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  1. The APOE4 allele shows opposite sex bias in microbleeds and Alzheimer’s Disease of humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Christensen, Amy; Moser, Alexandra; Liu, Jiahui; Pike, Christian J.; Sullivan, Patrick M.; Morgan, Todd E.; Dolzhenko, Egor; Charidimou, Andreas; Wahlund, Lars-Olaf; Wiberg, Maria Kristofferson; Shams, Sara; Chiang, Gloria Chia-Yi; Finch, Caleb E.

    2015-01-01

    The APOE4 allele confers greater risk of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) for women than men, in conjunction with greater clinical deficits per unit of AD neuropathology (plaques, tangles). Cerebral microbleeds, which contribute to cognitive dysfunctions during AD, also show APOE4 excess, but sex-APOE allele interactions are not described. We report that elderly men diagnosed for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD showed a higher risk of cerebral cortex microbleeds with APOE4 allele dose effect in two clinical cohorts (ADNI and KIDS). Sex-APOE interactions were further analyzed in EFAD mice carrying human APOE alleles and familial AD genes. At 7 months, E4FAD mice had cerebral cortex microbleeds with female excess, in contrast to humans. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), plaques, and soluble Aβ also showed female excess. Both the cerebral microbleeds and CAA increased in proportion to individual Aβ load. In humans, the opposite sex bias of APOE4 allele for microbleeds vs the plaques and tangles is the first example of organ-specific, sex-linked APOE allele effects, and further shows AD as a uniquely human condition. PMID:26686669

  2. Allele specific-PCR and melting curve analysis showed relatively high frequency of β-casein gene A1 allele in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cows.

    PubMed

    Gholami, M; Hafezian, S H; Rahimi, G; Farhadi, A; Rahimi, Z; Kahrizi, D; Kiani, S; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Muhammadi, S; Veisi, F; Ghadiri, K; Shetabi, H; Zargooshi, J

    2016-10-31

    There are two allelic forms of A1 and A2 of β-casein gene in dairy cattle. Proteolytic digestion of bovine β-casein A1 type produces bioactive peptide of β-casomorphin-7 known as milk devil. β-casomorphin-7 causes many diseases, including type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease syndrome, sudden death and madness. The aim of the present study was to determine the different allelic forms of β-casein gene in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cattle in order to identify A1 and A2 variants. The blood samples were collected randomly and DNA was extracted using modified salting out method. An 854 bp fragment including part of exon 7 and part of intron 6 of β-casein gene was amplified by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). Also, the accuracy of AS-PCR genotyping has been confirmed by melting temperature curve analysis using Real-time PCR machinery. The comparison of observed allele and genotype frequency among the studied breeds was performed using the Fisher exact and Chi-squared test, respectively by SAS program. Obtained results showed the A1 allele frequencies of 50, 51.57, 54.5, 49.4 and 46.6% in Holstein, Simmental, Sistani, Taleshi and Mazandarani cattle populations, respectively. The chi-square test was shown that no any populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for studied marker locus. Comparison and analysis of the test results for allelic frequency showed no any significant differences between breeds (P>0.05). The frequency of observed genotypes only differs significantly between Holstein and Taleshi breeds but no any statistically significant differences were found for other breeds (P>0.05). A relatively high frequency of β-casein A1 allele was observed in Iranian native cattle. Therefore, determine the genotypes and preference alleles A2 in these native and commercial cattle is recommended.

  3. Allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show genetic influence on chromatin state in human genome.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Mitsutaka; Yang, Howard H; Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Hu, Ying; Taylor, Philip R; Buetow, Kenneth H; Lee, Maxwell P

    2007-05-18

    Several recent studies have shown a genetic influence on gene expression variation, including variation between the two chromosomes within an individual and variation between individuals at the population level. We hypothesized that genetic inheritance may also affect variation in chromatin states. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed chromatin states in 12 lymphoblastoid cells derived from two Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families using an allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-chip) assay with Affymetrix 10K SNP chip. We performed the allele-specific ChIP-on-chip assays for the 12 lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies targeting at RNA polymerase II and five post-translation modified forms of the histone H3 protein. The use of multiple cell lines from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families allowed us to evaluate variation of chromatin states across pedigrees. These studies demonstrated that chromatin state clustered by family. Our results support the idea that genetic inheritance can determine the epigenetic state of the chromatin as shown previously in model organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration in humans that genetics may be an important factor that influences global chromatin state mediated by histone modification, the hallmark of the epigenetic phenomena.

  4. An MDR1 promoter allele with higher promoter activity is common in clinically isolated strains of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bruzual, Igor

    2013-01-01

    In the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, up-regulation of MDR1, encoding an efflux transporter, leads to increased resistance to the antifungal drug fluconazole. Antifungal resistance has been linked to several types of genetic change in C. albicans, including changes in genome structure, genetic alteration of the drug target, and overexpression of transporters. High-level over-expression of MDR1 is commonly mediated by mutation in a trans-acting factor, Mrr1p. This report describes a second mechanism that contributes to up-regulation of MDR1 expression. By analyzing the sequence of the MDR1 promoter region in fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible strains, we identified sequence polymorphisms that defined two linkage groups, corresponding to the two alleles in the diploid genome. One of the alleles conferred higher MDR1 expression compared with the other allele. Strains in which both alleles were of the higher activity type were common in collections of clinically isolated strains while strains carrying only the less active allele were rare. As increased expression of MDR1 confers higher resistance to drugs, strains with the more active MDR1 promoter allele may grow or survive longer when exposed to drugs or other selective pressures, providing greater opportunity for mutations that confer high-level drug resistance to arise. Through this mechanism, higher activity alleles of the MDR1 promoter could promote the development of drug resistance. PMID:21972105

  5. The postmitotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae after spaceflight showed higher viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Yan; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed as an ideal model organism for clarifying the biological effects caused by spaceflight conditions. The postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells onboard Practice eight recoverable satellite were subjected to spaceflight for 15 days. After recovery, the viability, the glycogen content, the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, the DNA content and the lipid peroxidation level in yeast cells were analyzed. The viability of the postmitotic yeast cells after spaceflight showed a three-fold increase as compared with that of the ground control cells. Compared to the ground control cells, the lipid peroxidation level in the spaceflight yeast cells markedly decreased. The spaceflight yeast cells also showed an increase in G2/M cell population and a decrease in Sub-G1 cell population. The glycogen content and the activities of hexokinase and succinate dehydrogenase significantly decreased in the yeast cells after spaceflight. In contrast, the activity of malate dehydrogenase showed an obvious increase after spaceflight. These results suggested that microgravity or spaceflight could promote the survival of postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells through regulating carbohydrate metabolism, ROS level and cell cycle progression.

  6. DRD4 long allele carriers show heightened attention to high-priority items relative to low-priority items.

    PubMed

    Gorlick, Marissa A; Worthy, Darrell A; Knopik, Valerie S; McGeary, John E; Beevers, Christopher G; Maddox, W Todd

    2015-03-01

    Humans with seven or more repeats in exon III of the DRD4 gene (long DRD4 carriers) sometimes demonstrate impaired attention, as seen in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and at other times demonstrate heightened attention, as seen in addictive behavior. Although the clinical effects of DRD4 are the focus of much work, this gene may not necessarily serve as a "risk" gene for attentional deficits, but as a plasticity gene where attention is heightened for priority items in the environment and impaired for minor items. Here we examine the role of DRD4 in two tasks that benefit from selective attention to high-priority information. We examine a category learning task where performance is supported by focusing on features and updating verbal rules. Here, selective attention to the most salient features is associated with good performance. In addition, we examine the Operation Span (OSPAN) task, a working memory capacity task that relies on selective attention to update and maintain items in memory while also performing a secondary task. Long DRD4 carriers show superior performance relative to short DRD4 homozygotes (six or less tandem repeats) in both the category learning and OSPAN tasks. These results suggest that DRD4 may serve as a "plasticity" gene where individuals with the long allele show heightened selective attention to high-priority items in the environment, which can be beneficial in the appropriate context.

  7. A mutant allele of the SUP45 (SAL4) gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows temperature-dependent allosuppressor and omnipotent suppressor phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, I; Akhmaloka; Tuite, M F

    1995-04-01

    Using a plasmid-based termination-read-through assay, the sal4-2 conditional-lethal (temperature-sensitive) allele of the SUP45 (SAL4) gene was shown to enhance the efficiency of the weak ochre suppressor tRNA SUQ5 some 10-fold at 30 degrees C. Additionally, this allele increased the suppressor efficiency of SRM2-2, a weak tRNA(Gln) ochre suppressor, indicating that the allosuppressor phenotype is not SUQ5-specific. A sup+ sal4-2 strain also showed a temperature-dependent omnipotent suppressor phenotype, enhancing readthrough of all three termination codons. Combining the sal4-2 allele with an efficient tRNA nonsense suppressor (SUP4) increased the temperature-sensitivity of that strain, indicating that enhanced nonsense suppressor levels contribute to the conditional-lethality conferred by the sal4-2 allele. However, UGA suppression levels in a sup+ sal4-2 strain following a shift to the non-permissive temperature reached a maximum significantly below that exhibited by a non-temperature sensitive SUP4 suppressor strain. Enhanced nonsense suppression may not therefore be the primary cause of the conditional-lethality of this allele. These data indicate a role for Sup45p in translation termination, and possibly in an additional, as yet unidentified, cellular process.

  8. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    PubMed

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  10. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  11. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    PubMed Central

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  12. Allelic variants at codon 146 in the PRNP gene show significant differences in the risk for natural scrapie in Cypriot goats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Georgiadou, S; Simmons, M M; Windl, O; Dawson, M; Arnold, M E; Neocleous, P; Papasavva-Stylianou, P

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the association between the polymorphisms serine (S) or aspartic acid (D) at codon 146 of the PRNP gene and resistance to scrapie. All goats aged >12 months (a total of 1075 animals) from four herds with the highest prevalence of scrapie in the country were culled and tested, of which 234 (21·7%) were positive by either the rapid test or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for any of the tissues tested. The odds of scrapie infection occurring in NN146 goats was 101 [95% credible interval (CrI) 19-2938] times higher than for non-NN146 or unknown genotypes. IHC applied to lymphoreticular tissue produced the highest sensitivity (94%, 95% CrI 90-97). The presence of putatively resistant non-NN146 alleles in the Cypriot goat population, severely affected by scrapie, provides a potential tool to reduce/eradicate scrapie provided that coordinated nationwide breeding programmes are implemented and maintained over time.

  13. CFH haplotypes and ARMS2, C2, C3, and CFB alleles show association with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration in Mexicans

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Corona, Ulises; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Sebastian, Leticia; Morales, Fabiola; Ochoa-Contreras, Daniel; Carnevale, Alessandra; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the contribution of genetic variants of complement factor H (CFH), complement component 2 and 3 (C2 and C3), complement factor B (CFB), and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk in the Mexican Mestizo population. Methods Analysis included 282 unrelated Mexican patients with advanced AMD, 205 healthy controls, and 280 population controls. Stereoscopic fundus images were graded on the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy System (CARMS). We designed a resequencing strategy using primers with M13 adaptor for the 23 exons of the CFH gene in a subgroup of 96 individuals clinically evaluated: 48 AMD cases and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in C3 (Arg80Gly and Pro292Leu), C2 (rs547154), CFB (Leu9His), and ARMS2 (Ala69Ser) were genotyped in all patients, healthy and population controls using TaqMan assay. Results All evaluated individuals were Mexican Mestizos, and their genetic ancestry was validated using 224 ancestry informative markers and calculating Fst values. The CFH resequencing revealed 19 SNPs and a common variant in the intron 2 splice acceptor site; three CFH haplotypes inferred from individual genotypes, showed significant differences between cases and controls. The risk alleles in C3 (rs1047286, odds ratio [OR]=2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.64–3.75, p=1.59E-05; rs2230199, OR=2.15, 95% CI=1.48–3.13, p=6.28E-05) and in ARMS2 (rs10490924, OR=3.09, 95% CI=2.48–3.86, p=5.42E-23) were strongly associated with risk of AMD. The protective effect of alleles in C2 (rs547154) and CFB (rs4151667) showed a trend but was not significantly associated after correction for multiple testing. Conclusions Our results show that ARMS2 and C3 are major contributors to advanced AMD in Mexican patients, while the contributions of CFH, C2, and CFB are minor to those of other populations, reveling significant ethnic differences in minor allele

  14. The higher exercise intensity and the presence of allele I of ACE gene elicit a higher post-exercise blood pressure reduction and nitric oxide release in elderly women: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The absence of the I allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with higher levels of circulating ACE, lower nitric oxide (NO) release and hypertension. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-exercise salivary nitrite (NO2-) and blood pressure (BP) responses to different exercise intensities in elderly women divided according to their ACE genotype. Methods Participants (n = 30; II/ID = 20 and DD = 10) underwent three experimental sessions: incremental test - IT (15 watts workload increase/3 min) until exhaustion; 20 min exercise 90% anaerobic threshold (90% AT); and 20 min control session without exercise. Volunteers had their BP and NO2- measured before and after experimental sessions. Results Despite both intensities showed protective effect on preventing the increase of BP during post-exercise recovery compared to control, post-exercise hypotension and increased NO2- release was observed only for carriers of the I allele (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotypes of the ACE gene may exert a role in post-exercise NO release and BP response. PMID:22136292

  15. Carbon nanotube fiber microelectrodes show a higher resistance to dopamine fouling.

    PubMed

    Harreither, Wolfgang; Trouillon, Raphaël; Poulin, Philippe; Neri, Wilfrid; Ewing, Andrew G; Safina, Gulnara

    2013-08-06

    We have compared the properties and resistance to DA fouling of a carbon nanotube fiber (CNTF) microelectrode to a traditional carbon fiber (CF) microelectrode. These two materials show comparable electrochemical activities for outer-sphere and inner-sphere redox reactions. Although the CNTF might have a higher intrinsic RC constant, thus limiting its high-frequency behavior, the CNTF shows a significantly higher durability than the CF in terms of electrode stability. During constant oxidation of 100 μM DA, the signal measured by the CNTF microelectrode shows a 2-h window over which no decrease in current is observed. Under the same conditions, the current obtained at the CF microelectrode decreases by almost 50%. A model of the fouling process, assuming the formation of growing patches of insulator on the surface, has been compared to the data. This model is found to be in good agreement with our results and indicates a growth rate of the patches in the 0.1-2 nm s(-1) range.

  16. PCOS women show significantly higher homocysteine level, independent to glucose and E2 level

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Zahra; Sadrkhanlou, Rajab-Ali; Nejati, Vahid; Tizro, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is reasonable to think that some biochemical characteristics of follicular fluid (FF) surrounding the oocyte may play a critical role in determining the quality of oocyte and the subsequent potential needed to achieve fertilization and embryo development. Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the levels of FF homocysteine (Hcy) in IVF candidate polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women and any relationships with FF glucose and estradiol (E2) levels. Materials and Methods: In this case control study which was performed in Dr. Tizro Day Care and IVF Center 70 infertile patients were enrolled in two groups: comprising 35 PCOS and 35 non PCOS women. Long protocol was performed for all patients. FF Hcy, glucose and E2 levels were analyzed at the time of oocyte retrieval. Results: It was observed that FF Hcy level was significantly higher in PCOS patients compared with non PCOSs (p<0.01). Observations demonstrated that in PCOS group, the Hcy level increased independent to E2, glucose levels, BMI and age, while the PCOS group showed significantly higher BMI compared with non-PCOS group (p=0.03). However, no significant differences were revealed between groups for FF glucose and E2 levels. Conclusion: Present data showed that although FF glucose and E2 levels were constant in PCOS and non PCOS patients, but the FF Hcy levels in PCOS were significantly increased (p=0.01). PMID:27679823

  17. Homozygous carriers of the TCF7L2 rs7903146 T-allele show altered postprandial response in triglycerides and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Engelbrechtsen, L.; Hansen, T. H.; Mahendran, Y.; Pyl, P.; Andersson, E.; Jonsson, A.; Gjesing, A.; Linneberg, A.; Jørgensen, T.; Hansen, T.; Vestergaard, H.

    2017-01-01

    The TCF7L2 rs7903146 T-allele shows the strongest association with type 2 diabetes (T2D) among common gene variants. The aim of this study was to assess circulating levels of metabolites following a meal test in individuals carrying the high risk rs790346 TT genotype (cases) and low-risk CC genotype (controls). Sixty-two men were recruited based on TCF7L2 genotype, 31 were TT carriers and 31 were age- and BMI-matched CC carriers. All participants consumed a test meal after 12 hours of fasting. Metabolites were measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Metabolomic profiling of TCF7L2 carriers were performed for 141 lipid estimates. TT carriers had lower fasting levels of L-VLDL-L (total lipids in large very low density lipoproteins, p = 0.045), L-VLDL-CE (cholesterol esters in large VLDL, p = 0.03), and L-VLDL-C (total cholesterol in large VLDL, p = 0.045) compared to CC carriers. Additionally, TT carriers had lower postprandial levels of total triglycerides (TG) (q = 0.03), VLDL-TG (q = 0.05, including medium, small and extra small, q = 0.048, q = 0.0009, q = 0.04, respectively), HDL-TG (triglycerides in high density lipoproteins q = 0.037) and S-HDL-TG (q = 0.00003). In conclusion, TT carriers show altered postprandial triglyceride response, mainly influencing VLDL and HDL subclasses suggesting a genotype-mediated effect on hepatic lipid regulation. PMID:28220878

  18. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K Allele Carriers Sustain a Higher Respiratory Quotient after Aerobic Exercise, but β3-Adrenoceptor 64R Allele Does Not Affect Lipolysis: A Human Model

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise. PMID:24905907

  19. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K allele carriers sustain a higher respiratory quotient after aerobic exercise, but β3-adrenoceptor 64R allele does not affect lipolysis: a human model.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise.

  20. Fibroblasts maintained in 3 dimensions show a better differentiation state and higher sensitivity to estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Montani, Claudia; Steimberg, Nathalie; Boniotti, Jennifer; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Zanella, Isabella; Diafera, Giuseppe; Biunno, Ida; Caimi, Luigi; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Di Lorenzo, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Cell differentiation and response to hormonal signals were studied in a 3D environment on an in-house generated mouse fibroblast cell line expressing a reporter gene under the control of estrogen responsive sequences (EREs). 3D cell culture conditions were obtained in a Rotary Cell Culture System; (RCCS™), a microgravity based bioreactor that promotes the aggregation of cells into multicellular spheroids (MCS). In this bioreactor the cells maintained a better differentiated phenotype and more closely resembled in vivo tissue. The RCCS™ cultured fibroblasts showed higher expression of genes regulating cell assembly, differentiation and hormonal functions. Microarray analysis showed that genes related to cell cycle, proliferation, cytoskeleton, migration, adhesion and motility were all down-regulated in 3D as compared to 2D conditions, as well as oncogene expression and inflammatory cytokines. Controlled remodeling of ECM, which is an essential aspect of cell organization, homeostasis and tissue was affected by the culture method as assessed by immunolocalization of β-tubulin. Markers of cell organization, homeostasis and tissue repair, metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and its physiological inhibitor (TIMP4) changed expression in association with the relative formation of cell aggregates. The fibroblasts cultured in the RCCS™ maintain a better responsiveness to estrogens, measured as expression of ERα and regulation of an ERE-dependent reporter and of the endogenous target genes CBP, Rarb, MMP1 and Dbp. Our data highlight the interest of this 3D culture model for its potential application in the field of cell response to hormonal signals and the pharmaco-toxicological analyses of chemicals and natural molecules endowed of estrogenic potential. - Highlights: • We here characterized the first cell line derived from an estrogen reporter mouse. • In the RCCS cells express an immortalized behavior but not a transformed phenotype. • The RCCS provides a system for

  1. Show Me the Money! Why Higher Ed Should Help K-12 Do Economic Impact Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    In education, economic impact studies have been largely the product of higher education institutions. Colleges and universities have recognized that they can cultivate public, political and financial support by effectively demonstrating their high return-on-investment value. For more than a decade, all types of higher education institutions have…

  2. Show me the money. Case study: negotiating higher reimbursement from an insurance company.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Marc G

    2004-10-01

    Most medical practices simply accept managed care contracts and their corresponding fee schedules. But by negotiating, a group can often find bargaining room to reach a deal for a higher level of reimbursement. The author describes how he renegotiated a contract with a health plan to the practice's advantage.

  3. Show Me Yours: Developing a Faculty-Wide Interdisciplinary Initiative in Built Environment Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephanie; Zamberlan, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    In the competitive market of higher education, government funding agencies consider universities accountable for ensuring a better alignment between educational processes, graduate capabilities and real world employability. Workforce leaders have developed new expectations about the capabilities of graduating students, expecting to employ…

  4. Ganas of Showing the Way: A Grounded Theory Study of Hispanic Presidents in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios Gutierrez, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, based on classical grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967, 1971; Glaser, 1978, 1992, 1993, 1994a, 1994b, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2004), second generation Hispanic presidents and chancellors in higher education were studied to discover how they continually try to resolve second culture-coping challenges, the…

  5. A Study Showing Research Has Been Valued over Teaching in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi Yusn

    2015-01-01

    Research has been valued and given priority over teaching for a long time in academia. In recent decades, the Taiwanese Ministry of Education has pursued objective and quantitative research criteria and has encouraged higher education institutions to ask teachers to publish papers in SSCI or SCI journals as part of the criteria for promotion and…

  6. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  7. Speed versus endurance tradeoff in plants: Leaves with higher photosynthetic rates show stronger seasonal declines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Cao, Kun-Fang; Wei, Xue-Mei; Li, Nan

    2017-02-10

    We tested for a tradeoff across species between plant maximum photosynthetic rate and the ability to maintain photosynthesis under adverse conditions in the unfavorable season. Such a trade-off would be consistent with the observed trade-off between maximum speed and endurance in athletes and some animals that has been explained by cost-benefit theory. This trend would have importance for the general understanding of leaf design, and would simplify models of annual leaf carbon relations. We tested for such a trade-off using a database analysis across vascular plants and using an experimental approach for 29 cycad species, representing an ancient plant lineage with diversified evergreen leaves. In both tests, a higher photosynthetic rate per mass or per area in the favorable season was associated with a stronger absolute or percent decline in the unfavorable season. We resolved a possible mechanism based on biomechanics and nitrogen allocation; cycads with high leaf toughness (leaf mass per area) and higher investment in leaf construction than in physiological function (C/N ratio) tended to have lower warm season photosynthesis but less depression in the cool season. We propose that this trade-off, consistent with cost-benefit theory, represents a significant physio-phenological constraint on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic rate.

  8. Speed versus endurance tradeoff in plants: Leaves with higher photosynthetic rates show stronger seasonal declines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Cao, Kun-Fang; Wei, Xue-Mei; Li, Nan

    2017-01-01

    We tested for a tradeoff across species between plant maximum photosynthetic rate and the ability to maintain photosynthesis under adverse conditions in the unfavorable season. Such a trade-off would be consistent with the observed trade-off between maximum speed and endurance in athletes and some animals that has been explained by cost-benefit theory. This trend would have importance for the general understanding of leaf design, and would simplify models of annual leaf carbon relations. We tested for such a trade-off using a database analysis across vascular plants and using an experimental approach for 29 cycad species, representing an ancient plant lineage with diversified evergreen leaves. In both tests, a higher photosynthetic rate per mass or per area in the favorable season was associated with a stronger absolute or percent decline in the unfavorable season. We resolved a possible mechanism based on biomechanics and nitrogen allocation; cycads with high leaf toughness (leaf mass per area) and higher investment in leaf construction than in physiological function (C/N ratio) tended to have lower warm season photosynthesis but less depression in the cool season. We propose that this trade-off, consistent with cost-benefit theory, represents a significant physio-phenological constraint on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic rate. PMID:28186201

  9. Sahara honey shows higher potency against Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to north Algerian types of honey.

    PubMed

    Boukraa, Laid; Niar, Abdellatif

    2007-12-01

    Six varieties of honey from different regions in Algeria were used to determine their potency against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Four varieties originated from northern Algeria, and two from the Sahara. Three types of media were used. On nutrient agar the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the four northern varieties ranged between 30% (vol/vol) and 31% (vol/vol), while the MIC of the Sahara varieties was 11% (vol/vol) and 14% (vol/vol). On King A agar the MIC of the four northern varieties ranged from 25% (vol/vol) to 31% (vol/vol), whereas the MIC of the two varieties of Sahara honey was 12% (vol/vol) and 15% (vol/vol). On nutrient broth the MIC of the northern varieties ranged from 10% (vol/vol) to 21% (vol/vol), whereas the MIC of the two varieties of Sahara honey was 9% (vol/vol). The botanic flora of Sahara is known in Algeria for its medicinal uses, and thus the higher potency of the Sahara honey is most probably due to antibacterial substances in its plant derivates. These findings suggest that Sahara honey could be used for managing wounds and burns, which are mostly infected by P. aeruginosa.

  10. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self-incompatibility, and transspecific polymorphism is therefore expected to be equally common. The previously reported directional turnover process of alleles in the SSIdomcod model results in coalescence times lower and substitution rates higher than those in the other models. The SSIdom model assumes strong asymmetries in allelic action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles, including interspecific comparisons, is discussed. PMID:9799270

  11. Higher Brain Perfusion May Not Support Memory Functions in Cognitively Normal Carriers of the ApoE ε4 Allele Compared to Non-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Hays, Chelsea C.; Liu, Thomas T.; Meloy, M. J.; Rissman, Robert A.; Bondi, Mark W.; Wierenga, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), which carries necessary nutrients to the brain, are associated with increased risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Whether the association between CBF and cognition is moderated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 genotype, a known risk factor for AD, remains understudied, with most research focusing on exploring brain regions in which there are diagnostic group differences in CBF (i.e., cognitively normal vs. MCI vs. AD). This study measured resting CBF via arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and verbal memory functions using a composite score in 59 older adults with normal cognition (38 ε3; 21 ε4). Linear mixed effect models were employed to investigate if the voxel-wise relationship between verbal memory performance and resting CBF was modified by ApoE genotype. Results indicated that carriers of the ApoE ε4 allele display negative associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, medial and lateral temporal cortex, parietal regions, insula, and the basal ganglia. Contrarily, ε3 carriers exhibited positive associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, thalamus, insula, and basal ganglia. Findings suggest that higher CBF was associated with worse verbal memory functions in cognitively normal ε4 carriers, perhaps reflecting dysregulation within the neurovascular unit, which is no longer supportive of cognition. Results are discussed within the context of the vascular theory of AD risk. PMID:27445794

  12. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

  13. Bovine oocytes show a higher tolerance to heat shock in the warm compared with the cold season of the year.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; López-Gatius, F; Andreu-Vázquez, C; López-Béjar, M

    2013-01-15

    Heat stress is especially harmful for bovine ovarian follicle development and oocyte competence. In this study, we assessed the effects of heat shock on oocyte maturation in oocytes collected during the cold (February-March; n = 114) or warm (May-June; n = 116) periods of the year. In both cases, cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured under control (38 °C) and heat shock conditions (41.5 °C, 18-21 h of maturation). For each oocyte, nuclear stage, cortical granule distribution and steroidogenic activity of cumulus cells were evaluated. Based on the odds ratio, heat-shocked oocytes were 26.83 times more likely to show an anomalous metaphase II morphology. When matured under heat shock conditions, oocytes obtained in both seasons were similarly affected in terms of nuclear maturation, whereas a seasonal effect was observed on cytoplasmic maturation. For oocytes collected during the cold season, the likelihood to show an anomalous maturation was 25.96 times higher when exposed to the heat treatment than when matured under control conditions. By contrast, oocytes collected during the warm season matured under control or heat shock did not show significant risk of showing an anomalous cytoplasmic maturation. Our findings indicate an increased rate of premature oocytes in response to heat shock as well as a higher tolerance to this stress of oocytes harvested in the warm season compared with those collected in the colder period.

  14. Severe Septic Patients with Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup JT Show Higher Survival Rates: A Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín, María M.; López-Gallardo, Esther; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Labarta, Lorenzo; Díaz, César; Borreguero-León, Juan María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a previous cohort study (n=96), we found an association between mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroup JT and increased survival of severe septic patients, after controlling for age and serum lactic acid levels. The aim of this research was to increase the predictive accuracy and to control for more confounder variables in a larger cohort (n=196) of severe septic patients, to confirm whether mtDNA haplogroup JT influences short and medium-term survival in these patients. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter, observational study in six Spanish Intensive Care Units. We determined 30-day and 6-month survival and mtDNA haplogroup in this second cohort of 196 patients and in the global cohort (first and second cohorts combined) with 292 severe septic patients. Multiple logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were used to test for the association of mtDNA haplogroups JT with survival at 30-days and 6-months, controlling for age, sex, serum interleukin-6 levels and SOFA score. Results Logistic and Cox regression analyses showed no differences in 30-day and 6-month survival between patients with mtDNA haplogroup JT and other haplogroups in the first cohort (n=96). In the second cohort (n=196), these analyses showed a trend to higher 30-day and 6-month survival in those with haplogroup JT. In the global cohort (n=292), logistic and Cox regression analyses showed higher 30-day and 6-month survival for haplogroup JT. There were no significant differences between J and T sub-haplogroups in 30-day and 6-month survival. Conclusions The global cohort study (first and second cohorts combined), the largest to date reporting on mtDNA haplogroups in septic patients, confirmed that haplogroup JT patients showed increased 30-day and 6-month survival. This finding may be due to single nucleotide polymorphism defining the whole haplogroup JT and not separately for J or T sub-haplogroups. PMID:24069186

  15. Patients with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage show higher levels of DR+ activated T-cells that are less responsive to mitogens.

    PubMed

    Kuon, R J; Schaumann, J; Goeggl, T; Strowitzki, T; Sadeghi, M; Opelz, G; Daniel, V; Toth, B

    2015-11-01

    In 50% of recurrent miscarriages (RM) the cause remains unknown and standardized immunological diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic RM (iRM) is yet not established. In this prospective case-control study, out of 220 RM patients screened, 97 iRM patients were identified and compared to 26 healthy controls without a previous pregnancy or blood transfusion in order to identify deregulated immunological parameters. Blood levels of lymphocyte subpopulations, cytokines and neopterin were determined by FACS, ELISA, and Luminex technique. Lymphocyte function was studied by in-vitro lympocyte proliferation tests. As compared to controls, patients had significantly higher proportions of activated CD3+DR+, CD4+DR+ and CD8+DR+ lymphocytes, elevated levels of neopterin and a lower in-vitro proliferation of lymphocytes (all p<0.05). Within the iRM patients higher proportions of CD3+DR+ T-lymphocytes correlated with higher proportions and absolute numbers of CD4+DR+ and CD8+DR+ T-lymphocytes and lower CD16+CD56+ NK-cells. Further, it was associated with lower absolute numbers of CD19+ B-lymphocytes, CD3+CD25+ T-lymphocytes and CD45+ total lymphocytes (all p<0.05). In addition we found decreased in-vitro lymphocyte proliferation in iRM patients with high CD3+DR+ T-lymphocytes (p<0.05). In summary patients with iRM showed increased activated T-cells that are less responsive to mitogens in-vitro. The inverse relationship of increased DR but decreased CD25 expression on CD3+ T-cells and the decreased in-vitro proliferation characterize an immunological disorder with similarities to T-cell exhaustion in patients with HIV and cancer. These abnormalities potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of iRM and might be a target for future immunomodulatory therapies.

  16. MDS shows a higher expression of hTERT and alternative splice variants in unactivated T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Houfang; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.; Yang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Telomere instability and telomerase reactivation are believed to play an important role in the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Abnormal enzymatic activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and its alternative splice variants have been reported to account for deregulated telomerase function in many cancers. In this study, we aim to compare the differences in expression of hTERT and hTERT splice variants, as well as telomere length and telomerase activity in unstimulated T-cells between MDS subgroups and healthy controls. Telomere length in MDS cases was significantly shorter than controls (n = 20, p<0.001) and observed across all subtypes of MDS using World Health Organization classification (WHO subgroups versus control: RARS, p= 0.009; RCMD, p=0.0002; RAEB1/2, p=0.004, respectively) and the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS subgroups: Low+Int-1, p<0.001; Int-2+High, p=0.004). However, unstimulated T-cells from MDS patients (n=20) had significantly higher telomerase activity (p=0.002), higher total hTERT mRNA levels (p=0.001) and hTERT α+β- splice variant expression (p<0.001) compared to controls. Other hTERT splice variants were lower in expression and not significantly different among cases and controls. Telomerase activity was positively correlated with total hTERT levels in MDS (r=0.58, p=0.007). This data is in sharp contrast to data published previously by our group showing a reduction in telomerase and hTERT mRNA in MDS T-cells after activation. In conclusion, this study provides additional insight into hTERT transcript patterns and activity in peripheral T-cells of MDS patients. Additional studies are necessary to better understand the role of this pathway in MDS development and progression. PMID:27655690

  17. MDS shows a higher expression of hTERT and alternative splice variants in unactivated T-cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Wu, Lei; Sun, Houfang; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Yang, Lili

    2016-11-01

    Telomere instability and telomerase reactivation are believed to play an important role in the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Abnormal enzymatic activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and its alternative splice variants have been reported to account for deregulated telomerase function in many cancers. In this study, we aim to compare the differences in expression of hTERT and hTERT splice variants, as well as telomere length and telomerase activity in unstimulated T-cells between MDS subgroups and healthy controls. Telomere length in MDS cases was significantly shorter than controls (n = 20, p<0.001) and observed across all subtypes of MDS using World Health Organization classification (WHO subgroups versus control: RARS, p= 0.009; RCMD, p=0.0002; RAEB1/2, p=0.004, respectively) and the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS subgroups: Low+Int-1, p<0.001; Int-2+High, p=0.004). However, unstimulated T-cells from MDS patients (n=20) had significantly higher telomerase activity (p=0.002), higher total hTERT mRNA levels (p=0.001) and hTERT α+β- splice variant expression (p<0.001) compared to controls. Other hTERT splice variants were lower in expression and not significantly different among cases and controls. Telomerase activity was positively correlated with total hTERT levels in MDS (r=0.58, p=0.007). This data is in sharp contrast to data published previously by our group showing a reduction in telomerase and hTERT mRNA in MDS T-cells after activation. In conclusion, this study provides additional insight into hTERT transcript patterns and activity in peripheral T-cells of MDS patients. Additional studies are necessary to better understand the role of this pathway in MDS development and progression.

  18. Two Bee-Pollinated Plant Species Show Higher Seed Production when Grown in Gardens Compared to Arable Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Cussans, John; Goulson, David; Sanderson, Roy; Goffe, Louis; Darvill, Ben; Osborne, Juliet L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insect pollinator abundance, in particular that of bees, has been shown to be high where there is a super-abundance of floral resources; for example in association with mass-flowering crops and also in gardens where flowering plants are often densely planted. Since land management affects pollinator numbers, it is also likely to affect the resultant pollination of plants growing in these habitats. We hypothesised that the seed or fruit set of two plant species, typically pollinated by bumblebees and/or honeybees might respond in one of two ways: 1) pollination success could be reduced when growing in a floriferous environment, via competition for pollinators, or 2) pollination success could be enhanced because of increased pollinator abundance in the vicinity. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the pollination success of experimental plants of Glechoma hederacea L. and Lotus corniculatus L. growing in gardens and arable farmland. On the farms, the plants were placed either next to a mass-flowering crop (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. or field beans, Vicia faba L.) or next to a cereal crop (wheat, Triticum spp.). Seed set of G. hederacea and fruit set of L. corniculatus were significantly higher in gardens compared to arable farmland. There was no significant difference in pollination success of G. hederacea when grown next to different crops, but for L. corniculatus, fruit set was higher in the plants growing next to oilseed rape when the crop was in flower. Conclusions/Significance The results show that pollination services can limit fruit set of wild plants in arable farmland, but there is some evidence that the presence of a flowering crop can facilitate their pollination (depending on species and season). We have also demonstrated that gardens are not only beneficial to pollinators, but also to the process of pollination. PMID:20668704

  19. Apollo Lunar Astronauts Show Higher Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: Possible Deep Space Radiation Effects on the Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Delp, Michael D.; Charvat, Jacqueline M.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.; Ghosh, Payal

    2016-01-01

    As multiple spacefaring nations contemplate extended manned missions to Mars and the Moon, health risks could be elevated as travel goes beyond the Earth’s protective magnetosphere into the more intense deep space radiation environment. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether mortality rates due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, accidents and all other causes of death differ in (1) astronauts who never flew orbital missions in space, (2) astronauts who flew only in low Earth orbit (LEO), and (3) Apollo lunar astronauts, the only humans to have traveled beyond Earth’s magnetosphere. Results show there were no differences in CVD mortality rate between non-flight (9%) and LEO (11%) astronauts. However, the CVD mortality rate among Apollo lunar astronauts (43%) was 4–5 times higher than in non-flight and LEO astronauts. To test a possible mechanistic basis for these findings, a secondary purpose was to determine the long-term effects of simulated weightlessness and space-relevant total-body irradiation on vascular responsiveness in mice. The results demonstrate that space-relevant irradiation induces a sustained vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. Such impairment is known to lead to occlusive artery disease, and may be an important risk factor for CVD among astronauts exposed to deep space radiation. PMID:27467019

  20. Do invasive species show higher phenotypic plasticity than native species and, if so, is it adaptive? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Amy Michelle; Jennions, Michael; Nicotra, Adrienne B

    2011-04-01

    Do invasive plant species have greater phenotypic plasticity than non-invasive species? And, if so, how does this affect their fitness relative to native, non-invasive species? What role might this play in plant invasions? To answer these long-standing questions, we conducted a meta-analysis using data from 75 invasive/non-invasive species pairs. Our analysis shows that invasive species demonstrate significantly higher phenotypic plasticity than non-invasive species. To examine the adaptive benefit of this plasticity, we plotted fitness proxies against measures of plasticity in several growth, morphological and physiological traits to test whether greater plasticity is associated with an improvement in estimated fitness. Invasive species were nearly always more plastic in their response to greater resource availability than non-invasives but this plasticity was only sometimes associated with a fitness benefit. Intriguingly, non-invasive species maintained greater fitness homoeostasis when comparing growth between low and average resource availability. Our finding that invasive species are more plastic in a variety of traits but that non-invasive species respond just as well, if not better, when resources are limiting, has interesting implications for predicting responses to global change.

  1. Tryptophan prenyltransferases showing higher catalytic activities for Friedel-Crafts alkylation of o- and m-tyrosines than tyrosine prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Xie, Xiulan; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-07-21

    Tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2, 5-DMATS, 6-DMATSSv and 7-DMATS catalyse regiospecific C-prenylations on the indole ring, while tyrosine prenyltransferases SirD and TyrPT catalyse the O-prenylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In this study, we report the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of L-o-tyrosine by these enzymes. Surprisingly, no conversion was detected with SirD and three tryptophan prenyltransferases showed significantly higher activity than another tyrosine prenyltransferase TyrPT. C5-prenylated L-o-tyrosine was identified as a unique product of these enzymes. Using L-m-tyrosine as the prenylation substrate, product formation was only observed with the tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS. C4- and C6-prenylated derivatives were identified in the reaction mixture of FgaPT2. These results provided additional evidence for the similarities and differences between these two subgroups within the DMATS superfamily in their catalytic behaviours.

  2. Apollo Lunar Astronauts Show Higher Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: Possible Deep Space Radiation Effects on the Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Delp, Michael D; Charvat, Jacqueline M; Limoli, Charles L; Globus, Ruth K; Ghosh, Payal

    2016-07-28

    As multiple spacefaring nations contemplate extended manned missions to Mars and the Moon, health risks could be elevated as travel goes beyond the Earth's protective magnetosphere into the more intense deep space radiation environment. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether mortality rates due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, accidents and all other causes of death differ in (1) astronauts who never flew orbital missions in space, (2) astronauts who flew only in low Earth orbit (LEO), and (3) Apollo lunar astronauts, the only humans to have traveled beyond Earth's magnetosphere. Results show there were no differences in CVD mortality rate between non-flight (9%) and LEO (11%) astronauts. However, the CVD mortality rate among Apollo lunar astronauts (43%) was 4-5 times higher than in non-flight and LEO astronauts. To test a possible mechanistic basis for these findings, a secondary purpose was to determine the long-term effects of simulated weightlessness and space-relevant total-body irradiation on vascular responsiveness in mice. The results demonstrate that space-relevant irradiation induces a sustained vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. Such impairment is known to lead to occlusive artery disease, and may be an important risk factor for CVD among astronauts exposed to deep space radiation.

  3. Genes with stable DNA methylation levels show higher evolutionary conservation than genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Wenhua; Luan, Meiwei; Zheng, Jiajia; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Li, Jin; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-24

    Different human genes often exhibit different degrees of stability in their DNA methylation levels between tissues, samples or cell types. This may be related to the evolution of human genome. Thus, we compared the evolutionary conservation between two types of genes: genes with stable DNA methylation levels (SM genes) and genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels (FM genes). For long-term evolutionary characteristics between species, we compared the percentage of the orthologous genes, evolutionary rate dn/ds and protein sequence identity. We found that the SM genes had greater percentages of the orthologous genes, lower dn/ds, and higher protein sequence identities in all the 21 species. These results indicated that the SM genes were more evolutionarily conserved than the FM genes. For short-term evolutionary characteristics among human populations, we compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density, and the linkage disequilibrium (LD) degree in HapMap populations and 1000 genomes project populations. We observed that the SM genes had lower SNP densities, and higher degrees of LD in all the 11 HapMap populations and 13 1000 genomes project populations. These results mean that the SM genes had more stable chromosome genetic structures, and were more conserved than the FM genes.

  4. PSI showed higher tolerance to Sb(V) than PSII due to stimulation of cyclic electron flow around PSI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhi; Pan, Xiangliang; Zhang, Daoyong

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the effects of Sb(V) on the physiological characteristics of cyanobacteria was still limited. In the present study, responses of photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII), cyclic electron flow (CEF), and interphotosystem electron transport of Microcystis aeruginosa to 5-100 mg/l Sb(V) were synchronously measured using the Dual-PAM-100. 5 mg/l Sb (V) significantly inhibited PSII activity, but had no significant effects on PSI activity. At higher concentrations of Sb(V), the quantum yield and electron transport of PSI were less affected compared to PSII. The ratio of Y(II)/Y(I) significantly decreased with increasing Sb(V) concentration. It decreased from 0.7 for control to 0.4 for 100 mg/l Sb(V)-treated cells, indicating that the change of the distribution of quantum yields between two photosystems and more serious inhibition of PSII under stress of Sb(V) compared to PSI. CEF was activated associated with the inhibition of linear electron flow after exposure to Sb(V). The contribution of Y(CEF) to the quantum yield and activity of PSI increased with increasing Sb(V) concentrations. The cyclic electron transport rate made a significant contribution to electron transport rate of PSI, especially at high Sb(V) concentration (100 mg/l) and high illumination (above 555 μmol photons/m(2)/s). The stimulation of CEF was essential for the higher tolerance of PSI than PSII to Sb(V).

  5. Xpert MTB/RIF Assay Shows Faster Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA with Higher Levels of Rifapentine Exposure.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, A; Savic, R M; Everett, C K; Benator, D; Alland, D; Heilig, C M; Weiner, M; Friedrich, S O; Martinson, N A; Kerrigan, A; Zamudio, C; Goldberg, S V; Whitworth, W C; Davis, J L; Nahid, P

    2016-12-01

    The Xpert MTB/RIF assay is both sensitive and specific as a diagnostic test. Xpert also reports quantitative output in cycle threshold (CT) values, which may provide a dynamic measure of sputum bacillary burden when used longitudinally. We evaluated the relationship between Xpert CT trajectory and drug exposure during tuberculosis (TB) treatment to assess the potential utility of Xpert CT for treatment monitoring. We obtained serial sputum samples from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB who were consecutively enrolled at 10 international clinical trial sites participating in study 29X, a CDC-sponsored Tuberculosis Trials Consortium study evaluating the tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of rifapentine at daily doses of up to 20 mg/kg of body weight. Xpert was performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. Longitudinal CT data were modeled using a nonlinear mixed effects model in relation to rifapentine exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]). The rate of change of CT was higher in subjects receiving rifapentine than in subjects receiving standard-dose rifampin. Moreover, rifapentine exposure, but not assigned dose, was significantly associated with rate of change in CT (P = 0.02). The estimated increase in CT slope for every additional 100 μg · h/ml of rifapentine drug exposure (as measured by AUC) was 0.11 CT/week (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.17). Increasing rifapentine exposure is associated with a higher rate of change of Xpert CT, indicating faster clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. These data suggest that the quantitative outputs of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay may be useful as a dynamic measure of TB treatment response.

  6. Xpert MTB/RIF Assay Shows Faster Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA with Higher Levels of Rifapentine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.; Savic, R. M.; Everett, C. K.; Benator, D.; Alland, D.; Heilig, C. M.; Weiner, M.; Friedrich, S. O.; Martinson, N. A.; Kerrigan, A.; Zamudio, C.; Goldberg, S. V.; Whitworth, W. C.; Davis, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Xpert MTB/RIF assay is both sensitive and specific as a diagnostic test. Xpert also reports quantitative output in cycle threshold (CT) values, which may provide a dynamic measure of sputum bacillary burden when used longitudinally. We evaluated the relationship between Xpert CT trajectory and drug exposure during tuberculosis (TB) treatment to assess the potential utility of Xpert CT for treatment monitoring. We obtained serial sputum samples from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB who were consecutively enrolled at 10 international clinical trial sites participating in study 29X, a CDC-sponsored Tuberculosis Trials Consortium study evaluating the tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of rifapentine at daily doses of up to 20 mg/kg of body weight. Xpert was performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. Longitudinal CT data were modeled using a nonlinear mixed effects model in relation to rifapentine exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]). The rate of change of CT was higher in subjects receiving rifapentine than in subjects receiving standard-dose rifampin. Moreover, rifapentine exposure, but not assigned dose, was significantly associated with rate of change in CT (P = 0.02). The estimated increase in CT slope for every additional 100 μg · h/ml of rifapentine drug exposure (as measured by AUC) was 0.11 CT/week (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.17). Increasing rifapentine exposure is associated with a higher rate of change of Xpert CT, indicating faster clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. These data suggest that the quantitative outputs of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay may be useful as a dynamic measure of TB treatment response. PMID:27733634

  7. Association mapping for phenology and plant architecture in maize shows higher power for developmental traits compared with growth influenced traits.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, S; Bertin, P; Presterl, T; Jamin, P; Coubriche, D; Gouesnard, B; Laborde, J; Charcosset, A

    2017-03-01

    Plant architecture, phenology and yield components of cultivated plants have repeatedly been shaped by selection to meet human needs and adaptation to different environments. Here we assessed the genetic architecture of 24 correlated maize traits that interact during plant cycle. Overall, 336 lines were phenotyped in a network of 9 trials and genotyped with 50K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Phenology was the main factor of differentiation between genetic groups. Then yield components distinguished dents from lower yielding genetic groups. However, most of trait variation occurred within group and we observed similar overall and within group correlations, suggesting a major effect of pleiotropy and/or linkage. We found 34 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for individual traits and six for trait combinations corresponding to PCA coordinates. Among them, only five were pleiotropic. We found a cluster of QTLs in a 5 Mb region around Tb1 associated with tiller number, ear row number and the first PCA axis, the latter being positively correlated to flowering time and negatively correlated to yield. Kn1 and ZmNIP1 were candidate genes for tillering, ZCN8 for leaf number and Rubisco Activase 1 for kernel weight. Experimental repeatabilities, numbers of QTLs and proportion of explained variation were higher for traits related to plant development such as tillering, leaf number and flowering time, than for traits affected by growth such as yield components. This suggests a simpler genetic determinism with larger individual QTL effects for the first category.

  8. A tale of two communities: Neotropical butterfly assemblages show higher beta diversity in the canopy compared to the understory.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, James A; DeVries, Philip J

    2016-05-01

    Tropical fruit-feeding nymphalid butterflies generally restrict adult foraging exclusively to either the canopy or understory strata. We compared canopy and understory butterfly communities using data from four long-term studies in Central and South America. At all study sites we found little similarity in species composition between canopy and understory, with most species showing a strong affinity for one of the two habitats. There was a consistent phylogenetic signal for canopy and understory association, suggesting a substantial evolutionary history with these habitats. In addition to compositional differences, we found different patterns of beta diversity between canopy and understory communities. Across all study sites, the canopy had greater temporal and spatial beta diversity compared to the understory. Although these two communities are composed of the same feeding guild and separated only by a relatively small vertical space, each has its own stratum-specific species composition and community dynamics.

  9. Dysphoric students show higher use of the observer perspective in their retrieval of positive versus negative autobiographical memories

    PubMed Central

    Nelis, Sabine; Debeer, Elise; Holmes, Emily A.; Raes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are retrieved as images from either a field perspective or an observer perspective. The observer perspective is thought to dull emotion. Positive affect is blunted in depressed mood. Consequently, are positive events recalled from an observer perspective in depressed mood? We investigated the relationship between memory vantage perspective and depressive symptoms in a student sample. Participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams & Broadbent, 1986) and assessed the perspective accompanying each memory. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and the Responses to Positive Affect questionnaire (RPA; Feldman, Joormann, & Johnson, 2008) were administered. The results showed a small positive association between depressive symptoms and the use of an observer perspective for positive autobiographical memories, but not for negative memories. Furthermore, comparing a subgroup with clinically significant symptom levels (dysphoric students) with non-dysphoric individuals revealed that dysphoric students used an observer perspective more for positive memories compared with negative memories. This was not the case for non-dysphoric students. The observer perspective in dysphorics was associated with a dampening cognitive style in response to positive experiences. PMID:23083015

  10. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-07

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the 'social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization.

  11. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-01

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the ‘social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization. PMID:25392473

  12. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  13. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  14. Characterization of Mhc-DRB allelic diversity in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) provides insight into Mhc-DRB allelic evolution within Cervidae.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bussche, R A; Hoofer, S R; Lochmiller, R L

    1999-05-01

    Although white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are one of North America's best studied mammals, no information is available concerning allelic diversity at any locus of the major histocompatibility complex in this taxon. Using the polymerase chain reaction, single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, and DNA sequencing techniques, 15 DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among 150 white-tailed deer from a single population in southeastern Oklahoma. These alleles represent a single locus and exhibit a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism, with most amino acid variation occurring at positions forming the peptide binding sites. Furthermore, twenty-seven amino acid residues unique to white-tailed deer DRB alleles were detected, with 19 of these occurring at residues forming contact points of the peptide binding region. Significantly higher rates of nonsynonymous than synonymous substitutions were detected among these DRB alleles. In contrast to other studies of Artiodactyla DRB sequences, interallelic recombination does not appear to be playing a significant role in the generation of allelic diversity at this locus in white-tailed deer. To examine evolution of white-tailed deer (Odvi-DRB) alleles within Cervidae, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of all published red deer (Ceel-DRB), roe deer (Caca-DRB), and moose (Alal-DRB) DRB alleles. The phylogenetic tree clearly shows a trans-species persistence of DRB lineages among these taxa. Moreover, this phylogenetic tree provides insight into evolution of DRB allelic lineages within Cervidae and may aid in assignment of red deer DRB alleles to specific loci.

  15. Frequency of HLA-A alleles in the Syrian population genotyped by sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Madania, A; Ghoury, I; Al-Ashkar, W; Nweder, S; Zarzour, H

    2014-10-01

    HLA-A molecules are highly polymorphic. Their accurate typing at a high-resolution level is crucial for successful organ, bone marrow and cord blood transplantation. Furthermore, several HLA alleles have been involved in susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, allergies, cancers and inflammations. In order to determine common HLA-A alleles in Syria and their frequencies, sequence-based typing (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-A alleles at high resolution (four digit level) among one hundred and thirty randomly selected Syrian individuals. Exons 2, 3 and 4 of the HLA-A gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sbt-engine software was used for allele assignment. Ambiguities were solved using group-specific sequencing primers (GSSPs). We could identify 32 different HLA-A alleles which were divided into 3 groups: high frequency (approximately 10%, A*01:01; A*24:02; A*03:01; A*02:01), moderate frequency (approximately 3%, such as A*02:05, A*31:01 and A*33:01), and low frequency (approximately 1%, such as A*02:11, A*29:01, A*02:02 and A*36:01). Homozygosity rate was higher than expected (11.5% vs. 7.15%). For high frequency alleles, our results show similarity to neighbouring countries. However, 15 alleles (such as A*02:04, A*02:06, A*02:11 and A*02:17) found in our cohort in low frequencies were never reported in some or all neighbouring countries. This is the first report on HLA-A allele frequencies in Syria. In spite of the relatively low number of tested subjects, our results revealed a high degree of diversity, with 32 different alleles, reflecting the high ethnic heterogeneity of the Syrian population. The identification of alleles rarely or never reported in neighbouring countries indicates a higher genetic diversity in Syria.

  16. Nucleotide variation and identification of novel blast resistance alleles of Pib by allele mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, G; Madhav, M S; Devi, S J S Rama; Prasad, M S; Babu, V Ravindra

    2015-04-01

    Pib is one of significant rice blast resistant genes, which provides resistance to wide range of isolates of rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. Identification and isolation of novel and beneficial alleles help in crop enhancement. Allele mining is one of the best strategies for dissecting the allelic variations at candidate gene and identification of novel alleles. Hence, in the present study, Pib was analyzed by allele mining strategy, and coding and non-coding (upstream and intron) regions were examined to identify novel Pib alleles. Allelic sequences comparison revealed that nucleotide polymorphisms at coding regions affected the amino acid sequences, while the polymorphism at upstream (non-coding) region affected the motifs arrangements. Pib alleles from resistant landraces, Sercher and Krengosa showed better resistance than Pib donor variety, might be due to acquired mutations, especially at LRR region. The evolutionary distance, Ka/Ks and phylogenetic analyzes also supported these results. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed that Pib (Sr) had a unique motif (DPBFCOREDCDC3), while five different motifs differentiated the resistance and susceptible Pib alleles. As the Pib is an inducible gene, the identified differential motifs helps to understand the Pib expression mechanism. The identified novel Pib resistant alleles, which showed high resistance to the rice blast, can be used directly in blast resistance breeding program as alternative Pib resistant sources.

  17. AMT1;1 transgenic rice plants with enhanced NH4(+) permeability show superior growth and higher yield under optimal and suboptimal NH4(+) conditions.

    PubMed

    Ranathunge, Kosala; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Gidda, Satinder; Bi, Yong-Mei; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    The major source of nitrogen for rice (Oryza sativa L.) is ammonium (NH4(+)). The NH4(+) uptake of roots is mainly governed by membrane transporters, with OsAMT1;1 being a prominent member of the OsAMT1 gene family that is known to be involved in NH4(+) transport in rice plants. However, little is known about its involvement in NH4(+) uptake in rice roots and subsequent effects on NH4(+) assimilation. This study shows that OsAMT1;1 is a constitutively expressed, nitrogen-responsive gene, and its protein product is localized in the plasma membrane. Its expression level is under the control of circadian rhythm. Transgenic rice lines (L-2 and L-3) overexpressing the OsAMT1;1 gene had the same root structure as the wild type (WT). However, they had 2-fold greater NH4(+) permeability than the WT, whereas OsAMT1;1 gene expression was 20-fold higher than in the WT. Analogous to the expression, transgenic lines had a higher NH4(+) content in the shoots and roots than the WT. Direct NH4(+) fluxes in the xylem showed that the transgenic lines had significantly greater uptake rates than the WT. Higher NH4(+) contents also promoted higher expression levels of genes in the nitrogen assimilation pathway, resulting in greater nitrogen assimilates, chlorophyll, starch, sugars, and grain yield in transgenic lines than in the WT under suboptimal and optimal nitrogen conditions. OsAMT1;1 also enhanced overall plant growth, especially under suboptimal NH4(+) levels. These results suggest that OsAMT1;1 has the potential for improving nitrogen use efficiency, plant growth, and grain yield under both suboptimal and optimal nitrogen fertilizer conditions.

  18. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E

    2014-01-15

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin.

  19. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin☆

    PubMed Central

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E.; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin. PMID:23707584

  20. Singly modified amikacin and tobramycin derivatives show increased rRNA A-site binding and higher potency against resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fair, Richard J; McCoy, Lisa S; Hensler, Mary E; Aguilar, Bernice; Nizet, Victor; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-09-01

    Semisynthetic derivatives of the clinically useful aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin were prepared by selectively modifying their 6'' positions with a variety of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. Their binding to the rRNA A-site was probed using an in vitro FRET-based assay, and their antibacterial activities against several resistant strains (e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, MRSA) were quantified by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The most potent derivatives were evaluated for their eukaryotic cytotoxicity. Most analogues displayed higher affinity for the bacterial A-site than the parent compounds. Although most tobramycin analogues exhibited no improvement in antibacterial activity, several amikacin analogues showed potent and broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against resistant bacteria. Derivatives tested for eukaryotic cytotoxicity exhibited minimal toxicity, similar to the parent compounds.

  1. The Dominant Ms Allele in Onion Shows Reduced Penetrance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most commonly used source of cytoplasmic male sterility in onion is controlled by the interaction of the cytoplasm [male-sterile (S) or normal (N) male-fertile] and one nuclear male-fertility-restoration locus (Ms). Scoring of genotypes at Ms is generally done by testcrossing male-fertile to mal...

  2. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jason H; Shaffer, Christian M; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M; Steiner, Heidi E; Mosley, Jonathan D; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Roden, Dan M

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations.

  3. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  4. Photosystem I shows a higher tolerance to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress than photosystem II in the intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Zheng, Zhenbing; Gu, Wenhui; Xie, Xiujun; Huan, Li; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic performance of the desiccation-tolerant, intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera was significantly affected by sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. Our results showed that photosynthetic activity decreased significantly with increases in sorbitol concentration. Although the partial activity of both photosystem I (PS I) and photosystem II (PS II) was able to recover after 30 min of rehydration, the activity of PS II decreased more rapidly than PS I. At 4 M sorbitol concentration, the activity of PS II was almost 0 while that of PS I was still at about one third of normal levels. Following prolonged treatment with 1 and 2 M sorbitol, the activity of PS I and PS II decreased slowly, suggesting that the effects of moderate concentrations of sorbitol on PS I and PS II were gradual. Interestingly, an increase in non-photochemical quenching occurred under these conditions in response to moderate osmotic stress, whereas it declined significantly under severe osmotic stress. These results suggest that photoprotection in U. prolifera could also be induced by moderate osmotic stress. In addition, the oxidation of PS I was significantly affected by osmotic stress. P700(+) in the thalli treated with high concentrations of sorbitol could still be reduced, as PS II was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), but it could not be fully oxidized. This observation may be caused by the higher quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PS I due to acceptor-side limitation (Y(NA)) during rehydration in seawater containing DCMU.

  5. Matrix-based three-dimensional culture of buffalo mammary epithelial cells showed higher induction of genes related to milk protein and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Umesh K; Sharma, Ankita; Sodhi, Monika; Kapila, Neha; Kishore, Amit; Mohanty, Ashok; Kataria, Ranjit; Malakar, Dhruva; Mukesh, Manishi

    2016-02-01

    Demanding transcriptomic studies in livestock animal species could be replaced by good in vitro models mimicking the function of mammary gland. Mammary epithelial cells (MEC) are the functional unit of the mammary gland. Extracellular matrix is known to be a key factor providing normal homeostasis in three-dimensional (3D) environment as important signals are lost when cells are cultured in two-dimensional (2D) environment. The aims of this study were to establish a buffalo mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) in 3D culture using extracellular matrix and to determine whether such a 3D culture model has different expression pattern than 2D counterpart. The purified MEC generated after several passages were used to establish 3D culture using Geltrex matrix. The expression of milk casein genes viz., alpha S1-casein (CSN1S1), alpha S2-casein (CSN1S2), beta-casein (CSN2), kappa-casein (CSN3); and fatty acid metabolism genes viz., butyrophilin (BTN1A1), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), fatty acid-binding protein 3 (FABP3), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) was assessed in 3D culture in comparison to traditional monolayer culture using qRT-PCR. Notable morphological differences were observed for BMECs grown in 3D culture in comparison to 2D culture. Morphologically, epithelial structures grown in Geltrex matrix (3D) environment showed enhanced functional differentiation in comparison to 2D culture. In 3D culture, lumen and dome-like structures were formed by day 5, whereas polarized acinus-like structure were formed within 15 days of culturing. The expression data showed higher mRNA induction of milk casein and fatty acid metabolism genes in 10-day-old 3D BMECs culture in comparison to 2D monolayer culture. The result suggests that 3D organization of epithelial cells has favorable effect on induction of milk and fatty acid metabolism-related genes. Therefore, matrix-based 3D culture of MEC that recapitulate the structural and functional context of normal tissues

  6. Cord blood banks collect units with different HLA alleles and haplotypes to volunteer donor banks: a comparative report from Swiss Blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Monard, S; Passweg, J; Troeger, C; Eberhard, H-P; Roosnek, E; de Faveri, G Nicoloso; Chalandon, Y; Rovo, A; Kindler, V; Irion, O; Holzgreve, W; Gratwohl, A; Müller, C; Tichelli, A; Tiercy, J-M

    2009-05-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic SCT is a standard therapy for many patients with haematological diseases. A major aim of public umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking is to establish an inventory with a large HLA diversity. Few studies have compared HLA diversity between UCB banks and volunteer unrelated donor (VUD) registries and examined whether UCB banks indeed collect more units with rare alleles and haplotypes. This study compares HLA-A/B/DRB1 allele frequencies and inferred A/B/DRB1-haplotypes in 1602 UCB units and 3093 VUD from two centres in distinct recruitment areas in Switzerland. The results show that the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles as well as of the HLA-A/B/DRB1 haplotypes differ between UCB and VUD. Ten DRB1 alleles occurred at a 2- to 12-fold higher relative frequency in UCB than in VUD and 27 rare alleles were identified in UCB. Out of these 27 alleles, 15 were absent in the entire VUD data set of the national registry. This difference in allele frequencies was found only by intermediate/high-resolution typing. Targeted recruitment of UCB units from non-Caucasian donors could further increase HLA allele and haplotype diversity of available donors. Intermediate or high-resolution DNA typing is essential to identify rare alleles or allele groups.

  7. AlleleSeq: analysis of allele-specific expression and binding in a network framework.

    PubMed

    Rozowsky, Joel; Abyzov, Alexej; Wang, Jing; Alves, Pedro; Raha, Debasish; Harmanci, Arif; Leng, Jing; Bjornson, Robert; Kong, Yong; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Rubin, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2011-08-02

    To study allele-specific expression (ASE) and binding (ASB), that is, differences between the maternally and paternally derived alleles, we have developed a computational pipeline (AlleleSeq). Our pipeline initially constructs a diploid personal genome sequence (and corresponding personalized gene annotation) using genomic sequence variants (SNPs, indels, and structural variants), and then identifies allele-specific events with significant differences in the number of mapped reads between maternal and paternal alleles. There are many technical challenges in the construction and alignment of reads to a personal diploid genome sequence that we address, for example, bias of reads mapping to the reference allele. We have applied AlleleSeq to variation data for NA12878 from the 1000 Genomes Project as well as matched, deeply sequenced RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq data sets generated for this purpose. In addition to observing fairly widespread allele-specific behavior within individual functional genomic data sets (including results consistent with X-chromosome inactivation), we can study the interaction between ASE and ASB. Furthermore, we investigate the coordination between ASE and ASB from multiple transcription factors events using a regulatory network framework. Correlation analyses and network motifs show mostly coordinated ASB and ASE.

  8. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications.

  9. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  10. High porous titanium scaffolds showed higher compatibility than lower porous beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds for regulating human osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Makoto; Hayakawa, Tohru; Shima, Takaki; Ametani, Akihiro; Tohnai, Iwai

    2015-04-01

    We compared osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation when using beta-tricalcium phosphate (βTCP) and titanium scaffolds by investigating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoclast progenitor cell activities. hMSCs were cultured for 7, 14, and 21days on titanium scaffolds with 60%, 73%, and 87% porosity and on βTCP scaffolds with 60% and 75% porosity. Human osteoclast progenitor cells were cultured with osteoblast for 14 and 21days on 87% titanium and 75% βTCP scaffolds. Viable cell numbers with 60% and 73% titanium were higher than with 87% titanium and βTCP scaffolds (P<0.05). An 87% titanium scaffold resulted in the highest osteocalcin production with calcification on day 14 (P<0.01) in titanium scaffolds. All titanium scaffolds resulted in higher osteocalcin production on days 7 and 14 compared to βTCP scaffolds (P<0.01). Osteoblasts cultured on 87% titanium scaffolds suppressed osteoclast differentiation on day 7 but enhanced osteoclast differentiation on day 14 compared to 75% βTCP scaffolds (P<0.01). These findings concluded that high porosity titanium scaffolds could enhance progression of hMSC/osteoblast differentiation and regulated osteoclast differentiation cooperating with osteoblast differentiation for calcification as compared with lower porous βTCP.

  11. Higher order Arabidopsis 14-3-3 mutants show 14-3-3 involvement in primary root growth both under control and abiotic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    van Kleeff, P. J. M.; Jaspert, N.; Li, K. W.; Rauch, S.; Oecking, C.; de Boer, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved proteins that interact with numerous partner proteins in a phospho-specific manner, and can affect the target proteins in a number of ways; e.g. modification of enzymatic activity. We isolated T-DNA insertion lines in six 14-3-3 genes within the non-epsilon group that phylogenetically group in three closely related gene pairs. In total, 6 single, 3 double, 12 triple, and 3 quadruple mutants were generated. The mutants were phenotyped for primary root growth on control plates: single and double mutants were indistinguishable from WT, whereas six triples and all quadruples showed a shorter primary root. In addition, length of the first epidermal cell with a visible root hair bulge (LEH) was used to determine primary root elongation on medium containing mannitol and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). This analysis showed clear differences depending on the stress and 14-3-3 gene combinations. Next to the phenotypic growth analyses, a 14-3-3 pull-down assay on roots treated with and without mannitol showed that mannitol stress strongly affects the 14-3-3 interactome. In conclusion, we show gene specificity and functional redundancy among 14-3-3 proteins in primary root elongation under control and under abiotic stress conditions and changes in the 14-3-3 interactome during the onset of stress adaptation. PMID:25189593

  12. Intragenic allele pyramiding combines different specificities of wheat Pm3 resistance alleles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Susanne; Hurni, Severine; Streckeisen, Philipp; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Keller, Beat

    2010-11-01

    Some plant resistance genes occur as allelic series, with each member conferring specific resistance against a subset of pathogen races. In wheat, there are 17 alleles of the Pm3 gene. They encode nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) and leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) domain proteins, which mediate resistance to distinct race spectra of powdery mildew. It is not known if specificities from different alleles can be combined to create resistance genes with broader specificity. Here, we used an approach based on avirulence analysis of pathogen populations to characterize the molecular basis of Pm3 recognition spectra. A large survey of mildew races for avirulence on the Pm3 alleles revealed that Pm3a has a resistance spectrum that completely contains that of Pm3f, but also extends towards additional races. The same is true for the Pm3b and Pm3c gene pair. The molecular analysis of these allelic pairs revealed a role of the NB-ARC protein domain in the efficiency of effector-dependent resistance. Analysis of the wild-type and chimeric Pm3 alleles identified single residues in the C-terminal LRR motifs as the main determinant of allele specificity. Variable residues of the N-terminal LRRs are necessary, but not sufficient, to confer resistance specificity. Based on these data, we constructed a chimeric Pm3 gene by intragenic allele pyramiding of Pm3d and Pm3e that showed the combined resistance specificity and, thus, a broader recognition spectrum compared with the parental alleles. Our findings support a model of stepwise evolution of Pm3 recognition specificities.

  13. Older leaves of lettuce (Lactuca spp.) support higher levels of Salmonella enterica ser. Senftenberg attachment and show greater variation between plant accessions than do younger leaves.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul J; Shaw, Robert K; Berger, Cedric N; Frankel, Gad; Pink, David; Hand, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Salmonella can bind to the leaves of salad crops including lettuce and survive for commercially relevant periods. Previous studies have shown that younger leaves are more susceptible to colonization than older leaves and that colonization levels are dependent on both the bacterial serovar and the lettuce cultivar. In this study, we investigated the ability of two Lactuca sativa cultivars (Saladin and Iceberg) and an accession of wild lettuce (L. serriola) to support attachment of Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, to the first and fifth to sixth true leaves and the associations between cultivar-dependent variation in plant leaf surface characteristics and bacterial attachment. Attachment levels were higher on older leaves than on the younger ones and these differences were associated with leaf vein and stomatal densities, leaf surface hydrophobicity and leaf surface soluble protein concentrations. Vein density and leaf surface hydrophobicity were also associated with cultivar-specific differences in Salmonella attachment, although the latter was only observed in the older leaves and was also associated with level of epicuticular wax.

  14. Elastin-insufficient mice show normal cardiovascular remodeling in 2K1C hypertension despite higher baseline pressure and unique cardiovascular architecture.

    PubMed

    Wagenseil, Jessica E; Knutsen, Russell H; Li, Dean Y; Mecham, Robert P

    2007-07-01

    Mice heterozygous for the elastin gene (ELN(+/-)) show unique cardiovascular properties, including increased blood pressure and smaller, thinner arteries with an increased number of lamellar units. Some of these properties are also observed in humans with supravalvular aortic stenosis, a disease caused by functional heterozygosity of the elastin gene. The arterial geometry in ELN(+/-) mice is contrary to the increased thickness that would be expected in an animal demonstrating hypertensive remodeling. To determine whether this is due to a decreased capability for cardiovascular remodeling or to a novel adaptation of the ELN(+/-) cardiovascular system, we increased blood pressure in adult ELN(+/+) and ELN(+/-) mice using the two-kidney, one-clip Goldblatt model of hypertension. Successfully clipped mice have a systolic pressure increase of at least 15 mmHg over sham-operated animals. ELN(+/+) and ELN(+/-)-clipped mice show significant increases over sham-operated mice in cardiac weight, arterial thickness, and arterial cross-sectional area with no changes in lamellar number. There are no significant differences in most mechanical properties with clipping in either genotype. These results indicate that ELN(+/+) and ELN(+/-) hearts and arteries remodel similarly in response to adult induced hypertension. Therefore, the cardiovascular properties of ELN(+/-) mice are likely due to developmental remodeling in response to altered hemodynamics and reduced elastin levels.

  15. Countries with Higher Levels of Gender Equality Show Larger National Sex Differences in Mathematics Anxiety and Relatively Lower Parental Mathematics Valuation for Girls

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite international advancements in gender equality across a variety of societal domains, the underrepresentation of girls and women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related fields persists. In this study, we explored the possibility that the sex difference in mathematics anxiety contributes to this disparity. More specifically, we tested a number of predictions from the prominent gender stratification model, which is the leading psychological theory of cross-national patterns of sex differences in mathematics anxiety and performance. To this end, we analyzed data from 761,655 15-year old students across 68 nations who participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Most importantly and contra predictions, we showed that economically developed and more gender equal countries have a lower overall level of mathematics anxiety, and yet a larger national sex difference in mathematics anxiety relative to less developed countries. Further, although relatively more mothers work in STEM fields in more developed countries, these parents valued, on average, mathematical competence more in their sons than their daughters. The proportion of mothers working in STEM was unrelated to sex differences in mathematics anxiety or performance. We propose that the gender stratification model fails to account for these national patterns and that an alternative model is needed. In the discussion, we suggest how an interaction between socio-cultural values and sex-specific psychological traits can better explain these patterns. We also discuss implications for policies aiming to increase girls’ STEM participation. PMID:27100631

  16. Countries with Higher Levels of Gender Equality Show Larger National Sex Differences in Mathematics Anxiety and Relatively Lower Parental Mathematics Valuation for Girls.

    PubMed

    Stoet, Gijsbert; Bailey, Drew H; Moore, Alex M; Geary, David C

    2016-01-01

    Despite international advancements in gender equality across a variety of societal domains, the underrepresentation of girls and women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related fields persists. In this study, we explored the possibility that the sex difference in mathematics anxiety contributes to this disparity. More specifically, we tested a number of predictions from the prominent gender stratification model, which is the leading psychological theory of cross-national patterns of sex differences in mathematics anxiety and performance. To this end, we analyzed data from 761,655 15-year old students across 68 nations who participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Most importantly and contra predictions, we showed that economically developed and more gender equal countries have a lower overall level of mathematics anxiety, and yet a larger national sex difference in mathematics anxiety relative to less developed countries. Further, although relatively more mothers work in STEM fields in more developed countries, these parents valued, on average, mathematical competence more in their sons than their daughters. The proportion of mothers working in STEM was unrelated to sex differences in mathematics anxiety or performance. We propose that the gender stratification model fails to account for these national patterns and that an alternative model is needed. In the discussion, we suggest how an interaction between socio-cultural values and sex-specific psychological traits can better explain these patterns. We also discuss implications for policies aiming to increase girls' STEM participation.

  17. Swedish spring wheat varieties with the rare high grain protein allele of NAM-B1 differ in leaf senescence and grain mineral content.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Linnéa; Bergkvist, Göran; Leino, Matti W; Westerbergh, Anna; Weih, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Some Swedish spring wheat varieties have recently been shown to carry a rare wildtype (wt) allele of the gene NAM-B1, known to affect leaf senescence and nutrient retranslocation to the grain. The wt allele is believed to increase grain protein concentration and has attracted interest from breeders since it could contribute to higher grain quality and more nitrogen-efficient varieties. This study investigated whether Swedish varieties with the wt allele differ from varieties with one of the more common, non-functional alleles in order to examine the effect of the gene in a wide genetic background, and possibly explain why the allele has been retained in Swedish varieties. Forty varieties of spring wheat differing in NAM-B1 allele type were cultivated under controlled conditions. Senescence was monitored and grains were harvested and analyzed for mineral nutrient concentration. Varieties with the wt allele reached anthesis earlier and completed senescence faster than varieties with the non-functional allele. The wt varieties also had more ears, lighter grains and higher yields of P and K. Contrary to previous information on effects of the wt allele, our wt varieties did not have increased grain N concentration or grain N yield. In addition, temporal studies showed that straw length has decreased but grain N yield has remained unaffected over a century of Swedish spring wheat breeding. The faster development of wt varieties supports the hypothesis of NAM-B1 being preserved in Fennoscandia, with its short growing season, because of accelerated development conferred by the NAM-B1 wt allele. Although the possible effects of other gene actions were impossible to distinguish, the genetic resource of Fennoscandian spring wheats with the wt NAM-B1 allele is interesting to investigate further for breeding purposes.

  18. Tracing the origin of HLA-DRB1 alleles by microsatellite polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, T F; Engkvist, H; Erlandsson, R; Josefsson, A; Mack, S J; Erlich, H A; Gyllensten, U

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the origin of allelic diversity at the class II HLA-DRB1 locus, using a complex microsatellite located in intron 2, close to the polymorphic second exon. A phylogenetic analysis of human, gorilla, and chimpanzee DRB1 sequences indicated that the structure of the microsatellite has evolved, primarily by point mutations, from a putative ancestral (GT)x(GA)y-complex-dinucleotide repeat. In all contemporary DRB1 allelic lineages, with the exception of the human *04 and the gorilla *08 lineages, the (GA)y repeat is interrupted, often by a G-->C substitution. In general, the length of the 3' (GA)y repeat correlates with the allelic lineage and thus evolves more slowly than a middle (GA)z repeat, whose length correlates with specific alleles within the lineage. Comparison of the microsatellite sequence from 30 human DRB1 alleles showed the longer 5' (GT)x to be more variable than the shorter middle (GA)z and 3' (GA)y repeats. Analysis of multiple samples with the same exon sequence, derived from different continents, showed that the 5' (GT)x repeat evolves more rapidly than the middle (GA)z and the 3' (GA)y repeats, which is consistent with findings of a higher mutation rate for longer tracts. The microsatellite-repeat-length variation was used to trace the origin of new DRB1 alleles, such as the new *08 alleles found in the Cayapa people of Ecuador and the Ticuna people of Brazil. PMID:10330359

  19. Altered Turnover of Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Erythroid Cells of Mice Expressing Hprt a and Hprt b Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gerald G.; Chapman, Verne M.

    1987-01-01

    We have previously shown that mice expressing Hprt a allele(s) have erythrocyte hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) levels that are approximately 25-fold (Mus musculus castaneus) and 70-fold ( Mus spretus) higher than in mice that express the Hprt b allele (Mus musculus domesticus; C57BI/6J; C3H/HeHa), and that these differences in erythrocyte HPRT levels are due to differences in the turnover rates of the HPRT A and B proteins as reticulocytes mature to erythrocytes. We show here that: (1) the taxonomic subgroups of the genus Mus are essentially monomorphic for the occurrence of either the Hprt a or the Hprt b allele, with Hprt a being common in the aboriginal species (M. spretus, Mus hortulanus and Mus abbotti) and in several commensal species (Mus musculus musculus, M. m. castaneus, Mus musculus molossinus), while Hprt b is common in feral M. m. domesticus populations as well as in all inbred strains of mice tested; (2) in all these diverse Mus subgroups there is a strict association of Hprt a with high and Hprt b with low levels of erythrocyte HPRT; and, (3) the association between the occurrence of the Hprt a allele and elevated erythrocyte HPRT levels is retained following repeated backcrosses of wild-derived Hprt a allele(s) into the genetic background of inbred strains of mice with the Hprt b allele. Collectively, these observations indicate that the elevated and low levels of erythrocyte HPRT are specified by differences in the Hprt a and b structural genes. Since evidence indicates that Hprt a and b encode HPRT proteins which differ in primary structure, we infer that the structure of HPRT is an important factor in determining its sensitivity to turnover in mouse erythroid cells. Hprt a and b may provide a useful system of "normal" allelic gene products for identifying factors that participate in protein turnover during mouse reticulocyte maturation. PMID:3609725

  20. HLA class II alleles and risk for peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Marzban, Ahmad; Kiani, Javad; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Kahramfar, Zohreh; Solgi, Ghasem

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype variations on development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is not well determined. This study aimed to identify the association of HLA class II alleles with DPN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Totally 106 T2D patients, 49 with DPN and 57 without DPN, and 100 ethnic-matched healthy controls were analyzed. Both groups of the patients were matched based on sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and duration of T2D. Polyneuropathy was diagnosed using electrodiagnostic methods. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in all subjects by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. T2D patients with DPN showed higher frequencies of HLA-DRB1*10 and DRB1*12 alleles compared to control group (P = 0.04). HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype were associated with a decreased risk for developing DPN in T2D patients (P = 0.02 and P = 0.05 respectively). Also, patients with severe neuropathy showed higher frequencies of DRB1*07 (P = 0.003) and DQB1*02 (P = 0.02) alleles than those with mild-to-moderate form of neuropathy. The distribution of DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were not statistically different between all patients and healthy controls. Our findings implicate a possible protective role of HLA-DQB1*02 allele and HLA-DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotype against development of peripheral neuropathy in T2D patients. Therefore, variations in HLA genotypes might be used as genetic markers for prediction and potentially management of neuropathy in T2D patients. PMID:28123430

  1. Different Alleles of a Gene Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase (PaLAR3) Influence Resistance against the Fungus Heterobasidion parviporum in Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Nemesio-Gorriz, Miguel; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Ihrmark, Katarina; Källman, Thomas; Olson, Åke; Lascoux, Martin; Stenlid, Jan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Elfstrand, Malin

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that fungal diseases are a growing menace for conifers in modern silviculture, only a very limited number of molecular markers for pathogen resistance have been validated in conifer species. A previous genetic study indicated that the resistance of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to Heterobasidion annosum s.l., a pathogenic basidiomycete species complex, is linked to a quantitative trait loci that associates with differences in fungal growth in sapwood (FGS) that includes a gene, PaLAR3, which encodes a leucoanthocyanidin reductase. In this study, gene sequences showed the presence of two PaLAR3 allelic lineages in P. abies. Higher resistance was associated with the novel allele, which was found in low frequency in the four P. abies populations that we studied. Norway spruce plants carrying at least one copy of the novel allele showed a significant reduction in FGS after inoculation with Heterobasidion parviporum compared to their half-siblings carrying no copies, indicating dominance of this allele. The amount of (+) catechin, the enzymatic product of PaLAR3, was significantly higher in bark of trees homozygous for the novel allele. Although we observed that the in vitro activities of the enzymes encoded by the two alleles were similar, we could show that allele-specific transcript levels were significantly higher for the novel allele, indicating that regulation of gene expression is responsible for the observed effects in resistance, possibly caused by differences in cis-acting elements that we observe in the promoter region of the two alleles.

  2. Allelic diversity associated with aridity gradient in wild emmer wheat populations.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Zvi; Saranga, Yehoshua; Krugman, Tamar; Abbo, Shahal; Nevo, Eviatar; Fahima, Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The association between allelic diversity and ecogeographical variables was studied in natural populations of wild emmer wheat [Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (Körn.) Thell.], the tetraploid progenitor of cultivated wheat. Patterns of allelic diversity in 54 microsatellite loci were analyzed in a collection of 145 wild emmer wheat accessions representing 25 populations that were sampled across naturally occurring aridity gradient in Israel and surrounding regions. The obtained results revealed that 56% of the genetic variation resided among accessions within populations, while only 44% of the variation resided between populations. An unweighted pair-group method analysis (UPGMA) tree constructed based on the microsatellite allelic diversity divided the 25 populations into six major groups. Several groups were comprised of populations that were collected in ecologically similar but geographically remote habitats. Furthermore, genetic differentiation between populations was independent of the geographical distances. An interesting evolutionary phenomenon is highlighted by the unimodal relationship between allelic diversity and annual rainfall (r = 0.74, P < 0.0002), indicating higher allelic diversity in populations originated from habitats with intermediate environmental stress (i.e. rainfall 350-550 mm year(-1)). These results show for the first time that the 'intermediate-disturbance hypothesis', explaining biological diversity at the ecosystem level, also dominates the genetic diversity within a single species, the lowest hierarchical element of the biological diversity.

  3. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-10-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction.

  4. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  5. Choreography of Ig allelic exclusion.

    PubMed

    Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2008-06-01

    Allelic exclusion guarantees that each B or T cell only produces a single antigen receptor, and in this way contributes to immune diversity. This process is actually initiated in the early embryo when the immune receptor loci become asynchronously replicating in a stochastic manner with one early and one late allele in each cell. This distinct differential replication timing feature then serves an instructive mark that directs a series of allele-specific epigenetic events in the immune system, including programmed histone modification, nuclear localization and DNA demethylation that ultimately bring about preferred rearrangement on a single allele, and this decision is temporally stabilized by feedback mechanisms that inhibit recombination on the second allele. In principle, these same molecular components are also used for controlling monoallelic expression at other genomic loci, such as those carrying interleukins and olfactory receptor genes that require the choice of one gene out of a large array. Thus, allelic exclusion appears to represent a general epigenetic phenomenon that is modeled on the same basis as X chromosome inactivation.

  6. Frequency of FCGR3B Alleles in Thai Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kaset, Chollanot; Leetrakool, Nipapan; Intharanut, Kamphon

    2013-01-01

    Background Human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) are involved in autoimmune and alloimmune neutropenia and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The HNA-1 system is important in immunogenetics, and allele frequencies have been described in different populations. This study investigated the frequency of FCGR3B alleles encoding HNA-1a, HNA-1b, and HNA-1c among Thai blood donors and compared these frequencies with those previously reported for other populations. Methods Eight hundred DNA samples obtained from unrelated healthy blood donors at the National Blood Centre, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, and the Blood Bank, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, were included. Samples were simultaneously typed for each FCGR3B allele using an in-house polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) technique. Results The frequencies of FCGR3B*1, FCGR3B*2, and FCGR3B*3 alleles in central Thai blood donors were 0.548, 0.452, and 0.004, respectively; only FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles were found in northern Thai blood donors (0.68 and 0.32, respectively). Compared with other Asian populations, central Thais had higher frequencies of the FCGR3B*2 allele (P<0.001), while the frequencies of the FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles in northern Thais were similar to those previously reported in Taiwanese and Japanese populations. In contrast, the frequencies of the FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles in the northern Thai population were statistically different from those observed in central Thai, Korean, German, and Turkish populations. Conclusions FCGR3B allele frequencies were significantly different between central and northern Thai blood donors. Our in-house PCR-SSP method is a simple, cost-effective, and convenient method for FCGR3B allele detection. PMID:24205492

  7. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  8. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  9. Novel alleles at the JK blood group locus explain the absence of the erythrocyte urea transporter in European families.

    PubMed

    Irshaid, Nidal M; Eicher, Nicole I; Hustinx, Hein; Poole, Joyce; Olsson, Martin L

    2002-02-01

    The Kidd (JK) blood group system is of importance in transfusion medicine. The Jk(null) phenotype is associated with absence of the urea transporter in erythrocytes and moderately reduced ability to concentrate urine. We and others recently reported different molecular alterations in the silenced Jkb-like alleles of Polynesians and Finns, populations with higher Jk(null) frequencies. Here we report novel molecular bases of this phenotype in Caucasians. Blood samples from a Swiss and an English family were investigated by serological methods, urea haemolysis test and JK genotyping. Genomic DNA and JK mRNA were sequenced. Genotyping showed homozygosity for Jka-like alleles. The Swiss Jk(null) alleles deviated from wild-type Jka sequence by a nonsense mutation in exon 7 causing an immediate stop codon (Tyr194stop). The English Jk(null) alleles revealed a genomic 1.6 kilobase pair deletion including exons 4 and 5, the former of which includes the translation start codon. Multiple mRNA splicing variants were detected in reticulocytes but exons 3-5 were absent in all transcripts analysed. Screening for these alleles was negative in random donors. Two novel molecular alterations at the JK locus were defined and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for detection of the five known silent Jk alleles was developed to complement JK genotyping in clinical transfusion medicine.

  10. A hypervariable STR polymorphism in the CFI gene: southern origin of East Asian-specific group H alleles.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Isao; Jin, Feng; Harihara, Shinji; Matsusue, Aya; Fujihara, Junko; Takeshita, Haruo; Akane, Atsushi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Saitou, Naruya; Chattopadhyay, Prasanta K

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of four populations revealed that a hypervariable short tandem repeat (iSTR) in intron 7 of the human complement factor I (CFI) gene on chromosome 4q was unique, with 17 possible East Asian-specific group H alleles observed at relatively high frequencies. To develop a deeper anthropological and forensic understanding of iSTR, 1161 additional individuals from 11 Asian populations were investigated. Group H alleles of iSTR and c.1217A allele of a SNP in exon 11 of the CFI gene were associated with each other and were almost entirely confined to East Asian populations. Han Chinese in Changsha, southern China, showed the highest frequency for East Asian-specific group H alleles (0.201) among 15 populations. Group H alleles were observed to decrease gradually from south to north in 11 East Asian populations. This expansion of group H alleles provides evidence that southern China and Southeast Asia are a hotspot of Asian diversity and a genetic reservoir of Asians after they entered East Asia. The expected heterozygosity values of iSTR ranged from 0.927 in Thais to 0.874 in Oroqens, higher than those of an STR in the fibrinogen alpha chain (FGA) gene on chromosome 4q. Thus, iSTR is a useful marker for anthropological and forensic genetics.

  11. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  12. Response to imazapyr and dominance relationships of two imidazolinone-tolerant alleles at the Ahasl1 locus of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano; Altieri, Emiliano; Weston, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    Imisun and CLPlus are two imidazolinone (IMI) tolerance traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) determined by the expression of different alleles at the same locus, Ahasl1-1 and Ahasl1-3, respectively. This paper reports the level of tolerance expressed by plants containing both alleles in a homozygous, heterozygous and in a heterozygous stacked state to increasing doses of IMI at the enzyme and whole plant levels. Six genotypes of the Ahasl1 gene were compared with each other in three different genetic backgrounds. These materials were treated at the V2-V4 stage with increasing doses of imazapyr (from 0 to 480 g a.i. ha(-1)) followed by an assessment of the aboveground biomass and herbicide phytotoxicity. The estimated dose of imazapyr required to reduce biomass accumulation by 50% (GR(50)) differed statistically for the six genotypes of the Ahasl1 gene. Homozygous CLPlus (Ahasl1-3/Ahasl1-3) genotypes and materials containing a combination of both tolerant alleles (Imisun/CLPlus heterozygous stack, Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-3) showed the highest values of GR(50), 300 times higher than the susceptible genotypes and more than 2.5 times higher than homozygous Imisun materials (Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-1). In vitro AHAS enzyme activity assays using increasing doses of herbicide (from 0 to 100 μM) showed similar trends, where homozygous CLPlus materials and those containing heterozygous stacks of Imisun/CLPlus were statistically similar and showed the least level of inhibition of enzyme activity to increasing doses of herbicide. The degree of dominance for the accumulation of biomass after herbicide application calculated for the Ahasl1-1 allele indicated that it is co-dominant to recessive depending on the imazapyr dose used. By the contrary, the Ahasl1-3 allele showed dominance to semi dominance according to the applied dose. This last allele is dominant over Ahasl1-1 over the entire range of herbicide rates tested. At the level of enzymatic activity, however, both alleles showed

  13. Allele Frequencies at Microsatellite Loci: The Stepwise Mutation Model Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, A. M.; Slatkin, M.; Freimer, N. B.

    1993-01-01

    We summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. We show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. We show that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. PMID:8454213

  14. Reactive oxygen species stimulate mitochondrial allele segregation toward homoplasmy in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Feng; Niu, Rong; Hatakeyama, Hideyuki; Goto, Yu-ichi; Shibata, Takehiko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria that contain a mixture of mutant and wild-type mitochondrial (mt) DNA copies are heteroplasmic. In humans, homoplasmy is restored during early oogenesis and reprogramming of somatic cells, but the mechanism of mt-allele segregation remains unknown. In budding yeast, homoplasmy is restored by head-to-tail concatemer formation in mother cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS)–induced rolling-circle replication and selective transmission of concatemers to daughter cells, but this mechanism is not obvious in higher eukaryotes. Here, using heteroplasmic m.3243A > G primary fibroblast cells derived from MELAS patients treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we show that an optimal ROS level promotes mt-allele segregation toward wild-type and mutant mtDNA homoplasmy. Enhanced ROS level reduced the amount of intact mtDNA replication templates but increased linear tandem multimers linked by head-to-tail unit-sized mtDNA (mtDNA concatemers). ROS-triggered mt-allele segregation correlated with mtDNA-concatemer production and enabled transmission of multiple identical mt-genome copies as a single unit. Our results support a mechanism by which mt-allele segregation toward mt-homoplasmy is mediated by concatemers. PMID:27009201

  15. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  16. Analysis of elite variety tag SNPs reveals an important allele in upland rice.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Jun; Zhang, Shilai; Dong, Yang; He, Weiming; Zhang, Jing; Deng, Xianneng; Zhang, Yesheng; Li, Xin; Li, Baoye; Huang, Wangqi; Wan, Wenting; Yu, Yang; Li, Qiong; Li, Jun; Liu, Xin; Wang, Bo; Tao, Dayun; Zhang, Gengyun; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xun; Hu, Fengyi; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Elite crop varieties usually fix alleles that occur at low frequencies within non-elite gene pools. Dissecting these alleles for desirable agronomic traits can be accomplished by comparing the genomes of elite varieties with those from non-elite populations. Here we deep-sequence six elite rice varieties and use two large control panels to identify elite variety tag single-nucleotide polymorphism alleles (ETASs). Guided by this preliminary analysis, we comprehensively characterize one protein-altering ETAS in the 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase gene of the IRAT104 upland rice variety. This allele displays a drastic frequency difference between upland and irrigated rice, and a selective sweep is observed around this allele. Functional analysis indicates that in upland rice, this allele is associated with significantly higher abscisic acid levels and denser lateral roots, suggesting its association with upland rice suitability. This report provides a potential strategy to mine rare, agronomically important alleles.

  17. Heterozygous alleles restore male fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.): a case of overdominance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi Wei; De Wang, Chuan; Wang, Chuan; Gao, Lei; Mei, Shi Yong; Zhou, Yuan; Xiang, Chang Ping; Wang, Ting

    2013-04-01

    The practice of hybridization has greatly contributed to the increase in crop productivity. A major component that exploits heterosis in crops is the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)/nucleus-controlled fertility restoration (Rf) system. Through positional cloning, it is shown that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) encoding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are responsible for restoring fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.). Furthermore, it was found that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) show higher expression and RNA polymerase II occupancy in the CMS cytoplasmic background compared with their homozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-1 or RsRf3-2/RsRf3-2). These data provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of fertility restoration to cytoplasmic male-sterile plants and illustrate a case of overdominance.

  18. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  19. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) mutations and their allelic linkage in unrelated caucasian individuals: Correlation with phenotypic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cascorbi, I.; Drakoulis, N.; Brockmoeller, J.

    1995-09-01

    The polymorphic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2; EC2.3.1.5) is supposed to be a susceptibility factor for several drug side effects and certain malignancies. A group of 844 unrelated German subjects was genotyped for their acetylation type, and 563 of them were also phenotyped. Seven mutations of the NAT2 gene were evaluated by allele-specific PCR (mutation 341C to T) and PCR-RFLP for mutations at nt positions 191, 282, 481, 590, 803, and 857. From the mutation pattern eight different alleles, including the wild type coding for rapid acetylation and seven alleles coding for slow phenotype, were determined. Four hundred ninety-seven subjects had a genotype of slow acetylation (58.9%; 95% confidence limits 55.5%-62.2%). Phenotypic acetylation capacity was expressed as the ratio of 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil and 1-methylxanthine in urine after caffeine intake. Some 6.7% of the cases deviated in genotype and phenotype, but sequencing DNA of these probands revealed no new mutations. Furthermore, linkage pattern of the mutations was always confirmed, as tested in 533 subjects. In vivo acetylation capacity of homozygous wild-type subjects (NAT2{sup *}4/{sup *}4) was significantly higher than in heterozygous genotypes (P = .001). All mutant alleles showed low in vivo acetylation capacities, including the previously not-yet-defined alleles {sup *}5A, {sup *}5C, and {sup *}13. Moreover, distinct slow genotypes differed significantly among each other, as reflected in lower acetylation capacity of {sup *}6A, {sup *}7B, and {sup *}13 alleles than the group of {sup *}5 alleles. The study demonstrated differential phenotypic activity of various NAT2 genes and gives a solid basis for clinical and molecular-epidemiological investigations. 34 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of two new alleles in Iranian buffalo breed.

    PubMed

    Mosafer, J; Heydarpour, M; Manshad, E; Russell, G; Sulimova, G E

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  1. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    PubMed Central

    Mosafer, J.; Heydarpour, M.; Manshad, E.; Russell, G.; Sulimova, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found. PMID:22454612

  2. Polymorphism of Mhc-DRB alleles in Cercopithecus aethiops (green monkey): generation and functionality.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Sánchez, M; Paz-Artal, E; Moreno-Pelayo, M A; Martínez-Quiles, N; Martínez-Laso, J; Martín-Villa, J M; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    1998-05-01

    DRB genes have been studied for the first time in green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops). Eleven new DRB alleles (exon 2, exon 3) have been obtained and sequenced from cDNA. A limited number of lineages have been identified: DRB1*03 (4 alleles), DRB1*07 (3 alleles), DRB5 (1 allele), DRB*w6 (1 allele), and DRB*w7 (2 alleles). The existence of Ceae-DRB1 duplications is supported by the finding of 3 DRB1 alleles in 3 different individuals. Ceae-DRB1*0701 may be non-functional because it bears serine at position 82, which hinders molecule surface expression in mice; the allele is only found in Ceae-DRB duplicated haplotypes. Base changes in cDNA Ceae-DRB alleles are consistent with the generation of polymorphism by point mutations or short segment exchanges between alleles. The eleven green monkey DRB alleles meet the requirements for functionality as antigen-presenting molecules (perhaps, excluding DRB1*0701), since: 1) they have been isolated from cDNA and do not present deletions, insertions or stop codons: 2) structural motifs necessary for a correct folding of the molecule, for the formation of DR/DR dimers and for CD4 interactions are conserved, and 3) the number of non-synonymous substitutions is higher than the number of synonymous substitutions in the peptide binding region (PBR), while the contrary holds true for the non-PBR region.

  3. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  4. Characterization of 40 full-length MHC class IIA functional alleles in miiuy croaker: Polymorphism and positive selection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Yueyan; Zhu, Zhihuang; Liu, Tianxing

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex is a highly polymorphic gene superfamily in vertebrates that plays an important role in adaptive immune response. In the present study, we identified 40 full-length miiuy croaker MHC class IIA (Mimi-DAA) functional alleles from 26 miiuy croaker individuals and found that the alleles encode 30 amino acid sequences. A high level of polymorphism in Mimi-DAA was detected in miiuy croaker. The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (d(N)) occurred at a significantly higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (d(S)) in the peptide-binding region (PBR) and non-PBR. This result suggests that balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at the Mimi-DAA locus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length sequences showed that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into three groups. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed using the exon 2 sequences indicated that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into two groups. A total of 22 positively selected sites were identified on the Mimi-DAA alleles after testing for positive selection, and five sites were predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen, suggesting that a few selected residues may play a significant role in immune function.

  5. Analysis and interpretation of short tandem repeat microvariants and three-banded allele patterns using multiple allele detection systems.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C A; Rogers, S; Amiott, E; Gibson, S; Masibay, A

    1999-01-01

    The Palm Beach County Sheriffs Office (PBSO) Crime Laboratory and the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences (ADFS) have validated and implemented analysis of short tandem repeat (STR) sequences on casework using silver staining kit and SYBR Green I detection systems and are presently validating fluorescently tagged STR alleles using the Hitachi FMBIO 100 instrument. Concurrently, the Broward County Sheriff's Office (BSO) Crime Laboratory is validating the ABI Prism310 Genetic Analyzer capillary electrophoresis STR detection system (ABI CE310) from Perkin Elmer Applied BioSystems. During the course of analyzing over 10,000 individuals for the STR loci CSF1PO, TPOX and THO1 (CTT) using silver staining for allele detection, 42 samples demonstrated alleles that were "off ladder," contained three-banded patterns at a single locus, or exhibited an apparent THO1 "9.3,10" allele pattern. PBSO, ADFS and BSO Crime Laboratories have collaborated on the verification of the allele patterns observed in these 42 samples using the following allele detection systems: (1) manual silver staining, (2) SYBR Green I staining, and/or (3) fluorescently tagged amplified products separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or capillary electrophoresis followed by laser detection. Regardless of the CTT allele detection system utilized, concordant results were obtained for 41 of the 42 samples. The only exception was a sample in which a wide band within the THO1 locus was identified as a THO1 "9.3, 10" genotype by silver staining kit and SYBR Green I staining but was verified to be a THO1 "9.3" homozygote by all other allele detection systems. Manual allele detection could readily identify microvariants, as a visual assessment of stained gels clearly shows that alleles do not migrate coincident with well-characterized allele size standards. As would be predicted, however, the manual detection systems did not provide adequate resolution to approximate the basepair size for off

  6. The Arg160Trp allele of melanocortin-1 receptor gene might protect against vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Széll, Márta; Baltás, Eszter; Bodai, László; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Nikoletta; Dallos, Attila; Pourfarzi, Reza; Simics, Eniko; Kondorosi, Ildikó; Szalai, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Gábor K; Hunyadi, János; Dobozy, Attila; Kemény, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and agouti signaling protein (ASIP) play pivotal roles in the regulation of human pigmentation. We aimed to study whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MC1R and ASIP genes contribute to the pathogenesis of the polygenic pigment skin disorder, vitiligo. The PCR-amplified, full-length MC1R gene was studied with sequence analysis, and the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) SNP of ASIP was detected using restriction fragment length polymorphism. The allele frequency of the ASIP SNP did not show any difference between the skin type, hair color and eye color-matched 97 vitiligo patients and the 59 healthy control individuals. As one of the MC1R polymorphisms showed significantly higher incidence among fair-skinned individuals (Fitzpatrick I+II, n=140) than among dark-skinned individuals (Fitzpatrick III+IV, n=90), both vitiligo patients and controls were divided into two groups and the frequency of the MC1R alleles was studied separately in fair-skinned and dark-skinned subgroups of diseased and healthy groups. C478T, one of the MC1R SNPs studied in 108 fair-skinned vitiligo patients and in 70 fair-skinned healthy control individuals, showed a significant difference (P=0.0262, odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=3.6 [0.0046-0.1003]) in allele frequency between the two groups: the allele frequency was higher in the control group, suggesting protection against vitiligo. Computer prediction of antigenicity has revealed that the Arg160Trp amino acid change caused by this SNP results in a decrease in antigenicity of the affected peptide epitope.

  7. Homology modelling of frequent HLA class-II alleles: A perspective to improve prediction of HLA binding peptide and understand the HLA associated disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Manju; Farooq, Umar; Jaiswal, Varun

    2016-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) plays significant role via the regulation of immune system and contribute in the progression and protection of many diseases. HLA molecules bind and present peptides to T- cell receptors which generate the immune response. HLA peptide interaction and molecular function of HLA molecule is the key to predict peptide binding and understanding its role in different diseases. The availability of accurate three dimensional (3D) structures is the initial step towards this direction. In the present work, homology modelling of important and frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles (07:01, 11:01 and 09:01) was done and acceptable models were generated. These modelled alleles were further refined and cross validated by using several methods including Ramachandran plot, Z-score, ERRAT analysis and root mean square deviation (RMSD) calculations. It is known that numbers of allelic variants are related to the susceptibility or protection of various infectious diseases. Difference in amino acid sequences and structures of alleles were also studied to understand the association of HLA with disease susceptibility and protection. Susceptible alleles showed more amino acid variations than protective alleles in three selected diseases caused by different pathogens. Amino acid variations at binding site were found to be more than other part of alleles. RMSD values were also higher at variable positions within binding site. Higher RMSD values indicate that mutations occurring at peptide binding site alter protein structure more than rest of the protein. Hence, these findings and modelled structures can be used to design HLA-DRB1 binding peptides to overcome low prediction accuracy of HLA class II binding peptides. Furthermore, it may help to understand the allele specific molecular mechanisms involved in susceptibility/resistance against pathogenic diseases.

  8. JAK2V617F Allele Burden Measurement in Peripheral Blood of Iranian Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and Effect of Hydroxyurea on JAK2V617F Allele Burden

    PubMed Central

    Ferdowsi, Shirin; Ghaffari, Seyed H.; Amirizadeh, Naser; Azarkeivan, Azita; Atarodi, Kamran; Faranoush, Mohammad; Toogeh, Gholamreza; Shirkoohi, Reza; Vaezi, Mohammad; Maghsoodlu, Mahtab; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Teimori Naghadeh, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal malignant diseases that represent a group of conditions including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The aim of this study was to evaluate possible correlations between JAK2V617F allele burden and clinicohematologic characteristics in Iranian patients with MPNs. We also aimed at determining the correlation between JAK2V617F allele burden and use of cyto reductive treatment (hydroxyurea). Materials and Methods: We performed ARMS-PCR for all MPNs samples and subsequently performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for JAK2V617F allele burden measurement using DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes. Results: Two distinct groups of patients were examined at a single time point: group A (n=40; 20 PV, 20 ET) was examined at the time of diagnosis; group B (n=85; 40 PV, 30 ET and 15 PMF) while under treatment with hydroxyurea (HU). The median allele burden of the JAK2 V617F was 72% for PV and 49% for ET patients at the time of diagnosis (p=0.01). For patients with HU treatment, we determined the median JAK2V617F allele burden to be 43%, 40%, and 46.5 % in PV, ET and PMF patients; respectively. HU-treated PV patients had a significant lower %JAK2V617F than PV patients at the time of diagnosis (43% vs. 72%, p=0.005). In ET group, the relationship between the JAK2 V617F allele burden and leukocyte count was significant (p=0.02 and p=0.01 in untreated and treated patients, respectively). Conclusions: Our results showed that patients with PV have a higher JAK2V617F allele burden. Moreover, our study demonstrated that the JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET group. We also showed hydroxyurea can affect the JAK2V617F allele burden in PV patients. PMID:27252806

  9. SSR allelic diversity changes in 480 European bread wheat varieties released from 1840 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Roussel, V; Leisova, L; Exbrayat, F; Stehno, Z; Balfourier, F

    2005-06-01

    A sample of 480 bread wheat varieties originating from 15 European geographical areas and released from 1840 to 2000 were analysed with a set of 39 microsatellite markers. The total number of alleles ranged from 4 to 40, with an average of 16.4 alleles per locus. When seven successive periods of release were considered, the total number of alleles was quite stable until the 1960s, from which time it regularly decreased. Clustering analysis on Nei's distance matrix between these seven temporal groups showed a clear separation between groups of varieties registered before and after 1970. Analysis of qualitative variation over time in allelic composition of the accessions indicated that, on average, the more recent the European varieties, the more similar they were to each other. However, European accessions appear to be more differentiated as a function of their geographical origin than of their registration period. On average, western European countries (France, The Netherlands, Great Britain, Belgium) displayed a lower number of alleles than southeastern European countries (former Yugoslavia, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary) and than the Mediterranean area (Italy, Spain and Portugal), which had a higher number. A hierarchical tree on Nei's distance matrix between the 15 geographical groups of accessions exhibited clear opposition between the geographical areas north and south of the arc formed by the Alps and the Carpathian mountains. These results suggest that diversity in European wheat accessions is not randomly distributed but can be explained both by temporal and geographical variation trends linked to breeding practices and agriculture policies in different countries.

  10. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Genro, Júlia P; Sortica, Vinicius A; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D J; dos Santos, Andrea K Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-01-01

    The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions.

  11. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  12. Robust identification of local adaptation from allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Günther, Torsten; Coop, Graham

    2013-09-01

    Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here we develop a set of methods to robustly test for unusual allele frequency patterns and correlations between environmental variables and allele frequencies while accounting for these complications based on a Bayesian model previously implemented in the software Bayenv. Using this model, we calculate a set of "standardized allele frequencies" that allows investigators to apply tests of their choice to multiple populations while accounting for sampling and covariance due to population history. We illustrate this first by showing that these standardized frequencies can be used to detect nonparametric correlations with environmental variables; these correlations are also less prone to spurious results due to outlier populations. We then demonstrate how these standardized allele frequencies can be used to construct a test to detect SNPs that deviate strongly from neutral population structure. This test is conceptually related to FST and is shown to be more powerful, as we account for population history. We also extend the model to next-generation sequencing of population pools-a cost-efficient way to estimate population allele frequencies, but one that introduces an additional level of sampling noise. The utility of these methods is demonstrated in simulations and by reanalyzing human SNP data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel populations and pooled next-generation sequencing data from Atlantic herring. An implementation of our method is available from http://gcbias.org.

  13. Simultaneous purifying selection on the ancestral MC1R allele and positive selection on the melanoma-risk allele V60L in south Europeans.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cadenas, Conrado; López, Saioa; Ribas, Gloria; Flores, Carlos; García, Oscar; Sevilla, Arrate; Smith-Zubiaga, Isabel; Ibarrola-Villaba, Maider; Pino-Yanes, Maria del Mar; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Boyano, Dolores; García de Galdeano, Alicia; Izagirre, Neskuts; de la Rúa, Concepción; Alonso, Santos

    2013-12-01

    In humans, the geographical apportionment of the coding diversity of the pigmentary locus melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is, unusually, higher in Eurasians than in Africans. This atypical observation has been interpreted as the result of purifying selection due to functional constraint on MC1R in high UV-B radiation environments. By analyzing 3,142 human MC1R alleles from different regions of Spain in the context of additional haplotypic information from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data, we show that purifying selection is also strong in southern Europe, but not so in northern Europe. Furthermore, we show that purifying and positive selection act simultaneously on MC1R. Thus, at least in Spain, regions at opposite ends of the incident UV-B radiation distribution show significantly different frequencies for the melanoma-risk allele V60L (a mutation also associated to red hair and fair skin and even blonde hair), with higher frequency of V60L at those regions of lower incident UV-B radiation. Besides, using the 1000G south European data, we show that the V60L haplogroup is also characterized by an extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) pattern indicative of positive selection. We, thus, provide evidence for an adaptive value of human skin depigmentation in Europe and illustrate how an adaptive process can simultaneously help to maintain a disease-risk allele. In addition, our data support the hypothesis proposed by Jablonski and Chaplin (Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UVB radiation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010;107:8962-8968), which posits that habitation of middle latitudes involved the evolution of partially depigmented phenotypes that are still capable of suitable tanning.

  14. Molecular genetic mechanisms of allelic specific regulation of murine Comt expression

    PubMed Central

    Segall, Samantha K.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Meloto, Carolina B.; Wen, Xia; Cunningham, Danielle; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Wiltshire, Tim; Gauthier, Josée; Tohyama, Sarasa; Martin, Loren J.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A functional allele of the mouse catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) gene is defined by the insertion of a B2 short interspersed repeat element in its 3′-untranslated region (UTR). This allele has been associated with a number of phenotypes, such as pain and anxiety. In comparison with mice carrying the ancestral allele (Comt+), ComtB2i mice show higher Comt mRNA and enzymatic activity levels. Here, we investigated the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying this allelic specific regulation of Comt expression. Insertion of the B2 element introduces an early polyadenylation signal generating a shorter Comt transcript, in addition to the longer ancestral mRNA. Comparative analysis and in silico prediction of Comt mRNA potential targets within the transcript 3′ to the B2 element was performed and allowed choosing microRNA (miRNA) candidates for experimental screening: mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667. Cell transfection with each miRNA downregulated the expression of the ancestral transcript and COMT enzymatic activity. Our in vivo experiments showed that mmu-miR-667-3p is strongly correlated with decreasing amounts of Comt mRNA in the brain, and lentiviral injections of mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667 increase hypersensitivity in the mouse formalin model, consistent with reduced COMT activity. In summary, our data demonstrate that the Comt+ transcript contains regulatory miRNA signals in its 3′-untranslated region leading to mRNA degradation; these signals, however, are absent in the shorter transcript, resulting in higher mRNA expression and activity levels. PMID:26067582

  15. Association between ACE D allele and elite short distance swimming.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Louro, Hugo; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-08-01

    The influence of ACE gene on athletic performance has been widely explored, and most of the published data refers to an I/D polymorphism leading to the presence (I allele) or absence (D allele) of a 287-bp sequence in intron 16, determining ACE activity in serum and tissues. A higher I allele frequency has been reported among elite endurance athletes, while the D allele was more frequent among those engaged in more power-orientated sports. However, on competitive swimming, the reproducibility of such associations is controversial. We thus compared the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with that of non-elite swimming cohort and of healthy control subjects. We thus sought an association of the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with their competitive distance. 39 Portuguese Olympic swimming candidates were classified as: short (<200 m) and middle (400-1,500 m) distance swimmers, respectively. A group of 32 non-elite swimmers were studied and classified as well, and a control group (n = 100) was selected from the Portuguese population. Chelex 100 was used for DNA extraction and genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP methods. We found that ACE genotype distribution and allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance only among elite swimmers (P < or = 0.05). Moreover, the allelic frequency of the elite short distance swimmers differed significantly from that of the controls (P = 0.021). No associations were found between middle distance swimmers and controls. Our results seem to support an association between the D allele and elite short distance swimming.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of three novel alleles for the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region.

    PubMed

    Ehli, E A; Hu, Y; Lengyel-Nelson, T; Hudziak, J J; Davies, G E

    2012-02-01

    A promoter polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) has been reported to confer relative risk for phenotypes (depression/anxiety) and endophenotypes (amygdala reactivity). In this report, we identify and characterize three rare 5-HTTLPR alleles not previously described in the human literature. The three novel alleles were identified while genotyping 5-HTTLPR in a family-based attention deficit hyperactivity disorder clinical population. Two of the novel alleles are longer than the common 16-repeat long (L) allele (17 and 18 repeats) and the third is significantly smaller than the 14-repeat short (S) allele (11 repeats). The sequence and genetic architecture of each novel allele is described in detail. We report a significant decrease in the expression between the XL₁₇ (17r) allele and the L(A) (16r) allele. The XS₁₁ (11r) allele showed similar expression with the S (14r) allele. A 1.8-fold increase in expression was observed with the L(A)(16r) allele compared with the L(G) (16r) allele, which replicates results from earlier 5-HTTLPR expression experiments. In addition, transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis was performed using MatInspector (Genomatix) that showed the presence or absence of different putative TFBSs between the novel alleles and the common L (16r) and S (14r) alleles. The identification of rare variants and elucidation of their functional impact could potentially lead to understanding the contribution that the rare variant may have on the inheritance/susceptibility of multifactorial common diseases.

  17. Correlated evolution of nucleotide substitution rates and allelic variation in Mhc-DRB lineages of primates

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, László Z; de Groot, Natasja G; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key model of genetic polymorphism. Selection pressure by pathogens or other microevolutionary forces may result in a high rate of non-synonymous substitutions at the codons specifying the contact residues of the antigen binding sites (ABS), and the maintenance of extreme MHC allelic variation at the population/species level. Therefore, selection forces favouring MHC variability for any reason should cause a correlated evolution between substitution rates and allelic polymorphism. To investigate this prediction, we characterised nucleotide substitution rates and allelic polymorphism (i.e. the number of alleles detected in relation to the number of animals screened) of several Mhc class II DRB lineages in 46 primate species, and tested for a correlation between them. Results First, we demonstrate that species-specific and lineage-specific evolutionary constraints favour species- and lineage-dependent substitution rate at the codons specifying the ABS contact residues (i.e. certain species and lineages can be characterised by high substitution rate, while others have low rate). Second, we show that although the degree of the non-synonymous substitution rate at the ABS contact residues was systematically higher than the degree of the synonymous substitution rate, these estimates were strongly correlated when we controlled for species-specific and lineage-specific effects, and also for the fact that different studies relied on different sample size. Such relationships between substitution rates of different types could even be extended to the non-contact residues of the molecule. Third, we provide statistical evidence that increased substitution rate along a MHC gene may lead to allelic variation, as a high substitution rate can be observed in those lineages in which many alleles are maintained. Fourth, we show that the detected patterns were independent of phylogenetic constraints. When we used phylogenetic

  18. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Josiemer; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Adiconis, Xian; Shen, Jian; Arnett, Donna; Demissie, Serkalem; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection pressures. Such genetic information is limited in Puerto Ricans, the second largest Hispanic ethnic group in the US, and a group with high prevalence of chronic disease. We determined allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 30 genes involved in major metabolic and disease-relevant pathways in Puerto Ricans (n = 969, ages 45–75 years) and compared them to similarly aged non-Hispanic whites (NHW) (n = 597). Results Minor allele frequency (MAF) distributions for 45.5% of the SNPs assessed in Puerto Ricans were significantly different from those of NHW. Puerto Ricans carried risk alleles in higher frequency and protective alleles in lower frequency than NHW. Patterns of population differentiation showed that Puerto Ricans had SNPs with exceptional FST values in intronic, non-synonymous and promoter regions. NHW had exceptional FST values in intronic and promoter region SNPs only. Conclusion These observations may serve to explain and broaden studies on the impact of gene polymorphisms on chronic diseases affecting Puerto Ricans. PMID:19682384

  19. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays ARGOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer’s modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer’s female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance. PMID:24218327

  20. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Wei, Jun; Winkler, Chris; Goncalves-Butruille, Marymar; Weers, Ben P; Cerwick, Sharon F; Dieter, Jo Ann; Duncan, Keith E; Howard, Richard J; Hou, Zhenglin; Löffler, Carlos M; Cooper, Mark; Simmons, Carl R

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays AR GOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer's modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer's female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance.

  1. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ϵ4 Allele Is Associated with Increased Symptom Reporting Following Sports Concussion.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Victoria C; Arnett, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between genetic factors and outcome following brain injury has received increased attention in recent years. However, few studies have evaluated the influence of genes on specific sequelae of concussion. The purpose of this study was to determine how the ϵ4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene influences symptom expression following sports-related concussion. Participants included 42 collegiate athletes who underwent neuropsychological testing, including completion of the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS), within 3 months after sustaining a concussion (73.8% were evaluated within 1 week). Athletes provided buccal samples that were analyzed to determine the make-up of their APOE genotype. Dependent variables included a total symptom score and four symptom clusters derived from the PCSS. Mann-Whitney U tests showed higher scores reported by athletes with the ϵ4 allele compared to those without it on the total symptom score and the physical and cognitive symptom clusters. Furthermore, logistic regression showed that the ϵ4 allele independently predicted those athletes who reported physical and cognitive symptoms following concussion. These findings illustrate that ϵ4+ athletes report greater symptomatology post-concussion than ϵ4- athletes, suggesting that the ϵ4 genotype may confer risk for poorer post-concussion outcome. (JINS, 2016, 22, 89-94).

  2. The GLO1 C332 (Ala111) allele confers autism vulnerability: family-based genetic association and functional correlates.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Stefano; Lombardi, Federica; Sacco, Roberto; Napolioni, Valerio; Altieri, Laura; Tirindelli, Maria Cristina; Gregorj, Chiara; Bravaccio, Carmela; Rousseau, Francis; Persico, Antonio M

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxalase I (GLO1) is a homodimeric Zn(2+)-dependent isomerase involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal and in limiting the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE). We previously found the rs4746 A332 (Glu111) allele of the GLO1 gene, which encodes for glyoxalase I, associated with "unaffected sibling" status in families with one or more children affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). To identify and characterize this protective allele, we sequenced GLO1 exons and exon-intron junctions, detecting two additional SNPs (rs1049346, rs1130534) in linkage disequilibrium with rs4746. A family-based association study involving 385 simplex and 20 multiplex Italian families yielded a significant association with autism driven only by the rs4746 C332 (Ala111) allele itself (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001 under additive and dominant/recessive models, respectively). Glyoxalase enzymatic activity was significantly reduced both in leukocytes and in post-mortem temporocortical tissue (N = 38 and 13, respectively) of typically developing C332 allele carriers (P < 0.05 and <0.01), with no difference in Glo1 protein levels. Conversely, AGE amounts were significantly higher in the same C332 post-mortem brains (P = 0.001), with a strong negative correlation between glyoxalase activity and AGE levels (τ = -0.588, P < 0.01). Instead, 19 autistic brains show a dysregulation of the glyoxalase-AGE axis (τ = -0.209, P = 0.260), with significant blunting of glyoxalase activity and AGE amounts compared to controls (P < 0.05), and loss of rs4746 genotype effects. In summary, the GLO1 C332 (Ala111) allele confers autism vulnerability by reducing brain glyoxalase activity and enhancing AGE formation, but years after an autism diagnosis the glyoxalase-AGE axis appears profoundly disrupted, with loss of C332 allelic effects.

  3. Natural allelic variations of TCS1 play a crucial role in caffeine biosynthesis of tea plant and its related species.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ji-Qiang; Yao, Ming-Zhe; Ma, Chun-Lei; Ma, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Tea caffeine synthase 1 (TCS1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of N-3 and N-1 and considered to be the most critical enzyme in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway of tea plant. This study shows that TCS1 has six types of allelic variations, namely, TCS1a, TCS1b, TCS1c, TCS1d, TCS1e, and TCS1f, with a 252 bp insertion/deletion mutation in the 5'-untranslated region. Among tea plant and its related species, TCS1a is the predominant allele, and TCS1b-f are the rare alleles that mainly appear in few wild germplasms. The full-length cDNA sequences of three new alleles, namely, TCS1d, TCS1e, and TCS1f, were isolated from specific germplasms, and all of recombinant proteins have higher caffeine synthase (CS, EC 2.1.1.160) activity than theobromine synthase (TS, EC 2.1.1.159). Amino acid residue 269 is responsible for the difference in TCS activity and substrate recognition, which was demonstrated by using site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Furthermore, natural variations in TCS1 change the transcription levels. There are two molecular mechanisms controlling the caffeine biosynthesis in low-caffeine-accumulating tea germplasms, i.e., TCS1 allele with low transcription level or its encoded protein with only TS activity. Allelic variations of TCS1 play a crucial role in caffeine biosynthesis. Taken together, our work provides valuable foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of caffeine biosynthesis in section Thea plants and useful guidance for effective breeding.

  4. Construction of a library of cloned short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as universal templates for allelic ladder preparation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Xing-Chun; Ye, Jian; Liu, Jin-Jie; Chen, Ting; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jian; Ou, Yuan; Hu, Lan; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping methods are widely used for human identity testing applications, including forensic DNA analysis. Samples of DNA containing the length-variant STR alleles are typically separated and genotyped by comparison to an allelic ladder. Here, we describe a newly devised library of cloned STR alleles. The library covers alleles X and Y for the sex-determining locus Amelogenin and 259 other alleles for 22 autosomal STR loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, D2S1338, D6S1043, D12S391, Penta E, D19S433, D11S4463, D17S974, D3S4529 and D12ATA63). New primers were designed for all these loci to construct recombinant plasmids so that the library retains core repeat elements of STR as well as 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences of ∼500 base pairs. Since amplicons of commercial STR genotyping kits and systems developed in laboratories are usually distributed from 50 to <500 base pairs, this library could provide universal templates for allelic ladder preparation. We prepared three different sets of allelic ladders for this locus TH01 and an updated version of an allelic ladder for the DNATyper(®)19 multiplex system using these plasmids to confirm the suitability of the library as a good source for allelic ladder preparation. Importantly, the authenticity of each construct was confirmed by bidirectional nucleotide sequencing and we report the repeat structures of the 259 STR alleles. The sequencing results showed all repeat structures we obtained for TPOX, CSF1PO, D7S820, TH01, D16S539, D18S51 and Penta E were the same as reported. However, we identified 102 unreported repeat structures from the other 15 STR loci, supplementing our current knowledge of repeat structures and leading to further understanding of these widely used loci.

  5. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele distribution in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with or without global intellectual deficits.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T; Kato, M; Matsui, T; Yoshimasu, H; Yoshino, A; Matsushita, S; Higuchi, S; Kashima, H

    1997-01-01

    Recent genetic studies show that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether this allele is associated with other dementing diseases is the next important question. The information could provide a clue to the pathogenetic role of ApoE. In the present study, patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) of alcoholic etiology were divided into two groups according to the severity of intellectual deficits, i.e., those of "classical" Korsakoff patients with preserved intellectual function other than amnesia and those with global intellectual deficits. Genotyping showed that the frequency of ApoE epsilon 4 allele was significantly higher in the patients with global deficits, suggesting the involvement of this allele in the intellectual decline of WKS. In contrast, distributions of other two markers, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and presenilin-1, did not differ between the two groups. These results added further support to the notion that the consequence of acute insult to the brain is influenced by the ApoE genotype, and suggested ApoE's role in the development of a certain group of "alcoholic dementia."

  6. Effect of MC1R variant allele status on MSH-ligand induction of dopachrome tautomerase in melanocytes co-cultured with keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ainger, Stephen A; Wong, Shu S; Roberts, Donald W; Leonard, J Helen; Sturm, Richard A

    2011-08-01

    A co-culture system of melanocytic cells and keratinocytes was used to examine dendricity and dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) responses in low penetrant 'r' homozygote and 'R/+' heterozygote MC1R variant allele expressing cells compared to that of wild-type (WT) cells. The V60L-/- homozygote r variant cells showed similar responses to ligand as WT MC1R strains, while V92M-/- homozygote r variant cells were generally shown to have greater dendricity and express higher DCT than the WT cells, even at basal levels. The R151C+/- heterozygote cells showed similar responses to WT cells, while the R160W+/- and D294H+/- variant cells were reduced in their responses to NDP-MSH, but still had an active cAMP response with forskolin treatment. These responses are consistent with the dominant negative effect of these alleles on the MC1R WT allele that has previously been demonstrated genetically and biochemically.

  7. Allelic inclusion in a pre-B-cell line that generates immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, G; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1987-01-01

    In a pre-B-cell line that rearranges its heavy chain gene segments in vitro, we found that the rate of productive rearrangement on one allele was not influenced by the presence of heavy chain protein encoded by the other allele. This shows that allelic exclusion of heavy chain genes is not regulated at the genetic level. Images PMID:3103122

  8. Protective Effect of HLA-DQB1 Alleles Against Alloimmunization in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fasano, Ross; Riggs, Michael; Fortier, Catherine; Andrew; Campbell, D.; Charron, Dominique; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Luban, Naomi L.C.; Vukmanovic, Stanislav; Tamouza, Ryad

    2015-01-01

    Background Alloimmunization or the development of alloantibodies to Red Blood Cell (RBC) antigens is considered one of the major complications after RBC transfusions in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and can lead to both acute and delayed hemolytic reactions. It has been suggested that polymorphisms in HLA genes, may play a role in alloimmunization. We conducted a retrospective study analyzing the influence of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 genetic diversity on RBC-alloimmunization. Study design Two-hundred four multi-transfused SCD patients with and without RBC-alloimmunization were typed at low/medium resolution by PCR-SSO, using IMGT-HLA Database. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 allele frequencies were analyzed using logistic regression models, and global p-value was calculated using multiple logistic regression. Results While only trends towards associations between HLA-DR diversity and alloimmunization were observed, analysis of HLA-DQ showed that HLA-DQ2 (p=0.02), -DQ3 (p=0.02) and -DQ5 (p=0.01) alleles were significantly higher in non-alloimmunized patients, likely behaving as protective alleles. In addition, multiple logistic regression analysis showed both HLA-DQ2/6 (p=0.01) and HLA-DQ5/5 (p=0.03) combinations constitute additional predictor of protective status. Conclusion Our data suggest that particular HLA-DQ alleles influence the clinical course of RBC transfusion in patients with SCD, which could pave the way towards predictive strategies. PMID:26476208

  9. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  10. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W.; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set. PMID:26500259

  11. Analysis of simple tandem repeat (STR) marker allele distributions in a Balinese population

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, R.; Ashler, J.H.; Friedman, T.B.

    1994-09-01

    Genotypes for 53 simple tandem repeat (STR) markers distributed at greater than 39 cM intervals throughout the genome were determined for 46 individuals from the village of Bengkala, Bali. This village dates to at least the thirteenth century, has approximately 2,200 individuals and has an oral and written tradition suggesting genetic bottlenecks. The allele frequency distributions in Bengkala were compared with distributions obtained by typing individuals in the CEPH data base using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov two sample test. Twenty-eight of the 53 markers showed differences (p<0.05) in distribution between the two populations. Allele frequencies of tetranucleotide STRs were much more similar between the two populations than were those of dinucleotide STRs (p < 0.0043). This may be due to the higher mutation rate of tetranucleotide STRs, combining with selection on repeat lengths, to produce a {open_quotes}stable{close_quotes} allele distribution. Population heterogeneity in Bengkala was indicated by an excess of observed homozygosity, deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at seven loci, and significant genotypic disequilibrium between physically unlinked loci. These analyses serve as a resource to map a gene causing non-syndromal autosomal recessive deafness in Bengkala, and to corroborate the anthropological study of the history and social structure of the village.

  12. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  13. Allelic imbalance identifies novel tissue specific cis-regulatory variation for human UGT2B15

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chang; Southard, Catherine; Witonsky, David B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Allelic imbalance (AI) is a powerful tool to identify cis-regulatory variation for gene expression. UGT2B15 is an important enzyme involved in the metabolism of multiple endobiotics and xenobiotics. In this study, we measured the relative expression of two alleles at this gene by using SNP rs1902023:G>T. An excess of the G over the T allele was consistently observed in liver (P<0.001), but not in breast (P=0.06) samples, suggesting that SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with G253T regulate UGT2B15 expression in liver. Seven such SNPs were identified by resequencing the promoter and exon 1, which define two distinct haplotypes. Reporter gene assays confirmed that one haplotype displayed ~20% higher promoter activity compared to the other major haplotype in liver HepG2 (P<0.001), but not in breast MCF-7 (P=0.540) cells. Reporter gene assays with additional constructs pointed to rs34010522:G>T and rs35513228:C>T as the cis-regulatory variants; both SNPs were also evaluated in LNCaP and Caco-2 cells. By ChIP, we showed that the transcription factor Nrf2 binds to the region spanning rs34010522:G>T in all four cell lines. Our results provide a good example for how AI can be used to identify cis-regulatory variation and gain insights into the tissue specific regulation of gene expression. PMID:19847790

  14. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges.

  15. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Gorlova, Olga Y; Amos, Christopher I

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning "environment" or "lifestyle" AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases.

  16. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  17. A Novel Dominant Transformer Allele of the Sex-Determining Gene Her-1 of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Trent, C.; Wood, W. B.; Horvitz, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized a novel dominant allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. This allele, called n695, results in the incomplete transformation of XX animals into phenotypic males. Previously characterized recessive her-1 alleles transform XO animals into phenotypic hermaphrodites. We have identified five new recessive her-1 mutations as intragenic suppressors of n695. Three of these suppressors are weak, temperature-sensitive alleles. We show that the recessive her-1 mutations are loss-of-function alleles, and that the her-1(n695) mutation results in a gain-of-function at the her-1 locus. The existence of dominant and recessive alleles that cause opposite phenotypic transformations demonstrates that the her-1 gene acts to control sexual identity in C. elegans. PMID:3220248

  18. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by

  19. Detecting low frequent loss-of-function alleles in genome wide association studies with red hair color as example.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Struchalin, Maksim V; Duijn, Kate van; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Duijn, Cornelia van; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Multiple loss-of-function (LOF) alleles at the same gene may influence a phenotype not only in the homozygote state when alleles are considered individually, but also in the compound heterozygote (CH) state. Such LOF alleles typically have low frequencies and moderate to large effects. Detecting such variants is of interest to the genetics community, and relevant statistical methods for detecting and quantifying their effects are sorely needed. We present a collapsed double heterozygosity (CDH) test to detect the presence of multiple LOF alleles at a gene. When causal SNPs are available, which may be the case in next generation genome sequencing studies, this CDH test has overwhelmingly higher power than single SNP analysis. When causal SNPs are not directly available such as in current GWA settings, we show the CDH test has higher power than standard single SNP analysis if tagging SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium with the underlying causal SNPs to at least a moderate degree (r²>0.1). The test is implemented for genome-wide analysis in the publically available software package GenABEL which is based on a sliding window approach. We provide the proof of principle by conducting a genome-wide CDH analysis of red hair color, a trait known to be influenced by multiple loss-of-function alleles, in a total of 7,732 Dutch individuals with hair color ascertained. The association signals at the MC1R gene locus from CDH were uniformly more significant than traditional GWA analyses (the most significant P for CDH = 3.11×10⁻¹⁴² vs. P for rs258322 = 1.33×10⁻⁶⁶). The CDH test will contribute towards finding rare LOF variants in GWAS and sequencing studies.

  20. Multiple heterologies increase mitotic double-strand break-induced allelic gene conversion tract lengths in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, J A; Sweetser, D B; Clikeman, J A; Khalsa, G J; Wheeler, S L

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous and double-strand break (DSB)-induced allelic recombination in yeast was investigated in crosses between ura3 heteroalleles inactivated by an HO site and a +1 frameshift mutation, with flanking markers defining a 3.4-kbp interval. In some crosses, nine additional phenotypically silent RFLP mutations were present at approximately 100-bp intervals. Increasing heterology from 0.2 to 1% in this interval reduced spontaneous, but not DSB-induced, recombination. For DSB-induced events, 75% were continuous tract gene conversions without a crossover in this interval; discontinuous tracts and conversions associated with a crossover each comprised approximately 7% of events, and 10% also converted markers in unbroken alleles. Loss of heterozygosity was seen for all markers centromere distal to the HO site in 50% of products; such loss could reflect gene conversion, break-induced replication, chromosome loss, or G2 crossovers. Using telomere-marked strains we determined that nearly all allelic DSB repair occurs by gene conversion. We further show that most allelic conversion results from mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA. Interestingly, markers shared between the sparsely and densely marked interval converted at higher rates in the densely marked interval. Thus, the extra markers increased gene conversion tract lengths, which may reflect mismatch repair-induced recombination, or a shift from restoration- to conversion-type repair. PMID:10511547

  1. Allelic selection of human IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, F; Delgado, C; Fresno, M; Alcina, A

    2000-12-01

    The allelic expression of mouse IL-2 cannot be definitely extrapolated to what might happen in humans. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of allelic expression of the IL-2 gene in non-genetically manipulated human T lymphocytes by following natural allelic polymorphisms. We found a phenotypically silent punctual change in the human IL-2 at position 114 after the first nucleotide of the initiation codon, which represents a dimorphic polymorphism at the first exon of the IL-2 gene. This allowed the study by single-cell PCR of the regulation of the human IL-2 allelic expression in heterozygous CD4(+) T cells, which was found to be tightly controlled monoallelically. These findings may be used as a suitable marker for monitoring the IL-2 allelic contribution to effector activities and in immune responses against different infections or in pathological situations.

  2. Large-scale profiling and identification of potential regulatory mechanisms for allelic gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robin Dong-Woo; Song, Min-Young; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2013-01-01

    Allelic variation in gene expression is common in humans and this variation is associated with phenotypic variation. In this study, we employed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips containing 13,900 exonic SNPs to identify genes with allelic gene expression in cells from colorectal cancer cell lines. We found 2 monoallelically expressed genes (ERAP2 and MYLK4), 32 genes with an allelic imbalance in their expression, and 13 genes showing allele substitution by RNA editing. Among a total of 34 allelically expressed genes in colorectal cancer cells, 15 genes (44.1%) were associated with cis-acting eQTL, indicating that large portions of allelically expressed genes are regulated by cis-acting mechanisms of gene expression. In addition, potential regulatory variants present in the proximal promoter regions of genes showing either monoallelic expression or allelic imbalance were not tightly linked with coding SNPs, which were detected with allelic gene expression. These results suggest that multiple rare variants could be involved in the cis-acting regulatory mechanism of allelic gene expression. In the comparison with allelic gene expression data from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) family B cells, 12 genes showed B-cell specific allelic imbalance and 1 noncoding SNP showed colorectal cancer cell-specific allelic imbalance. In addition, different patterns of allele substitution were observed between B cells and colorectal cancer cells. Overall, our study not only indicates that allelic gene expression is common in colorectal cancer cells, but our study also provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

  3. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Ho, April J; Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P; Leow, Alex D; Dinov, Ivo D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Stephan, Dietrich A; DeCarli, Charles S; DeChairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Raji, Cyrus A; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Carmichael, Owen T; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-05-04

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an approximately 1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an approximately 1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of approximately 8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes-these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly.

  4. Analysis of a Larger SNP Dataset from the HapMap Project Confirmed That the Modern Human A Allele of the ABO Blood Group Genes Is a Descendant of a Recombinant between B and O Alleles.

    PubMed

    Itou, Masaya; Sato, Mitsuharu; Kitano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The human ABO blood group gene consists of three main alleles (A, B, and O) that encode a glycosyltransferase. The A and B alleles differ by two critical amino acids in exon 7, and the major O allele has a single nucleotide deletion (Δ261) in exon 6. Previous evolutionary studies have revealed that the A allele is the most ancient, B allele diverged from the A allele with two critical amino acid substitutions in exon 7, and the major O allele diverged from the A allele with Δ261 in exon 6. However, a recent phylogenetic network analysis study showed that the A allele of humans emerged through a recombination between the B and O alleles. In the previous study, a restricted dataset from only two populations was used. In this study, therefore, we used a large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset from the HapMap Project. The results indicated that the A101-A201-O09 haplogroup was a recombinant lineage between the B and O haplotypes, containing the intact exon 6 from the B allele and the two critical A type sites in exon 7 from the major O allele. Its recombination point was assumed to be located just behind Δ261 in exon 6.

  5. Spermatozoa in the sperm-peak-fraction of the boar ejaculate show a lower flow of Ca(2+) under capacitation conditions post-thaw which might account for their higher membrane stability after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sharoare; Johannisson, Anders; Siqueira, Amanda Pimenta; Wallgren, Margareta; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto

    2011-10-01

    Boar spermatozoa collected in the ejaculate sperm peak-portion (P1, first 10 mL of the sperm-rich fraction, SRF), had shown a higher resilience to freezing and thawing compared to spermatozoa from the rest of the ejaculate (2nd portion of the SRF plus the post-sperm-rich fraction, PSRF), even when using a simplified freezing technique, as long as spermatozoa were incubated in their own seminal plasma (SP). This experiment studied the stability of P1- and SRF-P1 boar spermatozoa frozen in MiniFlatPacks (MFP), post-thaw, using flow cytometry. Since spermatozoa from either portion showed similar cryosurvival and low proportions of unstable membranes (<3%, annexin-V/propidium iodide staining), and only a tendency for SRF-P1 live spermatozoa to depict acrosome exocytosis (FITC-PNA/PI/H33342); they were explored for Ca(2+) contents using a Fluo-4 probe under in vitro capacitating conditions (mBO+ medium), as well they were tested for their ability to sustain a short Ca(2+)-ionophore (A23187) in vitro challenge. The proportions of live spermatozoa depicting high Ca(2+)-levels were initially <2% but increased over incubation time, particularly in SRF-P1(P<0.05), while proportions of live spermatozoa with low Ca(2+)-levels were basically constant over incubation time (~11-14%), for either portion. Incubation in capacitation medium did not modify the proportions of low-Ca(2+) but dramatically increased the proportions of high-Ca(2+) spermatozoa (P<0.001) already after 15 min exposure, highest for SRF-P1 spermatozoa. While the proportion of live spermatozoa with intact acrosome was significantly decreased among SRF-P1 (P<0.001), that of P1-spermatozoa remained unchanged, probably owing to the lowest relative content of cytosolic Ca(2+). The results suggest that spermatozoa in the P1-portion are more resilient to express acrosome exocytosis post-thaw compared to those bathing in the rest of the SRF-fraction when cryopreserved using a simplified technique, in MFPs.

  6. Molecular characterization and clinical presentation of HKαα and anti-HKαα alleles in southern Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Shang, X; Li, Q; Cai, R; Huang, J; Wei, X; Xu, X

    2013-05-01

    The HKαα allele is a rearrangement occurring in the α-globin gene cluster containing both the -α(3.7) and ααα(anti4.2) unequal crossover junctions. The anti-HKαα allele is the reciprocal product containing both the -α(4.2) and ααα(anti3.7) unequal crossover junctions, which had been predicted but had not been detected previously. The phenotypic feature and population frequency of these two unusual alleles were not described. We report the identification of nine individuals carrying the HKαα allele and two individuals carrying the anti-HKαα allele in southern China and describe their phenotype and haplotype data. The molecular structures of HKαα allele and anti-HKαα allele were confirmed by two-round nested polymerase chain reaction assay. The mechanism of origin of both alleles is related to probably simultaneous double crossover. Heterozygotes of HKαα or anti-HKαα allele show a normal hematological phenotype. Finally, we report the carrier rates of these both alleles in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of southern China, namely, ∼0.07% for the HKαα allele and ∼0.02% for the anti-HKαα allele.

  7. Association of BoLA-DRB3 alleles with tick-borne disease tolerance in dairy cattle in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Duangjinda, M; Jindatajak, Y; Tipvong, W; Sriwarothai, J; Pattarajinda, V; Katawatin, S; Boonkum, W

    2013-09-23

    Tick-borne disease is one of the most harmful tropical diseases in dairy production. Selection of dairy cows for tolerance to tick-borne disease is a challenging concept for dairy breeders in the tropics. The objectives of this study were (1) to detect specific tick-borne pathogen in cattle of different genetics and (2) to examine the polymorphisms of DRB3.2 alleles in Thai dairy cattle and find the allelic association with tick-borne disease tolerance. Specific primers to Anaplasma marginale (AM), Babesia bigemina (BG) and Babesia bovis (BB) were used to detect the infections by PCR. The results showed that the high proportion of infections were found in Bos indicus (Sahiwal, n=95) and crossbred Holstein × Zebu (75:25 Holstein:Zebu, n=101), compared to high Holstein fraction crossbreed (≥ 87.5% Holstein, n=187). The proportion of triple infections was also highly found in high Holstein fractions crossbreed. This study confirmed that Zebuine (Bos indicus) had a higher degree of tolerance, even when infected by tick-borne pathogens, compared to high Holstein fraction crossbred. The associated alleles of DRB3.2 for tick-borne pathogen infection tolerance were found: DRB3*14 and *41 were found to be tolerant to A. marginale; *14 to B. bovis; and *10 and *51 to B. bigemina. These tolerance alleles could be used as potential markers for selection in dairy genetic evaluation. The associated alleles for susceptibility were also found: *2 was found to be susceptible to A. marginale; *3 and *16 to B. bovis; and *20 to B. bigemina. These susceptibility alleles could be used as markers for culling, and selection favoring susceptibility alleles should be considered to maintain heterozygote advantage and pathogen-specific memories in the herd.

  8. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Sarah J; Meaburn, Emma L; Dempster, Emma L; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L; Smith, Rebecca G; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood.

  9. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  10. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  11. Genome-wide detection of allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells using a human exome SNP chip.

    PubMed

    Park, Yon Mi; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2014-11-10

    Allelic variations in gene expression influence many biological responses and cause phenotypic variations in humans. In this study, Illumina Human Exome BeadChips containing more than 240,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to identify changes in allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We found 17 monoallelically expressed genes, 58 allelic imbalanced genes, and 7 genes showing allele substitution. In addition, we also detected 33 differentially expressed genes following LPS treatment in vitro using these human exome SNP chips. However, alterations in allelic gene expression following LPS treatment were detected in only three genes (MLXIPL, TNC, and MX2), which were observed in one cell line sample only, indicating that changes in allelic gene expression following LPS stimulation of liver cells are rare events. Among a total of 75 genes showing allelic expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, either monoallelic or imbalanced, 43 genes (57.33%) had expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data, indicating that high-density exome SNP chips are useful and reliable for studying allelic gene expression. Furthermore, most genes showing allelic expression were regulated by cis-acting mechanisms and were also significantly associated with several human diseases. Overall, our study provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with and without LPS stimulation and potential clues for the cause of human disease due to alterations in allelic gene expression.

  12. SNP-based large-scale identification of allele-specific gene expression in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Young; Kim, Hye-Eun; Kim, Sun; Choi, Ick-Hwa; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2012-02-10

    Polymorphism and variations in gene expression provide the genetic basis for human variation. Allelic variation of gene expression, in particular, may play a crucial role in phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. To identify genes with allelic expression in human cells, we genotyped genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from 31 immortalized B cell lines from three Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) families using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips containing 13,900 exonic SNPs. We identified seven SNPs in five genes with monoallelic expression, 146 SNPs in 125 genes with allelic imbalance in expression with preferentially higher expression of one allele in a heterozygous individual. The monoallelically expressed genes (ERAP2, MDGA1, LOC644422, SDCCAG3P1 and CLTCL1) were regulated by cis-acting, non-imprinted differential allelic control. In addition, all monoallelic gene expression patterns and allelic imbalances in gene expression in B cells were transmitted from parents to offspring in the pedigree, indicating genetic transmission of allelic gene expression. Furthermore, frequent allele substitution, probably due to RNA editing, was also observed in 21 genes in 23 SNPs as well as in 48 SNPs located in regions containing no known genes. In this study, we demonstrated that allelic gene expression is frequently observed in human B cells, and SNP chips are very useful tools for detecting allelic gene expression. Overall, our data provide a valuable framework for better understanding allelic gene expression in human B cells.

  13. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  14. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Extensive allelic variation in gene expression in populus F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Adams, Keith L

    2007-12-01

    Hybridization between plant species can induce speciation as well as phenotypic novelty and heterosis. Hybrids also can show genome rearrangements and gene expression changes compared with their parents. Here we determined the allelic variation in gene expression in Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoides F(1) hybrids. Among 30 genes analyzed in four independently formed hybrids, 17 showed >1.5-fold expression biases for one of the two alleles, and there was monoallelic expression of one gene. Expression ratios of the alleles differed between leaves and stems for 10 genes. The results suggest differential regulation of the two parental alleles in the hybrids. To determine if the allelic expression biases were caused by hybridization we compared the ratios of species-specific transcripts between an F(1) hybrid and its parents. Thirteen of 19 genes showed allelic expression ratios in the hybrid that were significantly different from the ratios of the parental species. The P. deltoides allele of one gene was silenced in the hybrid. Modes of gene regulation were inferred from the hybrid-parent comparisons. Cis-regulation was inferred for 6 genes, trans-regulation for 1 gene, and combined cis- and trans-regulation for 9 genes. The results from this study indicate that hybridization between plant species can have extensive effects on allelic expression patterns, some of which might lead to phenotypic changes.

  16. Fixation probability and the crossing time in the Wright-Fisher multiple alleles model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2009-08-01

    The fixation probability and crossing time in the Wright-Fisher multiple alleles model, which describes a finite haploid population, were calculated by switching on an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive asymmetric parameter, r, such that the reversal allele of the optimal allele has higher fitness than the optimal allele. The fixation probability, which was evaluated as the ratio of the first arrival time at the reversal allele to the origination time, was double the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared with the optimal allele in the strong selection region, where the fitness parameter, k, is much larger than the critical fitness parameter, kc. The crossing time in a finite population for r>0 and kallele in the first generation should be greater than one individual in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape. It was also found that the crossing time in a finite population for r>0 and k≫kc scaled as a power law in the fitness parameter with a similar scaling exponent as the crossing time in an infinite population for r=0, and that the critical fitness parameter decreased with increasing sequence length with a fixed population size.

  17. Distribution of coat-color-associated alleles in the domestic horse population and Przewalski's horse.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Monika; Musa, Lutfi; Zakizadeh, Sonia; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-11-01

    Considering the hidden mode of inheritance of some coat-color-associated alleles, we investigated the presence/absence of coat-color-associated alleles in 1093 domestic horses of 55 breeds and 20 specimens of Przewalski's horse. For coat-color genotyping, allele specific PCR, pyrosequencing and Li-Cor analyses were conducted on 12 coat-color-associated alleles of five genes. Our data provide deep insight into the distribution of coat-color-associated alleles within breeds. We found that the alleles for the basic colorations (bay, black, and chestnut) are widely distributed and occur in nearly all breeds. Alleles leading to dilutions or patterns are rare in domestic breeds and were not found in Przewalski's horse. Higher frequencies of these alleles are only found in breeds that are selected for their expressed phenotypes (e.g., Kinsky horse, Lewitzer, Tinker). Nevertheless, our study produced strong evidence that molecular testing of the coat color is necessary for well-defined phenotyping to avoid unexpected colorations of offspring that can result in legal action.

  18. Generation of humoral immune responses to multi-allele PfAMA1 vaccines; effect of adjuvant and number of component alleles on the breadth of response.

    PubMed

    Kusi, Kwadwo A; Faber, Bart W; Riasat, Vanessa; Thomas, Alan W; Kocken, Clemens H M; Remarque, Edmond J

    2010-11-03

    There is increasing interest in multi-allele vaccines to overcome strain-specificity against polymorphic vaccine targets such as Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1). These have been shown to induce broad inhibitory antibodies in vitro and formed the basis for the design of three Diversity-Covering (DiCo) proteins with similar immunological effects. The antibodies produced are to epitopes that are shared between vaccine alleles and theoretically, increasing the number of component AMA1 alleles is expected to broaden the antibody response. A plateau effect could however impose a limit on the number of alleles needed to achieve the broadest specificity. Moreover, production cost and the vaccine formulation process would limit the number of component alleles. In this paper, we compare rabbit antibody responses elicited with multi-allele vaccines incorporating seven (three DiCos and four natural AMA1 alleles) and three (DiCo mix) antigens for gains in broadened specificity. We also investigate the effect of three adjuvant platforms on antigen specificity and antibody functionality. Our data confirms a broadened response after immunisation with DiCo mix in all three adjuvants. Higher antibody titres were elicited with either CoVaccine HT™ or Montanide ISA 51, resulting in similar in vitro inhibition (65-82%) of five out of six culture-adapted P. falciparum strains. The antigen binding specificities of elicited antibodies were also similar and independent of the adjuvant used or the number of vaccine component alleles. Thus neither the four extra antigens nor adjuvant had any observable benefits with respect to specificity broadening, although adjuvant choice influenced the absolute antibody levels and thus the extent of parasite inhibition. Our data confirms the feasibility and potential of multi-allele PfAMA1 formulations, and highlights the need for adjuvants with improved antibody potentiation properties for AMA1-based vaccines.

  19. Allelic variation at the VRN-1 promoter region in polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Yan, L; Helguera, M; Kato, K; Fukuyama, S; Sherman, J; Dubcovsky, J

    2004-11-01

    Vernalization, the requirement of a long exposure to low temperatures to induce flowering, is an essential adaptation of plants to cold winters. We have shown recently that the vernalization gene VRN-1 from diploid wheat Triticum monococcum is the meristem identity gene APETALA1, and that deletions in its promoter were associated with spring growth habit. In this study, we characterized the allelic variation at the VRN-1 promoter region in polyploid wheat. The Vrn-A1a allele has a duplication including the promoter region. Each copy has similar foldback elements inserted at the same location and is flanked by identical host direct duplications (HDD). This allele was found in more than half of the hexaploid varieties but not among the tetraploid lines analyzed here. The Vrn-A1b allele has two mutations in the HDD region and a 20-bp deletion in the 5' UTR compared with the winter allele. The Vrn-A1b allele was found in both tetraploid and hexaploid accessions but at a relatively low frequency. Among the tetraploid wheat accessions, we found two additional alleles with 32 bp and 54 bp deletions that included the HDD region. We found no size polymorphisms in the promoter region among the winter wheat varieties. The dominant Vrn-A1 allele from two spring varieties from Afghanistan and Egypt ( Vrn-A1c allele) and all the dominant Vrn-B1 and Vrn-D1 alleles included in this study showed no differences from their respective recessive alleles in promoter sequences. Based on these results, we concluded that the VRN-1 genes should have additional regulatory sites outside the promoter region studied here.

  20. Association of HLA class II alleles with hepatitis C virus clearance and persistence in thalassemia patients from Iran.

    PubMed

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Sadeghi, Farzin; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Eshraghian, Mohamad Reza; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Rahimnia, Ramin

    2015-09-01

    There is no published data on association of HLA class II alleles with clearance or persistence after acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients from Iran. HLA DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 alleles were determined using polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) on a total of 117 thalassemia patients (63 with chronic infection, and 54 with viral clearance) and 120 healthy controls. HLA-DRB1*0301 and DQA1*0501 alleles were found significantly present in patients with HCV clearance compared to those with chronic infection (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0007, respectively). By contrast, DRB1*0701, DQA1*0201, and DQB1*0602 alleles occurred significantly in those with chronic infection compared to those with viral clearance (P = 0.004, P = 0.007, and P = 0.02, respectively). As compared to the controls, DRB1*0301, DRB1*11, DQA1*0501, and DQB1*0301 alleles showed a significant decrease in chronic patients (P = 0.002, P = 0.001, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0004, respectively). Furthermore, the haplotype frequencies of DRB1*0301, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0201, and DRB1*1101, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 were found significantly higher (P = 0.004 and P = 0.04, respectively) in patients with HCV clearance than those with chronic infection. By contrast, the haplotype DRB1*0701, DQA1*0201, DQB1*0201 occurred more frequently (P = 0.02) in those with chronic infection compared with those with viral clearance. These findings suggest that particular HLA alleles and related haplotypes may have an influence on the outcome of HCV infection among the Iranian patients. Some of the HLA alleles found in the Iranian patients are different from those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the immunogenetic makeup for HCV clearance or persistence may vary based on the ethnicity.

  1. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E(35) alleles are functionally stronger than -Q(35) alleles.

    PubMed

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-31

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E(35)) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q(35)). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E(35) could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q(35) alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3(+) NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  2. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  3. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  4. Ten novel HLA-DRB1 alleles and one novel DRB3 allele.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, A M; Steiner, N K; Moraes, M E; Moraes, J R; Ng, J; Hartzman, R J; Hurley, C K

    2005-10-01

    Ten novel HLA-DRB1 and one DRB3 alleles are described. Eight of the variants are single-nucleotide substitutions, four resulting in an amino acid change (DRB1*1145, *1148, *0828 and *1514) and four with silent substitutions (DRB1*040504, *130103, *160502 and DRB3*020204). Two alleles differ by two nucleotide changes altering one (DRB1*1447 and *1361) amino acid and one allele alters three nucleotides and two amino acids.

  5. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Dombrock genotyping in Brazilian blood donors reveals different regional frequencies of the HY allele

    PubMed Central

    Piassi, Fabiana Chagas Camargos; Santos, Silvana Maria Eloi; de Castilho, Lilian Maria; Baleotti Júnior, Wilson; Suzuki, Rodrigo Buzinaro; da Cunha, Débora Moura

    2013-01-01

    Background Dombrock blood group system genotyping has revealed various rearrangements of the Dombrock gene and identified new variant alleles in Brazil (i.e., DO*A-SH, DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL). Because of the high heterogeneity of the Brazilian population, interregional differences are expected during the investigation of Dombrock genotypes. Objective The present study aims to determine the frequencies of Dombrock genotypes in blood donors from Minas Gerais and compare the frequencies of the HY and JO alleles to those of another population in Brazil. Methods The frequencies of the DO alleles in Minas Gerais, a southeastern state of Brazil, were determined from the genotyping of 270 blood donors. Genotyping involved polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to identify the 323G>T, 350C>T, 793A>G, and 898C>G mutations, which are related to the HY, JO, DO*A/DO*B, and DO*A-WL/DO*B-WL alleles, respectively. Moreover, the frequencies of rare HY and JO alleles were statistically compared using the chi-square test with data from another Brazilian region. Results The HY allele frequency in Minas Gerais (2.4%) was almost twice that of the JO allele (1.5%). The frequency of the HY allele was significantly higher (p-value = 0.001) than that in another Brazilian population and includes a rare homozygous donor with the Hy- phenotype. In addition, the DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL alleles, which were first identified in Brazil, were found in the state of Minas Gerais. Conclusions The data confirm that the frequencies of DO alleles differ between regions in Brazil. The population of Minas Gerais could be targeted in a screening strategy to identify the Hy- phenotype in order to develop a rare blood bank. PMID:24478605

  7. Ten Novel HLA-DRB1 Alleles and One Novel DRB3 Allele

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    BRIEF COMMUNICATION Ten novel HLA-DRB1 alleles and one novel DRB3 allele A. M. Lazaro1, N. K. Steiner1, M. E. Moraes2, J. R. Moraes2, J. Ng1, R. J...accepted for publication 31 May 2005 doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0039.2005.00459.x Abstract Ten novel HLA-DRB1 and one DRB3 alleles are described. Eight of the...substitutions (DRB1*040504, *130103, *160502 and DRB3 *020204). Two alleles differ by two nucleotide changes altering one (DRB1*1447 and *1361) amino acid and

  8. Inter-allelic interactions play a major role in microsatellite evolution.

    PubMed

    Amos, William; Kosanović, Danica; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-07

    Microsatellite mutations identified in pedigrees confirm that most changes involve the gain or loss of single repeats. However, an unexpected pattern is revealed when the resulting data are plotted on standardized scales that range from the shortest to longest allele at a locus. Both mutation rate and mutation bias reveal a strong dependency on allele length relative to other alleles at the same locus. We show that models in which alleles mutate independently cannot explain these patterns. Instead, both mutation probability and direction appear to involve interactions between homologues in heterozygous individuals. Simple models in which the longer homologue in heterozygotes is more likely to mutate and/or biased towards contraction readily capture the observed trends. The exact model remains unclear in all its details but inter-allelic interactions are a vital component, implying a link between demographic history and the mode and tempo of microsatellite evolution.

  9. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  10. Does 5HTTLPR long allele prevent hospitalization? Test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Gen; Kung, Simon; Mrazek, David A

    2014-02-01

    Many studies suggest an association of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5HTTLPR) long allele with better antidepressant treatment response than the short allele. However, there is controversy over these findings. We hypothesized that if the long allele is associated with a better outcome, we would find fewer inpatients with the long allele compared with the short allele. Chart review identified 925 depressed inpatients and 201 outpatients genotyped for 5HTTLPR. The sample was primarily White (>90%). We tested potential departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each sample. We analyzed three independent sets of inpatient samples separately and combined, a White subgroup of 791 patients of the total 925 inpatients, and 201 outpatients. There was no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with any of these samples. We also compared 5HTTLPR genotype prevalence between 925 inpatients and 201 outpatients, which showed no statistically significant difference.

  11. Inter-allelic interactions play a major role in microsatellite evolution

    PubMed Central

    Amos, William; Kosanović, Danica; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite mutations identified in pedigrees confirm that most changes involve the gain or loss of single repeats. However, an unexpected pattern is revealed when the resulting data are plotted on standardized scales that range from the shortest to longest allele at a locus. Both mutation rate and mutation bias reveal a strong dependency on allele length relative to other alleles at the same locus. We show that models in which alleles mutate independently cannot explain these patterns. Instead, both mutation probability and direction appear to involve interactions between homologues in heterozygous individuals. Simple models in which the longer homologue in heterozygotes is more likely to mutate and/or biased towards contraction readily capture the observed trends. The exact model remains unclear in all its details but inter-allelic interactions are a vital component, implying a link between demographic history and the mode and tempo of microsatellite evolution. PMID:26511050

  12. An autosomal locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and mono-allelic expression.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Eric P; Donley, Nathan; Stauffer, Daniel; Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew J

    2011-06-15

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times, following a temporal replication program. Homologous alleles typically replicate synchronously; however, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes and genes on the female X chromosome replicate asynchronously. We have used a chromosome engineering strategy to identify a human autosomal locus that controls this replication timing program in cis. We show that Cre/loxP-mediated rearrangements at a discrete locus at 6q16.1 result in delayed replication of the entire chromosome. This locus displays asynchronous replication timing that is coordinated with other mono-allelically expressed genes on chromosome 6. Characterization of this locus revealed mono-allelic expression of a large intergenic non-coding RNA, which we have named asynchronous replication and autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, ASAR6. Finally, disruption of this locus results in the activation of the previously silent alleles of linked mono-allelically expressed genes. We previously found that chromosome rearrangements involving eight different autosomes display delayed replication timing, and that cells containing chromosomes with delayed replication timing have a 30-80-fold increase in the rate at which new gross chromosomal rearrangements occurred. Taken together, these observations indicate that human autosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control chromosome-wide replication timing, mono-allelic expression and the stability of entire chromosomes.

  13. An autosomal locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and mono-allelic expression

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Eric P.; Donley, Nathan; Stauffer, Daniel; Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along chromosomes at different times, following a temporal replication program. Homologous alleles typically replicate synchronously; however, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes and genes on the female X chromosome replicate asynchronously. We have used a chromosome engineering strategy to identify a human autosomal locus that controls this replication timing program in cis. We show that Cre/loxP-mediated rearrangements at a discrete locus at 6q16.1 result in delayed replication of the entire chromosome. This locus displays asynchronous replication timing that is coordinated with other mono-allelically expressed genes on chromosome 6. Characterization of this locus revealed mono-allelic expression of a large intergenic non-coding RNA, which we have named asynchronous replication and autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, ASAR6. Finally, disruption of this locus results in the activation of the previously silent alleles of linked mono-allelically expressed genes. We previously found that chromosome rearrangements involving eight different autosomes display delayed replication timing, and that cells containing chromosomes with delayed replication timing have a 30–80-fold increase in the rate at which new gross chromosomal rearrangements occurred. Taken together, these observations indicate that human autosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control chromosome-wide replication timing, mono-allelic expression and the stability of entire chromosomes. PMID:21459774

  14. Favorable alleles for stem water-soluble carbohydrates identified by association analysis contribute to grain weight under drought stress conditions in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyu; Zhang, Bin; Li, Runzhi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental constraint to crop distribution and productivity. Stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) buffer wheat grain yield against conditions unfavorable for photosynthesis during the grain filling stage. In this study, 262 winter wheat accessions and 209 genome-wide SSR markers were collected and used to undertake association analysis based on a mixed linear model (MLM). The WSC in different internodes at three growth stages and 1000-grain weight (TGW) were investigated under four environmental regimes (well-watered, drought stress during the whole growth period, and two levels of terminal drought stress imposed by chemical desiccation under the well-watered and drought stress during the whole growth period conditions). Under diverse drought stress conditions, WSC in lower internodes showed significant positive correlations with TGW, especially at the flowering stage under well-watered conditions and at grain filling under drought stress. Sixteen novel WSC-favorable alleles were identified, and five of them contributed to significantly higher TGW. In addition, pyramiding WSC favorable alleles was not only effective for obtaining accessions with higher WSC, but also for enhancing TGW under different water regimes. During the past fifty years of wheat breeding, WSC was selected incidentally. The average number of favorable WSC alleles increased from 1.13 in the pre-1960 period to 4.41 in the post-2000 period. The results indicate a high potential for using marker-assisted selection to pyramid WSC favorable alleles in improving WSC and TGW in wheat.

  15. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  16. MicroRNA Genetic Variation: From Population Analysis to Functional Implications of Three Allele Variants Associated with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Torruella-Loran, Ignasi; Laayouni, Hafid; Dobon, Begoña; Gallego, Alicia; Balcells, Ingrid; Garcia-Ramallo, Eva; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2016-10-01

    Nucleotide variants in microRNA regions have been associated with disease; nevertheless, few studies still have addressed the allele-dependent effect of these changes. We studied microRNA genetic variation in human populations and found that while low-frequency variants accumulate indistinctly in microRNA regions, the mature and seed regions tend to be depleted of high-frequency variants, probably as a result of purifying selection. Comparison of pairwise population fixation indexes among regions showed that the seed had higher population fixation indexes than the other regions, suggesting the existence of local adaptation in the seed region. We further performed functional studies of three microRNA variants associated with cancer (rs2910164:C > G in MIR146A, rs11614913:C > T in MIR196A2, and rs3746444:A > G in both MIR499A and MIR499B). We found differences in the expression between alleles and in the regulation of several genes involved in cancer, such as TP53, KIT, CDH1, CLH, and TERT, which may result in changes in regulatory networks related to tumorigenesis. Furthermore, luciferase-based assays showed that MIR499A could be regulating the cadherin CDH1 and the cell adhesion molecule CLH1 in an allele-dependent fashion. A better understanding of the effect of microRNA variants associated with disease could be key in our way to a more personalized medicine.

  17. The evolution of Sex-linked barring alleles in chickens involves both regulatory and coding changes in CDKN2A.

    PubMed

    Schwochow Thalmann, Doreen; Ring, Henrik; Sundström, Elisabeth; Cao, Xiaofang; Larsson, Mårten; Kerje, Susanne; Höglund, Andrey; Fogelholm, Jesper; Wright, Dominic; Jemth, Per; Hallböök, Finn; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Dorshorst, Ben; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Andersson, Leif

    2017-04-01

    Sex-linked barring is a fascinating plumage pattern in chickens recently shown to be associated with two non-coding and two missense mutations affecting the ARF transcript at the CDKN2A tumor suppressor locus. It however remained a mystery whether all four mutations are indeed causative and how they contribute to the barring phenotype. Here, we show that Sex-linked barring is genetically heterogeneous, and that the mutations form three functionally different variant alleles. The B0 allele carries only the two non-coding changes and is associated with the most dilute barring pattern, whereas the B1 and B2 alleles carry both the two non-coding changes and one each of the two missense mutations causing the Sex-linked barring and Sex-linked dilution phenotypes, respectively. The data are consistent with evolution of alleles where the non-coding changes occurred first followed by the two missense mutations that resulted in a phenotype more appealing to humans. We show that one or both of the non-coding changes are cis-regulatory mutations causing a higher CDKN2A expression, whereas the missense mutations reduce the ability of ARF to interact with MDM2. Caspase assays for all genotypes revealed no apoptotic events and our results are consistent with a recent study indicating that the loss of melanocyte progenitors in Sex-linked barring in chicken is caused by premature differentiation and not apoptosis. Our results show that CDKN2A is a major locus driving the differentiation of avian melanocytes in a temporal and spatial manner.

  18. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    PubMed

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups.

  19. New polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog (EZH) 2-derived peptide with the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco A; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    Analyses on reactivity of anti-cancer cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and clinical application of peptide-based anti-cancer vaccine have been mainly focused on patients with HLA-A2 or -A24 alleles. In this study, we identified an enhancer of zeste homolog (EZH) 2-derived peptide applicable for anti-cancer vaccine for prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles. Five EZH2-derived peptides that were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A3 supertype alleles (HLA-A11, -A31, and -A33) were functionally screened for their potential to induce peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HLA-A3 supertype allele(+) prostate cancer patients. As a result, EZH2733-741 peptide was found to efficiently induce peptide-specific CTLs. The EZH2733-741 peptide-stimulated and purified CD8(+) T cells from PBMCs of HLA-A3 supertype allele(+) prostate cancer patients showed higher cytotoxicity against HLA-A3 supertype allele-expressing LNCaP prostate cancer cells than against parental LNCaP cells. This cytotoxicity against HLA-A3 supertype allele-expressing LNCaP cells was partially but significantly inhibited by the addition of EZH2733-741 peptide-pulsed competitive cells. These results indicate that the EZH2733-741 peptide could be a promising candidate for peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A3 supertype allele(+) prostate cancer patients.

  20. Transmission advantage favors selfing allele in experimental populations of self-incompatible Witheringia solanacea (solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy L; VanWyk, Emily J; Hale, Jennifer R

    2014-07-01

    The evolution of self-fertilization is one of the most commonly traversed transitions in flowering plants, with profound implications for population genetic structure and evolutionary potential. We investigated factors influencing this transition using Witheringia solanacea, a predominantly self-incompatible (SI) species within which self-compatible (SC) genotypes have been identified. We showed that self-compatibility in this species segregates with variation at the S-locus as inherited by plants in F1 and F2 generations. To examine reproductive assurance and the transmission advantage of selfing, we placed SC and SI genotypes in genetically replicated gardens and monitored male and female reproductive success, as well as selfing rates of SC plants. Self-compatibility did not lead to increased fruit or seed set, even under conditions of pollinator scarcity, and the realized selfing rate of SC plants was less than 10%. SC plants had higher fruit abortion rates, consistent with previous evidence showing strong inbreeding depression at the embryonic stage. Although the selfing allele did not provide reproductive assurance under observed conditions, it also did not cause pollen discounting, so the transmission advantage of selfing should promote its spread. Given observed numbers of S-alleles and selfing rates, self-compatibility should spread even under conditions of exceedingly high initial inbreeding depression.

  1. The maize d2003, a novel allele of VP8, is required for maize internode elongation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongkun; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Tianyu; Fu, Junjie; Huai, Junling; Min, Haowei; Zhang, Xiang; Tian, Baohua; Shi, Yunsu; Wang, Guoying

    2014-02-01

    The d2003 is a natural dwarf mutant from maize inbred line K36 and has less than one-third of K36 plant height with severely shortened internodes. In this study, we reported the cloning of d2003 gene using positional cloning. The results showed that there was a single-base insertion in the coding region of Viviparous8 (VP8) in d2003 mutant, which resulted in a premature stop codon. Further genetic allelism tests confirmed that d2003 mutation is a novel allele of VP8. VP8 is mainly expressed in the stem apex, young leaves, and developing vascular tissues, and its expression levels in nodes are significantly higher than that in internodes at 12-leaf stage. Subcellular localization demonstrated that the VP8 protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the N-terminal 26 amino acids (aa) of VP8 protein are essential to its localization in ER. Further transgenic experiments showed that lack of the 26 aa leads to loss of VP8 function in Arabidopsis amp1 phenotype rescue. These results strongly suggested that the N-terminal 26 aa is critical for VP8 protein localization, and the correct protein localization of VP8 in ER is necessary for its function.

  2. Transmission advantage favors selfing allele in experimental populations of self-incompatible Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Judy L.; VanWyk, Emily J.; Hale, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of self-fertilization is one of the most commonly traversed transitions in flowering plants, with profound implications for population genetic structure and evolutionary potential. We investigated factors influencing this transition using Witheringia solanacea, a predominantly self-incompatible species within which self-compatible genotypes have been identified. We showed that self-compatibility in this species segregates with variation at the S-locus as inherited by plants in F1 and F2 generations. To examine reproductive assurance and the transmission advantage of selfing, we placed self-compatible and self-incompatible genotypes in genetically replicated gardens and monitored male and female reproductive success, as well as selfing rates of self-compatible plants. Self-compatibility did not lead to increased fruit or seed set, even under conditions of pollinator scarcity, and the realized selfing rate of self-compatible plants was less than 10%. Self-compatible plants had higher fruit abortion rates, consistent with previous evidence showing strong inbreeding depression at the embryonic stage. Although the selfing allele did not provide reproductive assurance under observed conditions, it also did not cause pollen discounting, so the transmission advantage of selfing should promote its spread. Given observed numbers of S-alleles and selfing rates, self-compatibility should spread even under conditions of exceedingly high initial inbreeding depression. PMID:24713065

  3. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  4. Allelic variation at the vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity loci in Chinese winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangfen; Gao, Manxia; Wang, Shasha; Chen, Feng; Cui, Dangqun

    2015-01-01

    A total of 205 wheat cultivars from the Yellow and Huai valley of China were used to identify allelic variations of vernalization and photoperiod response genes, as well as the copy number variations (CNVs) of Ppd-B1 and Vrn-A1 genes. A novel Vrn-D1 allele with 174-bp insertion in the promoter region of the recessive allele vrn-D1 was discovered in three Chinese wheat cultivars and designated as Vrn-D1c. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that cultivars with the Vrn-D1c allele exhibited significantly higher expression of the Vrn-D1 gene than that in cultivars with the recessive allele vrn-D1, indicating that the 174-bp insertion of Vrn-D1c contributed to the increase in Vrn-D1 gene expression and caused early heading and flowering. The five new cis-elements (Box II-like, 3-AF1 binding site, TC-rich repeats, Box-W1 and CAT-box) in the 174-bp insertion possibly promoted the basal activity level of Vrn-D1 gene. Two new polymorphism combinations of photoperiod genes were identified and designated as Ppd-D1_Hapl-IX and Ppd-D1_Hapl-X. Association of the CNV of Ppd-B1 gene with the heading and flowering days showed that the cultivars with Ppd-B1_Hapl-VI demonstrated the earliest heading and flowering times, and those with Ppd-B1_Hapl-IV presented the latest heading and flowering times in three cropping seasons. Distribution of the vernalization and photoperiod response genes indicated that all recessive alleles at the four vernalization response loci, Ppd-B1_Hapl-I at Ppd-B1 locus, and Ppd-D1_Hapl-I at the Ppd-D1 locus were predominant in Chinese winter wheat cultivars. This study can provide useful information for wheat breeding programs to screen wheat cultivars with relatively superior adaptability and maturity.

  5. Allelic variation at the vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity loci in Chinese winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangfen; Gao, Manxia; Wang, Shasha; Chen, Feng; Cui, Dangqun

    2015-01-01

    A total of 205 wheat cultivars from the Yellow and Huai valley of China were used to identify allelic variations of vernalization and photoperiod response genes, as well as the copy number variations (CNVs) of Ppd-B1 and Vrn-A1 genes. A novel Vrn-D1 allele with 174-bp insertion in the promoter region of the recessive allele vrn-D1 was discovered in three Chinese wheat cultivars and designated as Vrn-D1c. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that cultivars with the Vrn-D1c allele exhibited significantly higher expression of the Vrn-D1 gene than that in cultivars with the recessive allele vrn-D1, indicating that the 174-bp insertion of Vrn-D1c contributed to the increase in Vrn-D1 gene expression and caused early heading and flowering. The five new cis-elements (Box II-like, 3-AF1 binding site, TC-rich repeats, Box-W1 and CAT-box) in the 174-bp insertion possibly promoted the basal activity level of Vrn-D1 gene. Two new polymorphism combinations of photoperiod genes were identified and designated as Ppd-D1_Hapl-IX and Ppd-D1_Hapl-X. Association of the CNV of Ppd-B1 gene with the heading and flowering days showed that the cultivars with Ppd-B1_Hapl-VI demonstrated the earliest heading and flowering times, and those with Ppd-B1_Hapl-IV presented the latest heading and flowering times in three cropping seasons. Distribution of the vernalization and photoperiod response genes indicated that all recessive alleles at the four vernalization response loci, Ppd-B1_Hapl-I at Ppd-B1 locus, and Ppd-D1_Hapl-I at the Ppd-D1 locus were predominant in Chinese winter wheat cultivars. This study can provide useful information for wheat breeding programs to screen wheat cultivars with relatively superior adaptability and maturity. PMID:26191066

  6. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    The site frequency spectrum (SFS) has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the “phylogenetically-conditioned SFS” or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans. PMID:27977673

  7. Transformation of QTL genotypic effects to allelic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Yoshitaka

    2005-01-01

    The genotypic and allelic effect models are equivalent in terms of QTL detection in a simple additive model, but the QTL allelic model has the advantage of providing direct information for marker-assisted selection. However, the allelic matrix is four times as large as the genotypic IBD matrix, causing computational problems, especially in genome scans examining multiple positions. Transformation from genotypic to allelic effects, after estimating the genotypic effects with a smaller IBD matrix, can solve this problem. Although the validity of transformation from genotypic to allelic effects has been disputed, this work proves that transformation can successfully yield unique allelic effects when genotypic and allelic IBD matrixes exist. PMID:16093016

  8. Molecular characterization of the new defective P(brescia) alpha1-antitrypsin allele.

    PubMed

    Medicina, Daniela; Montani, Nadia; Fra, Anna M; Tiberio, Laura; Corda, Luciano; Miranda, Elena; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bonetti, Fausta; Ingrassia, Rosaria; Scabini, Roberta; Facchetti, Fabio; Schiaffonati, Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha(1)AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder associated with reduced alpha(1)AT serum level, predisposing adults to pulmonary emphysema. Among the known mutations of the alpha(1)AT gene (SERPINA1) causing alpha(1)AT deficiency, a few alleles, particularly the Z allele, may also predispose adults to liver disease. We have characterized a new defective alpha(1)AT allele (c.745G>C) coding for a mutant alpha(1)AT (Gly225Arg), named P(brescia). The P(brescia) alpha(1)AT allele was first identified in combination with the rare defective M(würzburg) allele in an 11-year-old boy showing significantly reduced serum alpha(1)AT level. Subsequently, the P(brescia) allele was found in the heterozygous state with the normal M or the defective Z allele in nine and three adults respectively. In cellular models of the disease, we show that the P(brescia) mutant is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as ordered polymers and is secreted more slowly than the normal M alpha(1)AT. This behaviour recapitulates the abnormal cellular handling and fate of the Z alpha(1)AT and suggests that the mutation present in the P(brescia) alpha(1)AT causes a conformational change of the protein which, by favouring polymer formation, is etiologic to both severe alpha(1)AT deficiency in the plasma and toxic protein-overload in the liver.

  9. The Burden of JAK2V617F Mutated Allele in Turkish Patients With Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies regarding the impact of JAK2V617F allele burden on phenotypic properties and clinical course in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) have reported variable results. We aimed to analyze the association of mutated JAK2V617F allele burden with laboratory characteristics and clinical phenotype in Turkish patients (107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Methods Peripheral blood samples of 184 patients with Ph-negative MPNs were analyzed for JAK2V617F allele status and burden. JAK2 MutaScreen assay (Ipsogen, Luminy Biotech, Marseille, France) was used to detect the JAK2V617F status and quantitative JAK2V617F allele burdens in genomic DNA using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Results Frequency of JAK2V617F-positive patients with high mutation load (allele burden > 50%) was higher in PMF compared to ET (23.4% and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.001). We found significant association between ET patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and lower hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct), higher LDH levels and more prevalent massive splenomegaly (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ET patients with high mutation load displayed higher prevalence of bleeding compared to low mutation load and wild-type mutational status (P = 0.003). Rate of DVT was significantly higher in ET patients with mutant allele burden in upper half compared to lower half and wild-type (P = 0.029). We observed significant association between PMF patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and higher Hgb, Hct levels and leukocyte counts (P = 0.003, P = 0.021 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET and PMF. We conclude quantification of JAK2V617F mutation contributes to the workup of Ph-negative MPNs. PMID:25584101

  10. Allelic diversity at MHC class II DQ loci in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): evidence for duplication.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Saket K; Deb, Sitangsu M; Kumar, Subodh; Mitra, Abhijit; Sharma, Arjava; Sakaram, Durgam; Naskar, Soumen; Sharma, Deepak; Sharma, Sita R

    2010-12-01

    The genetic diversity of MHC class II DQ genes was investigated in riverine buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) by PCR-RFLP and sequencing. Highly variable regions (exons 2-3) of DQ genes were amplified from 152 buffaloes and genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Alleles identified by differential restriction patterns were sequenced for the characterization. PCR-RFLP was a rapid method to discriminate between DQA1 and duplicated DQA2 genes in buffalo, however, the method appeared to be inadequate for determining the more complicated DQB genotypes. A total of 7 and 10 alleles were identified for DQA and DQB loci, respectively. Nucleotide as well as amino acid variations among DQ alleles particularly at peptide binding regions were high. Such variations were as expected higher in DQB than DQA alleles. The phylogenetic analysis for both genes revealed the grouping of alleles into two major sub-groups with higher genetic divergence. High divergence among DQ allelic families and the isolation of two diverse DQA and DQB sequences from individual samples indicated duplication of DQ loci was similar in buffalo to other ruminants.

  11. Wide allelic heterogeneity with predominance of large IDS gene complex rearrangements in a sample of Mexican patients with Hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Ortigoza, M A; García-de Teresa, B; González-Del Angel, A; Berumen, J; Guardado-Estrada, M; Fernández-Hernández, L; Navarrete-Martínez, J I; Maza-Morales, M; Rius-Domínguez, R

    2016-05-01

    Hunter syndrome or mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is caused by pathogenic variants in the IDS gene. This is the first study that examines the mutational spectrum in 25 unrelated Mexican MPSII families. The responsible genotype was identified in 96% of the families (24/25) with 10 novel pathogenic variants: c.133G>C, c.1003C>T, c.1025A>C, c.463_464delinsCCGTATAGCTGG, c.754_767del, c.1132_1133del, c.1463del, c.508-1G>C, c.1006+1G>T and c.(-217_103del). Extensive IDS gene deletions were identified in four patients; using DNA microarray analysis two patients showed the loss of the entire AFF2 gene, and epilepsy developed in only one of them. Wide allelic heterogeneity was noted, with large gene alterations (e.g. IDS/IDSP1 gene inversions, partial to extensive IDS deletions, and one chimeric IDS-IDSP1 allele) that occurred at higher frequencies than previously reported (36% vs 18.9-29%). The frequency of carrier mothers (80%) is consistent with previous descriptions (>70%). Carrier assignment allowed molecular prenatal diagnoses. Notably, somatic and germline mosaicism was identified in one family, and two patients presented thrombocytopenic purpura and pancytopenia after idursulfase enzyme replacement treatment. Our findings suggest a wide allelic heterogeneity in Mexican MPSII patients; DNA microarray analysis contributes to further delineation of the resulting phenotype for IDS and neighboring loci deletions.

  12. Frequency Specific Effects of ApoE ε4 Allele on Resting-State Networks in Nondemented Elders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Li, Zhenzhen; Neuroimaging Initiative, Alzheimer's Disease

    2017-01-01

    We applied resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 allele effects on functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN). Considering the frequency specific effects of functional connectivity, we decomposed the brain network time courses into two bands: 0.01–0.027 Hz and 0.027–0.08 Hz. All scans were acquired by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroscience Initiative (ADNI). Thirty-two nondemented subjects were divided into two groups based on the presence (n = 16) or absence (n = 16) of the ApoE ε4 allele. We explored the frequency specific effects of ApoE ε4 allele on the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN) functional connectivity. Compared to ε4 noncarriers, the DMN functional connectivity of ε4 carriers was significantly decreased while the SN functional connectivity of ε4 carriers was significantly increased. Many functional connectivities showed significant differences at the lower frequency band of 0.01–0.027 Hz or the higher frequency band of 0.027–0.08 Hz instead of the typical range of 0.01–0.08 Hz. The results indicated a frequency dependent effect of resting-state signals when investigating RSNs functional connectivity.

  13. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation.

  14. Investigating the relationship between FMR1 allele length and cognitive ability in children: a subtle effect of the normal allele range on the normal ability range?

    PubMed

    Loat, C S; Craig, G; Plomin, R; Craig, I W

    2006-09-01

    The FMR1 gene contains a trinucleotide repeat tract which can expand from a normal size of around 30 repeats to over 200 repeats, causing mental retardation (Fragile X Syndrome). Evidence suggests that premutation males (55-200 repeats) are susceptible to a late-onset tremor/ataxia syndrome and females to premature ovarian failure, and that intermediate alleles ( approximately 41-55 repeats) and premutations may be in excess in samples with special educational needs. We explored the relationship between FMR1 allele length and cognitive ability in 621 low ability and control children assessed at 4 and 7 years, as well as 122 students with high IQ. The low and high ability and control samples showed no between-group differences in incidence of longer alleles. In males there was a significant negative correlation between allele length and non-verbal ability at 4 years (p = 0.048), academic achievement in maths (p = 0.003) and English (p = 0.011) at 7 years, and IQ in the high ability group (p = 0.018). There was a significant negative correlation between allele length and a standardised score for IQ and general cognitive ability at age 7 in the entire male sample (p = 0.002). This suggests that, within the normal spectrum of allele length, increased repeat numbers may have a limiting influence on cognitive performance.

  15. Allelic polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions of HLA-DQB genes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Class II genes of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are highly polymorphic. Allelic variation of structural genes provides diversity in immune cell interactions, contributing to the formation of the T cell repertoire and to susceptibility to certain autoimmune diseases. We now report that allelic polymorphism also exists in the promoter and upstream regulatory regions (URR) of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes. Nucleotide sequencing of these regulatory regions of seven alleles of the DQB locus reveals a number of allele-specific polymorphisms, some of which lie in functionally critical consensus regions thought to be highly conserved in class II promoters. These sequence differences also correspond to allelic differences in binding of nuclear proteins to the URR. Fragments of the URR of two DQB alleles were analyzed for binding to nuclear proteins extracted from human B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B- LCL). Gel retardation assays showed substantially different banding patterns to the two promoters, including prominent variation in nuclear protein binding to the partially conserved X box regions and a novel upstream polymorphic sequence element. Comparison of these two polymorphic alleles in a transient expression system demonstrated a marked difference in their promoter strengths determined by relative abilities to initiate transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in human B-LCL. Shuttling of URR sequences between alleles showed that functional variation corresponded to both the X box and upstream sequence polymorphic sites. These findings identify an important source of MHC class II diversity, and suggest the possibility that such regulatory region polymorphisms may confer allelic differences in expression, inducibility, and/or tissue specificity of class II molecules. PMID:1985121

  16. Detection, Validation, and Downstream Analysis of Allelic Variation in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Daniel C.; Lu, Lu; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Wang, Xusheng; Jagalur, Manjunatha; Morris, John A.; Taylor, William L.; Dietz, Klaus; Simon, Perikles; Williams, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Common sequence variants within a gene often generate important differences in expression of corresponding mRNAs. This high level of local (allelic) control—or cis modulation—rivals that produced by gene targeting, but expression is titrated finely over a range of levels. We are interested in exploiting this allelic variation to study gene function and downstream consequences of differences in expression dosage. We have used several bioinformatics and molecular approaches to estimate error rates in the discovery of cis modulation and to analyze some of the biological and technical confounds that contribute to the variation in gene expression profiling. Our analysis of SNPs and alternative transcripts, combined with eQTL maps and selective gene resequencing, revealed that between 17 and 25% of apparent cis modulation is caused by SNPs that overlap probes rather than by genuine quantitative differences in mRNA levels. This estimate climbs to 40–50% when qualitative differences between isoform variants are included. We have developed an analytical approach to filter differences in expression and improve the yield of genuine cis-modulated transcripts to ∼80%. This improvement is important because the resulting variation can be successfully used to study downstream consequences of altered expression on higher-order phenotypes. Using a systems genetics approach we show that two validated cis-modulated genes, Stk25 and Rasd2, are likely to control expression of downstream targets and affect disease susceptibility. PMID:19884314

  17. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  18. Column flotation shows higher recovery with less ash

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.

    1986-08-01

    Why column flotation. It can effectively clean fines and yield a saleable low-ash coal from what would otherwise be the waste stream. Not only does the coal recovery improve, but the waste tonnage is reduced, thereby prolonging the life of waste storage facilities. Although regular froth flotation has proven to be an effective method for recovering fine coal (-28 mesh), flotation efficiency often drops for the finest fractions, particularly when an excessive amount of fine clays are present. Because of their small mass and momentum, these fine particles wind up in the froth and get physically entrained with particles that float. Countercurrent column flotation solves this problem by providing a stream of wash water flowing against the bubble/particle aggregates. This action allows the sticky ash to be washed from the bubble as well as from the froth. Column flotation is not new to the mining industry; it has been used to separate fine graphite from clay, and such sulfide mineral separations as molybdenum and copper. The big advantage provided by countercurrent column flotation was it required only a single step to do what cleaner flotation did in several stages.

  19. A prevalent cancer susceptibility APOBEC3A hybrid allele bearing APOBEC3B 3'UTR enhances chromosomal DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Caval, Vincent; Suspène, Rodolphe; Shapira, Milana; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2014-10-09

    Human APOBEC3A (A3A) cytidine deaminase is a host enzyme that can introduce mutations into chromosomal DNA. As APOBEC3B (A3B) encodes a C-terminal catalytic domain ~91% identical to A3A, we examined its genotoxic potential as well as that of a highly prevalent chimaeric A3A-A3B deletion allele (ΔA3B), which is linked to a higher odds ratio of developing breast, ovarian and liver cancer. Interestingly, breast cancer genomes from ΔA3B(-/-) patients show a higher overall mutation burden. Here it is shown that germline A3B can hypermutate nuclear DNA, albeit less efficiently than A3A. Chimaeric A3A mRNA resulting from ΔA3B was more stable, resulting in higher intracellular A3A levels and greater DNA damage. The cancer burden implied by the higher A3A levels could be considerable given the high penetration of the ΔA3B allele in South East Asia.

  20. Crohn's Disease Risk Alleles on the NOD2 Locus Have Been Maintained by Natural Selection on Standing Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nakagome, Shigeki; Mano, Shuhei; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuaki; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kawamura, Shoji; Oota, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Risk alleles for complex diseases are widely spread throughout human populations. However, little is known about the geographic distribution and frequencies of risk alleles, which may contribute to differences in disease susceptibility and prevalence among populations. Here, we focus on Crohn's disease (CD) as a model for the evolutionary study of complex disease alleles. Recent genome-wide association studies and classical linkage analyses have identified more than 70 susceptible genomic regions for CD in Europeans, but only a few have been confirmed in non-European populations. Our analysis of eight European-specific susceptibility genes using HapMap data shows that at the NOD2 locus the CD-risk alleles are linked with a haplotype specific to CEU at a frequency that is significantly higher compared with the entire genome. We subsequently examined nine global populations and found that the CD-risk alleles spread through hitchhiking with a high-frequency haplotype (H1) exclusive to Europeans. To examine the neutrality of NOD2, we performed phylogenetic network analyses, coalescent simulation, protein structural prediction, characterization of mutation patterns, and estimations of population growth and time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA). We found that while H1 was significantly prevalent in European populations, the H1 TMRCA predated human migration out of Africa. H1 is likely to have undergone negative selection because 1) the root of H1 genealogy is defined by a preexisting amino acid substitution that causes serious conformational changes to the NOD2 protein, 2) the haplotype has almost become extinct in Africa, and 3) the haplotype has not been affected by the recent European expansion reflected in the other haplotypes. Nevertheless, H1 has survived in European populations, suggesting that the haplotype is advantageous to this group. We propose that several CD-risk alleles, which destabilize and disrupt the NOD2 protein, have been maintained by natural

  1. RNA-FISH to analyze allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the analysis of imprinted gene expression is the need to distinguish RNA synthesis occurring at the maternal vs the paternally inherited copy of the gene. Most of the techniques used to examine allele-specific expression exploit naturally occurring polymorphisms and measure steady-state levels of RNA isolated from a pool of cells. Hence, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) an be exploited in a heterozygote, by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)- based procedure, to analyze maternal vs paternal gene expression. The human IGF2R gene was analyzed in this way. Smrzka et al. (1) were thus able to show that the IGF2R gene possesses a hemimethylated, intronic CpG island analogous to the mouse imprinting box. However, IGF2R mRNA was detected that possessed the RFLP from both the maternal and paternal alleles in all but one of the 70 lymphoblastoid samples. (The one monoallelic sample reactivated its paternal allele with continued cell culturing.) It was concluded that monoallelic expression of the human gene is a polymorphic trait occurring in a small minority of all tested samples (reviewed in refs. 2,3). Although this is a sound conclusion, the question remains: Is the human IGF2R gene imprinted?

  2. A survey of FRAXE allele sizes in three populations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, N.; Ju, W.; Curley, D.

    1996-08-09

    FRAXE is a fragile site located at Xq27-8, which contains polymorphic triplet GCC repeats associated with a CpG island. Similar to FRAXA, expansion of the GCC repeats results in an abnormal methylation of the CpG island and is associated with a mild mental retardation syndrome (FRAXE-MR). We surveyed the GCC repeat alleles of FRAXE from 3 populations. A total of 665 X chromosomes including 416 from a New York Euro-American sample (259 normal and 157 with FRAXA mutations), 157 from a Chinese sample (144 normal and 13 FRAXA), and 92 from a Finnish sample (56 normal and 36 FRAXA) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-seven alleles, ranging from 4 to 39 GCC repeats, were observed. The modal repeat number was 16 in the New York and Finnish samples and accounted for 24% of all the chromosomes tested (162/665). The modal repeat number in the Chinese sample was 18. A founder effect for FRAXA was suggested among the Finnish FRAXA samples in that 75% had the FRAXE 16 repeat allele versus only 30% of controls. Sequencing of the FRAXE region showed no imperfections within the GCC repeat region, such as those commonly seen in FRAXA. The smaller size and limited range of repeats and the lack of imperfections suggests the molecular mechanisms underlying FRAXE triplet mutations may be different from those underlying FRAXA. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2009-09-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework.

  4. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  5. Functional conservation and coherence of HIV-1 subtype A Vpu alleles

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Bizhan; Kavyanifard, Amirarsalan; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2017-01-01

    Functional studies of HIV-1 proteins are normally conducted using lab adapted strains of HIV-1. The extent of those functions in clinical strains is sometimes unknown. In this study, we amplified and sequenced HIV-1 Vpu from 10 Iranian patients infected with HIV-1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Vpu alleles were closely related to the CRF35_AD from Iran and subtype A Vpu. We addressed some of the well-established functions of the HIV-1 Vpu, as well as some of its recently reported functions. Ability of the clinical strains of subtype A Vpu alleles for downregulation of CD4 was similar to that of the lab adapted NL4.3 Vpu. Majority of the subtype A Vpu alleles performed stronger than NL4.3 Vpu for downregulation of SNAT1. The Vpu alleles differentially induced downregulation of HLA-C, ranging from no effect to 88% downregulation of surface HLA-C. Downregulation of tetherin and enhancement of virus release was similar for the subtype A Vpu alleles and NL4.3. Subtype A Vpu alleles were more potent when compared with NL4.3 for inhibition of NF-κB activation. Our study shows that subtype A Vpu alleles exert the classical functions of HIV-1 Vpu. PMID:28317943

  6. Functional conservation and coherence of HIV-1 subtype A Vpu alleles.

    PubMed

    Romani, Bizhan; Kavyanifard, Amirarsalan; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2017-12-01

    Functional studies of HIV-1 proteins are normally conducted using lab adapted strains of HIV-1. The extent of those functions in clinical strains is sometimes unknown. In this study, we amplified and sequenced HIV-1 Vpu from 10 Iranian patients infected with HIV-1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Vpu alleles were closely related to the CRF35_AD from Iran and subtype A Vpu. We addressed some of the well-established functions of the HIV-1 Vpu, as well as some of its recently reported functions. Ability of the clinical strains of subtype A Vpu alleles for downregulation of CD4 was similar to that of the lab adapted NL4.3 Vpu. Majority of the subtype A Vpu alleles performed stronger than NL4.3 Vpu for downregulation of SNAT1. The Vpu alleles differentially induced downregulation of HLA-C, ranging from no effect to 88% downregulation of surface HLA-C. Downregulation of tetherin and enhancement of virus release was similar for the subtype A Vpu alleles and NL4.3. Subtype A Vpu alleles were more potent when compared with NL4.3 for inhibition of NF-κB activation. Our study shows that subtype A Vpu alleles exert the classical functions of HIV-1 Vpu.

  7. Kruppel-like factor4 regulates PRDM1 expression through binding to an autoimmune risk allele

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen; Gregersen, Peter K.; Diamond, Betty

    2017-01-01

    A SNP identified as rs548234, which is found in PRDM1, the gene that encodes BLIMP1, is a risk allele associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). BLIMP1 expression was reported to be decreased in women with the PRDM1 rs548234 risk allele compared with women with the nonrisk allele in monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs). In this study, we demonstrate that BLIMP1 expression is regulated by the binding of Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) to the risk SNP. KLF4 is highly expressed in MO-DCs but undetectable in B cells, consistent with the lack of altered expression of BLIMP1 in B cells from risk SNP carriers. Female rs548234 risk allele carriers, but not nonrisk allele carriers, exhibited decreased levels of BLIMP1 in MO-DCs, showing that the regulatory function of KLF4 is influenced by the risk allele. In addition, KLF4 directly recruits histone deacetylases (HDAC4, HDAC6, and HDAC7), established negative regulators of gene expression. Finally, the knock down of KLF4 expression reversed the inhibitory effects of the risk SNP on promoter activity and BLIMP1 expression. Therefore, the binding of KLF4 and the subsequent recruitment of HDACs represent a mechanism for reduced BLIMP1 expression in MO-DCs bearing the SLE risk allele rs548234. PMID:28097234

  8. Developmental profile of H19 differentially methylated domain (DMD) deletion alleles reveals multiple roles of the DMD in regulating allelic expression and DNA methylation at the imprinted H19/Igf2 locus.

    PubMed

    Thorvaldsen, Joanne L; Fedoriw, Andrew M; Nguyen, Son; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2006-02-01

    The differentially methylated domain (DMD) of the mouse H19 gene is a methylation-sensitive insulator that blocks access of the Igf2 gene to shared enhancers on the maternal allele and inactivates H19 expression on the methylated paternal allele. By analyzing H19 DMD deletion alleles H19DeltaDMD and H19Delta3.8kb-5'H19 in pre- and postimplantation embryos, we show that the DMD exhibits positive transcriptional activity and is required for H19 expression in blastocysts and full activation of H19 during subsequent development. We also show that the DMD is required to establish Igf2 imprinting by blocking access to shared enhancers when Igf2 monoallelic expression is initiated in postimplantation embryos and that the single remaining CTCF site of the H19DeltaDMD allele is unable to provide this function. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that sequence outside of the DMD can attract some paternal-allele-specific CpG methylation 5' of H19 in preimplantation embryos, although this methylation is not maintained during postimplantation in the absence of the DMD. Finally, we report a conditional allele floxing the 1.6-kb sequence deleted from the H19DeltaDMD allele and demonstrate that the DMD is required to maintain repression of the maternal Igf2 allele and the full activity of the paternal Igf2 allele in neonatal liver.

  9. Eccentric muscle challenge shows osteopontin polymorphism modulation of muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Barfield, Whitney L; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Wu, Chung-Sheih; Lin, Stephen; Chen, Yue; Wang, Paul C; Kanaan, Yasmine; Bond, Vernon; Hoffman, Eric P

    2014-08-01

    A promoter polymorphism of the osteopontin (OPN) gene (rs28357094) has been associated with multiple inflammatory states, severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and muscle size in healthy young adults. We sought to define the mechanism of action of the polymorphism, using allele-specific in vitro reporter assays in muscle cells, and a genotype-stratified intervention in healthy controls. In vitro reporter constructs showed the G allele to respond to estrogen treatment, whereas the T allele showed no transcriptional response. Young adult volunteers (n = 187) were enrolled into a baseline study, and subjects with specific rs28357094 genotypes enrolled into an eccentric muscle challenge intervention [n = 3 TT; n = 3 GG/GT (dominant inheritance model)]. Female volunteers carrying the G allele showed significantly greater inflammation and increased muscle volume change as determined by magnetic resonance imaging T1- and T2-weighted images after eccentric challenge, as well as greater decrement in biceps muscle force. Our data suggest a model where the G allele enables enhanced activities of upstream enhancer elements due to loss of Sp1 binding at the polymorphic site. This results in significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory OPN cytokine during tissue remodeling in response to challenge in G allele carriers, promoting muscle hypertrophy in normal females, but increased damage in DMD patients.

  10. Study on the association of BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with clinical mastitis in Norwegian Red cows.

    PubMed

    Kulberg, S; Heringstad, B; Guttersrud, O A; Olsaker, I

    2007-08-01

    Genotyping of bovine leucocyte antigen DRB3.2 (BoLA-DRB3.2) in a total of 523 Norwegian Red (NR) cows from two groups selected for high protein yield and low clinical mastitis, respectively, identified 27 previously reported BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles across the groups. Significant differences in BoLA-DRB3.2 allele frequencies were found between the selection groups. Alleles *13, *18, *22 and *27 had a significantly higher frequency in cows selected for low clinical mastitis, while alleles *3, *9, *11 and *26 had a higher frequency in cows selected for high protein yield. Associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and clinical mastitis were analysed based on mastitis data from 741,072 first-lactation NR cows, of which 452 were genotyped. Alleles *22 and *26 were found to be associated with increased clinical mastitis, while alleles *7, *11, *18 and *24 had a favourable effect on mastitis resistance. Contradictory results from different studies investigating associations between BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles and mastitis indicate that future studies should focus on associations of mastitis with BoLA haplotypes rather than with single BoLA genes.

  11. A New Strategy to Reduce Allelic Bias in RNA-Seq Readmapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    reference genome, so that each known single -nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) locus is masked with a third base that is neither the reference allele nor...we propose the construction of an enhanced reference genome that includes the alternative alleles at known polymorphic loci. We show that mapping to...proposed strategy reduced the number of loci with mapping bias by 63% when compared with a previous approach that relies on masking the polymorphic loci

  12. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Tzintzuni I; Matos, Isa; Shen, Yingjia; Pabuwal, Vagmita; Coelho, Maria Manuela; Wakamatsu, Yuko; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-01-01

    Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE) on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types) and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues). In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82%) shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18%) displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78%) displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  14. High-Throughput Genotyping with TaqMan Allelic Discrimination and Allele-Specific Genotyping Assays.

    PubMed

    Heissl, Angelika; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Real-time PCR-based genotyping methods, such as TaqMan allelic discrimination assays and allele-specific genotyping, are particularly useful when screening a handful of single nucleotide polymorphisms in hundreds of samples; either derived from different individuals, tissues, or pre-amplified DNA. Although real-time PCR-based methods such as TaqMan are well-established, alternative methods, like allele-specific genotyping, are powerful alternatives, especially for genotyping short tandem repeat (STR) length polymorphisms. Here, we describe all relevant aspects when developing an assay for a new SNP or STR using either TaqMan or allele-specific genotyping, respectively, such as primer and probe design, optimization of reaction conditions, the experimental procedure for typing hundreds of samples, and finally the data evaluation. Our goal is to provide a guideline for developing genotyping assays using these two approaches that render reliable and reproducible genotype calls involving minimal optimization.

  15. A majority of Huntington's disease patients may be treatable by individualized allele-specific RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Jaspers, Leonie; Spronkmans, Christine; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Di Maria, Emilio; Donato, Stefano Di; Kaemmerer, William F

    2009-06-01

    Use of RNA interference to reduce huntingtin protein (htt) expression in affected brain regions may provide an effective treatment for Huntington disease (HD), but it remains uncertain whether suppression of both wild-type and mutant alleles in a heterozygous patient will provide more benefit than harm. Previous research has shown suppression of just the mutant allele is achievable using siRNA targeted to regions of HD mRNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To determine whether more than a minority of patients may be eligible for an allele-specific therapy, we genotyped DNA from 327 unrelated European Caucasian HD patients at 26 SNP sites in the HD gene. Over 86% of the patients were found to be heterozygous for at least one SNP among those tested. Because the sites are genetically linked, one cannot use the heterozygosity rates of the individual SNPs to predict how many sites (and corresponding allele-specific siRNA) would be needed to provide at least one treatment possibility for this percentage of patients. By computing all combinations, we found that a repertoire of allele-specific siRNA corresponding to seven sites can provide at least one allele-specific siRNA treatment option for 85.6% of our sample. Moreover, we provide evidence that allele-specific siRNA targeting these sites are readily identifiable using a high throughput screening method, and that allele-specific siRNA identified using this method indeed show selective suppression of endogenous mutant htt protein in fibroblast cells from HD patients. Therefore, allele-specific siRNA are not so rare as to be impractical to find and use therapeutically.

  16. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: new B39 and B15 alleles.

    PubMed

    Garber, T L; Butler, L M; Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; De Stefano, G; Watkins, D I

    1995-01-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles.

  17. A hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 highlights the role of TSC1/TSC2 in signaling to AKT and models mild human TSC2 alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollizzi, Kristen; Malinowska-Kolodziej, Izabela; Doughty, Cheryl; Betz, Charles; Ma, Jian; Goto, June; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2009-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome in which hamartomas develop in multiple organ systems. Knockout and conditional alleles of Tsc1 and Tsc2 have been previously reported. Here, we describe the generation of a novel hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 (del3), in which exon 3, encoding 37 amino acids near the N terminus of tuberin, is deleted. Embryos homozygous for the del3 allele survive until E13.5, 2 days longer than Tsc2 null embryos. Embryos die from underdevelopment of the liver, deficient hematopoiesis, aberrant vascular development and hemorrhage. Mice that are heterozygous for the del3 allele have a markedly reduced kidney tumor burden in comparison with conventional Tsc2(+/-) mice. Murine embryo fibroblast (MEF) cultures that are homozygous for the del3 allele express mutant tuberin at low levels, and show enhanced activation of mTORC1, similar to Tsc2 null MEFs. Furthermore, the mutant cells show prominent reduction in the activation of AKT. Similar findings were made in the analysis of homozygous del3 embryo lysates. Tsc2-del3 demonstrates GTPase activating protein activity comparable to that of wild-type Tsc2 in a functional assay. These findings indicate that the del3 allele is a hypomorphic allele of Tsc2 with partial function due to reduced expression, and highlight the consistency of AKT downregulation when Tsc1/Tsc2 function is reduced. Tsc2-del3 mice also serve as a model for hypomorphic TSC2 missense mutations reported in TSC patients.

  18. Early detection of nonnative alleles in fish populations: When sample size actually matters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croce, Patrick Della; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Payne, Robert A.; Gresswell, Bob

    2017-01-01

    Reliable detection of nonnative alleles is crucial for the conservation of sensitive native fish populations at risk of introgression. Typically, nonnative alleles in a population are detected through the analysis of genetic markers in a sample of individuals. Here we show that common assumptions associated with such analyses yield substantial overestimates of the likelihood of detecting nonnative alleles. We present a revised equation to estimate the likelihood of detecting nonnative alleles in a population with a given level of admixture. The new equation incorporates the effects of the genotypic structure of the sampled population and shows that conventional methods overestimate the likelihood of detection, especially when nonnative or F-1 hybrid individuals are present. Under such circumstances—which are typical of early stages of introgression and therefore most important for conservation efforts—our results show that improved detection of nonnative alleles arises primarily from increasing the number of individuals sampled rather than increasing the number of genetic markers analyzed. Using the revised equation, we describe a new approach to determining the number of individuals to sample and the number of diagnostic markers to analyze when attempting to monitor the arrival of nonnative alleles in native populations.

  19. Balancing Selection at a Frog Antimicrobial Peptide Locus: Fluctuating Immune Effector Alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Balancing selection is common on many defense genes, but it has rarely been reported for immune effector proteins such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We describe genetic diversity at a brevinin-1 AMP locus in three species of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens, Rana blairi, and Rana palustris). Several highly divergent allelic lineages are segregating at this locus. That this unusual pattern results from balancing selection is demonstrated by multiple lines of evidence, including a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous polymorphism significantly higher than 1, the ZnS test, incongruence between the number of segregating sites and haplotype diversity, and significant Tajima's D values. Our data are more consistent with a model of fluctuating selection in which alleles change frequencies over time than with a model of stable balancing selection such as overdominance. Evidence for fluctuating selection includes skewed allele frequencies, low levels of synonymous variation, nonneutral values of Tajima's D within allelic lineages, an inverse relationship between the frequency of an allelic lineage and its degree of polymorphism, and divergent allele frequencies among populations. AMP loci could be important sites of adaptive genetic diversity, with consequences for host–pathogen coevolution and the ability of species to resist disease epidemics. PMID:18799711

  20. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  1. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE.

  2. Identification of Ppd-B1 alleles in common wheat cultivars by CAPS marker.

    PubMed

    Okoń, S; Kowalczyk, K; Miazga, D

    2012-05-01

    Photoperiod response is a major determinant of the duration of growth stages in common wheat. In common wheat, many genes play a role in determining flowering time, but the Ppd genes located on the homoeologous group 2 play a major role. Of these Ppd-B1 is located on the short arm of 2B. In 107 common wheat cultivars grown in Poland and neighboring countries, the identification of Ppd-B1 alleles using in-del analysis by using a CAPS markers was investigated. 87 cultivars were shown to carry dominant Ppd-B1 alleles. This shows that Ppd-B1 alleles is have been widely used in common wheat breeding programme in these countries. Recessive ppd-B1 alleles were found only in 20 cultivars (12 Polish, 5 former Soviet Union, 2 German, 1 Swedish).

  3. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  5. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; ...

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  6. Human leukocyte antigen-G allele polymorphisms have evolved following three different evolutionary lineages based on intron sequences.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Isabel; Herraiz, Miguel Angel; Peñaloza, Jorge; Barbolla, Maria Luz; Jurado, Maria Luisa; Macedo, Jacqueline; Vidart, José Antonio; Martinez-Laso, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G alleles follow a different pattern of polymorphism generation from those of the HLA classical I alleles. These polymorphisms have been defined as a result of random permitted point mutations in exons. However, this polymorphism maintenance could have an evolutionary specific pathways based on noncoding regions as introns, 14-bp deletion/insertion (exon 8), or promoter regions. Therefore a systematic sequencing study of HLA-G alleles was done obtaining the complete genomic sequence of 16 different HLA-G alleles: nine alleles were intron and exon confirmatory sequences, four were exon confirmatory and new intron described sequences, and three were new alleles. A 14-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism was also sequenced in these alleles. These sequences, together with those previously published, were compared, and phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses were performed. Results showed the presence of three major specific evolutionary patterns, tentatively named lineages, and the other four as minor lineages (only one allele). The relative age of the major lineages could also be established based on the number of lineage-specific positions and the number of alleles of each lineage. Two main mechanisms are clearly defined in the generation of the lineages (introns), gene conversion, and/or convergent evolution following specific patterns.

  7. Upper bounds on FST in terms of the frequency of the most frequent allele and total homozygosity: the case of a specified number of alleles.

    PubMed

    Edge, Michael D; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2014-11-01

    FST is one of the most frequently-used indices of genetic differentiation among groups. Though FST takes values between 0 and 1, authors going back to Wright have noted that under many circumstances, FST is constrained to be less than 1. Recently, we showed that at a genetic locus with an unspecified number of alleles, FST for two subpopulations is strictly bounded from above by functions of both the frequency of the most frequent allele (M) and the homozygosity of the total population (HT). In the two-subpopulation case, FST can equal one only when the frequency of the most frequent allele and the total homozygosity are 1/2. Here, we extend this work by deriving strict bounds on FST for two subpopulations when the number of alleles at the locus is specified to be I. We show that restricting to I alleles produces the same upper bound on FST over much of the allowable domain for M and HT, and we derive more restrictive bounds in the windows M∈[1/I,1/(I-1)) and HT∈[1/I,I/(I(2)-1)). These results extend our understanding of the behavior of FST in relation to other population-genetic statistics.

  8. Predictive long-range allele-specific mapping of regulatory variants and target transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibaick; Lee, Seulkee; Bang, Hyoeun; Choi, Jung Kyoon

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a large number of noncoding associations, calling for systematic mapping to causal regulatory variants and their distal target genes. A widely used method, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for chromatin or expression traits, suffers from sample-to-sample experimental variation and trans-acting or environmental effects. Instead, alleles at heterozygous loci can be compared within a sample, thereby controlling for those confounding factors. Here we introduce a method for chromatin structure-based allele-specific pairing of regulatory variants and target transcripts. With phased genotypes, much of allele-specific expression could be explained by paired allelic cis-regulation across a long range. This approach showed approximately two times greater sensitivity than QTL mapping. There are cases in which allele imbalance cannot be tested because heterozygotes are not available among reference samples. Therefore, we employed a machine learning method to predict missing positive cases based on various features shared by observed allele-specific pairs. We showed that only 10 reference samples are sufficient to achieve high prediction accuracy with a low sampling variation. In conclusion, our method enables highly sensitive fine mapping and target identification for trait-associated variants based on a small number of reference samples.

  9. Analysis of FBN1 allele expression by dermal fibroblasts from Marfan syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, E.A.; Cao, S.N.; Milewicz, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Screening for mutations in the FBN1 cDNA from Marfan patient cell strains has detected mutations in only 10-15% of patients. In an attempt to explain this poor detection rate, we examined FBN1 allele expression and fibrillin synthesis by 26 cell strains from Marfan patients. DNA from the patients and 10 controls was assessed for the presence of a polymorphic Rsa I restriction site in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the FBN1 gene. Twelve of 26 patient and 5 of 10 control DNAs were heterozygous. Fibroblast RNA from the heterozygous cell strains was reverse-transcribed and subsequently PCR amplified using a [{sup 32}P]-labelled primer, digested with Rsa I and analyzed. Although 3 samples showed no transcript from one allele by ethidium bromide staining, a Betagen scanner detected low levels (10-15%) of that allele. In addition, there was unequal expression of the two alleles in three other patients; for example, only 30% expression from one allele. The remaining patients and the controls had equal expression of each allele. Fibrillin protein synthesis by fibroblasts from these heterozygous patients was also examined. After a 30 minute pulse with [{sup 35}S]-cysteine, cell lysates were collected and proteins analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The amount of fibrillin produced relative to a reference protein was determined using a Betagen scanner. Fibrillin protein synthesis was reduced in 2 of the 3 patients with very low RNA production from one of the FBN1 alleles. All other Marfan and control cell strains showed normal amounts of fibrillin synthesized. The low expression levels from one allele may contribute to, but not fully account for, the low detection rate of FBN1 mutations. Interestingly, protein synthesis levels were not affected in 4 of 6 cell strains demonstrating low levels of RNA expression.

  10. Common Kibra alleles are associated with human memory performance.

    PubMed

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hoerndli, Frederic J; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Brunner, Fabienne; Corneveaux, Jason; Osborne, David; Wollmer, M Axel; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Hänggi, Jürgen; Mondadori, Christian R A; Buchmann, Andreas; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Henke, Katharina; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-10-20

    Human memory is a polygenic trait. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain protein KIBRA was significantly associated with memory performance in three independent, cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the United States. Gene expression studies showed that KIBRA was expressed in memory-related brain structures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging detected KIBRA allele-dependent differences in hippocampal activations during memory retrieval. Evidence from these experiments suggests a role for KIBRA in human memory.

  11. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  12. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  13. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  14. Alleles versus mutations: Understanding the evolution of genetic architecture requires a molecular perspective on allelic origins.

    PubMed

    Remington, David L

    2015-12-01

    Perspectives on the role of large-effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the evolution of complex traits have shifted back and forth over the past few decades. Different sets of studies have produced contradictory insights on the evolution of genetic architecture. I argue that much of the confusion results from a failure to distinguish mutational and allelic effects, a limitation of using the Fisherian model of adaptive evolution as the lens through which the evolution of adaptive variation is examined. A molecular-based perspective reveals that allelic differences can involve the cumulative effects of many mutations plus intragenic recombination, a model that is supported by extensive empirical evidence. I discuss how different selection regimes could produce very different architectures of allelic effects under a molecular-based model, which may explain conflicting insights on genetic architecture from studies of variation within populations versus between divergently selected populations. I address shortcomings of genome-wide association study (GWAS) practices in light of more suitable models of allelic evolution, and suggest alternate GWAS strategies to generate more valid inferences about genetic architecture. Finally, I discuss how adopting more suitable models of allelic evolution could help redirect research on complex trait evolution toward addressing more meaningful questions in evolutionary biology.

  15. Slight instability of a FMR-1 allele over three generations in a family from the general population

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, M.J.; Parma, J.; Cochaux, P.

    1996-08-09

    We report on a family segregating a FMR-1 allele within the {open_quotes}grey zone{close_quotes} of triplet repeat length (n = 51). The allele showed a 1-unit increment when transmitted through a female meiosis and a 1-unit increment when transmitted through a male of the next generation. At the following generation, a pregnant woman had amniocentesis performed. The latter showed she transmitted the allele unchanged (n = 53) to her male fetus. This family was not ascertained through an affected subject, and there was no family history of mental retardation. Thus our observation reflects the natural history of an unstable allele in the general population. Systematic analysis of such alleles may help refine our understanding of the grey zone of triplet repeat length. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Cytochrome allelic variants and clopidogrel metabolism in cardiovascular diseases therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Mohammed; Behl, Shalini; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ganah, Hany; Nazir, Mohammed; Nasab, Reem; Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are among the most prescribed dual antiplatelet therapies to treat the acute coronary syndrome and heart attacks. However, their potential clinical impacts are a subject of intense debates. The therapeutic efficiency of clopidogrel is controlled by the actions of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs) enzymes and impacted by individual genetic variations. Inter-individual polymorphisms in CYPs enzymes affect the metabolism of clopidogrel into its active metabolites and, therefore, modify its turnover and clinical outcome. So far, clinical trials fail to confirm higher or lower adverse cardiovascular effects in patients treated with combinations of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors, compared with clopidogrel alone. Such inconclusive findings may be due to genetic variations in the cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. To investigate potential interactions/effects of these cytochromes and their allele variants on the treatment of acute coronary syndrome with clopidogrel alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitors, we analyze recent literature and discuss the potential impact of the cytochrome allelic variants on cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis treated with clopidogrel. The diversity of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and prevalence span within various ethnic groups, subpopulations and demographic areas are also debated.

  17. Characterization of ROP18 alleles in human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Víctor; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2014-04-01

    The role of the virulent gene ROP18 polymorphisms is not known in human toxoplasmosis. A total of 320 clinical samples were analyzed. In samples positive for ROP18 gene, we determined by an allele specific PCR, if patients got the upstream insertion positive ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse avirulent strain) or the upstream insertion negative ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse virulent strain). We designed an ELISA assay for antibodies against ROP18 derived peptides from the three major clonal lineages of Toxoplasma. 20 clinical samples were of quality for ROP18 allele analysis. In patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a higher inflammatory reaction on eye was associated to a PCR negative result for the upstream region of ROP18. 23.3%, 33% and 16.6% of serums from individuals with ocular toxoplasmosis were positive for type I, type II and type III ROP18 derived peptides, respectively but this assay was affected by cross reaction. The absence of Toxoplasma ROP18 promoter insertion sequence in ocular toxoplasmosis was correlated with severe ocular inflammatory response. Determination of antibodies against ROP18 protein was not useful for serotyping in human toxoplasmosis.

  18. Multiple rare variants as a cause of a common phenotype: several different lactase persistence associated alleles in a single ethnic group.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Catherine J E; Raga, Tamiru Oljira; Tarekegn, Ayele; Browning, Sarah L; Elamin, Mohamed F; Bekele, Endashaw; Thomas, Mark G; Weale, Michael E; Bradman, Neil; Swallow, Dallas M

    2009-12-01

    Persistence of intestinal lactase into adulthood allows humans to use milk from other mammals as a source of food and water. This genetic trait has arisen by convergent evolution and the derived alleles of at least three different single nucleotide polymorphisms (-13910C>T, -13915T>G, -14010G>C) are associated with lactase persistence in different populations. Each allele occurs on an extended haplotype, consistent with positive directional selection. The SNPs are located in an 'enhancer' sequence in an intron of a neighboring gene (MCM6) and modulate lactase transcription in vitro. However, a number of lactase persistent individuals carry none of these alleles, but other low-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms have been observed in the same region. Here we examine a cohort of 107 milk-drinking Somali camel-herders from Ethiopia. Eight polymorphic sites are identified in the enhancer. -13915*G and -13907*G (a previously reported candidate) are each significantly associated with lactase persistence. A new allele, -14009*G, has borderline association with lactase persistence, but loses significance after correction for multiple testing. Sequence diversity of the enhancer is significantly higher in the lactase persistent members of this and a second cohort compared with non-persistent members of the two groups (P = 7.7 x 10(-9) and 1.0 x 10(-3)). By comparing other loci, we show that this difference is not due to population sub-structure, demonstrating that increased diversity can accompany selection. This contrasts with the well-documented observation that positive selection decreases diversity by driving up the frequency of a single advantageous allele, and has implications for association studies.

  19. Carriage of One or Two FMR1 Premutation Alleles Seems to Have No Effect on Illness Severity in a FXTAS Female with an Autozygous FMR1 Premutation Allele.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; López-Mourelo, Olga; Izquierdo, Silvia; Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Granell, Esther; Madrigal, Irene; Milà, Montserrat

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that occurs in FMR1 premutation carriers. The prevalence of FMR1 premutation carriers in the general population is relatively high, and although rare, a premutation in both X chromosomes may occur in females inheriting a premutation allele from each of both parent carriers. Here, we report the first female with an autozygous (homozygous by descendent) FMR1 premutation allele, who fulfills neurological and radiological FXTAS findings/criteria. Molecular characterization included CGG repeat length, AGG interruption pattern, FMR1 messenger RNA (mRNA), fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) level quantification, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Neuroradiological assessment of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and neurological and cognitive/neuropsychological evaluations were performed. Neurological and neuroradiological examination of the female with the same FMR1 allele in the premutation range (77 CGGs) demonstrated FXTAS features. Further familial evaluation showed a similar neuropsychiatric profile, with impairments in cognitive flexibility and visuospatial function, mainly. A unique family with an autozygous FMR1 premutation female is presented. Neurological/cognitive and neuroradiological examinations revealed FXTAS-specific findings in the female with the autozygous FMR1 premutation allele. The consistent molecular and cognitive/psychiatric phenotype in family members suggests that carrying one or two FMR1 premutation alleles has no effect on illness severity.

  20. PCR Strategies for Complete Allele Calling in Multigene Families Using High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches.

    PubMed

    Marmesat, Elena; Soriano, Laura; Mazzoni, Camila J; Sommer, Simone; Godoy, José A

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of multigene families with high copy number variation is often approached through PCR amplification with highly degenerate primers to account for all expected variants flanking the region of interest. Such an approach often introduces PCR biases that result in an unbalanced representation of targets in high-throughput sequencing libraries that eventually results in incomplete detection of the targeted alleles. Here we confirm this result and propose two different amplification strategies to alleviate this problem. The first strategy (called pooled-PCRs) targets different subsets of alleles in multiple independent PCRs using different moderately degenerate primer pairs, whereas the second approach (called pooled-primers) uses a custom-made pool of non-degenerate primers in a single PCR. We compare their performance to the common use of a single PCR with highly degenerate primers using the MHC class I of the Iberian lynx as a model. We found both novel approaches to work similarly well and better than the conventional approach. They significantly scored more alleles per individual (11.33 ± 1.38 and 11.72 ± 0.89 vs 7.94 ± 1.95), yielded more complete allelic profiles (96.28 ± 8.46 and 99.50 ± 2.12 vs 63.76 ± 15.43), and revealed more alleles at a population level (13 vs 12). Finally, we could link each allele's amplification efficiency with the primer-mismatches in its flanking sequences and show that ultra-deep coverage offered by high-throughput technologies does not fully compensate for such biases, especially as real alleles may reach lower coverage than artefacts. Adopting either of the proposed amplification methods provides the opportunity to attain more complete allelic profiles at lower coverages, improving confidence over the downstream analyses and subsequent applications.

  1. HLA-DRB1 and -DRB3 allele frequencies and haplotypic associations in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Young; Park, Hyejin; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 (HLA-DRB1) and -DRB3 alleles and DRB1-DRB3 haplotypic associations in 800 Koreans. DRB1 genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) methods. DRB3 genotyping was done on 447 samples carrying DRB3-associated DRB1 alleles (DRB1*03, *11, *12, *13, and *14) using PCR-SSCP method. The allele frequencies of DRB3*0101, DRB3*0202, and DRB3*0301 were 0.073, 0.136, and 0.120, respectively, and we found one case of a probable new allele (DRB3*01new, 0.001). DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes with frequency (HF) > 0.005 exhibited strong associations between DRB3*0101 and DRB1*1201, *1301, and *1403; between DRB3*0301 and DRB1*1202 and *1302; between DRB3*0202 and DRB1*0301, *1101, *1401, *1405, and *1406 alleles. Most of the DRB1 alleles with frequency > 0.005 were exclusively associated with particular DRB3 alleles with relative linkage disequilibrium values of 1.0, except for DRB1*1201, *1202 and *1301; the rare presence (HF < 0.005) of DRB3*0202 associations were observed for these DRB1 alleles. We also investigated and presented rare DRB1-DRB3 associations in additional 6000 Koreans. Comparison with other ethnic groups revealed that DRB1*0301 and *1301 related DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes vary among different populations, in that Koreans and other Asian populations show less diversity compared with Caucasoids or African Americans.

  2. Microsatellite allele sizes: a simple test to assess their significance on genetic differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Olivier J; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Fréville, Hélène; Heuertz, Myriam

    2003-01-01

    The mutation process at microsatellite loci typically occurs at high rates and with stepwise changes in allele sizes, features that may introduce bias when using classical measures of population differentiation based on allele identity (e.g., F(ST), Nei's Ds genetic distance). Allele size-based measures of differentiation, assuming a stepwise mutation process [e.g., Slatkin's R(ST), Goldstein et al.'s (deltamu)(2)], may better reflect differentiation at microsatellite loci, but they suffer high sampling variance. The relative efficiency of allele size- vs. allele identity-based statistics depends on the relative contributions of mutations vs. drift to population differentiation. We present a simple test based on a randomization procedure of allele sizes to determine whether stepwise-like mutations contributed to genetic differentiation. This test can be applied to any microsatellite data set designed to assess population differentiation and can be interpreted as testing whether F(ST) = R(ST). Computer simulations show that the test efficiently identifies which of F(ST) or R(ST) estimates has the lowest mean square error. A significant test, implying that R(ST) performs better than F(ST), is obtained when the mutation rate, mu, for a stepwise mutation process is (a) >/= m in an island model (m being the migration rate among populations) or (b) >/= 1/t in the case of isolated populations (t being the number of generations since population divergence). The test also informs on the efficiency of other statistics used in phylogenetical reconstruction [e.g., Ds and (deltamu)(2)], a nonsignificant test meaning that allele identity-based statistics perform better than allele size-based ones. This test can also provide insights into the evolutionary history of populations, revealing, for example, phylogeographic patterns, as illustrated by applying it on three published data sets. PMID:12702690

  3. Gene-based rare allele analysis identified a risk gene of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Song, Pamela; Lim, Hyunsun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Jun Hong; Park, Sun Ah

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a strong propensity to run in families. However, the known risk genes excluding APOE are not clinically useful. In various complex diseases, gene studies have targeted rare alleles for unsolved heritability. Our study aims to elucidate previously unknown risk genes for AD by targeting rare alleles. We used data from five publicly available genetic studies from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). A total of 4,171 cases and 9,358 controls were included. The genotype information of rare alleles was imputed using 1,000 genomes. We performed gene-based analysis of rare alleles (minor allele frequency≤3%). The genome-wide significance level was defined as meta P<1.8×10(-6) (0.05/number of genes in human genome = 0.05/28,517). ZNF628, which is located at chromosome 19q13.42, showed a genome-wide significant association with AD. The association of ZNF628 with AD was not dependent on APOE ε4. APOE and TREM2 were also significantly associated with AD, although not at genome-wide significance levels. Other genes identified by targeting common alleles could not be replicated in our gene-based rare allele analysis. We identified that rare variants in ZNF628 are associated with AD. The protein encoded by ZNF628 is known as a transcription factor. Furthermore, the associations of APOE and TREM2 with AD were highly significant, even in gene-based rare allele analysis, which implies that further deep sequencing of these genes is required in AD heritability studies.

  4. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive.

    PubMed

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity.

  5. Protective effect of CCR5 Delta-32 allele against HIV-1 in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Aguirre, Jesús A; Cázarez-Salazar, Silvestre G; Ochoa-Ramírez, Luis A; Acosta-Cota, Selene de J; Zamora-Gómez, Román; Najar-Reyes, Guilermi M; Villarreal-Escamilla, Perla; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Díaz-Camacho, Sylvia P; Sánchez-Zazueta, Jorge G; Ríos-Tostado, Juan J; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S

    2013-09-01

    C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is known for its role as a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection. Some individuals possess a 32 bp deletion, known as Delta-32 allele which has been reported to confer resistance to HIV-1 infection. In order to estimate the distribution of Delta-32 allele of CCR5 gene, 1034 mestizo individuals from the Northwest of Mexico, including 385 HIV-1-infected individuals, 472 healthy controls and 177 uninfected female sex workers; were examined by allele-specific PCR. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of Delta-32 allele between HIV-1 positive and healthy individuals (OR= 1.1, p= 0.6). However, we found a significantly reduced prevalence of CCR5 Delta-32 heterozygous genotype in female patients (OR= 0.084, 95% CI= 0.011 - 0.630, p= 0.002), as well as in allele frequency, compared to male patients. Furthermore, we observed an inverse relationship between allele frequency and the risk of HIV-1 transmission and AIDS progression among female healthy controls, sex workers and HIV-1 infected groups. Our findings support previous data showing Delta-32 as a genetic protective factor against HIV-1 infection in Mexican women, as well as in women from other populations.

  6. Allelic diversity of metallothionein in Orchesella cincta (L.): traces of natural selection by environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, M J T N; Ellers, J; Van Straalen, N M

    2007-05-01

    The advances made in statistical methods to detect selection from DNA sequence variation has resulted in an enormous increase in the number of studies reporting positive selection. However, a disadvantage of such statistical tests is that often no insight into the actual source of selection is obtained. Finer understanding of evolution can be obtained when those statistical tests are combined with field observations on allele frequencies. We assessed whether the metallothionein (mt) gene of Orchesella cincta (Collembola), which codes for a metal-binding protein, is subject to selection, by investigating alleles and allele frequencies among European metal-stressed and reference populations. Eight highly divergent alleles were resolved in Northwest Europe. At the nucleotide level, a total of 51 polymorphic sites (five of them implying amino-acid changes) were observed. Although statistical tests applied to the sequences alone showed no indication of selection, a G-test rejected the null hypothesis that alleles are homogeneously distributed over metal-stressed and reference populations. Analysis of molecular variance assigned a small, but significant amount of the total variance to differences between metal-stressed and non-stressed populations. In addition, it was shown that metal-stressed populations tend to be more genetically diversified at this locus than non-stressed ones. These results suggest that the mt gene and its surrounding DNA region are affected by environmental metal contamination. This study illustrates that, in addition to statistical tests, field observations on allele frequencies are needed to gain understanding of selection and adaptive evolution.

  7. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  8. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  9. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  10. Biased gene conversion skews allele frequencies in human populations, increasing the disease burden of recessive alleles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-10-02

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications.

  11. Enhanced low-template DNA analysis conditions and investigation of allele dropout patterns.

    PubMed

    Hedell, Ronny; Dufva, Charlotte; Ansell, Ricky; Mostad, Petter; Hedman, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Forensic DNA analysis applying PCR enables profiling of minute biological samples. Enhanced analysis conditions can be applied to further push the limit of detection, coming with the risk of visualising artefacts and allele imbalances. We have evaluated the consecutive increase of PCR cycles from 30 to 35 to investigate the limitations of low-template (LT) DNA analysis, applying the short tandem repeat (STR) analysis kit PowerPlex ESX 16. Mock crime scene DNA extracts of four different quantities (from around 8-84 pg) were tested. All PCR products were analysed using 5, 10 and 20 capillary electrophoresis (CE) injection seconds. Bayesian models describing allele dropout patterns, allele peak heights and heterozygote balance were developed to assess the overall improvements in EPG quality with altered PCR/CE settings. The models were also used to evaluate the impact of amplicon length, STR marker and fluorescent label on the risk for allele dropout. The allele dropout probability decreased for each PCR cycle increment from 30 to 33 PCR cycles. Irrespective of DNA amount, the dropout probability was not affected by further increasing the number of PCR cycles. For the 42 and 84 pg samples, mainly complete DNA profiles were generated applying 32 PCR cycles. For the 8 and 17 pg samples, the allele dropouts decreased from 100% using 30 cycles to about 75% and 20%, respectively. The results for 33, 34 and 35 PCR cycles indicated that heterozygote balance and stutter ratio were mainly affected by DNA amount, and not directly by PCR cycle number and CE injection settings. We found 32 and 33 PCR cycles with 10 CE injection seconds to be optimal, as 34 and 35 PCR cycles did not improve allele detection and also included CE saturation problems. We find allele dropout probability differences between several STR markers. Markers labelled with the fluorescent dyes CXR-ET (red in electropherogram) and TMR-ET (shown as black) generally have higher dropout risks compared with those

  12. Prognostic significance of ASXL1, JAK2V617F mutations and JAK2V617F allele burden in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite insights into the genetic basis of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs), a significant proportion of essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) patients present with no known MPN disease alleles. There were no previous studies investigating the impact of ASXL1 mutations in Ph-negative MPNs in Turkey. In the current study, we investigated the prognostic significance of ASXL1 mutations in Turkish MPN patients. We also aimed to determine the prognostic significance of JAK2V617F allele burden and the relationship of JAK2V617F mutation with ASXL1 mutations in Ph-negative MPNs. Methods About 184 patients from a single center diagnosed with Ph-negative MPNs were screened for ASXL1, JAK2V617F mutations, and JAK2V617F allele burden: 107 ET and 77 PMF. Results A total of 29 ASXL1 mutations were detected in 24.7% of PMF and 8.4% of ET patients. ASXL1-mutated ET patients showed a trend toward an increase in the incidence of cerebrovascular events and higher total leukocyte counts. ASXL1-mutation in PMF was associated with older age and a higher prevalence of bleeding complications. In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was significantly reduced in ASXL1-mutated PMF patients. In multivariate analysis, Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System-plus high-risk category and ASXL1 mutation status were independently associated with shorter survival in PMF. In PMF, mutational status and allele burden of JAK2V617F showed no difference in terms of OS and leukemia-free survival. Conclusion We conclude that ASXL1 mutations are molecular predictors of short OS in PMF. PMID:26082670

  13. Allelic loss and linkage studies in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Bale, A.E.; Lytton, B.

    1994-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in U.S. males. Many examples of familial aggregation have been reported, and segregration analysis suggests that an autosomal dominant gene with a penetrance of 88% by age 85 accounts for 9% of all cases. Because many dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are related to germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, we analyzed a series of sporadic and hereditary tumors for allelic loss. High grade sporadic, paraffin-embedded, primary prostate tumors were obtained from the archival collection in the Department of Pathology at Yale and hereditary tumors from three families were obtained by an advertisement in the New York Times and from referrals by urologists. PCR analysis showed loss in 4/7 informative sporadic prostate tumors with NEFL (8p21), in 8/22 informative tumors with D10S169 (10q26-qter), in 2/8 informative tumors with D10S108 (10q) and in 4/23 informative tumors with D10S89 (10p) in agreement with previous studies. PYGM on chromosome 11 and D9S127 on chromosome 9 showed no loss. Linkage analysis with NEFL in 3 prostate cancer families gave strongly negative results for close linkage (Z=-2.1 at {theta}=0.01) but LOD scores were very dependent on parameters, e.g. gene frequency, phenocopy rate, and penetrance. Linkage analysis with chromosome 10 markers and systematic analysis of the genome for other area of allelic loss are underway.

  14. Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY

    PubMed Central

    López-Euba, Tamara; Velayos, Teresa; Martínez de LaPiscina, Idoia; Bilbao, José Ramón; Rica, Itxaso; Castaño, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY. Materials and Methods 160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY) were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4); 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4); 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4). Results Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7–48.6) and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29–0.96) and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02–0.18), respectively. Conclusions The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4) reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes. PMID:28052112

  15. Root biomass response to foliar application of imazapyr for two imidazolinone tolerant alleles of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano; Altieri, Emiliano; Ramos, María Laura

    2012-09-01

    Imisun and CLPlus are two imidazolinone tolerance traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) determined by the expression of two alleles at the locus Ahasl1. Both traits differed in their tolerance level to imazapyr -a type of imidazolinone herbicide- when aboveground biomass is considered, but the concomitant herbicide effect over the root system has not been reported. The objective of this work was to quantify the root biomass response to increased doses of imazapyr in susceptible (ahasl1/ahasl1), Imisun (Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-1) and CLPlus (Ahasl1-3/Ahasl1-3) homozygous sunflower genotypes. These materials were sprayed at the V2-V4 stage with increased doses of imazapyr (from 0 to 480 g active ingredient ha(-1)) and 14 days after treatment root biomass of each plant was assessed. Genotype at the Ahasl1 locus, dose of imazapyr and their interaction significantly contributed (P < 0.001) to explain the reduction in root biomass accumulation after herbicide application. Estimated dose of imazapyr required to reduce root biomass accumulation by fifty percent (GR(50)) differed statistically for the three genotypes under study (P < 0.001). CLPlus genotypes showed the highest values of GR(50), 300 times higher on average than the susceptible genotypes, and almost 8 times higher than Imisun materials, demonstrating that both alleles differ in their root biomass response to foliar application of increased doses of imazapyr.

  16. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  17. An historical perspective on "The world-wide distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus".

    PubMed

    Kidd, Kenneth K; Pakstis, Andrew J; Yun, Libing

    2014-04-01

    Human population genetics is a completely different science today compared to two decades ago, at least at the empiric level. Our paper [Chang (Hum Genet 98:91-101, 1996a)] demonstrated that three different alleles were common when one considered many populations although other low frequency alleles occurred. Because previous work had been largely done on European subjects, our findings involved 36 distinct populations and showed that East Asian populations had nearly lost the 7-repeat allele, and that Native American populations had the highest frequencies of that allele globally, was a significant early empiric demonstration of the potential magnitude of population variation at important genes. There are thousands of loci tested on many of the same populations and the gene frequency pattern seen for the DRD4 7-repeat allele is seen at other loci, arguing that this pattern commonly reflects the pattern of divergence of populations and accumulated random genetic drift.

  18. Incidence and origin of [open quotes]Null[close quotes] alleles in the (AC)n microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, D.F.,; Thompson, A.D.; Shen, Y.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Mulley, J.C.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-three (AC)n repeat markers from chromosome 16 were typed in the parents of the 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families. Where parents were informative, the entire families were then typed. There were seven markers in which null alleles were demonstrated, as recognized by the apparent noninheritance, by a sib, of a parental allele. Four of these markers showed a null allele in a single sibship, while in the other three at least 30% of the CEPH sibships were shown to have a null allele segregating. One null allele was sequenced and shown to be the result of an 8-bp deletion occurring within the priming sequence for PCR amplification of the (AC)n repeats. In gene mapping or in application to diagnosis, the presence of a segregating null allele will not corrupt the linkage data but could result in loss of information. In isolated instances a segregating null allele may be interpreted as nonpaternity. The presence of a null allele may generate misleading data when individuals are haplotyped to determine the presence of linkage disequilibrium with a disease gene. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans.

  20. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  1. Self-incompatibility of Prunus tenella and evidence that reproductively isolated species of Prunus have different SFB alleles coupled with an identical S-RNase allele.

    PubMed

    Surbanovski, Nada; Tobutt, Kenneth R; Konstantinović, Miroslav; Maksimović, Vesna; Sargent, Daniel J; Stevanović, Vladimir; Bosković, Radovan I

    2007-05-01

    Many species of Prunus display an S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI), controlled by a single highly polymorphic multigene complex termed the S-locus. This comprises tightly linked stylar- and pollen-expressed genes that determine the specificity of the SI response. We investigated SI of Prunus tenella, a wild species found in small, isolated populations on the Balkan peninsula, initially by pollination experiments and identifying stylar-expressed RNase alleles. Nine P. tenella S-RNase alleles (S(1)-S(9)) were cloned; their sequence analysis showed a very high ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions (K(a)/K(s)) and revealed that S-RNase alleles of P. tenella, unlike those of Prunus dulcis, show positive selection in all regions except the conserved regions and that between C2 and RHV. Remarkably, S(8)-RNase, was found to be identical to S(1)-RNase from Prunus avium, a species that does not interbreed with P. tenella and, except for just one amino acid, to S(11) of P. dulcis. However, the corresponding introns and S-RNase-SFB intergenic regions showed considerable differences. Moreover, protein sequences of the pollen-expressed SFB alleles were not identical, harbouring 12 amino-acid replacements between those of P. tenella SFB(8) and P. avium SFB(1). Implications of this finding for hypotheses about the evolution of new S-specificities are discussed.

  2. A bird's eye view of a deleterious recessive allele.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In the endangered Scottish chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) population, a lethal blindness syndrome is found to be caused by a deleterious recessive allele. Photo: Gordon Yates. In Focus: Trask, A.E., Bignal, E.M., McCracken, D.I., Monaghan, P., Piertney, S.B. & Reid, J.M. (2016) Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 879-891. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Trask et al. () report on a strange, lethal, blindness that regularly affects chicks of an endangered bird population. The authors show that the inheritance mode of this blindness disease precisely matches the expectations of a recessive deleterious mutation. Intriguingly, there is also an indication that the disease-causing variant might be maintained in the population by balancing selection, due to a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Could this finding have consequences for conservation actions implemented for the population?

  3. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    PubMed

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found.

  4. Association between a high-expressing interferon-gamma allele and a lower frequency of kidney angiomyolipomas in TSC2 patients.

    PubMed

    Dabora, Sandra L; Roberts, Penelope; Nieto, Andres; Perez, Ron; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Franz, David; Bissler, John; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sims, Katherine; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a familial hamartoma syndrome in which renal involvement is common and, at times, life threatening. We have investigated the potential effect of a non-TSC gene on renal disease in a cohort of 172 TSC patients with TSC2 mutations. Patients were genotyped for an interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) microsatellite polymorphism, within intron 1, for which one common allele (allele 2, with 12 CA repeats) has been shown to have a higher expression of IFN-gamma. A chi(2) analysis was used to examine the association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the development of kidney angiomyolipomas (KAMLs) in this TSC2 cohort. Because of the age-dependent development of KAMLs in TSC, we initially focused on the 127 patients who were >5 years old. Additional subgroup analyses were done to investigate the influence of age and gender. The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) was also performed in a subset of this cohort (46 probands) for whom parent and/or sibling samples were available for analysis. Both chi(2) analysis and TDT suggested an association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the absence of KAMLs in patients who have known TSC2 mutations. Among the 127 patients who were >5 years old, KAMLs were present in 95 (75%) and were absent in 32 (25%). In the group with KAML present, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was 56%; in the group with KAML absent, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was significantly higher, at 78% (P=.02, by chi(2) analysis). The family-based TDT analysis gave similar results, with a TDT statistic (TDT chi2=5.45) corresponding to a P value of.02. Subgroup analyses show that both age and gender may influence the impact of this association. Although these results should be replicated in other populations with TSC, the present study suggests that modifier genes play a role in the variable expression of TSC and also suggests a potential therapy for KAMLs in patients with TSC.

  5. Frequencies of 23 Functionally Significant Variant Alleles Related with Metabolism of Antineoplastic Drugs in the Chilean Population: Comparison with Caucasian and Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Ángela; Quiñones, Luis; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Squicciarini, Valentina; Miranda, Carla; Garay, Joselyn; Farfán, Nancy; Saavedra, Iván; Cáceres, Dante; Ibarra, Carol; Varela, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The cancer incidence rate in Chile is 133.7/100,000 inhabitants and it is the second cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases. Most of the antineoplastic drugs are metabolized to be detoxified, and some of them to be activated. Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes can induce deep changes in enzyme activity, leading to individual variability in drug efficacy and/or toxicity. The present research describes the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the Chilean population, which might be useful in public health programs for personalized treatment of cancer, and compares these frequencies with those reported for Asian and Caucasian populations, as a contribution to the evaluation of ethnic differences in the response to chemotherapy. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in a group of 253 unrelated Chilean volunteers from the general population. The results showed that CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*3, CYP2D6*3, CYP2C19*3, and CYP3A4*17 variant alleles are virtually absent in Chileans. CYP1A1*2A allele frequency (0.37) is similar to that of Caucasians and higher than that reported for Japanese people. Allele frequencies for CYP3A5*3(0.76) and CYP2C9*3(0.04) are similar to those observed in Japanese people. CYP1A1*2C(0.32), CYP1A2*1F(0.77), CYP3A4*1B(0.06), CYP2D6*2(0.41), and MTHFR T(0.52) allele frequencies are higher than the observed either in Caucasian or in Japanese populations. Conversely, CYP2C19*2 allelic frequency (0.12), and genotype frequencies for GSTT1 null (0.11) and GSTM1 null (0.36) are lower than those observed in both populations. Finally, allele frequencies for CYP2A6*4(0.04), CYP2C8*3(0.06), CYP2C9*2(0.06), CYP2D6*4(0.12), CYP2E1*5B(0.14), CYP2E1*6(0.19), and UGT2B7*2(0.40) are intermediate in relation to those described in Caucasian and in Japanese populations, as expected according to the ethnic origin of the Chilean population. In conclusion, our findings support the idea that ethnic variability must be

  6. Use of allele scores as instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2013-01-01

    Background An allele score is a single variable summarizing multiple genetic variants associated with a risk factor. It is calculated as the total number of risk factor-increasing alleles for an individual (unweighted score), or the sum of weights for each allele corresponding to estimated genetic effect sizes (weighted score). An allele score can be used in a Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of the risk factor on an outcome. Methods Data were simulated to investigate the use of allele scores in Mendelian randomization where conventional instrumental variable techniques using multiple genetic variants demonstrate ‘weak instrument’ bias. The robustness of estimates using the allele score to misspecification (for example non-linearity, effect modification) and to violations of the instrumental variable assumptions was assessed. Results Causal estimates using a correctly specified allele score were unbiased with appropriate coverage levels. The estimates were generally robust to misspecification of the allele score, but not to instrumental variable violations, even if the majority of variants in the allele score were valid instruments. Using a weighted rather than an unweighted allele score increased power, but the increase was small when genetic variants had similar effect sizes. Naive use of the data under analysis to choose which variants to include in an allele score, or for deriving weights, resulted in substantial biases. Conclusions Allele scores enable valid causal estimates with large numbers of genetic variants. The stringency of criteria for genetic variants in Mendelian randomization should be maintained for all variants in an allele score. PMID:24062299

  7. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-09-15

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo.

  8. Influence of the APOE ε4 allele and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis in the disruption of the MEG resting state functional connectivity in sources space.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Pablo; Garcés, Pilar; Castellanos, Nazareth P; López, Maria Eugenia; Aurtenetxe, Sara; Bajo, Ricardo; Pineda-Pardo, José Angel; Bruña, Ricardo; Marín, Antonio García; Delgado, Marisa; Barabash, Ana; Ancín, Inés; Cabranes, Jose Antonio; Fernandez, Alberto; Del Pozo, Francisco; Sancho, Miguel; Marcos, Alberto; Nakamura, Akinori; Maestú, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele constitutes the major genetic risk for the development of late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, its influence on the neurodegeneration that occurs in early AD remains unresolved. In this study, the resting state magnetoencephalography(MEG) recordings were obtained from 27 aged healthy controls and 36 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients. All participants were divided into carriers and non-carriers of the ε4 allele. We have calculated the functional connectivity (FC) in the source space along brain regions estimated using the Harvard-Oxford atlas and in the classical bands. Then, a two way ANOVA analysis (diagnosis and APOE) was performed in each frequency band. The diagnosis effect consisted of a diminished FC within the high frequency bands in the MCI patients, affecting medial temporal and parietal regions. The APOE effect produced a decreased long range FC in delta band in ε4 carriers. Finally, the interaction effect showed that the FC pattern of the right frontal-temporal region could be reflecting a compensatory/disruption process within the ε4 allele carriers. Several of these results correlated with cognitive decline and neuropsychological performance. The present study characterizes how the APOE ε4 allele and MCI status affect the brain's functional organization by analyzing the FC patterns in MEG resting state in the sources space. Therefore a combination of genetic, neuropsychological, and neurophysiological information might help to detect MCI patients at higher risk of conversion to AD and asymptomatic subjects at higher risk of developing a manifest cognitive deterioration.

  9. The Minor Allele of rs7574865 in the STAT4 Gene Is Associated with Increased mRNA and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lamana, Amalia; López-Santalla, Mercedes; Castillo-González, Raquel; Ortiz, Ana María; Martín, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 confers risk of developing autoimmune disorders. However, its functional significance remains unclear. Here we analyze how rs7574865 affects the transcription of STAT4 and its protein expression. Methods We studied 201 patients (80% female; median age, 54 years; median disease duration, 5.4 months) from PEARL study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected at each visit. IL-6 serum levels were measured by enzyme immune assay. The rs7574865 was genotyped using TaqMan probes. The expression levels of STAT4 mRNA were determined at 182 visits from 69 patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. STAT4 protein was assessed by western blot in 62 samples from 34 patients. To determine the effect of different variables on the expression of STAT4 mRNA and protein, we performed multivariate longitudinal analyses using generalized linear models. Results After adjustment for age, disease activity and glucocorticoid dose as confounders, the presence of at least one copy of the T allele of rs7574865 was significantly associated with higher levels of STAT4 mRNA. Similarly, TT patients showed significantly higher levels of STAT4 protein than GG patients. IL-6 induced STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients carrying at least one T allele of rs7574865 displayed lower levels of serum IL-6 compared to GG homozygous; by contrast the production of C-reactive protein was similar in both populations. Conclusion Our data suggest that the presence of the rs7574865 T allele enhances STAT4 mRNA transcription and protein expression. It may enhance the signaling of molecules depending on the STAT4 pathway. PMID:26569609

  10. Automated analysis of sequence polymorphism in STR alleles by PCR and direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Planz, John V; Sannes-Lowery, Kristen A; Duncan, David D; Manalili, Sheri; Budowle, Bruce; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Hofstadler, Steven A; Hall, Thomas A

    2012-09-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are the primary genetic markers used for the analysis of biological samples in forensic and human identity testing. The discrimination power of a combination of STRs is sufficient in many human identity testing comparisons unless the evidence is substantially compromised and/or there are insufficient relatives or a potential mutation may have arisen in kinship analyses. An automated STR assay system that is based on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been developed that can increase the discrimination power of some of the CODIS core STR loci and thus provide more information in typical and challenged samples and cases. Data from the ESI-MS STR system is fully backwards compatible with existing STR typing results generated by capillary electrophoresis. In contrast, however, the ESI-MS analytical system also reveals nucleotide polymorphisms residing within the STR alleles. The presence of these polymorphisms expands the number of alleles at a locus. Population studies were performed on the 13 core CODIS STR loci from African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics capturing both the length of the allele, as well as nucleotide variations contained within repeat motifs or flanking regions. Such additional polymorphisms were identified in 11 of the 13 loci examined whereby several nominal length alleles were subdivided. A substantial increase in heterozygosity was observed, with close to or greater than 5% of samples analyzed being heterozygous with equal-length alleles in at least one of five of the core CODIS loci. This additional polymorphism increases discrimination power significantly, whereby the seven most polymorphic STR loci have a discrimination power equivalent to the 10 most discriminating of the CODIS core loci. An analysis of substructure among the three population groups revealed a higher θ than would be observed compared with using alleles designated by nominal length, i.e., repeats solely. Two loci, D3S1358

  11. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  12. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  13. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  14. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  15. Chemistry Game Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Susan; Muzyka, Jennifer

    2002-04-01

    We present a technological improvement to the use of game shows to help students review for tests. Our approach uses HTML files interpreted with a browser on a computer attached to an LCD projector. The HTML files can be easily modified for use of the game in a variety of courses.

  16. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  17. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  18. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  19. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p < 0.0001). Of the 122 infected fetuses, 10 presented susceptibility haplotypes contrasting with only one in the non-infected group. This difference was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparison (OR = 9.37, p=0.011). In the casuistic, there were two severely damaged fetuses with high parasite loads determined in amniotic fluid samples and HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown. PMID:26856406

  20. PCR Strategies for Complete Allele Calling in Multigene Families Using High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Marmesat, Elena; Soriano, Laura; Mazzoni, Camila J.; Sommer, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of multigene families with high copy number variation is often approached through PCR amplification with highly degenerate primers to account for all expected variants flanking the region of interest. Such an approach often introduces PCR biases that result in an unbalanced representation of targets in high-throughput sequencing libraries that eventually results in incomplete detection of the targeted alleles. Here we confirm this result and propose two different amplification strategies to alleviate this problem. The first strategy (called pooled-PCRs) targets different subsets of alleles in multiple independent PCRs using different moderately degenerate primer pairs, whereas the second approach (called pooled-primers) uses a custom-made pool of non-degenerate primers in a single PCR. We compare their performance to the common use of a single PCR with highly degenerate primers using the MHC class I of the Iberian lynx as a model. We found both novel approaches to work similarly well and better than the conventional approach. They significantly scored more alleles per individual (11.33 ± 1.38 and 11.72 ± 0.89 vs 7.94 ± 1.95), yielded more complete allelic profiles (96.28 ± 8.46 and 99.50 ± 2.12 vs 63.76 ± 15.43), and revealed more alleles at a population level (13 vs 12). Finally, we could link each allele’s amplification efficiency with the primer-mismatches in its flanking sequences and show that ultra-deep coverage offered by high-throughput technologies does not fully compensate for such biases, especially as real alleles may reach lower coverage than artefacts. Adopting either of the proposed amplification methods provides the opportunity to attain more complete allelic profiles at lower coverages, improving confidence over the downstream analyses and subsequent applications. PMID:27294261

  1. Biased Allele Expression and Aggression in Hybrid Honeybees may be Influenced by Inappropriate Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Joshua D.; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Miguel E.; Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Hunt, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid effects are often exhibited asymmetrically between reciprocal families. One way this could happen is if silencing of one parent’s allele occurs in one lineage but not the other, which could affect the phenotypes of the hybrids asymmetrically by silencing that allele in only one of the hybrid families. We have previously tested for allele-specific expression biases in hybrids of European and Africanized honeybees and we found that there was an asymmetric overabundance of genes showing a maternal bias in the family with a European mother. Here, we further analyze allelic bias in these hybrids to ascertain whether they may underlie previously described asymmetries in metabolism and aggression in similar hybrid families and we speculate on what mechanisms may produce this biased allele usage. We find that there are over 500 genes that have some form of biased allele usage and over 200 of these are biased toward the maternal allele but only in the family with European maternity, mirroring the pattern observed for aggression and metabolic rate. This asymmetrically biased set is enriched for genes in loci associated with aggressive behavior and also for mitochondrial-localizing proteins. It contains many genes that play important roles in metabolic regulation. Moreover we find genes relating to the piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway, which is involved in chromatin modifications and epigenetic regulation and may help explain the mechanism underlying this asymmetric allele use. Based on these findings and previous work investigating aggression and metabolism in bees, we propose a novel hypothesis; that the asymmetric pattern of biased allele usage in these hybrids is a result of inappropriate use of piRNA-mediated nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling that is normally used to modulate aggression in honeybees. This is the first report of widespread asymmetric effects on allelic expression in hybrids and may represent a novel mechanism for gene regulation. PMID:26648977

  2. Apolipoprotein E4 allele as a predictor of cholinergic deficits and treatment outcome in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, J; Delisle, M C; Quirion, R; Aubert, I; Farlow, M; Lahiri, D; Hui, S; Bertrand, P; Nalbantoglu, J; Gilfix, B M

    1995-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is critical in the modulation of cholesterol and phospholipid transport between cells of different types. Human apoE is a polymorphic protein with three common alleles, APO epsilon 2, APO epsilon 3, and APO epsilon 4. ApoE4 is associated with sporadic and late-onset familial Alzheimer disease (AD). Gene dose was shown to have an effect on risk of developing AD, age of onset, accumulation of senile plaques in the brain, and reduction of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in the hippocampus of AD subjects. To characterize the possible impact of the apoE4 allele on cholinergic markers in AD, we examined the effect of apoE4 allele copy number on pre- and postsynaptic markers of cholinergic activity. ApoE4 allele copy number showed an inverse relationship with residual brain ChAT activity and nicotinic receptor binding sites in both the hippocampal formation and the temporal cortex of AD subjects. AD cases lacking the apoE4 allele showed ChAT activities close or within age-matched normal control values. The effect of the apoE4 allele on cholinomimetic drug responsiveness was assessed next in a group (n = 40) of AD patients who completed a double-blind, 30-week clinical trial of the cholinesterase inhibitor tacrine. Results showed that > 80% of apoE4-negative AD patients showed marked improvement after 30 weeks as measured by the AD assessment scale (ADAS), whereas 60% of apoE4 carriers had ADAS scores that were worse compared to baseline. These results strongly support the concept that apoE4 plays a crucial role in the cholinergic dysfunction associated with AD and may be a prognostic indicator of poor response to therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in AD patients. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8618881

  3. Stochastic Loss of Silencing of the Imprinted Ndn/NDN Allele, in a Mouse Model and Humans with Prader-Willi Syndrome, Has Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Unmehopa, Unga; Matarazzo, Valery; Watrin, Françoise; Linke, Matthias; Georges, Beatrice; Bischof, Jocelyn; Dijkstra, Femke; Bloemsma, Monique; Corby, Severine; Michel, François J.; Wevrick, Rachel; Zechner, Ulrich; Swaab, Dick; Dudley, Keith; Bezin, Laurent; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that causes genes to be expressed from one allele only according to parental origin, the other allele being silent. Diseases can arise when the normally active alleles are not expressed. In this context, low level of expression of the normally silent alleles has been considered as genetic noise although such expression has never been further studied. Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disease involving imprinted genes, including NDN, which are only expressed from the paternally inherited allele, with the maternally inherited allele silent. We present the first in-depth study of the low expression of a normally silent imprinted allele, in pathological context. Using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches and comparing wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous mice deleted for Ndn, we show that, in absence of the paternal Ndn allele, the maternal Ndn allele is expressed at an extremely low level with a high degree of non-genetic heterogeneity. The level of this expression is sex-dependent and shows transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. In about 50% of mutant mice, this expression reduces birth lethality and severity of the breathing deficiency, correlated with a reduction in the loss of serotonergic neurons. In wild-type brains, the maternal Ndn allele is never expressed. However, using several mouse models, we reveal a competition between non-imprinted Ndn promoters which results in monoallelic (paternal or maternal) Ndn expression, suggesting that Ndn allelic exclusion occurs in the absence of imprinting regulation. Importantly, specific expression of the maternal NDN allele is also detected in post-mortem brain samples of PWS individuals. Our data reveal an unexpected epigenetic flexibility of PWS imprinted genes that could be exploited to reactivate the functional but dormant maternal alleles in PWS. Overall our results reveal high non-genetic heterogeneity between genetically identical individuals

  4. Dose effect of allele {epsilon}4 of apolipoprotein E on risk and age at onset of Pick disease

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, L.A.; Abraham, C.; Volicer, L.

    1994-09-01

    Pick disease (PD) is a rare progressive dementing illness characterized by severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. Brains of PD patients lack neurofibrillary tangles which are characteristic findings of Alzheimer disease (AD), but display neuronal swelling and argyrophilic inclusions (i.e., Pick bodies) which contain phosphorylated neurofilaments, tau and complex lipids. Clinically, PD is often difficult to distinguish from AD. The fact that PD is often familial and the evidence suggesting that the {epsilon}4 allele of apoE is a risk factor for AD and multi-infarct dementia prompted us to study apoE isoforms in PD. ApoE genotypes were evaluated in an autopsy series of cases (19 AD, 15 PD, and 7 {open_quotes}controls{close_quotes} with other or no pathology). All subjects were unrelated except for 2 brothers who both had PD. Age at onset in the PD patients ranged from 41 to 59 years. The frequency of {epsilon}4 is significantly higher among AD subjects (47.4%) than in Pick cases (23.3%; P=0.4) or controls (7.1%; P=.008), but the 16% difference between PD and control subjects was not significant, perhaps due to small sample sizes. Linear regression analysis showed that the number of {epsilon}4 alleles was inversely related to age at onset of PD (P=.04) and accounted for 27% of the variation in age at onset. These results suggest that {epsilon}4 may be a susceptibility factor for dementia and not specifically AD. Preliminary experiments using an antibody against apoE suggest that Pick bodies may be immunoreactive with this antibody and that apoE binds to abnormal filaments. The association of the {epsilon}4 allele with dementias other than AD and the apoE staining results support a model postulating an interaction between the {epsilon}4 isoform and tau.

  5. Identification of a novel HLA-A allele, A*3120.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y; Pascual, C J; Alonzo, P; Chamizo, A

    2009-03-01

    A novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A allele, HLA-A*3120, was first identified in a National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) donor. The A*3120 allele resulted from a single nucleotide substitution (T to G) at codon 92 of exon 3 of A*310102. The substitution caused an amino acid change (serine to alanine). This novel allele was also seen in two other unrelated NMDP donors.

  6. Cytochrome P450 2D6 variants in a Caucasian population: Allele frequencies and phenotypic consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Sachse, C.; Brockmoeller, J.; Bauer, S.; Roots, I.

    1997-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes many important drugs. CYP2D6 activity ranges from complete deficiency to ultrafast metabolism, depending on at least 16 different known alleles. Their frequencies were determined in 589 unrelated German volunteers and correlated with enzyme activity measured by phenotyping with dextromethorphan or debrisoquine. For genotyping, nested PCR-RFLP tests from a PCR amplificate of the entire CYP2D6 gene were developed. The frequency of the CYP2D6*1 allele coding for extensive metabolizer (EM) phenotype was .364. The alleles coding for slightly (CYP2D6*2) or moderately (*9 and *10) reduced activity (intermediate metabolizer phenotype [IM]) showed frequencies of .324, .018, and .015, respectively. By use of novel PCR tests for discrimination, CYP2D6 gene duplication alleles were found with frequencies of.005 (*1 x 2), .013 (* 2 x 2), and .001 (*4 x 2). Frequencies of alleles with complete deficiency (poor metabolizer phenotype [PM]) were .207 (*4), .020 (*3 and *5), .009 (*6), and .001 (*7, *15, and *16). The defective CYP2D6 alleles *8, *11, *12, *13, and *14 were not found. All 41 PMs (7.0%) in this sample were explained by five mutations detected by four PCR-RFLP tests, which may suffice, together with the gene duplication test, for clinical prediction of CYP2D6 capacity. Three novel variants of known CYP2D6 alleles were discovered: *1C (T{sub 1957}C), *2B (additional C{sub 2558}T), and *4E (additional C{sub 2938}T). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in enzymatic activity measured by the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio (MR) between carriers of EN/PM (mean MR = .006) and IM/PM (mean MR = .014) alleles and between carriers of one (mean MR = .009) and two (mean MR = .003) functional alleles. The results of this study provide a solid basis for prediction of CYP2D6 capacity, as required in drug research and routine drug treatment. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. THE REAL McCOIL: A method for the concurrent estimation of the complexity of infection and SNP allele frequency for malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Worby, Colin J.; Yeka, Adoke; Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Kamya, Moses R.; Staedke, Sarah G.; Hubbart, Christina; Amato, Roberto; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2017-01-01

    As many malaria-endemic countries move towards elimination of Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent human malaria parasite, effective tools for monitoring malaria epidemiology are urgent priorities. P. falciparum population genetic approaches offer promising tools for understanding transmission and spread of the disease, but a high prevalence of multi-clone or polygenomic infections can render estimation of even the most basic parameters, such as allele frequencies, challenging. A previous method, COIL, was developed to estimate complexity of infection (COI) from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, but relies on monogenomic infections to estimate allele frequencies or requires external allele frequency data which may not available. Estimates limited to monogenomic infections may not be representative, however, and when the average COI is high, they can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Therefore, we developed THE REAL McCOIL, Turning HEterozygous SNP data into Robust Estimates of ALelle frequency, via Markov chain Monte Carlo, and Complexity Of Infection using Likelihood, to incorporate polygenomic samples and simultaneously estimate allele frequency and COI. This approach was tested via simulations then applied to SNP data from cross-sectional surveys performed in three Ugandan sites with varying malaria transmission. We show that THE REAL McCOIL consistently outperforms COIL on simulated data, particularly when most infections are polygenomic. Using field data we show that, unlike with COIL, we can distinguish epidemiologically relevant differences in COI between and within these sites. Surprisingly, for example, we estimated high average COI in a peri-urban subregion with lower transmission intensity, suggesting that many of these cases were imported from surrounding regions with higher transmission intensity. THE REAL McCOIL therefore provides a robust tool for understanding the molecular epidemiology of malaria across transmission settings. PMID

  8. Novel HLA-A and HLA-B alleles.

    PubMed

    Hurley, C K; Steiner, N; Kosman, C; Mitton, W; Koester, R; Bei, M; Bush, J; McCormack, J; Hahn, A; Henson, V; Hoyer, R; Wade, J A; Hartzman, R J; Ng, J

    1998-07-01

    Nine novel HLA-A and HLA-B alleles are described: A*2609, A*6803, A*6806, B*1539, B*1540, B*2712, B*4103, B*5109, and B*5603. Most appear to have arisen by gene conversion events. B*5603 appears to have arisen by a reciprocal recombination event joining exon 2 of a B*55/ *56 allele with exon 3 of a B*15 allele. Serologically, the antigen encoded by this allele types with broad B22- and Bw6-specific alloantisera. Also unique, the antigen encoded by B*2712 does not react with B27-specific alloantisera but does react with Bw6-specific alloantisera.

  9. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  10. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  11. Detection of nucleotide-specific CRISPR/Cas9 modified alleles using multiplex ligation detection

    PubMed Central

    KC, R.; Srivastava, A.; Wilkowski, J. M.; Richter, C. E.; Shavit, J. A.; Burke, D. T.; Bielas, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing has emerged as a powerful tool to create mutant alleles in model organisms. However, the precision with which these mutations are created has introduced a new set of complications for genotyping and colony management. Traditional gene-targeting approaches in many experimental organisms incorporated exogenous DNA and/or allele specific sequence that allow for genotyping strategies based on binary readout of PCR product amplification and size selection. In contrast, alleles created by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair of double-stranded DNA breaks generated by Cas9 are much less amenable to such strategies. Here we describe a novel genotyping strategy that is cost effective, sequence specific and allows for accurate and efficient multiplexing of small insertion-deletions and single-nucleotide variants characteristic of CRISPR/Cas9 edited alleles. We show that ligation detection reaction (LDR) can be used to generate products that are sequence specific and uniquely detected by product size and/or fluorescent tags. The method works independently of the model organism and will be useful for colony management as mutant alleles differing by a few nucleotides become more prevalent in experimental animal colonies. PMID:27557703

  12. Spatial heterogeneity in the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and the mutation load

    PubMed Central

    Roze, D

    2012-01-01

    According to current estimates of genomic deleterious mutation rates (which are often of the order 0.1–1) the mutation load (defined as a reduction in the average fitness of a population due to the presence of deleterious alleles) may be important in many populations. In this paper, I use multilocus simulations to explore the effect of spatial heterogeneity in the strength of selection against deleterious alleles on the mutation load (for example, it has been suggested that stressful environments may increase the strength of selection). These simulations show contrasted results: in some situations, spatial heterogeneity may greatly reduce the mutation load, due to the fact that migrants coming from demes under stronger selection carry relatively few deleterious alleles, and benefit from a strong advantage within demes under weaker selection (where individuals carry many more deleterious alleles); in other situations, however, deleterious alleles accumulate within demes under stronger selection, due to migration pressure from demes under weaker selection, leading to fitness erosion within those demes. This second situation is more frequent when the productivity of the different demes is proportional to their mean fitness. The effect of spatial heterogeneity is greatly reduced, however, when the response to environmental differences is inconsistent across loci. PMID:22588129

  13. Rapid, efficient and precise allele replacement in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kan, Fengling; Wagnon, Jacy L.; Storey, Aaron J.; Protacio, Reine M.; Davidson, Mari K.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting provides a powerful tool to modify endogenous loci to contain specific mutations, insertions and deletions. Precise allele replacement, with no other chromosomal changes (e.g., insertion of selectable markers or heterologous promoters), maintains physiologically relevant context. Established methods for precise allele replacement in fission yeast employ two successive rounds of transformation and homologous recombination and require genotyping at each step. The relative efficiency of homologous recombination is low and a high rate of false positives during the second round of gene targeting further complicates matters. We report that pop-in, pop-out allele replacement circumvents these problems. We present data for 39 different allele replacements, involving simple and complex modifications at seven different target loci, that illustrate the power and utility of the approach. We also developed and validated a rapid, efficient process for precise allele replacement that requires only one round each of transformation and genotyping. We show that this process can be applied in population scale to an individual target locus, without genotyping, to identify clones with an altered phenotype (targeted forward genetics). It is therefore suitable for saturating, in situ, locus-specific mutation screens (e.g., of essential or non-essential genes and regulatory DNA elements) within normal chromosomal context. PMID:24026504

  14. Adaptation of Drosophila to a novel laboratory environment reveals temporally heterogeneous trajectories of selected alleles.

    PubMed

    Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Kapun, Martin; Nolte, Viola; Kofler, Robert; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2012-10-01

    The genomic basis of adaptation to novel environments is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that has gained additional importance in the light of the recent global change discussion. Here, we combined laboratory natural selection (experimental evolution) in Drosophila melanogaster with genome-wide next generation sequencing of DNA pools (Pool-Seq) to identify alleles that are favourable in a novel laboratory environment and traced their trajectories during the adaptive process. Already after 15 generations, we identified a pronounced genomic response to selection, with almost 5000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; genome-wide false discovery rates < 0.005%) deviating from neutral expectation. Importantly, the evolutionary trajectories of the selected alleles were heterogeneous, with the alleles falling into two distinct classes: (i) alleles that continuously rise in frequency; and (ii) alleles that at first increase rapidly but whose frequencies then reach a plateau. Our data thus suggest that the genomic response to selection can involve a large number of selected SNPs that show unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectories, possibly due to nonadditive effects.

  15. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-05

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep.

  16. Association study of human VN1R1 pheromone receptor gene alleles and gender.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Constantinos; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Pappa, Magda; Bertolis, George; Gerou, Spiros; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Pheromones are water-soluble chemicals that elicit neuroendocrine and physiological changes, while they also provide information about gender within individuals of the same species. VN1R1 is the only functional pheromone receptor in humans. We have undertaken a large mutation screening approach in 425 adult individuals from the Hellenic population to investigate whether the allelic differences, namely alleles 1a and 1b present in the human VN1R1 gene, are gender specific. Here we show that both VN1R1 1a and 1b alleles are found in chromosomes of both male and female subjects at frequency of 26.35% and 73.65%, respectively. Given the fact that those allelic differences potentially cause minor changes in the protein conformation and its transmembrane domains, as simulated by the TMHMM software, our data suggest that the allelic differences in the human VN1R1 gene are unlikely to be associated with gender and hence to contribute to distinct gender-specific behavior.

  17. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes.

  18. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  20. Monooxygenase Levels and Knockdown Resistance (kdr) Allele Frequencies in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Githeko, Andrew K; Githure, John I; Mutunga, James; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid-treated bed nets and indoor spray are important components of malaria control strategies in Kenya. Information on resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis populations is essential to the selection of appropriate insecticides and the management of insecticide resistance. Monooxygenase activity and knockdown resistance (kdr) allele frequency are biochemical and molecular indicators of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. This study determined baseline information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency in anopheline mosquitoes in the western region, the Great Rift Valley-central province region, and the coastal region of Kenya. A total of 1990 field-collected individuals, representing 12 An. gambiae and 22 An. arabiensis populations was analyzed. We found significant among-population variation in monooxygenase activity in An. gambiae and An. arabiensis and substantial variability among individuals within populations. Nine out of 12 An. gambiae populations exhibited significantly higher average monooxygenase activity than the susceptible Kisumu reference strain. The kdr alleles (L1014S) were detected in three An. gambiae populations, and one An. arabiensis population in western Kenya, but not in the Rift Valley-central region and the coastal Kenya region. All genotypes with the kdr alleles were heterozygous, and the conservative estimation of kdr allele frequency was below 1% in these four populations. Information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency reported in this study provided baseline data for monitoring insecticide resistance changes in Kenya during the era when large-scale insecticide-treated bednet and indoor residual spray campaigns were being implemented. PMID:18402140

  1. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  2. CFTR allelic heterogeneity in Brazil: historical and geographical perspectives and implications for screening and counseling for cystic fibrosis in this country.

    PubMed

    Faucz, Fabio R; Souza, Denise A S; Olandoski, Marcia; Raskin, Salmo

    2010-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to provide a complete and updated spectrum of cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in the Brazilian population combining all available in silico data for patients with CF in Brazil, including founder background and migration flow that consisted of the actual genetic pool of the Brazilian population. Information sources in international databases (PUBMED and SCIELO) were searched. The Brazilian population shows a wide variation in the frequency of CFTR mutations in states Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Santa Catarina (SC), Paraná (PR), São Paulo (SP), Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Minas Gerais (MG), Pará (PA) and Bahia (BA); this variation includes the most common mutation p.F508del. Apparently, this frequency variation is because of the different ethnic compositions. States such as SC and PR have a greater European admixture with almost 90% of CF alleles identified. In other states, such as BA, higher frequency of alleles that are common among African populations is seen. Overall, the CFTR mutational spectrum indicates the presence of European, African and Amerindian ethnic groups in the contemporary Brazilian CF patients. Here, we present an analysis of the CFTR allelic heterogeneity and discuss the origin of its genetic composition, in an attempt to provide improved perspective for the CF population screening in Brazil and genetic counseling.

  3. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  4. Using maximum likelihood to estimate population size from temporal changes in allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, E G; Slatkin, M

    1999-01-01

    We develop a maximum-likelihood framework for using temporal changes in allele frequencies to estimate the number of breeding individuals in a population. We use simulations to compare the performance of this estimator to an F-statistic estimator of variance effective population size. The maximum-likelihood estimator had a lower variance and smaller bias. Taking advantage of the likelihood framework, we extend the model to include exponential growth and show that temporal allele frequency data from three or more sampling events can be used to test for population growth. PMID:10353915

  5. A Tightly Regulated Genetic Selection System with Signaling-Active Alleles of Phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Lagarias, J Clark

    2017-01-01

    Selectable markers derived from plant genes circumvent the potential risk of antibiotic/herbicide-resistance gene transfer into neighboring plant species, endophytic bacteria, and mycorrhizal fungi. Toward this goal, we have engineered and validated signaling-active alleles of phytochrome B (eYHB) as plant-derived selection marker genes in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). By probing the relationship of construct size and induction conditions to optimal phenotypic selection, we show that eYHB-based alleles are robust substitutes for antibiotic/herbicide-dependent marker genes as well as surprisingly sensitive reporters of off-target transgene expression.

  6. A Tightly Regulated Genetic Selection System with Signaling-Active Alleles of Phytochrome B1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Selectable markers derived from plant genes circumvent the potential risk of antibiotic/herbicide-resistance gene transfer into neighboring plant species, endophytic bacteria, and mycorrhizal fungi. Toward this goal, we have engineered and validated signaling-active alleles of phytochrome B (eYHB) as plant-derived selection marker genes in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). By probing the relationship of construct size and induction conditions to optimal phenotypic selection, we show that eYHB-based alleles are robust substitutes for antibiotic/herbicide-dependent marker genes as well as surprisingly sensitive reporters of off-target transgene expression. PMID:27881727

  7. Heritable Individual-Specific and Allele-Specific Chromatin Signatures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    McDaniell, Ryan; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Song, Lingyun; Liu, Zheng; Boyle, Alan P.; Erdos, Michael R.; Scott, Laura J.; Morken, Mario A.; Kucera, Katerina S.; Battenhouse, Anna; Keefe, Damian; Collins, Francis S.; Willard, Huntington F.; Lieb, Jason D.; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Birney, Ewan

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which variation in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding may influence gene expression, and thus underlie or contribute to variation in phenotype, is unknown. To address this question, we cataloged both individual-to-individual variation and differences between homologous chromosomes within the same individual (allele-specific variation) in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding in lymphoblastoid cells derived from individuals of geographically diverse ancestry. Ten percent of active chromatin sites were individual-specific; a similar proportion were allele-specific. Both individual-specific and allele-specific sites were commonly transmitted from parent to child, which suggests that they are heritable features of the human genome. Our study shows that heritable chromatin status and transcription factor binding differ as a result of genetic variation and may underlie phenotypic variation in humans. PMID:20299549

  8. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  9. Estimation of the frequency of hexosaminidase a variant alleles in the American Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, D A; Kaback, M M

    1982-05-01

    There appear to be several alleles of the hexosaminidase A (HEX A) gene that lead to different clinical syndromes. In addition to the infantile-onset Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), there is a juvenile-onset and an adult-onset form, which are also characterized by low HEX A levels. There are also apparently healthy adults with low HEX A activity. Based primarily on data from population screening for TSD carrier status, we estimate the allele frequency of the combined variant alleles for which data are available to be about 4.5 x 10(-4) and the frequency of adults showing zero HEX A levels (when tested using artificial substrate) to be about 1:67,000. The implications for population screening and prenatal diagnosis are discussed.

  10. Functional characterization of CYP2B6 allelic variants in demethylation of antimalarial artemether.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masashi; Muroi, Yuka; Tamaki, Yuichiro; Saigusa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Naoto; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Matsubara, Yoichi; Oda, Akifumi; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Hiratsuka, Masahiro

    2011-10-01

    Artemether (AM) is one of the most effective antimalarial drugs. The elimination half-life of AM is very short, and it shows large interindividual variability in pharmacokinetic parameters. The aim of this study was to identify cytochrome P450 (P450) isozymes responsible for the demethylation of AM and to evaluate functional differences between 26 CYP2B6 allelic variants in vitro. Of 14 recombinant P450s examined in this study, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 were primarily responsible for production of the desmethyl metabolite dihydroartemisinin. The intrinsic clearance (V(max)/K(m)) of CYP2B6 was 6-fold higher than that of CYP3A4. AM demethylation activity was correlated with CYP2B6 protein levels (P = 0.004); however, it was not correlated with CYP3A4 protein levels (P = 0.27) in human liver microsomes. Wild-type CYP2B6.1 and 25 CYP2B6 allelic variants (CYP2B6.2-CYP2B6.21 and CYP2B6.23-CYP2B6.27) were heterologously expressed in COS-7 cells. In vitro analysis revealed no enzymatic activity in 5 variants (CYP2B6.8, CYP2B6.12, CYP2B6.18, CYP2B6.21, and CYP2B6.24), lower activity in 7 variants (CYP2B6.10, CYP2B6.11, CYP2B6.14, CYP2B6.15, CYP2B6.16, CYP2B6.20, and CYP2B6.27), and higher activity in 4 variants (CYP2B6.2, CYP2B6.4, CYP2B6.6, and CYP2B6.19), compared with that of wild-type CYP2B6.1. In kinetic analysis, 3 variants (CYP2B6.2, CYP2B6.4, and CYP2B6.6) exhibited significantly higher V(max), and 3 variants (CYP2B6.14, CYP2B6.20 and CYP2B6.27) exhibited significantly lower V(max) compared with that of CYP2B6.1. This functional analysis of CYP2B6 variants could provide useful information for individualization of antimalarial drug therapy.

  11. The Microcephalin Ancestral Allele in a Neanderthal Individual

    PubMed Central

    Lari, Martina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Milani, Lucio; Corti, Giorgio; Balsamo, Carlotta; Vai, Stefania; Catalano, Giulio; Pilli, Elena; Longo, Laura; Condemi, Silvana; Giunti, Paolo; Hänni, Catherine; De Bellis, Gianluca; Orlando, Ludovic; Barbujani, Guido; Caramelli, David

    2010-01-01

    Background The high frequency (around 0.70 worlwide) and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years) of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the first PCR amplification and high- throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy). We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. Conclusions/Significance The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS) Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA. PMID:20498832

  12. Optimization of the production of knock-in alleles by CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection into the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Raveux, Aurélien; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in zygotes is an efficient and comparatively fast method to generate genetically modified mice. So far, only few knock-in mice have been generated using this approach, and because no systematic study has been performed, parameters controlling the efficacy of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted insertion are not fully established. Here, we evaluated the effect of several parameters on knock-in efficiency changing only one variable at a time. We found that knock-in efficiency was dependent on injected Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA concentrations and that cytoplasmic injection resulted in more genotypic complexity compared to pronuclear injection. Our results also indicated that injection into the pronucleus compared to the cytoplasm is preferable to generate knock-in alleles with an oligonucleotide or a circular plasmid. Finally, we showed that Cas9D10A nickase variant was less efficient than wild-type Cas9 for generating knock-in alleles and caused a higher rate of mosaicism. Thus, our study provides valuable information that will help to improve the future production of precise genetic modifications in mice. PMID:28209967

  13. Optimization of the production of knock-in alleles by CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection into the mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Raveux, Aurélien; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2017-02-17

    Microinjection of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in zygotes is an efficient and comparatively fast method to generate genetically modified mice. So far, only few knock-in mice have been generated using this approach, and because no systematic study has been performed, parameters controlling the efficacy of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted insertion are not fully established. Here, we evaluated the effect of several parameters on knock-in efficiency changing only one variable at a time. We found that knock-in efficiency was dependent on injected Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA concentrations and that cytoplasmic injection resulted in more genotypic complexity compared to pronuclear injection. Our results also indicated that injection into the pronucleus compared to the cytoplasm is preferable to generate knock-in alleles with an oligonucleotide or a circular plasmid. Finally, we showed that Cas9D10A nickase variant was less efficient than wild-type Cas9 for generating knock-in alleles and caused a higher rate of mosaicism. Thus, our study provides valuable information that will help to improve the future production of precise genetic modifications in mice.

  14. LSCHL4 from Japonica Cultivar, Which Is Allelic to NAL1, Increases Yield of Indica Super Rice 93-11

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang-Heng; Li, Shu-Yu; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei-Jun; Zeng, Da-Li; Rao, Yu-Chun; Peng, You-Lin; Hu, Jiang; Yang, Yao-Long; Xu, Jie; Ren, De-Yong; Gao, Zhen-Yu; Zhu, Li; Dong, Guo-Jun; Hu, Xing-Ming; Yan, Mei-Xian; Guo, Long-Biao; Li, Chuan-You; Qian, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The basic premise of high yield in rice is to improve leaf photosynthetic efficiency and coordinate the source–sink relationship in rice plants. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to morphological traits and chlorophyll content of rice leaves were detected at the stages of heading to maturity, and a major QTL (qLSCHL4) related to flag leaf shape and chlorophyll content was detected at both stages in recombinant inbred lines constructed using the indica rice cultivar 93-11 and the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Map-based cloning and expression analysis showed that LSCHL4 is allelic to NAL1, a gene previously reported in narrow leaf mutant of rice. Overexpression lines transformed with vector carrying LSCHL4 from Nipponbare and a near-isogenic line of 93-11 (NIL-9311) had significantly increased leaf chlorophyll content, enlarged flag leaf size, and improved panicle type. The average yield of NIL-9311 was 18.70% higher than that of 93-11. These results indicate that LSCHL4 had a pleiotropic function. Exploring and pyramiding more high-yield alleles resembling LSCHL4 for super rice breeding provides an effective way to achieve new breakthroughs in raising rice yield and generate new ideas for solving the problem of global food safety. PMID:24795339

  15. Mutation of l7Rn3 Shows That Odz4 Is Required for Mouse Gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Lossie, Amy C.; Nakamura, Hisashi; Thomas, Sharon E.; Justice, Monica J.

    2005-01-01

    A mouse homolog of the Drosophila pair-rule gene Odd Oz (Odz4) maps to the critical region of the l7Rn3 locus on mouse chromosome 7. Here we show that Odz4 is an excellent candidate for this allelic series because (1) it spans the entire critical region, (2) the phenotypes correlate with embryonic expression, (3) the complex genetic inheritance of the alleles is consistent with complex transcriptional regulation, and (4) one allele has a mutation in a conserved amino acid. Odz4 uses five alternate promoters that encode both secreted and membrane-bound proteins. Intragenic complementation of the l7Rn3 alleles is consistent with these multiple-protein isoforms. Further, the allelic series shows that Odz4 is required to establish the anterior-posterior axis of the gastrulating mouse embryo and is necessary later for mesoderm-derived tissues such as somites, heart, and skeleton. Sequencing of RT-PCR products from five of the six alleles reveals a nonconservative amino acid change in the l7Rn3m4 allele. This amino acid is important evolutionarily, as it is conserved to Drosophila. Together, our data indicate that Odz4 is mutated in the l7Rn3 allele series and performs roles in the mouse brain, heart, and embryonic patterning similar to those of its Drosophila counterpart. PMID:15489520

  16. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  17. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  18. [Prognostic implications of GP3a glucoprotein gene PLA1/PLA2 allele in prostatic cancer: pilot results of the study].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Itkes, A V; Seregin, A A; Miandina, G I

    2005-01-01

    We studied the role of integrins, primarily, the role of allele distribution of GP3a gene in development of prostatic cancer (PC) and assessment of its prognostic significance. From November 2003 to May 2004 we examined 32 patients with PC: 11 patients with local PC T1-2N0M0; 14 patients with locally advanced cancer T3N0M0 and 7 patients with invasive and/or metastatic cancer T3-4N10-1 or T3-4N0-1M1. The blood from all the patients we studied with PCR for alleles of GP3a gene, PSA. Seventeen patients were found to have alleles PLA1A1, 14(44%)--alleles PLA1A2, 1(3%)--alleles PLA2A2. Alleles PLA1A2 occurred significantly more often than in the population (p < 0.005). The group analysis has found that 8 patients with local PC had alleles PLA1A1, 3 patients--alleles PLA1A2 (27%). We discovered alleles PLA2A2, PLA1A1 and PLA1A2 in 1(7%), 5(36%) and 8(57%) patients with locally advanced PC, respectively. Among patients with metastatic and/or invasive prostatic cancer, there were 4 (57%) and 3 (43%) cases of alleles PLA1A1 and PLA1A2, respectively. Our study demonstrated influence of carriage of PLA2 allele on occurrence of PC risk (5-fold higher) and its invasive forms (10-fold higher and more). Probability to develop local invasion among patients with prostatic cancer--carriers allele PLA1A2 is 6 times higher than among carriers of alleles PLA1A1. A PC course in carriers of alleles PLA1A2 may be characterized by faster development of local invasion and metastasizing vs carriers of alleles PLA1A1. These findings can be used in design of nomograms for prognostication of invasion of clinically small tumors in verification of significance on greater number of the patients.

  19. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  20. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  1. Three new HLA-G alleles and their linkage disequilibria with HLA-A.

    PubMed

    Morales, P; Corell, A; Martínez-Laso, J; Martín-Villa, J M; Varela, P; Paz-Artal, E; Allende, L M; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    1993-01-01

    Three new allelic forms of the HLA-G DNA sequence (HLA-G*II, HLA-G*III, and HLA-G*IV) have been identified. With the HLA-G*I sequence (previously designated HLA 6.0) as a reference, HLA-G*II shows a silent (G-->A) mutation at the third base of codon 57, HLA-G*III bears a non-synonymous (A-->T), but conservative, (Thr-->Ser) substitution at the first base of codon 31, and HLA-G*IV shows two silent substitutions: (A-->T) at the third base of codon 107 and (G-->A) at the third base of codon 57. A rapid method of singling out each allele on genomic DNA has been developed by using polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by restriction endonuclease treatment. Also, more or less strong linkage disequilibria has been found between most HLA-A alleles and either HLA-G*I or *II, both being the most prevalent alleles in the population, with a genotypic frequency of 0.55 and 0.38, respectively; HLA-G*III is very rare and HLA-G*IV has a genotypic frequency of 0.07. An evolutive classification of HLA-A alleles results according to their association with either HLA-G*I or HLA-G*II, which does not correlate with the classical serological cross-reacting groups classification. The finding of a strong and selective A/G linkage disequilibria with most HLA-A alleles, together with the existence of less frequent random A/G associations, may suggest that there exist in different haplotypes true and varied A/G genetic distances (and not a recombinational hotspot). It may be inferred from preliminary data that in primates HLA-A/G haplotypes bearing G*II may have appeared later than those bearing G*I.

  2. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  3. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  4. Allelic Associations between 100 DNA Markers and High versus Low IQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; And Others

    1995-01-01

    For DNA markers in or near genes of neurological relevance, allelic frequencies were compared for groups of high- and low-IQ children (total sample of 86). This study adds 40 markers to the 60 already studied. Only one showed a significant association with IQ in original and replication samples. (SLD)

  5. Allelic gene expression imbalance of bovine IGF2, LEP and CCL2 genes in liver, kidney and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Olbromski, R; Siadkowska, E; Zelazowska, B; Zwierzchowski, L

    2013-02-01

    Allelic expression imbalance (AEI) is an important genetic factor being the cause of differences in phenotypic traits that can be heritable. Studying AEI can be useful in searching for factors that modulate gene expression and help to understand molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic changes. Although it was commonly recognized in many species and we know many genes show allelic expression imbalance, this phenomena was not studied on a larger scale in cattle. Using the pyrosequencing method we analyzed a set of 29 bovine genes in order to find those that have preferential allelic expression. The study was conducted in three tissues: liver, pituitary and kindey. Out of the studied group of genes 3 of them-LEP (leptin), IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2), CCL2 (chemokine C-C motif ligand 2) showed allelic expression imbalance.

  6. Observations Suggesting Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes

    PubMed Central

    McKusick, Victor A.; Kelly, Thaddeus E.; Dorst, John P.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles. Images PMID:4697848

  7. HLA-DR alleles in amyloid beta-peptide autoimmunity: a highly immunogenic role for the DRB1*1501 allele.

    PubMed

    Zota, Victor; Nemirovsky, Anna; Baron, Rona; Fisher, Yair; Selkoe, Dennis J; Altmann, Daniel M; Weiner, Howard L; Monsonego, Alon

    2009-09-01

    Active amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) immunization of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) caused meningoencephalitis in approximately 6% of immunized patients in a clinical trial. In addition, long-term studies of AD patients show varying degrees of Abeta Ab responses, which correlate with the extent of Abeta clearance from the brain. In this study, we examined the contribution of various HLA-DR alleles to these immune-response variations by assessing Abeta T cell reactivity, epitope specificity, and immunogenicity. Analysis of blood samples from 133 individuals disclosed that the abundant DR haplotypes DR15 (found in 36% of subjects), DR3 (in 18%), DR4 (12.5%), DR1 (11%), and DR13 (8%) were associated with Abeta-specific T cell responses elicited via distinct T cell epitopes within residues 15-42 of Abeta. Because the HLA-DRB1*1501 occurred most frequently, we examined the effect of Abeta challenge in humanized mice bearing this allele. The observed T cell response was remarkably strong, dominated by secretion of IFN-gamma and IL-17, and specific to the same T cell epitope as that observed in the HLA-DR15-bearing humans. Furthermore, following long-term therapeutic immunization of an AD mouse model bearing the DRB1*1501 allele, Abeta was effectively cleared from the brain parenchyma and brain microglial activation was reduced. The present study thus characterizes HLA-DR alleles directly associated with specific Abeta T cell epitopes and demonstrates the highly immunogenic properties of the abundant allele DRB1*1501 in a mouse model of AD. This new knowledge enables us to explore the basis for understanding the variations in naturally occurring Abeta-reactive T cells and Abeta immunogenicity among humans.

  8. HLA class I allelic diversity and progression of fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keyur; Norris, Suzanne; Lebeck, Lauralynn; Feng, Anne; Clare, Michael; Pianko, Stephen; Portmann, Bernard; Blatt, Lawrence M; Koziol, James; Conrad, Andrew; McHutchison, John G

    2006-02-01

    Patients infected with HIV-1 who are heterozygous at HLA class I loci present greater variety of antigenic peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, slowing progression to AIDS. A similar broad immune response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection could result in greater hepatic injury. Although specific HLA class II alleles may influence outcome in CHC patients, the role of HLA class I heterogeneity is generally less clearly defined. Our aims were to determine whether HLA class I allelic diversity is associated with disease severity and progression of fibrosis in CHC. The study population consisted of 670 adults with CHC, including 155 with advanced cirrhosis, and 237 non-HCV-infected controls. Serological testing for HLA class I antigens was performed via microlymphocytotoxicity assay. Peptide expression was defined as heterozygous (i.e., a different allele at each locus) or homozygous. Fibrosis staging was determined using METAVIR classification. Heterozygosity at the B locus (fibrosis progression rate [FPR] 0.08 vs. 0.06 units/yr; P = .04) and homozygosity at the A locus (FPR 0.10 vs. 0.08 units/yr; P = .04) predicted a higher median FPR. Age at infection, genotype, and duration of infection were also predictors of FPR. A higher proportion of patients with stage F2-F4 expressed HLA-B18 compared with controls (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.17-4.23; P = .02). These differences were not observed in patients with advanced cirrhosis. HLA zygosity at 1, 2, or 3 alleles was not associated with fibrosis stage, liver inflammation, or treatment outcome. In conclusion, HLA class I allelic diversity has a minor influence on FPRs and disease severity in CHC.

  9. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  10. Salinity tolerance, Na+ exclusion and allele mining of HKT1;5 in Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima: many sources, many genes, one mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultivated rice species (Oryza sativa L. and O. glaberrima Steud.) are generally considered among the crop species most sensitive to salt stress. A handful of lines are known to be tolerant, and a small number of these have been used extensively as donors in breeding programs. However, these donors use many of the same genes and physiological mechanisms to confer tolerance. Little information is available on the diversity of mechanisms used by these species to cope with salt stress, and there is a strong need to identify varieties displaying additional physiological and/or genetic mechanisms to confer higher tolerance. Results Here we present data on 103 accessions from O. sativa and 12 accessions from O. glaberrima, many of which are identified as salt tolerant for the first time, showing moderate to high tolerance of high salinity. The correlation of salinity-induced senescence (as judged by the Standard Evaluation System for Rice, or SES, score) with whole-plant and leaf blade Na+ concentrations was high across nearly all accessions, and was almost identical in both O. sativa and O. glaberrima. The association of leaf Na+ concentrations with cultivar-groups was very weak, but association with the OsHKT1;5 allele was generally strong. Seven major and three minor alleles of OsHKT1;5 were identified, and their comparisons with the leaf Na+ concentration showed that the Aromatic allele conferred the highest exclusion and the Japonica allele the least. A number of exceptions to this association with the Oryza HKT1;5 allele were identified; these probably indicate the existence of additional highly effective exclusion mechanisms. In addition, two landraces were identified, one from Thailand and the other from Senegal, that show high tissue tolerance. Conclusions Significant variation in salinity tolerance exists within both cultivated Oryza species, and this is the first report of significant tolerance in O. glaberrima. The majority of accessions display a

  11. Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern.

    PubMed

    Trask, Amanda E; Bignal, Eric M; McCracken, Davy I; Monaghan, Pat; Piertney, Stuart B; Reid, Jane M

    2016-07-01

    Deleterious recessive alleles that are masked in outbred populations are predicted to be expressed in small, inbred populations, reducing both individual fitness and population viability. However, there are few definitive examples of phenotypic expression of lethal recessive alleles under inbreeding conditions in wild populations. Studies that demonstrate the action of such alleles, and infer their distribution and dynamics, are required to understand their potential impact on population viability and inform management responses. The Scottish population of red-billed choughs (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax), which currently totals <60 breeding pairs and is of major conservation concern, has recently been affected by lethal blindness in nestlings. We used family data to show that the pattern of occurrence of blindness within and across affected families that produced blind nestlings was exactly 0·25, matching that expected given a single-locus autosomal lethal recessive allele. Furthermore, the observed distribution of blind nestlings within affected families did not differ from that expected given Mendelian inheritance of such an allele. Relatedness estimates showed that individuals from affected families were not more closely related to each other than they were to individuals from unaffected families that did not produce blind nestlings. Blind individuals tended to be less heterozygous than non-blind individuals, as expected if blindness was caused by the expression of a recessive allele under inbreeding. However, there was no difference in the variance in heterozygosity estimates, suggesting that some blind individuals were relatively outbred. These results suggest carriers of the blindness allele may be widely distributed across contemporary families rather than restricted to a single family lineage, implying that the allele has persisted across multiple generations. Blindness occurred at low frequency (affecting 1·6% of observed nestlings since 1981). However

  12. Assortative mating can impede or facilitate fixation of underdominant alleles.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Mitchell G; McCandlish, David M; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2016-12-01

    Underdominant mutations have fixed between divergent species, yet classical models suggest that rare underdominant alleles are purged quickly except in small or subdivided populations. We predict that underdominant alleles that also influence mate choice, such as those affecting coloration patterns visible to mates and predators alike, can fix more readily. We analyze a mechanistic model of positive assortative mating in which individuals have n chances to sample compatible mates. This one-parameter model naturally spans random mating (n=1) and complete assortment (n→∞), yet it produces sexual selection whose strength depends non-monotonically on n. This sexual selection interacts with viability selection to either inhibit or facilitate fixation. As mating opportunities increase, underdominant alleles fix as frequently as neutral mutations, even though sexual selection and underdominance independently each suppress rare alleles. This mechanism allows underdominant alleles to fix in large populations and illustrates how life history can affect evolutionary change.

  13. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences.

  14. Association of BLV infection profiles with alleles of the BoLA-DRB3.2 gene.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Sala, L; Ceriani, C; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Rodríguez, E M; Mariño, B; Rodríguez-Dubra, C; Esteban, E N

    2008-08-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) causes lymphosarcoma and persistent lymphocytosis (PL). Some MHC class II gene polymorphisms have been associated with resistance and susceptibility to the development of lymphosarcoma and PL, as well as with a reduced number of circulating BLV-infected lymphocytes. Previously, 230 BLV-infected Holstein cattle were classified into two infection profiles characterized by low and high proviral loads (LPL and HPL respectively). Here, the influence of the polymorphism at the BoLA-DRB3.2* gene of these animals was examined. After genotyping, the association between the BoLA-DRB3.2* alleles and the BLV infection profile was determined as the odds ratio (OR). Two subtypes of allele *11 were identified (ISAG*0901 and *0902). Allele ISAG*0902 showed a stronger association with the LPL profile (OR = 8.24; P < 0.0001) than allele *11 itself (OR = 5.82; P < 0.0001). Allele ISAG*1701 (*12) also showed significant association with the LPL profile (OR = 3.46; P < 0.0055). Only one allele, ISAG*1501 or 03 (*16), showed significant association with HPL (OR = 0.36; P < 0.0005). The DRB3.2* alleles were assigned to three categories: resistant (R), susceptible (S) and neutral (N). Based on their DRB3 genotypes, cattle were classified as homozygous or heterozygous. The RR and RN genotypes were associated with the LPL profile, while the SS and NS genotypes were associated with the HPL profile. The RS genotype could not be associated with any particular profile. Our results show that allele ISAG*0902 appears to be the best BLV resistance marker in Holstein cattle.

  15. Microsatellite null alleles and estimation of population differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Marie-Pierre; Estoup, Arnaud

    2007-03-01

    Microsatellite null alleles are commonly encountered in population genetics studies, yet little is known about their impact on the estimation of population differentiation. Computer simulations based on the coalescent were used to investigate the evolutionary dynamics of null alleles, their impact on F(ST) and genetic distances, and the efficiency of estimators of null allele frequency. Further, we explored how the existing method for correcting genotype data for null alleles performed in estimating F(ST) and genetic distances, and we compared this method with a new method proposed here (for F(ST) only). Null alleles were likely to be encountered in populations with a large effective size, with an unusually high mutation rate in the flanking regions, and that have diverged from the population from which the cloned allele state was drawn and the primers designed. When populations were significantly differentiated, F(ST) and genetic distances were overestimated in the presence of null alleles. Frequency of null alleles was estimated precisely with the algorithm presented in Dempster et al. (1977). The conventional method for correcting genotype data for null alleles did not provide an accurate estimate of F(ST) and genetic distances. However, the use of the genetic distance of Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards (1967) corrected by the conventional method gave better estimates than those obtained without correction. F(ST) estimation from corrected genotype frequencies performed well when restricted to visible allele sizes. Both the proposed method and the traditional correction method have been implemented in a program that is available free of charge at http://www.montpellier.inra.fr/URLB/. We used 2 published microsatellite data sets based on original and redesigned pairs of primers to empirically confirm our simulation results.

  16. Association of the Apolipoprotein E 2 Allele with Concurrent Occurrence of Endometrial Hyperplasia and Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Tatiana I.; Krikunova, Ludmila I.; Ryabchenko, Nikolay I.; Mkrtchyan, Liana S.; Khorokhorina, Vera A.; Salnikova, Lyubov E.

    2015-01-01

    Genes encoding proteins with antioxidant properties may influence susceptibility to endometrial hyperplasia (EH) and endometrial carcinoma (ECa). Patients with EH (n = 89), EH concurrent with ECa (n = 76), ECa (n = 186), and healthy controls (n = 1110) were genotyped for five polymorphic variants in the genes involved in metabolism of lipoproteins (APOE Cys112Arg and Arg158Cys), iron (HFE Cys282Tyr and His63Asp), and catecholamines (COMT Val158Met). Patients and controls were matched by ethnicity (all Caucasians), age, body mass index (BMI), and incidence of hypertension and diabetes. The frequency of the APOE E 2 allele (158Cys) was higher in patients with EH + ECa than in controls (P = 0.0012, PBonferroni = 0.018, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.49–4.45). The APOE E 4 allele (112Arg) was more frequently found in patients with EH than in controls and HFE minor allele G (63Asp) had a protective effect in the ECa group, though these results appeared to be nonsignificant after correction for multiple comparisons. The results of the study indicate that E 2 allele might be associated with concurrent occurrence of EH and ECa. PMID:25741405

  17. JAK2 Allele Burden in the Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Effects on Phenotype, Prognosis and Change with Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Pieri, Lisa; Guglielmelli, Paola

    2011-01-01

    The field of Philadelphia-chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has recently witnessed tremendous advances in the basic knowledge of disease pathophysiology that followed the identification of mutations in JAK2 and MPL. These discoveries led to a revision of the criteria employed for diagnosis by the World Health Organization. The prognostic role of the JAK2V617F mutation and of its allelic burden has been the objective of intensive research using a variety of cellular and animal models as well as in large series of patients. While a definitive position cannot yet been taken on all of the issues, there is a consensus that the presence of higher V617F allele burden, that is on the basis of a stronger activation of intracellular signalling pathways, is associated with the clinical phenotype of polycythemia vera and with defined haematological and clinical markers indicative of a more aggressive phenotype. On the other hand, a low allele burden in myelofibrosis is associated with reduced survival. Finally, a significant reduction of JAK2 V617F allele burden has been demonstrated in patients treated with interferon, while the effects of novel JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitors have not yet been fully ascertained. PMID:23556073

  18. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates.

    PubMed

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Martin, Nicholas G; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel; Smith, George Davey

    2013-10-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to expensively measure

  19. The heterogeneous allelic repertoire of human toll-like receptor (TLR) genes.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe; Macquin, Cécile; Bahram, Seiamak

    2009-11-17

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) are critical elements of the innate arm of the vertebrate immune system. They constitute a multigenic family of receptors which collectively bind a diverse array of--exogeneous as well as endogeneous--ligands. An exponential burst of knowledge has defined their biological role in fight against infections and generation/modulation of auto-immune disorders. Hence, they could at least be conceptually recognized--despite being structurally unrelated - as innate counterparts to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules--equally recognizing antigenic ligands (albeit structurally more homogeneous i.e., peptides), again derived from self and/or non-self sources--preeminent this time in adaptive immunity. Our great disparities in face of infections and/or susceptibility to auto-immune diseases have provoked an intense search for genetic explanations, in part satisfied by the extraordinary MHC allelic repertoire. An equally in-depth and systematic analysis of TLR diversity is lacking despite numerous independent reports of a growing number of SNPs within these loci. The work described here aims at providing a preliminary picture of the allelic repertoire--and not purely SNPs--of all 10 human TLR coding sequences (with exception of TLR3) within a single cohort of up to 100 individuals. It appears from our work that TLR are unequally polymorphic: TLR2 (DNA alleles: 7/protein alleles: 3), 4 (4/3), 7 (6/3), 8 (9/2) and 9 (8/3) being comparatively least diverse whereas TLR1 (11/10), 5 (14/12), 6 (10/8) and 10 (15/10) show a substantial number of alleles. In addition to allelic assignment of a large number of SNPs, 10 new polymorphic positions were hereby identified. Hence this work depicts a first overview of the diversity of almost all human TLR genes, a prelude for large-scale population genetics as well as genetic association studies.

  20. Allelic Imbalance in Regulation of ANRIL through Chromatin Interaction at 9p21 Endometriosis Risk Locus

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Hayano, Takahide; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Omer, Waleed H; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Akihito; Kurose, Keisuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Akira, Shigeo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human complex disorders. However, functional characterization of the disease-associated SNPs remains a formidable challenge. Here we explored regulatory mechanism of a SNP on chromosome 9p21 associated with endometriosis by leveraging “allele-specific” functional genomic approaches. By re-sequencing 1.29 Mb of 9p21 region and scrutinizing DNase-seq data from the ENCODE project, we prioritized rs17761446 as a candidate functional variant that was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the original GWAS SNP (rs10965235) and located on DNase I hypersensitive site. Chromosome conformation capture followed by high-throughput sequencing revealed that the protective G allele of rs17761446 exerted stronger chromatin interaction with ANRIL promoter. We demonstrated that the protective allele exhibited preferential binding affinities to TCF7L2 and EP300 by bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. ChIP assays for histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation and RNA polymerase II reinforced the enhancer activity of the SNP site. The allele specific expression analysis for eutopic endometrial tissues and endometrial carcinoma cell lines showed that rs17761446 was a cis-regulatory variant where G allele was associated with increased ANRIL expression. Our work illuminates the allelic imbalances in a series of transcriptional regulation from factor binding to gene expression mediated by chromatin interaction underlie the molecular mechanism of 9p21 endometriosis risk locus. Functional genomics on common disease will unlock functional aspect of genotype-phenotype correlations in the post-GWAS stage. PMID:27055116

  1. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  2. Sex-specific allelic transmission bias suggests sexual conflict at MC1R.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Valérie; Gaigher, Arnaud; Simon, Céline; Goudet, Jérôme; Roulin, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Sexual conflict arises when selection in one sex causes the displacement of the other sex from its phenotypic optimum, leading to an inevitable tension within the genome - called intralocus sexual conflict. Although the autosomal melanocortin-1-receptor gene (MC1R) can generate colour variation in sexually dichromatic species, most previous studies have not considered the possibility that MC1R may be subject to sexual conflict. In the barn owl (Tyto alba), the allele MC1RWHITE is associated with whitish plumage coloration, typical of males, and the allele MC1RRUFOUS is associated with dark rufous coloration, typical of females, although each sex can express any phenotype. Because each colour variant is adapted to specific environmental conditions, the allele MC1RWHITE may be more strongly selected in males and the allele MC1RRUFOUS in females. We therefore investigated whether MC1R genotypes are in excess or deficit in male and female fledglings compared with the expected Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Our results show an overall deficit of 7.5% in the proportion of heterozygotes in males and of 12.9% in females. In males, interannual variation in assortative pairing with respect to MC1R explained the year-specific deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, whereas in females, the deficit was better explained by the interannual variation in the probability of inheriting the MC1RWHITE or MC1RRUFOUS allele. Additionally, we observed that sons inherit the MC1RRUFOUS allele from their fathers on average slightly less often than expected under the first Mendelian law. Transmission ratio distortion may be adaptive in this sexually dichromatic species if males and females are, respectively, selected to display white and rufous plumages.

  3. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jennifer E; Abramian, Jared R; Dao, Doan-Hieu V; Rigney, Todd W; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  4. Genetic Exchange of Fimbrial Alleles Exemplifies the Adaptive Virulence Strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jennifer E.; Abramian, Jared R.; Dao, Doan-Hieu V.; Rigney, Todd W.; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram–negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed “keystone” pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions. PMID:24626479

  5. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  6. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  7. Preferential transmission of the MTHFR 677 T allele to infants with Down syndrome: implications for a survival advantage.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Charlotte A; Cleves, Mario A; Lauer, Ronald M; Burns, Trudy L; James, S Jill

    2002-11-15

    We have examined the transmission frequencies of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677 T and C alleles from heterozygous parents to children with Down syndrome (trisomy 21) in 202 Caucasian families. Our results indicated that the MTHFR 677T allele was transmitted to children with Down syndrome at a significantly higher rate than would be expected based on Mendelian inheritance patterns, and the C allele was transmitted at a significantly lower rate (P < 0.009). Transmission frequencies were also examined independently for maternally and paternally transmitted alleles to assess potential parent-of-origin effects. Because the vast majority of conceptions with trisomy 21 end in pregnancy loss, we questioned whether the observed preferential transmission of the T allele to this population of liveborn infants with Down syndrome could reflect a survival advantage. A plausible biochemical interpretation of these results is presented based on a maternal-fetal MTHFR 677T allele interaction in the context of the constitutive overexpression of three copies of the cystathionine beta synthase gene in the trisomy 21 fetus. Published 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Heterologous protein-DNA interactions lead to biased allelic expression of circadian clock genes in interspecific hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Danny W-K.; Chen, Helen H. Y.; Chen, Z. Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Genomic interactions in allopolyploids create expression variation of homoeologous alleles through protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. However, the molecular basis for this is largely unknown. Here we investigated the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions among homoeologous transcription factors in the circadian-clock feedback loop, consisting of CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1), and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1), plus the interaction with a chromatin factor, HISTONE DEACETYLASE1 (HD1). In the allotetraploids formed between A. thaliana (At) and Arabidopsis arenosa (Aa), AtCCA1 is expressed at lower levels than AaCCA1, which could alter clock output traits. The reduced AtCCA1 expressions in the allotetraploids are consistent with the biochemical data that AaCHE showed preferential binding to the AtCCA1 promoter, in which AaCHE interacts with a higher affinity to AtHD1 than AtCHE. AaCHE also showed a higher affinity to TOC1 than AtCHE, consistent with the effect of TOC1 on repressing CCA1. Thus, stronger AaCHE-TOC1 and AaCHE-AtHD1 interactions reduce AtCC1 allelic expression. Our current data suggest a biochemical basis for protein interactions in trans with a preference to the cis-acting elements in heterologous combinations to reduce AtCCA1 expression, while altered CCA1 expression has been shown to affect metabolic and biomass heterosis in interspecific hybrids or allotetraploids. PMID:28345627

  9. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  10. Cooperation of Adhesin Alleles in Salmonella-Host Tropism

    PubMed Central

    De Masi, Leon; Yue, Min; Hu, Changmin; Rakov, Alexey V.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Allelic combinations and host specificities for three fimbrial adhesins, FimH, BcfD, and StfH, were compared for 262 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, a frequent human and livestock pathogen. Like FimH, BcfD had two major alleles (designated A and B), whereas StfH had two allelic groups, each with two alleles (subgroup A1 and A2 and subgroup B1 and B2). The most prevalent combinations of FimH/BcfD/StfH alleles in S. Newport were A/A/A1 and B/B/B1. The former set was most frequently found in bovine and porcine strains, whereas the latter combination was most frequently found in environmental and human isolates. Bacteria genetically engineered to express Fim, Bcf, or Stf fimbriae on their surface were tested with the different alleles for binding to human, porcine, and bovine intestinal epithelial cells. The major allelic combinations with bovine and porcine strains (A/A/A1) or with human isolates (B/B/B1) provided at least two alleles capable of binding significantly better than the other alleles to an intestinal epithelial cell line from the respective host(s). However, each combination of alleles kept at least one allele mediating binding to an intestinal epithelial cell from another host. These findings indicated that allelic variation in multiple adhesins of S. Newport contributes to bacterial adaptation to certain preferential hosts without losing the capacity to maintain a broad host range. IMPORTANCE Salmonella enterica remains a leading foodborne bacterial pathogen in the United States; infected livestock serve often as the source of contaminated food products. A study estimated that over a billion Salmonella gastroenteritis cases and up to 33 million typhoid cases occur annually worldwide, with 3.5 million deaths. Although many Salmonella strains with a broad host range present preferential associations with certain host species, it is not clear what determines the various levels of host adaptation. Here, causal properties of host

  11. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  12. Seed fates in crop–wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  13. Sequencing of two new HLA class II alleles: DRB3*0218 and DQB1*030202.

    PubMed

    Balas, A; Aviles, M J; Lillo, R; Alonso-Nieto, M; Zarapuz, L; García-Villaescusa, R; García-Sánchez, F; Vicario, J L

    2004-06-01

    Two novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles for DRB3 and DQB1 genes detected in Caucasoid Spanish individuals are described: DRB3*0218 and DQB1*030202. Both alleles have been found during routine high-resolution typing by sequencing. DRB3*0218 shows a novel DRB3 gene polymorphic position, located at amino acid residue 58, alanine to glutamic acid. This residue is shared by several DRB1 alleles, including all described DRB1*11 subtypes. DQB1*030202 differs from DQB1*030201 by a point mutation at position 319 (T to C). This nucleotide change generates a new codon at amino acid position 75 that is not shared by any other DQB1 allele.

  14. Additional variability at the D12S391 STR locus in an Austrian population sample: sequencing data and allele distribution.

    PubMed

    Glock, B; Dauber, E M; Schwartz, D W; Mayr, W R

    1997-12-01

    The highly polymorphic STR locus D12S391 was investigated in an Austrian population sample (N = 150) by PCR-amplification, comparative detection on native and denaturing polyacrylamide gels and solid phase single stranded sequencing of three size variant alleles and several additional alleles. A total of 15 alleles, distinguishable by size under denaturing conditions, could be detected. No deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in the population investigated (P = 0.52). Sequencing of size variants designated 17.3 and 18.3 showed an incomplete (GAT) repeat unit at position two of the tandem region. Additional new sequence variants due to varying compositions of the number of (AGAT) and (AGAC) repeats could be identified. Due to distinct electrophoretical mobilities of alleles of the same size but different sequence structures, denaturing detection conditions should be employed when the aim is standardization.

  15. Analysis and frequency of bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) alleles in Iranian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Nassiry, M R; Shahroodi, F Eftekhar; Mosafer, J; Mohammadi, A; Manshad, E; Ghazanfari, S; Mohammad Abadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2005-06-01

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune response by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. DRB3 gene has been extensively evaluated as a candidate marker for association with various bovine diseases and immunological traits. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian Holstein cattle. This is the first study of the DNA polymorphism of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Iranian Holstein cattle. Hemi-nested PCR-RFLP method is used for identification the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the studied herd (26 alleles). Almost 67% of the alleles were accounted for four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*8, *24, *11 and *16) in Iranian Holstein cattle. The DRB3.2*8 allele frequency (26.6%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2*54, *37, *36, *28, *25, *14, *13, *10, *1 alleles were lower than 1%. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian Holstein cattle and other cattle breeds studied. In Iranian Holstein cattle the alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*22, *2 and *16) associated with a lower risk of cystic ovarian disease in Holstein cattle are found. The alleles associated with the resistance to mastitis and to bovine leukemia virus infection BoLA-DRB3.2*11 and *23 are detected with the frequencies 10.4% and 4.4%, respectively. Thus in the Iranian Holstein cows studied are found alleles which are associated with resistance to various diseases. The method of DNA-typing of animals can be used in agricultural practice for BoLA-DRB3 allele genotyping of cattle in order to reduce spreading of alleles providing susceptibility to mastitis or leukemia in cattle herds.

  16. Association of the apolipoprotein E {epsilon}4 allele with clinical subtypes of autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer`s Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zubenko, G.S.; Stiffler, S.; Kopp, U.

    1994-09-15

    Consistent with previous reports, we observed a significant association of the APOE {epsilon}4 allele with Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) in a series of 91 autopsy-confirmed cases. The {epsilon}4 allele frequency was higher in cases with a family history of AD-like dementia (0.54 {+-} 0.07), although the {epsilon}4 allele frequency in the AD cases with a negative family history (0.38 {+-} 0.05) remained significantly greater than that for the non-AD control group (0.13 {+-} 0.03). A similar increase in {epsilon}4 allele frequency (0.54 {+-} 0.07) was observed in the AD cases with amyloid angiopathy, compared to those who did not have amyloid angiopathy (0.35 {+-} 0.04). Contrary to previous reports, no effect of the dosage of the {epsilon}4 allele was found on the age of onset of dementia among the AD cases and, contrary to reports suggesting an association of {epsilon}4 and atherosclerosis, the {epsilon}4 allele frequency was similar in cases with or without concurrent brain infarcts. Modest but consistent correlations were observed between the dosage of {epsilon}4 alleles and the cortical density of senile plaques, but not neurofibrillary tangles. The last finding suggests that the pathogenic events mediated by the {epsilon}4 allele may be more directly involved in the formation of senile plaques, the identifying lesions in AD, than neurofibrillary tangles. A robust association of both the presence of an {epsilon}4 allele and a family history of AD-like dementia with concurrent amyloid angiopathy occurred within our sample of AD cases. This association arose from an interaction of the {epsilon}4 allele with a separate familial factor for which a family history of dementia served as a surrogate. These results suggest that amyloid angiopathy may be a common or central feature of a form of familial AD that is associated with the transmission of the APOE {epsilon}4 allele. 22 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Population Bottlenecks and Nonequilibrium Models in Population Genetics. II. Number of Alleles in a Small Population That Was Formed by a Recent Bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takeo; Fuerst, Paul A.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented in which a large population in mutation/drift equilibrium undergoes a severe restriction in size and subsequently remains at the small size. The rate of loss of genetic variability has been studied. Allelic loss occurs more rapidly than loss of genic heterozygosity. Rare alleles are lost especially rapidly. The result is a transient deficiency in the total number of alleles observed in samples taken from the reduced population when compared with the number expected in a sample from a steady-state population having the same observed heterozygosity. Alternatively, the population can be considered to posses excess gene diversity if the number of alleles is used as the statistical estimator of mutation rate. The deficit in allele number arises principally from a lack of those alleles that are expected to appear only once or twice in the sample. The magnitude of the allelic deficiency is less, however, than the excess that an earlier study predicted to follow a rapid population expansion. This suggests that populations that have undergone a single bottleneck event, followed by rapid population growth, should have an apparent excess number of alleles, given the observed level of genic heterozygosity and provided that the bottleneck has not occurred very recently. Conversely, such populations will be deficient for observed heterozygosity if allele number is used as the sufficient statistic for the estimation of 4Nev . Populations that have undergone very recent restrictions in size should show the opposite tendencies. PMID:4054612

  18. Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection.

    PubMed

    Hofer, T; Ray, N; Wegmann, D; Excoffier, L

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found strikingly different allele frequencies between continents. This has been mainly interpreted as being due to local adaptation. However, demographic factors can generate similar patterns. Namely, allelic surfing during a population range expansion may increase the frequency of alleles in newly colonised areas. In this study, we examined 772 STRs, 210 diallelic indels, and 2834 SNPs typed in 53 human populations worldwide under the HGDP-CEPH Diversity Panel to determine to which extent allele frequency differs among four regions (Africa, Eurasia, East Asia, and America). We find that large allele frequency differences between continents are surprisingly common, and that Africa and America show the largest number of loci with extreme frequency differences. Moreover, more STR alleles have increased rather than decreased in frequency outside Africa, as expected under allelic surfing. Finally, there is no relationship between the extent of allele frequency differences and proximity to genes, as would be expected under selection. We therefore conclude that most of the observed large allele frequency differences between continents result from demography rather than from positive selection.

  19. Fitness evolution and the rise of mutator alleles in experimental Escherichia coli populations.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Aaron C; Dombrowski, Peter G; Sweeney, Joseph Y; Treis, Tania; Zappala, Renata M; Sniegowski, Paul D

    2002-01-01

    We studied the evolution of high mutation rates and the evolution of fitness in three experimental populations of Escherichia coli adapting to a glucose-limited environment. We identified the mutations responsible for the high mutation rates and show that their rate of substitution in all three populations was too rapid to be accounted for simply by genetic drift. In two of the populations, large gains in fitness relative to the ancestor occurred as the mutator alleles rose to fixation, strongly supporting the conclusion that mutator alleles fixed by hitchhiking with beneficial mutations at other loci. In one population, no significant gain in fitness relative to the ancestor occurred in the population as a whole while the mutator allele rose to fixation, but a substantial and significant gain in fitness occurred in the mutator subpopulation as the mutator neared fixation. The spread of the mutator allele from rarity to fixation took >1000 generations in each population. We show that simultaneous adaptive gains in both the mutator and wild-type subpopulations (clonal interference) retarded the mutator fixation in at least one of the populations. We found little evidence that the evolution of high mutation rates accelerated adaptation in these populations. PMID:12399371

  20. Generation of a Conditional Null Allele of Jumonji

    PubMed Central

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R.; Chen, Junqin; Powers, Patricia A.; Bartley, Christopher R.; Schneider, Michael D.; Lee, Youngsook

    2007-01-01

    Summary: The jumonji (jmj) gene plays important roles in multiple organ development in mouse, including cardiovascular development. Since JMJ is expressed widely during mouse development, it is essential that conditional knockout approaches be employed to ablate JMJ in a tissue-specific manner to identify the cell lineage specific roles of JMJ. In this report, we describe the establishment of a jmj conditional null allele in mice by generating a loxP-flanked (floxed) jmj allele, which allows the in vivo ablation of jmj via Cre recombinase-mediated deletion. Gene targeting was used to introduce loxP sites flanking exon 3 of the jmj allele to mouse embryonic stem cells. Our results indicate that the jmj floxed allele converts to a null allele in a heart-specific manner when embryos homozygous for the floxed jmj allele and carrying the α-myosin heavy chain promoter-Cre transgene were analyzed by Southern and Northern blot analyses. Therefore, this mouse line harboring the conditional jmj null allele will provide a valuable tool for deciphering the tissue and cell lineage specific roles of JMJ. PMID:16900512

  1. Estimating relatedness and relationships using microsatellite loci with null alleles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A P; Creel, S; Kalinowski, S T

    2006-11-01

    Relatedness is often estimated from microsatellite genotypes that include null alleles. When null alleles are present, observed genotypes represent one of several possible true genotypes. If null alleles are detected, but analyses do not adjust for their presence (ie, observed genotypes are treated as true genotypes), then estimates of relatedness and relationship can be incorrect. The number of loci available in many wildlife studies is limited, and loci with null alleles are commonly a large proportion of data that cannot be discarded without substantial loss of power. To resolve this problem, we present a new approach for estimating relatedness and relationships from data sets that include null alleles. Once it is recognized that the probability of the observed genotypes is dependent on the probabilities of a limited number of possible true genotypes, the required adjustments are straightforward. The concept can be applied to any existing estimators of relatedness and relationships. We review established maximum likelihood estimators and apply the correction in that setting. In an application of the corrected method to data from striped hyenas, we demonstrate that correcting for the presence of null alleles affect results substantially. Finally, we use simulated data to confirm that this method works better than two common approaches, namely ignoring the presence of null alleles or discarding affected loci.

  2. Allelic variant in the anti-Müllerian hormone gene leads to autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal in a selected Nile tilapia line.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Stephan; Sharifi, Reza Ahmad; Luehmann, Liane Magdalena; Rueangsri, Sawichaya; Krause, Ina; Pach, Sabrina; Hoerstgen-Schwark, Gabriele; Knorr, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the demand for sustainable sex-control protocols in aquaculture, research in tilapia sex determination is gaining momentum. The mutual influence of environmental and genetic factors hampers disentangling the complex sex determination mechanism in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Previous linkage analyses have demonstrated quantitative trait loci for the phenotypic sex on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Quantitative trait loci for temperature-dependent sex reversal similarly reside on linkage group 23. The anti-Müllerian hormone gene (amh), located in this genomic region, is important for sexual fate in higher vertebrates, and shows sexually dimorphic expression in Nile tilapia. Therefore this study aimed at detecting allelic variants and marker-sex associations in the amh gene. Sequencing identified six allelic variants. A significant effect on the phenotypic sex for SNP ss831884014 (p<0.0017) was found by stepwise logistic regression. The remaining variants were not significantly associated. Functional annotation of SNP ss831884014 revealed a non-synonymous amino acid substitution in the amh protein. Consequently, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based genotyping assay was developed and validated with a representative sample of fish. A logistic linear model confirmed a highly significant effect of the treatment and genotype on the phenotypic sex, but not for the interaction term (treatment: p<0.0001; genotype: p<0.0025). An additive genetic model proved a linear allele substitution effect of 12% in individuals from controls and groups treated at high temperature, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the genotype on the male proportion was significantly higher in groups treated at high temperature, giving 31% more males on average of the three genotypes. In addition, the groups treated at high temperature showed a positive dominance deviation (+11.4% males). In summary, marker-assisted selection for amh variant ss831884014 seems to be

  3. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Shen, Chen; Arai, Eri; Xu, Yali; Kinney, Justin B.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development. PMID:28231254

  4. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J; Shen, Chen; Arai, Eri; Xu, Yali; Kinney, Justin B; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Vakoc, Christopher R; Shi, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development.

  5. HLA class I-mediated control of HIV-1 in the Japanese population, in which the protective HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 alleles are absent.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Takuya; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Nelson, George; Sakai, Keiko; Carrington, Mary; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effect of HLA class I alleles on clinical parameters for HIV-1 disease progression in the Japanese population, where two strongly protective alleles, HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27, are virtually nonexistent. HLA-B alleles showed a dominant role, primarily through HLA-B*67:01 and the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype. Neither a rare-allele nor a heterozygote advantage was found, suggesting that the effect of HLA alleles in the Japanese population is either different from those observed in Africans and Caucasians or undetectable due to limited power.

  6. Quantifying RNA allelic ratios by microfluidic multiplex PCR and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Xin; Ramaswami, Gokul; Smith, Kevin S; Turecki, Gustavo; Montgomery, Stephen B; Li, Jin Billy

    2014-01-01

    We developed a targeted RNA sequencing method that couples microfluidics-based multiplex PCR and deep sequencing (mmPCR-seq) to uniformly and simultaneously amplify up to 960 loci in 48 samples independently of their gene expression levels and to accurately and cost-effectively measure allelic ratios even for low-quantity or low-quality RNA samples. We applied mmPCR-seq to RNA editing and allele-specific expression studies. mmPCR-seq complements RNA-seq for studying allelic variations in the transcriptome.

  7. Increased risk of the abdominal aortic aneurysm in carriers of the MTHFR 677T allele.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Gabriel, Marcin; Zapalski, Stanisław; Pawlak, Andrzej L

    2003-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) presents itself as a progressive dilation of the abdominal aorta, leading--if untreated--to rupture. It is a common disease of the elderly, with a complex etiology. Several genetic, biochemical and environmental factors are recognized as relevant for the pathogenesis of AAA. We determined the polymorphism of the MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) gene within the fourth exon (C677T) in 63 patients with AAA and compared it to that in 75 subjects of the population sample. The frequencies of the C/C, C/T and T/T genotypes were 65%, 27%, and 8% in the population sample and 33%, 60%, and 6% in the patients. This corresponds to a 4.4-fold greater risk of AAA in subjects who have the 677C/T variant of MTHFR, as compared with those who are 677C/C (p < 0.0001; 95% CI=2.11-9.34). The frequency of allele MTHFR 677T in patients (0.37) was higher than in the population sample (0.21; p < 0.007). This association between the common allele of the MTHFR gene--MTHFR 677T--and the development of AAA suggests that elevated homocysteine (Hcy) may disturb the function of the aortic wall. The disturbance may involve enhancement of elastin degradation, the process enhanced by mild hyperhomocysteinemia in minipigs. The magnitude of this effect, which refers to the AAA patients unselected for familial occurrence, indicates that the disturbance of aortic wall physiology caused by the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele is greater than the effect of the earlier described allele disequilibrium at the polymorphic alleles of the PAI1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1) gene seen only in familial cases of AAA.

  8. The Frequency of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in the Turkish Population: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Patıroğlu, Türkan; Akar, H. Haluk

    2016-01-01

    We studied the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen alleles (A, B, and DRB1) in 90 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and then compared them with 126 controls in this study. Although the frequencies of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and homozygosity of A*02 were higher in patients (p=0.006, p=0.003, p=0.002, p=0.01, and p=0.02, respectively), the frequencies of the A*23, B*13, B*40, and DRB1*13 alleles were lower (p=0.002, p=0.07, p=0.002, and p=0.003, respectively) in patients than controls. The frequencies of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles were higher in patients in the high-risk group and standard-risk group, respectively (p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively). This study indicated that the frequency of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and A*02 homozygosity may play a predisposing role in patients with ALL in the Turkish population. The frequency of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles may also be associated with high risk and standard risk in patients with ALL, respectively. PMID:27095065

  9. The Frequency of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in the Turkish Population: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Patıroğlu, Türkan; Akar, H Haluk

    2016-12-01

    We studied the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen alleles (A, B, and DRB1) in 90 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and then compared them with 126 controls in this study. Although the frequencies of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and homozygosity of A*02 were higher in patients (p=0.006, p=0.003, p=0.002, p=0.01, and p=0.02, respectively), the frequencies of the A*23, B*13, B*40, and DRB1*13 alleles were lower (p=0.002, p=0.07, p=0.002, and p=0.003, respectively) in patients than controls. The frequencies of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles were higher in patients in the high-risk group and standard-risk group, respectively (p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively). This study indicated that the frequency of the A*03 allele, the DRB1*03 allele, the DRB1*04 allele, the A*02/B*35/DRB1*13 haplotype, and A*02 homozygosity may play a predisposing role in patients with ALL in the Turkish population. The frequency of the DRB1*04 and DRB1*07 alleles may also be associated with high risk and standard risk in patients with ALL, respectively.

  10. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Bruce W.; Gell, Richard M.; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B.; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing. PMID:26731416

  11. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Horn, Bruce W; Gell, Richard M; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing.

  12. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Gregory, Dennis E.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning higher education are reported in this chapter. Issues of employment and the treatment of students underlay the bulk of the litigation. Specific topics addressed in these and other cases included federal authority to enforce regulations against age discrimination and to revoke an…

  13. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    Litigation in 1987 was very brisk with an increase in the number of higher education cases reviewed. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under four major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining and denial of employee benefits; (3)…

  14. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Finnegan, Dorothy E.

    The higher education case law in 1988 is extensive. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under five major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining, and denial of employee benefits; (3) students, involving admissions, financial aid, First…

  15. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Laurence W.; Wedlock, Eldon D., Jr.

    Courts have been consistently reluctant to interfere with governing boards' powers to control the administration of institutions of higher education. This deference seems to be based on the belief that board expertise makes it significantly more qualified than are the courts to make the necessary administrative decisions. Uncritical deference by…

  16. Transient Pairing of Homologous Oct4 Alleles Accompanies the Onset of Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Megan S.; Parfitt, David-Emlyn; Zepeda-Mendoza, Cinthya J.; Shen, Michael M.; Spector, David L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The relationship between chromatin organization and transcriptional regulation is an area of intense investigation. We have characterized the spatial relationships between alleles of the Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog genes in single cells during the earliest stages of mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation and during embryonic development. We describe homologous pairing of the Oct4 alleles during ESC differentiation and embryogenesis, and present evidence that pairing is correlated with the kinetics of ESC differentiation. Importantly, we identify critical DNA elements within the Oct4 promoter/enhancer region that mediate pairing of Oct4 alleles. Finally, we show that mutation of OCT4/SOX2 binding sites within this region abolishes inter-chromosomal interactions and affects accumulation of the repressive H3K9me2 modification at the Oct4 enhancer. Our findings demonstrate that chromatin organization and transcriptional programs are intimately connected in ESCs, and that the dynamic positioning of the Oct4 alleles is associated with the transition from pluripotency to lineage specification. PMID:25748933

  17. Allele frequencies of microsatellite loci for genetic characterization of a Sicilian bovine population.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, M; Reale, S; Lupo, T; Vitale, F; Caracappa, S

    2015-01-30

    Short tandem repeats are used as an effective method to trace DNA markers in genotyping. Using a standardized kit, we tested 11 microsatellite markers recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) in a sample of 495 Sicilian cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the allele frequencies in the Sicilian cattle population to provide a reference database and at the same time to assess the use of the ISAG microsatellite panel for pedigree analysis. DNA samples were collected from blood and amplified in an 11-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR); PCR products were injected in a 3130 Genetic Analyzer. All loci showed high mean polymorphism information content (0.768), and the observed mean heterozygosity was less than the expected value (0.732 vs 0.794, respectively). The exact test for Hardy-Weinberg proportions, allele number, and inbreeding coefficient were calculated. Our results indicated that equilibrium was not always maintained. The observed mean homozygote value exceeded the expected value (132.81 vs 102.14), but no evidence for allele dropout was found. These results could be explained by a non-random mating; further studies using a larger number of animals could confirm or invalidate this hypothesis. The probability of identity and exclusion of a locus were also estimated and proved to be useful in paternity testing. The ISAG microsatellite panel is useful to screen the Sicilian bovine kinship. Currently, an allele frequency database is being constructed.

  18. Estimating Allele Age and Selection Coefficient from Time-Serial Data

    PubMed Central

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright–Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication. PMID:22851647

  19. Associations of Moyamoya patients with HLA class I and class II alleles in the Korean population.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hoon; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Yoo, Do-Sung; Huh, Pil-Woo; Cho, Kyung-Souk; Kim, Dal-Soo

    2003-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by progressive cerebrovascular occlusion at the peripheral internal carotid artery and development of abnormal collateral circulation at the cerebral basal region. Although abnormal thrombogenesis, inflammation and autoimmune process might be involved in the etiology, the genetic pathogenesis of Moyamoya disease is still unknown. To evaluate the association of Moyamoya disease with HLA alleles in the Korean population, we investigated HLA class I and class II alleles in 28 Moyamoya patients and 198 unrelated healthy controls. The frequency of HLA-B35 allele was significantly increased in the patients compared to the controls (32.1% vs. 10.1%, RR=4.2, p<0.008). Further analysis of HLA-B35 on onset age and sex showed that this allele was significantly increased compared to the controls in both late-onset and female group. Especially, HLA-B35 was the most significantly increased in female of late-onset group compared to the controls. These results suggest that HLA-B35 may be an useful genetic marker for Moyamoya disease, and particularly in females of late onset group in the Korean population. PMID:14676447

  20. Estimating allele age and selection coefficient from time-serial data.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Malaspinas, Orestis; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made available an ever-increasing amount of ancient genomic data. In particular, it is now possible to target specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in several samples at different time points. Such time-series data are also available in the context of experimental or viral evolution. Time-series data should allow for a more precise inference of population genetic parameters and to test hypotheses about the recent action of natural selection. In this manuscript, we develop a likelihood method to jointly estimate the selection coefficient and the age of an allele from time-serial data. Our method can be used for allele frequencies sampled from a single diallelic locus. The transition probabilities are calculated by approximating the standard diffusion equation of the Wright-Fisher model with a one-step process. We show that our method produces unbiased estimates. The accuracy of the method is tested via simulations. Finally, the utility of the method is illustrated with an application to several loci encoding coat color in horses, a pattern that has previously been linked with domestication. Importantly, given our ability to estimate the age of the allele, it is possible to gain traction on the important problem of distinguishing selection on new mutations from selection on standing variation. In this coat color example for instance, we estimate the age of this allele, which is found to predate domestication.

  1. Genetic Heterogeneity within Electrophoretic "Alleles" of Xanthine Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. S.; Lewontin, R. C.; Felton, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental plan for an exhaustive determination of genic variation at structural gene loci is presented. In the initial steps of this program, 146 isochromosomal lines from 12 geographic populations of D. pseudoobscura were examined for allelic variation of xanthine dehydrogenase by the serial use of 4 different electrophoretic conditions and a heat stability test. The 5 criteria revealed a total of 37 allelic classes out of the 146 genomes examined where only 6 had been previously revealed by the usual method of gel electrophoresis. This immense increase in genic variation also showed previously unsuspected population differences between the main part of the species distribution and the isolated population of Bogotá, Colombia, in conformity with the known partial reproductive isolation of the Bogotá population. The average heterozygosity at the Xdh locus is at least 72% in natural populations. This result, together with the very large number of alleles segregating and the pattern of allelic frequencies, has implications for theories of genetic polymorphism which are discussed. PMID:1001881

  2. Evaluation of allelic instability in MEN 2A and FMTC tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, M.K.; Bratti, L.M.; Rothschild, C.B.

    1994-09-01

    Allelic instability of genomic DNA in tumors derived from individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) or medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) was evaluated. Fourteen highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat polymorphism markers from 5 different chromosomes were tested. Allelic difference between tumor and peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was observed in 4 of 9 tumors, 2 of which showed allelic instability at more than 1 locus. Pet 1, a sporadic, moderately aggressive MTC, revealed allelic instability at 5 different loci from 4 chromosomes. Rut1, an aggressive MTC from a patient with MEN 2A, revealed genetic instability at 3 different loci, all located on chromosome 10. Microsatellite instability has been associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) and has been attributed to germline mutations in hMSH2. In MEN 2A and familial MTC, the initiating event in tumorigenesis is a germline mutation in the receptor tyrosine kinase RET. Progression to full tumor development likely required additional somatic mutations. The presence of microsatellite instability in some MTCs suggests that these additional mutations may affect DNA repair genes such as hMSH2 that has been associated with HNPCC.

  3. Association between Age and the 7 Repeat Allele of the Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Anna; Bircher, Julianna; Vereczkei, Andrea; Balota, David A.; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is in part (25%) inherited, and genetic studies aim to uncover allelic variants that play an important role in prolonging life span. Results to date confirm only a few gene variants associated with longevity, while others show inconsistent results. However, GWAS studies concentrate on single nucleotide polymorphisms, and there are only a handful of studies investigating variable number of tandem repeat variations related to longevity. Recently, Grady and colleagues (2013) reported a remarkable (66%) accumulation of those carrying the 7 repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in a large population of 90–109 years old Californian centenarians, as compared to an ancestry-matched young population. In the present study we demonstrate the same association using continuous age groups in an 18–97 years old Caucasian sample (N = 1801, p = 0.007). We found a continuous pattern of increase from 18–75, however frequency of allele 7 carriers decreased in our oldest age groups. Possible role of gene-environment interaction effects driven by historical events are discussed. In accordance with previous findings, we observed association preferentially in females (p = 0.003). Our results underlie the importance of investigating non-disease related genetic variants as inherited components of longevity, and confirm, that the 7-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene is a longevity enabling genetic factor, accumulating in the elderly female population. PMID:27992450

  4. On the maintenance of genetic variation: global analysis of Kimura's continuum-of-alleles model.

    PubMed

    Bürger, R

    1986-01-01

    Methods of functional analysis are applied to provide an exact mathematical analysis of Kimura's continuum-of-alleles model. By an approximate analysis, Kimura obtained the result that the equilibrium distribution of allelic effects determining a quantitative character is Gaussian if fitness decreases quadratically from the optimum and if production of new mutants follows a Gaussian density. Lande extended this model considerably and proposed that high levels of genetic variation can be maintained by mutation even when there is strong stabilizing selection. This hypothesis has been questioned recently by Turelli, who published analyses and computer simulations of some multiallele models, approximating the continuum-of-alleles model, and reviewed relevant data. He found that the Kimura and Lande predictions overestimate the amount of equilibrium variance considerably if selection is not extremely weak or mutation rate not extremely high. The present analysis provides the first proof that in Kimura's model an equilibrium in fact exists and, moreover, that it is globally stable. Finally, using methods from quantum mechanics, estimates of the exact equilibrium variance are derived which are in best accordance with Turelli's results. This shows that continuum-of-alleles models may be excellent approximations to multiallele models, if analysed appropriately.

  5. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  6. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets.

  7. Salmonella Typhi shdA: pseudogene or allelic variant?

    PubMed

    Urrutia, I M; Fuentes, J A; Valenzuela, L M; Ortega, A P; Hidalgo, A A; Mora, G C

    2014-08-01

    ShdA from Salmonella Typhimurium (ShdASTm) is a large outer membrane protein that specifically recognizes and binds to fibronectin. ShdASTm is involved in the colonization of the cecum and the Peyer's patches of terminal ileum in mice. On the other hand, shdA gene from Salmonella Typhi (shdASTy) has been considered a pseudogene (i.e. a nonfunctional sequence of genomic DNA) due to the presence of deletions and mutations that gave rise to premature stop codons. In this work we show that, despite the deletions and mutations, shdASTy is fully functional. S. Typhi ΔshdA mutants presented an impaired adherence and invasion of HEp-2 pre-treated with TGF-β1, an inducer of fibronectin production. Moreover, shdA from S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium seem to be equivalent since shdASTm restored the adherence and invasion of S. Typhi ΔshdA mutant to wild type levels. In addition, anti-FLAG mAbs interfered with the adherence and invasion of the S. Typhi shdA-3xFLAG strain. Finally, shdASTy encodes a detectable protein when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α. The data presented here show that shdASTy is not a pseudogene, but a different functional allele compared with shdASTm.

  8. A maximum-likelihood method to correct for allelic dropout in microsatellite data with no replicate genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaolong; Schroeder, Kari B; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2012-10-01

    Allelic dropout is a commonly observed source of missing data in microsatellite genotypes, in which one or both allelic copies at a locus fail to be amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. Especially for samples with poor DNA quality, this problem causes a downward bias in estimates of observed heterozygosity and an upward bias in estimates of inbreeding, owing to mistaken classifications of heterozygotes as homozygotes when one of the two copies drops out. One general approach for avoiding allelic dropout involves repeated genotyping of homozygous loci to minimize the effects of experimental error. Existing computational alternatives often require replicate genotyping as well. These approaches, however, are costly and are suitable only when enough DNA is available for repeated genotyping. In this study, we propose a maximum-likelihood approach together with an expectation-maximization algorithm to jointly estimate allelic dropout rates and allele frequencies when only one set of nonreplicated genotypes is available. Our method considers estimates of allelic dropout caused by both sample-specific factors and locus-specific factors, and it allows for deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium owing to inbreeding. Using the estimated parameters, we correct the bias in the estimation of observed heterozygosity through the use of multiple imputations of alleles in cases where dropout might have occurred. With simulated data, we show that our method can (1) effectively reproduce patterns of missing data and heterozygosity observed in real data; (2) correctly estimate model parameters, including sample-specific dropout rates, locus-specific dropout rates, and the inbreeding coefficient; and (3) successfully correct the downward bias in estimating the observed heterozygosity. We find that our method is fairly robust to violations of model assumptions caused by population structure and by genotyping errors from sources other than allelic dropout. Because the data sets

  9. HLA class I alleles are associated with peptide-binding repertoires of different size, affinity, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sinu; Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-12-15

    Prediction of HLA binding affinity is widely used to identify candidate T cell epitopes, and an affinity of 500 nM is routinely used as a threshold for peptide selection. However, the fraction (percentage) of peptides predicted to bind with affinities of 500 nM varies by allele. For example, of a large collection of ~30,000 dengue virus-derived peptides only 0.3% were predicted to bind HLA A*0101, whereas nearly 5% were predicted for A*0201. This striking difference could not be ascribed to variation in accuracy of the algorithms used, as predicted values closely correlated with affinity measured in vitro with purified HLA molecules. These data raised the question whether different alleles would also vary in terms of epitope repertoire size, defined as the number of associated epitopes or, alternatively, whether alleles vary drastically in terms of the affinity threshold associated with immunogenicity. To address this issue, strains of HLA transgenic mice with wide (A*0201), intermediate (B*0702), or narrow (A*0101) repertoires were immunized with peptides of varying binding affinity and relative percentile ranking. The results show that absolute binding capacity is a better predictor of immunogenicity, and analysis of epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database revealed that predictive efficacy is increased using allele-specific affinity thresholds. Finally, we investigated the genetic and structural basis of the phenomenon. Although no stringent correlate was defined, on average HLA B alleles are associated with significantly narrower repertoires than are HLA A alleles.

  10. Comparison between subjects with long- and short-allele carriers in the BOLD signal within amygdala during emotional tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Shamil; Siadat, Mohamad R.; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Emotional tasks may result in a strong blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the amygdala in 5- HTTLRP short-allele. Reduced anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)-amygdala connectivity in short-allele provides a potential mechanistic account for the observed increase in amygdala activity. In our study, fearful and threatening facial expressions were presented to two groups of 12 subjects with long- and short-allele carriers. The BOLD signals of the left amygdala of each group were averaged to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. A Bayesian approach was used to estimate the model parameters to elucidate the underlying hemodynamic mechanism. Our results showed a positive BOLD signal in the left amygdala for short-allele individuals, and a negative BOLD signal in the same region for long-allele individuals. This is due to the fact that short-allele is associated with lower availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and this leads to an increase of serotonin (5-HT) concentration in the cACC-amygdala synapse.

  11. Genetic instability of the lozenge locus in Drosophila melanogaster: Characterization of the lz{sup 75V} allele

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshina, M.A.; Golubovskii, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    Genetic properties of lz{sup 75V}, an unstable allele of the lozenge locus, are described. The lz{sup 75V} allele appeared in progeny of a male from a Far East natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. Mutation of this allele produces a broad spectrum of mutant derivatives with phenotypes varying from normal to extreme. The arising alleles can be stable or unstable. Some lz{sup 75V} derivatives continuously preserve their spontaneous mutability in laboratory conditions, whereas other alleles of the same family show progressive stabilization at the intralocus or intrachromosome level. Instability of the lz{sup 75V}-bearing X chromosome is locus-specific: only the lozenge gene mutates with high frequency, while visible mutations at other loci rarely occur. As shown previously, the lz{sup 75V} allele appears to be caused by a P-element insertion. The appearance of spontaneous instability is discussed with regard to the general problem of transposition regulation in mobile elements. Different systems of hybrid dysgenesis, and, in particular, P elements are assumed to play an important role in induction of unstable mutations in nature. 24 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Diverse Non-genetic, Allele-Specific Expression Effects Shape Genetic Architecture at the Cellular Level in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chao; Ferris, Elliott; Cheng, Tong; Hörndli, Cornelia Stacher; Gleason, Kelly; Tamminga, Carol; Wagner, Janice D; Boucher, Kenneth M; Christian, Jan L; Gregg, Christopher

    2017-03-08

    Interactions between genetic and epigenetic effects shape brain function, behavior, and the risk for mental illness. Random X inactivation and genomic imprinting are epigenetic allelic effects that are well known to influence genetic architecture and disease risk. Less is known about the nature, prevalence, and conservation of other potential epigenetic allelic effects in vivo in the mouse and primate brain. Here we devise genomics, in situ hybridization, and mouse genetics strategies to uncover diverse allelic effects in the brain that are not caused by imprinting or genetic variation. We found allelic effects that are developmental stage and cell type specific, that are prevalent in the neonatal brain, and that cause mosaics of monoallelic brain cells that differentially express wild-type and mutant alleles for heterozygous mutations. Finally, we show that diverse non-genetic allelic effects that impact mental illness risk genes exist in the macaque and human brain. Our findings have potential implications for mammalian brain genetics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. MspI allelic pattern of bovine growth hormone gene in Indian zebu cattle (Bos indicus) breeds.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, M; Mukesh, M; Prakash, B; Mishra, B P; Sobti, R C; Singh, Karn P; Singh, Satbir; Ahlawat, S P S

    2007-02-01

    The MspI allelic variation in intron III of the bovine growth hormone (bGH) gene was explored using PCR-RFLP in 750 animals belonging to 17 well-recognized breeds of Indian zebu cattle (Bos indicus) reared in different geographic locations of the country. Restriction digestion analysis of a 329-bp PCR fragment of the bGH intron III region with MspI restriction enzyme revealed two alleles (MspI- and MspI+) and two genotypes (-/- and +/-) across the 17 cattle breeds studied. The allelic frequency varied from 0.67 to 0.94 for MspI (-) and from 0.06 to 0.33 for MspI (+) across the 17 breeds, with a combined average frequency of 0.87 and 0.13, respectively. No animal with +/+ genotype was detected across the samples analyzed. The chi-square test showed that the difference in MspI allelic frequency was not significant (p > 0.05), regardless of the geographic origin, coat color, or utility of the cattle breed. The high MspI (-) allele frequencies obtained for Indian zebu cattle in this study are in sharp contrast to those reported for taurine breeds from northern Europe, Mediterranean countries, and America. Findings of this study further substantiate the hypothesis that the MspI (-) allele has an Indian origin.

  14. Patterns of human genetic variation inferred from comparative analysis of allelic mutations in blood group antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2011-03-01

    Comparative analysis of allelic variation of a gene sheds light on the pattern and process of its diversification at the population level. Gene families for which a large number of allelic forms have been verified by sequencing provide a useful resource for such studies. In this regard, human blood group-encoding genes are unique in that differences of cell surface traits among individuals and populations can be readily detected by serological screening, and correlation between the variant cell surface phenotype and the genotype is, in most cases, unequivocal. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of allelic forms, compiled in the Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation database, of ABO, RHD/CE, GYPA/B/E and FUT1/2 gene families that encode the ABO, RH, MNS, and H/h blood group system antigens, respectively. These genes are excellent illustrative examples showing distinct mutational patterns among the alleles, and leading to speculation on how their origin may have been driven by recurrent but different molecular mechanisms. We illustrate how alignment of alleles of a gene may provide an additional insight into the DNA variation process and its pathways, and how this approach may serve to catalog alleles of a gene, simplifying the task and content of mutation databases.

  15. Sequencing of 15 new BoLA-DRB3 alleles.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Sun, D; Zhang, Y

    2008-08-01

    The class II DR of bovine major histocompatibility complex of cattle (BoLA) plays a central role in the regulation of the immune response through their ability to present those peptides to T-cell receptors. In this work, we sequenced the exon2 of DRB3 to identify new alleles in Chinese yellow cattle, a total of 15 new BoLA-DRB3 alleles were found.

  16. [Association of allelic polymorphisms of genes matrix Gla-protein system with ischemic atherothrombotic stroke].

    PubMed

    Garbuzova, V Yu; Stroy, D A; Dosenko, V E; Dubovyk, Ye I; Borodenko, A O; Shimko, K A; Obukhova, O A; Ataman, O V

    2015-01-01

    There are results of the determination of 10 polymorphisms of matrix Gla-protein system (gene MGP-T(-138)-->C (rs1800802), G(-7)-->A (rs1800801), Thr83-->Ala (rs4236), gene VDR-FokI (rs2228570), BsmI (rs1544410), ApaI (rs7975232), TaqI (rs731236), gene GGCX-Arg325-->Gln (rs699664), gene VKORS1-T(2255)-->C (rs2359612), gene BMP-2-Ser37-->Ala (rs2273073)) into 170 patients with ischemic atherothrombotic stroke (IATS) and 124 healthy individual is (control group). It is established that there is a connection between the IATS and polymorphic variants of genes MGP (G(-7)-->A) and VKORC1 (T(2255)-->C). The risk of IATS in carriers of minor allele A/A (G(-7)-->A polymorphism) in 2.6 times higher than in carriers of the major allele (G/A + G/G), and C/C genotype (T(2255)-->C polymorphism) in 2.2 times higher than the homozygotes of major allele. The coincidence of patients T/C and G/G, C/C and G/A genotypes, and A/A genotype (G(-7)-->A polymorphism) with any genotype T(2255)-->C polymorphism are increases the risk of IATS.

  17. Grain legume genetic resources for allele mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequencing capacities for higher throughput at significantly lower costs have enabled larger scale genotyping of plant genetic resources. One challenge to sequencing the USDA grain legume collections of pea, chickpea and lentil core accessions is the amount of heterogeneity in the landrace accessio...

  18. Characterization of Sucrose transporter alleles and their association with seed yield-related traits in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sucrose is the primary photosynthesis product and the principal translocating form within higher plants. Sucrose transporters (SUC/SUT) play a critical role in phloem loading and unloading. Photoassimilate transport is a major limiting factor for seed yield. Our previous research demonstrated that SUT co-localizes with yield-related quantitative trait loci. This paper reports the isolation of BnA7.SUT1 alleles and their promoters and their association with yield-related traits. Results Two novel BnA7.SUT1 genes were isolated from B. napus lines 'Eagle' and 'S-1300' and designated as BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b, respectively. The BnA7.SUT1 protein exhibited typical SUT features and showed high amino acid homology with related species. Promoters of BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b were also isolated and classified as pBnA7.SUT1.a and pBnA7.SUT1.b, respectively. Four dominant sequence-characterized amplified region markers were developed to distinguish BnA7.SUT1.a and BnA7.SUT1.b. The two genes were estimated as alleles with two segregating populations (F2 and BC1) obtained by crossing '3715'×'3769'. BnA7.SUT1 was mapped to the A7 linkage group of the TN doubled haploid population. In silico analysis of 55 segmental BnA7.SUT1 alleles resulted three BnA7.SUT1 clusters: pBnA7.SUT1.a- BnA7.SUT1.a (type I), pBnA7.SUT1.b- BnA7.SUT1.a (type II), and pBnA7.SUT1.b- BnA7.SUT1.b (type III). Association analysis with a diverse panel of 55 rapeseed lines identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in promoter and coding domain sequences of BnA7.SUT1 that were significantly associated with one of three yield-related traits: number of effective first branches (EFB), siliques per plant (SP), and seed weight (n = 1000) (TSW) across all four environments examined. SNPs at other BnA7.SUT1 sites were also significantly associated with at least one of six yield-related traits: EFB, SP, number of seeds per silique, seed yield per plant, block yield, and TSW. Expression levels

  19. SSR allelic variation in almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.).

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Sui, Yi; Chang, Feng-Qi; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rong-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen SSR markers including eight EST-SSR and eight genomic SSRs were used for genetic diversity analysis of 23 Chinese and 15 international almond cultivars. EST- and genomic SSR markers previously reported in species of Prunus, mainly peach, proved to be useful for almond genetic analysis. DNA sequences of 117 alleles of six of the 16 SSR loci were analysed to reveal sequence variation among the 38 almond accessions. For the four SSR loci with AG/CT repeats, no insertions or deletions were observed in the flanking regions of the 98 alleles sequenced. Allelic size variation of these loci resulted exclusively from differences in the structures of repeat motifs, which involved interruptions or occurrences of new motif repeats in addition to varying number of AG/CT repeats. Some alleles had a high number of uninterrupted repeat motifs, indicating that SSR mutational patterns differ among alleles at a given SSR locus within the almond species. Allelic homoplasy was observed in the SSR loci because of base substitutions, interruptions or compound repeat motifs. Substitutions in the repeat regions were found at two SSR loci, suggesting that point mutations operate on SSRs and hinder the further SSR expansion by introducing repeat interruptions to stabilize SSR loci. Furthermore, it was shown that some potential point mutations in the flanking regions are linked with new SSR repeat motif variation in almond and peach.

  20. Mutable R-Navajo Alleles of Cyclic Origin in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Brink, R. Alexander; Williams, Elizabeth

    1973-01-01

    The generation in cyclic fashion of 26 mutable R-Navajo (mRnj) alleles in maize involved transposition of a non-specific repressor of gene action, Modulator (Mp), first away from, and then back to, the R locus represented by the R-Navajo (Rnj) allele on chromosome 10. The mRnj alleles reconstituted in this way varied widely, and continuously, in mutability to Rnj—that is, in transposition of Mp away from the R locus, thus derepressing the Rnj gene. They were alike, or nearly so, however, in activating Ds chromosome breakage and in increasing the stability of variegated pericarp, another unstable compound allele comprising Mp conjoined with Prr on chromosomal 1. These latter two phenomena are based primarily on loci elsewhere in the genome. It is postulated that the 26 reconstituted mRnj alleles carry a common Mp which, however, is intercalated at a different site within each allele. Nucleotide sequence in the regions adjacent to Mp is assumed to determine the frequency with which a form of micro-nondisjunction occurs whereby Mp is released from a donor site. Transposition to a new site is interpreted in terms of a chromosome model that gives effect to nicking, or single strand breaks, occurring throughout the genome as a prerequisite to unwinding, strand separation, and replication, of the DNA double helix. PMID:17248592

  1. Overdominant alleles in a population of variable size.

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, M; Muirhead, C A

    1999-01-01

    An approximate method is developed to predict the number of strongly overdominant alleles in a population of which the size varies with time. The approximation relies on the strong-selection weak-mutation (SSWM) method introduced by J. H. Gillespie and leads to a Markov chain model that describes the number of common alleles in the population. The parameters of the transition matrix of the Markov chain depend in a simple way on the population size. For a population of constant size, the Markov chain leads to results that are nearly the same as those of N. Takahata. The Markov chain allows the prediction of the numbers of common alleles during and after a population bottleneck and the numbers of alleles surviving from before a bottleneck. This method is also adapted to modeling the case in which there are two classes of alleles, with one class causing a reduction in fitness relative to the other class. Very slight selection against one class can strongly affect the relative frequencies of the two classes and the relative ages of alleles in each class. PMID:10353917

  2. Independent introduction of two lactase-persistence alleles into human populations reflects different history of adaptation to milk culture.

    PubMed

    Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Jensen, Tine G K; Nielsen, Mette; Lewinski, Rikke; Kuokkanen, Mikko; Rasinpera, Heli; El-Shanti, Hatem; Seo, Jeong Kee; Alifrangis, Michael; Khalil, Insaf F; Natah, Abdrazak; Ali, Ahmed; Natah, Sirajedin; Comas, David; Mehdi, S Qasim; Groop, Leif; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Imtiaz, Faiqa; Rashed, Mohamed S; Meyer, Brian; Troelsen, Jesper; Peltonen, Leena

    2008-01-01

    The T(-13910) variant located in the enhancer element of the lactase (LCT) gene correlates perfectly with lactase persistence (LP) in Eurasian populations whereas the variant is almost nonexistent among Sub-Saharan African populations, showing high prevalence of LP. Here, we report identification of two new mutations among Saudis, also known for the high prevalence of LP. We confirmed the absence of the European T(-13910) and established two new mutations found as a compound allele: T/G(-13915) within the -13910 enhancer region and a synonymous SNP in the exon 17 of the MCM6 gene T/C(-3712), -3712 bp from the LCT gene. The compound allele is driven to a high prevalence among Middle East population(s). Our functional analyses in vitro showed that both SNPs of the compound allele, located 10 kb apart, are required for the enhancer effect, most probably mediated through the binding of the hepatic nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1 alpha). High selection coefficient (s) approximately 0.04 for LP phenotype was found for both T(-13910) and the compound allele. The European T(-13910) and the earlier identified East African G(-13907) LP allele share the same ancestral background and most likely the same history, probably related to the same cattle domestication event. In contrast, the compound Arab allele shows a different, highly divergent ancestral haplotype, suggesting that these two major global LP alleles have arisen independently, the latter perhaps in response to camel milk consumption. These results support the convergent evolution of the LP in diverse populations, most probably reflecting different histories of adaptation to milk culture.

  3. HLA-DRB and HLA-DQB Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Iranian Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Shamsolmoulouk; Mohammadzadeh, Mahsa; Zare Bidoki, Alireza; Meighani, Ghasem; Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Rezaei, Nima

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is known as the most common chronic disease of the oral cavity, which affects a range of 5-25% of the population. RAS appears to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles and haplotypes. This study attempts to survey the distribution of HLA-DRB and -DQB alleles among Iranian RAS patients and healthy controls. In order to evaluate the association of HLA-DR and DQ alleles and haplotypes, 54 patients with RAS and 100 unrelated healthy subjects as control group were investigated. Our data indicated that DRB1*13:17, DRB1*15:01, and DRB5*01 were significantly more frequent in RAS patients in comparison to controls. However, DRB3:01allele frequency was higher in the controls compared to the patients. The significantly frequent allele in the patients compared with the healthy subjects was HLA-DQB1*03:02. However, both HLA-DQB1*02:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01 alleles were most frequent in the healthy individuals rather than the patients. The DRB*04/DQB1*03:01 and DRB*01:01/DQB1*02:01 haplotypes were significantly distributed in healthy subjects compared with patients. However, DRB*07:01/DQB1*03:02 haplotype was found to be significantly frequent in patients than controls. In respect of HLA genes, factors are involved in the incidence of RAS; various HLA-DRB and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the related haplotypes are suggested to be the three main RAS susceptibility factors in our population study.

  4. Geostatistical analysis of allele presence patterns among American black bears in eastern North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, L.M.; Van Manen, F.T.; King, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Highways are one of the leading causes of wildlife habitat fragmentation and may particularly affect wide-ranging species, such as American black bears (Ursus americanus). We initiated a research project in 2000 to determine potential effects of a 4-lane highway on black bear ecology in Washington County, North Carolina. The research design included a treatment area (highway construction) and a control area and a pre- and post-construction phase. We used data from the pre-construction phase to determine whether we could detect scale dependency or directionality among allele occurrence patterns using geostatistics. Detection of such patterns could provide a powerful tool to measure the effects of landscape fragmentation on gene flow. We sampled DNA from roots of black bear hair at 70 hair-sampling sites on each study area for 7 weeks during fall of 2000. We used microsatellite analysis based on 10 loci to determine unique multi-locus genotypes. We examined all alleles sampled at ???25 sites on each study area and mapped their presence or absence at each hair-sample site. We calculated semivariograms, which measure the strength of statistical correlation as a function of distance, and adjusted them for anisotropy to determine the maximum direction of spatial continuity. We then calculated the mean direction of spatial continuity for all examined alleles. The mean direction of allele frequency variation was 118.3?? (SE = 8.5) on the treatment area and 172.3?? (SE = 6.0) on the control area. Rayleigh's tests showed that these directions differed from random distributions (P = 0.028 and P < 0.001, respectively), indicating consistent directional patterns for the alleles we examined in each area. Despite the small spatial scale of our study (approximately 11,000 ha for each study area), we observed distinct and consistent patterns of allele occurrence, suggesting different directions of gene flow between the study areas. These directions seemed to coincide with the

  5. HLA-B*57 Allele Is Associated with Concomitant Anti-tuberculosis and Antiretroviral Drugs Induced Liver Toxicity in Ethiopians

    PubMed Central

    Petros, Zelalem; Kishikawa, Junko; Makonnen, Eyasu; Yimer, Getnet; Habtewold, Abiy; Aklillu, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a known adverse effect of both anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) and antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. Recent studies highlight the implications of genetic predispositions to DILI. We performed a case-control study to identify Human Leukocyte Antigen-B (HLA-B) variant alleles associated with anti-TB and ARV co-treatment induced liver toxicity in Ethiopian TB and HIV co-infected patients. A total of 495 newly diagnosed TB and HIV co-infected patients were enrolled and received rifampicin based anti-TB and efavirenz based ARV therapy. Change in liver enzyme level from baseline was monitored 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 24th weeks after treatment initiation to identify patients who developed DILI (cases) and those who did not (treatment tolerants). Genomic DNA from 46 cases and 46 sex and age matched treatment tolerants were genotyped for HLA-B variant alleles using Olerup SSP®HLA-B DNA Typing Kits. The proportion of HLA-B*57 allele carriers in DILI cases (37.0%), particularly in those who developed cholestatic type of DILI (44.8%) was significantly higher compared with those who tolerated the treatment (2.2%). The HLA-B*57 allele frequency was significantly higher in cases (25%) than treatment tolerants (1.1%). In a multivariate logistic analysis, the proportion of patients carrying HLA-B*57 (P = 0.002) and HLA-B*14 (P = 0.014) alleles were significantly higher in DILI cases compared with treatment tolerants. HLA-B*57 was significantly associated with cholestatic (P = 0.001) and mixed (P = 0.017) types of liver toxicity, and mild-to-moderate severity (P = 0.001). Of all HLA-B*57 alleles detected, HLA-B*57:03 accounted 58.3% and HLA-B*57:02 accounted 41.7%. HLA-B*57:01 was not detected. The variant allele frequencies of HLA-B*57:03 (15.2 vs. 0%) and HLA-B*57:02 (9.8 vs. 1.1%) were significantly higher in the DILI cases than treatment tolerants (P < 0.03). We conclude that HLA-B*57 alleles (B*57:03 and B*57:02) confer susceptibility to the

  6. Global phylogeography of the avian malaria pathogen Plasmodium relictum based on MSP1 allelic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellgren, Olof; Atkinson, Carter T.; Bensch, Staffan; Albayrak, Tamer; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Ewen, John G.; Kim, Kyeong Soon; Lima, Marcos R.; Martin, Lynn; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Ricklefs, Robert; Sehgal, Ravinder N. M.; Gediminas, Valkiunas; Tsuda, Yoshio; Marzal, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the genetic variation that occurs in pathogen populations and how it is distributed across geographical areas is essential to understand parasite epidemiology, local patterns of virulence, and evolution of host-resistance. In addition, it is important to identify populations of pathogens that are evolutionarily independent and thus ‘free’ to adapt to hosts and environments. Here, we investigated genetic variation in the globally distributed, highly invasive avian malaria parasite Plasmodium relictum, which has several distinctive mitochondrial haplotyps (cyt b lineages, SGS1, GRW11 and GRW4). The phylogeography of P. relictum was accessed using the highly variable nuclear gene merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), a gene linked to the invasion biology of the parasite. We show that the lineage GRW4 is evolutionarily independent of GRW11 and SGS1 whereas GRW11 and SGS1 share MSP1 alleles and thus suggesting the presence of two distinct species (GRW4 versus SGS1 and GRW11). Further, there were significant differences in the global distribution of MSP1 alleles with differences between GRW4 alleles in the New and the Old World. For SGS1, a lineage formerly believed to have both tropical and temperate transmission, there were clear differences in MSP1 alleles transmitted in tropical Africa compared to the temperate regions of Europe and Asia. Further, we highlight the occurrence of multiple MSP1 alleles in GRW4 isolates from the Hawaiian Islands, where the parasite has contributed to declines and extinctions of endemic forest birds since it was introduced. This study stresses the importance of multiple independent loci for understanding patterns of transmission and evolutionary independence across avian malaria parasites.

  7. Variant RH alleles and Rh immunisation in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Sippert, Emilia; Fujita, Claudia R.; Machado, Debora; Guelsin, Glaucia; Gaspardi, Ane C.; Pellegrino, Jordão; Gilli, Simone; Saad, Sara S.T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Alloimmunisation is a major complication in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and despite provision of Rh phenotyped RBC units, Rh antibodies still occur. These antibodies in patients positive for the corresponding Rh antigen are considered autoantibodies in many cases but variant RH alleles found in SCD patients can also contribute to Rh alloimmunisation. In this study, we characterised variant RH alleles in 31 SCD patients who made antibodies to Rh antigens despite antigen-positive status and evaluated the clinical significance of the antibodies produced. Materials and methods RHD and RHCE BeadChip™ from BioArray Solutions and/or amplification and sequencing of exons were used to identify the RH variants. The serological features of all Rh antibodies in antigen-positive patients were analysed and the clinical significance of the antibodies was evaluated by retrospective analysis of the haemoglobin (Hb) levels before and after transfusion; the change from baseline pre-transfusion Hb and the percentage of HbS were also determined. Results We identified variant RH alleles in 31/48 (65%) of SCD patients with Rh antibodies. Molecular analyses revealed the presence of partial RHD alleles and variant RHCE alleles associated with altered C and e antigens. Five patients were compound heterozygotes for RHD and RHCE variants. Retrospective analysis showed that 42% of antibodies produced by the patients with RH variants were involved in delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions or decreased survival of transfused RBC. Discussion In this study, we found that Rh antibodies in SCD patients with RH variants can be clinically significant and, therefore, matching patients based on RH variants should be considered. PMID:24960646

  8. Differential Dynamics of CALR Mutant Allele Burden in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms during Interferon Alfa Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, Morten O.; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Pallisgaard, Niels; Larsen, Thomas S.; de Stricker, Karin; Skov, Vibe; Hasselbalch, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of somatic mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) has identified a subgroup of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) with separate haematological characteristics and prognosis. CALR mutations serve as novel markers both of diagnostic value and as targets for monitoring molecular responses during therapy. Interferon-α (IFN) selectively targets the malignant clone in a subset of MPN patients and can induce both haematological and molecular remissions in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. We investigated the response to IFN in a cohort of 21 CALR mutated MPN patients including ET, prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (pre-PMF), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) with a median follow-up of 31 months. For evaluation of a molecular response, we developed highly sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for monitoring the mutant allele burden of the two most prevalent CALR mutations (type 1 and type 2). Thirteen patients (62%) experienced a decrease in the mutant allele burden with a median decline of 29% from baseline. However, only four patients, including patients with ET, pre-PMF, and PMF diagnosis, achieved molecular responder (MR) status with >50% reduction in mutant allele burden according to European LeukemiaNet (ELN) guidelines. MR patients displayed significant differences in the dynamics of the CALR mutant load with regard to time to response and dynamics in mutant allele burden after discontinuation of IFN treatment. Furthermore, we highlight the prognostic value of the CALR mutant allele burden by showing a close association with leucocyte- and platelet counts, hemoglobin concentration, in addition to plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) irrespective of molecular response and treatment status. PMID:27764253

  9. Selection of Heterodera glycines chorismate mutase-1 alleles on nematode-resistant soybean.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kris N; Bekal, Sadia; Domier, Leslie L; Niblack, Terry L; Noel, Gregory R; Smyth, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines is the most destructive pathogen of soybean in the Unites States. Diversity in the parasitic ability of the nematode allows it to reproduce on nematode-resistant soybean. H. glycines chorismate mutase-1 (Hg-CM-1) is a nematode enzyme with the potential to suppress host plant defense compounds; therefore, it has the potential to enhance the parasitic ability of nematodes expressing the gene. Hg-cm-1 is a member of a gene family where two alleles, Hg-cm-1A and Hg-cm-1B, have been identified. Analysis of the Hg-cm-1 gene copy number revealed that there are multiple copies of Hg-cm-1 alleles in the H. glycines genome. H. glycines inbred lines were crossed to ultimately generate three F2 populations of second-stage juveniles (J2s) segregating for Hg-cm-1A and Hg-cm-1B. Segregation of Hg-cm-1A and 1B approximated a 1:2:1 ratio, which suggested that Hg-cm-1 is organized in a cluster of genes that segregate roughly as a single locus. The F2 H. glycines J2 populations were used to infect nematode-resistant (Hartwig, PI88788, and PI90763) and susceptible (Lee 74) soybean plants. H. glycines grown on Hartwig, Lee 74, and PI90763 showed allelic frequencies similar to Hg-cm-1A/B, but nematodes grown on PI88788 contained predominately Hg-cm-1A allele as a result of a statistically significant drop of Hg-cm-1B in the population. This result suggests that specific Hg-cm-1 alleles, or a closely linked gene, may aid H. glycines in adapting to particular soybean hosts.

  10. Characterization of 12 silent alleles of the human butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Primo-Parmo, S. L.; Bartels, C. F.; Wiersema, B.; van der Spek, A. F.; Innis, J. W.; La Du, B. N.

    1996-01-01

    The silent phenotype of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), present in most human populations in frequencies of approximately 1/100,000, is characterized by the complete absence of BChE activity or by activity <10% of the average levels of the usual phenotype. Heterogeneity in this phenotype has been well established at the phenotypic level, but only a few silent BCHE alleles have been characterized at the DNA level. Twelve silent alleles of the human butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE) have been identified in 17 apparently unrelated patients who were selected by their increased sensitivity to the muscle relaxant succinylcholine. All of these alleles are characterized by single nucleotide substitutions or deletions leading to distinct changes in the structure of the BChE enzyme molecule. Nine of the nucleotide substitutions result in the replacement of single amino acid residues. Three of these variants, BCHE*33C, BCHE*198G, and BCHE*201T, produce normal amounts of immunoreactive but enzymatically inactive BChE protein in the plasma. The other six amino acid substitutions, encoded by BCHE*37S, BCHE*125F, BCHE*170E, BCHE*471R, and BCHE*518L, seem to cause reduced expression of BChE protein, and their role in determining the silent phenotype was confirmed by expression in cell culture. The other four silent alleles, BCHE*271STOP, BCHE*500STOP, BCHE*FS6, and BCHE*I2E3-8G, encode BChES truncated at their C-terminus because of premature stop codons caused by nucleotide substitutions, a frame shift, or altered splicing. The large number of different silent BCHE alleles found within a relatively small number of patients shows that the heterogeneity of the silent BChE phenotype is high. The characterization of silent BChE variants will be useful in the study of the structure/function relationship for this and other closely related enzymes. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554068

  11. Sequence analysis of the fragile X trinucleotide repeat: Correlations with stability and haplotype and implications for the origin of fragile X alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, K.; Tester, D.J.; Kruckeberg, K.E.; Thibodeau, S.N.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X (FX) syndrome is associated with amplification of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the gene FMR-1. To address mechanism of instability and concern related to overlap between sizes of normal stable alleles and FX unstable alleles, we have sequenced 165 alleles to analyze patterns of AGG interruptions within the CGG repeat, and have typed the (CA)n at DXS548 for 204 chromosomes. Overall, our data is consistent with the idea that the length of uninterrupted CGG repeats determines instability. For 17 stably transmitted alleles with total repeat lengths between 33 and 51, the longest stretch of uninterrupted CGGs was 41. In contrast, for 13 premutation alleles, the shortest stretch of uninterrupted CGGs was 48, suggesting a threshold for expansion between 41 and 48 pure CGGs. For expansion from a premutation to a full mutation, the threshold appears to be {ge}70 uninterrupted repeats. Interestingly, an AGG was detected in some carriers of a full mutation. Comparison of the number of {open_quote}shadow bands{close_quote} in PCR products from similar size alleles with different AGG interruption patterns supports replication slippage as a potential mechanism, i.e. replication slippage occurs more readily as the length of pure repeat increases. Alleles with high total repeat lengths but up to 3 AGGs may be relatively protected against expansion, whereas smaller alleles with pure CGG sequence could be at higher risk for instability. Comparison of sequence data and DXS548 (CA)n data revealed specific sequence trends for each of the DXS548 alleles, explaining the previously reported haplotype association with FX. Incorporating these observations into models for the origin of FX alleles, we consider replication slippage, unequal crossover within the CGG repeat region, recombination between FMR-1 and DXS548, and loss of AGGs by A to C transversion.

  12. Influence of HLA-DRB alleles on haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in a Chinese Han population in Hubei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, N; Luo, F; Chen, Q; Li, N; Xiong, H; Feng, Y; Yang, Z; Hou, W

    2015-01-01

    Specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are considered a genetic risk factor for the progression of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by hantaviruses. The aim of this study was to establish whether HLA-DRB alleles are associated with the severity of HFRS caused by different types of hantaviruses in a Chinese Han population from Hubei Province of central China. Twenty-two specific HLA-DRB alleles were analysed by sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) in 100 HFRS patients and 213 healthy volunteers. Associations of HLA-DRB alleles with the severity and clinical parameters of HFRS caused by Hantaan virus (HTNV) or Seoul virus (SEOV) infection were evaluated. Six alleles (HLA-DRB1*0401-0411, HLA-DRB1*1001, HLA-DRB1*1101-1105, HLA-DRB1*1201-1202, HLA-DRB1*1305 and DRB5*0101-0201) demonstrated strong associations with HFRS caused by HTNV and SEOV infections. Further comparison of these HLA-DRB1 allele frequencies between HFRS patients with differing severities and healthy controls demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*0401-0411, HLA-DRB1*1001 and DRB1*1305 alleles were more frequent in the moderate course of HTNV-infected HFRS. Meanwhile, the DRB1*1101-1105 allele was more frequently observed in the severe course of HTNV-infected HFRS. We also found that the HLA-DRB1*1201-1202 allele frequency was higher in the moderate course of SEOV-infected HFRS, whereas the DRB5*0101-0201 allele may play a protective role in moderate HFRS caused by both HTNV and SEOV infections. These results provide evidence of the influence of HLA-DRB on the severity of HFRS and confirm the effect of HLA-DRB on HFRS during different types of hantavirus infection in a Chinese Han population in Hubei Province, China.

  13. G Allele of the IGF2 ApaI Polymorphism Is Associated With Judo Status.

    PubMed

    Itaka, Toshio; Agemizu, Kenichiro; Aruga, Seiji; Machida, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Itaka, T, Agemizu, K, Aruga, S, and Machida, S. G allele of the IGF2 ApaI polymorphism is associated with judo status. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2043-2048, 2016-Previous studies have reported that the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) ApaI polymorphism is associated with body mass index, fat mass, and grip strength. Competitive judo requires high levels of strength and power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the IGF2 ApaI and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and judo status. The subjects were 156 male judo athletes from a top-level university in Japan. They were divided into 3 groups based on their competitive history: international-level athletes, national-level athletes, and others. Genomic DNA was extracted from the saliva of each athlete, and the maximal isometric strength of the trunk muscles and handgrip strength were measured. Genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect IGF2 (rs680) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) (rs1815739) gene polymorphisms. The genotype frequencies of the 2 gene polymorphisms were compared among the 3 groups of judo athletes and controls. International-level judo athletes showed a higher frequency of the GG + GA genotype of the IGF2 gene than that of the national-level athletes and others. There was an inverse linear correlation between the frequency of the IGF2 AA genotype and level of judo performance (p = 0.041). Back muscle strength relative to height and weight was higher in subjects with the GG + GA genotype than in those with the AA genotype. Conversely, the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism was not associated with judo status. Additionally, no differences were found in back muscle or handgrip strength among the ACTN3 genotypes. In conclusion, the results indicate that the IGF2 gene polymorphism may be associated with judo status.

  14. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  15. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time.

  16. Allelic diversity of the MHC class II DRB genes in brown bears (Ursus arctos) and a comparison of DRB sequences within the family Ursidae.

    PubMed

    Goda, N; Mano, T; Kosintsev, P; Vorobiev, A; Masuda, R

    2010-11-01

    The allelic diversity of the DRB locus in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes was analyzed in the brown bear (Ursus arctos) from the Hokkaido Island of Japan, Siberia, and Kodiak of Alaska. Nineteen alleles of the DRB exon 2 were identified from a total of 38 individuals of U. arctos and were highly polymorphic. Comparisons of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions in the antigen-binding sites of deduced amino acid sequences indicated evidence for balancing selection on the bear DRB locus. The phylogenetic analysis of the DRB alleles among three genera (Ursus, Tremarctos, and Ailuropoda) in the family Ursidae revealed that DRB allelic lineages were not separated according to species. This strongly shows trans-species persistence of DRB alleles within the Ursidae.

  17. Evaluation of sequence-specific priming and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles confirmed by sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Kim, Y S; Kim, S I; Kim, H; Kim, H S

    2012-10-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*51 genotype is one of the well-known genetic factors associated with the development of Behcet's disease. We evaluated three sequence-specific priming (SSP) assays and one real-time PCR assay for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles using 93 whole blood samples, which were genotyped by high-resolution sequence-based typing (SBT). All HLA-B*51 alleles determined by SBT were detected by the four evaluated assays, and the results for all HLA-B alleles other than HLA-B*51 were negative on all assays. Thus, all HLA-B51 tests showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles. The three SSP assays and the real-time PCR test for HLA-B*51 genotyping are simple, but reliable for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles in clinical laboratories.

  18. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    de Smith, Adam J.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Hansen, Helen M.; Endicott, Alyson A.; Wiencke, John K.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19–142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  19. Generation of HLA-B*1516/B*1567/B*1595 and B*1517 alleles (B15 specific group) by transpecies evolution.

    PubMed

    Román, Angela; Cervera, Isabel; Head, Jacqueline; Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez-Laso, Jorge

    2007-12-01

    The generation of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*1516, B*1517, B*1567, and B*1595 alleles has been analyzed using exon 1, intron 1, exon 2, intron 2, and exon 3 sequences from human and non-human primates. Results showed that at the first place three evolutionary steps would have been necessary for the generation of HLA-B*1516 and B*1517 alleles: (1) a non-human primate step with the generation of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-B*1516/1517-like allele; (2) a human or non-human primate step with two different ways of evolution generating a MHC-B*1516 and a MHC-B*1517 ancestors; and (3) a human step consisting of the generation of HLA-B*1516 and HLA-B*15170101 alleles. After that, HLA-B*1567, B*1595 B*151701012, and B*151702 alleles would be generated by point mutation events. In conclusion these alleles are generated by two different evolutionary pathways. The generation of these alleles points out the importance of the exons/introns in the generation of the evolution of HLA alleles.

  20. The clinical presentation of Marfan syndrome is modulated by expression of wild-type FBN1 allele.

    PubMed

    Aubart, Mélodie; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Hanna, Nadine; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Sznajder, Marc; Detaint, Delphine; Gouya, Laurent; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Stheneur, Chantal

    2015-05-15

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder mainly caused by mutations within FBN1 gene. The disease displays large variability in age of onset or severity and very poor phenotype/genotype correlations have been demonstrated. We investigated the hypothesis that phenotype severity could be related to the variable expression level of fibrillin-1 (FBN1) synthesized from the wild-type (WT) allele. Quantitative reverse-transcription and polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate FBN1 levels in skin fibroblasts from 80 Marfan patients with premature termination codons and in skin fibroblasts from 80 controls. Results in controls showed a 3.9-fold variation in FBN1 mRNA synthesis level between subjects. A similar 4.4-fold variation was found in the Marfan population, but the mean level of FBN1 mRNA was a half of the control population. Differential allelic expression analysis in Marfan fibroblasts showed that over 90% of FBN1 mRNA was transcribed from the wild allele and the mutated allele was not detected. In the control population, independently of the expression level of FBN1, we observed steady-state equilibrium between the two allelic-mRNAs suggesting that FBN1 expression mainly depends on trans-acting regulators. Finally, we show that a low level of residual WT FBN1 mRNA accounts for a high risk of ectopia lentis and pectus abnormality and tends to increase the risk of aortic dilatation.

  1. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample.

    PubMed

    Matevosyan, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Madelian, V; Avagyan, S; Nazaretyan, M; Hyussian, A; Vardapetyan, E; Arutunyan, R; Jordan, F

    2011-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations.

  2. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Indap, Amit R; Marth, Gabor T; Clark, Andrew G; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2011-07-19

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2-4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence.

  3. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  4. Hamartomas from patients with tuberous sclerosis show loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 9q34

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.J.; Sepp, T.; Yates, J.R.W. |

    1994-09-01

    We have previously shown allele loss in hamartomas from cases of tuberous sclerosis (TSC) for markers in the region of the recently characterized TSC2 gene on chromosome 16p13.3. Germline deletions in the TSC2 gene have been shown in 5% of patients with TSC. These data strongly suggest that the TSC2 gene acts as a tumor suppressor gene. We hypothesised that hamartomas from patients with TSC can also show allele loss for markers on chromosome 9q34 in the region of the TSC1 gene. We studied 7 hamartomas (3 renal angiomyolipomas, 3 giant cell astrocytomas, and a cardiac rhabdomyoma) from 7 cases of TSC, none of which showed allele loss for markers on chromosome 16p13.3. Eight microsatellite markers were analyzed, comprising from centromeric to telomeric, ASS - D9S64 - D9S149 -D9S150 - DBH - D9S66 - D9S114 - D9S67. Two hamartomas (one renal angiomyolipoma and one giant cell astrocytoma) showed allele loss for at least two markers. The region of allele loss involved the TSC1 locus, but did not include D9S149 or D9S67. We have shown allele loss in two of seven TSC hamartomas in the region of the TSC1 gene on 9q34. Based on this deletion mapping, we suggest that the TSC1 gene on 9a34, like the TSC2 gene, acts as a tumor suppressor gene.

  5. Comparison of acetaminophen toxicity in primary hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice with different appolipoprotein E alleles.

    PubMed

    Mezera, V; Kucera, O; Moravcova, A; Peterova, E; Rousar, T; Rychtrmoc, D; Sobotka, O; Cervinkova, Z

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor, important for combating electrophilic and oxidative stress in the liver and other organs. This encompasses detoxification of hepatotoxic drugs, including acetaminophen (APAP). Recently, an association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype and Nrf2 expression was described. We compared the toxicity of APAP on primary culture hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice carrying two different human ApoE alleles and wild-type controls. The cells were exposed to APAP in concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mM for up to 24 hours. APAP led to a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity from 1 mM after 16 h exposure in all mice tested. The toxicity was higher in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls and most pronounced in ApoE3 mice. Concurrently, there was a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, especially in ApoE3 hepatocytes. The formation of reactive oxygen species was increased after 24 hours with 2.5 mM APAP in hepatocytes of all strains tested, with the highest increase being in the ApoE3 genotype. The activity of caspases 3 and 7 did not differ among groups and was minimal after 24 hour incubation with 4 mM APAP. We observed higher lipid accumulation in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls. The expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was higher in ApoE3 than in ApoE4 hepatocytes and some of these genes were induced by APAP treatment. In conclusion, transgenic mice with ApoE4 and ApoE3 alleles displayed higher susceptibility to acute APAP toxicity in vitro than wild-type mice. Of the two transgenic genotypes tested, ApoE3 allele carriers were more prone to injury.

  6. STR allele sequence variation: Current knowledge and future issues.

    PubMed

    Gettings, Katherine Butler; Aponte, Rachel A; Vallone, Peter M; Butler, John M

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews what is currently known about short tandem repeat (STR) allelic sequence variation in and around the twenty-four loci most commonly used throughout the world to perform forensic DNA investigations. These STR loci include D1S1656, TPOX, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, FGA, CSF1PO, D5S818, SE33, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, TH01, vWA, D12S391, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, Penta D, and D22S1045. All known reported variant alleles are compiled along with genomic information available from GenBank, dbSNP, and the 1000 Genomes Project. Supplementary files are included which provide annotated reference sequences for each STR locus, characterize genomic variation around the STR repeat region, and compare alleles present in currently available STR kit allelic ladders. Looking to the future, STR allele nomenclature options are discussed as they relate to next generation sequencing efforts underway.

  7. Assessing allelic dropout and genotype reliability using maximum likelihood.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig R; Joyce, Paul; Waits, Lisette P

    2002-01-01

    A growing number of population genetic studies utilize nuclear DNA microsatellite data from museum specimens and noninvasive sources. Genotyping errors are elevated in these low quantity DNA sources, potentially compromising the power and accuracy of the data. The most conservative method for addressing this problem is effective, but requires extensive replication of individual genotypes. In search of a more efficient method, we developed a maximum-likelihood approach that minimizes errors by estimating genotype reliability and strategically directing replication at loci most likely to harbor errors. The model assumes that false and contaminant alleles can be removed from the dataset and that the allelic dropout rate is even across loci. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method marks a vast improvement in efficiency while maintaining accuracy. When allelic dropout rates are low (0-30%), the reduction in the number of PCR replicates is typically 40-50%. The model is robust to moderate violations of the even dropout rate assumption. For datasets that contain false and contaminant alleles, a replication strategy is proposed. Our current model addresses only allelic dropout, the most prevalent source of genotyping error. However, the developed likelihood framework can incorporate additional error-generating processes as they become more clearly understood. PMID:11805071

  8. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  9. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R; Mullighan, Charles G; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-03-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis.

  10. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  11. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    PubMed

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  12. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure in Oenococcus oeni as Determined from Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes

    PubMed Central

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the organism of choice for promoting malolactic fermentation in wine. The population biology of O. oeni is poorly understood and remains unclear. For a better understanding of the mode of genetic variation within this species, we investigated by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with the gyrB, pgm, ddl, recP, and mleA genes the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 18 O. oeni strains isolated in various years from wines of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. These strains have also been characterized by ribotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR). Ribotyping grouped the strains into two groups; however, the RFLP analysis of the ISRs showed no differences in the strains analyzed. In contrast, MLST in oenococci had a good discriminatory ability, and we have found a higher genetic diversity than indicated by ribotyping analysis. All sequence types were represented by a single strain, and all the strains could be distinguished from each other because they had unique combinations of alleles. Strains assumed to be identical showed the same sequence type. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a panmictic population structure in O. oeni. Sequences were analyzed for evidence of recombination by split decomposition analysis and analysis of clustered polymorphisms. All results indicated that recombination plays a major role in creating the genetic heterogeneity of O. oeni. A low standardized index of association value indicated that the O. oeni genes analyzed are close to linkage equilibrium. This study constitutes the first step in the development of an MLST method for O. oeni and the first example of the application of MLST to a nonpathogenic food production bacteria. PMID:15574919

  13. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  14. Allelic interaction of F1 pollen sterility loci and abnormal chromosome behaviour caused pollen sterility in intersubspecific autotetraploid rice hybrids.

    PubMed

    He, J H; Shahid, M Q; Li, Y J; Guo, H B; Cheng, X A; Liu, X D; Lu, Y G

    2011-08-01

    The intersubspecific hybrids of autotetraploid rice has many features that increase rice yield, but lower seed set is a major hindrance in its utilization. Pollen sterility is one of the most important factors which cause intersubspecific hybrid sterility. The hybrids with greater variation in seed set were used to study how the F(1) pollen sterile loci (S-a, S-b, and S-c) interact with each other and how abnormal chromosome behaviour and allelic interaction of F(1) sterility loci affect pollen fertility and seed set of intersubspecific autotetraploid rice hybrids. The results showed that interaction between pollen sterility loci have significant effects on the pollen fertility of autotetraploid hybrids, and pollen fertility further decreased with an increase in the allelic interaction of F(1) pollen sterility loci. Abnormal ultra-structure and microtubule distribution patterns during pollen mother cell (PMC) meiosis were found in the hybrids with low pollen fertility in interphase and leptotene, suggesting that the effect-time of pollen sterility loci interaction was very early. There were highly significant differences in the number of quadrivalents and bivalents, and in chromosome configuration among all the hybrids, and quadrivalents decreased with an increase in the seed set of autotetraploid hybrids. Many different kinds of chromosomal abnormalities, such as chromosome straggling, chromosome lagging, asynchrony of chromosome disjunction, and tri-fission were found during the various developmental stages of PMC meiosis. All these abnormalities were significantly higher in sterile hybrids than in fertile hybrids, suggesting that pollen sterility gene interactions tend to increase the chromosomal abnormalities which cause the partial abortion of male gametes and leads to the decline in the seed set of the autotetraploid rice hybrids.

  15. Genetic influences on bone density: Physiological correlates of vitamin D receptor gene alleles in premonopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Nguyen, T.; Morrison, N.

    1995-09-01

    Common vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene alleles have recently been shown to contribute to the genetic variability in bone mass and bone turnover; however, the physiological mechanisms involved are unknown. To examine this, the response to 7 days of 2 {mu}g oral 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25-(OH){sub 2}D] (calcitrol) stimulation was assessed in 21 premenopausal women, homozygous for one or other of the common VDR alleles (bb, N = 11; BB, n = 10). Indices of bone turnover and calcium homeostasis were measured during 2 weeks. Baseline osteocalcin, 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D, type I collagen carboxyterminal telopeptide, and inorganic phosphate levels were significantly higher and spinal bone mineral density was significantly lower in the BB allelic group. After calcitrol administration, similar levels of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D were attained throughout the study in both genotypic groups. The increase in serum osteocalcin levels in the BB group was significantly less than that in the bb group (11% vs. 32%, P = 0.01). The genotype-related baseline difference in osteocalcin levels was not apparent at the similar serum 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D levels. By contrast, the baseline differences in phosphate and type I collagen carboxyterminal telopeptide persisted throughout the study. Serum ionized calcium levels did not differ between genotypes, nor did it move out of normal range values. However, parathyroid hormone was less suppressed in the low bone density group (38% vs. 11%, P = 0.01). These data indicate that the VDR alleles are associated with differences in the vitamin D endocrine system and may have important implications in relation to the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, Dean A.; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n=49) and non-violent (n=40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P<0.0001) association between low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles and violent crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P<0.01), but reached only a marginal trend (P=0.08) in their African American counterparts. While violent crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P<0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors. PMID:25082653

  17. A personalised approach to prostate cancer screening based on genotyping of risk founder alleles

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, C; Wokołorczyk, D; Kluźniak, W; Kashyap, A; Gołąb, A; Słojewski, M; Sikorski, A; Puszyński, M; Soczawa, M; Borkowski, T; Borkowski, A; Antczak, A; Przybyła, J; Sosnowski, M; Małkiewicz, B; Zdrojowy, R; Domagała, P; Piotrowski, K; Menkiszak, J; Krzystolik, K; Gronwald, J; Jakubowska, A; Górski, B; Dębniak, T; Masojć, B; Huzarski, T; Muir, K R; Lophatananon, A; Lubiński, J; Narod, S A

    2013-01-01

    Background: To evaluate whether genotyping for 18 prostate cancer founder variants is helpful in identifying high-risk individuals and for determining optimal screening regimens. Methods: A serum PSA level was measured and a digital rectal examination (DRE) was performed on 2907 unaffected men aged 40–90. Three hundred and twenty-three men with an elevated PSA (⩾4 ng ml−1) or an abnormal DRE underwent a prostate biopsy. All men were genotyped for three founder alleles in BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA and C61G), for four alleles in CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395 and I157T), for one allele in NBS1 (657del5), for one allele in HOXB13 (G84E), and for nine low-risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results: On the basis of an elevated PSA or an abnormal DRE, prostate cancer was diagnosed in 135 of 2907 men (4.6%). In men with a CHEK2 missense mutation I157T, the cancer detection rate among men with an elevated PSA or an abnormal DRE was much higher (10.2%, P=0.0008). The cancer detection rate rose with the number of SNP risk genotypes observed from 1.2% for men with no variant to 8.6% for men who carried six or more variants (P=0.04). No single variant was helpful on its own in predicting the presence of prostate cancer, however, the combination of all rare mutations and SNPs improved predictive power (area under the curve=0.59; P=0.03). Conclusion: These results suggest that testing for germline CHEK2 mutations improves the ability to predict the presence of prostate cancer in screened men, however, the clinical utility of incorporating DNA variants in the screening process is marginal. PMID:23722471

  18. Association of low-activity MAOA allelic variants with violent crime in incarcerated offenders.

    PubMed

    Stetler, Dean A; Davis, Chad; Leavitt, Kathryn; Schriger, Ilana; Benson, Katie; Bhakta, Samir; Wang, Lam Chee; Oben, Cynthia; Watters, Matthew; Haghnegahdar, Tara; Bortolato, Marco

    2014-11-01

    The main enzyme for serotonin degradation, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A, has recently emerged as a key biological factor in the predisposition to impulsive aggression. Male carriers of low-activity variants of the main functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene (MAOA-uVNTR) have been shown to exhibit a greater proclivity to engage in violent acts. Thus, we hypothesized that low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles may be associated with a higher risk for criminal violence among male offenders. To test this possibility, we analyzed the MAOA-uVNTR variants of violent (n = 49) and non-violent (n = 40) male Caucasian and African-American convicts in a correctional facility. All participants were also tested with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) to assess their levels of childhood trauma exposure, impulsivity and aggression, respectively. Our results revealed a robust (P < 0.0001) association between low-activity MAOA-uVNTR alleles and violent crime. This association was replicated in the group of Caucasian violent offenders (P < 0.01), but reached only a marginal trend (P = 0.08) in their African American counterparts. While violent crime charges were not associated with CTQ, BIS-11 and BPAQ scores, carriers of low-activity alleles exhibited a mild, yet significant (P < 0.05) increase in BIS-11 total and attentional-impulsiveness scores. In summary, these findings support the role of MAOA gene as a prominent genetic determinant for criminal violence. Further studies are required to confirm these results in larger samples of inmates and evaluate potential interactions between MAOA alleles and environmental vulnerability factors.

  19. [Study on identification of cistanche hebra and its adulterants by PCR amplification of specific alleles based on ITS sequences].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Hua; Long, Ping; Zou, De-Zhi; Li, Yue; Cui, Zhan-Hu; Li, Min-Hui

    2014-10-01

    To explore the new method of discriminating Cistanche deserticola, Cynomorium songaricum and Orobanche pycnostachya by using PCR amplification of specific alleles. 30 samples of the different C. deserticola, 21 samples of C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya were collected. The total DNA of the samples were extracted, the ITS sequences from C. deserticola, C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya were amplified by PCR and sequenced unidirectionally. These sequences were aligned by using ClustulW. Specific primer was designed according to the ITS sequences of specific alleles, and PCR reaction system was optimized. Additionally, compare with the identification of specific PCR method and DNA sequence analysis method. The result showed that the 331 bp identification band for C. deserticola and the adulterants not amplified bands by a single PCR reaction, which showed good identification ability to the three species. PCR amplification of specific alleles can be used to identify C. deserticola, C. songaricum and O. pycnostachya successfully.

  20. Identification of two novel human CD1E alleles.

    PubMed

    Mirones, I; Oteo, M; Parra-Cuadrado, J F; Martínez-Naves, E

    2000-08-01

    CD1 is a family of proteins structurally related to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and specialized in presenting lipids or glycolipids to T cells. In humans, there are five CD1 genes (CD1A to CD1E). It has been shown that, in contrast with classical MHC genes, CD1 loci display a very limited polymorphism. In the present work we describe two novel CD1E alleles found in two healthy Caucasian individuals. One allele differs from the wild-type by a point mutation resulting in a replacement of arginine at position 154 by a tryptophan. In the second allele we found a substitution of the leucine 184 by a proline.