher age categories, while IGG1 usage was decreased. In addition, we studied clonal relationship in the different samples. Clonally related sequences were found with different subclasses. Interestingly, we found transcripts with the same CDR1–CDR3 sequence, but different subclasses. Together, these data suggest that

  14. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  15. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans.

  16. Aging affects B-cell antigen receptor repertoire diversity in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tabibian-Keissar, Hilla; Hazanov, Lena; Schiby, Ginette; Rosenthal, Noemie; Rakovsky, Aviya; Michaeli, Miri; Shahaf, Gitit Lavy; Pickman, Yishai; Rosenblatt, Kinneret; Melamed, Doron; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Mehr, Ramit; Barshack, Iris

    2016-02-01

    The elderly immune system is characterized by reduced responses to infections and vaccines, and an increase in the incidence of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Age-related deficits in the immune system may be caused by peripheral homeostatic pressures that limit bone marrow B-cell production or migration to the peripheral lymphoid tissues. Studies of peripheral blood B-cell receptor spectratypes have shown that those of the elderly are characterized by reduced diversity, which is correlated with poor health status. In the present study, we performed for the first time high-throughput sequencing of immunoglobulin genes from archived biopsy samples of primary and secondary lymphoid tissues in old (74 ± 7 years old, range 61-89) versus young (24 ± 5 years old, range 18-45) individuals, analyzed repertoire diversities and compared these to results in peripheral blood. We found reduced repertoire diversity in peripheral blood and lymph node repertoires from old people, while in the old spleen samples the diversity was larger than in the young. There were no differences in somatic hypermutation characteristics between age groups. These results support the hypothesis that age-related immune frailty stems from altered B-cell homeostasis leading to narrower memory B-cell repertoires, rather than changes in somatic hypermutation mechanisms.

  17. Positive selection of the peripheral B cell repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Ki-Jong; Jasper, Paul J; Sethupathi, Periannan; Shanmugam, Malathy; Lanning, Dennis; Knight, Katherine L

    2005-01-01

    Gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs) interact with intestinal microflora to drive GALT development and diversify the primary antibody repertoire; however, the molecular mechanisms that link these events remain elusive. Alicia rabbits provide an excellent model to investigate the relationship between GALT, intestinal microflora, and modulation of the antibody repertoire. Most B cells in neonatal Alicia rabbits express V(H)n allotype immunoglobulin (Ig)M. Within weeks, the number of V(H)n B cells decreases, whereas V(H)a allotype B cells increase in number and become predominant. We hypothesized that the repertoire shift from V(H)n to V(H)a B cells results from interactions between GALT and intestinal microflora. To test this hypothesis, we surgically removed organized GALT from newborn Alicia pups and ligated the appendix to sequester it from intestinal microflora. Flow cytometry and nucleotide sequence analyses revealed that the V(H)n to V(H)a repertoire shift did not occur, demonstrating the requirement for interactions between GALT and intestinal microflora in the selective expansion of V(H)a B cells. By comparing amino acid sequences of V(H)n and V(H)a Ig, we identified a putative V(H) ligand binding site for a bacterial or endogenous B cell superantigen. We propose that interaction of such a superantigen with V(H)a B cells results in their selective expansion.

  18. Distinctive properties of identical twins' TCR repertoires revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zvyagin, Ivan V; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Ivanova, Marina E; Komech, Ekaterina A; Shugay, Mikhail; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Shelenkov, Andrey A; Kurnosov, Alexey A; Staroverov, Dmitriy B; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Lebedev, Yuri B; Mamedov, Ilgar Z

    2014-04-22

    Adaptive immunity in humans is provided by hypervariable Ig-like molecules on the surface of B and T cells. The final set of these molecules in each organism is formed under the influence of two forces: individual genetic traits and the environment, which includes the diverse spectra of alien and self-antigens. Here we assess the impact of individual genetic factors on the formation of the adaptive immunity by analyzing the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoires of three pairs of monozygous twins by next-generation sequencing. Surprisingly, we found that an overlap between the TCR repertoires of monozygous twins is similar to an overlap between the TCR repertoires of nonrelated individuals. However, the number of identical complementary determining region 3 sequences in two individuals is significantly increased for twin pairs in the fraction of highly abundant TCR molecules, which is enriched by the antigen-experienced T cells. We found that the initial recruitment of particular TCR V genes for recombination and subsequent selection in the thymus is strictly determined by individual genetic factors. J genes of TCRs are selected randomly for recombination; however, the subsequent selection in the thymus gives preference to some α but not β J segments. These findings provide a deeper insight into the mechanism of TCR repertoire generation. PMID:24711416

  19. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Zhao, Y; Sinkora, M; Wertz, N; Kacskovics, I

    2009-03-01

    Swine share with most placental mammals the same five antibody isotypes and same two light chain types. Loci encoding lambda, kappa and Ig heavy chains appear to be organized as they are in other mammals. Swine differ from rodents and primates, but are similar to rabbits in using a single VH family (VH3) to encode their variable heavy chain domain, but not the family used by cattle, another artiodactyl. Distinct from other hoofed mammals and rodents, Ckappa:Clambda usage resembles the 1:1 ratio seen in primates. Since IgG subclasses diversified after speciation, same name subclass homologs do not exist among swine and other mammals unless very closely related. Swine possess six putative IgG subclasses that appear to have diversified by gene duplication and exon shuffle while retaining motifs that can bind to FcgammaRs, FcRn, C1q, protein A and protein G. The epithelial chorial placenta of swine and the precosial nature of their offspring have made piglets excellent models for studies on fetal antibody repertoire development and on the postnatal role of gut colonization, maternal colostrum and neonatal infection on the development of adaptive immunity during the "critical window" of immunological development. This chapter traces the study of the humoral immune system of this species through its various eras of discovery and compiles the results in tables and figures that should be a useful reference for educators and investigators.

  20. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  1. Transcription factor repertoire of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouffi, Carine; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Chen, Xiaoting; Bacon, W. Clark; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Barski, Artem; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The production of mature eosinophils is a tightly orchestrated process with the aim to sustain normal eosinophil levels in tissues while also maintaining low numbers of these complex and sensitive cells in the blood. To identify regulators of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis in mice, we took a global approach to identify genome-wide transcriptome and epigenome changes that occur during homeostasis at critical developmental stages, including eosinophil-lineage commitment and lineage maturation. Our analyses revealed a markedly greater number of transcriptome alterations associated with eosinophil maturation (1199 genes) than with eosinophil-lineage commitment (490 genes), highlighting the greater transcriptional investment necessary for differentiation. Eosinophil progenitors (EoPs) were noted to express high levels of granule proteins and contain granules with an ultrastructure distinct from that of mature resting eosinophils. Our analyses also delineated a 976-gene eosinophil-lineage transcriptome that included a repertoire of 56 transcription factors, many of which have never previously been associated with eosinophils. EoPs and eosinophils, but not granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) or neutrophils, expressed Helios and Aiolos, members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, which regulate gene expression via modulation of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. Epigenetic studies revealed a distinct distribution of active chromatin marks between genes induced with lineage commitment and genes induced with cell maturation during eosinophil development. In addition, Aiolos and Helios binding sites were significantly enriched in genes expressed by EoPs and eosinophils with active chromatin, highlighting a potential novel role for Helios and Aiolos in regulating gene expression during eosinophil development. PMID:26268651

  2. Thinking through Text Comprehension II: Analysis of Verbal and Investigative Repertoires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sota, Melinda; Leon, Marta; Layng, T. V. Joe

    2011-01-01

    Reading comprehension can be considered a complex human performance involving two integrated repertoires: a verbal repertoire and an investigative (generative) repertoire. This paper describes an analysis of these repertoires in terms which can ultimately inform the design of programs to teach them, using the analysis and design of Headsprout[R]…

  3. Thinking through Text Comprehension III: The Programing of Verbal and Investigative Repertoires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Marta; Layng, T. V. Joe; Sota, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Reading comprehension can be considered a complex human performance involving two integrated repertoires: a verbal repertoire and an investigative (generative) repertoire. The analytical and reasoning skills necessary to demonstrate reading comprehension can be systematically taught by analyzing the verbal and investigative repertoires involved…

  4. IGHV1-69 polymorphism modulates anti-influenza antibody repertoires, correlates with IGHV utilization shifts and varies by ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Avnir, Yuval; Watson, Corey T.; Glanville, Jacob; Peterson, Eric C.; Tallarico, Aimee S.; Bennett, Andrew S.; Qin, Kun; Fu, Ying; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Beigel, John H.; Breden, Felix; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    IGHV polymorphism provides a rich source of humoral immune system diversity. One important example is the IGHV1-69 germline gene where the biased use of alleles that encode the critical CDR-H2 Phe54 (F-alleles) to make broadly neutralizing antibodies (HV1-69-sBnAb) to the influenza A hemagglutinin stem domain has been clearly established. However, whether IGHV1-69 polymorphism can also modulate B cell function and Ab repertoire expression through promoter and copy number (CN) variations has not been reported, nor has whether IGHV1-69 allelic distribution is impacted by ethnicity. Here we studied a cohort of NIH H5N1 vaccinees and demonstrate for the first time the influence of IGHV1-69 polymorphism on V-segment usage, somatic hypermutation and B cell expansion that elucidates the dominance of F-alleles in HV1-69-sBnAbs. We provide evidence that Phe54/Leu54 (F/L) polymorphism correlates with shifted repertoire usage of other IGHV germline genes. In addition, we analyzed ethnically diverse individuals within the 1000 genomes project and discovered marked variations in F- and L- genotypes and CN among the various ethnic groups that may impact HV1-69-sBnAb responses. These results have immediate implications for understanding HV1-69-sBnAb responses at the individual and population level and for the design and implementation of “universal” influenza vaccine. PMID:26880249

  5. Increased Prevalence of Mutant Allele Pfdhps 437G and Pfdhfr Triple Mutation in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from a Rural Area of Gabon, Three Years after the Change of Malaria Treatment Policy

    PubMed Central

    Ndong Ngomo, Jacques-Mari; Mawili-Mboumba, Denise Patricia; M'Bondoukwe, Noé Patrick; Nikiéma Ndong Ella, Rosalie; Bouyou Akotet, Marielle Karine

    2016-01-01

    In Gabon, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended for intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp-SP) and for uncomplicated malaria treatment through ACTs drug. P. falciparum strains resistant to SP are frequent in areas where this drug is highly used and is associated with the occurrence of mutations on Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (Pfdhps) genes. The aim of the study was to compare the proportion of mutations on Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes in isolates collected at Oyem in northern Gabon, in 2005 at the time of IPTp-SP introduction and three years later. Point mutations were analyzed by nested PCR-RFLP method. Among 91 isolates, more than 90% carried Pfdhfr 108N and Pfdhfr 59R alleles. Frequencies of Pfdhfr 51I (98%) and Pfdhps 437G (67.7%) mutant alleles were higher in 2008. Mutations at codons 164, 540, and 581 were not detected. The proportion of the triple Pfdhfr mutation and quadruple mutation including A437G was high: 91.9% in 2008 and 64.8% in 2008, respectively. The present study highlights an elevated frequency of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles, although quintuple mutations were not found in north Gabon. These data suggest the need of a continuous monitoring of SP resistance in Gabon. PMID:27190671

  6. Accurate and High-Coverage Immune Repertoire Sequencing Reveals Characteristics of Antibody Repertoire Diversification in Young Children with Malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning

    Accurately measuring the immune repertoire sequence composition, diversity, and abundance is important in studying repertoire response in infections, vaccinations, and cancer immunology. Using molecular identifiers (MIDs) to tag mRNA molecules is an effective method in improving the accuracy of immune repertoire sequencing (IR-seq). However, it is still difficult to use IR-seq on small amount of clinical samples to achieve a high coverage of the repertoire diversities. This is especially challenging in studying infections and vaccinations where B cell subpopulations with fewer cells, such as memory B cells or plasmablasts, are often of great interest to study somatic mutation patterns and diversity changes. Here, we describe an approach of IR-seq based on the use of MIDs in combination with a clustering method that can reveal more than 80% of the antibody diversity in a sample and can be applied to as few as 1,000 B cells. We applied this to study the antibody repertoires of young children before and during an acute malaria infection. We discovered unexpectedly high levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in infants and revealed characteristics of antibody repertoire development in young children that would have a profound impact on immunization in children.

  7. Interrogating the repertoire: broadening the scope of peptide–MHC multimer analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mark M.; Altman, John D.; Newell, Evan W.

    2013-01-01

    Labelling antigen-specific T cells with peptide–MHC multimers has provided an invaluable way to monitor T cell-mediated immune responses. A number of recent developments in this technology have made these multimers much easier to make and use in large numbers. Furthermore, enrichment techniques have provided a greatly increased sensitivity that allows the analysis of the naive T cell repertoire directly. Thus, we can expect a flood of new information to emerge in the coming years. PMID:21760610

  8. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  9. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  10. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  11. A comprehensive repertoire of prokaryotic species identified in human beings.

    PubMed

    Hugon, Perrine; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Colson, Philippe; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Sallah, Kankoe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-10-01

    The compilation of the complete prokaryotic repertoire associated with human beings as commensals or pathogens is a major goal for the scientific and medical community. The use of bacterial culture techniques remains a crucial step to describe new prokaryotic species. The large number of officially acknowledged bacterial species described since 1980 and the recent increase in the number of recognised pathogenic species have highlighted the absence of an exhaustive compilation of species isolated in human beings. By means of a thorough investigation of several large culture databases and a search of the scientific literature, we built an online database containing all human-associated prokaryotic species described, whether or not they had been validated and have standing in nomenclature. We list 2172 species that have been isolated in human beings. They were classified in 12 different phyla, mostly in the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes phyla. Our online database is useful for both clinicians and microbiologists and forms part of the Human Microbiome Project, which aims to characterise the whole human microbiota and help improve our understanding of the human predisposition and susceptibility to infectious agents.

  12. Schizophyllum commune has an extensive and functional alternative splicing repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Gehrmann, Thies; Pelkmans, Jordi F.; Lugones, Luis G.; Wösten, Han A. B.; Abeel, Thomas; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide studies have demonstrated that fungi possess the machinery to alternatively splice pre-mRNA. However, there has not been a systematic categorization of the functional impact of alternative splicing in a fungus. We investigate alternative splicing and its functional consequences in the model mushroom forming fungus Schizophyllum commune. Alternative splicing was demonstrated for 2,285 out of 12,988 expressed genes, resulting in 20% additional transcripts. Intron retentions were the most common alternative splicing events, accounting for 33% of all splicing events, and 43% of the events in coding regions. On the other hand, exon skipping events were rare in coding regions (1%) but enriched in UTRs where they accounted for 57% of the events. Specific functional groups, including transcription factors, contained alternatively spliced genes. Alternatively spliced transcripts were regulated differently throughout development in 19% of the 2,285 alternatively spliced genes. Notably, 69% of alternatively spliced genes have predicted alternative functionality by loss or gain of functional domains, or by acquiring alternative subcellular locations. S. commune exhibits more alternative splicing than any other studied fungus. Taken together, alternative splicing increases the complexity of the S. commune proteome considerably and provides it with a rich repertoire of alternative functionality that is exploited dynamically. PMID:27659065

  13. Opsin gene repertoires in northern archaic hominids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John S; Reimchen, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    The Neanderthals' northern distribution, hunting techniques, and orbit breadths suggest that they were more active in dim light than modern humans. We surveyed visual opsin genes from four Neanderthals and two other archaic hominids to see if they provided additional support for this hypothesis. This analysis was motivated by the observation that alleles responsible for anomalous trichromacy in humans are more common in northern latitudes, by data suggesting that these variants might enhance vision in mesopic conditions, and by the observation that dim light active species often have fewer opsin genes than diurnal relatives. We also looked for evidence of convergent amino acid substitutions in Neanderthal opsins and orthologs from crepuscular or nocturnal species. The Altai Neanderthal, the Denisovan, and the Ust'-Ishim early modern human had opsin genes that encoded proteins identical to orthologs in the human reference genome. Opsins from the Vindija Cave Neanderthals (three females) had many nonsynonymous substitutions, including several predicted to influence colour vision (e.g., stop codons). However, the functional implications of these observations were difficult to assess, given that "control" loci, where no substitutions were expected, differed from humans to the same extent. This left unresolved the test for colour vision deficiencies in Vindija Cave Neanderthals.

  14. Opsin gene repertoires in northern archaic hominids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John S; Reimchen, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    The Neanderthals' northern distribution, hunting techniques, and orbit breadths suggest that they were more active in dim light than modern humans. We surveyed visual opsin genes from four Neanderthals and two other archaic hominids to see if they provided additional support for this hypothesis. This analysis was motivated by the observation that alleles responsible for anomalous trichromacy in humans are more common in northern latitudes, by data suggesting that these variants might enhance vision in mesopic conditions, and by the observation that dim light active species often have fewer opsin genes than diurnal relatives. We also looked for evidence of convergent amino acid substitutions in Neanderthal opsins and orthologs from crepuscular or nocturnal species. The Altai Neanderthal, the Denisovan, and the Ust'-Ishim early modern human had opsin genes that encoded proteins identical to orthologs in the human reference genome. Opsins from the Vindija Cave Neanderthals (three females) had many nonsynonymous substitutions, including several predicted to influence colour vision (e.g., stop codons). However, the functional implications of these observations were difficult to assess, given that "control" loci, where no substitutions were expected, differed from humans to the same extent. This left unresolved the test for colour vision deficiencies in Vindija Cave Neanderthals. PMID:27463216

  15. Allelic association between marker loci.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1999-02-16

    Allelic association has proven useful to refine the location of major genes prior to positional cloning, but it is of uncertain value for genome scans in complex inheritance. We have extended kinship theory to give information content for linkage and allelic association. Application to pairs of closely linked markers as a surrogate for marker x oligogene pairs indicates that association is largely determined by regional founders, with little effect of subsequent demography. Sub-Saharan Africa has the least allelic association, consistent with settlement of other regions by small numbers of founders. Recent speculation about substantial advantages of isolates over large populations, of constant size over expansion, and of F1 hybrids over incrosses is not supported by theory or data. On the contrary, fewer affected cases, less opportunity for replication, and more stochastic variation tend to make isolates less informative for allelic association, as they are for linkage.

  16. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  17. Primary immunoglobulin repertoire development: time and space matter.

    PubMed

    Granato, Alessandra; Chen, Yuezhou; Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-04-01

    The primary immunoglobulin repertoire develops via opposing forces of expanding diversification balanced by contracting selection mechanisms. The resulting shape is essential for host health and immune fitness. While the molecular mechanisms of Ig diversification have largely been defined, selection forces shaping emerging Ig repertoires are poorly understood. During lifetime, human and mouse early B cell development occurs at distinct locations-beginning in fetal liver before transferring to bone marrow and spleen by the end of gestation. During an early life window of time, the murine gut lamina propria harbors developing immature B cells in proximity to intestinal contents such as commensal microbes and dietary antigens. Location and timing of early B cell development may thus endow neighboring antigens with primary repertoire-shaping capabilities.

  18. A «Repertoire for Repertoire» Hypothesis: Repertoires of Type Three Effectors are Candidate Determinants of Host Specificity in Xanthomonas

    PubMed Central

    Hajri, Ahmed; Brin, Chrystelle; Hunault, Gilles; Lardeux, Frédéric; Lemaire, Christophe; Manceau, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background The genetic basis of host specificity for animal and plant pathogenic bacteria remains poorly understood. For plant pathogenic bacteria, host range is restricted to one or a few host plant species reflecting a tight adaptation to specific hosts. Methodology/Principal Findings Two hypotheses can be formulated to explain host specificity: either it can be explained by the phylogenetic position of the strains, or by the association of virulence genes enabling a pathological convergence of phylogenically distant strains. In this latter hypothesis, host specificity would result from the interaction between repertoires of bacterial virulence genes and repertoires of genes involved in host defences. To challenge these two hypotheses, we selected 132 Xanthomonas axonopodis strains representative of 18 different pathovars which display different host range. First, the phylogenetic position of each strain was determined by sequencing the housekeeping gene rpoD. This study showed that many pathovars of Xanthomonas axonopodis are polyphyletic. Second, we investigated the distribution of 35 type III effector genes (T3Es) in these strains by both PCR and hybridization methods. Indeed, for pathogenic bacteria T3Es were shown to trigger and to subvert host defences. Our study revealed that T3E repertoires comprise core and variable gene suites that likely have distinct roles in pathogenicity and different evolutionary histories. Our results showed a correspondence between composition of T3E repertoires and pathovars of Xanthomonas axonopodis. For polyphyletic pathovars, this suggests that T3E genes might explain a pathological convergence of phylogenetically distant strains. We also identified several DNA rearrangements within T3E genes, some of which correlate with host specificity of strains. Conclusions/Significance These data provide insight into the potential role played by T3E genes for pathogenic bacteria and support a “repertoire for repertoire” hypothesis

  19. Contrasted Evolution of the Vomeronasal Receptor Repertoires in Mammals and Squamate Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Brykczynska, Urszula; Tzika, Athanasia C.; Rodriguez, Ivan; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory structure that detects pheromones and environmental cues. It consists of sensory neurons that express evolutionary unrelated groups of transmembrane chemoreceptors. The predominant V1R and V2R receptor repertoires are believed to detect airborne and water-soluble molecules, respectively. It has been suggested that the shift in habitat of early tetrapods from water to land is reflected by an increase in the ratio of V1R/V2R genes. Snakes, which have a very large VNO associated with a sophisticated tongue delivery system, are missing from this analysis. Here, we use RNA-seq and RNA in situ hybridization to study the diversity, evolution, and expression pattern of the corn snake vomeronasal receptor repertoires. Our analyses indicate that snakes and lizards retain an extremely limited number of V1R genes but exhibit a large number of V2R genes, including multiple lineages of reptile-specific and snake-specific expansions. We finally show that the peculiar bigenic pattern of V2R vomeronasal receptor gene transcription observed in mammals is conserved in squamate reptiles, hinting at an important but unknown functional role played by this expression strategy. Our results do not support the hypothesis that the shift to a vomeronasal receptor repertoire dominated by V1Rs in mammals reflects the evolutionary transition of early tetrapods from water to land. This study sheds light on the evolutionary dynamics of the vomeronasal receptor families in vertebrates and reveals how mammals and squamates differentially adapted the same ancestral vomeronasal repertoire to succeed in a terrestrial environment. PMID:23348039

  20. Dynamic Repertoire of Intrinsic Brain States Is Reduced in Propofol-Induced Unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiping; Pillay, Siveshigan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The richness of conscious experience is thought to scale with the size of the repertoire of causal brain states, and it may be diminished in anesthesia. We estimated the state repertoire from dynamic analysis of intrinsic functional brain networks in conscious sedated and unconscious anesthetized rats. Functional resonance images were obtained from 30-min whole-brain resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals at propofol infusion rates of 20 and 40 mg/kg/h, intravenously. Dynamic brain networks were defined at the voxel level by sliding window analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) or coincident threshold crossings (CTC) of the BOLD signal acquired in nine sagittal slices. The state repertoire was characterized by the temporal variance of the number of voxels with significant ReHo or positive CTC. From low to high propofol dose, the temporal variances of ReHo and CTC were reduced by 78%±20% and 76%±20%, respectively. Both baseline and propofol-induced reduction of CTC temporal variance increased from lateral to medial position. Group analysis showed a 20% reduction in the number of unique states at the higher propofol dose. Analysis of temporal variance in 12 anatomically defined regions of interest predicted that the largest changes occurred in visual cortex, parietal cortex, and caudate-putamen. The results suggest that the repertoire of large-scale brain states derived from the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic networks is substantially reduced at an anesthetic dose associated with loss of consciousness. PMID:24702200

  1. T cell receptor repertoire and function in patients with DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, M; Marziali, M; Giovannetti, A; Oliva, A; Rosso, R; Marino, B; Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Novelli, G; Dallapiccola, B; Aiuti, F; Pandolfi, F

    2000-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) are associated with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion. Limited information is available on the T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ repertoire. We therefore investigated TCR Vβ families in lymphocytes isolated from blood and thymic samples of seven patients with DGS and seven patients with VCFS, all with 22q11.2 deletion. We also studied activities related to TCR signalling including in vitro proliferation, anti-CD3-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and susceptibility to apoptosis. Reduced CD3+ T cells were observed in most patients. Spontaneous improvement of T cell numbers was detected in patients, 3 years after the first study. Analysis of CD4+ and CD8+ TCR Vβ repertoire in peripheral and thymic cells showed a normal distribution of populations even if occasional deletions were observed. Lymphoproliferative responses to mitogens were comparable to controls as well as anti-CD3-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Increased anti-CD3-mediated apoptosis was observed in thymic cells. Our data support the idea that in patients surviving the correction of cardiac anomalies, the immune defect appears milder than originally thought, suggesting development of a normal repertoire of mature T cells. PMID:10886249

  2. Extraordinary diversity of chemosensory receptor gene repertoires among vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shi, P; Zhang, J

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensation (smell and taste) is important to the survival and reproduction of vertebrates and is mediated by specific bindings of odorants, pheromones, and tastants by chemoreceptors that are encoded by several large gene families. This review summarizes recent comparative genomic and evolutionary studies of vertebrate chemoreceptor genes. It focuses on the remarkable diversity of chemoreceptor gene repertoires in terms of gene number and gene sequence across vertebrates and the evolutionary mechanisms that are responsible for generating this diversity. We argue that the great among-species variation of chemoreceptor gene repertoires is a result of adaptations of individual species to their environments and diets. PMID:19145414

  3. VDJtools: Unifying Post-analysis of T Cell Receptor Repertoires.

    PubMed

    Shugay, Mikhail; Bagaev, Dmitriy V; Turchaninova, Maria A; Bolotin, Dmitriy A; Britanova, Olga V; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Nazarov, Vadim I; Zvyagin, Ivan V; Kirgizova, Vitalina I; Kirgizov, Kirill I; Skorobogatova, Elena V; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2015-11-01

    Despite the growing number of immune repertoire sequencing studies, the field still lacks software for analysis and comprehension of this high-dimensional data. Here we report VDJtools, a complementary software suite that solves a wide range of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires post-analysis tasks, provides a detailed tabular output and publication-ready graphics, and is built on top of a flexible API. Using TCR datasets for a large cohort of unrelated healthy donors, twins, and multiple sclerosis patients we demonstrate that VDJtools greatly facilitates the analysis and leads to sound biological conclusions. VDJtools software and documentation are available at https://github.com/mikessh/vdjtools. PMID:26606115

  4. VDJtools: Unifying Post-analysis of T Cell Receptor Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Dmitriy A.; Britanova, Olga V.; Putintseva, Ekaterina V.; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V.; Nazarov, Vadim I.; Zvyagin, Ivan V.; Kirgizova, Vitalina I.; Kirgizov, Kirill I.; Skorobogatova, Elena V.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing number of immune repertoire sequencing studies, the field still lacks software for analysis and comprehension of this high-dimensional data. Here we report VDJtools, a complementary software suite that solves a wide range of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires post-analysis tasks, provides a detailed tabular output and publication-ready graphics, and is built on top of a flexible API. Using TCR datasets for a large cohort of unrelated healthy donors, twins, and multiple sclerosis patients we demonstrate that VDJtools greatly facilitates the analysis and leads to sound biological conclusions. VDJtools software and documentation are available at https://github.com/mikessh/vdjtools. PMID:26606115

  5. Contribution of receptor editing to the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Casellas, R; Shih, T A; Kleinewietfeld, M; Rakonjac, J; Nemazee, D; Rajewsky, K; Nussenzweig, M C

    2001-02-23

    Receptor editing, clonal deletion, and anergy are the mechanisms by which B cells maintain tolerance to self antigens. To determine the extent to which receptor editing shapes the normal antibody repertoire, we generated an immunoglobulin kappa polymorphism that facilitates the detection of editing of immunoglobulin light chains in vivo. We found that B cells are targeted for editing during a 2-hour delay in development at the pre-BII cell stage, and that about 25% of all antibody molecules are produced by gene replacement. These results suggest that receptor editing represents a major force in shaping the antibody repertoire.

  6. Microbial colonization influences composition and T-cell receptor V beta repertoire of intraepithelial lymphocytes in rat intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Helgeland, L; Vaage, J T; Rolstad, B; Midtvedt, T; Brandtzaeg, P

    1996-01-01

    Studies in mice have shown that the composition of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) may be markedly altered by gut microbial colonization. Such modulation was studied in a rat model by the use of germ-free and conventionalized animals from which IEL from the small intestine were isolated and analysed by flow cytometry. Conventionalization caused expansion as well as phenotypic alterations of T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha/beta + IEL in that the proportions of CD4+ and CD8 alpha beta + TCR alpha/beta + cells were increased, while the double negative (CD4- CD8-) fraction was reduced. microbial colonization also influenced the TCR V beta repertoire of CD8+ IEL in that the proportions of V beta 8.2+ and V beta 10+ cells were increased, whereas V beta 8.5+ and V beta 16+ cells were relatively decreased. Moreover, conventionalization influenced the levels of TCR cell surface expression in the same V beta subsets. Three-colour flow-cytometric analysis demonstrated that skewing of the V beta repertoire was most pronounced in the CD8 alpha alpha + subset, although the numerical increase of IEL mainly included the CD8 alpha beta + subset. In contrast to IEL, the TCR V beta repertoire in mesenteric lymph nodes was unchanged after intestinal colonization. These results confirm that TCR alpha/beta + IEL subpopulations respond dynamically to the microbial gut flora and suggest that their V beta repertoire can be shaped by luminal microbial antigens. PMID:9014812

  7. Enhanced repertoire of brain dynamical states during the psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Carhart-Harris, Robin; Leech, Robert; Nutt, David; Chialvo, Dante R

    2014-11-01

    The study of rapid changes in brain dynamics and functional connectivity (FC) is of increasing interest in neuroimaging. Brain states departing from normal waking consciousness are expected to be accompanied by alterations in the aforementioned dynamics. In particular, the psychedelic experience produced by psilocybin (a substance found in "magic mushrooms") is characterized by unconstrained cognition and profound alterations in the perception of time, space and selfhood. Considering the spontaneous and subjective manifestation of these effects, we hypothesize that neural correlates of the psychedelic experience can be found in the dynamics and variability of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations and connectivity, measurable with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Fifteen healthy subjects were scanned before, during and after intravenous infusion of psilocybin and an inert placebo. Blood-Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) temporal variability was assessed computing the variance and total spectral power, resulting in increased signal variability bilaterally in the hippocampi and anterior cingulate cortex. Changes in BOLD signal spectral behavior (including spectral scaling exponents) affected exclusively higher brain systems such as the default mode, executive control, and dorsal attention networks. A novel framework enabled us to track different connectivity states explored by the brain during rest. This approach revealed a wider repertoire of connectivity states post-psilocybin than during control conditions. Together, the present results provide a comprehensive account of the effects of psilocybin on dynamical behavior in the human brain at a macroscopic level and may have implications for our understanding of the unconstrained, hyper-associative quality of consciousness in the psychedelic state. PMID:24989126

  8. Enhanced repertoire of brain dynamical states during the psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Carhart-Harris, Robin; Leech, Robert; Nutt, David; Chialvo, Dante R

    2014-11-01

    The study of rapid changes in brain dynamics and functional connectivity (FC) is of increasing interest in neuroimaging. Brain states departing from normal waking consciousness are expected to be accompanied by alterations in the aforementioned dynamics. In particular, the psychedelic experience produced by psilocybin (a substance found in "magic mushrooms") is characterized by unconstrained cognition and profound alterations in the perception of time, space and selfhood. Considering the spontaneous and subjective manifestation of these effects, we hypothesize that neural correlates of the psychedelic experience can be found in the dynamics and variability of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations and connectivity, measurable with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Fifteen healthy subjects were scanned before, during and after intravenous infusion of psilocybin and an inert placebo. Blood-Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) temporal variability was assessed computing the variance and total spectral power, resulting in increased signal variability bilaterally in the hippocampi and anterior cingulate cortex. Changes in BOLD signal spectral behavior (including spectral scaling exponents) affected exclusively higher brain systems such as the default mode, executive control, and dorsal attention networks. A novel framework enabled us to track different connectivity states explored by the brain during rest. This approach revealed a wider repertoire of connectivity states post-psilocybin than during control conditions. Together, the present results provide a comprehensive account of the effects of psilocybin on dynamical behavior in the human brain at a macroscopic level and may have implications for our understanding of the unconstrained, hyper-associative quality of consciousness in the psychedelic state.

  9. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  10. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  11. Linking Experiences with Emotions and the Development of Interpretive Repertoires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Norah I.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I consider the case of one student, Todd Alexander, through analyzing the transcripts of his interviews between him and his teacher (Wolff-Michael Roth). I examine the role that emotions play in the development of the interpretive repertoires that Todd employed as he talked about his scientific and his religious beliefs. I identify…

  12. Accelerated Loss of TCR Repertoire Diversity in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Gabriel K.; Millar, David; Penny, Sarah; Heather, James M.; Mistry, Punam; Buettner, Nico; Bryon, Jane; Huissoon, Aarnoud P.

    2016-01-01

    Although common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) has long been considered as a group of primary Ab deficiencies, growing experimental data now suggest a global disruption of the entire adaptive immune response in a segment of patients. Oligoclonality of the TCR repertoire was previously demonstrated; however, the manner in which it relates to other B cell and T cell findings reported in CVID remains unclear. Using a combination approach of high-throughput TCRβ sequencing and multiparametric flow cytometry, we compared the TCR repertoire diversity between various subgroups of CVID patients according to their B cell immunophenotypes. Our data suggest that the reduction in repertoire diversity is predominantly restricted to those patients with severely reduced class-switched memory B cells and an elevated level of CD21lo B cells (Freiburg 1a), and may be driven by a reduced number of naive T cells unmasking underlying memory clonality. Moreover, our data indicate that this loss in repertoire diversity progresses with advancing age far exceeding the expected physiological rate. Radiological evidence supports the loss in thymic volume, correlating with the decrease in repertoire diversity. Evidence now suggests that primary thymic failure along with other well-described B cell abnormalities play an important role in the pathophysiology in Freiburg group 1a patients. Clinically, our findings emphasize the integration of combined B and T cell testing to identify those patients at the greatest risk for infection. Future work should focus on investigating the link between thymic failure and the severe reduction in class-switched memory B cells, while gathering longitudinal laboratory data to examine the progressive nature of the disease. PMID:27481850

  13. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals Skewing of the T and B Cell Receptor Repertoires in Patients with Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Amy E.; Volpi, Stefano; Dobbs, Kerry; Fiorini, Claudia; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; de Boer, Helen; Barlan, Isil B.; Despotovic, Jenny M.; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco J.; Hanson, I. Celine; Kanariou, Maria G.; Martínez-Beckerat, Roxana; Mayorga-Sirera, Alvaro; Mejia-Carvajal, Carmen; Radwan, Nesrine; Weiss, Aaron R.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Lee, Yu Nee; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2014-01-01

    The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is due to mutations of the WAS gene encoding for the cytoskeletal WAS protein, leading to abnormal downstream signaling from the T cell and B cell antigen receptors (TCR and BCR). We hypothesized that the impaired signaling through the TCR and BCR in WAS would subsequently lead to aberrations in the immune repertoire of WAS patients. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), the T cell receptor β and B cell immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) repertoires of eight patients with WAS and six controls were sequenced. Clonal expansions were identified within memory CD4+ cells as well as in total, naïve and memory CD8+ cells from WAS patients. In the B cell compartment, WAS patient IGH repertoires were also clonally expanded and showed skewed usage of IGHV and IGHJ genes, and increased usage of IGHG constant genes, compared with controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates significant abnormalities of the immune repertoire in WAS patients using NGS. PMID:25101082

  14. Hamilton and Zuk meet heterozygosity? Song repertoire size indicates inbreeding and immunity in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia).

    PubMed

    Reid, Janem; Arcese, Peter; Cassidy, Alicel E V; Marr, Amyb; Smith, Jamesn M; Keller, Lukasf

    2005-03-01

    Hamilton and Zuk's influential hypothesis of parasite-mediated sexual selection proposes that exaggerated secondary sexual ornaments indicate a male's addictive genetic immunity to parasites. However, genetic correlated of ornaments and immunity have rarely been explicitly identified. Evidence supporting Hamilton and Zuk's hypothesis has instead been gathered by looking for positive phenotypic correlations between ornamentation and immunity; such correlations are assumed to reflect causal, addictive relationships between these traits. We show that in a song sparrows, Melospiza melodia, male's song repertoire size, a secondary sexual trait, increased with his cell-mediated immune response (CMI) to an experimental challenge. However, this phenotypic correlation could be explained because both repertoire size and CMI declined with a male's inbreeding level. Repertoire size therefore primarily indicated a male's relative heterozygosity, a non-addictive genetic predictor of immunity. Caution may therefore be required when interpreting phenotypic correlations as support for Hamilton and Zuk's addictive model of sexual selection. However, our results suggest that female song sparrows choosing with large repertoires would on average acquire more outbred and therefore more heterozygous mates. Such genetic dominance effects on ornamentation are likely to influence evolutionary trajectories of female choice, and should be explicitly incorporated into genetic models of sexual selection. PMID:15799943

  15. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  16. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  17. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. The effects of response cost and response restriction on a multiple-response repertoire with humans

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, John

    1993-01-01

    In two experiments a multiple-response repertoire of four free-operant responses was developed with university students as subjects using monetary gain as reinforcement. Following baseline, one of the responses was reduced either by making monetary loss contingent upon it (response cost) or by removing it from the repertoire (response restriction). In Experiment 1 a multielement baseline design was employed in which baseline and restriction or response-cost contingencies alternated semirandomly every 3 minutes. In Experiment 2 a reversal design was employed (i.e., baseline, restriction or response cost, then baseline), and each response required a different amount of effort. Both experiments had the following results: (a) The target response decreased substantially; (b) most nontarget responses increased, and the rest remained near their baseline levels; and (c) no support was found for Dunham's hierarchical, most frequent follower, or greatest temporal similarity rules. For several subjects, the least probable responses during baseline increased most, and the most probable responses increased least. Furthermore, in Experiment 2, responses with the lowest frequency of reinforcement increased most (for all 7 subjects), and those with the greatest frequency of reinforcement increased least (for 5 subjects). PMID:16812683

  19. DQB1*06:02 allele specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    PubMed Central

    lachmi, Karin Weiner; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Rico, Tom; Lo, Betty; Aran, Adi; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single allele HLA associations. In this study, we explored genome wide expression in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and found the largest differences between the groups to be in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did not reveal any difference, a result we explain by the lack of proper control of allelic diversity in Affymetrix HLA probes. Rather, a clear effect of DQB1*06:02 allelic dosage on DQB1*06:02 mRNA levels (1.65 fold) and protein (1.59 fold) could be demonstrated independent of the disease status. These results indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes. PMID:22326585

  20. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status.

    PubMed

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Rico, Tom; Lo, Betty; Aran, Adi; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and observed the largest differences between the groups in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did not reveal any difference, a result we explain by the lack of proper control of allelic diversity in Affymetrix HLA probes. Rather, a clear effect of DQB1*06:02 allelic dosage on DQB1*06:02 mRNA levels (1.65-fold) and protein (1.59-fold) could be demonstrated independent of disease status. These results indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain the increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes.

  1. Linking experiences with emotions and the development of interpretive repertoires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, Norah I.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper I consider the case of one student, Todd Alexander, through analyzing the transcripts of his interviews between him and his teacher (Wolff-Michael Roth). I examine the role that emotions play in the development of the interpretive repertoires that Todd employed as he talked about his scientific and his religious beliefs. I identify how lived experiences support the development of emotions and what educational conditions are necessary to allow for appropriate lived experiences. In so doing we might be able to support educational conditions that result in interpretive repertoires that allow for acceptance of multiple perspectives with a moral grounding, leading to students who are well positioned to be valuable contributors to society.

  2. Highly sensitive and unbiased approach for elucidating antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sherry G; Ba, Zhaoqing; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Alt, Frederick W

    2016-07-12

    Developing B lymphocytes undergo V(D)J recombination to assemble germ-line V, D, and J gene segments into exons that encode the antigen-binding variable region of Ig heavy (H) and light (L) chains. IgH and IgL chains associate to form the B-cell receptor (BCR), which, upon antigen binding, activates B cells to secrete BCR as an antibody. Each of the huge number of clonally independent B cells expresses a unique set of IgH and IgL variable regions. The ability of V(D)J recombination to generate vast primary B-cell repertoires results from a combinatorial assortment of large numbers of different V, D, and J segments, coupled with diversification of the junctions between them to generate the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) for antigen contact. Approaches to evaluate in depth the content of primary antibody repertoires and, ultimately, to study how they are further molded by secondary mutation and affinity maturation processes are of great importance to the B-cell development, vaccine, and antibody fields. We now describe an unbiased, sensitive, and readily accessible assay, referred to as high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing-adapted repertoire sequencing (HTGTS-Rep-seq), to quantify antibody repertoires. HTGTS-Rep-seq quantitatively identifies the vast majority of IgH and IgL V(D)J exons, including their unique CDR3 sequences, from progenitor and mature mouse B lineage cells via the use of specific J primers. HTGTS-Rep-seq also accurately quantifies DJH intermediates and V(D)J exons in either productive or nonproductive configurations. HTGTS-Rep-seq should be useful for studies of human samples, including clonal B-cell expansions, and also for following antibody affinity maturation processes. PMID:27354528

  3. Mother and child T cell receptor repertoires: deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Britanova, Olga V; Staroverov, Dmitriy B; Merzlyak, Ekaterina M; Turchaninova, Maria A; Shugay, Mikhail; Bolotin, Dmitriy A; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Bobrynina, Vlasta; Maschan, Mikhail; Lebedev, Yuri B; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between maternal and child immunity has been actively studied in the context of complications during pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, and haploidentical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and solid organs. Here, we have for the first time used high-throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing to perform deep quantitative profiling of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires for peripheral blood samples of three mothers and their six children. Advanced technology allowed accurate identification of 5 × 10(5) to 2 × 10(6) TCR beta clonotypes per individual. We performed comparative analysis of these TCR repertoires with the aim of revealing characteristic features that distinguish related mother-child pairs, such as relative TCR beta variable segment usage frequency and relative overlap of TCR beta complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) repertoires. We show that thymic selection essentially and similarly shapes the initial output of the TCR recombination machinery in both related and unrelated pairs, with minor effect from inherited differences. The achieved depth of TCR profiling also allowed us to test the hypothesis that mature T cells transferred across the placenta during pregnancy can expand and persist as functional microchimeric clones in their new host, using characteristic TCR beta CDR3 variants as clonal identifiers.

  4. Serum Antibody Repertoire Profiling Using In Silico Antigen Screen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyue; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Tallo, Luke J.; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Schettine, Cassandra A.; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Klyushnenkova, Elena N.; Ionov, Yurij

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies are valuable source of information on the health state of an organism. The profiles of serum antibody reactivity can be generated by using a high throughput sequencing of peptide-coding DNA from combinatorial random peptide phage display libraries selected for binding to serum antibodies. Here we demonstrate that the targets of immune response, which are recognized by serum antibodies directed against sequential epitopes, can be identified using the serum antibody repertoire profiles generated by high throughput sequencing. We developed an algorithm to filter the results of the protein database BLAST search for selected peptides to distinguish real antigens recognized by serum antibodies from irrelevant proteins retrieved randomly. When we used this algorithm to analyze serum antibodies from mice immunized with human protein, we were able to identify the protein used for immunizations among the top candidate antigens. When we analyzed human serum sample from the metastatic melanoma patient, the recombinant protein, corresponding to the top candidate from the list generated using the algorithm, was recognized by antibodies from metastatic melanoma serum on the western blot, thus confirming that the method can identify autoantigens recognized by serum antibodies. We demonstrated also that our unbiased method of looking at the repertoire of serum antibodies reveals quantitative information on the epitope composition of the targets of immune response. A method for deciphering information contained in the serum antibody repertoire profiles may help to identify autoantibodies that can be used for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune diseases or malignancies. PMID:23826227

  5. Serum Antibody Repertoire Profiling Using In Silico Antigen Screen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Tallo, Luke J; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Schettine, Cassandra A; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Ionov, Yurij

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies are valuable source of information on the health state of an organism. The profiles of serum antibody reactivity can be generated by using a high throughput sequencing of peptide-coding DNA from combinatorial random peptide phage display libraries selected for binding to serum antibodies. Here we demonstrate that the targets of immune response, which are recognized by serum antibodies directed against sequential epitopes, can be identified using the serum antibody repertoire profiles generated by high throughput sequencing. We developed an algorithm to filter the results of the protein database BLAST search for selected peptides to distinguish real antigens recognized by serum antibodies from irrelevant proteins retrieved randomly. When we used this algorithm to analyze serum antibodies from mice immunized with human protein, we were able to identify the protein used for immunizations among the top candidate antigens. When we analyzed human serum sample from the metastatic melanoma patient, the recombinant protein, corresponding to the top candidate from the list generated using the algorithm, was recognized by antibodies from metastatic melanoma serum on the western blot, thus confirming that the method can identify autoantigens recognized by serum antibodies. We demonstrated also that our unbiased method of looking at the repertoire of serum antibodies reveals quantitative information on the epitope composition of the targets of immune response. A method for deciphering information contained in the serum antibody repertoire profiles may help to identify autoantibodies that can be used for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune diseases or malignancies. PMID:23826227

  6. Characterizing allelic association in the genome era

    PubMed Central

    WEIR, B. S.; LAURIE, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Whole genome data are allowing the estimation of population genetic parameters with an accuracy not imagined 50 years ago. Variation in these parameters along the genome is being found empirically where once only approximate theoretical values were available. Along with increased information, however, has come the issue of multiple testing and the realization that high values of the coefficients of variation of quantities such as relatedness measures may make it difficult to draw inferences. This review concentrates on measures of allelic association within and between individuals and within and between populations. PMID:21429275

  7. Impact of clonal competition for peptide-MHC complexes on the CD8[superscript +] T-cell repertoire selection in a persistent viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, Katherine K.; Fulton, Zara; Cooper, Leanne; Silins, Sharon L.; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Miles, John J.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2008-04-29

    CD8{sup +} T-cell responses to persistent viral infections are characterized by the accumulation of an oligoclonal T-cell repertoire and a reduction in the naive T-cell pool. However, the precise mechanism for this phenomenon remains elusive. Here we show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific CD8{sup +} T cells recognizing distinct epitopes from the pp65 protein and restricted through an identical HLA class I allele (HLA B*3508) exhibited either a highly conserved public T-cell repertoire or a private, diverse T-cell response, which was uniquely altered in each donor following in vitro antigen exposure. Selection of a public T-cell receptor (TCR) was coincident with an atypical major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide structure, in that the epitope adopted a helical conformation that bulged from the peptide-binding groove, while a diverse TCR profile was observed in response to the epitope that formed a flatter, more 'featureless' landscape. Clonotypes with biased TCR usage demonstrated more efficient recognition of virus-infected cells, a greater CD8 dependency, and were more terminally differentiated in their phenotype when compared with the T cells expressing diverse TCR. These findings provide new insights into our understanding on how the biology of antigen presentation in addition to the structural features of the pMHC-I might shape the T-cell repertoire and its phenotype.

  8. Distribution of HLA-B alleles in Mexican Amerindian populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Zuñiga, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rangel, Carlos; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Granados, Julio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    In the present study we analyzed by PCR-SSO technique the HLA-B gene frequencies in 281 healthy individuals from four Mexican Amerindian populations (66 Mayos, 90 Mazatecans, 72 Nahuas and 53 Teenek). The most frequent alleles in all studied populations were HLA-B35, HLA-B39, and HLA-B40; however, some differences were observed between populations. The HLA-B35 allele was the most frequent in three of the four populations studied (Mayos, Nahuas and Teenek), whereas in Mazatecans the most frequent allele was HLA-B39. HLA-B40 presented frequencies higher than 10% in all groups. On the other hand, only Mayos presented an HLA-B51 gene frequency higher than 10%. When comparisons were made, important differences between groups were observed. The Teenek group presented an increased frequency of HLA-B35 when compared to Mazatecans and the HLA-B52 allele was increased in Nahuas and Teenek when compared to Mayos. An increased frequency of HLA-B39 was observed in Mazatecans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos and Teenek. Also, an increased frequency of HLA-B51 was observed in Mayos when compared to Mazatecans and Nahuas. These data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-B alleles and the high frequency of HLA-B35, HLA-B39 and HLA-B40 alleles in autochthonous American populations. In spite of the restriction in this polymorphism, differences in frequencies of HLA-B alleles could be helpful in distinguishing each of these populations.

  9. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  10. T cell development in B cell-deficient mice. V. Stopping anti-mu treatment results in Igh-restricted expansion of the T suppressor cell repertoire concomitant with the development of normal immunoglobulin levels

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    B cell-deficient (anti-mu-treated) mice have proven to be a valuable tool with which to examine the influence of Ig idiotypic determinants upon the development of the Ts repertoire. We have previously reported that ABA-specific Ts repertoires matured in normal and Ig-deficient environments differ from one another in their composition, and consequently, their functionally expressed Igh restrictions. The present report characterizes the impact of natural development of mature B cell activity upon the composition of the Ts repertoire. After stopping anti-mu treatment of C.AL-20 mice, ABA-specific Ts repertoires undergo a defined expansion shown by their acquisition of an additional Ts network that displays Igh restrictions characteristic of normal C.AL- 20 mice. This Igh-1d-restricted repertoire can be readily shown within 2 wk of major increases in surface Ig spleen cells and total serum Ig levels in these mice. At the same time, the original Ts restriction specificity (Igh-1a-restricted) generated in the Ig-deficient environment of anti-mu. C.AL-20 mice, is not lost for at least 20 wk. The resulting dual Ts repertoire, characterized by expression of parallel, idiotypically restricted Ts networks, is demonstrable for at least 13 wk. These findings favor an important role for Ig determinants in determining the makeup of the T cell repertoire, and ultimately, the composition of immunologic networks as a whole. PMID:2941514

  11. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  12. Selection of the lamprey VLRC antigen receptor repertoire.

    PubMed

    Holland, Stephen J; Gao, Mingming; Hirano, Masayuki; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Luo, Ming; Schorpp, Michael; Cooper, Max D; Aravind, L; Mariuzza, Roy A; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-10-14

    The alternative adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates is based on different isotypes of variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that are composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and expressed by distinct B- and T-like lymphocyte lineages. VLRB is expressed by B-like cells, whereas VLRA and VLRC are expressed by two T-like lineages that develop in the thymoid, a thymus-like structure in lamprey larvae. In each case, stepwise combinatorial insertions of different types of short donor LRR cassettes into incomplete germ-line genes are required to generate functional VLR gene assemblies. It is unknown, however, whether the diverse repertoires of VLRs that are expressed by peripheral blood lymphocytes are shaped by selection after their assembly. Here, we identify signatures of selection in the peripheral repertoire of VLRC antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by one of the T-like cell types in lampreys. Selection strongly favors VLRC molecules containing four internal variable leucine-rich repeat (LRRV) modules, although VLRC assemblies encoding five internal modules are initially equally frequent. In addition to the length selection, VLRC molecules in VLRC(+) peripheral lymphocytes exhibit a distinct pattern of high entropy sites in the N-terminal LRR1 module, which is inserted next to the germ-line-encoded LRRNT module. This is evident in comparisons to VLRC gene assemblies found in the thymoid and to VLRC gene assemblies found in some VLRA(+) cells. Our findings are the first indication to our knowledge that selection operates on a VLR repertoire and provide a framework to establish the mechanism by which this selection occurs during development of the VLRC(+) lymphocyte lineage.

  13. panhandling repertoires and routines for overcoming the nonperson treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I present panhandling as a dynamic undertaking that requires conscious actions and purposeful modifications of self, performances, and emotions to gain the attention and interest of passersby. I show that describing and theorizing panhandling in terms of dramaturgical routines is useful in understanding the interactions and exchanges that constitute panhandling. In addition, repertoires rightly portray panhandlers as agents engaging the social world rather than as passive social types. From this perspective, sidewalks serve as stages on which panhandlers confront and overcome various forms of the nonperson treatment. The research is based on a street ethnography of homeless panhandlers living in Washington, DC. PMID:17541452

  14. Profiling tissue-resident T cell repertoires by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott D; Raeburn, Lisa A; Holt, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing of recombined T cell receptor (TCR) genes and transcripts has provided a view of T cell repertoire diversity at an unprecedented resolution. Beyond profiling peripheral blood, analysis of tissue-resident T cells provides further insight into immune-related diseases. We describe the extraction of TCR sequence information directly from RNA-sequencing data from 6738 tumor and 604 control tissues, with a typical yield of 1 TCR per 10 million reads. This method circumvents the need for PCR amplification of the TCR template and provides TCR information in the context of global gene expression, allowing integrated analysis of extensive RNA-sequencing data resources. PMID:26620832

  15. Units of analysis and kinetic structure of behavioral repertoires.

    PubMed

    Thompson, T; Lubinski, D

    1986-09-01

    It is suggested that molar streams of behavior are constructed of various arrangements of three elementary constituents (elicited, evoked, and emitted response classes). An eight-cell taxonomy is elaborated as a framework for analyzing and synthesizing complex behavioral repertoires based on these functional units. It is proposed that the local force binding functional units into a smoothly articulated kinetic sequence arises from temporally arranged relative response probability relationships. Behavioral integration is thought to reflect the joint influence of the organism's hierarchy of relative response probabilities, fluctuating biological states, and the arrangement of environmental and behavioral events in time.

  16. Units of analysis and kinetic structure of behavioral repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis; Lubinski, David

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that molar streams of behavior are constructed of various arrangements of three elementary constituents (elicited, evoked, and emitted response classes). An eight-cell taxonomy is elaborated as a framework for analyzing and synthesizing complex behavioral repertoires based on these functional units. It is proposed that the local force binding functional units into a smoothly articulated kinetic sequence arises from temporally arranged relative response probability relationships. Behavioral integration is thought to reflect the joint influence of the organism's hierarchy of relative response probabilities, fluctuating biological states, and the arrangement of environmental and behavioral events in time. PMID:16812461

  17. Registration of TIL:383.13, TIL:625 and TIL:634, three long grain tropical Japonica Rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm lines containing novel Indica Alleles that increase tiller production and grain yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These three breeding lines were from a set of 123 progeny lines that were released by the USDA-ARS in 2012 as a mapping population. Chromosomal regions containing genes for increased tiller number under greenhouse conditions were subsequently identified in this population. We used the molecular an...

  18. What are the commonalities governing the behavior of humoral immune recognitive repertoires?

    PubMed

    Cohn, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    The humoral repertoire of immune systems is large, random and somatically selected. It is derived from a germline selected repertoire by a variety of diversification mechanisms, complementation of subunits, mutation and gene conversion. However derived, the end-product must be able to recognize and rid a vast variety of pathogens. This is accomplished by viewing antigens as combinatorials of epitopes, an astuce that permits a small repertoire to respond sufficiently rapidly to a vast antigenic universe. A somatically generated repertoire, however, requires a solution to two problems. First, a somatic mechanism for a self-nonself discrimination has to be put in place. Second, the repertoire has to be coupled to the effector mechanisms in a coherent fashion. The rules governing these two mechanisms are species-independent and delineate the parameters of all immune repertoires, whatever the somatic mechanism used to generate them.

  19. What are the commonalities governing the behavior of humoral immune recognitive repertoires?

    PubMed

    Cohn, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    The humoral repertoire of immune systems is large, random and somatically selected. It is derived from a germline selected repertoire by a variety of diversification mechanisms, complementation of subunits, mutation and gene conversion. However derived, the end-product must be able to recognize and rid a vast variety of pathogens. This is accomplished by viewing antigens as combinatorials of epitopes, an astuce that permits a small repertoire to respond sufficiently rapidly to a vast antigenic universe. A somatically generated repertoire, however, requires a solution to two problems. First, a somatic mechanism for a self-nonself discrimination has to be put in place. Second, the repertoire has to be coupled to the effector mechanisms in a coherent fashion. The rules governing these two mechanisms are species-independent and delineate the parameters of all immune repertoires, whatever the somatic mechanism used to generate them. PMID:16139887

  20. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  1. Identification and functional characterization of three novel alleles for the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region.

    PubMed

    Ehli, E A; Hu, Y; Lengyel-Nelson, T; Hudziak, J J; Davies, G E

    2012-02-01

    A promoter polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) has been reported to confer relative risk for phenotypes (depression/anxiety) and endophenotypes (amygdala reactivity). In this report, we identify and characterize three rare 5-HTTLPR alleles not previously described in the human literature. The three novel alleles were identified while genotyping 5-HTTLPR in a family-based attention deficit hyperactivity disorder clinical population. Two of the novel alleles are longer than the common 16-repeat long (L) allele (17 and 18 repeats) and the third is significantly smaller than the 14-repeat short (S) allele (11 repeats). The sequence and genetic architecture of each novel allele is described in detail. We report a significant decrease in the expression between the XL₁₇ (17r) allele and the L(A) (16r) allele. The XS₁₁ (11r) allele showed similar expression with the S (14r) allele. A 1.8-fold increase in expression was observed with the L(A)(16r) allele compared with the L(G) (16r) allele, which replicates results from earlier 5-HTTLPR expression experiments. In addition, transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis was performed using MatInspector (Genomatix) that showed the presence or absence of different putative TFBSs between the novel alleles and the common L (16r) and S (14r) alleles. The identification of rare variants and elucidation of their functional impact could potentially lead to understanding the contribution that the rare variant may have on the inheritance/susceptibility of multifactorial common diseases.

  2. RHD allele distribution in Africans of Mali

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franz F; Moulds, Joann M; Tounkara, Anatole; Kouriba, Bourema; Flegel, Willy A

    2003-01-01

    Background Aberrant and non-functional RHD alleles are much more frequent in Africans than in Europeans. The DAU cluster of RHD alleles exemplifies that the alleles frequent in Africans have evaded recognition until recently. A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in any African population was lacking. Results We surveyed the molecular structure and frequency of RHD alleles in Mali (West Africa) by evaluating 116 haplotypes. Only 69% could be attributed to standard RHD (55%) or the RHD deletion (14%). The aberrant RHD allele DAU-0 was predicted for 19%, RHDΨ for 7% and Ccdes for 4% of all haplotypes. DAU-3 and the new RHD allele RHD(L207F), dubbed DMA, were found in one haplotype each. A PCR-RFLP for the detection of the hybrid Rhesus box diagnostic for the RHD deletion in Europeans was false positive in 9 individuals, including all carriers of RHDΨ . Including two silent mutations and the RHD deletion, a total of 9 alleles could be differentiated. Conclusion Besides standard RHD and the RHD deletion, DAU-0, RHDΨ and Ccdes are major alleles in Mali. Our survey proved that the most frequent alleles of West Africans have been recognized allowing to devise reliable genotyping and phenotyping strategies. PMID:14505497

  3. The Role of Atomic Repertoires in Complex Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, David C

    2012-01-01

    Evolution and reinforcement shape adaptive forms and adaptive behavior through many cycles of blind variation and selection, and therein lie their parsimony and power. Human behavior is distinctive in that this shaping process is commonly “short circuited”: Critical variations are induced in a single trial. The processes by which this economy is accomplished have a common feature: They all exploit one or more atomic repertoires, elementary units of behavior each under control of a distinctive stimulus. By appropriate arrangements of these discriminative stimuli, an indefinite number of permutations of atomic units can be evoked. When such a permutation satisfies a second contingency, it can come under control of the relevant context, and the explicit arrangement of discriminative stimuli will no longer be required. Consequently, innovations in adaptive behavior can spread rapidly through the population. A consideration of atomic repertoires informs our interpretation of generalized operants and other phenomena that are otherwise difficult to explain. Observational learning is discussed as a case in point. PMID:22942536

  4. The mimetic repertoire of the spotted bowerbird Ptilonorhynchus maculatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Laura A.; Healy, Susan D.

    2011-06-01

    Although vocal mimicry in songbirds is well documented, little is known about the function of such mimicry. One possibility is that the mimic produces the vocalisations of predatory or aggressive species to deter potential predators or competitors. Alternatively, these sounds may be learned in error as a result of their acoustic properties such as structural simplicity. We determined the mimetic repertoires of a population of male spotted bowerbirds Ptilonorhynchus maculatus, a species that mimics predatory and aggressive species. Although male mimetic repertoires contained an overabundance of vocalisations produced by species that were generally aggressive, there was also a marked prevalence of mimicry of sounds that are associated with alarm such as predator calls, alarm calls and mobbing calls, irrespective of whether the species being mimicked was aggressive or not. We propose that it may be the alarming context in which these sounds are first heard that may lead both to their acquisition and to their later reproduction. We suggest that enhanced learning capability during acute stress may explain vocal mimicry in many species that mimic sounds associated with alarm.

  5. Gestural communication in subadult bonobos (Pan paniscus): repertoire and use.

    PubMed

    Pika, Simone; Liebal, Katja; Tomasello, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This article aims to provide an inventory of the communicative gestures used by bonobos (Pan paniscus), based on observations of subadult bonobos and descriptions of gestural signals and similar behaviors in wild and captive bonobo groups. In addition, we focus on the underlying processes of social cognition, including learning mechanisms and flexibility of gesture use (such as adjustment to the attentional state of the recipient). The subjects were seven bonobos, aged 1-8 years, living in two different groups in captivity. Twenty distinct gestures (one auditory, eight tactile, and 11 visual) were recorded. We found individual differences and similar degrees of concordance of the gestural repertoires between and within groups, which provide evidence that ontogenetic ritualization is the main learning process involved. There is suggestive evidence, however, that some form of social learning may be responsible for the acquisition of special gestures. Overall, the present study establishes that the gestural repertoire of bonobos can be characterized as flexible and adapted to various communicative circumstances, including the attentional state of the recipient. Differences from and similarities to the other African ape species are discussed.

  6. Evolving a Behavioral Repertoire for a Walking Robot.

    PubMed

    Cully, A; Mouret, J-B

    2016-01-01

    Numerous algorithms have been proposed to allow legged robots to learn to walk. However, most of these algorithms are devised to learn walking in a straight line, which is not sufficient to accomplish any real-world mission. Here we introduce the Transferability-based Behavioral Repertoire Evolution algorithm (TBR-Evolution), a novel evolutionary algorithm that simultaneously discovers several hundreds of simple walking controllers, one for each possible direction. By taking advantage of solutions that are usually discarded by evolutionary processes, TBR-Evolution is substantially faster than independently evolving each controller. Our technique relies on two methods: (1) novelty search with local competition, which searches for both high-performing and diverse solutions, and (2) the transferability approach, which combines simulations and real tests to evolve controllers for a physical robot. We evaluate this new technique on a hexapod robot. Results show that with only a few dozen short experiments performed on the robot, the algorithm learns a repertoire of controllers that allows the robot to reach every point in its reachable space. Overall, TBR-Evolution introduced a new kind of learning algorithm that simultaneously optimizes all the achievable behaviors of a robot.

  7. Evolving a Behavioral Repertoire for a Walking Robot.

    PubMed

    Cully, A; Mouret, J-B

    2016-01-01

    Numerous algorithms have been proposed to allow legged robots to learn to walk. However, most of these algorithms are devised to learn walking in a straight line, which is not sufficient to accomplish any real-world mission. Here we introduce the Transferability-based Behavioral Repertoire Evolution algorithm (TBR-Evolution), a novel evolutionary algorithm that simultaneously discovers several hundreds of simple walking controllers, one for each possible direction. By taking advantage of solutions that are usually discarded by evolutionary processes, TBR-Evolution is substantially faster than independently evolving each controller. Our technique relies on two methods: (1) novelty search with local competition, which searches for both high-performing and diverse solutions, and (2) the transferability approach, which combines simulations and real tests to evolve controllers for a physical robot. We evaluate this new technique on a hexapod robot. Results show that with only a few dozen short experiments performed on the robot, the algorithm learns a repertoire of controllers that allows the robot to reach every point in its reachable space. Overall, TBR-Evolution introduced a new kind of learning algorithm that simultaneously optimizes all the achievable behaviors of a robot. PMID:25585055

  8. Characterization of the Sortase Repertoire in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Fouet, Agnès

    2011-01-01

    LPXTG proteins, present in most if not all Gram-positive bacteria, are known to be anchored by sortases to the bacterial peptidoglycan. More than one sortase gene is often encoded in a bacterial species, and each sortase is supposed to specifically anchor given LPXTG proteins, depending of the sequence of the C-terminal cell wall sorting signal (cwss), bearing an LPXTG motif or another recognition sequence. B. anthracis possesses three sortase genes. B. anthracis sortase deleted mutant strains are not affected in their virulence. To determine the sortase repertoires, we developed a genetic screen using the property of the gamma phage to lyse bacteria only when its receptor, GamR, an LPXTG protein, is exposed at the surface. We identified 10 proteins that contain a cell wall sorting signal and are covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan. Some chimeric proteins yielded phage lysis in all sortase mutant strains, suggesting that cwss proteins remained surface accessible in absence of their anchoring sortase, probably as a consequence of membrane localization of yet uncleaved precursor proteins. For definite assignment of the sortase repertoires, we consequently relied on a complementary test, using a biochemical approach, namely immunoblot experiments. The sortase anchoring nine of these proteins has thus been determined. The absence of virulence defect of the sortase mutants could be a consequence of the membrane localization of the cwss proteins. PMID:22076158

  9. In silico analysis of the cyclophilin repertoire of apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Krücken, Jürgen; Greif, Gisela; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyclophilins (Cyps) are peptidyl cis/trans isomerases implicated in diverse processes such as protein folding, signal transduction, and RNA processing. They are also candidate drug targets, in particular for the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. In addition, cyclosporine is known to exhibit anti-parasitic effects on a wide range of organisms including several apicomplexa. In order to obtain new non-immunosuppressive drugs targeting apicomplexan cyclophilins, a profound knowledge of the cyclophilin repertoire of this phylum would be necessary. Results BLAST and maximum likelihood analyses identified 16 different cyclophilin subfamilies within the genomes of Cryptosporidium hominis, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Theileria annulata, Theileria parva, and Babesia bovis. In addition to good statistical support from the phylogenetic analysis, these subfamilies are also confirmed by comparison of cyclophilin domain architecture. Within an individual genome, the number of different Cyp genes that could be deduced varies between 7–9 for Cryptosporidia and 14 for T. gondii. Many of the putative apicomplexan cyclophilins are predicted to be nuclear proteins, most of them presumably involved in RNA processing. Conclusion The genomes of apicomplexa harbor a cyclophilin repertoire that is at least as complex as that of most fungi. The identification of Cyp subfamilies that are specific for lower eukaryotes, apicomplexa, or even the genus Plasmodium is of particular interest since these subfamilies are not present in host cells and might therefore represent attractive drug targets. PMID:19555495

  10. Evolutionary redesign of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) Toll-like receptor repertoire by gene losses and expansions

    PubMed Central

    Solbakken, Monica H.; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Seppola, Marit; Gregers, Tone F.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the teleost Atlantic cod demonstrated loss of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II, an extreme gene expansion of MHC class I and gene expansions and losses in the innate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family of Toll-like receptors (TLR). In a comparative genomic setting, using an improved version of the genome, we characterize PRRs in Atlantic cod with emphasis on TLRs demonstrating the loss of TLR1/6, TLR2 and TLR5 and expansion of TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, TLR22 and TLR25. We find that Atlantic cod TLR expansions are strongly influenced by diversifying selection likely to increase the detectable ligand repertoire through neo- and subfunctionalization. Using RNAseq we find that Atlantic cod TLRs display likely tissue or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. In a broader perspective, a comprehensive vertebrate TLR phylogeny reveals that the Atlantic cod TLR repertoire is extreme with regards to losses and expansions compared to other teleosts. In addition we identify a substantial shift in TLR repertoires following the evolutionary transition from an aquatic vertebrate (fish) to a terrestrial (tetrapod) life style. Collectively, our findings provide new insight into the function and evolution of TLRs in Atlantic cod as well as the evolutionary history of vertebrate innate immunity. PMID:27126702

  11. Evolutionary redesign of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) Toll-like receptor repertoire by gene losses and expansions.

    PubMed

    Solbakken, Monica H; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Seppola, Marit; Gregers, Tone F; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the teleost Atlantic cod demonstrated loss of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II, an extreme gene expansion of MHC class I and gene expansions and losses in the innate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family of Toll-like receptors (TLR). In a comparative genomic setting, using an improved version of the genome, we characterize PRRs in Atlantic cod with emphasis on TLRs demonstrating the loss of TLR1/6, TLR2 and TLR5 and expansion of TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, TLR22 and TLR25. We find that Atlantic cod TLR expansions are strongly influenced by diversifying selection likely to increase the detectable ligand repertoire through neo- and subfunctionalization. Using RNAseq we find that Atlantic cod TLRs display likely tissue or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. In a broader perspective, a comprehensive vertebrate TLR phylogeny reveals that the Atlantic cod TLR repertoire is extreme with regards to losses and expansions compared to other teleosts. In addition we identify a substantial shift in TLR repertoires following the evolutionary transition from an aquatic vertebrate (fish) to a terrestrial (tetrapod) life style. Collectively, our findings provide new insight into the function and evolution of TLRs in Atlantic cod as well as the evolutionary history of vertebrate innate immunity.

  12. Erasure and reestablishment of random allelic expression imbalance after epigenetic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Aaron Richard; Uwanogho, Dafe Aghogho; Cocks, Graham; Perfect, Leo William; Dempster, Emma; Mill, Jonathan; Price, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Clonal level random allelic expression imbalance and random monoallelic expression provides cellular heterogeneity within tissues by modulating allelic dosage. Although such expression patterns have been observed in multiple cell types, little is known about when in development these stochastic allelic choices are made. We examine allelic expression patterns in human neural progenitor cells before and after epigenetic reprogramming to induced pluripotency, observing that loci previously characterized by random allelic expression imbalance (0.63% of expressed genes) are generally reset to a biallelic state in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We subsequently neuralized the iPSCs and profiled isolated clonal neural stem cells, observing that significant random allelic expression imbalance is reestablished at 0.65% of expressed genes, including novel loci not found to show allelic expression imbalance in the original parental neural progenitor cells. Allelic expression imbalance was associated with altered DNA methylation across promoter regulatory regions, with clones characterized by skewed allelic expression being hypermethylated compared to their biallelic sister clones. Our results suggest that random allelic expression imbalance is established during lineage commitment and is associated with increased DNA methylation at the gene promoter. PMID:27539784

  13. Erasure and reestablishment of random allelic expression imbalance after epigenetic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Aaron Richard; Uwanogho, Dafe Aghogho; Cocks, Graham; Perfect, Leo William; Dempster, Emma; Mill, Jonathan; Price, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Clonal level random allelic expression imbalance and random monoallelic expression provides cellular heterogeneity within tissues by modulating allelic dosage. Although such expression patterns have been observed in multiple cell types, little is known about when in development these stochastic allelic choices are made. We examine allelic expression patterns in human neural progenitor cells before and after epigenetic reprogramming to induced pluripotency, observing that loci previously characterized by random allelic expression imbalance (0.63% of expressed genes) are generally reset to a biallelic state in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We subsequently neuralized the iPSCs and profiled isolated clonal neural stem cells, observing that significant random allelic expression imbalance is reestablished at 0.65% of expressed genes, including novel loci not found to show allelic expression imbalance in the original parental neural progenitor cells. Allelic expression imbalance was associated with altered DNA methylation across promoter regulatory regions, with clones characterized by skewed allelic expression being hypermethylated compared to their biallelic sister clones. Our results suggest that random allelic expression imbalance is established during lineage commitment and is associated with increased DNA methylation at the gene promoter. PMID:27539784

  14. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  15. Reconstructing and mining the B cell repertoire with ImmunediveRsity

    PubMed Central

    Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth Ernestina; Sámano-Sánchez, Hugo; Aguilar-Salgado, Andrés; Velasco-Herrera, Martín Del Castillo; Vargas-Chávez, Carlos; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Romero, Guillermo; Moreno, José; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor repertoire is highly diverse and constantly modified by clonal selection. High-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) of the lymphocyte repertoire (Rep-Seq) represents a promising technology to explore such diversity ex-vivo and assist in the identification of antigen-specific antibodies based on molecular signatures of clonal selection. Therefore, integrative tools for repertoire reconstruction and analysis from antibody sequences are needed. We developed ImmunediveRity, a stand-alone pipeline primarily based in R programming for the integral analysis of B cell repertoire data generated by HTS. The pipeline integrates GNU software and in house scripts to perform quality filtering, sequencing noise correction and repertoire reconstruction based on V, D and J segment assignment, clonal origin and unique heavy chain identification. Post-analysis scripts generate a wealth of repertoire metrics that in conjunction with a rich graphical output facilitates sample comparison and repertoire mining. Its performance was tested with raw and curated human and mouse 454-Roche sequencing benchmarks providing good approximations of repertoire structure. Furthermore, ImmunediveRsity was used to mine the B cell repertoire of immunized mice with a model antigen, allowing the identification of previously validated antigen-specific antibodies, and revealing different and unexpected clonal diversity patterns in the post-immunization IgM and IgG compartments. Although ImmunediveRsity is similar to other recently developed tools, it offers significant advantages that facilitate repertoire analysis and repertoire mining. ImmunediveRsity is open source and free for academic purposes and it runs on 64 bit GNU/Linux and MacOS. Available at: https://bitbucket.org/ImmunediveRsity/immunediversity/ PMID:25875140

  16. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    PubMed

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  17. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  18. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges. PMID:27307400

  19. Allelic diversity and molecular characterization of puroindoline genes in five diploid species of the Aegilops genus.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Susana; Guzmán, Carlos; Alvarez, Juan B

    2013-11-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait in wheat. This trait is related to the variation in, and the presence of, puroindolines (PINA and PINB). This variation can be increased by the allelic polymorphism present in the Aegilops species that are related to wheat. This study evaluated allelic Pina and Pinb gene variability in five diploid species of the Aegilops genus, along with the molecular characterization of the main allelic variants found in each species. This polymorphism resulted in 16 alleles for the Pina gene and 24 alleles for the Pinb gene, of which 10 and 17, respectively, were novel. Diverse mutations were detected in the deduced mature proteins of these alleles, which could influence the hardness characteristics of these proteins. This study shows that the diploid species of the Aegilops genus could be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, which could be used in breeding programmes to extend the range of different textures in wheat.

  20. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  1. Estimating vocal repertoire size is like collecting coupons: a theoretical framework with heterogeneity in signal abundance.

    PubMed

    Kershenbaum, Arik; Freeberg, Todd M; Gammon, David E

    2015-05-21

    Vocal repertoire size is an important behavioural measure in songbirds and mammals with complex vocal communication systems, and has traditionally been used as an indicator of individual fitness, cognitive ability, and social structure. Estimates of asymptotic repertoire size have typically been made using curve fitting techniques. However, the exponential model usually applied in these techniques has never been provided with a theoretical justification based on probability theory, and the model has led to inaccurate estimates. We derived the precise expression for the expected number of distinct signal types observed for a fixed sampling effort: a variation of what is known in the statistical literature as the "Coupon Collector׳s problem". We used empirical data from three species (northern mockingbird, Carolina chickadee, and rock hyrax) to assess the performance of the Coupon Collector model compared to commonly used techniques, such as exponential fitting and repertoire enumeration, and also tested the different models against simulated artificial data sets with the statistical properties of the empirical data. We found that when signal probabilities are dissimilar, the Coupon Collector model provides far more accurate estimates of repertoire size than traditional techniques. Enumeration and exponential curve fitting greatly underestimated repertoire size, despite appearing to have reached saturation. Application of the Coupon Collector model can generate more accurate estimates of repertoire size than the commonly used exponential model of repertoire discovery, and could go a long way towards re-establishing repertoire size as a useful indicator in animal communication research.

  2. Repertoires to Scaffold Teacher Learning and Practice in Assessment of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Judy

    2011-01-01

    In a community of practice, shared repertoires develop as resources to create meaning in the joint pursuit of an enterprise. Repertoires include tools and routines. This article examines use of a tool, the "Literacy Learning Progressions" ("LLP"), in assessing development in writing. Teachers (Max N = 291) responded to a questionnaire regarding…

  3. Repertoires: How to Transform a Project into a Research Community

    PubMed Central

    Leonelli, Sabina; Ankeny, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    How effectively communities of scientists come together and co-operate is crucial both to the quality of research outputs and to the extent to which such outputs integrate insights, data and methods from a variety of fields, laboratories and locations around the globe. This essay focuses on the ensemble of material and social conditions that makes it possible for a short-term collaboration, set up to accomplish a specific task, to give rise to relatively stable communities of researchers. We refer to these distinctive features as repertoires, and investigate their development and implementation across three examples of collaborative research in the life sciences. We conclude that whether a particular project ends up fostering the emergence of a resilient research community is partly determined by the degree of attention and care devoted by researchers to material and social elements beyond the specific research questions under consideration. PMID:26412866

  4. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the “germ-line multipotency program” and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells. PMID:26644562

  5. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  6. Diversity in clinical guidelines: the role of repertoires of evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Tiago

    2005-05-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are one of the main tools by which clinicians, policy makers and patients hope to make health care less variable, more reliable and efficient, but there is little understanding of the processes by which clinical guidance is put together by guideline groups. This paper describes the social organisation of knowledge within clinical practice guideline development processes by drawing on the sociology of situated judgement. Two guideline development processes were observed, and the development group meetings (N = 21) recorded and analysed qualitatively. Data analysis suggested that clinical guidance comes to existence through the combination of repertoires of evaluation, organised around four different epistemic criteria: robustness, usability, acceptability and adequacy. This research provides a detailed and layered understanding of the knowledge dynamics involved in developing recommendations for appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstance.

  7. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells. PMID:26644562

  8. Stem cell reconstitution of autoimmune T cell repertoires.

    PubMed

    Edling, Andrea E; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2005-12-01

    Maintenance of T cell memory in autoimmune disease may be complex because the unending renewable supply of self provides an inherent high antigen load that effectively precludes clearance, and because the broad array of potential immunogenic targets provides extensive self-recognition plasticity. Autoimmunity is characterized by a dynamic self-recognition process in which the primary autoreactivity initiating disease is soon followed and often displaced by secondary neoautoreactivities, or epitope spreading, that emerge as a result of endogenous self-priming. Here we show that the autoimmune disease process involves a tertiary phase of self recognition characterized by stem cell reconstitution of autoreactive T cells that recapitulates the myelin self recognition process involved in disease initiation and spreading during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our study indicates that sustained autoimmune memory may not simply be due to the persistence of long-lived memory T cells, but may also involve bone marrow regeneration and replacement of the autoreactive T cell repertoire.

  9. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  10. Establishing a Generalized Repertoire of Helping Behavior in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Sharon A; Reeve, Kenneth F; Buffington Townsend, Dawn; Poulson, Claire L

    2007-01-01

    The present study used a multiple baseline across participants design to assess whether 4 children with autism could learn a generalized repertoire of helping adults with different tasks through the use of a multicomponent teaching package. Different helping responses were taught in the presence of multiple exemplars of discriminative stimuli drawn from experimenter-defined categories of helping behavior (e.g., locating objects, putting away items, setting up an activity). During the training condition, video models, prompting, and reinforcement were used. The results showed that all 4 children learned to emit appropriate helping responses in the presence of discriminative stimuli from the helping categories used during training. Generalization of helping responses was observed in the presence of untrained discriminative stimuli during additional probe conditions. Additional pre- and postintervention generalization trials showed that the frequency of helping responses also increased in the presence of novel stimuli, in a novel setting, and with a novel instructor. PMID:17471797

  11. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector repertoires: last words in endless arguments.

    PubMed

    Lindeberg, Magdalen; Cunnac, Sébastien; Collmer, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Many plant pathogens subvert host immunity by injecting compositionally diverse but functionally similar repertoires of cytoplasmic effector proteins. The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae is a model for exploring the functional structure of such repertoires. The pangenome of P. syringae encodes 57 families of effectors injected by the type III secretion system. Distribution of effector genes among phylogenetically diverse strains reveals a small set of core effectors targeting antimicrobial vesicle trafficking and a much larger set of variable effectors targeting kinase-based recognition processes. Complete disassembly of the 28-effector repertoire of a model strain and reassembly of a minimal functional repertoire reveals the importance of simultaneously attacking both processes. These observations, coupled with growing knowledge of effector targets in plants, support a model for coevolving molecular dialogs between effector repertoires and plant immune systems that emphasizes mutually-driven expansion of the components governing recognition. PMID:22341410

  12. Characterization of Neonatal Vocal and Motor Repertoire of Reelin Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Angela; Laviola, Giovanni; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Reelin is a large secreted extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing an important role in early neurodevelopment. Several genetic studies found an association between RELN gene and increased risk of autism suggesting that reelin deficiency may be a vulnerability factor in its etiology. Moreover, a reduced reelin expression has been observed in several brain regions of subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Since a number of reports have documented presence of vocal and neuromotor abnormalities in patients with autism and suggested that these dysfunctions predate the onset of the syndrome, we performed a fine-grain characterization of the neonatal vocal and motor repertoire in reelin mutant mice to explore the developmental precursors of the disorder. Our findings evidence a general delay in motor and vocal development in heterozygous (50% reduced reelin) and reeler (lacking reelin gene) mutant mice. As a whole, an increased number of calls characterized heterozygous pup's emission. Furthermore, the typical ontogenetic peak in the number of calls characterizing wild-type pups on postnatal day 4 appeared slightly delayed in heterozygous pups (to day 6) and was quite absent in reeler littermates, which exhibited a flat profile during development. We also detected a preferential use of a specific call category (two-components) by heterozygous and reeler mice at postnatal days 6 and 8 as compared to their wild-type littermates. With regard to the analysis of spontaneous movements, a differential profile emerged early in development among the three genotypes. While only slight coordination difficulties are exhibited by heterozygous pups, all indices of motor development appear delayed in reeler mice. Overall, our results evidence a genotype-dependent deviation in ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development in reelin mutant pups. PMID:23700474

  13. VNTR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin locus are haplotype and population related

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The human {alpha}-globin complex contains several polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites (i.e., RFLPs) linked to form haplotypes and is flanked by two hypervariable VNTR loci, the 5{prime} hypervariable region (HVR) and the more highly polymorphic 3{prime}HVR. Using a combination of RFLP analysis and PCR, the authors have characterized the 5{prime}HVR and 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin haplotypes of 133 chromosomes, and they here show that specific {alpha}-globin haplotypes are each associated with discrete subsets of the alleles observed at these two VNTR loci. This statistically highly significant association is observed over a region spanning {approximately} 100 kb. With the exception of closely related haplotypes, different haplotypes do not share identically sized 3{prime}HVR alleles. Earlier studies have shown that {alpha}-globin haplotype distributions differ between populations; the current findings also reveal extensive population substructure in the repertoire of {alpha}-globin VNTRs. If similar features are characteristic of other VNTR loci, this will have important implications for forensic and anthropological studies. 42 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Efficient genotype elimination via adaptive allele consolidation.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Nicoletta; Lettieri, Giuseppe; Martini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We propose the technique of Adaptive Allele Consolidation, that greatly improves the performance of the Lange-Goradia algorithm for genotype elimination in pedigrees, while still producing equivalent output. Genotype elimination consists in removing from a pedigree those genotypes that are impossible according to the Mendelian law of inheritance. This is used to find errors in genetic data and is useful as a preprocessing step in other analyses (such as linkage analysis or haplotype imputation). The problem of genotype elimination is intrinsically combinatorial, and Allele Consolidation is an existing technique where several alleles are replaced by a single “lumped” allele in order to reduce the number of combinations of genotypes that have to be considered, possibly at the expense of precision. In existing Allele Consolidation techniques, alleles are lumped once and for all before performing genotype elimination. The idea of Adaptive Allele Consolidation is to dynamically change the set of alleles that are lumped together during the execution of the Lange-Goradia algorithm, so that both high performance and precision are achieved. We have implemented the technique in a tool called Celer and evaluated it on a large set of scenarios, with good results.

  15. Maximizing allele detection: Effects of analytical threshold and DNA levels on rates of allele and locus drop-out.

    PubMed

    Rakay, Christine A; Bregu, Joli; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2012-12-01

    Interpretation of DNA evidence depends upon the ability of the analyst to accurately compare the DNA profile obtained from an item of evidence and the DNA profile of a standard. This interpretation becomes progressively more difficult as the number of 'drop-out' and 'drop-in' events increase. Analytical thresholds (AT) are typically selected to ensure the false detection of noise is minimized. However, there exists a tradeoff between the erroneous labeling of noise as alleles and the false non-detection of alleles (i.e. drop-out). In this study, the effect ATs had on both types of error was characterized. Various ATs were tested, where three relied upon the analysis of baseline signals obtained from 31 negative samples. The fourth AT was determined by utilizing the relationship between RFU signal and DNA input. The other ATs were the commonly employed 50, 150 and 200 RFU thresholds. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) plots showed that although high ATs completely negated the false labeling of noise, DNA analyzed with ATs derived using analysis of the baseline signal exhibited the lowest rates of drop-out and the lowest total error rates. In another experiment, the effect small changes in ATs had on drop-out was examined. This study showed that as the AT increased from ∼10 to 60 RFU, the number of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of one allele increased. Between ATs of 60 and 150 RFU, the frequency of allelic drop-out remained constant at 0.27 (±0.02) and began to decrease when ATs of 150 RFU or greater were utilized. In contrast, the frequency of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of both alleles consistently increased with AT. In summary, for samples amplified with less than 0.5ng of DNA, ATs derived from baseline analysis of negatives were shown to decrease the frequency of drop-out by a factor of 100 without significantly increasing rates of erroneous noise detection.

  16. Rare HLA drive additional HIV evolution compared to more frequent alleles.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Christine M; Lockhart, David W; Listgarten, Jennifer; Maley, Stephen N; Kadie, Carl; Learn, Gerald H; Nickle, David C; Heckerman, David E; Deng, Wenjie; Brander, Christian; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Coovadia, Hoosen; Goulder, Philip J R; Korber, Bette T; Walker, Bruce D; Mullins, James I

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 can evolve HLA-specific escape variants in response to HLA-mediated cellular immunity. HLA alleles that are common in the host population may increase the frequency of such escape variants at the population level. When loss of viral fitness is caused by immune escape variation, these variants may revert upon infection of a new host who does not have the corresponding HLA allele. Furthermore, additional escape variants may appear in response to the nonconcordant HLA alleles. Because individuals with rare HLA alleles are less likely to be infected by a partner with concordant HLA alleles, viral populations infecting hosts with rare HLA alleles may undergo a greater amount of evolution than those infecting hosts with common alleles due to the loss of preexisting escape variants followed by new immune escape. This hypothesis was evaluated using maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of each gene from 272 full-length HIV-1 sequences. Recent viral evolution, as measured by the external branch length, was found to be inversely associated with HLA frequency in nef (p < 0.02), env (p < 0.03), and pol (p < or = 0.05), suggesting that rare HLA alleles provide a disproportionate force driving viral evolution compared to common alleles, likely due to the loss of preexisting escape variants during early stages postinfection.

  17. "Is English Also the Place Where I Belong?": Linguistic Biographies and Expanding Communicative Repertoires in Central Java

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentz, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This article employs the term "communicative repertoire" in order to highlight that when one learns any new "language", one introduces new communicative resources into a unified communicative repertoire. As repertoires represent such singular "grammars" in individuals' minds, learned communicative resources can…

  18. Preservation of Tetherin and CD4 Counter-Activities in Circulating Vpu Alleles despite Extensive Sequence Variation within HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Suzanne; Hué, Stephane; Kim, Eun-Young; Reddy, Susheel; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Vpu protein is expressed from a bi-cistronic message late in the viral life cycle. It functions during viral assembly to maximise infectious virus release by targeting CD4 for proteosomal degradation and counteracting the antiviral protein tetherin (BST2/CD317). Single genome analysis of vpu repertoires throughout infection in 14 individuals infected with HIV-1 clade B revealed extensive amino acid diversity of the Vpu protein. For the most part, this variation in Vpu increases over the course of infection and is associated with predicted epitopes of the individual's MHC class I haplotype, suggesting CD8+ T cell pressure is the major driver of Vpu sequence diversity within the host. Despite this variability, the Vpu functions of targeting CD4 and counteracting both physical virus restriction and NF-κB activation by tetherin are rigorously maintained throughout HIV-1 infection. Only a minority of circulating alleles bear lesions in either of these activities at any given time, suggesting functional Vpu mutants are heavily selected against even at later stages of infection. Comparison of Vpu proteins defective for one or several functions reveals novel determinants of CD4 downregulation, counteraction of tetherin restriction, and inhibition of NF-κB signalling. These data affirm the importance of Vpu functions for in vivo persistence of HIV-1 within infected individuals, not simply for transmission, and highlight its potential as a target for antiviral therapy. PMID:24465210

  19. Requirement of full TCR repertoire for regulatory T cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Junko; Baba, Minato; Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Negishi, Hideo; Yanai, Hideyuki; Habu, Sonoko; Hori, Shohei; Honda, Kenya; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of intestinal homeostasis by the immune system involves the dynamic interplay between gut commensal microbiota and resident immune cells. It is well known that a large and diverse lymphocyte antigen receptor repertoire enables the immune system to recognize and respond to a wide range of invading pathogens. There is also an emerging appreciation for a critical role the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire serves in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Nevertheless, how the diversity of the TCR repertoire in Tregs affects intestinal homeostasis remains unknown. To address this question, we studied mice whose T cells express a restricted TCR repertoire. We observed the development of spontaneous colitis, accompanied by the induction of T-helper type 17 cells in the colon that is driven by gut commensal microbiota. We provide further evidence that a restricted TCR repertoire causes a loss of tolerogenicity to microbiota, accompanied by a paucity of peripherally derived, Helios− Tregs and hyperactivation of migratory dendritic cells. These results thus reveal a new facet of the TCR repertoire in which Tregs require a diverse TCR repitoire for intestinal homeostasis, suggesting an additional driving force in the evolutional significance of the TCR repertoire. PMID:26420876

  20. Alternative 3' splice acceptor sites modulate enzymic activity in derivative alleles of the maize bronze1-mutable 13 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Okagaki, R J; Sullivan, T D; Schiefelbein, J W; Nelson, O E

    1992-01-01

    The defective Suppressor-mutator (dSpm)-induced allele bronze1-mutable 13 (bz1-m13) and many of its derivative alleles are leaky mutants with measurable levels of flavonol O3-glucosyltransferase activity. This activity results from splicing at acceptor site-1, one of two cryptic 3' splice sites within the dSpm insertion in bz1-m13. In this study, splicing in bz1-m13 change-in-state (CS) alleles CS-3 and CS-64 was shown to be altered from bz1-m13; previous work found altered splicing in CS-9. CS-64 is a null allele and lacks the acceptor site-1-spliced transcript because this site is deleted. CS-3 and CS-9 had increased levels of the acceptor site-1 transcript relative to bz1-m13 and increased enzymic activities. A deletion in CS-9 altered splicing by eliminating acceptor site-2. Both acceptor sites were intact in CS-3, but a deletion removed most of a 275-bp GC-rich sequence in dSpm. This suggests that GC-rich sequences affect splicing and is consistent with models postulating a role for AU content in the splicing of plant introns. Splicing does not necessarily occur, however, at the junction of AU-rich intron sequences and GC-rich exon sequences. PMID:1477558

  1. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  2. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Tracking global changes induced in the CD4 T-cell receptor repertoire by immunization with a complex antigen using short stretches of CDR3 protein sequence

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Niclas; Best, Katharine; Cinelli, Mattia; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Gal, Hilah; Shifrut, Eric; Madi, Asaf; Friedman, Nir; Shawe-Taylor, John; Chain, Benny

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The clonal theory of adaptive immunity proposes that immunological responses are encoded by increases in the frequency of lymphocytes carrying antigen-specific receptors. In this study, we measure the frequency of different T-cell receptors (TcR) in CD4 + T cell populations of mice immunized with a complex antigen, killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using high throughput parallel sequencing of the TcRβ chain. Our initial hypothesis that immunization would induce repertoire convergence proved to be incorrect, and therefore an alternative approach was developed that allows accurate stratification of TcR repertoires and provides novel insights into the nature of CD4 + T-cell receptor recognition. Results: To track the changes induced by immunization within this heterogeneous repertoire, the sequence data were classified by counting the frequency of different clusters of short (3 or 4) continuous stretches of amino acids within the antigen binding complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) repertoire of different mice. Both unsupervised (hierarchical clustering) and supervised (support vector machine) analyses of these different distributions of sequence clusters differentiated between immunized and unimmunized mice with 100% efficiency. The CD4 + TcR repertoires of mice 5 and 14 days postimmunization were clearly different from that of unimmunized mice but were not distinguishable from each other. However, the repertoires of mice 60 days postimmunization were distinct both from naive mice and the day 5/14 animals. Our results reinforce the remarkable diversity of the TcR repertoire, resulting in many diverse private TcRs contributing to the T-cell response even in genetically identical mice responding to the same antigen. However, specific motifs defined by short stretches of amino acids within the CDR3 region may determine TcR specificity and define a new approach to TcR sequence classification. Availability and implementation: The analysis was

  4. Monitoring Pharmacologically Induced Immunosuppression by Immune Repertoire Sequencing to Detect Acute Allograft Rejection in Heart Transplant Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Penland, Lolita; Luikart, Helen; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains difficult to predict and to measure the efficacy of pharmacological immunosuppression. We hypothesized that measuring the B-cell repertoire would enable assessment of the overall level of immunosuppression after heart transplantation. Methods and Findings In this proof-of-concept study, we implemented a molecular-barcode-based immune repertoire sequencing assay that sensitively and accurately measures the isotype and clonal composition of the circulating B cell repertoire. We used this assay to measure the temporal response of the B cell repertoire to immunosuppression after heart transplantation. We selected a subset of 12 participants from a larger prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01985412) that is ongoing at Stanford Medical Center and for which enrollment started in March 2010. This subset of 12 participants was selected to represent post-heart-transplant events, with and without acute rejection (six participants with moderate-to-severe rejection and six without). We analyzed 130 samples from these patients, with an average follow-up period of 15 mo. Immune repertoire sequencing enables the measurement of a patient’s net state of immunosuppression (correlation with tacrolimus level, r = −0.867, 95% CI −0.968 to −0.523, p = 0.0014), as well as the diagnosis of acute allograft rejection, which is preceded by increased immune activity with a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI 30.3% to 94.9%) and a specificity of 82.0% (95% CI 72.1% to 89.1%) (cell-free donor-derived DNA as noninvasive gold standard). To illustrate the potential of immune repertoire sequencing to monitor atypical post-transplant trajectories, we analyzed two more patients, one with chronic infections and one with amyloidosis. A larger, prospective study will be needed to validate the power of immune repertoire sequencing to predict rejection events, as this proof-of-concept study is limited to a small number of patients who were selected based on several

  5. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  6. Plasticity of the chemoreceptor repertoire in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shanshan; Stone, Eric A; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2009-10-01

    For most organisms, chemosensation is critical for survival and is mediated by large families of chemoreceptor proteins, whose expression must be tuned appropriately to changes in the chemical environment. We asked whether expression of chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome would be regulated independently; whether expression of certain chemoreceptor genes would be especially sensitive to environmental changes; whether groups of chemoreceptor genes undergo coordinated rexpression; and how plastic the expression of chemoreceptor genes is with regard to sex, development, reproductive state, and social context. To answer these questions we used Drosophila melanogaster, because its chemosensory systems are well characterized and both the genotype and environment can be controlled precisely. Using customized cDNA microarrays, we showed that chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome undergo independent transcriptional regulation at different developmental stages and between sexes. Expression of distinct subgroups of chemoreceptor genes is sensitive to reproductive state and social interactions. Furthermore, exposure of flies only to odor of the opposite sex results in altered transcript abundance of chemoreceptor genes. These genes are distinct from those that show transcriptional plasticity when flies are allowed physical contact with same or opposite sex members. We analyzed covariance in transcript abundance of chemosensory genes across all environmental conditions and found that they segregated into 20 relatively small, biologically relevant modules of highly correlated transcripts. This finely pixilated modular organization of the chemosensory subgenome enables fine tuning of the expression of the chemoreceptor repertoire in response to ecologically relevant environmental and physiological conditions. PMID:19816562

  7. Acoustic and behavioral repertoires of the hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius).

    PubMed

    Maust-Mohl, Maria; Soltis, Joseph; Reiss, Diana

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the acoustic and behavioral repertoires of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius). Simultaneous audio and video recordings were collected of male and female hippos at Disney's Animal Kingdom(®). Visual inspection of spectrograms resulted in classifying signals into three main categories (burst of air, tonal, and pulsed) produced in-air, underwater, or simultaneously in both mediums. Of the total acoustic signals, most were produced underwater (80%), and the majority of the total signals were tonal (54%). Using multivariate analysis of the acoustic parameters, 11 signal types were described and differentiated. In the burst of air category, chuffs and snorts were distinguished by minimum and peak frequency, and bubble displays were described. In the tonal category, grunts, groans, screams, and whines were distinguished by several frequency measures (e.g., minimum, maximum, fundamental, peak frequency). Wheeze honks were tonal signals that often involved a chorus of overlapping calls. In the pulsed category, click trains, croaks, and growls were distinguished by frequency and duration. Video analysis demonstrated that chuffs, groans, and whines were associated with submissive contexts, while snorts, grunts, and growls were associated with dominance contexts. These results provide further information about the acoustic signals and concurrent behavior of hippos.

  8. Plasticity of the Chemoreceptor Repertoire in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shanshan; Stone, Eric A.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Anholt, Robert R. H.

    2009-01-01

    For most organisms, chemosensation is critical for survival and is mediated by large families of chemoreceptor proteins, whose expression must be tuned appropriately to changes in the chemical environment. We asked whether expression of chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome would be regulated independently; whether expression of certain chemoreceptor genes would be especially sensitive to environmental changes; whether groups of chemoreceptor genes undergo coordinated rexpression; and how plastic the expression of chemoreceptor genes is with regard to sex, development, reproductive state, and social context. To answer these questions we used Drosophila melanogaster, because its chemosensory systems are well characterized and both the genotype and environment can be controlled precisely. Using customized cDNA microarrays, we showed that chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome undergo independent transcriptional regulation at different developmental stages and between sexes. Expression of distinct subgroups of chemoreceptor genes is sensitive to reproductive state and social interactions. Furthermore, exposure of flies only to odor of the opposite sex results in altered transcript abundance of chemoreceptor genes. These genes are distinct from those that show transcriptional plasticity when flies are allowed physical contact with same or opposite sex members. We analyzed covariance in transcript abundance of chemosensory genes across all environmental conditions and found that they segregated into 20 relatively small, biologically relevant modules of highly correlated transcripts. This finely pixilated modular organization of the chemosensory subgenome enables fine tuning of the expression of the chemoreceptor repertoire in response to ecologically relevant environmental and physiological conditions. PMID:19816562

  9. Phenotypic repertoire of the FNR regulatory network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tolla, Dean A; Savageau, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The FNR protein in Escherichia coli is an O(2) sensor that modifies global gene expression to adapt the cell to anaerobic growth. Regulation of FNR involves continuous cycling of the protein between its active and inactive states under aerobic conditions without apparent function. This raises the question of what benefit to the overall life cycle might compensate for the cost of cycling and reveals that the role of this process is poorly understood. To address this problem, we introduce the concept of a 'system design space', which provides a rigorous definition of phenotype at the molecular level and a means of visualizing the phenotypic repertoire of the system. Our analysis reveals undesirable and desirable phenotypes with an optimal constellation of parameter values for the system. To facilitate a more concrete understanding of what the design space represents, we analyse mutations that alter the apparent dimerization rate constant of FNR. We show that our estimated wild-type value of this rate constant, which is difficult to measure in situ, is located within this constellation and that the behaviour of the system is compromised in mutants if the value of the apparent dimerization rate constant lies beyond the bounds of this optimal constellation. PMID:21166900

  10. Acoustic and behavioral repertoires of the hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius).

    PubMed

    Maust-Mohl, Maria; Soltis, Joseph; Reiss, Diana

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the acoustic and behavioral repertoires of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius). Simultaneous audio and video recordings were collected of male and female hippos at Disney's Animal Kingdom(®). Visual inspection of spectrograms resulted in classifying signals into three main categories (burst of air, tonal, and pulsed) produced in-air, underwater, or simultaneously in both mediums. Of the total acoustic signals, most were produced underwater (80%), and the majority of the total signals were tonal (54%). Using multivariate analysis of the acoustic parameters, 11 signal types were described and differentiated. In the burst of air category, chuffs and snorts were distinguished by minimum and peak frequency, and bubble displays were described. In the tonal category, grunts, groans, screams, and whines were distinguished by several frequency measures (e.g., minimum, maximum, fundamental, peak frequency). Wheeze honks were tonal signals that often involved a chorus of overlapping calls. In the pulsed category, click trains, croaks, and growls were distinguished by frequency and duration. Video analysis demonstrated that chuffs, groans, and whines were associated with submissive contexts, while snorts, grunts, and growls were associated with dominance contexts. These results provide further information about the acoustic signals and concurrent behavior of hippos. PMID:26328671

  11. Systematic Comparative Evaluation of Methods for Investigating the TCRβ Repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xiaojing; Zhang, Ruifang; Du, Yuanping; Hong, Xueyu; Cao, Hongzhi; Su, Zheng; Wang, Changxi; Wu, Jinghua; Nie, Chao; Xu, Xun; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has recently been applied to profile the high diversity of antibodyome/B cell receptors (BCRs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) among immune cells. To date, Multiplex PCR (MPCR) and 5'RACE are predominately used to enrich rearranged BCRs and TCRs. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages; however, a systematic evaluation and direct comparison of them would benefit researchers in the selection of the most suitable method. In this study, we used both pooled control plasmids and spiked-in cells to benchmark the MPCR bias. RNA from three healthy donors was subsequently processed with the two methods to perform a comparative evaluation of the TCR β chain sequences. Both approaches demonstrated high reproducibility (R2 = 0.9958 and 0.9878, respectively). No differences in gene usage were identified for most V/J genes (>60%), and an average of 52.03% of the CDR3 amino acid sequences overlapped. MPCR exhibited a certain degree of bias, in which the usage of several genes deviated from 5'RACE, and some V-J pairings were lost. In contrast, there was a smaller rate of effective data from 5'RACE (11.25% less compared with MPCR). Nevertheless, the methodological variability was smaller compared with the biological variability. Through direct comparison, these findings provide novel insights into the two experimental methods, which will prove to be valuable in immune repertoire research and its interpretation.

  12. Degeneracy-driven self-structuring dynamics in selective repertoires.

    PubMed

    Atamas, Sergei P; Bell, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Numerous biological interactions, such as interactions between T cell receptors or antibodies with antigens, interactions between enzymes and substrates, or interactions between predators and prey are often not strictly specific. In such less specific, or "sloppy," systems, referred to here as degenerate systems, a given unit of a diverse resource (antigens, enzymatic substrates, prey) is at risk of being recognized and consumed by multiple consumers (lymphocytes, enzymes, predators). In this study, we model generalized degenerate consumer-resource systems of Lotka-Volterra and Verhulst types. In the degenerate systems of Lotka-Volterra, there is a continuum of types of consumer and resource based on variation of a single trait (characteristic, or preference). The consumers experience competition for a continuum of resource types. This non-local interaction system is modeled with partial differential-integral equations and shows spontaneous self-structuring of the consumer population that depends on the degree of interaction degeneracy between resource and consumer, but does not mirror the distribution of resource. We also show that the classical Verhulst (i.e. logistic) single population model can be generalized to a degenerate model, which shows qualitative behavior similar to that in the degenerate Lotka-Volterra model. These results provide better insight into the dynamics of selective systems in biology, suggesting that adaptation of degenerate repertoires is not a simple "mirroring" of the environment by the "fittest" elements of population.

  13. Phenotypic repertoire of the FNR regulatory network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tolla, Dean A; Savageau, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The FNR protein in Escherichia coli is an O(2) sensor that modifies global gene expression to adapt the cell to anaerobic growth. Regulation of FNR involves continuous cycling of the protein between its active and inactive states under aerobic conditions without apparent function. This raises the question of what benefit to the overall life cycle might compensate for the cost of cycling and reveals that the role of this process is poorly understood. To address this problem, we introduce the concept of a 'system design space', which provides a rigorous definition of phenotype at the molecular level and a means of visualizing the phenotypic repertoire of the system. Our analysis reveals undesirable and desirable phenotypes with an optimal constellation of parameter values for the system. To facilitate a more concrete understanding of what the design space represents, we analyse mutations that alter the apparent dimerization rate constant of FNR. We show that our estimated wild-type value of this rate constant, which is difficult to measure in situ, is located within this constellation and that the behaviour of the system is compromised in mutants if the value of the apparent dimerization rate constant lies beyond the bounds of this optimal constellation.

  14. Determinants of the mouse ultrasonic vocal structure and repertoire.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Jesse; McGuinness, Brigit; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) exhibit a high degree of complexity as demonstrated in recent years. A multitude of factors have been identified to influence USVs on the spectrotemporal as well as structural - e.g. syntactic - level. A synthesis of the various studies that attributes semantics to USV properties or sequences is still lacking. Presently, we address the factors modulating the composition of USVs, specifically age, gender, genetic background (including the targeted FoxP2 mutagenesis), behavioral state and individuality. It emerges that the different factors share a set of common influences, e.g. vocalization rate and frequency range are universally modulated across independent variables described; however, distinct influences exist for sequential structure (different effects for age, behavioral state and genetic background) or vocal repertoire (age). Recently, USV research has seen important advances based on the quantitative maturation of methods on multiple levels of vocalization. Adoption of these methods to address the natural statistics of USV will ultimately benefit several related research areas, e.g. neurolinguistics, neurodevelopmental disorders, multisensory and sensorimotor research. PMID:27060755

  15. Comprehensive Repertoire of Foldable Regions within Whole Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Guilhem; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    In order to get a comprehensive repertoire of foldable domains within whole proteomes, including orphan domains, we developed a novel procedure, called SEG-HCA. From only the information of a single amino acid sequence, SEG-HCA automatically delineates segments possessing high densities in hydrophobic clusters, as defined by Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA). These hydrophobic clusters mainly correspond to regular secondary structures, which together form structured or foldable regions. Genome-wide analyses revealed that SEG-HCA is opposite of disorder predictors, both addressing distinct structural states. Interestingly, there is however an overlap between the two predictions, including small segments of disordered sequences, which undergo coupled folding and binding. SEG-HCA thus gives access to these specific domains, which are generally poorly represented in domain databases. Comparison of the whole set of SEG-HCA predictions with the Conserved Domain Database (CDD) also highlighted a wide proportion of predicted large (length >50 amino acids) segments, which are CDD orphan. These orphan sequences may either correspond to highly divergent members of already known families or belong to new families of domains. Their comprehensive description thus opens new avenues to investigate new functional and/or structural features, which remained so far uncovered. Altogether, the data described here provide new insights into the protein architecture and organization throughout the three kingdoms of life. PMID:24204229

  16. Gene repertoire of amoeba-associated giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Colson, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, Marseillevirus, and Sputnik, a virophage, are intra-amoebal viruses that have been isolated from water collected in cooling towers. They have provided fascinating data and have raised exciting questions about viruses definition and evolution. Mimivirus and Marseillevirus have been classified in the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) class. Their genomes are the largest and fifth largest viral genomes sequenced so far. The gene repertoire of these amoeba-associated viruses can be divided into four groups: the core genome, genes acquired by lateral gene transfer, duplicated genes, and ORFans. Open reading frames (ORFs) that have homologs in the NCLDVs core gene set represent 2.9 and 6.1% of the Mimivirus and Marseillevirus gene contents, respectively. A substantial proportion of the Mimivirus, Marseillevirus and Sputnik ORFs exhibit sequence similarities to homologs found in bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes or viruses. The large amount of chimeric genes in these viral genomes might have resulted from acquisitions by lateral gene transfers, implicating sympatric bacteria and viruses with an intra-amoebal lifestyle. In addition, lineage-specific gene expansion may have played a major role in the genome shaping. Altogether, the data so far accumulated on amoeba-associated giant viruses are a powerful incentive to isolate and study additional strains to gain better understanding of their pangenome. PMID:20551685

  17. Impact of asymmetric gene repertoire between cyclostomes and gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-02-01

    Extant vertebrates are divided into the two major groups, cyclostomes and gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). The former includes jawless fishes, hagfishes and lampreys, and the latter includes all extant jawed vertebrates. In many research fields, the phenotypic traits of the cyclostomes have been considered crucial in understanding the evolutionary process from invertebrates to vertebrates. Recent studies have suggested that the common ancestor of the extant vertebrates including hagfishes and lampreys underwent two-round of whole genome duplications, and thus the genome expansion solely does not account for phenotypic differences between cyclostomes and gnathostomes. Emerging evidence from molecular phylogeny of individual gene families indicates that the gene repertoire expanded at the common ancestor of vertebrates were later reshaped asymmetrically between the two lineages, resulting in the retention of differential gene sets. This also confuses interpretation of conserved synteny which often serves as indicator of orthology and the ploidy level. In this review, current controversy and future perspectives of cyclostome genomics are discussed with reference to evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:23291292

  18. Systematic Comparative Evaluation of Methods for Investigating the TCRβ Repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xiaojing; Zhang, Ruifang; Du, Yuanping; Hong, Xueyu; Cao, Hongzhi; Su, Zheng; Wang, Changxi; Wu, Jinghua; Nie, Chao; Xu, Xun; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has recently been applied to profile the high diversity of antibodyome/B cell receptors (BCRs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) among immune cells. To date, Multiplex PCR (MPCR) and 5'RACE are predominately used to enrich rearranged BCRs and TCRs. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages; however, a systematic evaluation and direct comparison of them would benefit researchers in the selection of the most suitable method. In this study, we used both pooled control plasmids and spiked-in cells to benchmark the MPCR bias. RNA from three healthy donors was subsequently processed with the two methods to perform a comparative evaluation of the TCR β chain sequences. Both approaches demonstrated high reproducibility (R2 = 0.9958 and 0.9878, respectively). No differences in gene usage were identified for most V/J genes (>60%), and an average of 52.03% of the CDR3 amino acid sequences overlapped. MPCR exhibited a certain degree of bias, in which the usage of several genes deviated from 5'RACE, and some V-J pairings were lost. In contrast, there was a smaller rate of effective data from 5'RACE (11.25% less compared with MPCR). Nevertheless, the methodological variability was smaller compared with the biological variability. Through direct comparison, these findings provide novel insights into the two experimental methods, which will prove to be valuable in immune repertoire research and its interpretation. PMID:27019362

  19. The V beta 17+ T cell repertoire: skewed J beta usage after thymic selection; dissimilar CDR3s in CD4+ versus CD8+ cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    To ascertain how the actual repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs) deviates from the theoretical, we have generated a large number of junctional region sequences from TCRs carrying the V beta 17 variable region. The greater than 600 sequences analyzed represent transcripts from nine different cell populations, permitting several comparisons: transcripts from an expressed vs. a non-expressed V beta 17 allele, those from E+ vs. E- mice, transcripts from immature vs. mature thymocytes, those from thymic vs. peripheral T cells, and those from CD4+ vs. CD8+ cells. These comparisons have allowed us to distinguish between the influence of molecular events involved in TCR gene rearrangement and that of various selection events that shape the T cell repertoire. Our most striking findings are: (a) that J beta usage is markedly skewed, partly due to recombination mechanics and partly due to selection forces: in particular, those mediated by the class II E molecule in the thymus; and (b) that TCRs on CD4+ and CD8+ cells show intriguing dissimilarities. In addition, we present evidence that N nucleotide additions occur with clear biases, probably due to idiosyncrasies of the recombination enzymes, and provide arguments that TCR and immunoglobulin CDR3s have distinct structures. PMID:1940807

  20. Effect of the herbal formulation Jianpijiedu on the TCRVβCDR3 repertoire in rats with hepatocellular carcinoma and subjected to food restriction combined with laxative

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BAOGUO; MENG, JUN; XIANG, TING; ZHANG, LEI; DENG, LIUXIANG; CHEN, YAN; LUO, HAOXUAN; YANG, ZHANGBIN; CHEN, ZEXIONG; ZHANG, SHIJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the Chinese herbal formulation Jianpijiedu (JPJD) in a rat model of orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (OHC). The tumor-bearing rats underwent food restriction combined with laxative (FRL) treatment in order to model the nutritional and digestive symptoms of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, the study aimed to elucidate the effect of JPJD on the T cell receptor Vβ-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (TCRVβCDR3) repertoire and the underlying mechanism. The FRL rat model was established by alternate-day food restriction and the oral administration of Glauber's salt (sodium sulfate), based on which the OHC model was then established. Subsequently, the FRL-OHC induced animals received JPJD or thymopentin-5 (TP5) for 17 days. Differences in the TCRVβCDR3 repertoire in the rat thymus, liver and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the FRL-OHC model animals without any treatment, those treated with JPJD exhibited significantly inhibited hepatocellular carcinoma growth (P<0.05), reduced weight loss (P<0.01) and stable visceral indices (P<0.05). Furthermore, the JPJD treatment appeared to improve Simpsons diversity index (Ds) values and the quasi-Gaussian distribution rate of the TCRVβCDR3 repertoire in the thymus, liver and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. However, no anti-hepatoma effects were evident in the rats treated with TP5. In addition, TP5 increased the Ds values and the quasi-Gaussian distribution rate of the TCRVβCDR3 repertoire in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues compared with those in the JPJD-treated group. The anti-hepatoma effects of JPJD in FRL-OHC-induced animals may be due to the promotion of the Ds values of the TCRVβCDR3 repertoire. PMID:26997998

  1. Generation of humoral immune responses to multi-allele PfAMA1 vaccines; effect of adjuvant and number of component alleles on the breadth of response.

    PubMed

    Kusi, Kwadwo A; Faber, Bart W; Riasat, Vanessa; Thomas, Alan W; Kocken, Clemens H M; Remarque, Edmond J

    2010-11-03

    There is increasing interest in multi-allele vaccines to overcome strain-specificity against polymorphic vaccine targets such as Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1). These have been shown to induce broad inhibitory antibodies in vitro and formed the basis for the design of three Diversity-Covering (DiCo) proteins with similar immunological effects. The antibodies produced are to epitopes that are shared between vaccine alleles and theoretically, increasing the number of component AMA1 alleles is expected to broaden the antibody response. A plateau effect could however impose a limit on the number of alleles needed to achieve the broadest specificity. Moreover, production cost and the vaccine formulation process would limit the number of component alleles. In this paper, we compare rabbit antibody responses elicited with multi-allele vaccines incorporating seven (three DiCos and four natural AMA1 alleles) and three (DiCo mix) antigens for gains in broadened specificity. We also investigate the effect of three adjuvant platforms on antigen specificity and antibody functionality. Our data confirms a broadened response after immunisation with DiCo mix in all three adjuvants. Higher antibody titres were elicited with either CoVaccine HT™ or Montanide ISA 51, resulting in similar in vitro inhibition (65-82%) of five out of six culture-adapted P. falciparum strains. The antigen binding specificities of elicited antibodies were also similar and independent of the adjuvant used or the number of vaccine component alleles. Thus neither the four extra antigens nor adjuvant had any observable benefits with respect to specificity broadening, although adjuvant choice influenced the absolute antibody levels and thus the extent of parasite inhibition. Our data confirms the feasibility and potential of multi-allele PfAMA1 formulations, and highlights the need for adjuvants with improved antibody potentiation properties for AMA1-based vaccines.

  2. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  3. Differential expression of sets of highly homologous variable region gene products in selected and preimmune repertoires of inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using mAb that selectively recognize the various allelic forms of the VHT15 and Vk21D-E genes' products, we analyzed the influence of VH and Vk polymorphism on the probability of expression of these gene segments. Our data show that the frequency to which the VHT15 gene product becomes available in the preimmune repertoire is strongly influenced by the polymorphism of the relevant structural gene, suggesting therefore that VH genes cannot be randomly used in the various strains. Contrary to this, the frequency of Vk21D-E+ clones is similar in all mouse strains tested, and in all cases is higher than the frequency of VHT15 clones. This observation strongly suggests that Vk genes can be randomly expressed, and/or that their number is lower than that of their VH counterpart. Finally, analysis of the specificity associated to the expression of the VHT15 segment revealed that VH polymorphism strongly influences not only the probability of expression of each V gene, but also the specificity of the antibodies on which these VH genes are used. PMID:3084699

  4. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif.

  5. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M.; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif. PMID:26399241

  6. Genomic repertoires of DNA-binding transcription factors across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Charoensawan, Varodom; Wilson, Derek; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important to genetic regulation in all organisms because they recognize and directly bind to regulatory regions on DNA. Here, we survey and summarize the TF resources available. We outline the organisms for which TF annotation is provided, and discuss the criteria and methods used to annotate TFs by different databases. By using genomic TF repertoires from ∼700 genomes across the tree of life, covering Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, we review TF abundance with respect to the number of genes, as well as their structural complexity in diverse lineages. While typical eukaryotic TFs are longer than the average eukaryotic proteins, the inverse is true for prokaryotes. Only in eukaryotes does the same family of DNA-binding domain (DBD) occur multiple times within one polypeptide chain. This potentially increases the length and diversity of DNA-recognition sequence by reusing DBDs from the same family. We examined the increase in TF abundance with the number of genes in genomes, using the largest set of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes to date. As pointed out before, prokaryotic TFs increase faster than linearly. We further observe a similar relationship in eukaryotic genomes with a slower increase in TFs. PMID:20675356

  7. Defining the Alloreactive T Cell Repertoire Using High-Throughput Sequencing of Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction Culture

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Iwona M.; Robins, Harlan S.; Leventhal, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular immune response is the most important mediator of allograft rejection and is a major barrier to transplant tolerance. Delineation of the depth and breadth of the alloreactive T cell repertoire and subsequent application of the technology to the clinic may improve patient outcomes. As a first step toward this, we have used MLR and high-throughput sequencing to characterize the alloreactive T cell repertoire in healthy adults at baseline and 3 months later. Our results demonstrate that thousands of T cell clones proliferate in MLR, and that the alloreactive repertoire is dominated by relatively high-abundance T cell clones. This clonal make up is consistently reproducible across replicates and across a span of three months. These results indicate that our technology is sensitive and that the alloreactive TCR repertoire is broad and stable over time. We anticipate that application of this approach to track donor-reactive clones may positively impact clinical management of transplant patients. PMID:25365040

  8. Positive emotions broaden the scope of attention and thought-action repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, Barbara L.; Branigan, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The broaden-and-build theory (Fredrickson, 1998, 2001) hypothesises that positive emotions broaden the scope of attention and thought-action repertoires. Two experiments with 104 college students tested these hypotheses. In each, participants viewed a film that elicited (a) amusement, (b) contentment, (c) neutrality, (d) anger, or (e) anxiety. Scope of attention was assessed using a global-local visual processing task (Experiment 1) and thought-action repertoires were assessed using a Twenty Statements Test (Experiment 2). Compared to a neutral state, positive emotions broadened the scope of attention in Experiment 1 and thought-action repertoires in Experiment 2. In Experiment 2, negative emotions, relative to a neutral state, narrowed thought-action repertoires. Implications for promoting emotional well-being and physical health are discussed. PMID:21852891

  9. Natural and man-made V-gene repertoires for antibody discovery

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, William J. J.; Almagro, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety, and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of humans, mice, and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity, and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process. PMID:23162556

  10. Robust estimates of overall immune-repertoire diversity from high-throughput measurements on samples.

    PubMed

    Kaplinsky, Joseph; Arnaout, Ramy

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of an organism's B- and T-cell repertoires is both clinically important and a key measure of immunological complexity. However, diversity is hard to estimate by current methods, because of inherent uncertainty in the number of B- and T-cell clones that will be missing from a blood or tissue sample by chance (the missing-species problem), inevitable sampling bias, and experimental noise. To solve this problem, we developed Recon, a modified maximum-likelihood method that outputs the overall diversity of a repertoire from measurements on a sample. Recon outputs accurate, robust estimates by any of a vast set of complementary diversity measures, including species richness and entropy, at fractional repertoire coverage. It also outputs error bars and power tables, allowing robust comparisons of diversity between individuals and over time. We apply Recon to in silico and experimental immune-repertoire sequencing data sets as proof of principle for measuring diversity in large, complex systems. PMID:27302887

  11. Robust estimates of overall immune-repertoire diversity from high-throughput measurements on samples

    PubMed Central

    Kaplinsky, Joseph; Arnaout, Ramy

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of an organism's B- and T-cell repertoires is both clinically important and a key measure of immunological complexity. However, diversity is hard to estimate by current methods, because of inherent uncertainty in the number of B- and T-cell clones that will be missing from a blood or tissue sample by chance (the missing-species problem), inevitable sampling bias, and experimental noise. To solve this problem, we developed Recon, a modified maximum-likelihood method that outputs the overall diversity of a repertoire from measurements on a sample. Recon outputs accurate, robust estimates by any of a vast set of complementary diversity measures, including species richness and entropy, at fractional repertoire coverage. It also outputs error bars and power tables, allowing robust comparisons of diversity between individuals and over time. We apply Recon to in silico and experimental immune-repertoire sequencing data sets as proof of principle for measuring diversity in large, complex systems. PMID:27302887

  12. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  13. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  15. No effect of the α1-antichymotrypsin A allele in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Didierjean, O; Martinez, M; Campion, D; Hannequin, D; Dubois, B; Martin, C; Puel, M; Anterion, C; Pasquier, F; Moreau, O; Babron, M; Penet, C; Agid, Y; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Frebourg, T; Brice, A

    1997-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-ε4 allele is associated in a dose dependent manner to an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. However, the ApoE-ε4 allele effect does not account for all patients with Alzheimer's disease, and the existence of other genetic risk factors has been postulated. Kamboh et al reported an association between Alzheimer's disease and the A allele of α1-antichymotrypsin (Aact) gene, which was not confirmed in a larger series more recently analysed. The ApoE and Aact genotypes were analysed in 314 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 173 healthy controls, confirming the dose dependent effect of the ApoE-ε4 allele. Nevertheless, even using odds ratios adjusted for age and sex, there was no significant effect of the Aact genotype on Alzheimer's disease or on the ApoE-ε4 allele associated risk for Alzheimer's disease.

 PMID:9221977

  16. The apolipoprotein CI A allele as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Poduslo, S E; Neal, M; Herring, K; Shelly, J

    1998-03-01

    The E4 allele for the apolipoprotein E gene has been shown to be a significant risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. The gene is located in a conserved gene cluster on chromosome 19q12-13.2. Downstream from APOE is the gene for apolipoprotein CI. We had previously shown that the presence of a restriction site in the 5'end of APOCI (the A allele) was present at increased frequency in Alzheimer's patients and could also be considered as a risk factor for the disease. We have extended these studies and find that both familial and sporadic cases of Alzheimer's disease have a higher frequency of the APOCI A allele than control spouses. In addition, male patients with the APOCI A allele and/or the APOE4 allele tend to have an earlier age of onset of the disease than female patients.

  17. Position 156 influences the peptide repertoire and tapasin dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Soumya; Saunders, Philippa; Huyton, Trevor; Aufderbeck, Susanne; Hiller, Oliver; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphic differences between donor and recipient human leukocyte antigen class I molecules can result in graft-versus-host disease due to distinct peptide presentation. As part of the peptide-loading complex, tapasin plays an important role in selecting peptides from the pool of potential ligands. Class I polymorphisms can significantly alter the tapasin-mediated interaction with the peptide-loading complex and although most class I allotypes are highly dependent upon tapasin, some are able to load peptides independently of tapasin. Several human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes differ exclusively at position 156 (B*44:02156Asp, 44:03156Leu, 44:28156Arg, 44:35156Glu). From these alleles, only the high tapasin-dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44:02 has been reported. Design and Methods We investigated the influence of position 156 polymorphisms on both the requirement of tapasin for efficient surface expression of each allotype and their peptide features. Genes encoding human leukocyte antigen B*44 variants bearing all possible substitutions at position 156 were lentivirally transduced into human leukocyte antigen class I-negative LCL 721.221 cells and the tapasin-deficient cell line LCL 721.220. Results Exclusively human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg was expressed on the surface of tapasin-deficient cells, suggesting that the remaining B*44/156 variants are highly tapasin-dependent. Our computational analysis suggests that the tapasin-independence of human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg is a result of stabilization of the peptide binding region and generation of a more peptide receptive state. Sequencing of peptides eluted from human leukocyte antigen B*44 molecules by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap) demonstrated that both B*44:02 and B*44:28 share the same overall peptide motif and a certain percentage of their individual peptide repertoires in the presence and/or absence of tapasin

  18. Imprint of 5-azacytidine on the natural killer cell repertoire during systemic treatment for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sohlberg, Ebba; Pfefferle, Aline; Andersson, Sandra; Baumann, Bettina C; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-10-27

    5-azacytidine (5-aza) is a hypomethylating agent approved for the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is assumed to act by demethylating tumor suppressor genes and via direct cytotoxic effects on malignant cells. In vitro treatment with hypomethylating agents has profound effects on the expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, as these receptors are epigenetically regulated via methylation of the promoters. Here we investigated the influence of 5-aza on the NK-cell repertoire during cytokine-induced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo in patients with high-risk MDS. In vitro treatment of NK cells from both healthy donors and MDS patients with low doses of 5-aza led to a significant increase in expression of multiple KIRs, but only in cells that had undergone several rounds of cell division. Proliferating 5-aza exposed NK cells exhibited increased IFN-γ production and degranulation towards tumor target cells. MDS patients had lower proportions of educated KIR-expressing NK cells than healthy controls but after systemic treatment with 5-aza, an increased proportion of Ki-67+ NK cells expressed multiple KIRs suggesting uptake of 5-aza in cycling cells in vivo. Hence, these results suggest that systemic treatment with 5-aza may shape the NK cell repertoire, in particular during homeostatic proliferation, thereby boosting NK cell-mediated recognition of malignant cells.

  19. Fixation probability and the crossing time in the Wright-Fisher multiple alleles model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2009-08-01

    The fixation probability and crossing time in the Wright-Fisher multiple alleles model, which describes a finite haploid population, were calculated by switching on an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive asymmetric parameter, r, such that the reversal allele of the optimal allele has higher fitness than the optimal allele. The fixation probability, which was evaluated as the ratio of the first arrival time at the reversal allele to the origination time, was double the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared with the optimal allele in the strong selection region, where the fitness parameter, k, is much larger than the critical fitness parameter, kc. The crossing time in a finite population for r>0 and kallele in the first generation should be greater than one individual in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape. It was also found that the crossing time in a finite population for r>0 and k≫kc scaled as a power law in the fitness parameter with a similar scaling exponent as the crossing time in an infinite population for r=0, and that the critical fitness parameter decreased with increasing sequence length with a fixed population size.

  20. Accurate and predictive antibody repertoire profiling by molecular amplification fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tarik A.; Friedensohn, Simon; de Vries, Arthur R. Gorter; Straszewski, Jakub; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Reddy, Sai T.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput antibody repertoire sequencing (Ig-seq) provides quantitative molecular information on humoral immunity. However, Ig-seq is compromised by biases and errors introduced during library preparation and sequencing. By using synthetic antibody spike-in genes, we determined that primer bias from multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) library preparation resulted in antibody frequencies with only 42 to 62% accuracy. Additionally, Ig-seq errors resulted in antibody diversity measurements being overestimated by up to 5000-fold. To rectify this, we developed molecular amplification fingerprinting (MAF), which uses unique molecular identifier (UID) tagging before and during multiplex PCR amplification, which enabled tagging of transcripts while accounting for PCR efficiency. Combined with a bioinformatic pipeline, MAF bias correction led to measurements of antibody frequencies with up to 99% accuracy. We also used MAF to correct PCR and sequencing errors, resulting in enhanced accuracy of full-length antibody diversity measurements, achieving 98 to 100% error correction. Using murine MAF-corrected data, we established a quantitative metric of recent clonal expansion—the intraclonal diversity index—which measures the number of unique transcripts associated with an antibody clone. We used this intraclonal diversity index along with antibody frequencies and somatic hypermutation to build a logistic regression model for prediction of the immunological status of clones. The model was able to predict clonal status with high confidence but only when using MAF error and bias corrected Ig-seq data. Improved accuracy by MAF provides the potential to greatly advance Ig-seq and its utility in immunology and biotechnology. PMID:26998518

  1. In-air vocal repertoires of spotted seals, Phoca largha.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peijun; Lu, Jiaojiao; Li, Songhai; Han, Jiabo; Wang, Qinguo; Yang, Liangliang

    2016-08-01

    Spotted seals (Phoca largha) are thought to be less vocal than other phocids. However, acoustic communication behaviors of spotted seals have been reported several times. In this study, the vocal repertoires of spotted seals housed in Dalian Sun Aquarium, China were recorded and analyzed. The frequencies of the sounds made by the seals ranged from 139.3 to 2323.1 Hz, and the time durations lasted from 92.8 to 1208 ms, depending on age and gender (P < 0.01). The peak-to-peak sound source levels were 109-124 dB re 20μPa. In total, seven vocal types were identified: pup call, yearling call, bark, growl, grunt, moo, and throat guttural. The pups emitted sounds with high frequencies (F1: 972.4 ± 374.4 Hz, mean ± standard deviation) and medial time durations (564 ± 178 ms); when the pups grew older, the sounds became yearling calls, which had high frequencies with median (interquartile range) of 1198.0 (821.7-1385.5) Hz; and long time durations [902 (745-1080) ms]. The male adults emitted sounds with low frequencies [430.2 (388.2-486.7) Hz] and short time durations [334 (233-599) ms], while the female adults emitted sounds with medial frequencies [814.5 (592.6-1024.3) Hz] and medial time durations [531 (336-688) ms]. PMID:27586740

  2. Novel underwater soundscape: acoustic repertoire of plainfin midshipman fish.

    PubMed

    McIver, Eileen L; Marchaterre, Margaret A; Rice, Aaron N; Bass, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Toadfishes are among the best-known groups of sound-producing (vocal) fishes and include species commonly known as toadfish and midshipman. Although midshipman have been the subject of extensive investigation of the neural mechanisms of vocalization, this is the first comprehensive, quantitative analysis of the spectro-temporal characters of their acoustic signals and one of the few for fishes in general. Field recordings of territorial, nest-guarding male midshipman during the breeding season identified a diverse vocal repertoire composed of three basic sound types that varied widely in duration, harmonic structure and degree of amplitude modulation (AM): 'hum', 'grunt' and 'growl'. Hum duration varied nearly 1000-fold, lasting for minutes at a time, with stable harmonic stacks and little envelope modulation throughout the sound. By contrast, grunts were brief, ~30-140 ms, broadband signals produced both in isolation and repetitively as a train of up to 200 at intervals of ~0.5-1.0 s. Growls were also produced alone or repetitively, but at variable intervals of the order of seconds with durations between those of grunts and hums, ranging 60-fold from ~200 ms to 12 s. Growls exhibited prominent harmonics with sudden shifts in pulse repetition rate and highly variable AM patterns, unlike the nearly constant AM of grunt trains and flat envelope of hums. Behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the hypothesis that each sound type's unique acoustic signature contributes to signal recognition mechanisms. Nocturnal production of these sounds against a background chorus dominated constantly for hours by a single sound type, the multi-harmonic hum, reveals a novel underwater soundscape for fish.

  3. Functional characterization of visual opsin repertoire in Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Fukamachi, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Shoji

    2006-04-26

    A variety of visual pigment repertoires present in fish species is believed due to the great variation under the water of light environment. A complete set of visual opsin genes has been isolated and characterized for absorption spectra and expression in the retina only in zebrafish. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a fish species phylogenetically distant from zebrafish and has served as an important vertebrate model system in molecular and developmental genetics. We previously isolated a medaka rod opsin gene (RH1). In the present study we isolated all the cone opsin genes of medaka by genome screening of a lambda-phage and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. The medaka genome contains two red, LWS-A and LWS-B, three green, RH2-A, RH2-B and RH2-C, and two blue, SWS2-A and SWS2-B, subtype opsin genes as well as a single-copy of the ultraviolet, SWS1, opsin gene. Previously only one gene was believed present for each opsin type as reported in a cDNA-based study. These subtype opsin genes are closely linked and must be the products of local gene duplications but not of a genome-wide duplication. Peak absorption spectra (lambda(max)) of the reconstituted photopigments with 11-cis retinal varied greatly among the three green opsins, 452 nm for RH2-A, 516 nm for RH2-B and 492 nm for RH2-C, and between the two blue opsins, 439 nm for SWS2-A and 405 nm for SWS2-B. Zebrafish also has multiple opsin subtypes, but phylogenetic analysis revealed that medaka and zebrafish gained the subtype opsins independently. The lambda and BAC DNA clones isolated in this study could be useful for investigating the regulatory mechanisms and evolutionary diversity of fish opsin genes.

  4. TLR2∆22 (-196-174) significantly increases the risk of breast cancer in females carrying proline allele at codon 72 of TP53 gene: a case-control study from four ethnic groups of North Eastern region of India.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Rekha; Chenkual, Saia; Majumdar, Gautam; Ahmed, Jishan; Kaur, Tanvir; Zonunmawia, Jason C; Mukherjee, Kaustab; Phukan, Rup Kumar; Mahanta, Jagdish; Rajguru, S K; Mukherjee, Debdutta; Narain, Kanwar

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cancer in women. In the North Eastern Region (NER) of India, BC is emerging as an important concern as evidenced by the data available from population and hospital-based cancer registries. Studies on genetic susceptibility to BC are important to understand the increase in the incidence of BC in NER. The present case control study was conducted to investigate the association between tumour suppressor gene TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and innate immune pathway gene TLR2∆22 (-196-174) polymorphism with BC in females of NER of India for the identification of novel biomarker of BC. Four hundred sixty-two histopathologically confirmed BC cases from four states of NER of India, and 770 healthy controls were included by organizing community surveys from the neighbourhood of cases. In our study, no significant association between TP53 codon 72 polymorphisms and the risk of BC was found. However, our study has shown that TP53 codon 72 polymorphism is an important effect modifier. In the present study it was found that females carrying 22 base-pair deletion in the promoter region of their TLR2 gene had two times (AOR= 2.18, 95 % CI 1.13-4.21, p=0.019 in dominant model; AOR= 2.17, 95 % CI 1.09-4.34, p=0.027 in co-dominant model) increased risk of BC whwn they also carry proline allele at codon 72 of their TP53 gene. PMID:26188904

  5. EXPANDING URBAN AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTHS’ REPERTOIRE OF DRUG RESISTANCE SKILLS: PILOT RESULTS FROM A CULTURALLY ADAPTED PREVENTION PROGRAM

    PubMed Central

    Kulis, Stephen; Dustman, Patricia A.; Brown, Eddie F.; Martinez, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    This article examines changes in the drug resistance strategies used by urban American Indian (UAI) middle school students during a pilot test of a substance use prevention curriculum designed specifically for UAI youth, Living in 2 Worlds (L2W). L2W teaches four drug resistance strategies (refuse, explain, avoid, leave [R-E-A-L]) in culturally appropriate ways. Data come from 57 UAI students (53% female; mean age = 12.5 years) who participated in L2W during an academic enrichment class for Native youth at two Phoenix schools. Students completed a pre-test questionnaire before the L2W lessons and a post-test 7 months later. Questions assessed the use of R-E-A-L and alternative strategies commonly reported by UAI youth (change the subject, use humor). Tests of mean differences from pre-test to post-test showed significant increases in use of refuse, R-E-A-L repertoire. Use of more passive strategies (avoid, use humor) did not change significantly, except for change the subject, which increased. Changes in the use of strategies did not differ significantly by gender, age, school grades, parental education, or length of urban residence. The L2W curriculum appears effective in teaching culturally relevant communication strategies that expand UAI youths’ repertoire of drug resistance skills. PMID:23529769

  6. An rpsL-based allelic exchange vector for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chen, John; Ram, Geeta; Yoong, Pauline; Penadés, José R; Shopsin, Bo; Novick, Richard P

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most successful bacterial pathogens, harboring a vast repertoire of virulence factors in its arsenal. As such, the genetic manipulation of S. aureus chromosomal DNA is an important tool for the study of genes involved in virulence and survival in the host. Previously reported allelic exchange vectors for S. aureus are shuttle vectors that can be propagated in Escherichia coli, so that standard genetic manipulations can be carried out. Most of the vectors currently in use carry the temperature-sensitive replicon (pE194ts) that was originally developed for use in Bacillus subtilis. Here we show that in S. aureus, the thermosensitivity of a pE194ts vector is incomplete at standard non-permissive temperatures (42 °C), and replication of the plasmid is impaired but not abolished. We report rpsL-based counterselection vectors, with an improved temperature-sensitive replicon (pT181 repC3) that is completely blocked for replication in S. aureus at non-permissive and standard growth temperature (37 °C). We also describe a set of temperature-sensitive vectors that can be cured at standard growth temperature. These vectors provide highly effective tools for rapidly generating allelic replacement mutations and curing expression plasmids, and expand the genetic tool set available for the study of S. aureus.

  7. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-12-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  8. The application of real-time PCR to the analysis of T cell repertoires.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Peter; Strausbauch, Michael; Therneau, Terry; Borson, Nancy

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of T-cell populations is determined by the spectrum of antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) that are heterodimers of alpha and beta subunits encoded by rearranged combinations of variable (AV and BV), joining (AJ and BJ), and constant region genes (AC and BC). We have developed a novel approach for analysis of beta transcript diversity in mice with a real-time PCR-based method that uses a matrix of BV- and BJ-specific primers to amplify 240 distinct BV-BJ combinations. Defined endpoints (Ct values) and dissociation curves are generated for each BV-BJ combination and the Ct values are consolidated in a matrix that characterizes the beta transcript diversity of each RNA sample. Relative diversities of BV-BJ combinations in individual RNA samples are further described by estimates of scaled entropy. A skin allograft system was used to demonstrate that dissection of repertoires into 240 BV-BJ combinations increases efficiency of identifying and sequencing beta transcripts that are overrepresented at inflammatory sites. These BV-BJ matrices should generate greater investigation in laboratory and clinical settings due to increased throughput, resolution and identification of overrepresented TCR transcripts.

  9. FKBP5 risk alleles and the development of intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress and are central to numerous psychological disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Convergent evidence suggests that glucocorticoid increases enhance the strength of emotional memories. The FKBP5 polymorphism modulates glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity, and has been shown to increase risk for PTSD. Healthy high and low risk FKBP5 allele carriers (N=46) underwent a cold pressor task, and then viewed negative and neutral images. Two days later participants were given a surprise recall test and measure of intrusive memories of the images. Following the cold pressor task, high-risk allele participants had a higher cortisol response than low-risk participants. High-risk carriers also reported more intrusive memories of the negative and neutral images than low-risk carriers. These findings point to the minor alleles of the FKBP5 polymorphism being a risk factor for development of intrusive memories, possibly as a result of impaired glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity. This may explain one mechanism for FKBP5 being a risk factor for PTSD following traumatic events.

  10. Reliability assessment of null allele detection: inconsistencies between and within different methods.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Pilot, M; Kruczyk, M; Żmihorski, M; Umer, H M; Gliwicz, J

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used in population genetic studies, but the presence of null alleles may lead to biased results. Here, we assessed five methods that indirectly detect null alleles and found large inconsistencies among them. Our analysis was based on 20 microsatellite loci genotyped in a natural population of Microtus oeconomus sampled during 8 years, together with 1200 simulated populations without null alleles, but experiencing bottlenecks of varying duration and intensity, and 120 simulated populations with known null alleles. In the natural population, 29% of positive results were consistent between the methods in pairwise comparisons, and in the simulated data set, this proportion was 14%. The positive results were also inconsistent between different years in the natural population. In the null-allele-free simulated data set, the number of false positives increased with increased bottleneck intensity and duration. We also found a low concordance in null allele detection between the original simulated populations and their 20% random subsets. In the populations simulated to include null alleles, between 22% and 42% of true null alleles remained undetected, which highlighted that detection errors are not restricted to false positives. None of the evaluated methods clearly outperformed the others when both false-positive and false-negative rates were considered. Accepting only the positive results consistent between at least two methods should considerably reduce the false-positive rate, but this approach may increase the false-negative rate. Our study demonstrates the need for novel null allele detection methods that could be reliably applied to natural populations.

  11. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  12. Network Signatures of IgG Immune Repertoires in Hepatitis B Associated Chronic Infection and Vaccination Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Hui; Kuan, Hui-Chung; Hsieh, T. C.; Ma, K. H.; Yang, Chung-Hsiang; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Chao, Anne; Liu, Hong-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    The repertoire of IgG antibody responses to infection and vaccination varies depending on the characteristics of the immunogen and the ability of the host to mount a protective immune response. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are marked by persistent infection and immune tolerance to vaccination. This disease offers a unique opportunity to discover key repertoire signatures during infection and in response to vaccination. Complementarity determining region 3 of an antibody heavy chain (CDR-H3) has a major impact on the antigenic specificity of an antibody. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize the CDR-H3 sequences in paired siblings of 4 families in which only one member of each pair had chronic HBV infection. Blood samples were obtained before and 2 weeks after HBV vaccination. The analysis revealed a huge network of sequence-related CDR-H3 clones found almost exclusively among carriers. In contrast, vaccination induced significant increases of CDR-H3 cluster diversities among siblings without hepatitis B. Several vaccination-associated clone clusters were identified. Similar findings of vaccination-associated clone networks were observed in healthy adults receiving HBV boosters. These strategies can be used to identify signatures of other infectious diseases and accelerate discoveries of antibody sequences with important biomedical implications. PMID:27222149

  13. Immune Repertoire Diversity Correlated with Mortality in Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongni; Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Lili; Chen, Cuicui; Lu, Shuihua; Wang, Qin; Seeley, Eric; Xu, Jianqing; Xi, Xiuhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Jie; Tang, Xinjun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Jian; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Chunlin; Byrne-Steele, Miranda; Qu, Jieming; Han, Jian; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    Specific changes in immune repertoires at genetic level responding to the lethal H7N9 virus are still poorly understood. We performed deep sequencing on the T and B cells from patients recently infected with H7N9 to explore the correlation between clinical outcomes and immune repertoire alterations. T and B cell repertoires display highly dynamic yet distinct clonotype alterations. During infection, T cell beta chain repertoire continues to contract while the diversity of immunoglobulin heavy chain repertoire recovers. Patient recovery is correlated to the diversity of T cell and B cell repertoires in different ways – higher B cell diversity and lower T cell diversity are found in survivors. The sequences clonally related to known antibodies with binding affinity to H7 hemagglutinin could be identified from survivors. These findings suggest that utilizing deep sequencing may improve prognostication during influenza infection and could help in development of antibody discovery methodologies for the treatment of virus infection. PMID:27669665

  14. Major histocompatibility complex class I chain related (MIC) A gene, TNFa microsatellite alleles and TNFB alleles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients from Latvia.

    PubMed

    Nikitina Zake, Liene; Cimdina, Ija; Rumba, Ingrida; Dabadghao, Preethi; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2002-05-01

    In order to analyze involvement of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) microsatellite polymorphisms as well as TNFB gene in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), we studied 128 patients divided into groups according to clinical features [monoarthritis (n = 14), oligoarthritis (n = 58), polyarthritis (n = 50), and systemic (n = 6)], and 114 age- and sex-matched healthy controls from Latvia. DNA samples were amplified with specific primers and used for genotyping of MICA and TNFa microsatellite. Typing for a biallelic NcoI polymerase chain reaction RFLP polymorphism located at the first intron of TNFB gene was done as follows: restriction digests generated fragments of 555bp and 185bp for TNFB*1 allele, and 740bp for TNFB*2 allele. The results were compared between cases and controls. We found significant increase of MICA allele A4 (p = 0.009; odds ratio [OR] = 2.3) and allele TNFa2 (p = 0.0001; OR = 4.4) in patients compared with controls. The frequency of allele TNFa9 was significantly decreased (p = 0.0001; OR = 0.1) in patients with JIA. No significant differences of TNFB allele frequency were found. Our data suggest that MICA and TNFa microsatellite polymorphisms may be used as markers for determination of susceptibility and protection from JIA.

  15. Genome-wide characterization of the binding repertoire of small molecule drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division

    2003-07-01

    Most, if not all, drugs interact with multiple proteins. One or more of these interactions are responsible for carrying out the primary therapeutic effects of the drug. Others are involved in the transport or metabolic processing of the drug or in the mediation of side effects. Still others may be responsible for activities that correspond to alternate therapeutic applications. The potential clinical impact of a drug and its cost of development are affected by the sum of all these interactions. The drug development process includes the identification and characterisation of a drug's clinically relevant interactions. This characterisation is presently accomplished by a combination of experimental laboratory techniques and clinical trials, with increasing numbers of patient participants. Efficient methods for the identification of all the molecular targets of a drug prior to clinical trials could greatly expedite the drug development process. Combinatorial peptide and cDNA phage display have the potential for achieving a complete characterisation of the binding repertoire of a small molecule. This paper will discuss the current state of phage display technology, as applied to the identification of novel receptors for small molecules, using a successful application with the drug Taxoltrade mark as an example of the technical and theoretical benefits and pitfalls of this method.

  16. An effective network reduction approach to find the dynamical repertoire of discrete dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zañudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Réka

    2013-06-01

    Discrete dynamic models are a powerful tool for the understanding and modeling of large biological networks. Although a lot of progress has been made in developing analysis tools for these models, there is still a need to find approaches that can directly relate the network structure to its dynamics. Of special interest is identifying the stable patterns of activity, i.e., the attractors of the system. This is a problem for large networks, because the state space of the system increases exponentially with network size. In this work, we present a novel network reduction approach that is based on finding network motifs that stabilize in a fixed state. Notably, we use a topological criterion to identify these motifs. Specifically, we find certain types of strongly connected components in a suitably expanded representation of the network. To test our method, we apply it to a dynamic network model for a type of cytotoxic T cell cancer and to an ensemble of random Boolean networks of size up to 200. Our results show that our method goes beyond reducing the network and in most cases can actually predict the dynamical repertoire of the nodes (fixed states or oscillations) in the attractors of the system.

  17. Distinct mechanisms define murine B cell lineage immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Qunying; Kantor, Aaron B; Chu, Hiutung; Ghosn, Eliver EB; Qin, Guang; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Han, Jian; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-01-01

    Processes that define immunoglobulin repertoires are commonly presumed to be the same for all murine B cells. However, studies here that couple high-dimensional FACS sorting with large-scale quantitative IgH deep-sequencing demonstrate that B-1a IgH repertoire differs dramatically from the follicular and marginal zone B cells repertoires and is defined by distinct mechanisms. We track B-1a cells from their early appearance in neonatal spleen to their long-term residence in adult peritoneum and spleen. We show that de novo B-1a IgH rearrangement mainly occurs during the first few weeks of life, after which their repertoire continues to evolve profoundly, including convergent selection of certain V(D)J rearrangements encoding specific CDR3 peptides in all adults and progressive introduction of hypermutation and class-switching as animals age. This V(D)J selection and AID-mediated diversification operate comparably in germ-free and conventional mice, indicating these unique B-1a repertoire-defining mechanisms are driven by antigens that are not derived from microbiota. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09083.001 PMID:26422511

  18. Shaping of the autoreactive regulatory T cell repertoire by thymic cortical positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Ribot, Julie; Enault, Geneviève; Pilipenko, Sylvie; Huchenq, Anne; Calise, Maryline; Hudrisier, Denis; Romagnoli, Paola; van Meerwijk, Joost PM

    2007-01-01

    The main function of regulatory T lymphocytes is to keep autoimmune responses at bay. Accordingly, it has been firmly established that the repertoire of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells is enriched in autospecific cells. Differences in thymic positive and/or negative selection may account for selection of the qualitatively distinct regulatory and conventional T cell repertoires. It has previously been shown that precursors for regulatory T cells are less sensitive to negative selection than conventional T cell-precursors. Studies with TCR/ligand doubly transgenic mice suggested that agonist ligand might induce positive selection of regulatory (but not conventional) T cells. However, massive deletion of conventional (but not regulatory) T cell precursors observed in these mice renders interpretation of such data problematic and a potential role for positive selection in generation of the autospecific regulatory T cell-repertoire has remained therefore incompletely understood. To study this important unresolved issue and circumvent use of TCR/ligand transgenic mice, we have developed transgenic mice expressing a single MHC class II/peptide ligand on positively selecting thymic cortical epithelial cells. We found that functional regulatory (but not conventional) T cells specific for the single ligand were preferentially selected from the naturally diverse repertoire of immature precursors. Our data therefore demonstrate that thymic cortical positive selection of regulatory and conventional T cell precursors is governed by distinct rules and that it plays an important role in shaping the autoreactive regulatory T cell repertoire. PMID:17982064

  19. CD8+ TCR repertoire formation is guided primarily by the peptide component of the antigenic complex.

    PubMed

    Koning, Dan; Costa, Ana I; Hoof, Ilka; Miles, John J; Nanlohy, Nening M; Ladell, Kristin; Matthews, Katherine K; Venturi, Vanessa; Schellens, Ingrid M M; Borghans, Jose A M; Kesmir, Can; Price, David A; van Baarle, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    CD8(+) T cells recognize infected or dysregulated cells via the clonotypically expressed αβ TCR, which engages Ag in the form of peptide bound to MHC class I (MHC I) on the target cell surface. Previous studies have indicated that a diverse Ag-specific TCR repertoire can be beneficial to the host, yet the determinants of clonotypic diversity are poorly defined. To better understand the factors that govern TCR repertoire formation, we conducted a comprehensive clonotypic analysis of CD8(+) T cell populations directed against epitopes derived from EBV and CMV. Neither pathogen source nor the restricting MHC I molecule were linked with TCR diversity; indeed, both HLA-A and HLA-B molecules were observed to interact with an overlapping repertoire of expressed TRBV genes. Peptide specificity, however, markedly impacted TCR diversity. In addition, distinct peptides sharing HLA restriction and viral origin mobilized TCR repertoires with distinct patterns of TRBV gene usage. Notably, no relationship was observed between immunodominance and TCR diversity. These findings provide new insights into the forces that shape the Ag-specific TCR repertoire in vivo and highlight a determinative role for the peptide component of the peptide-MHC I complex on the molecular frontline of CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance.

  20. Contrasting Patterns of Evolutionary Diversification in the Olfactory Repertoires of Reptile and Bird Genomes.

    PubMed

    Vandewege, Michael W; Mangum, Sarah F; Gabaldón, Toni; Castoe, Todd A; Ray, David A; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2016-03-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are membrane proteins that mediate the detection of odorants in the environment, and are the largest vertebrate gene family. Comparative studies of mammalian genomes indicate that OR repertoires vary widely, even between closely related lineages, as a consequence of frequent OR gains and losses. Several studies also suggest that mammalian OR repertoires are influenced by life history traits. Sauropsida is a diverse group of vertebrates group that is the sister group to mammals, and includes birds, testudines, squamates, and crocodilians, and represents a natural system to explore predictions derived from mammalian studies. In this study, we analyzed olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire variation among several representative species and found that the number of intact OR genes in sauropsid genomes analyzed ranged over an order of magnitude, from 108 in the green anole to over 1,000 in turtles. Our results suggest that different sauropsid lineages have highly divergent OR repertoire composition that derive from lineage-specific combinations of gene expansions, losses, and retentions of ancestral OR genes. These differences also suggest that varying degrees of adaption related to life history have shaped the unique OR repertoires observed across sauropsid lineages. PMID:26865070

  1. Distinct mechanisms define murine B cell lineage immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Qunying; Kantor, Aaron B; Chu, Hiutung; Ghosn, Eliver Eb; Qin, Guang; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Han, Jian; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-09-30

    Processes that define immunoglobulin repertoires are commonly presumed to be the same for all murine B cells. However, studies here that couple high-dimensional FACS sorting with large-scale quantitative IgH deep-sequencing demonstrate that B-1a IgH repertoire differs dramatically from the follicular and marginal zone B cells repertoires and is defined by distinct mechanisms. We track B-1a cells from their early appearance in neonatal spleen to their long-term residence in adult peritoneum and spleen. We show that de novo B-1a IgH rearrangement mainly occurs during the first few weeks of life, after which their repertoire continues to evolve profoundly, including convergent selection of certain V(D)J rearrangements encoding specific CDR3 peptides in all adults and progressive introduction of hypermutation and class-switching as animals age. This V(D)J selection and AID-mediated diversification operate comparably in germ-free and conventional mice, indicating these unique B-1a repertoire-defining mechanisms are driven by antigens that are not derived from microbiota.

  2. Contrasting Patterns of Evolutionary Diversification in the Olfactory Repertoires of Reptile and Bird Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Vandewege, Michael W.; Mangum, Sarah F.; Gabaldón, Toni; Castoe, Todd A.; Ray, David A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are membrane proteins that mediate the detection of odorants in the environment, and are the largest vertebrate gene family. Comparative studies of mammalian genomes indicate that OR repertoires vary widely, even between closely related lineages, as a consequence of frequent OR gains and losses. Several studies also suggest that mammalian OR repertoires are influenced by life history traits. Sauropsida is a diverse group of vertebrates group that is the sister group to mammals, and includes birds, testudines, squamates, and crocodilians, and represents a natural system to explore predictions derived from mammalian studies. In this study, we analyzed olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire variation among several representative species and found that the number of intact OR genes in sauropsid genomes analyzed ranged over an order of magnitude, from 108 in the green anole to over 1,000 in turtles. Our results suggest that different sauropsid lineages have highly divergent OR repertoire composition that derive from lineage-specific combinations of gene expansions, losses, and retentions of ancestral OR genes. These differences also suggest that varying degrees of adaption related to life history have shaped the unique OR repertoires observed across sauropsid lineages. PMID:26865070

  3. A computer simulation study of VNTR population genetics: Constrained recombination rules out the infinite alleles model

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, R.M.; Martinson, J.J.; Flint, J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J. )

    1993-11-01

    Extensive allelic diversity in variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) has been discovered in the human genome. For population genetic studies of VNTRs, such as forensic applications, it is important to know whether a neutral mutation-drift balance of VNTR polymorphism can be represented by the infinite alleles model. The assumption of the infinite alleles model that each new mutant is unique is very likely to be violated by unequal sister chromatid exchange (USCE), the primary process believed to generate VNTR mutants. The authors show that increasing both mutation rates and misalignment constraint for intrachromosomal recombination in a computer simulation model reduces simulated VNTR diversity below the expectations of the infinite alleles model. Maximal constraint, represented as slippage of single repeats, reduces simulated VNTR diversity to levels expected from the stepwise mutation model. Although misalignment rule is the more important variable, mutation rate also has an effect. At moderate rates of USCE, simulated VNTR diversity fluctuates around infinite alleles expectation. However, if rates of USCE are high, as for hypervariable VNTRs, simulated VNTR diversity is consistently lower than predicted by the infinite alleles model. This has been observed for many VNTRs and accounted for by technical problems in distinguishing alleles of neighboring size classes. The authors use sampling theory to confirm the intrinsically poor fit to the infinite model of both simulated VNTR diversity and observed VNTR polymorphisms sampled from two Papua New Guinean populations. 25 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Correlation of DNA fragment sizes within loci in the presence of non-detectable alleles.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, R; Li, Z

    1995-01-01

    At present most forensic databases of DNA profiling of individuals consist of DNA fragment sizes measured from Southern blot restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Statistical studies of these databases have revealed that, when fragment sizes are measured from RFLP analysis, some of the single-band patterns of individuals may actually be due to heterozygosity of alleles in which fragment size resulting from one allele remains undetected. In this work, we evaluate the effect of such allelic non-detectability on correlation of fragment sizes within individuals at a locus, and its impact on the inference of independence of fragment sizes within loci. We show that when non-detectable alleles are present in a population at a locus, positive correlations of fragment sizes are expected, which increase with the proportion of non-detectable alleles at the locus. Therefore, a non-zero positive correlation is not a proof of allelic dependence within individuals. Applications of this theory to the current forensic RFLP databases within the US show that there is virtually no evidence of significant allelic dependence within any of the loci. Therefore, the assumption that DNA fragment sizes within loci are independent is valid, and hence, the population genetic principles of computing DNA profile frequencies by multiplying binned frequencies of fragment sizes are most likely to be appropriate for forensic applications of DNA typing data.

  5. Intragenic allele pyramiding combines different specificities of wheat Pm3 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Susanne; Hurni, Severine; Streckeisen, Philipp; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2010-11-01

    Some plant resistance genes occur as allelic series, with each member conferring specific resistance against a subset of pathogen races. In wheat, there are 17 alleles of the Pm3 gene. They encode nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) and leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain proteins, which mediate resistance to distinct race spectra of powdery mildew. It is not known if specificities from different alleles can be combined to create resistance genes with broader specificity. Here, we used an approach based on avirulence analysis of pathogen populations to characterize the molecular basis of Pm3 recognition spectra. A large survey of mildew races for avirulence on the Pm3 alleles revealed that Pm3a has a resistance spectrum that completely contains that of Pm3f, but also extends towards additional races. The same is true for the Pm3b and Pm3c gene pair. The molecular analysis of these allelic pairs revealed a role of the NB-ARC protein domain in the efficiency of effector-dependent resistance. Analysis of the wild-type and chimeric Pm3 alleles identified single residues in the C-terminal LRR motifs as the main determinant of allele specificity. Variable residues of the N-terminal LRRs are necessary, but not sufficient, to confer resistance specificity. Based on these data, we constructed a chimeric Pm3 gene by intragenic allele pyramiding of Pm3d and Pm3e that showed the combined resistance specificity and, thus, a broader recognition spectrum compared with the parental alleles. Our findings support a model of stepwise evolution of Pm3 recognition specificities.

  6. bcRep: R Package for Comprehensive Analysis of B Cell Receptor Repertoire Data

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Saleh M.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins, as well as T cell receptors, play a key role in adaptive immune responses because of their ability to recognize antigens. Recent advances in next generation sequencing improved also the quality and quantity of individual B cell receptors repertoire sequencing. Unfortunately, appropriate software to exhaustively analyze repertoire data from NGS platforms without limitations of the number of sequences are lacking. Here we introduce a new R package, bcRep, which offers a platform for comprehensive analyses of B cell receptor repertoires, using IMGT/HighV-QUEST formatted data. Methods for gene usage statistics, clonotype classification, as well as diversity measures, are included. Furthermore, functions to filter datasets, to do summary statistics about mutations, as well as visualization methods, are available. To compare samples in respect of gene usage, diversity, amino acid proportions, similar sequences or clones, several functions including also distance measurements, as well as multidimensional scaling methods, are provided. PMID:27551775

  7. Cross-Reactivity of TCR Repertoire: Current Concepts, Challenges, and Implication for Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Degauque, Nicolas; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Being able to track donor reactive T cells during the course of organ transplantation is a key to improve the graft survival, to prevent graft dysfunction, and to adapt the immunosuppressive regimen. The attempts of transplant immunologists have been for long hampered by the large size of the alloreactive T cell repertoire. Understanding how self-TCR can interact with allogeneic MHC is a key to critically appraise the different assays available to analyze the TCR Vβ repertoire usage. In this report, we will review conceptually and experimentally the process of cross-reactivity. We will then highlight what can be learned from allotransplantation, a situation of artificial cross-reactivity. Finally, the low- and high-resolution techniques to characterize the TCR Vβ repertoire usage in transplantation will be critically discussed. PMID:27047489

  8. Identification of a Bitter-Taste Receptor Gene Repertoire in Different Lagomorphs Species

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana M.; Marques, Andreia T.; Fontanesi, Luca; Thulin, Carl-Gustaf; Sales-Baptista, Elvira; Araújo, Susana S.; Almeida, André M.

    2016-01-01

    The repertoires of bitter-taste receptor (T2R) gene have been described for several animal species, but these data are still scarce for Lagomorphs. The aim of the present work is to identify potential repertoires of T2R in several Lagomorph species, covering a wide geographical distribution. We studied these genes in Lepus timidus, L. europaeus, Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, Romerolagus diazi, and Sylvilagus floridanus, using O. cuniculus cuniculus as control species for PCR and DNA sequencing. We studied the identities of the DNA sequences and built the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Sequencing was successful for both subspecies of O. cuniculus for all T2R genes studied, for five genes in Lepus, and for three genes in R. diazi and S. floridanus. We describe for the first time the partial repertoires of T2R genes for Lagomorphs species, other than the common rabbit. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that sequence proximity levels follow the established taxonomic classification. PMID:27092177

  9. Identification of a Bitter-Taste Receptor Gene Repertoire in Different Lagomorphs Species.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana M; Marques, Andreia T; Fontanesi, Luca; Thulin, Carl-Gustaf; Sales-Baptista, Elvira; Araújo, Susana S; Almeida, André M

    2016-01-01

    The repertoires of bitter-taste receptor (T2R) gene have been described for several animal species, but these data are still scarce for Lagomorphs. The aim of the present work is to identify potential repertoires of T2R in several Lagomorph species, covering a wide geographical distribution. We studied these genes in Lepus timidus, L. europaeus, Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, Romerolagus diazi, and Sylvilagus floridanus, using O. cuniculus cuniculus as control species for PCR and DNA sequencing. We studied the identities of the DNA sequences and built the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Sequencing was successful for both subspecies of O. cuniculus for all T2R genes studied, for five genes in Lepus, and for three genes in R. diazi and S. floridanus. We describe for the first time the partial repertoires of T2R genes for Lagomorphs species, other than the common rabbit. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that sequence proximity levels follow the established taxonomic classification. PMID:27092177

  10. bcRep: R Package for Comprehensive Analysis of B Cell Receptor Repertoire Data.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Julia; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins, as well as T cell receptors, play a key role in adaptive immune responses because of their ability to recognize antigens. Recent advances in next generation sequencing improved also the quality and quantity of individual B cell receptors repertoire sequencing. Unfortunately, appropriate software to exhaustively analyze repertoire data from NGS platforms without limitations of the number of sequences are lacking. Here we introduce a new R package, bcRep, which offers a platform for comprehensive analyses of B cell receptor repertoires, using IMGT/HighV-QUEST formatted data. Methods for gene usage statistics, clonotype classification, as well as diversity measures, are included. Furthermore, functions to filter datasets, to do summary statistics about mutations, as well as visualization methods, are available. To compare samples in respect of gene usage, diversity, amino acid proportions, similar sequences or clones, several functions including also distance measurements, as well as multidimensional scaling methods, are provided. PMID:27551775

  11. The autoantibody repertoire against copper- or macrophage-modified LDL differs in normolipidemics and hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Fernvik, Eva C; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Russo, Momtchilo; Gidlund, Magnus

    2004-03-01

    We have analyzed the antibody repertoire from normo- and hypercholesterolemic subjects to investigate how it can be related to macrophage-dependent modification of low-density lipoproteins, in comparison to the commonly used copper-oxidized LDL. Preexisting natural antibodies in plasma from normo- and hypercholesterolemic individuals were tested for their reactivity against copper ion oxidized LDL and LDL modified by macrophages. A crosswise comparison between these two antigen preparations demonstrated a different antibody repertoire in normo- and hypercholesterolemic patients. This study suggest that the search for antibodies that can influence the progression or regression of an atherosclerotic process has to take into account the process by which LDL is modified, and the repertoire of antibodies that is generated in the normal population, in comparison to that with, or at risk for, coronary artery diseases. PMID:15024184

  12. Availability of a diversely avid CD8+ T cell repertoire specific for the subdominant HLA-A2-restricted HIV-1 Gag p2419-27 epitope.

    PubMed

    Schaubert, Keri L; Price, David A; Frahm, Nicole; Li, Jinzhu; Ng, Hwee L; Joseph, Aviva; Paul, Elyse; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Gostick, Emma; Adams, Sharon; Marincola, Francesco M; Sewell, Andrew K; Altfeld, Marcus; Brenchley, Jason M; Douek, Daniel C; Yang, Otto O; Brander, Christian; Goldstein, Harris; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2007-06-15

    HLA-A2-restricted CTL responses to immunodominant HIV-1 epitopes do not appear to be very effective in the control of viral replication in vivo. In this study, we studied human CD8+ T cell responses to the subdominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope TV9 (Gag p24(19-27), TLNAWVKVV) to explore the possibility of increasing its immune recognition. We confirmed in a cohort of 313 patients, infected by clade B or clade C viruses, that TV9 is rarely recognized. Of interest, the functional sensitivity of the TV9 response can be relatively high. The potential T cell repertoires for TV9 and the characteristics of constituent clonotypes were assessed by ex vivo priming of circulating CD8+ T cells from healthy seronegative donors. TV9-specific CTLs capable of suppressing viral replication in vitro were readily generated, suggesting that the cognate T cell repertoire is not limiting. However, these cultures contained multiple discrete populations with a range of binding avidities for the TV9 tetramer and correspondingly distinct functional dependencies on the CD8 coreceptor. The lack of dominant clonotypes was not affected by the stage of maturation of the priming dendritic cells. Cultures primed by dendritic cells transduced to present endogenous TV9 were also incapable of clonal maturation. Thus, a diffuse TCR repertoire appeared to be an intrinsic characteristic of TV9-specific responses. These data indicate that subdominance is not a function of poor immunogenicity, cognate TCR repertoire availability, or the potential avidity properties thereof, but rather suggest that useful responses to this epitope are suppressed by competing CD8+ T cell populations during HIV-1 infection.

  13. B-cell repertoire responses to varicella-zoster vaccination in human identical twins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yi; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; Qi, Qian; Roskin, Krishna M; Looney, Timothy J; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Dixit, Vaishali; Dekker, Cornelia L; Swan, Gary E; Goronzy, Jörg J; Boyd, Scott D

    2015-01-13

    Adaptive immune responses in humans rely on somatic genetic rearrangements of Ig and T-cell receptor loci to generate diverse antigen receptors. It is unclear to what extent an individual's genetic background affects the characteristics of the antibody repertoire used in responding to vaccination or infection. We studied the B-cell repertoires and clonal expansions in response to attenuated varicella-zoster vaccination in four pairs of adult identical twins and found that the global antibody repertoires of twin pair members showed high similarity in antibody heavy chain V, D, and J gene segment use, and in the length and features of the complementarity-determining region 3, a major determinant of antigen binding. These twin similarities were most pronounced in the IgM-expressing B-cell pools, but were seen to a lesser extent in IgG-expressing B cells. In addition, the degree of antibody somatic mutation accumulated in the B-cell repertoire was highly correlated within twin pair members. Twin pair members had greater numbers of shared convergent antibody sequences, including mutated sequences, suggesting similarity among memory B-cell clonal lineages. Despite these similarities in the memory repertoire, the B-cell clones used in acute responses to ZOSTAVAX vaccination were largely unique to each individual. Taken together, these results suggest that the overall B-cell repertoire is significantly shaped by the underlying germ-line genome, but that stochastic or individual-specific effects dominate the selection of clones in response to an acute antigenic stimulus. PMID:25535378

  14. Gene Behavior Interaction of Depressive Symptoms and the Apolipoprotein E ε4 Allele on Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Kumar B.; Wilson, Robert S.; Skarupski, Kimberly A.; de Leon, Carlos Mendes; Evans, Denis A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Depressive symptoms and the APOE ε4 allele are independent risk factors for cognitive decline. However, it is not clear whether the presence of both depressive symptoms and the APOE ε4 allele increases cognitive decline. Methods A prospective study of a population-based sample of 4,150 (70% African American and 63% women) participants, aged 65 years and older, who were interviewed at 3-year intervals. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 10-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale, with each item coded as presence or absence of a symptom. The APOE genotype was ascertained by DNA samples collected during follow-up. Cognitive function was assessed at the initial and follow-up interviews (average follow-up of 9.2 years), using a standardized global cognitive score. Results There were 1405 (34%) participants with one or more copies of the APOE ε4 allele. In participants with no depressive symptoms, cognitive function decreased by 0.0412-unit per year among those with no copies and 0.0704-unit per year among those with one or more copies of the APOE ε4 allele. For each additional symptom of depression, cognitive decline increased by 0.0021-unit per year among those with no copies and 0.0051-unit per year among those with one or more copies of the APOE ε4 allele. The three-way interaction of depressive symptoms, APOE ε4 allele, and time was significant (p=0.021). Conclusions The association of depressive symptoms on cognitive decline was increased among participants with one or more copies of the APOE ε4 allele compared to those without the allele. PMID:24434953

  15. Analysis of a complete homeobox gene repertoire: Implications for the evolution of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kappen, Claudia

    2000-01-01

    The completion of sequencing projects for various organisms has already advanced our insight into the evolution of entire genomes and the role of gene duplications. One multigene family that has served as a paradigm for the study of gene duplications and molecular evolution is the family of homeodomain-encoding genes. I present here an analysis of the homeodomain repertoire of an entire genome, that of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in relation to our current knowledge of these genes in plants, arthropods, and mammals. A methodological framework is developed that proposes approaches for the analysis of homeodomain repertoires and multigene families in general. PMID:10781048

  16. Diversification of the Primary Antibody Repertoire by AID-Mediated Gene Conversion.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Dennis K; Knight, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Gene conversion, mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), has been found to contribute to generation of the primary antibody repertoire in several vertebrate species. Generation of the primary antibody repertoire by gene conversion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes occurs primarily in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and is best described in chicken and rabbit. Here, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanism of gene conversion as well as the contribution of the microbiota in promoting gene conversion of Ig genes. Finally, we propose that the antibody diversification strategy used in GALT species, such as chicken and rabbit, is conserved in a subset of human and mouse B cells.

  17. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity within electrophoretic "alleles" of xanthine dehydrogenase in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S; Lewontin, R C; Felton, A A

    1976-11-01

    An experimental plan for an exhaustive determination of genic variation at structural gene loci is presented. In the initial steps of this program, 146 isochromosomal lines from 12 geographic populations of D. pseudoobscura were examined for allelic variation of xanthine dehydrogenase by the serial use of 4 different electrophoretic conditions and a head stability test. The 5 criteria revealed a total of 37 allelic classes out of the 146 genomes examined where only 6 had been previously revealed by the usual method of gel electrophoresis. This immense increase in genic variation also showed previously unsuspected population differences between the main part of the species distribution and the isolated population of Bogotá population. The average heterozygosity at the Xdh locus is at least 72% in natural populations. This result, together with the very large number of alleles segregating and the pattern of allelic frequencies, has implications for theories of genetic polymorphism which are discussed.

  19. No Association Between CEL-HYB Hybrid Allele and Chronic Pancreatitis in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen-Bin; Boulling, Arnaud; Masamune, Atsushi; Issarapu, Prachand; Masson, Emmanuelle; Wu, Hao; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Zhan; He, Lin; Fichou, Yann; Nakano, Eriko; Hamada, Shin; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kume, Kiyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Paliwal, Sumit; Mani, K Radha; Bhaskar, Seema; Cooper, David N; Férec, Claude; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chen, Jian-Min; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid allele between the carboxyl ester lipase gene (CEL) and its pseudogene, CELP (called CEL-HYB), generated by nonallelic homologous recombination between CEL intron 10 and CELP intron 10', was found to increase susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis in a case-control study of patients of European ancestry. We attempted to replicate this finding in 3 independent cohorts from China, Japan, and India, but failed to detect the CEL-HYB allele in any of these populations. The CEL-HYB allele might therefore be an ethnic-specific risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. An alternative hybrid allele (CEL-HYB2) was identified in all 3 Asian populations (1.7% combined carrier frequency), but was not associated with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26946345

  20. OptiMAS: A Decision Support Tool for Marker-Assisted Assembly of Diverse Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Fabio; Gauthier, Franck; Bardol, Nicolas; Blanc, Guylaine; Joets, Johann; Charcosset, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Current advances in plant genotyping lead to major progress in the knowledge of genetic architecture of traits of interest. It is increasingly important to develop decision support tools to help breeders and geneticists to conduct marker-assisted selection methods to assemble favorable alleles that are discovered. Algorithms have been implemented, within an interactive graphical interface, to 1) trace parental alleles throughout generations, 2) propose strategies to select the best plants based on estimated molecular scores, and 3) efficiently intermate them depending on the expected value of their progenies. With the possibility to consider a multi-allelic context, OptiMAS opens new prospects to assemble favorable alleles issued from diverse parents and further accelerate genetic gain. PMID:23576670

  1. OptiMAS: a decision support tool for marker-assisted assembly of diverse alleles.

    PubMed

    Valente, Fabio; Gauthier, Franck; Bardol, Nicolas; Blanc, Guylaine; Joets, Johann; Charcosset, Alain; Moreau, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Current advances in plant genotyping lead to major progress in the knowledge of genetic architecture of traits of interest. It is increasingly important to develop decision support tools to help breeders and geneticists to conduct marker-assisted selection methods to assemble favorable alleles that are discovered. Algorithms have been implemented, within an interactive graphical interface, to 1) trace parental alleles throughout generations, 2) propose strategies to select the best plants based on estimated molecular scores, and 3) efficiently intermate them depending on the expected value of their progenies. With the possibility to consider a multi-allelic context, OptiMAS opens new prospects to assemble favorable alleles issued from diverse parents and further accelerate genetic gain.

  2. No Association Between CEL-HYB Hybrid Allele and Chronic Pancreatitis in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen-Bin; Boulling, Arnaud; Masamune, Atsushi; Issarapu, Prachand; Masson, Emmanuelle; Wu, Hao; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Zhan; He, Lin; Fichou, Yann; Nakano, Eriko; Hamada, Shin; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kume, Kiyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Paliwal, Sumit; Mani, K Radha; Bhaskar, Seema; Cooper, David N; Férec, Claude; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chen, Jian-Min; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid allele between the carboxyl ester lipase gene (CEL) and its pseudogene, CELP (called CEL-HYB), generated by nonallelic homologous recombination between CEL intron 10 and CELP intron 10', was found to increase susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis in a case-control study of patients of European ancestry. We attempted to replicate this finding in 3 independent cohorts from China, Japan, and India, but failed to detect the CEL-HYB allele in any of these populations. The CEL-HYB allele might therefore be an ethnic-specific risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. An alternative hybrid allele (CEL-HYB2) was identified in all 3 Asian populations (1.7% combined carrier frequency), but was not associated with chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  4. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R

    2013-08-23

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes.

  5. Combination of Eight Alleles at Four Quantitative Trait Loci Determines Grain Length in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuxiang; Ji, Zhijuan; Wen, Zhihua; Liang, Yan; Yang, Changdeng

    2016-01-01

    Grain length is an important quantitative trait in rice (Oryza sativa L.) that influences both grain yield and exterior quality. Although many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for grain length have been identified, it is still unclear how different alleles from different QTLs regulate grain length coordinately. To explore the mechanisms of QTL combination in the determination of grain length, five mapping populations, including two F2 populations, an F3 population, an F7 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, and an F8 RIL population, were developed from the cross between the U.S. tropical japonica variety 'Lemont' and the Chinese indica variety 'Yangdao 4' and grown under different environmental conditions. Four QTLs (qGL-3-1, qGL-3-2, qGL-4, and qGL-7) for grain length were detected using both composite interval mapping and multiple interval mapping methods in the mapping populations. In each locus, there was an allele from one parent that increased grain length and another allele from another parent that decreased it. The eight alleles in the four QTLs were analyzed to determine whether these alleles act additively across loci, and lead to a linear relationship between the predicted breeding value of QTLs and phenotype. Linear regression analysis suggested that the combination of eight alleles determined grain length. Plants carrying more grain length-increasing alleles had longer grain length than those carrying more grain length-decreasing alleles. This trend was consistent in all five mapping populations and demonstrated the regulation of grain length by the four QTLs. Thus, these QTLs are ideal resources for modifying grain length in rice.

  6. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E; Milner, Matthew J; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling.

  7. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  8. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  9. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  10. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  11. Interpretive Repertoires as Mirrors on Society and as Tools for Action: Reflections on Zeyer and Roth's "A Mirror of Society"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    I respond to Zeyer and Roth's ("Cultural Studies of Science Education," 2009) paper on their use of interpretive repertoire analysis to explicate Swiss middle school students' dialogic responses to environmental issues. I focus on the strategy of interpretive repertoire analysis, making sense of the stance Zeyer and Roth take with this analysis by…

  12. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  13. Repertoires, Characters and Scenes: Sociolinguistic Difference in Turkish-German Comedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Androutsopoulos, Jannis

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines representations of sociolinguistic difference in a German "ethnic comedy" as a means to contribute to a framework for the sociolinguistic study of film. Three levels of analysis of sociolinguistic difference in film are distinguished: repertoire analysis reconstructs the entirety of codes used in a film and their assignment to…

  14. The Effects of Multiple Exemplar Instruction on the Relation between Listener and Intraverbal Categorization Repertoires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechago, Sarah A.; Carr, James E.; Kisamore, April N.; Grow, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of multiple exemplar instruction (MEI) on the relation between listener and intraverbal categorization repertoires of six typically developing preschool-age children using a nonconcurrent multiple-probe design across participants. After failing to emit intraverbal categorization responses following listener categorization…

  15. Interrogating the relationship between naïve and immune antiviral T cell repertoires.

    PubMed

    La Gruta, Nicole L; Thomas, Paul G

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how naïve virus-specific CD8+ T cells influence the type of immune response generated after virus infection is critical for the development of enhanced therapeutic and vaccination strategies to exploit CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. Recent technological advances in T cell isolation and T receptor sequencing have allowed for greater understanding of the basic structure of immune T cell repertoires, the diversity of responses within and between individuals, and changes in repertoires over time and in response to infection conditions. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of how T cell repertoires contribute to potent antiviral responses. Additionally we compare the state of the art in receptor sequencing, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the three most common approaches: next-generation sequencing, template-switch anchored RT-PCR, and multiplex single cell PCR. Finally, we describe how TCR sequencing has delineated the relationship between naïve and immune T cell repertoires.

  16. The Representations of French as Part of the Linguistic Repertoire of Young Anglo-Montrealers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blondeau, Helene; Fonollosa, Marie-Odile

    2009-01-01

    Examining the linguistic repertoire of the Anglophone community living in Montreal, this article provides an analysis of the representations of the variety of French spoken by the first generation of young Anglophones who had experienced different types of contact with French. The relation between functional competence and usage of French is…

  17. Depth versus Breadth of Lexical Repertoire: Assessing Their Roles in EFL Students' Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehsanzadeh, Seyed Jafar

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the roles of depth and breadth of lexical repertoire in L2 lexical inferencing success and incidental vocabulary acquisition through reading. Students read a graded reader containing 13 pseudo-words and attempted to infer the meanings of underlined target words. The Word Associates Test (WAT, Read, 2004) and the Vocabulary…

  18. The analysis of clonal expansions in normal and autoimmune B cell repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Hershberg, Uri; Luning Prak, Eline T.

    2015-01-01

    Clones are the fundamental building blocks of immune repertoires. The number of different clones relates to the diversity of the repertoire, whereas their size and sequence diversity are linked to selective pressures. Selective pressures act both between clones and within different sequence variants of a clone. Understanding how clonal selection shapes the immune repertoire is one of the most basic questions in all of immunology. But how are individual clones defined? Here we discuss different approaches for defining clones, starting with how antibodies are diversified during different stages of B cell development. Next, we discuss how clones are defined using different experimental methods. We focus on high-throughput sequencing datasets, and the computational challenges and opportunities that these data have for mining the antibody repertoire landscape. We discuss methods that visualize sequence variants within the same clone and allow us to consider collections of shared mutations to determine which sequences share a common ancestry. Finally, we comment on features of frequently encountered expanded B cell clones that may be of particular interest in the setting of autoimmunity and other chronic conditions. PMID:26194753

  19. The vocal repertoire in a solitary foraging carnivore, Cynictis penicillata, may reflect facultative sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Aliza; Cherry, Michael I.; Manser, Marta B.

    2009-05-01

    We describe the vocal repertoire of a facultatively social carnivore, the yellow mongoose, Cynictis penicillata. Using a combination of close-range observations, recordings and experiments with simulated predators, we were able to obtain clear descriptions of call structure and function for a wide range of calls used by this herpestid. The vocal repertoire of the yellow mongooses comprised ten call types, half of which were used in appeasing or fearful contexts and half in aggressive interactions. Data from this study suggest that the yellow mongoose uses an urgency-based alarm calling system, indicating high and low urgency through two distinct call types. Compared to solitary mongooses, the yellow mongoose has a large proportion of ‘friendly’ vocalisations that enhance group cohesion, but its vocal repertoire is smaller and less context-specific than those of obligate social species. This study of the vocal repertoire of the yellow mongoose is, to our knowledge, the most complete to have been conducted on a facultatively social species in its natural habitat.

  20. Ontogeny of the avian intestinal immunoglobulin repertoire: modification in CDR3 length and conserved VH-pseudogene usage.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Gerco; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Parmentier, Henk K; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Bos, Nicolaas A; Lammers, Aart

    2013-12-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis in the gut. The antigen binding specificity of these immunoglobulins depends for a large part on the hypervariable CDR3 region. To gain knowledge about isotype-specific development of the CDR3 repertoire we examined CDR3 spectratypes at multiple time points between 4 and 70 days post hatch. In order to identify clonal expansions deviation from the normal distribution (SS) and the average CDR3 length was calculated. IgA-CDR3 regions were studied in more detail by DNA sequence analysis at day 7 and 70 and preferential VH pseudogene usage was estimated. The SS of CDR3 repertoires of the IgM, IgG and IgA isotypes successively increased, but for each isotype this increase was transiently. The length of the CDR3 regions decreased with age for IgM becoming similar to the CDR3 length of IgA at day 70. The IgA- and IgG-CDR3 lengths did not change with age. On average, the CDR3 length of IgA was the shortest. IgA CDR3 sequences were similar between animals aged 7 and 70 days. A limited number of pseudogenes was used, and no differences in pseudogene usage were observed between animals aged 7 and 70 days. Of the identified VH pseudogenes, half of the sequences used VH15, whilst a number of the pseudogenes were not used at all. We conclude that CDR3 spectratype profiles change during aging, whilst at the CDR3-sequence level, variation in VH pseudogene usage for ileal IgA is limited suggesting conservation during ontogeny.

  1. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  2. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa.

  3. Apolipoprotein E e4 allele is associated with more rapid motor decline in older persons.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Aron S; Boyle, Patricia A; Wilson, Robert S; Beck, Todd L; Kelly, Jeremiah F; Bennett, David A

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that apolipoprotein E allele status predicts the rate of motor decline in the elderly. Eight hundred seventy-six older participants without dementia underwent baseline and annual motor testing for up to 10 years. In a generalized estimating equation controlling for age, sex, and education, motor function declined by about 0.03 U/y. The presence of epsilon4 allele was associated with a 2-fold increase in rate of motor decline epsilon4 allele x time: estimate=-0.027 (SE 0.012, P=0.025)]. The association of epsilon4 allele with motor decline persisted even after controlling for cognitive status, race, body mass index, vascular risk factors, and diseases. Further analyses suggested that the association of epsilon4 with motor decline was for the most part explained by the association between epsilon4 allele and change in muscle strength. These results suggest that the presence of epsilon4 allele is a risk factor for more rapid motor decline in the elderly.

  4. Subcellular Profiling Reveals Distinct and Developmentally Regulated Repertoire of Growth Cone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zivraj, Krishna H.; Tung, Yi Chun Loraine; Piper, Michael; Gumy, Laura; Fawcett, James W.; Yeo, Giles S. H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-directed axon guidance depends partly on local translation in growth cones. Many mRNA transcripts are known to reside in developing axons, yet little is known about their subcellular distribution or, specifically, which transcripts are in growth cones. Here laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate the growth cones of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons of two vertebrate species, mouse and Xenopus, coupled with unbiased genomewide microarray profiling. An unexpectedly large pool of mRNAs defined predominant pathways in protein synthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, cancer, neurological disease, and signaling. Comparative profiling of “young” (pathfinding) versus “old” (target-arriving) Xenopus growth cones revealed that the number and complexity of transcripts increases dramatically with age. Many presynaptic protein mRNAs are present exclusively in old growth cones, suggesting that functionally related sets of mRNAs are targeted to growth cones in a developmentally regulated way. Remarkably, a subset of mRNAs was significantly enriched in the growth cone compared with the axon compartment, indicating that mechanisms exist to localize mRNAs selectively to the growth cone. Furthermore, some receptor transcripts (e.g., EphB4), present exclusively in old growth cones, were equally abundant in young and old cell bodies, indicating that RNA trafficking from the soma is developmentally regulated. Our findings show that the mRNA repertoire in growth cones is regulated dynamically with age and suggest that mRNA localization is tailored to match the functional demands of the growing axon tip as it transforms into the presynaptic terminal. PMID:21084603

  5. Comparative analyses of developmental transcription factor repertoires in sponges reveal unexpected complexity of the earliest animals.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Developmental transcription factors (DTFs) control development of animals by affecting expression of target genes, some of which are transcription factors themselves. In bilaterians and cnidarians, conserved DTFs are involved in homologous processes such as gastrulation or specification of neurons. The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica, the first sponge to be sequenced, revealed that only a fraction of these conserved DTF families are present in demosponges. This finding was in line with the view that morphological complexity in the animal lineage correlates with developmental toolkit complexity. However, as the phylum Porifera is very diverse, Amphimedon's genome may not be representative of all sponges. The recently sequenced genomes of calcareous sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata allowed investigations of DTFs in a sponge lineage evolutionarily distant from demosponges. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic analyses of identified DTFs revealed striking differences between the calcareous sponges and Amphimedon. As these differences appear to be a result of independent gene loss events in the two sponge lineages, the last common ancestor of sponges had to possess a much more diverse repertoire of DTFs than extant sponges. Developmental expression of sponge homologs of genes involved in specification of the Bilaterian endomesoderm and the neurosensory cells suggests that roles of many DTFs date back to the last common ancestor of all animals. Strikingly, even DTFs displaying apparent pan-metazoan conservation of sequence and function are not immune to being lost from individual species genomes. The quest for a comprehensive picture of the developmental toolkit in the last common metazoan ancestor is thus greatly benefitting from the increasing accessibility of sequencing, allowing comparisons of multiple genomes within each phylum.

  6. The vocal repertoire of adult and neonate giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Mumm, Christina A S; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Animals use vocalizations to exchange information about external events, their own physical or motivational state, or about individuality and social affiliation. Infant babbling can enhance the development of the full adult vocal repertoire by providing ample opportunity for practice. Giant otters are very social and frequently vocalizing animals. They live in highly cohesive groups, generally including a reproductive pair and their offspring born in different years. This basic social structure may vary in the degree of relatedness of the group members. Individuals engage in shared group activities and different social roles and thus, the social organization of giant otters provides a basis for complex and long-term individual relationships. We recorded and analysed the vocalizations of adult and neonate giant otters from wild and captive groups. We classified the adult vocalizations according to their acoustic structure, and described their main behavioural context. Additionally, we present the first description of vocalizations uttered in babbling bouts of new born giant otters. We expected to find 1) a sophisticated vocal repertoire that would reflect the species' complex social organisation, 2) that giant otter vocalizations have a clear relationship between signal structure and function, and 3) that the vocal repertoire of new born giant otters would comprise age-specific vocalizations as well as precursors of the adult repertoire. We found a vocal repertoire with 22 distinct vocalization types produced by adults and 11 vocalization types within the babbling bouts of the neonates. A comparison within the otter subfamily suggests a relation between vocal and social complexity, with the giant otters being the socially and vocally most complex species.

  7. The Vocal Repertoire of Adult and Neonate Giant Otters (Pteronura brasiliensis)

    PubMed Central

    Mumm, Christina A. S.; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Animals use vocalizations to exchange information about external events, their own physical or motivational state, or about individuality and social affiliation. Infant babbling can enhance the development of the full adult vocal repertoire by providing ample opportunity for practice. Giant otters are very social and frequently vocalizing animals. They live in highly cohesive groups, generally including a reproductive pair and their offspring born in different years. This basic social structure may vary in the degree of relatedness of the group members. Individuals engage in shared group activities and different social roles and thus, the social organization of giant otters provides a basis for complex and long-term individual relationships. We recorded and analysed the vocalizations of adult and neonate giant otters from wild and captive groups. We classified the adult vocalizations according to their acoustic structure, and described their main behavioural context. Additionally, we present the first description of vocalizations uttered in babbling bouts of new born giant otters. We expected to find 1) a sophisticated vocal repertoire that would reflect the species’ complex social organisation, 2) that giant otter vocalizations have a clear relationship between signal structure and function, and 3) that the vocal repertoire of new born giant otters would comprise age-specific vocalizations as well as precursors of the adult repertoire. We found a vocal repertoire with 22 distinct vocalization types produced by adults and 11 vocalization types within the babbling bouts of the neonates. A comparison within the otter subfamily suggests a relation between vocal and social complexity, with the giant otters being the socially and vocally most complex species. PMID:25391142

  8. The vocal repertoire of adult and neonate giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Mumm, Christina A S; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Animals use vocalizations to exchange information about external events, their own physical or motivational state, or about individuality and social affiliation. Infant babbling can enhance the development of the full adult vocal repertoire by providing ample opportunity for practice. Giant otters are very social and frequently vocalizing animals. They live in highly cohesive groups, generally including a reproductive pair and their offspring born in different years. This basic social structure may vary in the degree of relatedness of the group members. Individuals engage in shared group activities and different social roles and thus, the social organization of giant otters provides a basis for complex and long-term individual relationships. We recorded and analysed the vocalizations of adult and neonate giant otters from wild and captive groups. We classified the adult vocalizations according to their acoustic structure, and described their main behavioural context. Additionally, we present the first description of vocalizations uttered in babbling bouts of new born giant otters. We expected to find 1) a sophisticated vocal repertoire that would reflect the species' complex social organisation, 2) that giant otter vocalizations have a clear relationship between signal structure and function, and 3) that the vocal repertoire of new born giant otters would comprise age-specific vocalizations as well as precursors of the adult repertoire. We found a vocal repertoire with 22 distinct vocalization types produced by adults and 11 vocalization types within the babbling bouts of the neonates. A comparison within the otter subfamily suggests a relation between vocal and social complexity, with the giant otters being the socially and vocally most complex species. PMID:25391142

  9. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications.

  10. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  11. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  12. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  13. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment.

  14. Intrinsic variability in Pv, RRP size, Ca(2+) channel repertoire, and presynaptic potentiation in individual synaptic boutons.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Pablo; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    The strength of individual synaptic contacts is considered a key modulator of information flow across circuits. Presynaptically the strength can be parsed into two key parameters: the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) and the probability that a vesicle in that pool will undergo exocytosis when an action potential fires (Pv). How these variables are controlled and the degree to which they vary across individual nerve terminals is crucial to understand synaptic plasticity within neural circuits. Here we report robust measurements of these parameters in rat hippocampal neurons and their variability across populations of individual synapses. We explore the diversity of presynaptic Ca(2+) channel repertoires and evaluate their effect on synaptic strength at single boutons. Finally, we study the degree to which synapses can be differentially modified by a known potentiator of presynaptic function, forskolin. Our experiments revealed that both Pv and RRP spanned a large range, even for synapses made by the same axon, demonstrating that presynaptic efficacy is governed locally at the single synapse level. Synapses varied greatly in their dependence on N or P/Q type Ca(2+) channels for neurotransmission, but there was no association between specific channel repertoires and synaptic efficacy. Increasing cAMP concentration using forskolin enhanced synaptic transmission in a Ca(2+)-independent manner that was inversely related with a synapse's initial Pv, and independent of its RRP size. We propose a simple model based on the relationship between Pv and calcium entry that can account for the variable potentiation of synapses based on initial probability of vesicle fusion.

  15. Characterization of rainbow trout gonad, brain and gill deep cDNA repertoires using a Roche 454-Titanium sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Aurélie; Bobe, Julien; Bouchez, Olivier; Cabau, Cédric; Kah, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Guen, Isabelle; Lluch, Jérôme; Montfort, Jérôme; Moreews, Francois; Nicol, Barbara; Prunet, Patrick; Rescan, Pierre-Yves; Servili, Arianna; Guiguen, Yann

    2012-05-25

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is an important aquaculture species worldwide and, in addition to being of commercial interest, it is also a research model organism of considerable scientific importance. Because of the lack of a whole genome sequence in that species, transcriptomic analyses of this species have often been hindered. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, we sought to fill these informational gaps. Here, using Roche 454-Titanium technology, we provide new tissue-specific cDNA repertoires from several rainbow trout tissues. Non-normalized cDNA libraries were constructed from testis, ovary, brain and gill rainbow trout tissue samples, and these different libraries were sequenced in 10 separate half-runs of 454-Titanium. Overall, we produced a total of 3million quality sequences with an average size of 328bp, representing more than 1Gb of expressed sequence information. These sequences have been combined with all publicly available rainbow trout sequences, resulting in a total of 242,187 clusters of putative transcript groups and 22,373 singletons. To identify the predominantly expressed genes in different tissues of interest, we developed a Digital Differential Display (DDD) approach. This approach allowed us to characterize the genes that are predominantly expressed within each tissue of interest. Of these genes, some were already known to be tissue-specific, thereby validating our approach. Many others, however, were novel candidates, demonstrating the usefulness of our strategy and of such tissue-specific resources. This new sequence information, acquired using NGS 454-Titanium technology, deeply enriched our current knowledge of the expressed genes in rainbow trout through the identification of an increased number of tissue-specific sequences. This identification allowed a precise cDNA tissue repertoire to be characterized in several important rainbow trout tissues. The rainbow trout contig browser can be accessed at the following

  16. Characterization of rainbow trout gonad, brain and gill deep cDNA repertoires using a Roche 454-Titanium sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Aurélie; Bobe, Julien; Bouchez, Olivier; Cabau, Cédric; Kah, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Guen, Isabelle; Lluch, Jérôme; Montfort, Jérôme; Moreews, Francois; Nicol, Barbara; Prunet, Patrick; Rescan, Pierre-Yves; Servili, Arianna; Guiguen, Yann

    2012-05-25

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is an important aquaculture species worldwide and, in addition to being of commercial interest, it is also a research model organism of considerable scientific importance. Because of the lack of a whole genome sequence in that species, transcriptomic analyses of this species have often been hindered. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, we sought to fill these informational gaps. Here, using Roche 454-Titanium technology, we provide new tissue-specific cDNA repertoires from several rainbow trout tissues. Non-normalized cDNA libraries were constructed from testis, ovary, brain and gill rainbow trout tissue samples, and these different libraries were sequenced in 10 separate half-runs of 454-Titanium. Overall, we produced a total of 3million quality sequences with an average size of 328bp, representing more than 1Gb of expressed sequence information. These sequences have been combined with all publicly available rainbow trout sequences, resulting in a total of 242,187 clusters of putative transcript groups and 22,373 singletons. To identify the predominantly expressed genes in different tissues of interest, we developed a Digital Differential Display (DDD) approach. This approach allowed us to characterize the genes that are predominantly expressed within each tissue of interest. Of these genes, some were already known to be tissue-specific, thereby validating our approach. Many others, however, were novel candidates, demonstrating the usefulness of our strategy and of such tissue-specific resources. This new sequence information, acquired using NGS 454-Titanium technology, deeply enriched our current knowledge of the expressed genes in rainbow trout through the identification of an increased number of tissue-specific sequences. This identification allowed a precise cDNA tissue repertoire to be characterized in several important rainbow trout tissues. The rainbow trout contig browser can be accessed at the following

  17. Uncommon HLA alleles identified by hemizygous ultra-high Sanger sequencing: haplotype associations and reconsideration of their assignment in the Common and Well-Documented catalogue.

    PubMed

    Voorter, Christina E M; Groeneweg, Mathijs; Groeneveld, Lisette; Tilanus, Marcel G J

    2016-02-01

    Although the number of HLA alleles still increases, many of them have been reported being uncommon. This is partly due to lack of full length gene sequencing, especially for those alleles belonging to an allele ambiguity in which the first discovered allele has been assigned as the most frequent one. As members of the working group on Common and Well Documented (CWD) alleles and since we implemented full length group-specific sequencing as standard method routinely, we have investigated the presence of presumably rare alleles in our collection of HLA typing data. We identified 50 alleles, that were not previously encountered as Common or Well Documented. Sixteen of them should be added to the CWD catalogue, since we encountered them in 5 or more unrelated individuals. Another 11 could be added, based upon our results and the data present in the IMGT database and the rare allele section of the allele frequencies database. Furthermore, tight associations were observed between several different alleles even at the level of synonymous and non-coding sequences. In addition, in several cases the uncommon allele was found to be more frequent than its common counterpart.

  18. A Large Repertoire of Parasite Epitopes Matched by a Large Repertoire of Host Immune Receptors in an Invertebrate Host/Parasite Model

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Yves; Gourbal, Benjamin; Duval, David; Du Pasquier, Louis; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Mitta, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    For many decades, invertebrate immunity was believed to be non-adaptive, poorly specific, relying exclusively on sometimes multiple but germ-line encoded innate receptors and effectors. But recent studies performed in different invertebrate species have shaken this paradigm by providing evidence for various types of somatic adaptations at the level of putative immune receptors leading to an enlarged repertoire of recognition molecules. Fibrinogen Related Proteins (FREPs) from the mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata are an example of these putative immune receptors. They are known to be involved in reactions against trematode parasites. Following not yet well understood somatic mechanisms, the FREP repertoire varies considerably from one snail to another, showing a trend towards an individualization of the putative immune repertoire almost comparable to that described from vertebrate adaptive immune system. Nevertheless, their antigenic targets remain unknown. In this study, we show that a specific set of these highly variable FREPs from B. glabrata forms complexes with similarly highly polymorphic and individually variable mucin molecules from its specific trematode parasite S. mansoni (Schistosoma mansoni Polymorphic Mucins: SmPoMucs). This is the first evidence of the interaction between diversified immune receptors and antigenic variant in an invertebrate host/pathogen model. The same order of magnitude in the diversity of the parasite epitopes and the one of the FREP suggests co-evolutionary dynamics between host and parasite regarding this set of determinants that could explain population features like the compatibility polymorphism observed in B. glabrata/S. mansoni interaction. In addition, we identified a third partner associated with the FREPs/SmPoMucs in the immune complex: a Thioester containing Protein (TEP) belonging to a molecular category that plays a role in phagocytosis or encapsulation following recognition. The presence of this last partner in this

  19. The impact of library preparation protocols on the consistency of allele frequency estimates in Pool-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing pools of individuals (Pool-Seq) is a cost-effective method to determine genome-wide allele frequency estimates. Given the importance of meta-analyses combining data sets, we determined the influence of different genomic library preparation protocols on the consistency of allele frequency estimates. We found that typically no more than 1% of the variation in allele frequency estimates could be attributed to differences in library preparation. Also read length had only a minor effect on the consistency of allele frequency estimates. By far, the most pronounced influence could be attributed to sequence coverage. Increasing the coverage from 30- to 50-fold improved the consistency of allele frequency estimates by at least 27%. We conclude that Pool-Seq data can be easily combined across different library preparation methods, but sufficient sequence coverage is key to reliable results.

  20. Mixed allele malaria vaccines: Host protection and within-host selection

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Victoria C.; Chan, Brian H.K.; Anders, Robin F.; Read, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    Malaria parasites are frequently polymorphic at the antigenic targets of many candidate vaccines, presumably as a consequence of selection pressure from protective immune responses. Conventional wisdom is therefore that vaccines directed against a single variant could select for non-target variants, rendering the vaccine useless. Many people have argued that a solution is to develop vaccines containing the products of more than one variant of the target. However, we are unaware of any evidence that multi-allele vaccines better protect hosts against parasites or morbidity. Moreover, selection of antigen-variants is not the only evolution that could occur in response to vaccination. Increased virulence could also be favored if more aggressive strains are less well controlled by vaccine-induced immunity. Virulence and antigenic identity have been confounded in all studies so far, and so we do not know formally from any animal or human studies whether vaccine failure has been due to evasion of protective responses by variants at target epitopes, or whether vaccines are just less good at protecting against more aggressive strains. Using the rodent malaria model Plasmodium chabaudi and recombinant apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1), we tested whether a bi-allelic vaccine afforded greater protection from parasite infection and morbidity than did vaccination with the component alleles alone. We also tested the effect of mono- and bi-allelic vaccination on within-host selection of mixed P. chabaudi infections, and whether parasite virulence mediates pathogen titres in immunized hosts. We found that vaccination with the bi-allelic AMA-1 formulation did not afford the host greater protection from parasite infection or morbidity than did mono-allelic AMA-1 immunization. Mono-allelic immunization increased the frequency of heterologous clones in mixed clone infections. There was no evidence that any type of immunization regime favored virulence. A single AMA-1 variant is a

  1. Enhanced low-template DNA analysis conditions and investigation of allele dropout patterns.

    PubMed

    Hedell, Ronny; Dufva, Charlotte; Ansell, Ricky; Mostad, Petter; Hedman, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Forensic DNA analysis applying PCR enables profiling of minute biological samples. Enhanced analysis conditions can be applied to further push the limit of detection, coming with the risk of visualising artefacts and allele imbalances. We have evaluated the consecutive increase of PCR cycles from 30 to 35 to investigate the limitations of low-template (LT) DNA analysis, applying the short tandem repeat (STR) analysis kit PowerPlex ESX 16. Mock crime scene DNA extracts of four different quantities (from around 8-84 pg) were tested. All PCR products were analysed using 5, 10 and 20 capillary electrophoresis (CE) injection seconds. Bayesian models describing allele dropout patterns, allele peak heights and heterozygote balance were developed to assess the overall improvements in EPG quality with altered PCR/CE settings. The models were also used to evaluate the impact of amplicon length, STR marker and fluorescent label on the risk for allele dropout. The allele dropout probability decreased for each PCR cycle increment from 30 to 33 PCR cycles. Irrespective of DNA amount, the dropout probability was not affected by further increasing the number of PCR cycles. For the 42 and 84 pg samples, mainly complete DNA profiles were generated applying 32 PCR cycles. For the 8 and 17 pg samples, the allele dropouts decreased from 100% using 30 cycles to about 75% and 20%, respectively. The results for 33, 34 and 35 PCR cycles indicated that heterozygote balance and stutter ratio were mainly affected by DNA amount, and not directly by PCR cycle number and CE injection settings. We found 32 and 33 PCR cycles with 10 CE injection seconds to be optimal, as 34 and 35 PCR cycles did not improve allele detection and also included CE saturation problems. We find allele dropout probability differences between several STR markers. Markers labelled with the fluorescent dyes CXR-ET (red in electropherogram) and TMR-ET (shown as black) generally have higher dropout risks compared with those

  2. Worldwide allele frequencies of the human apolipoprotein E gene: climate, local adaptations, and evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Dan T A; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Hayes, M Geoffrey

    2010-09-01

    The epsilon4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is associated with increased cholesterol levels and heart disease. Population allele frequencies of APOE have previously been shown to vary, with epsilon4 frequencies generally increasing with latitude. We hypothesize that this trend resulted from natural selection protecting against low-cholesterol levels. In high-latitude cold environments and low-latitude hot environments, metabolic rate is elevated, which could require higher cholesterol levels. To explore this hypothesis, we compiled APOE allele frequencies, latitude, temperature, and elevation from populations around the world. epsilon4 allele frequencies show a curvilinear relationship with absolute latitude, with lowest frequencies found in the mid-latitudes where temperatures generally require less expenditure on cooling/thermogenesis. Controlling for population structure in a subset of populations did not appreciably change this pattern of association, consistent with selection pressures that vary by latitude shaping epsilon4 allele frequencies. Temperature records also predict APOE frequency in a curvilinear fashion, with lowest epsilon4 frequencies at moderate temperatures. The model fit between historical temperatures and epsilon4 is less than between latitude and epsilon4, but strengthened after correcting for estimated temperature differences during the Paleolithic. Contrary to our hypothesis, we find that elevation did not improve predictive power, and an integrated measure of the cholesterol effect of multiple APOE alleles was less related to latitude than was epsilon4 alone. Our results lend mixed support for a link between past temperature and human APOE allele distribution and point to the need to develop better models of past climate in future analyses.

  3. Antigenic Fingerprinting following Primary RSV Infection in Young Children Identifies Novel Antigenic Sites and Reveals Unlinked Evolution of Human Antibody Repertoires to Fusion and Attachment Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Sandra; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Beeler, Judy; Golding, Hana; Khurana, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the major cause of pneumonia among infants. Here we elucidated the antibody repertoire following primary RSV infection and traced its evolution through adolescence and adulthood. Whole genome-fragment phage display libraries (GFPDL) expressing linear and conformational epitopes in the RSV fusion protein (F) and attachment protein (G) were used for unbiased epitope profiling of infant sera prior to and following RSV infection. F-GFPDL analyses demonstrated modest changes in the anti-F epitope repertoires post-RSV infection, while G-GFPDL analyses revealed 100-fold increase in number of bound phages. The G-reactive epitopes spanned the N- and C-terminus of the G ectodomain, along with increased reactivity to the central conserved domain (CCD). Panels of F and G antigenic sites were synthesized to evaluate sera from young children (<2 yr), adolescents (14–18 yr) and adults (30–45 yr) in SPR real-time kinetics assays. A steady increase in RSV-F epitope repertoires from young children to adults was observed using peptides and F proteins. Importantly, several novel epitopes were identified in pre-fusion F and an immunodominant epitope in the F-p27. In all age groups, antibody binding to pre-fusion F was 2–3 folds higher than to post-fusion form. For RSV-G, antibody responses were high following early RSV infection in children, but declined significantly in adults, using either G proteins or peptides. This study identified unlinked evolution of anti-F and anti G responses and supportive evidence for immune pressure driven evolution of RSV-G. These findings could help development of effective countermeasures including vaccines. PMID:27100289

  4. Identification of new primer binding site mutations at TH01 and D13S317 loci and determination of their corresponding STR alleles by allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengrui; Xuan, Jinfeng; Xing, Jiaxin; Ding, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Pang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Several commercial multiplex PCR kits for the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci have been extensively applied in forensic genetics. Consequently, large numbers of samples have been genotyped, and the number of discordant genotypes observed has also increased. We observed allele dropout with two novel alleles at the STR loci TH01 and D13S317 during paternity testing using the AmpFℓSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit. The lost alleles reappeared when alternative PCR primer pairs were used. A sequence analysis revealed a G-to-A substitution 82 bases downstream of the last TCAT motif of the repeat region at the TH01 locus (GenBank accession: D00269) and a G-to-T substitution 90 bases upstream of the first TATC motif of the repeat region at the D13S317 locus (GenBank accession: G09017). The frequencies of these two point mutations were subsequently investigated in the Chinese population using sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR), but neither of these mutations was detected in any of the samples tested. In addition, the DNA samples in which the mutations were identified were amplified to type the point mutations by SSP-PCR to determine the corresponding STR alleles at the two loci. Subsequently, the amplified PCR products with different point mutations and STR repeat numbers were directly sequenced because this strategy overcomes the appearance overlapping peaks generated by different STR alleles and accurately characterizes genotypes. Thus, our findings not only provide useful information for DNA databases and forensic identification but also establish an effective strategy for typing STR alleles with primer binding site mutations.

  5. Assessment of allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2006-02-28

    Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is therapeutically useful for specifically suppressing the expression of alleles associated with disease. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASPRNAi), the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital, but is also difficult. Here, we show ASP-RNAi against the Swedish- and London-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) variants related to familial Alzheimer's disease using two reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes and carrying mutant and wild-type allelic sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions. We examined the effects of siRNA duplexes against the mutant alleles in allele-specific gene silencing and off-target silencing against the wild-type allele under heterozygous conditions, which were generated by cotransfecting the reporter alleles and siRNA duplexes into cultured human cells. Consistently, the siRNA duplexes determined to confer ASP-RNAi also inhibited the expression of the bona fide mutant APP and the production of either amyloid beta 40- or 42-peptide in Cos-7 cells expressing both the full-length Swedish- and wild-type APP alleles. The present data suggest that the system with reporter alleles may permit the preclinical assessment of siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi, and thus contribute to the design and selection of the most suitable of such siRNA duplexes.

  6. Repertoire of Practice: Reconceptualizing Instructor Competency in Contemporary Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Jayson; Coppens, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, adventure educators have used the metaphor of hard and soft skills to understand their practice: hard skills representing technical competencies, and soft skills representing interpersonal competencies. In light of current research and in the face of increasingly complex varieties of adventure practice, the categorization of skills…

  7. Multicultural Counseling beyond the Relationship: Expanding the Repertoire with Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Fred J.; Cardona, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural counseling approaches variously focus on the counseling relationship. Relatively few discuss clinical techniques and strategies to any significant extent. This article explores enhancing multicultural counseling by offering an array of techniques and strategies based on addressing oppression and increasing psychological freedom.…

  8. Steel Band Repertoire: The Case for Original Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades, the steel band art form has experienced consistent growth and development in several key respects. For example, in the United States, the sheer number of steel band programs has steadily increased, and it appears that this trend will continue in the future. Additionally, pan builders and tuners have made great strides in…

  9. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources.

  10. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  11. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  12. Automated analysis of sequence polymorphism in STR alleles by PCR and direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Planz, John V; Sannes-Lowery, Kristen A; Duncan, David D; Manalili, Sheri; Budowle, Bruce; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Hofstadler, Steven A; Hall, Thomas A

    2012-09-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are the primary genetic markers used for the analysis of biological samples in forensic and human identity testing. The discrimination power of a combination of STRs is sufficient in many human identity testing comparisons unless the evidence is substantially compromised and/or there are insufficient relatives or a potential mutation may have arisen in kinship analyses. An automated STR assay system that is based on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been developed that can increase the discrimination power of some of the CODIS core STR loci and thus provide more information in typical and challenged samples and cases. Data from the ESI-MS STR system is fully backwards compatible with existing STR typing results generated by capillary electrophoresis. In contrast, however, the ESI-MS analytical system also reveals nucleotide polymorphisms residing within the STR alleles. The presence of these polymorphisms expands the number of alleles at a locus. Population studies were performed on the 13 core CODIS STR loci from African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics capturing both the length of the allele, as well as nucleotide variations contained within repeat motifs or flanking regions. Such additional polymorphisms were identified in 11 of the 13 loci examined whereby several nominal length alleles were subdivided. A substantial increase in heterozygosity was observed, with close to or greater than 5% of samples analyzed being heterozygous with equal-length alleles in at least one of five of the core CODIS loci. This additional polymorphism increases discrimination power significantly, whereby the seven most polymorphic STR loci have a discrimination power equivalent to the 10 most discriminating of the CODIS core loci. An analysis of substructure among the three population groups revealed a higher θ than would be observed compared with using alleles designated by nominal length, i.e., repeats solely. Two loci, D3S1358

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I and II Alleles and Cervical Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Johnson, Lisa G.; Yu, Kai; Wang, Sophia S.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Hansen, John A.; Carrington, Mary; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Gao, Xiaojiang; Hildesheim, Allan; Madeleine, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C) and class II (DRB1 and DQB1) loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC), a less common but aggressive histologic subtype. Methods: We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US Cervical Cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n = 630 ADC; n = 775 controls). Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type) and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Results: Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC [DRB1*13:01 (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41–0.93), DRB1*13:02 (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.31–0.77), and DQB1*06:03 (OR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.42–0.95)]; one was associated with increased risk [B*07:02 (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.07–1.79)]. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.27–0.78) was associated with decreased risk of ADC and remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, and C*07:02 (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09–1.81) was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.01–1.76) and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.21–0.80). Conclusion: Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing

  14. Diet Shapes the Evolution of the Vertebrate Bitter Taste Receptor Gene Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Li, Diyan; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate Tas2r taste receptors bind to bitter compounds, which are typically poisonous, to elicit bitter sensation to prevent the ingestion of toxins. Previous studies noted a marked variation in the number of Tas2r genes among species, but the underlying cause is unclear. To address this question, we compile the Tas2r gene repertoires from 41 mammals, 4 birds, 2 reptiles, 1 amphibian, and 6 fishes. The number of intact Tas2r genes varies from 0 in the bottlenose dolphin to 51 in the Western clawed frog, with numerous expansions and contractions of the gene family throughout vertebrates, especially among tetrapods. The Tas2r gene number in a species correlates with the fraction of plants in its diet. Because plant tissues contain more toxic compounds than animal tissues do, our observation supports the hypothesis that dietary toxins are a major selective force shaping the diversity of the Tas2r repertoire. PMID:24202612

  15. Serology in the 21st Century: The Molecular-Level Analysis of the Serum Antibody Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Yariv; Horton, Andrew P.; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Georgiou, George

    2015-01-01

    The ensemble of antibodies found in serum and secretions represents the key adaptive component of B-cell mediated humoral immunity. The antibody repertoire is shaped by the historical record of exposure to exogenous factors such as pathogens and vaccines, as well as by endogenous host-intrinsic factors such as genetics, self-antigens, and age. Thanks to very recent technology advancements it is now becoming possible to identify and quantify the individual antibodies comprising the serological repertoire. In parallel, the advent of high throughput methods for antigen and immunosignature discovery opens up unprecedented opportunities to transform our understanding of numerous key questions in adaptive humoral immunity, including the nature and dynamics of serological memory, the role of polyspecific antibodies in health and disease and how protective responses to infections or vaccine challenge arise. Additionally, these technologies also hold great promise for therapeutic antibody and biomarker discovery in a variety of settings PMID:26172290

  16. Using information theory to assess the diversity, complexity, and development of communicative repertoires.

    PubMed

    McCowan, Brenda; Doyle, Laurance R; Hanser, Sean F

    2002-06-01

    The application of quantitative and comparative measures from information theory on animal communication can provide novel insights into the ecological, environmental, social, and contextual properties that shape the structure, organization, and function of signal repertoires. Using 2 phylogenetically different mammalian species that share similar ecological and social constraints as examples, the authors quantitatively examined the internal structure and development of a subsystem of these species' vocal repertoires in comparison with that of human language and illustrated that these species exhibit convergent developmental processes. The authors also discussed how predictions on the structure and organization of animal communication systems can be made from this new application of information theoretic measures with respect to behavioral ecology.

  17. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines. PMID:27630639

  18. The Application of Next Generation Sequencing to the Understanding of Antibody Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Mathonet, Pascale; Ullman, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    In the decade since the human genome sequence was declared complete, the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) or “deep” sequencing to deliver cost-effective genomic sequencing has influenced advances beyond its primary application and changed the research landscape in many other areas. This review will survey recent applications of NGS which have broadened the understanding of natural antibody repertoires (the “antibodyome”) and how these evolve in response to viral infection. We will also report examples where deep sequencing of binding populations, derived from both natural and synthetic repertoires, have been used to benefit antibody engineering. This knowledge will ultimately lead to the design of more effective biological drugs and vaccines. PMID:24062737

  19. Genomic analysis of 38 Legionella species identifies large and diverse effector repertoires.

    PubMed

    Burstein, David; Amaro, Francisco; Zusman, Tal; Lifshitz, Ziv; Cohen, Ofir; Gilbert, Jack A; Pupko, Tal; Shuman, Howard A; Segal, Gil

    2016-02-01

    Infection by the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila relies on the translocation of ∼ 300 virulence proteins, termed effectors, which manipulate host cell processes. However, almost no information exists regarding effectors in other Legionella pathogens. Here we sequenced, assembled and characterized the genomes of 38 Legionella species and predicted their effector repertoires using a previously validated machine learning approach. This analysis identified 5,885 predicted effectors. The effector repertoires of different Legionella species were found to be largely non-overlapping, and only seven core effectors were shared by all species studied. Species-specific effectors had atypically low GC content, suggesting exogenous acquisition, possibly from the natural protozoan hosts of these species. Furthermore, we detected numerous new conserved effector domains and discovered new domain combinations, which allowed the inference of as yet undescribed effector functions. The effector collection and network of domain architectures described here can serve as a roadmap for future studies of effector function and evolution.

  20. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines.

  1. Uncovering the Legionella genus effector repertoire - strength in diversity and numbers

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, David; Amaro, Francisco; Zusman, Tal; Lifshitz, Ziv; Cohen, Ofir; Gilbert, Jack A; Pupko, Tal; Shuman, Howard A; Segal, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Infection by the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila relies on the translocation of ~300 virulence proteins, termed effectors, which manipulate host-cell processes. However, almost no information exists regarding effectors in other Legionella pathogens. Here we sequenced, assembled and characterized the genomes of 38 Legionella species, and predicted their effector repertoire using a previously validated machine-learning approach. This analysis revealed a treasure trove of 5,885 predicted effectors. The effector repertoire of different Legionella species was found to be largely non-overlapping, and only seven core-effectors were shared among all species studied. Species-specific effectors had atypically low GC content, suggesting exogenous acquisition, possibly from their natural protozoan hosts. Furthermore, we detected numerous novel conserved effector domains, and discovered new domain combinations, which allowed inferring yet undescribed effector functions. The effector collection and network of domain architectures described here can serve as a roadmap for future studies of effector function and evolution. PMID:26752266

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Immune Repertoire Study during Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongni; Chen, Cuicui; Seely, Eric John; Chen, Shujing; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of the adaptive immune response is based on the enormous diversity of T and B cell antigen-specific receptors. The immune repertoire, the collection of T and B cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system at any given time, is dynamic and reflects the essence of immune selectivity. In this article, we review the recent advances in immune repertoire study of infectious diseases, which were achieved by traditional techniques and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. HTS techniques enable the determination of complementary regions of lymphocyte receptors with unprecedented efficiency and scale. This progress in methodology enhances the understanding of immunologic changes during pathogen challenge and also provides a basis for further development of novel diagnostic markers, immunotherapies, and vaccines. PMID:27630639

  3. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability.

  4. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D.; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  5. Serology in the 21st century: the molecular-level analysis of the serum antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Wine, Yariv; Horton, Andrew P; Ippolito, Gregory C; Georgiou, George

    2015-08-01

    The ensemble of antibodies found in serum and secretions represents the key adaptive component of B-cell mediated humoral immunity. The antibody repertoire is shaped by the historical record of exposure to exogenous factors such as pathogens and vaccines, as well as by endogenous host-intrinsic factors such as genetics, self-antigens, and age. Thanks to very recent technology advancements it is now becoming possible to identify and quantify the individual antibodies comprising the serological repertoire. In parallel, the advent of high throughput methods for antigen and immunosignature discovery opens up unprecedented opportunities to transform our understanding of numerous key questions in adaptive humoral immunity, including the nature and dynamics of serological memory, the role of polyspecific antibodies in health and disease and how protective responses to infections or vaccine challenge arise. Additionally, these technologies also hold great promise for therapeutic antibody and biomarker discovery in a variety of settings.

  6. High-resolution analysis of the human T-cell receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Eliana; Nicolay, Jan P.; Fronza, Raffaele; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Nowrouzi, Ali; Ürenden, Gökçe; Lulay, Christina; Schneider, Sven; Goerdt, Sergij; Glimm, Hanno; Krammer, Peter H.; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased dissection of T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire diversity at the nucleotide level could provide important insights into human immunity. Here we show that TCR ligation-anchored-magnetically captured PCR (TCR-LA-MC PCR) identifies TCR α- and β-chain diversity without sequence-associated or quantitative restrictions in healthy and diseased conditions. TCR-LA-MC PCR identifies convergent recombination events, classifies different stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in vivo and demonstrates TCR reactivation after in vitro cytomegalovirus stimulation. TCR-LA-MC PCR allows ultra-deep data access to both physiological TCR diversity and mechanisms influencing clonality in all clinical settings with restricted or distorted TCR repertoires. PMID:26324409

  7. Nck adaptors are positive regulators of the size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy D; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-08-31

    The size and sensitivity of the T-cell repertoire governs the effectiveness of immune responses against invading pathogens. Both are modulated by T-cell receptor (TCR) activity through molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the SH2/SH3 domain containing proteins Nck lower the threshold of T-cell responsiveness. The hallmarks of Nck deletion were T-cell lymphopenia and hyporeactivity to TCR-mediated stimulation. In the absence of the Nck adaptors, peripheral T cells expressing a TCR with low avidity for self-antigens were strongly reduced, whereas an overall impairment of T-cell activation by weak antigenic stimulation was observed. Mechanistically, Nck deletion resulted in a significant decrease in calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation upon TCR engagement. Taken together, our findings unveil a crucial role for the Nck adaptors in shaping the T-cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage and optimal T cell excitability. PMID:20709959

  8. Repertoire of Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce K.; Landay, Alan; Andersson, Jan; Brown, Clark; Behbahani, Homira; Jiyamapa, Dan; Burki, Zareefa; Stanislawski, Donna; Czerniewski, Mary Ann; Garcia, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone therapy increase susceptibility to lentivirus transmission. Infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on expression of specific chemokine receptors known to function as HIV co-receptors. Quantitative kinetic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was developed to determine the in vivo expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4, CCR3, CCR2b, and the cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cervical biopsies from 12 women with and without sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone-predominant conditions. Our data indicate that CCR5 is the major HIV co-receptor expressed in the female genital tract, and CXCR4 is the predominantly expressed HIV co-receptor in peripheral blood. CCR5 mRNA expression in the ectocervix was 10-fold greater than CXCR4, 20-fold greater than CCR2b, and 100-fold greater than CCR3. In peripheral blood, CXCR4 expression was 1.5-fold greater than CCR5, 10-fold greater than CCR2b, and 15-fold greater than CCR3. US28 was not expressed in cervical tissue despite expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five individuals. CCR5 was significantly increased (p < 0.02) in biopsies from women with sexually transmitted diseases and others who were progesterone predominant. In vitro studies demonstrate that progesterone increases CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 expression and decreases CCR2b expression in lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Characterization of chemokine receptors at the tissue level provides important information in identifying host determinants of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:9708808

  9. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice.

  10. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  11. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  12. Rapid Evolution of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Genes in Primates Generates New Disease Alleles in Humans via Hitchhiking Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Takashi; Ota, Masao; Shimizu, Sayoko; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Nami; Takasu, Miwa; Anzai, Tatsuya; Kulski, Jerzy K.; Kikkawa, Eri; Naruse, Taeko; Kimura, Natsuki; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kohara, Sakae; Iwamoto, Chie; Umehara, Yumi; Meyer, Alice; Wanner, Valérie; Sano, Kazumi; Macquin, Cécile; Ikeo, Kazuho; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Gojobori, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Bahram, Seiamak

    2006-01-01

    A plausible explanation for many MHC-linked diseases is lacking. Sequencing of the MHC class I region (coding units or full contigs) in several human and nonhuman primate haplotypes allowed an analysis of single nucleotide variations (SNV) across this entire segment. This diversity was not evenly distributed. It was rather concentrated within two gene-rich clusters. These were each centered, but importantly not limited to, the antigen-presenting HLA-A and HLA-B/-C loci. Rapid evolution of MHC-I alleles, as evidenced by an unusually high number of haplotype-specific (hs) and hypervariable (hv) (which could not be traced to a single species or haplotype) SNVs within the classical MHC-I, seems to have not only hitchhiked alleles within nearby genes, but also hitchhiked deleterious mutations in these same unrelated loci. The overrepresentation of a fraction of these hvSNV (hv1SNV) along with hsSNV, as compared to those that appear to have been maintained throughout primate evolution (trans-species diversity; tsSNV; included within hv2SNV) tends to establish that the majority of the MHC polymorphism is de novo (species specific). This is most likely reminiscent of the fact that these hsSNV and hv1SNV have been selected in adaptation to the constantly evolving microbial antigenic repertoire. PMID:16702430

  13. Restrictive flamenco alleles are maintained in Drosophila melanogaster population cages, despite the absence of their endogenous gypsy retroviral targets.

    PubMed

    Pélisson, Alain; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Terzian, Christophe; Bucheton, Alain

    2007-02-01

    The flamenco (flam) locus, located at 20A1-3 in the centromeric heterochromatin of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. In restrictive strains, functional flam alleles maintain gypsy proviruses in a repressed state. By contrast, in permissive strains, proviral amplification results from infection of the female germ line and subsequent insertions into the chromosomes of the progeny. A restrictive/permissive polymorphism prevails in natural and laboratory populations. This polymorphism was assumed to be maintained by the interplay of opposite selective forces; on one hand, the increase of genetic load caused by proviral insertions would favor restrictive flam alleles because they make flies resistant to these gypsy replicative transpositions and, on the other, a hypothetical resistance cost would select against such alleles in the absence of the retrovirus. However, the population cage data presented in this paper do not fit with this simple resistance cost hypothesis because restrictive alleles were not eliminated in the absence of functional gypsy proviruses; on the contrary, using 2 independent flam allelic pairs, the restrictive frequency rose to about 90% in every experimental population, whatever the pair of alleles and the allelic proportions in the initial inoculum. These data suggest that the flam polymorphism is maintained by some strong balancing selection, which would act either on flam itself, independently of the deleterious effect of gypsy, or on a hypothetical flanking gene, in linkage disequilibrium with flam. Alternatively, restrictive flam alleles might also be resistant to some other retroelements that would be still present in the cage populations, causing a positive selection for these alleles. Whatever selective forces that maintain high levels of restrictive alleles independently of gypsy, this unknown mechanism can set up an interesting kind of antiviral innate immunity, at

  14. Rapid Evolution of the Sequences and Gene Repertoires of Secreted Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins secreted to the extracellular environment or to the periphery of the cell envelope, the secretome, play essential roles in foraging, antagonistic and mutualistic interactions. We hypothesize that arms races, genetic conflicts and varying selective pressures should lead to the rapid change of sequences and gene repertoires of the secretome. The analysis of 42 bacterial pan-genomes shows that secreted, and especially extracellular proteins, are predominantly encoded in the accessory genome, i.e. among genes not ubiquitous within the clade. Genes encoding outer membrane proteins might engage more frequently in intra-chromosomal gene conversion because they are more often in multi-genic families. The gene sequences encoding the secretome evolve faster than the rest of the genome and in particular at non-synonymous positions. Cell wall proteins in Firmicutes evolve particularly fast when compared with outer membrane proteins of Proteobacteria. Virulence factors are over-represented in the secretome, notably in outer membrane proteins, but cell localization explains more of the variance in substitution rates and gene repertoires than sequence homology to known virulence factors. Accordingly, the repertoires and sequences of the genes encoding the secretome change fast in the clades of obligatory and facultative pathogens and also in the clades of mutualists and free-living bacteria. Our study shows that cell localization shapes genome evolution. In agreement with our hypothesis, the repertoires and the sequences of genes encoding secreted proteins evolve fast. The particularly rapid change of extracellular proteins suggests that these public goods are key players in bacterial adaptation. PMID:23189144

  15. BMI-Associated Alleles Do Not Constitute Risk Alleles for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Independently of BMI: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Louwers, Yvonne V.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Stolk, Lisette; Groves, Christopher J.; Barber, Thomas M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franks, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has a strong genetic background and the majority of patients with PCOS have elevated BMI levels. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent BMI-increasing alleles contribute to risk of PCOS when contemporaneous BMI is taken into consideration. Methods Patients with PCOS and controls were recruited from the United Kingdom (563 cases and 791 controls) and The Netherlands (510 cases and 2720 controls). Cases and controls were of similar BMI. SNPs mapping to 12 BMI-associated loci which have been extensively replicated across different ethnicities, i.e., BDNF, FAIM2, ETV5, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, MC4R, MTCH2, NEGR1, SEC16B, SH2B1, and TMEM18, were studied in association with PCOS within each cohort using the additive genetic model followed by a combined analysis. A genetic allelic count risk score model was used to determine the risk of PCOS for individuals carrying increasing numbers of BMI-increasing alleles. Results None of the genetic variants, including FTO and MC4R, was associated with PCOS independently of BMI in the meta-analysis. Moreover, no differences were observed between cases and controls in the number of BMI-risk alleles present and no overall trend across the risk score groups was observed. Conclusion In this combined analysis of over 4,000 BMI-matched individuals from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, we observed no association of BMI risk alleles with PCOS independent of BMI. PMID:24498077

  16. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marcatili, Paolo; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10−6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models. PMID:27074145

  17. Differences in transcriptomic profile and IgA repertoire between jejunal and ileal Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Levast, Benoît; De Monte, Michèle; Melo, Sandrine; Chevaleyre, Claire; Berri, Mustapha; Salmon, Henri; Meurens, François

    2010-02-01

    In many species such as sheep and pig, there are two types of Peyer's patches (PP): several discrete patches in the jejunum and a long and continuous patch in the ileum. Most of the immunoglobulin A in the gut is generated by B-cells in the PP germinal centers. Moreover, swine like ovine ileal PP might be important for antigen independent B-cell repertoire diversification. We examined, by quantitative real-time PCR, the expression of 36 transcripts of antimicrobial peptides, chemokines, interleukines, Toll-like receptors and transcription factors from both PP and we highlighted the differences by a principal component analysis. Ileal PP was characterized by a higher mRNA expression of CCL28, IL5, IL10, TLR2 and TLR4 while jejunal PP showed higher mRNA expression of antimicrobial peptides, CCL25, FOXP3, IL4, T-Bet, TSLP and SOCS2. Then, we analyzed some VDJ rearrangements to assess immunoglobulin repertoire diversity in jejunal and ileal PP from weaned piglets. The IgA and IgM repertoires were more diverse in ileal than in jejunal piglet PP. All these results could be related to the rarefaction of interfollicular T-cell zone and the presence in ileal versus jejunal lumen of a more diversified microflora. These findings shed a light on the functional differences between both PP.

  18. A quantitative acoustic analysis of the vocal repertoire of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Agamaite, James A; Chang, Chia-Jung; Osmanski, Michael S; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-11-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a highly vocal New World primate species, has emerged in recent years as a promising animal model for studying brain mechanisms underlying perception, vocal production, and cognition. The present study provides a quantitative acoustic analysis of a large number of vocalizations produced by marmosets in a social environment within a captive colony. Previous classifications of the marmoset vocal repertoire were mostly based on qualitative observations. In the present study a variety of vocalizations from individually identified marmosets were sampled and multiple acoustic features of each type of vocalization were measured. Results show that marmosets have a complex vocal repertoire in captivity that consists of multiple vocalization types, including both simple calls and compound calls composed of sequences of simple calls. A detailed quantification of the vocal repertoire of the marmoset can serve as a solid basis for studying the behavioral significance of their vocalizations and is essential for carrying out studies that investigate such properties as perceptual boundaries between call types and among individual callers as well as neural coding mechanisms for vocalizations. It can also serve as the basis for evaluating abnormal vocal behaviors resulting from diseases or genetic manipulations. PMID:26627765

  19. Practical compassions: repertoires of practice and compassion talk in acute mental healthcare.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brian; Crawford, Paul; Gilbert, Paul; Gilbert, Jean; Gale, Corinne

    2014-03-01

    This article reports an exploratory study of the concept of compassion in the work of 20 mental health practitioners in a UK Midlands facility. Using notions of practice derived from phenomenology and Bourdieusian sociology and notions of emotional labour we identify two contrasting interpretive repertoires in discussions of compassion. The first, the practical compassion repertoire, evokes the practical, physical and bodily aspects of compassion. It involves organising being with patients, playing games, anticipating disruption and taking them outside for cigarettes. Practitioners described being aware that these practical, bodily activities could lead to patients 'opening up', disclosing their interior concerns and enabling practical, compassionate mental health work to take place. In contrast, the second, organisational repertoire, concerns organisational constraints on compassionate practice. The shortage of staff, the record-keeping and internal processes of quality control were seen as time-greedy and apt to detract from contact with patients. The findings are discussed in relation to Bourdieu and Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological accounts of practice and habit and set in context in the growing interest in placing compassion centrally in healthcare. We also explore how the exercise of compassion in the way our participants describe it can afford the more effective exercise of medical power. PMID:24117523

  20. A quantitative acoustic analysis of the vocal repertoire of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Agamaite, James A; Chang, Chia-Jung; Osmanski, Michael S; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-11-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a highly vocal New World primate species, has emerged in recent years as a promising animal model for studying brain mechanisms underlying perception, vocal production, and cognition. The present study provides a quantitative acoustic analysis of a large number of vocalizations produced by marmosets in a social environment within a captive colony. Previous classifications of the marmoset vocal repertoire were mostly based on qualitative observations. In the present study a variety of vocalizations from individually identified marmosets were sampled and multiple acoustic features of each type of vocalization were measured. Results show that marmosets have a complex vocal repertoire in captivity that consists of multiple vocalization types, including both simple calls and compound calls composed of sequences of simple calls. A detailed quantification of the vocal repertoire of the marmoset can serve as a solid basis for studying the behavioral significance of their vocalizations and is essential for carrying out studies that investigate such properties as perceptual boundaries between call types and among individual callers as well as neural coding mechanisms for vocalizations. It can also serve as the basis for evaluating abnormal vocal behaviors resulting from diseases or genetic manipulations.

  1. Climate Change and Everyday Life: Repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jenny; Ideland, Malin; Malmberg, Claes; Grace, Marcus

    2014-06-01

    There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9-10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue (SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these were sometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives. Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students' engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens.

  2. Dance choreography is coordinated with song repertoire in a complex avian display.

    PubMed

    Dalziell, Anastasia H; Peters, Richard A; Cockburn, Andrew; Dorland, Alexandra D; Maisey, Alex C; Magrath, Robert D

    2013-06-17

    All human cultures have music and dance, and the two activities are so closely integrated that many languages use just one word to describe both. Recent research points to a deep cognitive connection between music and dance-like movements in humans, fueling speculation that music and dance have coevolved and prompting the need for studies of audiovisual displays in other animals. However, little is known about how nonhuman animals integrate acoustic and movement display components. One striking property of human displays is that performers coordinate dance with music by matching types of dance movements with types of music, as when dancers waltz to waltz music. Here, we show that a bird also temporally coordinates a repertoire of song types with a repertoire of dance-like movements. During displays, male superb lyrebirds (Menura novaehollandiae) sing four different song types, matching each with a unique set of movements and delivering song and dance types in a predictable sequence. Crucially, display movements are both unnecessary for the production of sound and voluntary, because males sometimes sing without dancing. Thus, the coordination of independently produced repertoires of acoustic and movement signals is not a uniquely human trait.

  3. Four novel PEPD alleles causing prolidase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ledoux, P.; Scriver, C.; Hechtman, P. )

    1994-06-01

    Mutations at the PEPD locus cause prolidase (an enzyme specific for proline- and hydroxyproline-terminated dipeptides) deficiency (McKusick 170100), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by iminodipeptiduria, skin ulcers, mental retardation, and recurrent infections. Four PEPD mutations from five severely affected individuals were characterized by analysis of reverse-transcribed, PCR-amplified (RT-PCR) cDNA. The authors used SSCP analysis on four overlapping cDNA fragments covering the entire coding region of the PEPD gene and detected abnormal SSCP bands for the fragments spanning all or part of exons 13-15 in three of the probands. Direct sequencing of the mutant cDNAs showed a G[yields]A, 1342 substitution (G448R) in two patients and a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]E452 or [Delta]E453) in another. In the other two probands the amplified products were of reduced size. Direct sequencing of these mutant cDNAs revealed a deletion of exon 5 in one patient and of exon 7 in the other. Intronic sequences flanking exons 5 and 7 were identified using inverse PCR followed by direct sequencing. Conventional PCR and direct sequencing then established the intron-exon borders of the mutant genomic DNA revealing two splice acceptor mutations: a G[yields]C substitution at position -1 of intron 4 and an A[yields]G substitution at position -2 of intron 6. The results indicate that the severe form of prolidase deficiency is caused by multiple PEPD alleles. In this report the authors attempt to begin the process of describing these alleles and cataloging their phenotype expression. 31 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Intracellular Population Genetics: Evidence for Random Drift of Mitochondrial Allele Frequencies in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE and SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE

    PubMed Central

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Birky, C. William; Lückemann, Gudrun; Wolf, Klaus

    1980-01-01

    We report evidence for random drift of mitochondrial allele frequencies in zygote clones of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Monofactorial and bifactorial crosses were done, using strains resistant or sensitive to erythromycin (alleles ER, ES), oligomycin (OR, OS), or diuron (DR, DS). The frequencies of resistant and sensitive cells (and thus the frequencies of the resistant and sensitive alleles) were determined for each of a number of clones of diploid cells arising from individual zygotes. Allele frequencies were extremely variable among these zygote clones; some clones were "uniparental," with mitochondrial alleles from only one parent present. These observations suggest random drift of the allele frequencies in the population of mitochondrial genes within an individual zygote and its diploid progeny. Drift would cease when all the cells in a clone become homoplasmic, due to segregation of the mitochondrial genomes during vegetative cell divisions. To test this, we delayed cell division (and hence segregation) for varying times by starving zygotes in order to give drift more time to operate. As predicted, delaying cell division resulted in an increase in the variance of allele frequencies among the zygote clones and an increase in the proportion of uniparental zygote clones. The changes in form of the allele frequency distributions resembled those seen during random drift in finite Mendelian populations. In bifactorial crosses, genotypes as well as individual alleles were fixed or lost in some zygote clones. However, the mean recombination frequency for a large number of clones did not increase when cell division was delayed. Several possible molecular mechanisms for intracellular random drift are discussed. PMID:7009322

  5. Laboratory and Data Analysis Methods for Characterization of Human B Cell Repertoires by High-Throughput DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yi; Roskin, Krishna M; Jackson, Katherine J L; Boyd, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing techniques have greatly accelerated the pace of research into the repertoires of antibody and T cell receptor gene rearrangements that confer antigen specificity to adaptive immune responses. Studies of aging-related changes in human B cell repertoires have benefited from the ability to detect and quantify thousands to millions of B cell clones in human samples, and study the mutational lineages and isotype switching relationships within each clonal lineage. Correlation of repertoire analysis with antibody gene data from antigen-specific B cells is poised to give much greater insight into clinically relevant B cell responses and memory storage. Here, we describe strategies for preparing and analyzing human antibody gene libraries for studying B cell repertoires. PMID:26420720

  6. A discrete chromatin loop in the murine Tcra-Tcrd locus shapes the TCRδ and TCRα repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Carico, Zachary; Shih, Han-Yu; Krangel, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The Tcra-Tcrd locus undergoes V(D)J recombination in CD4−CD8−double-negative thymocytes and CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes to generate diverse TCRδ and TCRα repertoires, respectively. Here we reveal a Tcra-Tcrd locus chromatin interaction network in double-negative thymocytes that was formed by interactions between CTCF-binding elements. Disruption of a discrete chromatin loop encompassing Tcrd diversity, joining and constant gene segments allowed a single variable gene segment to frequently contact and rearrange to diversity and joining gene segments and dominate the adult TCRδ repertoire. Disruption of this loop also narrowed the TCRα repertoire, which, we believe, follows as a consequence of the restricted TCRδ repertoire. Hence, a single CTCF-mediated chromatin loop directly regulates TCRδ diversity and indirectly regulates TCRα diversity. PMID:26258942

  7. Structural diversity repertoire of gene silencing small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chan Il; Kim, Helena Andrade; Dua, Pooja; Kim, Soyoun; Li, Chiang J; Lee, Dong-ki

    2011-06-01

    Since the discovery of double-stranded (ds) RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) phenomenon in Caenorhabditis elegans, specific gene silencing based upon RNAi mechanism has become a novel biomedical tool that has extended our understanding of cell biology and opened the door to an innovative class of therapeutic agents. To silence genes in mammalian cells, short dsRNA referred to as small interfering RNA (siRNA) is used as an RNAi trigger to avoid nonspecific interferon responses induced by long dsRNAs. An early structure-activity relationship study performed in Drosophila melanogaster embryonic extract suggested the existence of strict siRNA structural design rules to achieve optimal gene silencing. These rules include the presence of a 3' overhang, a fixed duplex length, and structural symmetry, which defined the structure of a classical siRNA. However, several recent studies performed in mammalian cells have hinted that the gene silencing siRNA structure could be much more flexible than that originally proposed. Moreover, many of the nonclassical siRNA structural variants reported improved features over the classical siRNAs, including increased potency, reduced nonspecific responses, and enhanced cellular delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the development of gene silencing siRNA structural variants and discuss these in light of the flexibility of the RNAi machinery in mammalian cells. PMID:21749289

  8. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selection and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.

  9. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selectionmore » and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.« less

  10. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep. PMID:23993196

  11. Spatial heterogeneity in the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and the mutation load.

    PubMed

    Roze, D

    2012-09-01

    According to current estimates of genomic deleterious mutation rates (which are often of the order 0.1-1) the mutation load (defined as a reduction in the average fitness of a population due to the presence of deleterious alleles) may be important in many populations. In this paper, I use multilocus simulations to explore the effect of spatial heterogeneity in the strength of selection against deleterious alleles on the mutation load (for example, it has been suggested that stressful environments may increase the strength of selection). These simulations show contrasted results: in some situations, spatial heterogeneity may greatly reduce the mutation load, due to the fact that migrants coming from demes under stronger selection carry relatively few deleterious alleles, and benefit from a strong advantage within demes under weaker selection (where individuals carry many more deleterious alleles); in other situations, however, deleterious alleles accumulate within demes under stronger selection, due to migration pressure from demes under weaker selection, leading to fitness erosion within those demes. This second situation is more frequent when the productivity of the different demes is proportional to their mean fitness. The effect of spatial heterogeneity is greatly reduced, however, when the response to environmental differences is inconsistent across loci.

  12. Adaptation of Drosophila to a novel laboratory environment reveals temporally heterogeneous trajectories of selected alleles

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Kapun, Martin; Nolte, Viola; Kofler, Robert; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The genomic basis of adaptation to novel environments is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that has gained additional importance in the light of the recent global change discussion. Here, we combined laboratory natural selection (experimental evolution) in Drosophila melanogaster with genome-wide next generation sequencing of DNA pools (Pool-Seq) to identify alleles that are favourable in a novel laboratory environment and traced their trajectories during the adaptive process. Already after 15 generations, we identified a pronounced genomic response to selection, with almost 5000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; genome-wide false discovery rates < 0.005%) deviating from neutral expectation. Importantly, the evolutionary trajectories of the selected alleles were heterogeneous, with the alleles falling into two distinct classes: (i) alleles that continuously rise in frequency; and (ii) alleles that at first increase rapidly but whose frequencies then reach a plateau. Our data thus suggest that the genomic response to selection can involve a large number of selected SNPs that show unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectories, possibly due to nonadditive effects. PMID:22726122

  13. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep.

  14. Adaptation of Drosophila to a novel laboratory environment reveals temporally heterogeneous trajectories of selected alleles.

    PubMed

    Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Kapun, Martin; Nolte, Viola; Kofler, Robert; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-10-01

    The genomic basis of adaptation to novel environments is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that has gained additional importance in the light of the recent global change discussion. Here, we combined laboratory natural selection (experimental evolution) in Drosophila melanogaster with genome-wide next generation sequencing of DNA pools (Pool-Seq) to identify alleles that are favourable in a novel laboratory environment and traced their trajectories during the adaptive process. Already after 15 generations, we identified a pronounced genomic response to selection, with almost 5000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; genome-wide false discovery rates < 0.005%) deviating from neutral expectation. Importantly, the evolutionary trajectories of the selected alleles were heterogeneous, with the alleles falling into two distinct classes: (i) alleles that continuously rise in frequency; and (ii) alleles that at first increase rapidly but whose frequencies then reach a plateau. Our data thus suggest that the genomic response to selection can involve a large number of selected SNPs that show unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectories, possibly due to nonadditive effects.

  15. Accounting for genotype uncertainty in the estimation of allele frequencies in autopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Blischak, Paul D; Kubatko, Laura S; Wolfe, Andrea D

    2016-05-01

    Despite the increasing opportunity to collect large-scale data sets for population genomic analyses, the use of high-throughput sequencing to study populations of polyploids has seen little application. This is due in large part to problems associated with determining allele copy number in the genotypes of polyploid individuals (allelic dosage uncertainty-ADU), which complicates the calculation of important quantities such as allele frequencies. Here, we describe a statistical model to estimate biallelic SNP frequencies in a population of autopolyploids using high-throughput sequencing data in the form of read counts. We bridge the gap from data collection (using restriction enzyme based techniques [e.g. GBS, RADseq]) to allele frequency estimation in a unified inferential framework using a hierarchical Bayesian model to sum over genotype uncertainty. Simulated data sets were generated under various conditions for tetraploid, hexaploid and octoploid populations to evaluate the model's performance and to help guide the collection of empirical data. We also provide an implementation of our model in the R package polyfreqs and demonstrate its use with two example analyses that investigate (i) levels of expected and observed heterozygosity and (ii) model adequacy. Our simulations show that the number of individuals sampled from a population has a greater impact on estimation error than sequencing coverage. The example analyses also show that our model and software can be used to make inferences beyond the estimation of allele frequencies for autopolyploids by providing assessments of model adequacy and estimates of heterozygosity.

  16. Diploid male dynamics under different numbers of sexual alleles and male dispersal abilities.

    PubMed

    Faria, Luiz R R; Soares, Elaine Della Giustina; Carmo, Eduardo do; Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro de

    2016-09-01

    Insects in the order Hymenoptera (bees, wasps and ants) present an haplodiploid system of sexual determination in which fertilized eggs become females and unfertilized eggs males. Under single locus complementary sex-determination (sl-CSD) system, the sex of a specimen depends on the alleles at a single locus: when diploid, an individual will be a female if heterozygous and male if homozygous. Significant diploid male (DM) production may drive a population to an extinction scenario called "diploid male vortex". We aimed at studying the dynamics of populations of a sl-CSD organism under several combinations of two parameters: male flight abilities and number of sexual alleles. In these simulations, we evaluated the frequency of DM and a genetic diversity measure over 10,000 generations. The number of sexual alleles varied from 10 to 100 and, at each generation, a male offspring might fly to another random site within a varying radius R. Two main results emerge from our simulations: (i) the number of DM depends more on male flight radius than on the number of alleles; (ii) in large geographic regions, the effect of males flight radius on the allelic diversity turns out much less pronounced than in small regions. In other words, small regions where inbreeding normally appears recover genetic diversity due to large flight radii. These results may be particularly relevant when considering the population dynamics of species with increasingly limited dispersal ability (e.g., forest-dependent species of euglossine bees in fragmented landscapes). PMID:27067711

  17. Interpretive repertoires as mirrors on society and as tools for action: reflections on Zeyer and Roth's A mirror of society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Catherine

    2009-12-01

    I respond to Zeyer and Roth's (Cultural Studies of Science Education, 2009) paper on their use of interpretive repertoire analysis to explicate Swiss middle school students' dialogic responses to environmental issues. I focus on the strategy of interpretive repertoire analysis, making sense of the stance Zeyer and Roth take with this analysis by synthesizing their argument and comparing their analysis with other researchers that have also used this analytic tool. Interpretive repertoires are discourse resources, including mores, tropes, and metaphors that can be evoked by speakers in support of a tenuous claim. So interpretive repertoires have rhetorical character and function. Interpretive repertoire analysis requires looking for patterns in the contradictions in the speech of a collective of participants that can be codified as interpretive repertoires. Interpretive repertoires provide insight into macro-structures that frame, and are used to justify participants' behavior. My response to Zeyer and Roth's argument might also be thought to be contradictory but I think defensible. In this paper, I outline why I am excited by the possibilities I can image for this type of analysis in areas of science education research. However, I also felt the need to identify possible limitations of Zeyer and Roth's exclusive focus on environmental issues to the neglect of other issues, such as those associated with gender, embedded in participants' discourse. I argue that a critical and historical focus, in conjunction with interpretive repertoire analysis, offer a rich strategy for analysis in science education research, especially in the study of macrostructures, such as gender, race, identity and power.

  18. A novel HLA-A allele: A*0257.

    PubMed

    García-Ortiz, J E; Cox, S T; Sandoval-Ramirez, L; Little, A M; Marsh, S G E; Madrigal, J A; Argüello, J R

    2004-01-01

    A novel human leucocyte antigen-A*02 (HLA-A*02) allele was detected by reference strand-mediated conformation analysis (RSCA) of a DNA sample from a Tarahumara individual. Direct sequencing of HLA-A locus polymerase chain reaction products identified a mutation in one of the alleles. Cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of a new allele, A*0257 which differed from A*0206 by two nucleotides at positions 355 and 362, inducing changes in residues 95 and 97, respectively, within the peptide-binding site. Those changes suggest that allele A*0257 may have resulted from an intralocus recombination event.

  19. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  20. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  1. A noncomplementation screen for quantitative trait alleles in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Huh, Juyoung; Riles, Linda; Reyes, Alejandro; Fay, Justin C

    2012-07-01

    Both linkage and linkage disequilibrium mapping provide well-defined approaches to mapping quantitative trait alleles. However, alleles of small effect are particularly difficult to refine to individual genes and causative mutations. Quantitative noncomplementation provides a means of directly testing individual genes for quantitative trait alleles in a fixed genetic background. Here, we implement a genome-wide noncomplementation screen for quantitative trait alleles that affect colony color or size by using the yeast deletion collection. As proof of principle, we find a previously known allele of CYS4 that affects colony color and a novel allele of CTT1 that affects resistance to hydrogen peroxide. To screen nearly 4700 genes in nine diverse yeast strains, we developed a high-throughput robotic plating assay to quantify colony color and size. Although we found hundreds of candidate alleles, reciprocal hemizygosity analysis of a select subset revealed that many of the candidates were false positives, in part the result of background-dependent haploinsufficiency or second-site mutations within the yeast deletion collection. Our results highlight the difficulty of identifying small-effect alleles but support the use of noncomplementation as a rapid means of identifying quantitative trait alleles of large effect. PMID:22870398

  2. Quantitative tools for comparing animal communication systems: information theory applied to bottlenose dolphin whistle repertoires.

    PubMed

    McCOWAN; Hanser; Doyle

    1999-02-01

    Comparative analysis of nonhuman animal communication systems and their complexity, particularly in comparison to human language, has been generally hampered by both a lack of sufficiently extensive data sets and appropriate analytic tools. Information theory measures provide an important quantitative tool for examining and comparing communication systems across species. In this paper we use the original application of information theory, that of statistical examination of a communication system's structure and organization. As an example of the utility of information theory to the analysis of animal communication systems, we applied a series of information theory statistics to a statistically categorized set of bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus, whistle vocalizations. First, we use the first-order entropic relation in a Zipf-type diagram (Zipf 1949 Human Behavior and the Principle of Least Effort) to illustrate the application of temporal statistics as comparative indicators of repertoire complexity, and as possible predictive indicators of acquisition/learning in animal vocal repertoires. Second, we illustrate the need for more extensive temporal data sets when examining the higher entropic orders, indicative of higher levels of internal informational structure, of such vocalizations, which could begin to allow the statistical reconstruction of repertoire organization. Third, we propose using 'communication capacity' as a measure of the degree of temporal structure and complexity of statistical correlation, represented by the values of entropic order, as an objective tool for interspecies comparison of communication complexity. In doing so, we introduce a new comparative measure, the slope of Shannon entropies, and illustrate how it potentially can be used to compare the organizational complexity of vocal repertoires across a diversity of species. Finally, we illustrate the nature and predictive application of these higher-order entropies using a preliminary

  3. A novel JK null allele associated with typing discrepancies among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Katrina L; Posadas, Jeff B; Moulds, Joann M; Gaur, Lakshmi K

    2013-01-01

    The Jknun (Jk-3) phenotype, attributable to null or silenced alleles, has predominantly been found in persons of Polynesian descent. With the increased use of molecular genotyping, many new silencing mutations have been identified in persons of other ethnic backgrounds. To date, only two JK null alleles have been reported in African Americans, JK*01N.04 and JK*OlN.OS.A comparative study was undertaken to determine whether JK mutations were present in the regional African American population. Results of donor genotyping were compared with previously recorded results of serologic tests, and discrepant results were investigated. Although the two previously identified polymorphisms were not detected in the discrepant samples, a novel allele (191G>A) was identified and was assigned the ISBT number JK*02N.09. This study illustrates a limitation of using single-nucleotide polymorphisms for prediction of blood group antigens. PMID:24689685

  4. [A Detection of Allelic Variants at Microsatellite Markers by Using Capillary and Traditional Electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, G A; Ponomareva, E V; Afanasiev, K I; Shaikhaev, E G; Kholodova, M V; Pavlov, S D; Zhivotovsky, L A

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellite alleles are detected by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) that provides a manifold increase in the number of copies (amplification) of a given DNA fragment. The fragment visualization can be reached by two different methods. These are fragment analysis by capillary electrophoresis in denaturing gel and frag- ment separation in non-denaturing gel with subsequent gel staining. The first method is more accurate and automated, but expensive. The second method is much cheaper but less convenient. It requires manual pro- cessing and is presumably less accurate. In this study, we present the results of comparison of the allele typing at nine microsatellite loci using these two methods for one of the species of Pacific salmon, sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum. In most cases, both methods give identical fragment sizes or a constant differ- ence if the alleles are relatively small (not larger than 200-220 bp). PMID:27529983

  5. Confirmation of association between the e4 allele of apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liddell, M; Williams, J; Bayer, A; Kaiser, F; Owen, M

    1994-03-01

    The Apo E genotype of 86 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 77 age matched controls was determined by digestion of Apo E PCR products with the restriction enzyme CfoI. The frequency of the e4 allele was significantly increased in the patient group (0.33) as compared with controls (0.12). This effect was seen in patients with a family history and in sporadic cases. The odds ratio in homozygotes for the e4 allele was 11.24 (95% confidence interval 2.45-51.50). There was no relationship between age of onset and Apo E genotype. There was no linkage disequilibrium between the apolipoprotein E locus and a TaqI polymorphism at the Apo CII locus, and no allelic association between Apo CII and AD.

  6. Molecular mapping of the mutant fap4(A24) allele for elevated palmitate concentration in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.] oil with an elevated palmitate concentration is useful for some food and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to map the genetic location of the fap4(A24) allele that controls an increase in palmitate concentration and to identify molecular marker...

  7. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  8. Comparative in vivo expression of beta(+)-thalassemia alleles.

    PubMed

    Marwan, M M; Scerri, C A; Zarroag, S O; Cao, A; Kyrri, A; Kalogirou, E; Kleanthous, M; Ioannou, P; Angastiniotis, M; Felice, A E

    1999-08-01

    Double heterozygotes who inherit one abnormal though stable beta-globin variant in association with a molecularly identified beta(+)-thalassaemia allele provide unique opportunities to quantify the in vivo expression of particular beta(+)-thalassemia alleles. The globin products of the two alleles can be separated, quantified and the output of the beta(+)-thalassaemia allele expressed as the MCH-beta(A) in pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC = 0.5 MCH x Hb A%. In this communication we provide new quantitative data on the expression of five mutations as follows: the beta(+)-87 (C-->G) = 3.8 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 1); the beta(+) IVS-I-1 (G-->A) = 0.2 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 1); the beta(+) IVS-I-6 (T-->C) = 2.9 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 7); the beta(+) IVS-I-110 (G-->A) = 1.1 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 13), and the beta(+) IVS-II-745 (C-->G) = 1.74 pg beta(A)-globin/beta(+)-thalassemia allele/RBC (n = 2). The values obtained are compared with those of other beta(+)-thalassemia alleles from the literature. It can be seen that the MCH-beta(A) value may be a correct index of thalassemia severity useful for the correlation of genotype with phenotype, and for understanding the effects of mutations in beta-globin genes on pathophysiologically meaningful beta-globin gene expression. PMID:10490134

  9. Germline variable region gene segment derivation of human monoclonal anti-Rh(D) antibodies. Evidence for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation and repertoire shift.

    PubMed Central

    Bye, J M; Carter, C; Cui, Y; Gorick, B D; Songsivilai, S; Winter, G; Hughes-Jones, N C; Marks, J D

    1992-01-01

    To date, there has been no systematic study of the process of affinity maturation of human antibodies. We therefore sequenced the variable region genes (V genes) of 14 human monoclonal antibodies specific for the erythrocyte Rh(D) alloantigen and determined the germline gene segments of origin and extent of somatic hypermutation. These data were correlated with determinations of antibody affinity. The four IgM antibodies (low affinity) appear to be derived from two germline heavy chain variable region gene segments and one or two germline light chain variable region gene segments and were not extensively mutated. The 10 IgG antibodies (higher affinity) appear to be derived from somatic hypermutation of these V gene segments and by use of new V gene segments or V gene segment combinations (repertoire shift). Affinity generally increased with increasing somatic hypermutation; on average, there were 8.9 point mutations in the V gene segments of the four IgM antibodies (Ka = 1-4 x 10(7)/M-1) compared with 19 point mutations in the V gene segments of the 10 IgG antibodies. The four highest affinity antibodies (Ka = 0.9-3 x 10(9)/M-1) averaged 25.5 point mutations. The use of repertoire shift and somatic hypermutation in affinity maturation of human alloantibodies is similar to data obtained in inbred mice immunized with haptens. PMID:1469099

  10. Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection.

    PubMed

    Hofer, T; Ray, N; Wegmann, D; Excoffier, L

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found strikingly different allele frequencies between continents. This has been mainly interpreted as being due to local adaptation. However, demographic factors can generate similar patterns. Namely, allelic surfing during a population range expansion may increase the frequency of alleles in newly colonised areas. In this study, we examined 772 STRs, 210 diallelic indels, and 2834 SNPs typed in 53 human populations worldwide under the HGDP-CEPH Diversity Panel to determine to which extent allele frequency differs among four regions (Africa, Eurasia, East Asia, and America). We find that large allele frequency differences between continents are surprisingly common, and that Africa and America show the largest number of loci with extreme frequency differences. Moreover, more STR alleles have increased rather than decreased in frequency outside Africa, as expected under allelic surfing. Finally, there is no relationship between the extent of allele frequency differences and proximity to genes, as would be expected under selection. We therefore conclude that most of the observed large allele frequency differences between continents result from demography rather than from positive selection.

  11. Cost-effective genome-wide estimation of allele frequencies from pooled DNA in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New sequencing technologies have tremendously increased the number of known molecular markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in a variety of species. Concurrently, improvements to genotyping technology have now made it possible to efficiently genotype large numbers of genome-wide distributed SNPs enabling genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, genotyping significant numbers of individuals with large number of SNPs remains prohibitively expensive for many research groups. A possible solution to this problem is to determine allele frequencies from pooled DNA samples, such ‘allelotyping’ has been presented as a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping and has become popular in human GWAS. In this article we have tested the effectiveness of DNA pooling to obtain accurate allele frequency estimates for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations using an Illumina SNP-chip. Results In total, 56 Atlantic salmon DNA pools from 14 populations were analyzed on an Atlantic salmon SNP-chip containing probes for 5568 SNP markers, 3928 of which were bi-allelic. We developed an efficient quality control filter which enables exclusion of loci showing high error rate and minor allele frequency (MAF) close to zero. After applying multiple quality control filters we obtained allele frequency estimates for 3631 bi-allelic loci. We observed high concordance (r > 0.99) between allele frequency estimates derived from individual genotyping and DNA pools. Our results also indicate that even relatively small DNA pools (35 individuals) can provide accurate allele frequency estimates for a given sample. Conclusions Despite of higher level of variation associated with array replicates compared to pool construction, we suggest that both sources of variation should be taken into account. This study demonstrates that DNA pooling allows fast and high-throughput determination of allele frequencies in Atlantic salmon enabling cost

  12. Trans allele methylation and paramutation-like effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Herry; Lu, Michael; Anggraini, Melly; Sikora, Aimee; Chang, Yanjie; Yoon, Bong June; Soloway, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, imprinted genes have parent-of-origin–specific patterns of DNA methylation that cause allele-specific expression. At Rasgrf1 (encoding RAS protein-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1), a repeated DNA element is needed to establish methylation and expression of the active paternal allele1. At Igf2r (encoding insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor), a sequence called region 2 is needed for methylation of the active maternal allele2,3. Here we show that replacing the Rasgrf1 repeats on the paternal allele with region 2 allows both methylation and expression of the paternal copy of Rasgrf1, indicating that sequences that control methylation can function ectopically. Paternal transmission of the mutated allele also induced methylation and expression in trans of the normally unmethylated and silent wild-type maternal allele. Once activated, the wild-type maternal Rasgrf1 allele maintained its activated state in the next generation independently of the paternal allele. These results recapitulate in mice several features in common with paramutation described in plants4. PMID:12740578

  13. Rescue of Progeria in Trichothiodystrophy by Homozygous Lethal Xpd Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Jans, Judith; de Wit, Jan; Coin, Frederic; Hoogstraten, Deborah; van de Ven, Marieke; Toussaint, Wendy; Huijmans, Jan; Thio, H. Bing; van Leeuwen, Wibeke J; de Boer, Jan; Egly, Jean-Marc; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J; Mitchell, James R

    2006-01-01

    Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i) the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii) differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii) interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of “null” alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals. PMID:17020410

  14. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  15. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  16. Apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 allele and familial risk in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Silverman, J M; Altstiel, L D; Haroutunian, V; Perl, D P; Purohit, D; Birstein, S; Lantz, M; Mohs, R C; Davis, K L

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have found an association between presence of apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 allele and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study compared the cumulative risk of primary progressive dementia (PPD) in relatives of AD probands carrying at least one copy of the epsilon 4 allele with the relatives of AD probands not carrying epsilon 4 and with relatives of non-demented controls. Our aim was to determine whether the familial aggregation of PPD in relatives of AD probands is primarily due to those carrying epsilon 4. Seventy-seven neuropathologically diagnosed AD patients were obtained as probands through our Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Brain Bank. AD probands were genotyped for APOE. As a comparison group, 198 non-demented probands were also included. Through family informants, demographic and diagnostic data were collected on 382 first-degree relatives (age > or = 45 years) of AD probands and 848 relatives of the controls. We found that the cumulative risk of PPD in both relatives of AD probands with and without the epsilon 4 allele was significantly higher than that in the relatives of non-demented controls. However, the increased risk in the relatives of AD probands with the epsilon 4 allele was marginally, but not significantly, lower than the risk in the relatives of probands without epsilon 4. A greater likelihood of death by heart diseases over developing PPD in relatives of AD probands with epsilon 4 (3.1-fold increase) was found compared to relatives of probands without epsilon 4 (1.7-fold increase), especially prior to age 70, although the difference was not statistically significant. The increased familial risk for PPD in the relatives of AD probands with the APOE-epsilon 4 allele relative to controls suggests that familial factors in addition to APOE-epsilon 4 are risk factors for AD. Differential censorship from increased mortality of heart diseases may have prevented a higher incidence of PPD among the relatives of probands with

  17. The identification of an integral membrane, cytochrome c urate oxidase completes the catalytic repertoire of a therapeutic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Doniselli, Nicola; Monzeglio, Enrico; Dal Palù, Alessandro; Merli, Angelo; Percudani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In living organisms, the conversion of urate into allantoin requires three consecutive enzymes. The pathway was lost in hominid, predisposing humans to hyperuricemia and gout. Among other species, the genomic distribution of the two last enzymes of the pathway is wider than that of urate oxidase (Uox), suggesting the presence of unknown genes encoding Uox. Here we combine gene network analysis with association rule learning to identify the missing urate oxidase. In contrast with the known soluble Uox, the identified gene (puuD) encodes a membrane protein with a C-terminal cytochrome c. The 8-helix transmembrane domain corresponds to DUF989, a family without similarity to known proteins. Gene deletion in a PuuD-encoding organism (Agrobacterium fabrum) abolished urate degradation capacity; the phenotype was fully restored by complementation with a cytosolic Uox from zebrafish. Consistent with H2O2 production by zfUox, urate oxidation in the complemented strain caused a four-fold increase of catalase. No increase was observed in the wild-type, suggesting that urate oxidation by PuuD proceeds through cytochrome c-mediated electron transfer. These findings identify a missing link in purine catabolism, assign a biochemical activity to a domain of unknown function (DUF989), and complete the catalytic repertoire of an enzyme useful for human therapy. PMID:26349049

  18. The Repertoires of Peptides Presented by MHC-II in the Thymus and in Peripheral Tissue: A Clue for Autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Collado, Javier A; Guitart, Carolina; Ciudad, M Teresa; Alvarez, Iñaki; Jaraquemada, Dolores

    2013-12-17

    T-cell tolerance to self-antigens is established in the thymus through the recognition by developing thymocytes of self-peptide-MHC complexes and induced and maintained in the periphery. Efficient negative selection of auto-reactive T cells in the thymus is dependent on the in situ expression of both ubiquitous and tissue-restricted self-antigens and on the presentation of derived peptides. Weak or inadequate intrathymic expression of self-antigens increases the risk to generate an autoimmune-prone T-cell repertoire. Indeed, even small changes of self-antigen expression in the thymus affect negative selection and increase the predisposition to autoimmunity. Together with other mechanisms, tolerance is maintained in the peripheral lymphoid organs via the recognition by mature T cells of a similar set of self-peptides in homeostatic conditions. However, non-lymphoid peripheral tissue, where organ-specific autoimmunity takes place, often have differential functional processes that may lead to the generation of epitopes that are absent or non-presented in the thymus. These putative differences between peptides presented by MHC molecules in the thymus and in peripheral tissues might be a major key to the initiation and maintenance of autoimmune conditions.

  19. The Repertoires of Peptides Presented by MHC-II in the Thymus and in Peripheral Tissue: A Clue for Autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Javier A.; Guitart, Carolina; Ciudad, M. Teresa; Alvarez, Iñaki; Jaraquemada, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    T-cell tolerance to self-antigens is established in the thymus through the recognition by developing thymocytes of self-peptide-MHC complexes and induced and maintained in the periphery. Efficient negative selection of auto-reactive T cells in the thymus is dependent on the in situ expression of both ubiquitous and tissue-restricted self-antigens and on the presentation of derived peptides. Weak or inadequate intrathymic expression of self-antigens increases the risk to generate an autoimmune-prone T-cell repertoire. Indeed, even small changes of self-antigen expression in the thymus affect negative selection and increase the predisposition to autoimmunity. Together with other mechanisms, tolerance is maintained in the peripheral lymphoid organs via the recognition by mature T cells of a similar set of self-peptides in homeostatic conditions. However, non-lymphoid peripheral tissue, where organ-specific autoimmunity takes place, often have differential functional processes that may lead to the generation of epitopes that are absent or non-presented in the thymus. These putative differences between peptides presented by MHC molecules in the thymus and in peripheral tissues might be a major key to the initiation and maintenance of autoimmune conditions. PMID:24381570

  20. HLA-DR alleles determine responsiveness to Borrelia burgdoferi antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulou, Bettina Panagiota; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Arthritis is a prominent manifestation of Lyme disease, caused upon infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Persistent chronic Lyme arthritis, even after antibiotic treatment, is linked to HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4) and related alleles. On the contrary, Lyme patients who resolve arthritis within 3 months post-infection show an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101 (DR11). The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying mechanism by which HLA-DR alleles confer genetic susceptibility or resistance to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Methods We generated DR11 transgenic (tg) mice on a murine class II−/− background and compared their immune response to Bb-antigens to that of DR4 tg mice after immunization with Bb outer surface protein (Osp)A or infection with live Bb. Results We report that the T cells of OspA-immunized and Bb-infected DR11 tg mice were defective in IFN-γ production compared to those of DR4 mice. On the other hand, DR11 tg mice developed higher titers of anti-OspA and anti-Bb Abs, respectively, than DR4 mice. In accordance with this observation, we found that Bb-infected DR11 tg mice had decreased spirochetal burden compared to DR4 mice, measured by qPCR. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence that in the presence of HLA-DR11 the immune response against Bb-antigens is directed towards a protective Ab response. In contrast, an inflammatory Th1 response is induced in the presence of DR4. These observations offer an explanation for the differential genetic susceptibility of DR4+ and DR11+ individuals for the development of chronic Lyme arthritis and eventually the progression to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:19950279

  1. Statistical Studies on Protein Polymorphism in Natural Populations. III. Distribution of Allele Frequencies and the Number of Alleles per Locus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranajit; Fuerst, Paul A.; Nei, Masatoshi

    1980-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the mechanism of maintenance of protein polymorphism, we have studied the properties of allele frequency distribution and the number of alleles per locus, using gene-frequency data from a wide range of organisms (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, Drosophila and non-Drosophila invertebrates) in which 20 or more loci with at least 100 genes were sampled. The observed distribution of allele frequencies was U-shaped in all of the 138 populations (mostly species or subspecies) examined and generally agreed with the theoretical distribution expected under the mutation-drift hypothesis, though there was a significant excess of rare alleles (gene frequency, 0 ∼ 0.05) in about a quarter of the populations. The agreement between the mutation-drift theory and observed data was quite satisfactory for the numbers of polymorphic (gene frequency, 0.05 ∼ 0.95) and monomorphic (0.95 ∼ 1.0) alleles.—The observed pattern of allele-frequency distribution was incompatible with the prediction from the overdominance hypothesis. The observed correlations of the numbers of rare alleles, polymorphic alleles and monomorphic alleles with heterozygosity were of the order of magnitude that was expected under the mutation-drift hypothesis. Our results did not support the view that intracistronic recombination is an important source of genetic variation. The total number of alleles per locus was positively correlated with molecular weight in most of the species examined, and the magnitude of the correlation was consistent with the theoretical prediction from mutation-drift hypothesis. The correlation between molecular weight and the number of alleles was generally higher than the correlation between molecular weight and heterozygosity, as expected. PMID:17249018

  2. Comparison between subjects with long- and short-allele carriers in the BOLD signal within amygdala during emotional tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Shamil; Siadat, Mohamad R.; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Emotional tasks may result in a strong blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the amygdala in 5- HTTLRP short-allele. Reduced anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)-amygdala connectivity in short-allele provides a potential mechanistic account for the observed increase in amygdala activity. In our study, fearful and threatening facial expressions were presented to two groups of 12 subjects with long- and short-allele carriers. The BOLD signals of the left amygdala of each group were averaged to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. A Bayesian approach was used to estimate the model parameters to elucidate the underlying hemodynamic mechanism. Our results showed a positive BOLD signal in the left amygdala for short-allele individuals, and a negative BOLD signal in the same region for long-allele individuals. This is due to the fact that short-allele is associated with lower availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and this leads to an increase of serotonin (5-HT) concentration in the cACC-amygdala synapse.

  3. ALFRED: an allele frequency resource for research and teaching

    PubMed Central

    Rajeevan, Haseena; Soundararajan, Usha; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    ALFRED (http://alfred.med.yale.edu) is a free, web accessible, curated compilation of allele frequency data on DNA sequence polymorphisms in anthropologically defined human populations. Currently, ALFRED has allele frequency tables on over 663 400 polymorphic sites; 170 of them have frequency tables for more than 100 different population samples. In ALFRED, a population may have multiple samples with each ‘sample’ consisting of many individuals on which an allele frequency is based. There are 3566 population samples from 710 different populations with allele frequency tables on at least one polymorphism. Fifty of those population samples have allele frequency data for over 650 000 polymorphisms. Records also have active links to relevant resources (dbSNP, PharmGKB, OMIM, Ethnologue, etc.). The flexible search options and data display and download capabilities available through the web interface allow easy access to the large quantity of high-quality data in ALFRED. PMID:22039151

  4. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences.

  5. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania.

  6. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  7. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  8. Allelic differences in a vacuolar invertase affect Arabidopsis growth at early plant development.

    PubMed

    Leskow, Carla Coluccio; Kamenetzky, Laura; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Díaz Zirpolo, José Antonio; Obata, Toshihiro; Costa, Hernán; Martí, Marcelo; Taboga, Oscar; Keurentjes, Joost; Sulpice, Ronan; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair Robert; Carrari, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Improving carbon fixation in order to enhance crop yield is a major goal in plant sciences. By quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, it has been demonstrated that a vacuolar invertase (vac-Inv) plays a key role in determining the radical length in Arabidopsis. In this model, variation in vac-Inv activity was detected in a near isogenic line (NIL) population derived from a cross between two divergent accessions: Landsberg erecta (Ler) and Cape Verde Island (CVI), with the CVI allele conferring both higher Inv activity and longer radicles. The aim of the current work is to understand the mechanism(s) underlying this QTL by analyzing structural and functional differences of vac-Inv from both accessions. Relative transcript abundance analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed similar expression patterns in both accessions; however, DNA sequence analyses revealed several polymorphisms that lead to changes in the corresponding protein sequence. Moreover, activity assays revealed higher vac-Inv activity in genotypes carrying the CVI allele than in those carrying the Ler allele. Analyses of purified recombinant proteins showed a similar K m for both alleles and a slightly higher V max for that of Ler. Treatment of plant extracts with foaming to release possible interacting Inv inhibitory protein(s) led to a large increase in activity for the Ler allele, but no changes for genotypes carrying the CVI allele. qRT-PCR analyses of two vac-Inv inhibitors in seedlings from parental and NIL genotypes revealed different expression patterns. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the vac-Inv QTL affects root biomass accumulation and also carbon partitioning through a differential regulation of vac-Inv inhibitors at the mRNA level. PMID:27194734

  9. Genetic Exchange of Fimbrial Alleles Exemplifies the Adaptive Virulence Strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jennifer E.; Abramian, Jared R.; Dao, Doan-Hieu V.; Rigney, Todd W.; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram–negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed “keystone” pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions. PMID:24626479

  10. Comparison of T-cell receptor repertoire restriction in blood and tumor tissue of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several immunotherapeutic approaches rely on antigen-specific T-cells. Restrictions in the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire were reported as indicator of anti-tumor cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in various tumor entities. It is unclear yet whether a TCR restriction in peripheral blood mirrors the tumor compartment. We compared the expression of TCR Vβ-families for the quantification of TCR repertoire alterations in blood and tissue samples from patients with colorectal carcinoma. Blood samples from patients with colorectal carcinoma and healthy volunteers and tissue samples of normal colonic mucosa and colorectal carcinoma were analyzed. Relative Vβ-family quantification was performed based on quantitative reverse transcribed PCR. Standard deviation and average mean of the single families were determined. Two variables describing the degree of Vβ-repertoire restriction were defined. Forty-eight blood samples and 37 tissue samples were analyzed. TCR repertoire restriction was higher in blood of tumor patients than in blood of healthy controls (p < 0.05). No difference in the degree of TCR repertoire restriction was found between carcinoma and unaffected colon tissue. We found no corresponding elevated TCR families among the different compartments blood, normal colon, and carcinoma tissue of the same patient. In conclusion, we observed a repertoire restriction in peripheral blood as well as in tumor tissue of cancer patients. However, in tumor tissue, repertoire alterations were comparable to normal mucosa, suggesting compartment-specific TCR distribution rather than alterations due to tumor-T-cell interaction questioning the presence of highly restricted clonal T-cell expansions in colorectal cancer as they have been described in other, assumingly more immunogenic tumor entities. PMID:20385014

  11. The Astonishing Diversity of Ig Classes and B Cell Repertoires in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Fillatreau, Simon; Six, Adrien; Magadan, Susanna; Castro, Rosario; Sunyer, J. Oriol; Boudinot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    With lymphoid tissue anatomy different than mammals, and diverse adaptations to all aquatic environments, fish constitute a fascinating group of vertebrate to study the biology of B cell repertoires in a comparative perspective. Fish B lymphocytes express immunoglobulin (Ig) on their surface and secrete antigen-specific antibodies in response to immune challenges. Three antibody classes have been identified in fish, namely IgM, IgD, and IgT, while IgG, IgA, and IgE are absent. IgM and IgD have been found in all fish species analyzed, and thus seem to be primordial antibody classes. IgM and IgD are normally co-expressed from the same mRNA through alternative splicing, as in mammals. Tetrameric IgM is the main antibody class found in serum. Some species of fish also have IgT, which seems to exist only in fish and is specialized in mucosal immunity. IgM/IgD and IgT are expressed by two different sub-populations of B cells. The tools available to investigate B cell responses at the cellular level in fish are limited, but the progress of fish genomics has started to unravel a rich diversity of IgH and immunoglobulin light chain locus organization, which might be related to the succession of genome remodelings that occurred during fish evolution. Moreover, the development of deep sequencing techniques has allowed the investigation of the global features of the expressed fish B cell repertoires in zebrafish and rainbow trout, in steady state or after infection. This review provides a description of the organization of fish Ig loci, with a particular emphasis on their heterogeneity between species, and presents recent data on the structure of the expressed Ig repertoire in healthy and infected fish. PMID:23408183

  12. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  13. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases. PMID:26850319

  14. Norepinephrine-induced apoptotic and hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts are characterized by different repertoire of reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anita; Alam, Md Jahangir; Ajayakumar, M R; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Sharma, Manish; Goswami, Shyamal K

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances, the role of ROS in mediating hypertrophic and apoptotic responses in cardiac myocytes elicited by norepinephrine (NE) is rather poorly understood. We demonstrate through our experiments that H9c2 cardiac myoblasts treated with 2 µM NE (hypertrophic dose) generate DCFH-DA positive ROS only for 2h; while those treated with 100 µM NE (apoptotic dose) sustains generation for 48 h, followed by apoptosis. Though the levels of DCFH fluorescence were comparable at early time points in the two treatment sets, its quenching by DPI, catalase and MnTmPyP suggested the existence of a different repertoire of ROS. Both doses of NE also induced moderate levels of H2O2 but with different kinetics. Sustained but intermittent generation of highly reactive species detectable by HPF was seen in both treatment sets but no peroxynitrite was generated in either conditions. Sustained generation of hydroxyl radicals with no appreciable differences were noticed in both treatment sets. Nevertheless, despite similar profile of ROS generation between the two conditions, extensive DNA damage as evident from the increase in 8-OH-dG content, formation of γ-H2AX and PARP cleavage was seen only in cells treated with the higher dose of NE. We therefore conclude that hypertrophic and apoptotic doses of NE generate distinct but comparable repertoire of ROS/RNS leading to two very distinct downstream responses. PMID:26070033

  15. Proinsulin Expression Shapes the TCR Repertoire but Fails to Control the Development of Low-Avidity Insulin-Reactive CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Pearson, James A; Thayer, Terri C; McLaren, James E; Ladell, Kristin; De Leenheer, Evy; Phillips, Amy; Davies, Joanne; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Miners, Kelly; Morgan, Peter; Wen, Li; Price, David A; Wong, F Susan

    2016-06-01

    NOD mice, a model strain for human type 1 diabetes, express proinsulin (PI) in the thymus. However, insulin-reactive T cells escape negative selection, and subsequent activation of the CD8(+) T-cell clonotype G9C8, which recognizes insulin B15-23 via an αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) incorporating TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 and TRBV19/TRBJ2-3 gene rearrangements, contributes to the development of diabetes. In this study, we used fixed TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 TCRα-chain transgenic mice to assess the impact of PI isoform expression on the insulin-reactive CD8(+) T-cell repertoire. The key findings were: 1) PI2 deficiency increases the frequency of insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells and causes diabetes; 2) insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells are more abundant in the pancreatic lymph nodes of mice lacking PI1 and/or PI2; 3) overexpression of PI2 decreases TRBV19 usage in the global CD8(+) T-cell compartment; 4) a biased repertoire of insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells emerges in the periphery regardless of antigen exposure; and 5) low-avidity insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells are less affected by antigen exposure in the thymus than in the periphery. These findings inform our understanding of the diabetogenic process and reveal new avenues for therapeutic exploitation in type 1 diabetes.

  16. Norepinephrine-induced apoptotic and hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts are characterized by different repertoire of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anita; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Ajayakumar, MR; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Sharma, Manish; Goswami, Shyamal K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances, the role of ROS in mediating hypertrophic and apoptotic responses in cardiac myocytes elicited by norepinephrine (NE) is rather poorly understood. We demonstrate through our experiments that H9c2 cardiac myoblasts treated with 2 µM NE (hypertrophic dose) generate DCFH-DA positive ROS only for 2 h; while those treated with 100 µM NE (apoptotic dose) sustains generation for 48 h, followed by apoptosis. Though the levels of DCFH fluorescence were comparable at early time points in the two treatment sets, its quenching by DPI, catalase and MnTmPyP suggested the existence of a different repertoire of ROS. Both doses of NE also induced moderate levels of H2O2 but with different kinetics. Sustained but intermittent generation of highly reactive species detectable by HPF was seen in both treatment sets but no peroxynitrite was generated in either conditions. Sustained generation of hydroxyl radicals with no appreciable differences were noticed in both treatment sets. Nevertheless, despite similar profile of ROS generation between the two conditions, extensive DNA damage as evident from the increase in 8-OH-dG content, formation of γ-H2AX and PARP cleavage was seen only in cells treated with the higher dose of NE. We therefore conclude that hypertrophic and apoptotic doses of NE generate distinct but comparable repertoire of ROS/RNS leading to two very distinct downstream responses. PMID:26070033

  17. A Risk Allele for Nicotine Dependence in CHRNA5 Is a Protective Allele for Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C.; Stitzel, Jerry A.; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Saccone, Scott F.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Cloninger, C. Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J.; Budde, John P.; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John. I.; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Rice, John P.; Goate, Alison M.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Background A non-synonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene which encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence (20). The goal of the present study is to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Methods Genetic association analysis in two, independent samples of unrelated cases and controls; 1.) 504 European-American participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD); 2.) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholsim (COGA). Results In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (OR = 0.67 per allele, p = 0.0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared to that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. Conclusion The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways. PMID:18519132

  18. Ethical guideposts for allelic variation databases.

    PubMed

    Knoppers, B M; Laberge, C M

    2000-01-01

    Basically, a mutation database (MDB) is a repository where allelic variations are described and assigned within a specific gene locus. The purposes of an MDB may vary greatly and have different content and structure. The curator of an electronic and computer-based MDB will provide expert feedback (clinical and research). This requires ethical guideposts. Going to direct on-line public access for the content of an MDB or to interactive communication also raises other considerations. Currently, HUGO's MDI (Mutation Database Initiative) is the only integrated effort supporting and guiding the coordinated deployment of MDBs devoted to genetic diversity. Thus, HUGO's ethical "Statements" are applicable. Among the ethical principles, the obligation of preserving the confidentiality of information transferred by a collaborator to the curator is particularly important. Thus, anonymization of such data prior to transmission is essential. The 1997 Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights of UNESCO addresses the participation of vulnerable persons. Researchers in charge of MDBs should ensure that information received on the testing of children or incompetent adults is subject to ethical review and approval in the country of origin. Caution should be taken against the involuntary consequences of public disclosure of results without complete explanation. Clear and enforceable regulations must be developed to protect the public against misuse of genetic databanks. Interaction with a databank could be seen as creating a "virtual" physician-patient relationship. However, interactive public MDBs should not give medical advice. We have identified new social ethical principles to govern different levels of complexity of genetic information. They are: reciprocity, mutuality, solidarity, and universality. Finally, precaution and prudence at this early stage of the MDI may not only avoid ethically inextricable conundrums but also provide for the respect for the rights

  19. Influence of HLA DRB1 alleles in the susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis and the regulation of antibodies against citrullinated proteins and rheumatoid factor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and production of antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF). Methods We studied 408 patients (235 with RA, 173 non-RA) and 269 controls. ACPA, RF and HLA-DR typing were determined. Results We found an increased frequency of HLA DRB1 alleles with the shared epitope (SE) in ACPA-positive RA. Inversely, HLA DRB1 alleles encoding DERAA sequences were more frequent in controls than in ACPA-positive RA, and a similar trend was found for HLA DR3. However, these results could not be confirmed after stratification for the presence of the SE, probably due to the relatively low number of patients. These data may suggest that the presence of these alleles may confer a protective role for ACPA-positive RA. In RA patients we observed association between SE alleles and ACPA titers in a dose-dependent effect. The presence of HLA DR3 or DERAA-encoding alleles was associated with markedly reduced ACPA levels. No association between RF titers and HLA DR3 or DERAA-encoding alleles was found. Conclusions HLA DRB1 alleles with the SE are associated with production of ACPA. DERAA-encoding HLA-DR alleles and HLA DR3 may be protective for ACPA-positive RA. PMID:20370905

  20. The rs1024611 regulatory region polymorphism is associated with CCL2 allelic expression imbalance.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh-Hieu T; Bonello, Gregory B; Castiblanco, John; Le, Tuan; Sigala, Jose; He, Weijing; Mummidi, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) is the most potent monocyte chemoattractant and inter-individual differences in its expression level have been associated with genetic variants mapping to the cis-regulatory regions of the gene. An A to G polymorphism in the CCL2 enhancer region at position -2578 (rs1024611; A>G), was found in most studies to be associated with higher serum CCL2 levels and increased susceptibility to a variety of diseases such as HIV-1 associated neurological disorders, tuberculosis, and atherosclerosis. However, the precise mechanism by which rs1024611influences CCL2 expression is not known. To address this knowledge gap, we tested the hypothesis that rs1024611G polymorphism is associated with allelic expression imbalance (AEI) of CCL2. We used haplotype analysis and identified a transcribed SNP in the 3'UTR (rs13900; C>T) can serve as a proxy for the rs1024611 and demonstrated that the rs1024611G allele displayed a perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs13900T allele. Allele-specific transcript quantification in lipopolysaccharide treated PBMCs obtained from heterozygous donors showed that rs13900T allele were expressed at higher levels when compared to rs13900C allele in all the donors examined suggesting that CCL2 is subjected to AEI and that that the allele containing rs1024611G is preferentially transcribed. We also found that AEI of CCL2 is a stable trait and could be detected in newly synthesized RNA. In contrast to these in vivo findings, in vitro assays with haplotype-specific reporter constructs indicated that the haplotype bearing rs1024611G had a lower or similar transcriptional activity when compared to the haplotype containing rs1024611A. This discordance between the in vivo and in vitro expression studies suggests that the CCL2 regulatory region polymorphisms may be functioning in a complex and context-dependent manner. In summary, our studies provide strong functional evidence and a rational explanation for the phenotypic effects of the

  1. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism in Mice: Allele- Specific Effects on Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sujung; Pierce, Anson; Dory, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) from oxidative stress. We previously reported a new allele for ecSOD, expressed in 129P3/J mice (129), which differs from the wild-type (wt), expressed in C57BL/6J and other strains, by two amino acid substitutions and a 10 bp deletion in the 3' UTR of the mRNA [1]. The newly discovered allele is associated with a phenotype of significantly increased circulating and heparin-releasable enzyme activities and levels. In order to examine the properties of the two forms of ecSOD in an identical environment we generated, by extensive backcrossing of ecSOD heterozygous progeny to C57BL/6J females, a congenic C57 strain with the 129 (or wt) allele of ecSOD. These mice are homozygous for nearly 5,000 SNPs across all chromosomes, as determined by Affymetrix Parallele Mouse 5K SNP panel. The present study describes the generation of the congenic mice (genetically >99.8 % identical) and their ecSOD phenotype. The congenic mice plasma ecSOD activities before and after heparin administration recapitulate the differences reported in the founder mice. Tissue enzyme distribution is similar in both congenic groups, although the 129 allele is associated with higher levels of enzyme expression despite lower levels of enzyme mRNA. In these characteristics the phenotype is also allele driven, with little impact by the rest of the genome. The congenic mice carrying the 129 allele have mRNA levels that are in between those found in the founder 129P3/J and C57BL/6J strains. We conclude that the ecSOD phenotype in most aspects of enzyme expression is allele- driven, with the exception of tissue mRNA levels, where a significant contribution by the surrounding (host) genome is observed. These results also suggest potential allele-specific differences in the regulation of ecSOD synthesis and intracellular processing/secretion of ecSOD, independent of the genotype context. Most importantly, the congenic mice

  2. A specific HLA-DP beta allele is associated with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis but not adult rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Begovich, A B; Bugawan, T L; Nepom, B S; Klitz, W; Nepom, G T; Erlich, H A

    1989-01-01

    Nonradioactive sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes specific for the HLA-DP beta locus have been used in a simple dot-blot format to type samples amplified by the polymerase chain reaction from 44 patients with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, 32 patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis, and 50 random controls. The sequences of four new DP beta alleles derived from these patients and controls are reported, bringing the total number of alleles identified thus far to 19. The DPB2.1 allele is significantly increased in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients over controls; this allele is not increased in patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis. The association of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with the DPB2.1 allele is independent of linkage with previously defined HLA-D region markers of disease. Analysis of the DPB2.1 sequence shows that it differs from the nonsusceptible DPB4.2 allele by only 1 amino acid at position 69 in the beta 1 domain. PMID:2512583

  3. Influence of environmental enrichment vs. time-of-day on behavioral repertoire of male albino Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Loss, Cássio Morais; Binder, Luisa Bandeira; Muccini, Eduarda; Martins, Wagner Carbolin; de Oliveira, Paulo Alexandre; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Tasca, Carla Inês; Zimmer, Eduardo R; Costa-Schmidt, Luiz Ernesto; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Viola, Giordano Gubert

    2015-11-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a non-pharmacological manipulation that promotes diverse forms of benefits in the central nervous system of captive animals. It is thought that EE influences animal behavior in a specie-(strain)-specific manner. Since rodents in general present different behaviors during distinct periods of the day, in this study we aimed to investigate the influence of time-of-day on behavioral repertoire of Swiss mice that reared in EE. Forty male Swiss mice (21days old) were housed in standard (SC) or enriched conditions (EC) for 60days. Behavioral assessments were conducted during the light phase (in presence of light) or dark phase (in absence of light) in the following tasks: open field, object recognition and elevated plus maze. First, we observed that the locomotor and exploratory activities are distinct between SC and EC groups only during the light phase. Second, we observed that "self-protective behaviors" were increased in EC group only when mice were tested during the light phase. However, "less defensive behaviors" were not affected by both housing conditions and time-of-day. Third, we showed that the performance of EE animals in object recognition task was improved in both light and dark conditions. Our findings highlight that EE-induced alterations in exploratory and emotional behaviors are just evident during light conditions. However, EE-induced cognitive benefits are remarkable even during dark conditions, when exploratory and emotional behaviors were similar between groups.

  4. Red and green algal monophyly and extensive gene sharing found in a rich repertoire of red algal genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Yang, Eun Chan; Banerjee, Titas; Yoon, Hwan Su; Martone, Patrick T; Estevez, José M; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2011-02-22

    The Plantae comprising red, green (including land plants), and glaucophyte algae are postulated to have a single common ancestor that is the founding lineage of photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, recent multiprotein phylogenies provide little or no support for this hypothesis. This may reflect limited complete genome data available for red algae, currently only the highly reduced genome of Cyanidioschyzon merolae, a reticulate gene ancestry, or variable gene divergence rates that mislead phylogenetic inference. Here, using novel genome data from the mesophilic Porphyridium cruentum and Calliarthron tuberculosum, we analyze 60,000 novel red algal genes to test the monophyly of red + green (RG) algae and their extent of gene sharing with other lineages. Using a gene-by-gene approach, we find an emerging signal of RG monophyly (supported by ∼50% of the examined protein phylogenies) that increases with the number of distinct phyla and terminal taxa in the analysis. A total of 1,808 phylogenies show evidence of gene sharing between Plantae and other lineages. We demonstrate that a rich mesophilic red algal gene repertoire is crucial for testing controversial issues in eukaryote evolution and for understanding the complex patterns of gene inheritance in protists.

  5. Allelic variation in CRHR1 predisposes to panic disorder: evidence for biased fear processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Richter, J; Straube, B; Lueken, U; Domschke, K; Schartner, C; Klauke, B; Baumann, C; Pané-Farré, C; Jacob, C P; Scholz, C-J; Zwanzger, P; Lang, T; Fehm, L; Jansen, A; Konrad, C; Fydrich, T; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Ströhle, A; Gerlach, A L; Alpers, G W; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Wittchen, H-U; Kent, L; Hamm, A; Kircher, T; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2016-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Binding to its receptor CRHR1 triggers the downstream release of the stress response-regulating hormone cortisol. Biochemical, behavioral and genetic studies revealed CRHR1 as a possible candidate gene for mood and anxiety disorders. Here we aimed to evaluate CRHR1 as a risk factor for panic disorder (PD). Allelic variation of CRHR1 was captured by 9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were genotyped in 531 matched case/control pairs. Four SNPs were found to be associated with PD, in at least one sub-sample. The minor allele of rs17689918 was found to significantly increase risk for PD in females after Bonferroni correction and furthermore decreased CRHR1 mRNA expression in human forebrains and amygdalae. When investigating neural correlates underlying this association in patients with PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging, risk allele carriers of rs17689918 showed aberrant differential conditioning predominantly in the bilateral prefrontal cortex and safety signal processing in the amygdalae, arguing for predominant generalization of fear and hence anxious apprehension. Additionally, the risk allele of rs17689918 led to less flight behavior during fear-provoking situations but rather increased anxious apprehension and went along with increased anxiety sensitivity. Thus reduced gene expression driven by CRHR1 risk allele leads to a phenotype characterized by fear sensitization and hence sustained fear. These results strengthen the role of CRHR1 in PD and clarify the mechanisms by which genetic variation in CRHR1 is linked to this disorder.

  6. Adult lupus-prone MRL/MpJ2+ mice express a primary antibody repertoire that differs in CDR-H3 length distribution and hydrophobicity from that expressed in the C3H parental strain.

    PubMed

    Zemlin, Michael; Ippolito, Gregory C; Zemlin, Cosima; Link, Jason; Monestier, Marc; Schroeder, Harry W

    2005-05-01

    Anti-dsDNA antibodies tend to be enriched for heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR-H3) intervals of above average length that contain an increased frequency of charged amino acids. It is unclear whether these types of CDR-H3s are more common in the primary B-cell repertoire of auto-immune prone strains or whether their increased prevalence in affected individuals reflects positive selection and expansion of atypical CDR-H3s in the pathogenic response to self-antigen. Here, we present evidence that when compared to C3H, a MRL/MpJ(2+) parental strain, CDR-H3 intervals from pre-B cells of adult lupus-prone MRL/MpJ(2+) mice are longer on average and are enriched for charged amino acids. The predicted prevalence of deformed loops per Shirai H3 criteria is also higher. In contrast, the frequency of charge, the distribution of length, and the pattern of predicted deformed loop structures did not differ in sequences obtained from neonates of the same two strains. These observations suggest that the mechanisms that serve to shape the initial CDR-H3 repertoire in adults, but not neonates, are being regulated differently in C3H versus MRL/MpJ(2+). Dysregulation of the adult pre-B CDR-H3 antibody repertoire could be a contributing factor for the development of florid auto-immune disease in MRL/MpJ(2+) mice.

  7. Allelic interactions at the nivea locus of Antirrhinum.

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, J; Carpenter, R; Coen, E S

    1991-01-01

    Most null alleles at the nivea (niv) locus are recessive to Niv+ and, when homozygous, give white flowers rather than the red of the wild type. In contrast, the niv-571 allele is semidominant; although it gives white flowers when homozygous, very pale flowers result when this allele is heterozygous with NIV+. We showed that in heterozygotes, niv-571 acts in trans to inhibit expression of its Niv+ homology 25-fold to 50-fold. The inhibition is reversible after meiosis and partially reversible somatically. The niv-571 allele carries a transposable element Tam3 insertion and three truncated copies of the niv gene, one copy being in inverse orientation. Analysis of two further niv alleles, niv-572 and niv-527, showed that excision of Tam3 from niv-571 does not affect the ability of the allele to repress Niv+ and that one truncated niv copy alone is insufficient to confer semidominance. The detailed structures of various semidominant niv alleles suggest that their effects in trans are not readily explained by production of antisense RNA but are more easily reconciled with a direct recognition/interaction between homologous genes, reminiscent of cosuppression and transvection phenomena described in other systems. PMID:1840900

  8. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  9. Allelic Diversity and Its Implications for the Rate of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Armando; García-Dorado, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation is usually estimated empirically from statistics based on population gene frequencies, but alternative statistics based on allelic diversity (number of allelic types) can provide complementary information. There is a lack of knowledge, however, on the evolutionary implications attached to allelic-diversity measures, particularly in structured populations. In this article we simulated multiple scenarios of single and structured populations in which a quantitative trait subject to stabilizing selection is adapted to different fitness optima. By forcing a global change in the optima we evaluated which diversity variables are more strongly correlated with both short- and long-term adaptation to the new optima. We found that quantitative genetic variance components for the trait and gene-frequency-diversity measures are generally more strongly correlated with short-term response to selection, whereas allelic-diversity measures are more correlated with long-term and total response to selection. Thus, allelic-diversity variables are better predictors of long-term adaptation than gene-frequency variables. This observation is also extended to unlinked neutral markers as a result of the information they convey on the demographic population history. Diffusion approximations for the allelic-diversity measures in a finite island model under the infinite-allele neutral mutation model are also provided. PMID:24121776

  10. Expression of the B cell repertoire in lpr mice; abnormal expansion of a few VHJ558 germ-line genes.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Fernández, C

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the VH gene repertoire of the J558 family was done in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated resting cells and in vivo activated cells derived from C57Bl/6-lpr mice (IghCb). Using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) based on digestion with the restriction enzyme Pstl, the expression of the subfamilies of the J558 family of VH genes could be determined. The J558 subfamily repertoire of resting B cells of the lpr mice was similar to that of the normal mice, while the J558 repertoire of the in vivo-activated cells was altered: analysis and sequencing of the IgM-expressed J558 repertoire of a sick female mouse showed that 50% of the J558 genes were represented by a single VH gene rearrangement, showing that its expansion was monoclonal. Furthermore, this same rearrangement made up to 90% of the J558 repertoire in the IgG2a+ population, showing that it had been preferentially selected, expanded and switched. However, compared with its IgM counterpart, it showed no evidence of somatic hypermutation. PMID:7851020

  11. Dynamic Perturbations of the T-Cell Receptor Repertoire in Chronic HIV Infection and following Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Best, Katharine; Oakes, Theres; Gray, Eleanor R.; Roe, Jennifer K.; Thomas, Niclas; Friedman, Nir; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection profoundly affects many parameters of the immune system and ultimately leads to AIDS, yet which factors are most important for determining resistance, pathology, and response to antiretroviral treatment – and how best to monitor them – remain unclear. We develop a quantitative high-throughput sequencing pipeline to characterize the TCR repertoires of HIV-infected individuals before and after antiretroviral therapy, working from small, unfractionated samples of peripheral blood. This reveals the TCR repertoires of HIV+ individuals to be highly perturbed, with considerably reduced diversity as a small proportion of sequences are highly overrepresented. HIV also causes specific qualitative changes to the repertoire including an altered distribution of V gene usage, depletion of public TCR sequences, and disruption of TCR networks. Short-term antiretroviral therapy has little impact on most of the global damage to repertoire structure, but is accompanied by rapid changes in the abundance of many individual TCR sequences, decreases in abundance of the most common sequences, and decreases in the majority of HIV-associated CDR3 sequences. Thus, high-throughput repertoire sequencing of small blood samples that are easy to take, store, and process can shed light on various aspects of the T-cell immune compartment and stands to offer insights into patient stratification and immune reconstitution. PMID:26793190

  12. Age-related changes in natural killer cell repertoires: impact on NK cell function and immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Manser, Angela R; Uhrberg, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of human natural killer (NK) cells, which enables efficient recognition of infected and malignant target cells, is the expression of HLA class I-specific receptors of the KIR and NKG2 gene families. Cell-to-cell variability in receptor expression leads to the formation of complex NK cell repertoires. As outlined here, NK cells go through major changes from newborns to adults characterized by downregulation of the inhibitory NKG2A receptor and concomitant upregulation of KIR family members. This process is completed in young adults, and in the majority of individuals, KIR/NKG2A repertoires remain remarkably stable until old age. Nonetheless, age-related factors have the potential to majorly influence the complexity of NK cell repertoires: Firstly infection with HCMV is associated with major clonal expansions of terminally differentiated NKG2C- and KIR-expressing NK cells in certain individuals. Secondly, ineffective hematopoiesis can lead to immature and less diversified NK cell repertoires as observed in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a malignant disease of the elderly. Thus, whereas in the majority of elderly the NK cell compartment appears to be highly stable in terms of function and phenotype, in a minority of subjects a breakdown of NK cell repertoire diversity is observed that might influence immune surveillance and healthy aging.

  13. Quantifying RNA allelic ratios by microfluidic multiplex PCR and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Xin; Ramaswami, Gokul; Smith, Kevin S; Turecki, Gustavo; Montgomery, Stephen B; Li, Jin Billy

    2014-01-01

    We developed a targeted RNA sequencing method that couples microfluidics-based multiplex PCR and deep sequencing (mmPCR-seq) to uniformly and simultaneously amplify up to 960 loci in 48 samples independently of their gene expression levels and to accurately and cost-effectively measure allelic ratios even for low-quantity or low-quality RNA samples. We applied mmPCR-seq to RNA editing and allele-specific expression studies. mmPCR-seq complements RNA-seq for studying allelic variations in the transcriptome.

  14. The Vocal Repertoire of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus): Structure and Function of Calls

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Livio; Ozella, Laura; Pessani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) is a highly social and vocal seabird. However, currently available descriptions of the vocal repertoire of African Penguin are mostly limited to basic descriptions of calls. Here we provide, for the first time, a detailed description of the vocal behaviour of this species by collecting audio and video recordings from a large captive colony. We combine visual examinations of spectrograms with spectral and temporal acoustic analyses to determine vocal categories. Moreover, we used a principal component analysis, followed by signal classification with a discriminant function analysis, for statistical validation of the vocalisation types. In addition, we identified the behavioural contexts in which calls were uttered. The results show that four basic vocalisations can be found in the vocal repertoire of adult African Penguin, namely a contact call emitted by isolated birds, an agonistic call used in aggressive interactions, an ecstatic display song uttered by single birds, and a mutual display song vocalised by pairs, at their nests. Moreover, we identified two distinct vocalisations interpreted as begging calls by nesting chicks (begging peep) and unweaned juveniles (begging moan). Finally, we discussed the importance of specific acoustic parameters in classifying calls and the possible use of the source-filter theory of vocal production to study penguin vocalisations. PMID:25076136

  15. Quantitative analysis of the acoustic repertoire of southern right whales in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webster, Trudi A; Dawson, Stephen M; Rayment, William J; Parks, Susan E; Van Parijs, Sofie M

    2016-07-01

    Quantitatively describing the acoustic repertoire of a species is important for establishing effective passive acoustic monitoring programs and developing automated call detectors. This process is particularly important when the study site is remote and visual surveys are not cost effective. Little is known about the vocal behavior of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in New Zealand. The aim of this study was to describe and quantify their entire vocal repertoire on calving grounds in the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands. Over three austral winters (2010-2012), 4349 calls were recorded, measured, and classified into 10 call types. The most frequently observed types were pulsive, upcall, and tonal low vocalizations. A long tonal low call (≤15.5 s duration) and a very high call (peak frequency ∼750 Hz) were described for the first time. Random Forest multivariate analysis of 28 measured variables was used to classify calls with a high degree of accuracy (82%). The most important variables for classification were maximum ceiling frequency, number of inflection points, duration, and the difference between the start and end frequency. This classification system proved to be a repeatable, fast, and objective method for categorising right whale calls and shows promise for other vocal taxa.

  16. Vocal fold control beyond the species-specific repertoire in an orang-utan

    PubMed Central

    Lameira, Adriano R.; Hardus, Madeleine E.; Mielke, Alexander; Wich, Serge A.; Shumaker, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Vocal fold control was critical to the evolution of spoken language, much as it today allows us to learn vowel systems. It has, however, never been demonstrated directly in a non-human primate, leading to the suggestion that it evolved in the human lineage after divergence from great apes. Here, we provide the first evidence for real-time, dynamic and interactive vocal fold control in a great ape during an imitation “do-as-I-do” game with a human demonstrator. Notably, the orang-utan subject skilfully produced “wookies” – an idiosyncratic vocalization exhibiting a unique spectral profile among the orang-utan vocal repertoire. The subject instantaneously matched human-produced wookies as they were randomly modulated in pitch, adjusting his voice frequency up or down when the human demonstrator did so, readily generating distinct low vs. high frequency sub-variants. These sub-variants were significantly different from spontaneous ones (not produced in matching trials). Results indicate a latent capacity for vocal fold exercise in a great ape (i) in real-time, (ii) up and down the frequency spectrum, (iii) across a register range beyond the species-repertoire and, (iv) in a co-operative turn-taking social setup. Such ancestral capacity likely provided the neuro-behavioural basis of the more fine-tuned vocal fold control that is a human hallmark. PMID:27461756

  17. The vocal repertoire of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus): structure and function of calls.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Livio; Ozella, Laura; Pessani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) is a highly social and vocal seabird. However, currently available descriptions of the vocal repertoire of African Penguin are mostly limited to basic descriptions of calls. Here we provide, for the first time, a detailed description of the vocal behaviour of this species by collecting audio and video recordings from a large captive colony. We combine visual examinations of spectrograms with spectral and temporal acoustic analyses to determine vocal categories. Moreover, we used a principal component analysis, followed by signal classification with a discriminant function analysis, for statistical validation of the vocalisation types. In addition, we identified the behavioural contexts in which calls were uttered. The results show that four basic vocalisations can be found in the vocal repertoire of adult African Penguin, namely a contact call emitted by isolated birds, an agonistic call used in aggressive interactions, an ecstatic display song uttered by single birds, and a mutual display song vocalised by pairs, at their nests. Moreover, we identified two distinct vocalisations interpreted as begging calls by nesting chicks (begging peep) and unweaned juveniles (begging moan). Finally, we discussed the importance of specific acoustic parameters in classifying calls and the possible use of the source-filter theory of vocal production to study penguin vocalisations. PMID:25076136

  18. The acoustic repertoire of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazua-Duran, Carmen

    2005-04-01

    Bottlenose dolphins live in a variety of habitats of the world's oceans using their acoustic repertoire to communicate and inspect their environment. This work investigates the acoustic repertoire of bottlenose dolphins that inhabit a coastal lagoon of the southern Gulf of Mexico, the Laguna de Terminos and how it may relate to the dolphins' general behavioral state and herd size, and to the general characteristics of the habitat, such as visibility, depth, and sea state. Preliminary results show that bottlenose dolphins produce by far more clicks than whistles in all behavioral states (feeding, resting, social, and travel) and herd sizes, which may correlate with the decreased visibility and shallow depth of the Laguna de Terminos. Additionally, silence was found during all behavioral states, but very seldom in herds of large size. These preliminary results suggest that bottlenose dolphins are choosing when and where to produce their phonations. Therefore, more detailed studies are needed to understand how these animals are using their acoustic sense to communicate and inspect their environment. [Work supported by CONACyT-Gobierno Edo. de Campeche and PAPIIT, UNAM.

  19. Birds Generally Carry a Small Repertoire of Bitter Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhao, Huabin

    2015-01-01

    As they belong to the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates, birds have long been believed to possess an inferior taste system. However, the bitter taste is fundamental in birds to recognize dietary toxins (which are typically bitter) in potential food sources. To characterize the evolution of avian bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2rs) and to test whether dietary toxins have shaped the repertoire size of avian Tas2rs, we examined 48 genomes representing all but 3 avian orders. The total number of Tas2r genes was found to range from 1 in the domestic pigeon to 12 in the bar-tailed trogon, with an average of 4, which suggested that a much smaller Tas2r gene repertoire exists in birds than in other vertebrates. Furthermore, we uncovered a positive correlation between the number of putatively functional Tas2rs and the abundance of potential toxins in avian diets. Because plant products contain more toxins than animal tissues and insects release poisonous defensive secretions, we hypothesized that herbivorous and insectivorous birds may demand more functional Tas2rs than carnivorous birds feeding on noninsect animals. Our analyses appear to support this hypothesis and highlight the critical role of taste perception in birds. PMID:26342138

  20. T Cell Repertoire Development in XSCID Dogs Following Non-conditioned Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vernau, William; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Douglas R.; Moore, Peter F.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) can be successfully treated by bone marrow transplants (BMT) resulting in full immunologic reconstitution and engraftment of both donor B and T cells without the need for pre-transplant conditioning. In this study, we evaluated the T cell diversity in XSCID dogs 4 months to 10 1/2 years following BMT. At 4 months post transplantation, when the number of CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells had peaked and plateaued, the T cells in the transplanted dogs showed the same complex, diverse repertoire as those of normal young adult dogs. A decline in T cell diversity became evident approximately 3 1/2 years post transplant, but the proportion of Vβ families showing a polyclonal Gaussian spectratype still predominated up to 7 1/2 years post transplant. In two dogs evaluated at 7 1/2 and 10 1/2 years post transplant, >75% of the Vβ families consisted of a skewed or oligoclonal spectratype that was associated with a CD4/CD8 ratio of <0.5. The decline in the complexity of T cell diversity in the transplanted XSCID dogs is similar to that reported for XSCID patients following BMT. However, in contrast to transplanted XSCID boys who show a significant decline in their T cell diversity by 10 to 12 years following BMT, transplanted XSCID dogs maintain a polyclonal, diverse T cell repertoire through mid-life. PMID:17697962

  1. Quantitative analysis of the acoustic repertoire of southern right whales in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webster, Trudi A; Dawson, Stephen M; Rayment, William J; Parks, Susan E; Van Parijs, Sofie M

    2016-07-01

    Quantitatively describing the acoustic repertoire of a species is important for establishing effective passive acoustic monitoring programs and developing automated call detectors. This process is particularly important when the study site is remote and visual surveys are not cost effective. Little is known about the vocal behavior of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in New Zealand. The aim of this study was to describe and quantify their entire vocal repertoire on calving grounds in the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands. Over three austral winters (2010-2012), 4349 calls were recorded, measured, and classified into 10 call types. The most frequently observed types were pulsive, upcall, and tonal low vocalizations. A long tonal low call (≤15.5 s duration) and a very high call (peak frequency ∼750 Hz) were described for the first time. Random Forest multivariate analysis of 28 measured variables was used to classify calls with a high degree of accuracy (82%). The most important variables for classification were maximum ceiling frequency, number of inflection points, duration, and the difference between the start and end frequency. This classification system proved to be a repeatable, fast, and objective method for categorising right whale calls and shows promise for other vocal taxa. PMID:27475156

  2. Birds Generally Carry a Small Repertoire of Bitter Taste Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhao, Huabin

    2015-09-04

    As they belong to the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates, birds have long been believed to possess an inferior taste system. However, the bitter taste is fundamental in birds to recognize dietary toxins (which are typically bitter) in potential food sources. To characterize the evolution of avian bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2rs) and to test whether dietary toxins have shaped the repertoire size of avian Tas2rs, we examined 48 genomes representing all but 3 avian orders. The total number of Tas2r genes was found to range from 1 in the domestic pigeon to 12 in the bar-tailed trogon, with an average of 4, which suggested that a much smaller Tas2r gene repertoire exists in birds than in other vertebrates. Furthermore, we uncovered a positive correlation between the number of putatively functional Tas2rs and the abundance of potential toxins in avian diets. Because plant products contain more toxins than animal tissues and insects release poisonous defensive secretions, we hypothesized that herbivorous and insectivorous birds may demand more functional Tas2rs than carnivorous birds feeding on noninsect animals. Our analyses appear to support this hypothesis and highlight the critical role of taste perception in birds.

  3. Delineation of autoantibody repertoire through differential proteogenomics in hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies cross-reactive to pathogens and autoantigens are considered pivotal in both infection control and accompanying autoimmunity. However, the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies largely remain elusive without a priori knowledge of disease-specific autoantigens. Here, through a novel quantitative proteogenomics approach, we demonstrated a successful identification of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) sequences highly enriched in pathological immune complex from clinical specimens obtained from a patient with hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia (HCV-CG). Reconstructed single-domain antibodies were reactive to both HCV antigens and potentially liver-derived human proteins. Moreover, over the course of antiviral therapy, a substantial “de-evolution” of a distinct sub-repertoire was discovered, to which proteomically identified cryoprecipitation-prone autoantibodies belonged. This sub-repertoire was characterized by IGHJ6*03-derived, long, hydrophobic complementarity determining region (CDR-H3). This study provides a proof-of-concept of de novo mining of autoantibodies and corresponding autoantigen candidates in a disease-specific context in human, thus facilitating future reverse-translational research for the discovery of novel biomarkers and the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against various autoantibody-related disorders. PMID:27403724

  4. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pantazes, Robert J; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N; Murray, Joseph A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  5. The natural antibody repertoire of sharks and humans recognizes the potential universe of antigens.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Miranda K; Schluter, Samuel F; Marchalonis, John J

    2004-02-01

    In ancestral sharks, a rapid emergence in the evolution of the immune system occurred, giving jawed-vertebrates the necessary components for the combinatorial immune response (CIR). To compare the natural antibody (NAb) repertoires of the most divergent vertebrates with the capacity to produce antibodies, we isolated NAbs to the same set of antigens by affinity chromatography from two species of Carcharhine sharks and from human polyclonal IgG and IgM antibody preparations. The activities of the affinity-purified anti-T-cell receptor (anti-TCR) NAbs were compared with those of monoclonal anti-TCR NAbs that were generated from a systemic lupus erythematosus patient. We report that sharks and humans, representing the evolutionary extremes of vertebrate species sharing the CIR, have NAbs to human TCRs, Igs, the human senescent cell antigen, and to numerous retroviral antigens, indicating that essential features of the combinatorial repertoire and the capacity to recognize the potential universe of antigens is shared among all jawed-vertebrates.

  6. A public T cell clonotype within a heterogeneous autoreactive repertoire is dominant in driving EAE

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Juscilene S.; van den Elzen, Peter; Thornes, Jordan; Huffman, Donald; Droin, Nathalie M.; Maverakis, Emanual; Sercarz, Eli E.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Immunization of B10.PL mice with the Ac1–9 peptide, the immunodominant determinant of myelin basic protein (MBP), produced a single episode of EAE followed by recovery and resistance to reinduction of disease. Using the CDR3 length spectratyping technique, we characterized the clonal composition of the Ac1–9–specific T cell repertoire from induction through onset and resolution of disease. Two clonally restricted subsets within a heterogeneous self-reactive repertoire were found in mouse lymph nodes, spleen, and spinal cord soon after immunization, before any sign of EAE. These clonotypes, designated BV8S2/BJ2S7 and BV16/BJ2S5, were present in all mice examined and thus considered public. BV8S2/BJ2S7 was found in far greater excess; was exclusively Th1 polarized; disappeared from the spinal cord, spleen, and lymph nodes concomitantly with recovery; and transferred disease to naive recipients. In contrast, BV16/BJ2S5 and numerous private clonotypes were either Th1 or Th2 and persisted following recovery. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the public clonotype BV8S2/BJ2S7 is a driver of disease and necessary for its propagation. PMID:17627303

  7. VH repertoire in progeny of long term lymphoid-cultured cells used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Denis, K.A.; Timson, L.K.; Witte, O.N.

    1989-05-01

    VH gene utilization in the progeny of long term lymphoid-cultured cells used for reconstitution of severe combined immunodeficient mice under varying conditions was determined. Hybridomas made from the spleens of these animals were evaluated for clonality and donor origin and a panel of 146 independent hybridomas were subsequently examined for VH expression. Hybridomas derived from the spleens of SCID mice reconstituted with fresh cells, used as a control, utilized VH families in proportion to their numerical representation in the genome. However, hybridomas from the spleens of mice reconstituted with long term cultured cells utilized a predominance of the two VH gene families most proximal to JH, characteristic of cells early in B lymphocyte development. Coinjection of thymocytes with cultured fetal liver cells, to provide good levels of T lymphocytes, did not alter this pattern of VH utilization. Irradiation (3 Gy) of the mice before cultured cell injection, which leads to more complete reconstitution of the B cell compartment, was effective in removing this bias in the VH repertoire. Hybridomas derived from these mice expressed their VH genes more in proportion to family size, characteristic of cells later in B lymphocyte development. In this manner, long term lymphoid-cultured cells can be used to study the transitions that occur in VH repertoire expression which appear to be mediated by either B lymphocyte developmental microenvironment or population size.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of embryonic and adult sensory axons reveals changes in mRNA repertoire localization

    PubMed Central

    Gumy, Laura F.; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Tung, Yi-Chun Loraine; Zivraj, Krishna H.; Willis, Dianna; Coppola, Giovanni; Lam, Brian Y.H.; Twiss, Jeffery L.; Holt, Christine E.; Fawcett, James W.

    2011-01-01

    mRNAs are transported, localized, and translated in axons of sensory neurons. However, little is known about the full repertoire of transcripts present in embryonic and adult sensory axons and how this pool of mRNAs dynamically changes during development. Here, we used a compartmentalized chamber to isolate mRNA from pure embryonic and adult sensory axons devoid of non-neuronal or cell body contamination. Genome-wide microarray analysis reveals that a previously unappreciated number of transcripts are localized in sensory axons and that this repertoire changes during development toward adulthood. Embryonic axons are enriched in transcripts encoding cytoskeletal-related proteins with a role in axonal outgrowth. Surprisingly, adult axons are enriched in mRNAs encoding immune molecules with a role in nociception. Additionally, we show Tubulin-beta3 (Tubb3) mRNA is present only in embryonic axons, with Tubb3 locally synthesized in axons of embryonic, but not adult neurons where it is transported, thus validating our experimental approach. In summary, we provide the first complete catalog of embryonic and adult sensory axonal mRNAs. In addition we show that this pool of axonal mRNAs dynamically changes during development. These data provide an important resource for studies on the role of local protein synthesis in axon regeneration and nociception during neuronal development. PMID:21098654

  9. High Throughput Sequencing of T Cell Antigen Receptors Reveals a Conserved TCR Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xianliang; Lu, Chong; Chen, Sisi; Xie, Qian; Cui, Guangying; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Zhi; Wu, Zhongwen; Ding, Yulong; Ye, Ping; Dai, Yong; Diao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is a mirror of the human immune system that reflects processes caused by infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and aging. Next-generation sequencing has become a powerful tool for deep TCR profiling. Herein, we used this technology to study the repertoire features of TCR beta chain in the blood of healthy individuals. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 10 healthy donors. T cells were isolated with anti-human CD3 magnetic beads according to the manufacturer's protocol. We then combined multiplex-PCR, Illumina sequencing, and IMGT/High V-QUEST to analyze the characteristics and polymorphisms of the TCR. Most of the individual T cell clones were present at very low frequencies, suggesting that they had not undergone clonal expansion. The usage frequencies of the TCR beta variable, beta joining, and beta diversity gene segments were similar among T cells from different individuals. Notably, the usage frequency of individual nucleotides and amino acids within complementarity-determining region (CDR3) intervals was remarkably consistent between individuals. Moreover, our data show that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity was biased toward the insertion of G (31.92%) and C (27.14%) over A (21.82%) and T (19.12%) nucleotides. Some conserved features could be observed in the composition of CDR3, which may inform future studies of human TCR gene recombination. PMID:26962778

  10. The vocal repertoire of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus): structure and function of calls.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Livio; Ozella, Laura; Pessani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) is a highly social and vocal seabird. However, currently available descriptions of the vocal repertoire of African Penguin are mostly limited to basic descriptions of calls. Here we provide, for the first time, a detailed description of the vocal behaviour of this species by collecting audio and video recordings from a large captive colony. We combine visual examinations of spectrograms with spectral and temporal acoustic analyses to determine vocal categories. Moreover, we used a principal component analysis, followed by signal classification with a discriminant function analysis, for statistical validation of the vocalisation types. In addition, we identified the behavioural contexts in which calls were uttered. The results show that four basic vocalisations can be found in the vocal repertoire of adult African Penguin, namely a contact call emitted by isolated birds, an agonistic call used in aggressive interactions, an ecstatic display song uttered by single birds, and a mutual display song vocalised by pairs, at their nests. Moreover, we identified two distinct vocalisations interpreted as begging calls by nesting chicks (begging peep) and unweaned juveniles (begging moan). Finally, we discussed the importance of specific acoustic parameters in classifying calls and the possible use of the source-filter theory of vocal production to study penguin vocalisations.

  11. Birds Generally Carry a Small Repertoire of Bitter Taste Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhao, Huabin

    2015-09-01

    As they belong to the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates, birds have long been believed to possess an inferior taste system. However, the bitter taste is fundamental in birds to recognize dietary toxins (which are typically bitter) in potential food sources. To characterize the evolution of avian bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2rs) and to test whether dietary toxins have shaped the repertoire size of avian Tas2rs, we examined 48 genomes representing all but 3 avian orders. The total number of Tas2r genes was found to range from 1 in the domestic pigeon to 12 in the bar-tailed trogon, with an average of 4, which suggested that a much smaller Tas2r gene repertoire exists in birds than in other vertebrates. Furthermore, we uncovered a positive correlation between the number of putatively functional Tas2rs and the abundance of potential toxins in avian diets. Because plant products contain more toxins than animal tissues and insects release poisonous defensive secretions, we hypothesized that herbivorous and insectivorous birds may demand more functional Tas2rs than carnivorous birds feeding on noninsect animals. Our analyses appear to support this hypothesis and highlight the critical role of taste perception in birds. PMID:26342138

  12. Immunology (1955-1975): the natural selection theory, the two signal hypothesis and positive repertoire selection.

    PubMed

    Forsdyke, Donald R

    2012-01-01

    Observations suggesting the existence of natural antibody prior to exposure of an organism to the corresponding antigen, led to the natural selection theory of antibody formation of Jerne in 1955, and to the two signal hypothesis of Forsdyke in 1968. Aspects of these were not only first discoveries but also foundational discoveries in that they influenced contemporaries in a manner that, from our present vantage point, appears to have been constructive. Jerne's later hypothesis (1971, European Journal of Immunology 1: 1-9), that antibody-like receptors on lymphocytes were selected over evolutionary time for reactivity with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens of the species, was a first, but it was incorrect, and was foundational only to the extent that it emphasized the need to explain the Simonsen phenomenon. Although easily construed as derivative of Jerne (1971), the affinity/avidity model of Forsdyke (1975, Journal of Theoretical Biology 52: 187-198), which predicted that cell-surface components, including MHC antigens, would restrict antigen-reactivity by somatically shaping lymphocyte repertoires, was actually an extension of the two signal hypothesis. While presenting a mechanism for the positive selection of lymphocyte repertoires, and explaining the Simonsen phenomenon, the affinity/avidity model was not foundational in that it had to be independently rediscovered. For science to advance optimally we must seek to close temporal gaps so that first discoveries are also foundational. Listening to young scientists may be part of the solution. PMID:21336661

  13. Facile Discovery of a Diverse Panel of Anti-Ebola Virus Antibodies by Immune Repertoire Mining

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Kluwe, Christien A.; Lungu, Oana I.; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Kerr, Scott A.; Johnson, Erik L.; Jung, Jiwon; Rezigh, Alec B.; Carroll, Sean M.; Reyes, Ann N.; Bentz, Janelle R.; Villanueva, Itamar; Altman, Amy L.; Davey, Robert A.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Georgiou, George

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing evolution of Ebolaviruses poses significant challenges to the development of immunodiagnostics for detecting emergent viral variants. There is a critical need for the discovery of monoclonal antibodies with distinct affinities and specificities for different Ebolaviruses. We developed an efficient technology for the rapid discovery of a plethora of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from immunized animals by mining the VH:VL paired antibody repertoire encoded by highly expanded B cells in the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN). This approach requires neither screening nor selection for antigen-binding. Specifically we show that mouse immunization with Ebola VLPs gives rise to a highly polarized antibody repertoire in CD138+ antibody-secreting cells within the PLN. All highly expanded antibody clones (7/7 distinct clones/animal) were expressed recombinantly, and shown to recognize the VLPs used for immunization. Using this approach we obtained diverse panels of antibodies including: (i) antibodies with high affinity towards GP; (ii) antibodies which bound Ebola VLP Kissidougou-C15, the strain circulating in the recent West African outbreak; (iii) non-GP binding antibodies that recognize wild type Sudan or Bundibugyo viruses that have 39% and 37% sequence divergence from Ebola virus, respectively and (iv) antibodies to the Reston virus GP for which no antibodies have been reported. PMID:26355042

  14. The formation of a generalized categorization repertoire: effect of training with multiple domains, samples, and comparisons.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Lanny; Reeve, Kenneth F; Matneja, Priya; Varelas, Antonios; Belanich, James; Fitzer, Adrienne; Shamoun, Kim

    2002-01-01

    The present experiment explored the effects of three variables on the spontaneous categorization of stimuli in perceptually distinct and novel domains. Each of six stimulus domains was created by morphing two images that were the domain endpoints. The endpoints of the domains were male and female faces, two abstract drawings, a car and a truck, two banded-elevation satellite land images, a tree and a cat, and two false-color satellite images. The stimulus variants at each end of a domain defined two potential perceptual classes. Training was conducted in a matching-to-sample format and used stimuli from one or two domains, one or three variants per class as samples, and one or three variants per class as comparisons. The spontaneous categorization of stimuli in the untrained stimulus domains showed the emergence of a generalized categorization repertoire. The proportion of spontaneously categorized stimuli in the new domains was positively related to the number of domains and samples used in training, and was inversely related to the number of comparisons used in training. Differential reaction times demonstrated the discriminability of the stimuli in the emergent classes. This study is among the first to provide an empirical basis for a behavior-analytic model of the development of generalized categorization repertoires in natural settings. PMID:12507005

  15. Analysis of heavy and light chain pairings indicates that receptor editing shapes the human antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    de Wildt, R M; Hoet, R M; van Venrooij, W J; Tomlinson, I M; Winter, G

    1999-01-22

    In the bone marrow, diversity in the primary antibody repertoire is created by the combinatorial rearrangement of different gene segments and by the association of different heavy and light chains. During the secondary response in the germinal centres, antibodies are diversified by somatic mutation and possibly by further rearrangements, or "receptor editing". Here, we have analysed the pairings of heavy and light chain variable domains (VH and VL) in 365 human IgG+ B cells from peripheral blood, and established that these pairings are largely random. The repertoire is dominated by a limited number of pairings of segments and folds. Among these pairings we identified two identical mutated heavy chains in combination with two different mutated light chains (one kappa and one lambda). This shows that receptor editing occurs in the human periphery and that the same antibody lineage can be subjected to both receptor editing and somatic hypermutation. This suggests that receptor editing may be used together with somatic mutation for the affinity maturation of antibodies. We also propose that receptor editing has shaped variable gene segment use and the evolution of V gene families.

  16. Impaired receptor editing in the primary B cell repertoire of BASH-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Nojima, Takuya; Goitsuka, Ryo; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2004-11-15

    The editing of B cell Ag receptor (BCR) through successive rearrangements of Ig genes has been considered to be a major mechanism for the central B cell tolerance, which precludes appearance of self-reactive B cells, through studies using anti-self-Ig transgenic/knock-in mouse systems. However, contribution of the receptor editing in the development of the normal B cell repertoire remains unclear. In addition, the signaling pathway directing this event is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that receptor editing in anti-DNA Ig knock-in mice is impaired in the absence of an adaptor protein BASH (BLNK/SLP-65) that is involved in BCR signaling. Remarkably, the supposed hallmarks of receptor editing such as Iglambda chain expression, recombination sequence rearrangements at Igkappa loci, and presence of in-frame VkappaJkappa joins in the Igkappa loci inactivated by the recombination sequence rearrangements, were all diminished in BASH-deficient mice with unmanipulated Ig loci. BCR ligation-induced Iglambda gene recombination in vitro was also impaired in BASH-deficient B cells. Furthermore, the BASH-deficient mice showed an excessive Ab response to a DNA carrier immunization, suggesting the presence of unedited DNA-reactive B cells in the periphery. These results not only define a signaling pathway required for receptor editing but indicate that the BCR-signaled receptor editing indeed operates in the development of normal B cell repertoire and contributes to establishing the B cell tolerance.

  17. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pantazes, Robert J.; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N.; Murray, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  18. Different aubergine alleles confirm the specificity of different RNAi pathways in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Specchia, Valeria; Bozzetti, Maria Pia

    2009-01-01

    The crystal-Stellate system is one of the best-known examples of heterochromatin-euchromatin interaction. The components of this system are homologous repetitive sequences clustered in three regions: 12E1 and h27 on the X and h11 on the Y. The symptom of a disrupted crystal-Stellate interaction is the presence of crystals in the spermatocytes of males lacking the crystal region. Stellate silencing is based on the RNAi process. Many modifiers of this system have been isolated and many of these are involved in RNAi. One of these modifiers is aubergine(sting); this is a "gain of function" allele in somatic tissues. Here we report the different behavior of two aubergine alleles with respect to the RNAi pathway: aub(sting) and a "loss of function" heteroallelic combination aub(HN)/aub(QC42). An increased