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Sample records for allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization

  1. Quantitative genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization on DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Andreas M; Ballvora, Agim; Matzner, Ulrich; Klemm, Manfred; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    Genotyping of SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) has challenged the development of several novel techniques. Most of these methods have been introduced to discriminate binary SNPs in diploid species. In the present study, the quantitative genotyping of SNPs in natural DNA pools of a polyploid organism via DNA microarrays was analysed. Three randomly selected SNP loci were genotyped in the tetraploid species potato (Solanum tuberosum). For each SNP, 24 oligomers were designed, 12 with forward and 12 with reverse orientation. They contained the polymorphic site at one of the positions 11, 14 and 17. Several steps of optimizations were performed, including the 'materials' used and the establishment of hybridization conditions. Glass surfaces were either epoxy- or aldehyde-modified, and allele-specific oligonucleotides contained either SH or NH2 groups. Hybridization stringency conditions were established by varying the concentration of formamide in the hybridization buffer. For SNP BA213c14t7/403, the quantitative discrimination between all four different naturally occurring genotypes could be demonstrated. PMID:15847606

  2. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described. PMID:22215554

  3. In Vivo Evaluation of Candidate Allele-specific Mutant Huntingtin Gene Silencing Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Østergaard, Michael E; Watt, Andrew T; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Doty, Crystal N; Villanueva, Erika B; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Xie, Yuanyun; Freier, Susan M; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, Clarence Frank; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant, genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of voluntary motor control, psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive decline, for which there is currently no disease-modifying therapy. HD is caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mutant HTT protein (muHTT) acquires toxic functions, and there is significant evidence that muHTT lowering would be therapeutically efficacious. However, the wild-type HTT protein (wtHTT) serves vital functions, making allele-specific muHTT lowering strategies potentially safer than nonselective strategies. CAG tract expansion is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be targeted by gene silencing reagents such as antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to accomplish allele-specific muHTT lowering. Here we evaluate ASOs targeted to HD-associated SNPs in acute in vivo studies including screening, distribution, duration of action and dosing, using a humanized mouse model of HD, Hu97/18, that is heterozygous for the targeted SNPs. We have identified four well-tolerated lead ASOs that potently and selectively silence muHTT at a broad range of doses throughout the central nervous system for 16 weeks or more after a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. With further validation, these ASOs could provide a therapeutic option for individuals afflicted with HD. PMID:25101598

  4. Allele-Specific Suppression of Mutant Huntingtin Using Antisense Oligonucleotides: Providing a Therapeutic Option for All Huntington Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Skotte, Niels H.; Southwell, Amber L.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Warby, Simon C.; Doty, Crystal N.; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P.; Bennett, C. Frank; Swayze, Eric E.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder. PMID:25207939

  5. Extensive allele-specific translational regulation in hybrid mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jingyi; Wang, Xi; McShane, Erik; Zauber, Henrik; Sun, Wei; Selbach, Matthias; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Translational regulation is mediated through the interaction between diffusible trans-factors and cis-elements residing within mRNA transcripts. In contrast to extensively studied transcriptional regulation, cis-regulation on translation remains underexplored. Using deep sequencing-based transcriptome and polysome profiling, we globally profiled allele-specific translational efficiency for the first time in an F1 hybrid mouse. Out of 7,156 genes with reliable quantification of both alleles, we found 1,008 (14.1%) exhibiting significant allelic divergence in translational efficiency. Systematic analysis of sequence features of the genes with biased allelic translation revealed that local RNA secondary structure surrounding the start codon and proximal out-of-frame upstream AUGs could affect translational efficiency. Finally, we observed that the cis-effect was quantitatively comparable between transcriptional and translational regulation. Such effects in the two regulatory processes were more frequently compensatory, suggesting that the regulation at the two levels could be coordinated in maintaining robustness of protein expression. PMID:26253569

  6. Direct fluorescence analysis of genetic polymorphisms by hybridization with oligonucleotide arrays on glass supports.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Z; Guilfoyle, R A; Thiel, A J; Wang, R; Smith, L M

    1994-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms has been developed using allele-specific oligonucleotide arrays bound to glass supports. Allele-specific oligonucleotides are covalently immobilized on glass slides in arrays of 3 mm spots. Genomic DNA is amplified by PCR using one fluorescently tagged primer oligonucleotide and one biotinylated primer oligonucleotide. The two complementary DNA strands are separated, the fluorescently tagged strand is hybridized to the support-bound oligonucleotide array, and the hybridization pattern is detected by fluorescence scanning. Multiple polymorphisms present in the PCR product may be detected in parallel. The effect of spacer length, surface density and hybridization conditions were evaluated, as was the relative efficacy of hybridization with single or double-stranded PCR products. The utility of the method was demonstrated in the parallel analysis of 5 point mutations from exon 4 of the human tyrosinase gene. Images PMID:7816638

  7. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish. PMID:26747053

  8. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis with allele-specific oligonucleotide primers for individual IgH VDJ regions to evaluate tumor burden in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Sata, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Maeda, Ikuhiro; Habuchi, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Fukushima, Kentaro; Fujita, Jiro; Ezoe, Sachiko; Tadokoro, Seiji; Maeda, Tetsuo; Mizuki, Masao; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masashi; Ueda, Shuji; Iida, Masato; Tokumine, Yukihiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko; Mitsui, Hideki; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with patient-specific, allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) primers for individual immunoglobulin H VDJ region (ASO-PCR) amplification was performed using several sources of clinical material, including mRNA from peripheral blood cells (PBMNCs), whole bone marrow cells (BMMNCs), and the CD20+ CD38- B-cell population in bone marrow, as well as cell-free DNA from the sera of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We designed the ASO primers and produced sufficient PCR fragments to evaluate tumor burden in 20 of 30 bone marrow samples at diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification efficiency depended on primer sequences because the production of ASO-PCR fragments did not correlate with serum M-protein levels. However, the ASO-PCR levels in BMMNCs showed statistically significant correlations with those in PBMNCs and CD20+ CD38- B-cells. The good association between the BMMNC and PBMNC data indicated that PBMNCs could be a suitable source for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). In the case of cell-free DNA, ASO-PCR levels showed a unique pattern and remained high even after treatment. Because the sequence information for each ASO-PCR product was identical to the original, the cell-free DNA might also be useful for evaluating MRD. Moreover, the ASO-PCR products were clearly detected in 17 of 22 mRNA samples from CD20+ CD38- populations, suggesting that MM clones might exist in relatively earlier stages of B cells than in plasma cells. Thus, ASO-PCR analysis using various clinical materials is useful for detecting MRD in MM patients as well as for clarifying MM pathogenesis. PMID:25591497

  9. Hybrid sterility and evolution in Hawaiian Drosophila: differential gene and allele-specific expression analysis of backcross males.

    PubMed

    Brill, E; Kang, L; Michalak, K; Michalak, P; Price, D K

    2016-08-01

    The Hawaiian Drosophila are an iconic example of sequential colonization, adaptive radiation and speciation on islands. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of closely related species pairs that exhibit incomplete reproductive isolation can provide insights into the mechanisms of speciation. Drosophila silvestris from Hawai'i Island and Drosophila planitibia from Maui are two closely related allopatric Hawaiian picture-winged Drosophila that produce sterile F1 males but fertile F1 females, a pattern consistent with Haldane's rule. Backcrossing F1 hybrid females between these two species to parental species gives rise to recombinant males with three distinct sperm phenotypes despite a similar genomic background: motile sperm, no sperm (sterile), and immotile sperm. We found that these three reproductive morphologies of backcross hybrid males produce divergent gene expression profiles in testes, as measured with RNA sequencing. There were a total of 71 genes significantly differentially expressed between backcross males with no sperm compared with those backcross males with motile sperm and immotile sperm, but no significant differential gene expression between backcross males with motile sperm and backcross males with immotile sperm. All of these genes were underexpressed in males with no sperm, including a number of genes with previously known activities in adult testis. An allele-specific expression analysis showed overwhelmingly more cis-divergent than trans-divergent genes, with no significant difference in the ratio of cis- and trans-divergent genes among the sperm phenotypes. Overall, the results indicate that the regulation of gene expression involved in sperm production likely diverged relatively rapidly between these two closely related species. PMID:27220308

  10. Sequence-dependent theory of oligonucleotide hybridization kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-05-07

    A theoretical approach to the prediction of the sequence and temperature-dependent rate constants for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions has been developed based on the theory of relaxation kinetics. One-sided and two-sided melting reaction mechanisms for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions have been considered, analyzed, modified, and compared to select a physically consistent as well as robust model for prediction of the relaxation times of DNA hybridization reactions that agrees with the experimental evidence. The temperature- and sequence-dependent parameters of the proposed model have been estimated using available experimental data. The relaxation time model that we developed has been combined with the nearest neighbor model of hybridization thermodynamics to estimate the temperature- and sequence-dependent rate constants of an oligonucleotide hybridization reaction. The model-predicted rate constants are compared to experimentally determined rate constants for the same oligonucleotide hybridization reactions. Finally, we consider a few important applications of kinetically controlled DNA hybridization reactions.

  11. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  12. Finding a most likely clone ordering from oligonucleotide hybridization data

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, L.A.

    1994-06-01

    Using an extension of a statistical model given by E. Lander and M. Waterman, the authors define the a posteriori probability of a clone ordering based upon oligonucleotide hybridization data. They give algorithms for computing the likelihood of a clone ordering and for finding a clone ordering of maximum likelihood. The dynamic programming algorithm for computing likelihoods runs in time O(mnc), where m is the number of oligonucleotide probes, n is the number of clones, and c is the coverage of the clone library. They use the Expectation-Maximization technique to maximize likelihoods. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Identification of rifampin-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by hybridization, PCR, and ligase detaction reaction on oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovich, V.; Lapa, S.; Gryadunov, D.; Sobolev, A.; Strizhkov, B.; Chernyh, N.; Skotnikova, O.; Irtuganova, O.; Moroz, A.; Litvinov, V.; Vladimirskii, M.; Perelman, M.; Chernousova, L.; Erokhin, V.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Russian Academy of Sciences; Moscow Antituberculosis Center; Moscow Medical Academy; Russian Academy of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    Three new molecular approaches were developed to identify drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using biochips with oligonucleotides immobilized in polyacrylamide gel pads. These approaches are significantly faster than traditional bacteriological methods. All three approaches -- hybridization, PCR, and ligase detection reaction -- were designed to analyze an 81-bp fragment of the gene rpoB encoding the {beta}-subunit of RNA polymerase, where most known mutations of rifampin resistance are located. The call set for hybridization analysis consisted of 42 immobilized oligonucleotides and enabled us to identify 30 mutant variants of the rpoB gene within 24 h. These variants are found in 95% of all mutants whose rifampin resistance is caused by mutations in the 81-bp fragment. Using the second approach, allele-specific on-chip PCR, it was possible to directly identify mutations in clinical samples within 1.5 h. The third approach, on-chip ligase detection reaction, was sensitive enough to reveal rifampin-resistant strains in a model mixture containing 1% of resistant and 99% of susceptible bacteria. This level of sensitivity is comparable to that from the determination of M. tuberculosis drug resistance by using standard bacteriological tests.

  14. Oligonucleotide Immobilization and Hybridization on Aldehyde-Functionalized Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Brushes.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Tugba; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-11-01

    DNA biosensing requires high oligonucleotide binding capacity interface chemistries that can be tuned to maximize probe presentation as well as hybridization efficiency. This contribution investigates the feasibility of aldehyde-functionalized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brush-based interfaces for oligonucleotide binding and hybridization. These polymer brushes, which allow covalent immobilization of oligonucleotides, are prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of HEMA followed by a postpolymerization oxidation step to generate side chain aldehyde groups. A series of polymer brushes covering a range of film thicknesses and grafting densities was investigated with regard to their oligonucleotide binding capacity as well as their ability to support oligonucleotide hybridization. Densely grafted brushes were found to have probe oligonucleotide binding capacities of up to ∼30 pmol/cm(2). Increasing the thickness of these densely grafted brush films, however, resulted in a decrease in the oligonucleotide binding capacity. Less densely grafted brushes possess binding capacities of ∼10 pmol/cm(2), which did not significantly depend on film thickness. The oligonucleotide hybridization efficiencies, however, were highest (93%) on those brushes that present the lowest surface concentration of the probe oligonucleotide. These results highlight the importance of optimizing the probe oligonucleotide surface concentration and binding interface chemistry. The versatility and tunability of the PHEMA-based brushes presented herein makes these films a very attractive platform for the immobilization and hybridization of oligonucleotides. PMID:26441148

  15. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  16. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, M; Le Gall, I; Millasseau, P; Dausset, J; Cohen, D

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ beta gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. We used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period. Images PMID:2895927

  17. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  18. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in a 175-allele specific mutant p53 dependent manner. This activity depends upon the zinc ion chelating properties of the compound as well as redox changes. These data identify NSC319726 as a p53R175 mutant reactivator and as a lead compound for p53 targeted drug development. PMID:22624712

  19. Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. S.; Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Veligura, A. A.; Govorov, M. I.; Shulitsky, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    Self-assembled complexes consisting of thin multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and DNA-oligonucleotides which are able to a cooperative binding to complementary oligonucleotides have been investigated. It was establised a high-performance charge transport in nanostructured Langmuir-Blodgett complexes thin MWCNTs/DNA. A method to electrochemically detect DNA hybridization on the self-organized structures has been proposed.

  20. The illusion of specific capture: surface and solution studies of suboptimal oligonucleotide hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization based assays and capture systems depend on the specificity of hybridization between a probe and its intended target. A common guideline in the construction of DNA microarrays, for instance, is that avoiding complementary stretches of more than 15 nucleic acids in a 50 or 60-mer probe will eliminate sequence specific cross-hybridization reactions. Here we present a study of the behavior of partially matched oligonucleotide pairs with complementary stretches starting well below this threshold complementarity length – in silico, in solution, and at the microarray surface. The modeled behavior of pairs of oligonucleotide probes and their targets suggests that even a complementary stretch of sequence 12 nt in length would give rise to specific cross-hybridization. We designed a set of binding partners to a 50-mer oligonucleotide containing complementary stretches from 6 nt to 21 nt in length. Results Solution melting experiments demonstrate that stable partial duplexes can form when only 12 bp of complementary sequence are present; surface hybridization experiments confirm that a signal close in magnitude to full-strength signal can be obtained from hybridization of a 12 bp duplex within a 50mer oligonucleotide. Conclusions Microarray and other molecular capture strategies that rely on a 15 nt lower complementarity bound for eliminating specific cross-hybridization may not be sufficiently conservative. PMID:23445545

  1. Selection of oligonucleotide probes and experimental conditions for multiplex hybridization experiments.

    PubMed

    Bains, W

    1994-01-01

    Different DNA probes hybridize under different conditions. I examine the constraints of the design of oligonucleotide probes that are meant to hybridize to different unique sites in human genomic DNA under a single set of hybridization conditions as a parallel array. In 522 kb of human genomic DNA, 75% of 12-base and 89% of 22-base are unique, as opposed to 90% and 100% as expected of unstructured DNA, and this is not due solely to repetitive elements in the DNA. Hybridization in TMAC to reduce A+T content effects on melting temperature allows only 90% of unique targets to be hybridized under one set of conditions if a 2 degrees C difference between matched and mismatched sequences is required. Standard hybridization conditions allow no more than 60% of unique probes to be used together. This suggests that probe, hybridization conditions, and instrument design for multiple-probe hybridization applications will be harder than previously suggested. PMID:7803130

  2. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  3. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  4. A competitive enzyme hybridization assay for plasma determination of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Deverre, J R; Boutet, V; Boquet, D; Ezan, E; Grassi, J; Grognet, J M

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme competitive hybridization assay was developed and validated for determination of mouse plasma concentrations of a 15mer antisense phosphodiester oligodeoxyribonucleotide and of two phosphorothioate analogs. Assays were performed in 96-well microtiter plates. The phosphodiester sense sequence was covalently bound to the microwells. The 5'-biotinylated antisense sequence was used as tracer. The principle of the assay involves competitive hybridization of tracer and antisense nucleotide to the solid phase-immobilized sense oligonucleotide. Solid phase- bound tracer oligonucleotide was assayed after reaction with a streptavidin-acetylcholinesterase conjugate, using the colorimetric method of Ellman. As in competitive enzyme immunoassays, coloration was inversely related to the amount of analyte initially present in the sample. The limit of quantification was 900 pM for phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotide using a 100 microl volume of plasma without extraction. Cross-reactivity was negligible after a four base deletion in either the 3'or 5'position. The assay was simple and sensitive, suitable for in vitro screening of oligonucleotide hybridization potency in biological fluids and for measuring the plasma pharmacokinetics of phosphorothioate and phosphodiester sequences. PMID:9278477

  5. Lattice model of oligonucleotide hybridization in solution. II. Specificity and cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araque, J. C.; Robert, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Because oligonucleotides are short sequences of nucleic acid bases, their association in solution with complementary strands (hybridization) is often seen to conform to a simple two-state model. However, experimental evidence suggests that, despite their short length, oligonucleotides may hybridize through multiple states involving intermediates. We investigate whether these apparently contradictory scenarios are possible by imposing different levels of sequence specificity on a lattice model of oligonucleotides in solution, which we introduced in Part I [J. C. Araque et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 165103 (2011)]. We find that both multiple-intermediate (weakly cooperative) and two-state (strongly cooperative) transitions are possible and that these are directly linked to the level of sequence specificity. Sequences with low specificity hybridize (base-by-base) by way of multiple stable intermediates with increasing number of paired bases. Such intermediate states are weakly cooperative because the energetic gain from adding an additional base pair is outweighed by the conformational entropy loss. Instead, sequences with high specificity hybridize through multiple metastable intermediates which easily bridge the configurational and energetic gaps between single- and double-stranded states. These metastable intermediates interconvert with minimal loss of conformational entropy leading to a strongly cooperative hybridization. The possibility of both scenarios, multiple- and two-states, is therefore encoded in the specificity of the sequence which in turn defines the level of cooperativity.

  6. Direct Fluorescence Detection of Allele-Specific PCR Products Using Novel Energy-Transfer Labeled Primers.

    PubMed

    Winn-Deen

    1998-12-01

    Background: Currently analysis of point mutations can be done by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by gel analysis or by gene-specific PCR followed by hybridization with an allele-specific probe. Both of these mutation detection methods require post-PCR laboratory time and run the risk of contaminating subsequent experiments with the PCR product liberated during the detection step. The author has combined the PCR amplification and detection steps into a single procedure suitable for closed-tube analysis. Methods and Results: Allele-specific PCR primers were designed as Sunrise energy-transfer primers and contained a 3' terminal mismatch to distinguish between normal and mutant DNA. Cloned normal (W64) and mutant (R64) templates of the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene were tested to verify amplification specificity and yield. A no-target negative control was also run with each reaction. After PCR, each reaction was tested for fluorescence yield by measuring fluorescence on a spectrofluorimeter or fluorescent microtitreplate reader. The cloned controls and 24 patient samples were tested for the W64R mutation by two methods. The direct fluorescence results with the Sunrise allele-specific PCR method gave comparable genotypes to those obtained with the PCR/ restriction digest/gel electrophoresis control method. No PCR artifacts were observed in the negative controls or in the PCR reactions run with the mismatched target. Conclusions: The results of this pilot study indicate good PCR product and fluorescence yield from allele-specific energy-transfer labeled primers, and the capability of distinguishing between normal and mutant alleles based on fluorescence alone, without the need for restriction digestion, gel electrophoresis, or hybridization with an allele-specific probe. PMID:10089280

  7. Rapid, high-resolution in situ hybridization histochemistry with radioiodinated synthetic oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Arentzen, R.; Baldino, F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry is a valuable technique for localizing specific messenger RNA (mRNA) and detecting changes in gene expression. Generally, the mRNA of interest has been detected by probes obtained from cloned DNA and labelled to high specific activity by nick translation. Such probes have a number of disadvantages which can be circumvented by the use of short synthetic oligonucleotides designed to be complementary to a known mRNA sequence. We report here that synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to part of the mRNA coding for rat arginine-vasopressin (AVP) can be labelled to high specific activity with (/sup 125/I), using either the primer extension method with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I or the 3'-tailing method with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Both AVP probes hybridized well to the magnocellular neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. A strong autoradiographic signal was present by 2 days, with grains largely confined to the perikaryon. These results compare favorably to those obtained with (/sup 32/P)- or (/sup 3/H)-labelled probes. Given the ease of the 3'-tailing method, (/sup 125/I)-labelled oligonucleotides appear to be especially useful probes for in situ hybridization histochemistry.

  8. Allele-specific loss or imbalance of chromosomes 9, 15, and 16 in B-cell tumors from interspecific F1 hybrid mice carrying Emu-c-myc or N-myc transgenes.

    PubMed

    Linardopoulos, S; Silva, S; Klein, G; Balmain, A

    2000-12-15

    Mice carrying an immunoglobulin enhancer (Emu-) linked c- or N-myc transgene develop fatal monoclonal or oligoclonal pre-B or B-cell lymphomas. This indicates that, beside the Emu-activated myc gene, additional genetic changes are required for tumor development. To trace these additional changes, we carried out a genome-wide search for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and allelic imbalance (AI). This was done at 53 microsatellite markers in a panel of 34 lymphomas and four plasmacytomas from c- or N-myc transgene carrying (BALB/c x Mus spretus)F1 hybrids. An additional 43 lymphomas and three plasmacytomas from non-transgenic F1 mice were also investigated. Losses of one or more spretus-derived chromosome 9 markers were detected in 19 of 23 (83%) of the lymphomas, but in none of the four plasmacytomas that developed in N-myc F1 mice. No LOH-9 was found in any of the 11 lymphomas from Emu-c-myc F1 mice and only in 1 of 46 (2%) tumors derived from non-transgenic (BALB/c x spretus)F1 hybrid controls. These results suggest that a gene on spretus chromosome 9 confers resistance to the development of N-myc but not c-myc-induced lymphomas. AI of chromosome 15 markers (AI-15) was detected in 57 of 77 (74%) lymphomas and in 5 of 7 (72%) plasmacytomas, independently of the transgenic status and the mode of induction. All of the lymphomas and plasmacytomas with AI-15 revealed a relative gain of the spretus-derived D15Mit6 allele (located at 13.7 cM from the centromere), together with a gain of the BALB/c allele of the more distal (29.6 cM) D15Mit64 marker, suggesting somatic recombination. LOH in the region close to c-myc was detected in a proportion of tumors with AI-15. The observation of complex genetic alterations includes somatic recombination, AI and LOH involving chromosome 15 in tumors induced by a myc transgene. This indicates that at least two genes in addition to c-myc on this chromosome can be involved in lymphoma development. PMID:11093815

  9. Assembly of hybrid oligonucleotide modified gold (Au) and alloy nanoparticles building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Ching; Jen, Chun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Hung; Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Shu-Hui; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The alloy-based hybrid materials with macroscopic network arrays were developed by AuAg/Au and AuAgPd/Au nanoparticle composites through oligonucleotides hybridization. AuAg/Au and AuAgPd/Au exhibited distinct organization. The morphology of AuAg/Au conjugation assembled mainly as compact aggregates while AuAgPd/Au hybrid conjugated into the loosen network assemblies. The dehybridization temperatures were studied as a function of molar ratio of alloy/Au. It was found that higher alloy/gold molar ratio led to stronger hybridization for alloy/gold composite, accompanied with increased melting temperature. These results could be interpreted in terms of more alloy nanoparticles bound to a Au particle when the molar ratio of alloy/gold increased. The thermal analysis also showed that AuAg/Au exhibited higher dehybridization temperature. A modified model describing the dehybridization probability of an intact Au/alloy aggregate was performed to support the dehybridization temperature increased with increasing alloy/Au molar ratio. As to more oligonucleotides carried by AuAg (4.9 +/- 1.9 nm) than by AuAgPd (4.4 +/- 1.5 nm) due to larger size in AuAg, the efficient hybridization could result in higher dehybridization temperature in AuAg/Au. PMID:16573077

  10. Hybridization-based aptamer labeling using complementary oligonucleotide platform for PET and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, In Ho; Cho, Ye Lim; Chae, Ju Ri; Yun, Mijin; Kang, Hyungu; Lee, Jung Hwan; Lim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Won Gil; Kang, Won Jun

    2016-09-01

    Aptamers are promising next-generation ligands used in molecular imaging and theragnosis. Aptamers are synthetic nucleic acids that can be held together with complementary sequences by base-pair hybridization. In this study, the complementary oligonucleotide (cODN) hybridization-based aptamer conjugation platform was developed to use aptamers as the molecular imaging agent. The cODN was pre-labeled with fluorescent dye or radioisotope and hybridized with a matched sequence containing aptamers in aqueous conditions. The cODN platform-hybridized aptamers exhibited good serum stability and specific binding affinity towards target cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the newly designed aptamer conjugation platform offers great potential for the versatile application of aptamers as molecular imaging agents. PMID:27258484

  11. Hybridization of binary monolayers of single stranded oligonucleotides and short blocking molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Auer, Sanna; Munter, Tony; Fiegl, Heidi; Apostolidou, Sophia

    2009-02-01

    We have studied the immobilization of single stranded (ss) DNA oligonucleotides of 16-27 base pairs on gold. The oligonucleotides were thiol-modified (SH-ssDNA) or disulfide-modified via a dimethoxytrityl-group (DMT-S-S-ssDNA). Immobilization was performed by adsorption of the probes on the gold surface for 10-15 min, a time within which saturation coverage was obtained for both thiol- and disulfide-modified probes. Hereafter the layer was post-treated with hydroxyalkyl substituted lipoamides also for a time of 10-15 min. The surface density of layers with shorter probes (16-18 mer) was twice (2.4 ± 0.2 × 10 13 probes/cm 2) that of the longer probes (25-27 mer) as studied with surface plasmon resonance. Hybridization of single stranded polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified products with a length above 300 base pairs gave a very low hybridization response. For amplicons with about 100 base pairs the response was high. The surface coverage was comparable to that of complementary ssDNA binding (3.0 × 10 12 strands/cm 2). Surfaces made from SH-ssDNA showed a 30% higher hybridization response than surfaces made from DMT-S-S-ssDNA. The PCR amplified products used are of relevance in breast cancer diagnosis. The results clearly demonstrate that the single stranded PCR products might be used in label-free cancer diagnostics.

  12. Quantification of methanogenic groups in anaerobic biological reactors by oligonucleotide probe hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, L; Poulsen, L K; Noguera, D R; Rittmann, B E; Stahl, D A

    1994-01-01

    The microbial community structure of anaerobic biological reactors was evaluated by using oligonucleotide probes complementary to conserved tracts of the 16S rRNAs of phylogenetically defined groups of methanogens. Phylogenetically defined groups of methanogens were quantified and visualized, respectively, by hybridization of 32P- and fluorescent-dye-labeled probes to the 16S rRNAs from samples taken from laboratory acetate-fed chemostats, laboratory municipal solid waste digestors, and full-scale sewage sludge digestors. Methanosarcina species, members of the order Methanobacteriales, and Methanosaeta species were the most abundant methanogens present in the chemostats, the solid-waste digestors, and the sewage sludge digestors, respectively. PMID:7517129

  13. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  14. Comparing Charge Transport in Oligonucleotides: RNA:DNA Hybrids and DNA Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Qi, Jianqing; Morelan, Ian A; Feldstein, Paul; Anantram, M P; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-05-19

    Understanding the electronic properties of oligonucleotide systems is important for applications in nanotechnology, biology, and sensing systems. Here the charge-transport properties of guanine-rich RNA:DNA hybrids are compared to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) duplexes with identical sequences. The conductance of the RNA:DNA hybrids is ∼10 times higher than the equivalent dsDNA, and conformational differences are determined to be the primary reason for this difference. The conductance of the RNA:DNA hybrids is also found to decrease more rapidly than dsDNA when the length is increased. Ab initio electronic structure and Green's function-based density of states calculations demonstrate that these differences arise because the energy levels are more spatially distributed in the RNA:DNA hybrid but that the number of accessible hopping sites is smaller. These combination results indicate that a simple hopping model that treats each individual guanine as a hopping site is insufficient to explain both a higher conductance and β value for RNA:DNA hybrids, and larger delocalization lengths must be considered. PMID:27145167

  15. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  16. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  17. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  18. Electrochemical Investigation of Oligonucleotide-DNA Hybridization on Poly(4-Methoxyphenethylamine)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francielle B.; Vieira, Sabrina N.; Goulart Filho, Luiz R.; Boodts, Julien F. C.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.; Madurro, João M.

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the immobilization of purine and pyrimidine bases and immobilization/hybridization of synthetic oligonucleotides on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-methoxyphenethylamine) produced in acid medium. The immobilization of adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine on these modified electrodes was efficient, producing characteristic peaks. Another relevant observation is that, according to the literature, pyrimidine bases, cytosine and thymine are more difficult to detect. However, when immobilized onto the poly(4-methoxyphenethylamine), a significant increase in the magnitude of the current was obtained. The observation of the hybridization between the poly(GA) probe and its complementary, poly(CT) target, was possible by monitoring the guanosine and adenosine peaks or through methylene blue indicator, using differential pulse voltammetry. Hybridization results in a decrease of the peak current of guanosine and adenosine or the signal of methylene blue accumulated on the modified electrode surface. The hybridization with the complementary target was also investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed a significant modification in the Nyquist plot, after addition of the complementary target, with increase of the charge transference resistance. PMID:19325797

  19. Self-assembling DNA-peptide hybrids: morphological consequences of oligonucleotide grafting to a pathogenic amyloid fibrils forming dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Gour, Nidhi; Kedracki, Dawid; Safir, Ilyès; Ngo, Kien Xuan; Vebert-Nardin, Corinne

    2012-06-01

    For the very first time, highly efficient synthesis of DNA-peptide hybrids to scaffold self-assembled nanostructures is described. Oligonucleotide conjugation to the diphenylalanine dipeptide triggers a morphological transition from fibrillar to vesicular structures which may potentially be used as delivery vehicles, since they exhibit pH triggered release. PMID:22534735

  20. Vesicles tethered to microbubbles by hybridized DNA oligonucleotides: Flow cytometry analysis of this new drug delivery vehicle design

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Monica M.; Starkel, Cambrie D.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2010-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary lipid-linked DNA oligonucleotides was used to tether small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) to the lipid monolayer shells of air-microbubbles, a new attachment design for a drug delivery vehicle to be used in tandem with ultrasound imaging. Flow cytometry was used and a novel analysis was developed, based upon light scattering and fluorescence intensity, to quantify the fraction of microbubbles of chosen size-ranges with oligonucleotide-tethered fluorescently labeled SUVs. Fluorescence microscopy was used to verify that our methodology results in successful high-density SUV tethering to a similar fraction of the microbubbles when compared to the flow cytometry statistics. The fraction of successful tetherings increased with the concentration of the complementary lipid-linked oligonucleotide as expected and decreased with the time that microbubbles were incubated with SUVs, which was not expected. Also unexpected, a large fraction of microbubbles had only background fluorescence levels while a much smaller fraction (at most one-eighth, for the shortest incubation and highest concentration of lipid-linked oligonucleotide) had oligonucleotide-tethered fluorescently labeled SUVs and, according to our fluorescence microscopy, that small fraction was densely covered with SUVs. Ejection of the lipid-linked oligonucleotide during high surface pressure compression of the monolayer shells of actively shrinking microbubbles subjected to the Laplace overpressure is speculated as a qualitatively explanation for the statistics. PMID:20229988

  1. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  2. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  3. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-01-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples. PMID:26333806

  4. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-09-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples.

  5. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-01-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples. PMID:26333806

  6. Structured oligonucleotides for target indexing to allow single-vessel PCR amplification and solid support microarray hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Laurie D.; Boissinot, Karel; Peytavi, Régis; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of molecular diagnostic technologies is increasingly used to overcome limitations on sensitivity, specificity or multiplexing capabilities, and provide efficient lab-on-chip devices. Two such techniques, PCR amplification and microarray hybridization are used serially to take advantage of the high sensitivity and specificity of the former combined with high multiplexing capacities of the latter. These methods are usually performed in different buffers and reaction chambers. However, these elaborate methods have a high complexity cost related to reagent requirements, liquid storage and the number of reaction chambers to integrate into automated devices. Furthermore, microarray hybridizations have a sequence dependent efficiency not always predictable. In this work, we have developed the concept of a structured oligonucleotide probe which is activated by cleavage from polymerase exonuclease activity. This technology is called SCISSOHR for Structured Cleavage Induced Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide Hybridization Reaction. The SCISSOHR probes enable indexing the target sequence to a tag sequence. The SCISSOHR technology also allows the combination of nucleic acid amplification and microarray hybridization in a single vessel in presence of the PCR buffer only. The SCISSOHR technology uses an amplification probe that is irreversibly modified in presence of the target, releasing a single-stranded DNA tag for microarray hybridization. Each tag is composed of a 3-nucleotidesequence-dependent segment and a unique “target sequence-independent” 14-nucleotide segment allowing for optimal hybridization with minimal cross-hybridization. We evaluated the performance of five (5) PCR buffers to support microarray hybridization, compared to a conventional hybridization buffer. Finally, as a proof of concept, we developed a multiplexed assay for the amplification, detection, and identification of three (3) DNA targets. This new technology will facilitate the design

  7. Methods of DNA sequencing by hybridization based on optimizing concentration of matrix-bound oligonucleotide and device for carrying out same

    DOEpatents

    Khrapko, Konstantin R.; Khorlin, Alexandr A.; Ivanov, Igor B.; Ershov, Gennady M.; Lysov, Jury P.; Florentiev, Vladimir L.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    1996-09-03

    A method for sequencing DNA by hybridization that includes the following steps: forming an array of oligonucleotides at such concentrations that either ensure the same dissociation temperature for all fully complementary duplexes or allows hybridization and washing of such duplexes to be conducted at the same temperature; hybridizing said oligonucleotide array with labeled test DNA; washing in duplex dissociation conditions; identifying single-base substitutions in the test DNA by analyzing the distribution of the dissociation temperatures and reconstructing the DNA nucleotide sequence based on the above analysis. A device for carrying out the method comprises a solid substrate and a matrix rigidly bound to the substrate. The matrix contains the oligonucleotide array and consists of a multiplicity of gel portions. Each gel portion contains one oligonucleotide of desired length. The gel portions are separated from one another by interstices and have a thickness not exceeding 30 .mu.m.

  8. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  9. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  10. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  11. Allele-specific tumor spectrum in pten knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Karikomi, Matt; Naidu, Shan; Rajmohan, Ravi; Caserta, Enrico; Chen, Hui-Zi; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Moffitt, Julie; Stephens, Julie A; Fernandez, Soledad A; Weinstein, Michael; Wang, Danxin; Sadee, Wolfgang; La Perle, Krista; Stromberg, Paul; Rosol, Thomas J; Eng, Charis; Ostrowski, Michael C; Leone, Gustavo

    2010-03-16

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10) cause Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba (BRR) syndromes, two dominantly inherited disorders characterized by mental retardation, multiple hamartomas, and variable cancer risk. Here, we modeled three sentinel mutant alleles of PTEN identified in patients with Cowden syndrome and show that the nonsense Pten(4-5) and missense Pten(C124R) and Pten(G129E) alleles lacking lipid phosphatase activity cause similar developmental abnormalities but distinct tumor spectra with varying severity and age of onset. Allele-specific differences may be accounted for by loss of function for Pten(4-5), hypomorphic function for Pten(C124R), and gain of function for Pten(G129E). These data demonstrate that the variable tumor phenotypes observed in patients with Cowden and BRR syndromes can be attributed to specific mutations in PTEN that alter protein function through distinct mechanisms. PMID:20194734

  12. Genomic Characterization of Prenatally Detected Chromosomal Structural Abnormalities Using Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peining; Pomianowski, Pawel; DiMaio, Miriam S.; Florio, Joanne R.; Rossi, Michael R.; Xiang, Bixia; Xu, Fang; Yang, Hui; Geng, Qian; Xie, Jiansheng; Mahoney, Maurice J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of chromosomal structural abnormalities using conventional cytogenetic methods poses a challenge for prenatal genetic counseling due to unpredictable clinical outcomes and risk of recurrence. Of the 1,726 prenatal cases in a 3-year period, we performed oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis on 11 cases detected with various structural chromosomal abnormalities. In nine cases, genomic aberrations and gene contents involving a 3p distal deletion, a marker chromosome from chromosome 4, a derivative chromosome 5 from a 5p/7q translocation, a de novo distal 6q deletion, a recombinant chromosome 8 comprised of an 8p duplication and an 8q deletion, an extra derivative chromosome 9 from an 8p/9q translocation, mosaicism for chromosome 12q with added material of initially unknown origin, an unbalanced 13q/15q rearrangement, and a distal 18q duplication and deletion were delineated. An absence of pathogenic copy number changes was noted in one case with a de novo 11q/14q translocation and in another with a familial insertion of 21q into a 19q. Genomic characterization of the structural abnormalities aided in the prediction of clinical outcomes. These results demonstrated the value of aCGH analysis in prenatal cases with subtle or complex chromosomal rearrangements. Furthermore, a retrospective analysis of clinical indications of our prenatal cases showed that approximately 20% of them had abnormal ultrasound findings and should be considered as high risk pregnancies for a combined chromosome and aCGH analysis. PMID:21671377

  13. MiL-FISH: Multilabeled Oligonucleotides for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Improve Visualization of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wetzel, Silke; Liebeke, Manuel; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become a vital tool for environmental and medical microbiology and is commonly used for the identification, localization, and isolation of defined microbial taxa. However, fluorescence signal strength is often a limiting factor for targeting all members in a microbial community. Here, we present the application of a multilabeled FISH approach (MiL-FISH) that (i) enables the simultaneous targeting of up to seven microbial groups using combinatorial labeling of a single oligonucleotide probe, (ii) is applicable for the isolation of unfixed environmental microorganisms via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and (iii) improves signal and imaging quality of tissue sections in acrylic resin for precise localization of individual microbial cells. We show the ability of MiL-FISH to distinguish between seven microbial groups using a mock community of marine organisms and its applicability for the localization of bacteria associated with animal tissue and their isolation from host tissues using FACS. To further increase the number of potential target organisms, a streamlined combinatorial labeling and spectral imaging-FISH (CLASI-FISH) concept with MiL-FISH probes is presented here. Through the combination of increased probe signal, the possibility of targeting hard-to-detect taxa and isolating these from an environmental sample, the identification and precise localization of microbiota in host tissues, and the simultaneous multilabeling of up to seven microbial groups, we show here that MiL-FISH is a multifaceted alternative to standard monolabeled FISH that can be used for a wide range of biological and medical applications. PMID:26475101

  14. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  15. Rapid In Situ Hybridization using Oligonucleotide Probes on Paraformaldehyde-prefixed Brain of Rats with Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Ibrahim M; Callanan, John J; Sousa, John; Tao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) toxicity may cause region-specific changes in serotonergic mRNA expression due to acute serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) syndrome. This hypothesis can be tested using in situ hybridization to detect the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene htr2a. In the past, such procedures, utilizing radioactive riboprobe, were difficult because of the complicated workflow that needs several days to perform and the added difficulty that the technique required the use of fresh frozen tissues maintained in an RNase-free environment. Recently, the development of short oligonucleotide probes has simplified in situ hybridization procedures and allowed the use of paraformaldehyde-prefixed brain sections, which are more widely available in laboratories. Here, we describe a detailed protocol using non-radioactive oligonucleotide probes on the prefixed brain tissues. Hybridization probes used for this study include dapB (a bacterial gene coding for dihydrodipicolinate reductase), ppiB (a housekeeping gene coding for peptidylprolyl isomerase B), and htr2a (a serotonin gene coding for 5-HT2A receptors). This method is relatively simply, cheap, reproducible and requires less than two days to complete. PMID:26437182

  16. Synthesis of eight-arm, branched oligonucleotide hybrids and studies on the limits of DNA-driven assembly.

    PubMed

    Schwenger, Alexander; Gerlach, Claudia; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2014-12-01

    Oligonucleotide hybrids with organic cores as rigid branching elements and four or six CG dimer strands have been shown to form porous materials from dilute aqueous solution. In order to explore the limits of this form of DNA-driven assembly, we prepared hybrids with three or eight DNA arms via solution-phase syntheses, using H-phosphonates of protected dinucleoside phosphates. This included the synthesis of (CG)8TREA, where TREA stands for the tetrakis[4-(resorcin-5-ylethynyl)phenyl]adamantane core. The ability of the new compounds to assemble in a DNA-driven fashion was studied by UV-melting analysis and NMR, using hybrids with self-complementary CG zipper arms or non-self-complementary TC dimer arms. The three-arm hybrid failed to form a material under conditions where four-arm hybrids did so. Further, the assembly of TREA hybrids appears to be dominated by hydrophobic interactions, not base pairing of the DNA arms. These results help in the design of materials forming by multivalent DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:25407332

  17. Hybridization specificity, enzymatic activity and biological (Ha-ras) activity of oligonucleotides containing 2,4-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexopyranosyl nucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Augustyns, K; Godard, G; Hendrix, C; Van Aerschot, A; Rozenski, J; Saison-Behmoaras, T; Herdewijn, P

    1993-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides with a 2,4-dideoxyhexopyranosyl nucleoside incorporated at the 3'-end and at a mutation site of the Ha-ras oncogene mRNA were synthesized. Melting temperature studies revealed that an A*-G mismatch is more stable than an A*-T mismatch with these hexopyranosyl nucleosides incorporated at the mutation site. The oligonucleotides are stable against enzymatic degradation. RNase H mediated cleavage studies revealed selective cleavage of mutated Ha-ras mRNA. The oligonucleotide containing two pyranose nucleosides at the penultimate position activates RNase H more strongly than natural oligonucleotides. No correlation, however, was found between DNA - DNA or RNA - DNA melting temperatures and RNase H mediated cleavage capacity. Although the A*-G mismatch gives more stable hybridization than the A*-T base pairing, only the oligonucleotides containing an A*-T base pair are recognized by RNase H. This modification is situated 3 base pairs upstream to the cleavage site. Finally, the double pyranose modified oligonucleotide was able to reduce the growth of T24 cells (bladder carcinoma) while the unmodified antisense oligonucleotide was not. Images PMID:7694231

  18. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Werren, John H; Clark, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  19. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Clark, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  20. Dynamic variation in allele-specific gene expression of Paraoxonase-1 in murine and human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Bousiaki, Eleni; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Differential allelic expression has been shown to be common in mice, humans and maize, and variability in the expression of polymorphic alleles has been associated with human disease. Here, we describe the differential expression pattern of Paraoxonase-1, a gene involved in lipid metabolism and implicated in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. We measured the expression of the murine Paraoxonase-1 gene (Pon1) in livers at different stages of embryonic development using F1 hybrid crosses and quantified the transcriptional level of both parental alleles. Using human foetal tissues, we analysed the expression of the human orthologue (PON1) and found monoallelic or preferential allelic expression in 6/7 and 4/4 samples from liver and pancreas, respectively. We observed that Pon1 does not show a parent-of-origin preference in its allelic expression, but has dramatic variations in allele-specific expression occurring throughout development. This study has important repercussions in the analysis of haplotypes at disease loci, since it implies that the expression of polymorphic alleles can be unequal and dynamic. PMID:18678600

  1. Design and application of two oligonucleotide probes for the identification of Geodermatophilaceae strains using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Urzì, Clara; La Cono, Violetta; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2004-07-01

    Bacteria of the family of Geodermatophilaceae are actively involved in the decay processes [Urzì, C. and Realini, M. (1998) Int Biodeterior Biodegrad 42: 45-54; Urzì, C., Salamone, P., Schumann, P., and Stackebrandt, E. (2000) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 50: 529-536] of stone monuments. Characterization of isolates includes phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genetic analysis often requiring long-term procedures. The use of specific probes for members of Geodermatophilaceae family could be useful for the easy detection of those strains colonizing rock surfaces and involved in the biodeterioration. Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the specific detection of members of the family Geodermatophilaceae using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); one probe specific for members of the two genera Geodermatophilus/Blastococcus and the second for members of the genus Modestobacter. PMID:15186346

  2. Vasopressin mRNA in situ hybridization: localization and regulation studied with oligonucleotide cDNA probes in normal and Brattleboro rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.R.; Zingg, H.H.; Habener, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    Hybridizable vasopressin mRNA may be quantitatively localized in situ in sections from rat hypothalamus. Radiolabeled oligonucleotide cDNA probes, synthesized by chemical and enzymatic means, provide strong hybridization in zones known to contain vasopressin cell bodies. Multiple single-stranded /sup 32/P-, /sup 35/S-, or /sup 3/H-labeled oligonucleotides demonstrate localized hybridization that increases as probes are lengthened from 8 to 75 bases. Competition studies, RNase experiments, anatomic localization, and use of multiple probes all support hybridization specificity. An approximate doubling of hybridizable mRNA in both supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei can be detected with dehydration of the animals. Hybridizable mRNA densities are virtually normal in hypothalamic nuclei of Brattleboro rats given free access to water. These methods can provide insight into regional mRNA dynamics and may reflect functional activity of peptidergic neurons.

  3. Distance-Dependent Emission from Dye-Labeled Oligonucleotides on Striped Au/Ag Nanowires: Effect of Secondary Structure and Hybridization Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Rebecca L.; Keating, Christine D.

    2010-01-01

    When fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides are located near metal surfaces, their emission intensity is impacted by both electromagnetic effects (i.e., quenching and/or enhancement of emission) and the structure of the nucleic acids (e.g., random coil, hairpin, or duplex). We present experiments exploring the effect of label position and secondary structure in oligonucleotide probes as a function of hybridization buffer, which impacts the percentage of double-stranded probes on the surface after exposure to complementary DNA. Nanowires containing identifiable patterns of Au and Ag segments were used as the metal substrates in this work, which enabled us to directly compare different dye positions in a single multiplexed experiment and differences in emission for probes attached to the two metals. The observed metal–dye separation dependence for unstructured surface-bound oligonucleotides is highly sensitive to hybridization efficiency, due to substantial changes in DNA extension from the surface upon hybridization. In contrast, fluorophore labeled oligonucleotides designed to form hairpin secondary structures analogous to solution-phase molecular beacon probes are relatively insensitive to hybridization efficiency, since the folded form is quenched and therefore does not appreciably impact the observed distance-dependence of the response. Differences in fluorescence patterning on Au and Ag were noted as a function of not only chromophore identity but also metal–dye separation. For example, emission intensity for TAMRA-labeled oligonucleotides changed from brighter on Ag for 24-base probes to brighter on Au for 48-base probes. We also observed fluorescence enhancement at the ends of nanowires and at surface defects where heightened electromagnetic fields affect the fluorescence. PMID:17017805

  4. Working with Oligonucleotide Arrays.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Benilton S

    2016-01-01

    Preprocessing microarray data consists of a number of statistical procedures that convert the observed intensities into quantities that represent biological events of interest, like gene expression and allele-specific abundances. Here, we present a summary of the theory behind microarray data preprocessing for expression, whole transcriptome and SNP designs and focus on the computational protocol used to obtain processed data that will be used on downstream analyses. We describe the main features of the oligo Bioconductor package, an application designed to support oligonucleotide microarrays using the R statistical environment and the infrastructure provided by Bioconductor, allowing the researcher to handle probe-level data and interface with advanced statistical tools under a simplified framework. We demonstrate the use of the package by preprocessing data originated from three different designs. PMID:27008013

  5. Allele-specific copy-number discovery from whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, WeiBo; Wang, Wei; Sun, Wei; Crowley, James J.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a major form of genetic variation and a risk factor for various human diseases, so it is crucial to accurately detect and characterize them. It is conceivable that allele-specific reads from high-throughput sequencing data could be leveraged to both enhance CNV detection and produce allele-specific copy number (ASCN) calls. Although statistical methods have been developed to detect CNVs using whole-genome sequence (WGS) and/or whole-exome sequence (WES) data, information from allele-specific read counts has not yet been adequately exploited. In this paper, we develop an integrated method, called AS-GENSENG, which incorporates allele-specific read counts in CNV detection and estimates ASCN using either WGS or WES data. To evaluate the performance of AS-GENSENG, we conducted extensive simulations, generated empirical data using existing WGS and WES data sets and validated predicted CNVs using an independent methodology. We conclude that AS-GENSENG not only predicts accurate ASCN calls but also improves the accuracy of total copy number calls, owing to its unique ability to exploit information from both total and allele-specific read counts while accounting for various experimental biases in sequence data. Our novel, user-friendly and computationally efficient method and a complete analytic protocol is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/asgenseng/. PMID:25883151

  6. Allele-specific copy-number discovery from whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, WeiBo; Wang, Wei; Sun, Wei; Crowley, James J; Szatkiewicz, Jin P

    2015-08-18

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a major form of genetic variation and a risk factor for various human diseases, so it is crucial to accurately detect and characterize them. It is conceivable that allele-specific reads from high-throughput sequencing data could be leveraged to both enhance CNV detection and produce allele-specific copy number (ASCN) calls. Although statistical methods have been developed to detect CNVs using whole-genome sequence (WGS) and/or whole-exome sequence (WES) data, information from allele-specific read counts has not yet been adequately exploited. In this paper, we develop an integrated method, called AS-GENSENG, which incorporates allele-specific read counts in CNV detection and estimates ASCN using either WGS or WES data. To evaluate the performance of AS-GENSENG, we conducted extensive simulations, generated empirical data using existing WGS and WES data sets and validated predicted CNVs using an independent methodology. We conclude that AS-GENSENG not only predicts accurate ASCN calls but also improves the accuracy of total copy number calls, owing to its unique ability to exploit information from both total and allele-specific read counts while accounting for various experimental biases in sequence data. Our novel, user-friendly and computationally efficient method and a complete analytic protocol is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/asgenseng/. PMID:25883151

  7. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  8. Quantification of Gordona amarae strains in foaming activated sludge and anaerobic digester systems with oligonucleotide hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, M F; de los Reyes, F L; Hernandez, M; Raskin, L

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  9. Known unknowns for allele-specific expression and genomic imprinting effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects that are associated with allele-specific expression biases at the tissue level in mice. These imprinting effects have features that are distinct from canonical imprinting effects that involve allele silencing. Here, I discuss some of the evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects in the context of random X-inactivation and epigenetic allele-specific expression effects on the autosomes. I propose several mechanisms that may underlie non-canonical imprinting effects and outline future directions and approaches to study these effects at the cellular level in vivo. The growing evidence for complex allele-specific expression effects that are cell- and developmental stage-specific has opened a new frontier for study. Currently, the function of these effects and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:25343032

  10. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RIBO-, DEOXYRIBO-, AND HYBRID OLIGONUCLEOTIDE HELICES BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, Arthur; Martin, Francis H.; Tinoco, Jr., Ignacio

    1980-11-01

    The nonexchangeable base protons and the hydrogen- bonding NH-N imino protons were used to study the conformations and the helix-coil transitions in the following oligonucleotides: (I) dCT{sub 5}G + dCA{sub 5}G, (II) rCU{sub 5}G + rCA{sub 5}G, (III) dCT{sub 5}G + rCA{sub 5}G, (IV) rCU{sub 5}G + dCA{sub 5}G. The first three mixtures all form stable double-helical structures at 5{degrees}C, whereas IV forms a triple strand with a ratio of 2:1 rCU{sub 5}G:dCA{sub 5}G. The chemical shifts of the imino protons in the double strands indicate that I, II, and III have different conformations in solution. For example, the hydrogen-bonded proton of one of the C-G base pairs is more shielded (a 0.4-ppm upfield shift) in helix I than in helix II or III. This implies a significant change in helical parameters, such as the winding angle, the distance between base pairs, or overlap of the bases. The coupling constants of the H1’ sugar protons show that helix I has 90% 2’-endo sugar conformation, whereas helix III has greater than 85% 3’-endo conformation for the observed sugar rings. The sugar pucker data are consistent with helix I having B-family geometry; III has A-family geometry. The chemical shifts of the nonexchangeable base protons in system I were followed with increasing temperature. The midpoints for the transitions, T{sub m}’s, for all the base protons were 28-30 {degrees}C; this indicates an all-or-none transition.

  11. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

    1999-11-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

  12. Validation of the Agilent 244K oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform for clinical cytogenetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shihui; Bittel, Douglas C; Kibiryeva, Nataliya; Zwick, David L; Cooley, Linda D

    2009-09-01

    High-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is being adopted for diagnostic evaluation of genomic disorders, but validation for clinical diagnosis has not yet been reported. We present validation data for the Agilent Human Genome Microarray Kit 244K for clinical application. The platform contains approximately 240,000 distinct 60-mer oligonucleotide probes spanning the entire human genome. We studied 45 previously characterized samples (43 abnormal, 2 normal), 32 with knowledge of prior results and 13 in a blinded manner with 11 performed in a reference laboratory providing microarray testing. Array analysis confirmed known aberrations in 43 samples and a normal result in 2. The array analysis corrected 1 karyotype and clarified 2 additional cases. Array data from 6 patients with 22q11.2 deletion found an average of 2.56 megabases (Mb; range, 2.49-2.62 Mb) with a common 2.43-Mb deleted region. Approximately 7 copy number variants from 400 base pairs to 1.6 Mb were identified per sample. Results demonstrate the usefulness of the aCGH-244K platform as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:19687311

  13. Quantification of Syntrophic Fatty Acid-β-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor by Oligonucleotide Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kaare H.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S. wolfei LYB was closely related to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, of which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas. PMID:10543784

  14. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  15. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Matsishin, M J; Ushenin, Iu V; Rachkov, A E; Solatkin, A P

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C). PMID:26759355

  16. Allele-specific copy number profiling by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bell, John M; Zavala, Nicolas A; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-02-27

    The progression and clonal development of tumors often involve amplifications and deletions of genomic DNA. Estimation of allele-specific copy number, which quantifies the number of copies of each allele at each variant loci rather than the total number of chromosome copies, is an important step in the characterization of tumor genomes and the inference of their clonal history. We describe a new method, falcon, for finding somatic allele-specific copy number changes by next generation sequencing of tumors with matched normals. falcon is based on a change-point model on a bivariate mixed Binomial process, which explicitly models the copy numbers of the two chromosome haplotypes and corrects for local allele-specific coverage biases. By using the Binomial distribution rather than a normal approximation, falcon more effectively pools evidence from sites with low coverage. A modified Bayesian information criterion is used to guide model selection for determining the number of copy number events. Falcon is evaluated on in silico spike-in data and applied to the analysis of a pre-malignant colon tumor sample and late-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma from the same individual. The allele-specific copy number estimates obtained by falcon allows us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the clonal history of the individual's colon cancer. PMID:25477383

  17. Probe-free allele-specific copy number detection and analysis of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ailin; Guan, Xiaowei; Gu, Xinbin; Xie, Guiqin

    2016-03-15

    Cancer development and progression frequently involve nucleotide mutations as well as amplifications and deletions of genomic segments. Quantification of allele-specific copy number is an important step in characterizing tumor genomes for precision medicine. Despite advances in approaches to high-throughput genomic DNA analysis, inexpensive and simple methods for analyzing complex nucleotide and copy number variants are still needed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for discovering and genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms are becoming increasingly important in genetic analysis. In this study, we describe a simple, single-tube, probe-free method that combines SYBR Green I-based quantitative real-time PCR and quantitative melting curve analysis both to detect specific nucleotide variants and to quantify allele-specific copy number variants of tumors. The approach is based on the quantification of the targets of interest and the relative abundance of two alleles in a single tube. The specificity, sensitivity, and utility of the assay were demonstrated in detecting allele-specific copy number changes critical for carcinogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Our approach would be useful for allele-specific copy number analysis or precise genotyping. PMID:26743720

  18. Hybridization modeling of oligonucleotide SNP arrays for accurate DNA copy number estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Kelian; Ding, Qi; Cui, Yuehua; Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Elston, Robert C.; Qian, Minping; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2009-01-01

    Affymetrix SNP arrays have been widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype calling and DNA copy number variation inference. Although numerous methods have achieved high accuracy in these fields, most studies have paid little attention to the modeling of hybridization of probes to off-target allele sequences, which can affect the accuracy greatly. In this study, we address this issue and demonstrate that hybridization with mismatch nucleotides (HWMMN) occurs in all SNP probe-sets and has a critical effect on the estimation of allelic concentrations (ACs). We study sequence binding through binding free energy and then binding affinity, and develop a probe intensity composite representation (PICR) model. The PICR model allows the estimation of ACs at a given SNP through statistical regression. Furthermore, we demonstrate with cell-line data of known true copy numbers that the PICR model can achieve reasonable accuracy in copy number estimation at a single SNP locus, by using the ratio of the estimated AC of each sample to that of the reference sample, and can reveal subtle genotype structure of SNPs at abnormal loci. We also demonstrate with HapMap data that the PICR model yields accurate SNP genotype calls consistently across samples, laboratories and even across array platforms. PMID:19586935

  19. Mutation Screening and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Using a 180K Oligonucleotide Array in VACTERL Association

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, Johanna; Gustavsson, Peter; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Sahlin, Ellika; Bradley, Frideborg; Nordenskjöld, Edvard; Svensson, Pär-Johan; Annerén, Göran; Iwarsson, Erik; Nordgren, Ann; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify genetic causes of VACTERL association (V vertebral defects, A anorectal malformations, C cardiac defects, T tracheoesofageal fistula, E esophageal atresia, R renal anomalies, L limb deformities), we have collected DNA samples from 20 patients diagnosed with VACTERL or with a VACTERL-like phenotype as well as samples from 19 aborted fetal cases with VACTERL. To investigate the importance of gene dose alterations in the genetic etiology of VACTERL association we have performed a systematic analysis of this cohort using a 180K array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) platform. In addition, to further clarify the significance of PCSK5, HOXD13 and CHD7 genes in the VACTERL phenotype, mutation screening has been performed. We identified pathogenic gene dose imbalances in two fetal cases; a hemizygous deletion of the FANCB gene and a (9;18)(p24;q12) unbalanced translocation. In addition, one pathogenic mutation in CHD7 was detected, while no apparent disease-causing mutations were found in HOXD13 or PCSK5. Our study shows that although large gene dose alterations do not seem to be a common cause in VACTERL association, array-CGH is still important in clinical diagnostics to identify disease cause in individual cases. PMID:24416387

  20. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in raw milk by PCR and oligonucleotide probe hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, I; Ibrahim, A; Barta, J R; Griffiths, M W

    1996-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are potential contaminants of food. Suspected cases of food-borne cryptosporidiosis are rarely confirmed because of the limited numbers of oocysts in the samples and the lack of sensitive detection methods adaptable to food. PCR was investigated as a means of overcoming this problem. A PCR assay was designed for the specific amplification of a previously sequenced portion of an oocyst protein gene fragment of Cryptosporidium parvum (N. C. Lally, G. D. Baird, S. J. McQuay, F. Wright, and J. J. Oliver, Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 56:69-78, 1992) and compared with the primer set of Laxer et al. (M. A. Laxer, B. K. Timblin, and R. J. Patel, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 45:688-694, 1991). The PCR products were hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled internal probes and detected by chemiluminescence to enhance sensitivity. The two sets of primers were compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity by using a variety of human and animal isolates of C. parvum and related parasites. Both assays enabled the detection of 1 to 10 oocysts in 20 ml of artificially contaminated raw milk. The assay based on the PCR set and probe of Laxer et al. detected DNAs from Eimeria acervulina and Giardia intestinalis. The new assay has good specificity for C. parvum bovine isolates and hence has a better potential for monitoring the prevalence of C. parvum in raw milk and other environmental samples. PMID:8795214

  1. Identification of transcriptome SNPs between Xiphophorus lines and species for assessing allele specific gene expression within F1 interspecies hybrids☆

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yingjia; Catchen, Julian; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Amores, Angel; Beldroth, Ion; Wagner, Jonathon R; Zhang, Ziping; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wes; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Variations in gene expression are essential for the evolution of novel phenotypes and for speciation. Studying allelic specific gene expression (ASGE) within interspecies hybrids provides a unique opportunity to reveal underlying mechanisms of genetic variation. Using Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid fishes and high-throughput next generation sequencing technology, we were able to assess variations between two closely related vertebrate species, X. maculatus and X. couchianus, and their F1 interspecies hybrids. We constructed transcriptome-wide SNP polymorphism sets between two highly inbred X. maculatus lines (JP 163 A and B), and between X. maculatus and a second species, X. couchianus. The X. maculatus JP 163 A and B parental lines have been separated in the laboratory for ≈ 70 years and we were able to identify SNPs at a resolution of 1 SNP per 49 kb of transcriptome. In contrast, SNP polymorphisms between X. couchianus and X. maculatus species, which diverged ≈ 5–10 million years ago, were identified about every 700 bp. Using 6,524 transcripts with identified SNPs between the two parental species (X. maculatus and X. couchianus), we mapped RNA-seq reads to determine ASGE within F1 interspecies hybrids. We developed an in silico X. couchianus transcriptome by replacing 90,788 SNP bases for X. maculatus transcriptome with the consensus X. couchianus SNP bases and provide evidence that this procedure overcomes read mapping biases. Employment of the insilico reference transcriptome and tolerating 5 mismatches during read mapping allow direct assessment of ASGE in the F1 interspecies hybrids. Overall, these results show that Xiphophorus is a tractable vertebrate experimental model to investigate how genetic variations that occur during speciation may affect gene interactions and the regulation of gene expression. PMID:21466860

  2. Detection of mutation by allele-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (AS-LAMP).

    PubMed

    Aonuma, Hiroka; Badolo, Athanase; Okado, Kiyoshi; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    For effective control of pathogen-transmitting mosquitoes, precise surveillance data of mosquito distribution are essential. Recently, an increase of insecticide resistance due to the kdr mutation in Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits the malaria parasite, has been reported. With the aim of developing a simple and effective method for surveying resistant mosquitoes, LAMP was applied to the allele-specific detection of the kdr gene in An. gambiae. Allele-specific LAMP (AS-LAMP) method successfully distinguished the kdr homozygote from the heterozygote and the wild type. The robustness of AS-LAMP suggests its usefulness for routine identification of insects, not only mosquitoes but also other vectors and agricultural pests. Here we describe the method of AS-LAMP to detect mutation in Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:24026691

  3. Allele-Specific Reprogramming of Cancer Metabolism by the Long Non-coding RNA CCAT2.

    PubMed

    Redis, Roxana S; Vela, Luz E; Lu, Weiqin; Ferreira de Oliveira, Juliana; Ivan, Cristina; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Adamoski, Douglas; Pasculli, Barbara; Taguchi, Ayumu; Chen, Yunyun; Fernandez, Agustin F; Valledor, Luis; Van Roosbroeck, Katrien; Chang, Samuel; Shah, Maitri; Kinnebrew, Garrett; Han, Leng; Atlasi, Yaser; Cheung, Lawrence H; Huang, Gilbert Y; Monroig, Paloma; Ramirez, Marc S; Catela Ivkovic, Tina; Van, Long; Ling, Hui; Gafà, Roberta; Kapitanovic, Sanja; Lanza, Giovanni; Bankson, James A; Huang, Peng; Lai, Stephen Y; Bast, Robert C; Rosenblum, Michael G; Radovich, Milan; Ivan, Mircea; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Liang, Han; Fraga, Mario F; Widger, William R; Hanash, Samir; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ambrosio, Andre L B; Gomes Dias, Sandra M; Calin, George A

    2016-02-18

    Altered energy metabolism is a cancer hallmark as malignant cells tailor their metabolic pathways to meet their energy requirements. Glucose and glutamine are the major nutrients that fuel cellular metabolism, and the pathways utilizing these nutrients are often altered in cancer. Here, we show that the long ncRNA CCAT2, located at the 8q24 amplicon on cancer risk-associated rs6983267 SNP, regulates cancer metabolism in vitro and in vivo in an allele-specific manner by binding the Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) complex with distinct affinities for the two subunits (CFIm25 and CFIm68). The CCAT2 interaction with the CFIm complex fine-tunes the alternative splicing of Glutaminase (GLS) by selecting the poly(A) site in intron 14 of the precursor mRNA. These findings uncover a complex, allele-specific regulatory mechanism of cancer metabolism orchestrated by the two alleles of a long ncRNA. PMID:26853146

  4. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  5. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han B.; Schwab, Tanya L.; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L.; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S.; Bostwick, Hannah S.; Clark, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98–100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  6. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring 'allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable 'allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  7. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R.; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring ‘allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable ‘allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  8. Multiplex Allele-Specific Amplification from Whole Blood for Detecting Multiple Polymorphisms Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianjie; Chen, Lanxin; Mao, Yong; Zhou, Huan

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific amplification on the basis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. However, the extraction of PCR-compatible genomic DNA from whole blood is usually required. This process is complicated and tedious, and is prone to cause cross-contamination between samples. To facilitate direct PCR amplification from whole blood without the extraction of genomic DNA, we optimized the pH value of PCR solution and the concentrations of magnesium ions and facilitator glycerol. Then, we developed multiplex allele-specific amplifications from whole blood and applied them to a case–control study. In this study, we successfully established triplex, five-plex, and eight-plex allele-specific amplifications from whole blood for determining the distribution of genotypes and alleles of 14 polymorphisms in 97 gastric cancer patients and 141 healthy controls. Statistical analysis results showed significant association of SNPs rs9344, rs1799931, and rs1800629 with the risk of gastric cancer. This method is accurate, time-saving, cost-effective, and easy-to-do, especially suitable for clinical prediction of disease susceptibility. PMID:23072573

  9. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  10. Correction of hair shaft defects through allele-specific silencing of mutant Krt75

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R.; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yan-Feng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A.; Roop, Dennis R.; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele specific siRNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific shRNA persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of the mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  11. Poly(oligonucleotide)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the preparation of poly(oligonucleotide) brush polymers and amphiphilic brush copolymers from nucleic acid monomers via graft-through polymerization. We describe the polymerization of PNA-norbornyl monomers to yield poly-PNA (poly(peptide nucleic acid)) via ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) with the initiator, (IMesH2)(C5H5N)2(Cl)2RuCHPh.1 In addition, we present the preparation of poly-PNA nanoparticles from amphiphilic block copolymers and describe their hybridization to a complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide. PMID:25077676

  12. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  13. Allele-Specific Amplification in Cancer Revealed by SNP Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a) determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site), and (b) infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ. PMID:16322765

  14. Allele-specific silencing of mutant Ataxin-7 in SCA7 patient-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Scholefield, Janine; Watson, Lauren; Smith, Danielle; Greenberg, Jacquie; Wood, Matthew J A

    2014-12-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) disorders are inherited neurodegenerative conditions defined by a common pathogenic CAG repeat expansion leading to a toxic gain-of-function of the mutant protein. Consequences of this toxicity include activation of heat-shock proteins (HSPs), impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and transcriptional dysregulation. Several studies in animal models have shown that reducing levels of toxic protein using small RNAs would be an ideal therapeutic approach for such disorders, including spinocerebellar ataxia-7 (SCA7). However, testing such RNA interference (RNAi) effectors in genetically appropriate patient cell lines with a disease-relevant phenotype has yet to be explored. Here, we have used primary adult dermal fibroblasts from SCA7 patients and controls to assess the endogenous allele-specific silencing of ataxin-7 by two distinct siRNAs. We further identified altered expression of two disease-relevant transcripts in SCA7 patient cells: a twofold increase in levels of the HSP DNAJA1 and a twofold decrease in levels of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, UCHL1. After siRNA treatment, the expression of both genes was restored towards normal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first time that allele-specific silencing of mutant ataxin-7, targeting a common SNP, has been demonstrated in patient cells. These findings highlight the advantage of an allele-specific RNAi-based therapeutic approach, and indicate the value of primary patient-derived cells as useful models for mechanistic studies and for measuring efficacy of RNAi effectors on a patient-to-patient basis in the polyQ diseases. PMID:24667781

  15. Allelic Specificity of Ube3a Expression in the Mouse Brain during Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    JUDSON, MATTHEW C.; SOSA-PAGAN, JASON O.; DEL CID, WILMER A.; HAN, JI EUN; PHILPOT, BENJAMIN D.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic alterations of the maternal UBE3A allele result in Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe developmental delay, lack of speech, and difficulty with movement and balance. The combined effects of maternal UBE3A mutation and cell type-specific epigenetic silencing of paternal UBE3A are hypothesized to result in a complete loss of functional UBE3A protein in neurons. However, the allelic specificity of UBE3A expression in neurons and other cell types in the brain has yet to be characterized throughout development, including the early postnatal period when AS phenotypes emerge. Here we define maternal and paternal allele-specific Ube3a protein expression throughout postnatal brain development in the mouse, a species which exhibits orthologous epigenetic silencing of paternal Ube3a in neurons and AS-like behavioral phenotypes subsequent to maternal Ube3a deletion. We find that neurons downregulate paternal Ube3a protein expression as they mature and, with the exception of neurons born from postnatal stem cell niches, do not express detectable paternal Ube3a beyond the first postnatal week. By contrast, neurons express maternal Ube3a throughout postnatal development, during which time localization of the protein becomes increasingly nuclear. Unlike neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrotyes biallelically express Ube3a. Notably, mature oligodendrocytes emerge as the predominant Ube3a-expressing glial cell type in the cortex and white matter tracts during postnatal development. These findings demonstrate the spatiotemporal characteristics of allele-specific Ube3a expression in key brain cell types, thereby improving our understanding of the developmental parameters of paternal Ube3a silencing and the cellular basis of AS. PMID:24254964

  16. A rapid and efficient strategy to generate allele-specific anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Nao; Saito, Tsuneyoshi; Ishii, Yumiko; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Nobukazu

    2009-03-31

    That generation of allele-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) monoclonal antibodies (ASHmAb) is very difficult is well known. This is thought to be due to the unique epitope structure, an assemblage of amino acid residues that lie separately in the amino acid sequence of human HLA, and to its low antigenicity compared with that of common epitopes recognized as xenogeneic determinants by mice. Here we report a rapid and efficient strategy to generate ASHmAb. Different from usual immunization methods is that we suppressed the production of non-allele-specific anti-HLA antibodies against xenogeneic determinants of HLA molecules by immunizing human HLA-B51 transgenic mice against non-HLA-B51 HLA tetramers. In addition, HLA-coated beads enabled rapid and efficient screening for ASHmAb. ASHmAb generated by this strategy will be useful for HLA typing and for clinical diagnosis, such as flow cytometry-based chimerism analysis for early detection of graft failure and relapse of leukemia after HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:19187783

  17. Hypervariable Domains of Self-Incompatibility RNases Mediate Allele-Specific Pollen Recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Matton, D. P.; Maes, O.; Laublin, G.; Xike, Q.; Bertrand, C.; Morse, D.; Cappadocia, M.

    1997-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) in angiosperms is a genetic mechanism that promotes outcrossing through rejection of self-pollen. In the Solanaceae, SI is determined by a multiallelic S locus whose only known product is an S RNase. S RNases show a characteristic pattern of five conserved and two hypervariable regions. These are thought to be involved in the catalytic function and in allelic specificity, respectively. When the Solanum chacoense S12S14 genotype is transformed with an S11 RNase, the styles of plants expressing significant levels of the transgene reject S11 pollen. A previously characterized S RNase, S13, differs from the S11 RNase by only 10 amino acids, four of which are located in the hypervariable regions. When S12S14 plants were transformed with a chimeric S11 gene in which these four residues were substituted with those present in the S13 RNase, the transgenic plants acquired the S13 phenotype. This result demonstrates that the S RNase hypervariable regions control allelic specificity. PMID:12237346

  18. Allele-specific RNAi Mitigates Phenotypic Progression in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Gouvion, Cynthia M; Moore, Steven A; Davidson, Beverly L; Paulson, Henry L

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances suggesting new therapeutic targets, Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains incurable. Aberrant production and accumulation of the Aβ peptide resulting from altered processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is central to the pathogenesis of disease, particularly in dominantly inherited forms of AD. Thus, modulating the production of APP is a potential route to effective AD therapy. Here, we describe the successful use of an allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeting the Swedish variant of APP (APPsw) in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), we delivered an anti-APPsw short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) to the hippocampus of AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1). In short- and long-term transduction experiments, reduced levels of APPsw transprotein were observed throughout targeted regions of the hippocampus while levels of wild-type murine APP remained unaltered. Moreover, intracellular production of transfer RNA (tRNA)-valine promoter–driven shRNAs did not lead to detectable neuronal toxicity. Finally, long-term bilateral hippocampal expression of anti-APPsw shRNA mitigated abnormal behaviors in this mouse model of AD. The difference in phenotype progression was associated with reduced levels of soluble Aβ but not with a reduced number of amyloid plaques. Our results support the development of allele-specific RNAi strategies to treat familial AD and other dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19532137

  19. Comparative study of colony hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, H; Svennerholm, A M; Kalland, K H; Haukanes, B I; Bjorvatn, B

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the published nucleotide sequences of the genes that code for the heat-labile toxin LTh and the heat-stable toxins STaI and STaII of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, a 34-mer and two 33-mer oligonucleotide probes were synthesized. To compare their relative efficacies in the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli, a colony hybridization technique using these probes and a GM1 ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal anti-LT and anti-ST antibodies were used with 76 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles. For further evaluation of probe specificity, the enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1 and non-O1 and Yersinia enterocolitica were examined with the colony hybridization technique. The sensitivity of colony hybridization compared favorably with that of GM1 ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the two assays showed a high level of concordance in specific detection and differentiation of E. coli with various enterotoxin profiles (kappa = 0.906, P less than 0.00001). The probes did not hybridize with DNAs from strains of V. cholerae O1 or non-O1 or Y. enterocolitica. PMID:3281978

  20. Comparative Anatomy of Chromosomal Domains with Imprinted and Non-Imprinted Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L.; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  1. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  2. Development and Application of an Ultrasensitive Hybridization-Based ELISA Method for the Determination of Peptide-Conjugated Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Burki, Umar; Keane, Jonathan; Blain, Alison; O'Donovan, Liz; Gait, Michael John; Laval, Steven H; Straub, Volker

    2015-10-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-induced exon skipping is one of the most promising strategies for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and other rare monogenic conditions. Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMOs) and 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe) are two of the most advanced AONs in development. The next generation of peptide-conjugated PMO (P-PMO) is also showing great promise, but to advance these therapies it is essential to determine the pharmacokinetic and biodistribution (PK/BD) profile using a suitable method to detect AON levels in blood and tissue samples. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method, which shows greater sensitivity than the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method, is the method of choice for 2'OMe detection in preclinical and clinical studies. However, no such assay has been developed for PMO/P-PMO detection, and we have, therefore, developed an ultrasensitive hybridization-based ELISA for this purpose. The assay has a linear detection range of 5-250 pM (R(2)>0.99) in mouse serum and tissue lysates. The sensitivity was sufficient for determining the 24-h PK/BD profile of PMO and P-PMO injected at standard doses (12.5 mg/kg) in mdx mice, the dystrophin-deficient mouse model for DMD. The assay demonstrated an accuracy approaching 100% with precision values under 12%. This provides a powerful cost-effective assay for the purpose of accelerating the development of these emerging therapeutic agents. PMID:26176274

  3. Biopolymer synthesis on polypropylene supports. I. Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Matson, R S; Rampal, J B; Coassin, P J

    1994-03-01

    We have modified polypropylene to serve as a new solid-phase support for oligonucleotide synthesis. The plastic is first surface aminated by exposure to an ammonia plasma generated by radiofrequency plasma discharge. The aminated polypropylene has been found to be useful as a support for the in situ synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers. Furthermore, oligonucleotides synthesized on the surface of the plastic remain attached following deprotection and can be used directly for hybridization. PMID:8203760

  4. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  5. In situ identification of bacteria in drinking water and adjoining biofilms by hybridization with 16S and 23S rRNA-directed fluorescent oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Manz, W; Szewzyk, U; Ericsson, P; Amann, R; Schleifer, K H; Stenström, T A

    1993-01-01

    Free-water-phase and surface-associated microorganisms from drinking water were detected and roughly identified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes complementary to regions of 16S and 23S rRNA characteristic for the domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya and the beta and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria. Samples of glass-attached biofilms and plankton were taken from a Robbins device installed in a water distribution system. More than 70% of the surface-associated cells and less than 40% of the planktonic cells visualized by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining bound detectable amounts of rRNA-targeted probes. These findings are an indication for higher average rRNA content and consequently higher physiological activity of the attached microbial cells compared with the free-living cells. All detectable cells hybridized with the bacterial probe, whereas no Archaea and no Eucarya cells could be detected. Simultaneous hybridization with probes specific for the beta and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria revealed that microcolonies already consisted of mixed populations in early stages with fewer than 50 cells. These observations provide further evidence that the coexistence and interaction of bacteria in drinking water biofilms may be an integral part of their growth and survival strategies. Images PMID:8357261

  6. Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers for Amplification of Priming Glycosyltransferase Genes of the Exopolysaccharide Locus in Strains of the Lactobacillus casei Group

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, Cathy; LaPointe, Gisèle; Sirois, Stéphane; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Roy, Denis

    2003-01-01

    A primer design strategy named CODEHOP (consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primer) for amplification of distantly related sequences was used to detect the priming glycosyltransferase (GT) gene in strains of the Lactobacillus casei group. Each hybrid primer consisted of a short 3′ degenerate core based on four highly conserved amino acids and a longer 5′ consensus clamp region based on six sequences of the priming GT gene products from exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria. The hybrid primers were used to detect the priming GT gene of 44 commercial isolates and reference strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. casei, Lactobacillus zeae, and Streptococcus thermophilus. The priming GT gene was detected in the genome of both non-EPS-producing (EPS−) and EPS-producing (EPS+) strains of L. rhamnosus. The sequences of the cloned PCR products were similar to those of the priming GT gene of various gram-negative and gram-positive EPS+ bacteria. Specific primers designed from the L. rhamnosus RW-9595M GT gene were used to sequence the end of the priming GT gene in selected EPS+ strains of L. rhamnosus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Lactobacillus spp. form a distinctive group apart from other lactic acid bacteria for which GT genes have been characterized to date. Moreover, the sequences show a divergence existing among strains of L. rhamnosus with respect to the terminal region of the priming GT gene. Thus, the PCR approach with consensus-degenerate hybrid primers designed with CODEHOP is a practical approach for the detection of similar genes containing conserved motifs in different bacterial genomes. PMID:12788729

  7. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies. PMID:9740353

  8. A simple and rapid method for HLA-DQA1 genotyping by digestion of PCR-amplified DNA with allele specific restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Murayama, N; Ishii, H; Uryu, N; Ota, M; Tsuji, K; Inoko, H

    1989-11-01

    The second exon of the HLA-DQA1 genes was selectively amplified from genomic DNAs of 72 HLA-homozygous B cell lines by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplified DNAs were digested with HaeIII, Ddel, ScrFI, FokI and RsaI, which recognize allelic sequence variations in the polymorphic segments of the DQA1 second exon, and then subjected to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Eight different polymorphic patterns of restriction fragments were obtained, and seven were identical to patterns predicted from the known DNA sequences, correlating with each HLA-DQw type defined by serological typing. The remaining one pattern cannot be explained from the sequence data, suggesting the presence of a novel DQA1 allele at the nucleotide level. This PCR-RFLP method provides a simple and rapid technique for accurate definition of the HLA-DQ types at the nucleotide level, eliminating the need for radioisotope as well as allele specific oligonucleotide probes and can be extended and applied to HLA-DR, -Dw DP typing. PMID:2576477

  9. Allele-Specific Behavior of Molecular Networks: Understanding Small-Molecule Drug Response in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunquan; Hao, Dapeng; Zhang, Shaojun; Zhou, Meng; Su, Fei; Chen, Xi; Zhi, Hui; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The study of systems genetics is changing the way the genetic and molecular basis of phenotypic variation, such as disease susceptibility and drug response, is being analyzed. Moreover, systems genetics aids in the translation of insights from systems biology into genetics. The use of systems genetics enables greater attention to be focused on the potential impact of genetic perturbations on the molecular states of networks that in turn affects complex traits. In this study, we developed models to detect allele-specific perturbations on interactions, in which a genetic locus with alternative alleles exerted a differing influence on an interaction. We utilized the models to investigate the dynamic behavior of an integrated molecular network undergoing genetic perturbations in yeast. Our results revealed the complexity of regulatory relationships between genetic loci and networks, in which different genetic loci perturb specific network modules. In addition, significant within-module functional coherence was found. We then used the network perturbation model to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of individual differences in response to 100 diverse small molecule drugs. As a result, we identified sub-networks in the integrated network that responded to variations in DNA associated with response to diverse compounds and were significantly enriched for known drug targets. Literature mining results provided strong independent evidence for the effectiveness of these genetic perturbing networks in the elucidation of small-molecule responses in yeast. PMID:23308257

  10. Allele-Specific Gene Expression Is Widespread Across the Genome and Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Joaquín; Piedrafita, Gabriel; Fernando, Olga; Navarro, Arcadi; Villoslada, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Allelic specific gene expression (ASGE) appears to be an important factor in human phenotypic variability and as a consequence, for the development of complex traits and diseases. In order to study ASGE across the human genome, we have performed a study in which genotyping was coupled with an analysis of ASGE by screening 11,500 SNPs using the Mapping 10 K Array to identify differential allelic expression. We found that from the 5,133 SNPs that were suitable for analysis (heterozygous in our sample and expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells), 2,934 (57%) SNPs had differential allelic expression. Such SNPs were equally distributed along human chromosomes and biological processes. We validated the presence or absence of ASGE in 18 out 20 SNPs (90%) randomly selected by real time PCR in 48 human subjects. In addition, we observed that SNPs close to -but not included in- segmental duplications had increased levels of ASGE. Finally, we found that transcripts of unknown function or non-coding RNAs, also display ASGE: from a total of 2,308 intronic SNPs, 1510 (65%) SNPs underwent differential allelic expression. In summary, ASGE is a widespread mechanism in the human genome whose regulation seems to be far more complex than expected. PMID:19127300

  11. Allele-specific analysis of DNA replication origins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bartholdy, Boris; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lajugie, Julien; Aladjem, Mirit I; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the location and timing of firing of replication origins are poorly understood. Using a novel functional genomic approach based on the analysis of SNPs and indels in phased human genomes, we observe that replication asynchrony is associated with small cumulative variations in the initiation efficiency of multiple origins between the chromosome homologues, rather than with the activation of dormant origins. Allele-specific measurements demonstrate that the presence of G-quadruplex-forming sequences does not correlate with the efficiency of initiation. Sequence analysis reveals that the origins are highly enriched in sequences with profoundly asymmetric G/C and A/T nucleotide distributions and are almost completely depleted of antiparallel triplex-forming sequences. We therefore propose that although G4-forming sequences are abundant in replication origins, an asymmetry in nucleotide distribution, which increases the propensity of origins to unwind and adopt non-B DNA structure, rather than the ability to form G4, is directly associated with origin activity. PMID:25987481

  12. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene–childhood trauma interactions

    PubMed Central

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma–dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  13. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  14. Allele-specific analysis of DNA replication origins in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Boris; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lajugie, Julien; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Bouhassira, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the location and timing of firing of replication origins are poorly understood. Using a novel functional genomic approach based on the analysis of SNPs and indels in phased human genomes, we observe that replication asynchrony is associated with small cumulative variations in the initiation efficiency of multiple origins between the chromosome homologues, rather than with the activation of dormant origins. Allele-specific measurements demonstrate that the presence of G-quadruplex-forming sequences does not correlate with the efficiency of initiation. Sequence analysis reveals that the origins are highly enriched in sequences with profoundly asymmetric G/C and A/T nucleotide distributions and are almost completely depleted of antiparallel triplex-forming sequences. We therefore propose that although G4-forming sequences are abundant in replication origins, an asymmetry in nucleotide distribution, which increases the propensity of origins to unwind and adopt non-B DNA structure, rather than the ability to form G4, is directly associated with origin activity. PMID:25987481

  15. Germline Allele-Specific Expression of DAPK1 in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hielscher, Thomas; Mertens, Daniel; Raval, Aparna; Oakes, Christopher C.; Tanner, Stephan M.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Byrd, John C.; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Plass, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported a rare germline variant (c.1-6531) that resulted in allele–specific expression (ASE) of death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and predisposition to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We investigated a cohort of CLL patients lacking this mutation for the presence of ASE of DAPK1. We developed a novel strategy that combines single-nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and detected germline DAPK1 ASE in 17 out of 120 (14.2%) CLL patients associated with a trend towards younger age at diagnosis. ASE was absent in 63 healthy controls. Germline cells of CLL patients with ASE showed increased levels of DNA methylation in the promoter region, however, neither genetic nor further epigenetic aberrations could be identified in the DAPK1 5′ upstream regulatory region, within distinct exons or in the 3′-UTR. We identified B-lymphoid malignancy related cell line models harboring allelic imbalance and found that allele-specific methylation in DAPK1 is associated with ASE. Our data indicate that ASE at the DAPK1 gene locus is a recurrent event, mediated by epigenetic mechanisms and potentially predisposing to CLL. PMID:23383130

  16. Nested Allele-Specific PCR Primers Distinguish Genetic Groups of Uncinula necator

    PubMed Central

    Délye, Christophe; Ronchi, Valérie; Laigret, Frédéric; Corio-Costet, Marie-France

    1999-01-01

    Isolates of the obligately biotrophic fungus Uncinula necator cluster in three distinct genetic groups (groups I, II, and III). We designed PCR primers specific for these groups in order to monitor field populations of U. necator. We used the nucleotide sequences of the gene that encodes eburicol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) and of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), ITS2, and 5.8S regions. We identified four point mutations (three in CYP51 and one in ITS1) that distinguished groups I and II from group III based on a sample of 132 single-spore isolates originating from Europe, Tunisia, Israel, India, and Australia. We developed a nested allele-specific PCR assay in which the CYP51 point mutations were used to detect and distinguish groups I and II from group III in crude mildewed samples from vineyards. In a preliminary study performed with samples from French vineyards in which isolates belonging to genetic groups I and III were present, we found that a shift from a population composed primarily of group I isolates to a population composed primarily of group III isolates occurred during the grapevine growing season. PMID:10473400

  17. Allele-Specific Network Reveals Combinatorial Interaction That Transcends Small Effects in Psoriasis GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Climer, Sharlee; Templeton, Alan R.; Zhang, Weixiong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of genetic markers have shown associations with various complex diseases, yet the “missing heritability” remains alarmingly elusive. Combinatorial interactions may account for a substantial portion of this missing heritability, but their discoveries have been impeded by computational complexity and genetic heterogeneity. We present BlocBuster, a novel systems-level approach that efficiently constructs genome-wide, allele-specific networks that accurately segregate homogenous combinations of genetic factors, tests the associations of these combinations with the given phenotype, and rigorously validates the results using a series of unbiased validation methods. BlocBuster employs a correlation measure that is customized for single nucleotide polymorphisms and returns a multi-faceted collection of values that captures genetic heterogeneity. We applied BlocBuster to analyze psoriasis, discovering a combinatorial pattern with an odds ratio of 3.64 and Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 5.01×10−16. This pattern was replicated in independent data, reflecting robustness of the method. In addition to improving prediction of disease susceptibility and broadening our understanding of the pathogenesis underlying psoriasis, these results demonstrate BlocBuster's potential for discovering combinatorial genetic associations within heterogeneous genome-wide data, thereby transcending the limiting “small effects” produced by individual markers examined in isolation. PMID:25233071

  18. Allele-Specific Methylation Occurs at Genetic Variants Associated with Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, John N.; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T.; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results. PMID:24911414

  19. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene-childhood trauma interactions.

    PubMed

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2013-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma-dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  20. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe (5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)) is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection.

  1. SNP Detection in mRNA in Living Cells Using Allele Specific FRET Probes

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Liya; Huang, Lingyan; Kedmi, Ranit; Behlke, Mark A.; Peer, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Live mRNA detection allows real time monitoring of specific transcripts and genetic alterations. The main challenge of live genetic detection is overcoming the high background generated by unbound probes and reaching high level of specificity with minimal off target effects. The use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) probes allows differentiation between bound and unbound probes thus decreasing background. Probe specificity can be optimized by adjusting the length and through use of chemical modifications that alter binding affinity. Herein, we report the use of two oligonucleotide FRET probe system to detect a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in murine Hras mRNA, which is associated with malignant transformations. The FRET oligonucleotides were modified with phosphorothioate (PS) bonds, 2′OMe RNA and LNA residues to enhance nuclease stability and improve SNP discrimination. Our results show that a point mutation in Hras can be detected in endogenous RNA of living cells. As determined by an Acceptor Photobleaching method, FRET levels were higher in cells transfected with perfect match FRET probes whereas a single mismatch showed decreased FRET signal. This approach promotes in vivo molecular imaging methods and could further be applied in cancer diagnosis and theranostic strategies. PMID:24039756

  2. Allele-specific gene expression in a wild nonhuman primate population

    PubMed Central

    Tung, J.; Akinyi, M. Y.; Mutura, S.; Altmann, J.; Wray, G. A.; Alberts, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations hold enormous potential for evolutionary genetic studies, especially when phenotypic, genetic and environmental data are all available on the same individuals. However, untangling the genotype-phenotype relationship in natural populations remains a major challenge. Here, we describe results of an investigation of one class of phenotype, allele-specific gene expression (ASGE), in the well-studied natural population of baboons of the Amboseli basin, Kenya. ASGE measurements identify cases in which one allele of a gene is overexpressed relative to the alternative allele of the same gene, within individuals, thus providing a control for background genetic and environmental effects. Here, we characterize the incidence of ASGE in the Amboseli baboon population, focusing on the genetic and environmental contributions to ASGE in a set of eleven genes involved in immunity and defence. Within this set, we identify evidence for common ASGE in four genes. We also present examples of two relationships between cis-regulatory genetic variants and the ASGE phenotype. Finally, we identify one case in which this relationship is influenced by a novel gene-environment interaction. Specifically, the dominance rank of an individual’s mother during its early life (an aspect of that individual’s social environment) influences the expression of the gene CCL5 via an interaction with cis-regulatory genetic variation. These results illustrate how environmental and ecological data can be integrated into evolutionary genetic studies of functional variation in natural populations. They also highlight the potential importance of early life environmental variation in shaping the genetic architecture of complex traits in wild mammals. PMID:21226779

  3. Molecular genetic mechanisms of allelic specific regulation of murine Comt expression.

    PubMed

    Segall, Samantha K; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Meloto, Carolina B; Wen, Xia; Cunningham, Danielle; Tarantino, Lisa M; Wiltshire, Tim; Gauthier, Josée; Tohyama, Sarasa; Martin, Loren J; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    A functional allele of the mouse catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) gene is defined by the insertion of a B2 short interspersed repeat element in its 3'-untranslated region (UTR). This allele has been associated with a number of phenotypes, such as pain and anxiety. In comparison with mice carrying the ancestral allele (Comt+), Comt B2i mice show higher Comt mRNA and enzymatic activity levels. Here, we investigated the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying this allelic specific regulation of Comt expression. Insertion of the B2 element introduces an early polyadenylation signal generating a shorter Comt transcript, in addition to the longer ancestral mRNA. Comparative analysis and in silico prediction of Comt mRNA potential targets within the transcript 3' to the B2 element was performed and allowed choosing microRNA (miRNA) candidates for experimental screening: mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667. Cell transfection with each miRNA downregulated the expression of the ancestral transcript and COMT enzymatic activity. Our in vivo experiments showed that mmu-miR-667-3p is strongly correlated with decreasing amounts of Comt mRNA in the brain, and lentiviral injections of mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667 increase hypersensitivity in the mouse formalin model, consistent with reduced COMT activity. In summary, our data demonstrate that the Comt+ transcript contains regulatory miRNA signals in its 3'-untranslated region leading to mRNA degradation; these signals, however, are absent in the shorter transcript, resulting in higher mRNA expression and activity levels. PMID:26067582

  4. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P; Goland, Robin S; Clynes, Raphael A; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A(∗)-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  5. Application of Sequence-Specific Labeled 16S rRNA Gene Oligonucleotide Probes for Genetic Profiling of Cyanobacterial Abundance and Diversity by Array Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, Knut; Skulberg, Olav M.; Skulberg, Randi; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2000-01-01

    DNA sequence information for the small-subunit rRNA gene (16S rDNA) obtained from cyanobacterial cultures was used to investigate the presence of cyanobacteria and their abundance in natural habitats. Eight planktonic communities developing in lakes characterized by relatively low algal biomass (mesotrophic) and in lakes with correspondingly high biomass (eutrophic) were selected for the study. The organismal compositions of the water samples were analyzed genetically, using multiplex sequence-specific labeling of oligonucleotide probes targeted to 16S rDNA and subsequent hybridization of the labeled probes to their respective complements spotted onto a solid support (DNA array). Ten probes were established to determine the relative abundances of the discernible cyanobacteria encountered in the selected lakes. The probes were generally specific for their targets, as determined through analyses of clone cultures. Reproducible abundance profiles were established for the lakes investigated in the subsequent analyses of natural cyanobacterial communities. The results from the genetic analyses were then compared with information obtained from standard hydrobiological and hydrochemical analyses. Qualitatively, there were relatively good correlations among the groups of organisms (Nostoc, Microcystis, and Planktothrix species) found in the different lakes. The levels of correlation were lower for the quantitative data. This may, however, be due to differences in sample processing technique. The conclusions from these comparisons are that the genetic abundance profiles may provide a foundation for separating and quantifying genetically distinct groups of cyanobacteria in their natural habitats. PMID:10966421

  6. Clonal evolution in chronic lymphocytic leukemia detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and conventional cytogenetics after stimulation with CpG oligonucleotides and interleukin-2: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Brejcha, Martin; Stoklasová, Martina; Brychtová, Yvona; Panovská, Anna; Štěpanovská, Kristina; Vaňková, Gabriela; Plevová, Karla; Oltová, Alexandra; Horká, Kateřina; Pospíšilová, Šárka; Mayer, Jiří; Doubek, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients may acquire new chromosome abnormalities during the course of their disease. Clonal evolution (CE) has been detected by conventional chromosome banding (CBA), several groups also confirmed CE with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). At present, there are minimal prospective data on CE frequency determined using a combination of both methods. Therefore, the aim of our study was to prospectively assess CE frequency using a combination of FISH and CBA after stimulation with CpG oligonucleotides and interleukin-2. Between 2008 and 2012, we enrolled 140 patients with previously untreated CLL in a prospective trial evaluating CE using FISH and CBA after stimulation. Patients provided baseline and regular follow-up peripheral blood samples for testing. There was a median of 3 cytogenetic examinations (using both methods) per patient. CE was detected in 15.7% (22/140) of patients using FISH, in 28.6% (40/140) using CBA, and in 34.3% (48/140) of patients by combining both methods. Poor-prognosis CE (new deletion 17p, new deletion 11q or new complex karyotype) was detected in 15% (21/140) of patients and was significantly associated with previous CLL treatment (p=0.013). CBA provides more complex information about cytogenetic abnormalities in CLL patients than FISH and confirms that many patients can acquire new abnormalities during the course of their disease in a relatively short time period. PMID:24246692

  7. Allele-specific transcription factor binding to common and rare variants associated with disease and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallerman, Ola; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Berggren, Olof; Elvers, Ingegerd; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Lindblad Toh, Kerstin; Wadelius, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of disease-associated SNPs, but in few cases the functional variant and the gene it controls have been identified. To systematically identify candidate regulatory variants, we sequenced ENCODE cell lines and used public ChIP-seq data to look for transcription factors binding preferentially to one allele. We found 9962 candidate regulatory SNPs, of which 16 % were rare and showed evidence of larger functional effect than common ones. Functionally rare variants may explain divergent GWAS results between populations and are candidates for a partial explanation of the missing heritability. The majority of allele-specific variants (96 %) were specific to a cell type. Furthermore, by examining GWAS loci we found >400 allele-specific candidate SNPs, 141 of which were highly relevant in our cell types. Functionally validated SNPs support identification of an SNP in SYNGR1 which may expose to the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as an SNP in the last intron of COG6 exposing to the risk of psoriasis. We propose that by repeating the ChIP-seq experiments of 20 selected transcription factors in three to ten people, the most common polymorphisms can be interrogated for allele-specific binding. Our strategy may help to remove the current bottleneck in functional annotation of the genome. PMID:26993500

  8. Comparison of immunohistochemistry, DNA sequencing and allele-specific PCR for the detection of IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Loussouarn, Delphine; Le Loupp, Anne-Gaëlle; Frenel, Jean-Sébastien; Leclair, François; Von Deimling, Andreas; Aumont, Maud; Martin, Stéphane; Campone, Mario; Denis, Marc G

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have identified mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene in more than 70% of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II and III gliomas. The most frequent mutation leads to a specific amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 132 (c.395G>A, p.R132H). IDH1 mutated tumors have a better prognosis than IDH1 non-mutated tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the methods of mIDH1 R132H immunohistochemistry, allele-specific PCR and DNA sequencing for determination of IDH1 status. We performed a retrospective study of 91 patients with WHO grade II (n=43) and III (n=48) oligodendrogliomas. A fragment of exon 4 spanning the sequence encoding the catalytic domain of IDH1, including codon 132, was amplified and sequenced using standard conditions. Allele-specific amplification was performed using two forward primers with variations in their 3' nucleotides such that each was specific for the wild-type or the mutated variant, and one reverse primer. Immunohistochemistry was performed with mouse monoclonal mIDH1 R132H. DNA was extracted from FFPE sections following macrodissection. IDH1 mutations were found in 55/90 patients (61.1%) by direct sequencing. R132H mutations were found in 47/55 patients (85.4%). The results of the allele-specific PCR positively correlated with those from DNA sequencing. Other mutations (p.R132C, p.R132S and pR132G) were found by DNA sequencing in 3, 3 and 2 tumors, respectively (8/55 patients, 14.6%). mIDH1 R132H immunostaining was found in the 47 patients presenting the R132H mutation (sensitivity 47/47, 100% for this mutation). None of the tumors presenting a wild-type IDH1 gene were stained (specificity 35/35, 100%). Our results demonstrate that immunohistochemistry using the mIDH1 R132H antibody and allele-specific amplification are highly sensitive techniques to detect the most frequent mutation of the IDH1 gene. PMID:22447191

  9. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J P; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia; Eriksson, Per; Stender, Stefan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Folkersen, Lasse; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Palmen, Jutta; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS. PMID:22916038

  10. DNA analysis and diagnostics on oligonucleotide microchips.

    PubMed Central

    Yershov, G; Barsky, V; Belgovskiy, A; Kirillov, E; Kreindlin, E; Ivanov, I; Parinov, S; Guschin, D; Drobishev, A; Dubiley, S; Mirzabekov, A

    1996-01-01

    We present a further development in the technology of sequencing by hybridization to oligonucleotide microchips (SHOM) and its application to diagnostics for genetic diseases. A robot has been constructed to manufacture sequencing "microchips." The microchip is an array of oligonucleotides immobilized into gel elements fixed on a glass plate. Hybridization of the microchip with fluorescently labeled DNA was monitored in real time simultaneously for all microchip elements with a two-wavelength fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. SHOM has been used to detect beta-thalassemia mutations in patients by hybridizing PCR-amplified DNA with the microchips. A contiguous stacking hybridization technique has been applied for the detection of mutations; it can simplify medical diagnostics and enhance its reliability. The use of multicolor monitoring of contiguous stacking hybridization is suggested for large-scale diagnostics and gene polymorphism studies. Other applications of the SHOM technology are discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8643503

  11. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  13. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  14. Allele-specific silencing of mutant p53 attenuates dominant-negative and gain-of-function activities

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Swathi V.; Parrales, Alejandro; Begani, Priya; Narkar, Akshay; Adhikari, Amit S.; Martinez, Luis A.; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Many p53 hotspot mutants not only lose the transcriptional activity, but also show dominant-negative (DN) and oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) activities. Increasing evidence indicates that knockdown of mutant p53 (mutp53) in cancer cells reduces their aggressive properties, suggesting that survival and proliferation of cancer cells are, at least partially, dependent on the presence of mutp53. However, these p53 siRNAs can downregulate both wild-type p53 (wtp53) and mutp53, which limits their therapeutic applications. In order to specifically deplete mutp53, we have developed allele-specific siRNAs against p53 hotspot mutants and validated their biological effects in the absence or presence of wtp53. First, the mutp53-specific siRNAs selectively reduced protein levels of matched p53 mutants with minimal reduction in wtp53 levels. Second, downregulation of mutp53 in cancer cells expressing a mutp53 alone (p53mut) resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation and migration. Third, transfection of mutp53-specific siRNAs in cancer cells expressing both wtp53 and mutp53 also reduced cell proliferation and migration with increased transcripts of p53 downstream target genes, which became further profound when cells were treated with an MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3a or a chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. These results indicate that depletion of mutp53 by its specific siRNA restored endogenous wtp53 activity in cells expressing both wtp53 and mutp53. This is the first study demonstrating biological effects and therapeutic potential of allele-specific silencing of mutp53 by mutp53-specific siRNAs in cancer cells expressing both wtp53 and mutp53, thus providing a novel strategy towards targeted cancer therapies. PMID:26700961

  15. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Alzheimer’s disease-related single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease, particularly in developing countries, is expected to increase exponentially as the population ages. Continuing research in this area is essential in order to better understand this disease and develop strategies for treatment and prevention. Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci as genetic risk factors of AD aside from apolipoprotein E such as bridging integrator (BIN1), clusterin (CLU), ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 7 (ABCA7), complement receptor 1 (CR1) and phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM). However genetic research in developing countries is often limited by lack of funding and expertise. This study therefore developed and validated a simple, cost effective polymerase chain reaction based technique to determine these single nucleotide polymorphisms. Methods An allele-specific PCR method was developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms of BIN1 rs744373, CLU rs11136000, ABCA7 rs3764650, CR1 rs3818361 and PICALM rs3851179 in human DNA samples. Allele-specific primers were designed by using appropriate software to permit the PCR amplification only if the nucleotide at the 3’-end of the primer complemented the base at the wild-type or variant-type DNA sample. The primers were then searched for uniqueness using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool search engine. Results The assay was tested on a hundred samples and accurately detected the homozygous wild-type, homozygous variant-type and heterozygous of each SNP. Validation was by direct DNA sequencing. Conclusion This method will enable researchers to carry out genetic polymorphism studies for genetic risk factors associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (BIN1, CLU, ABCA7, CR1 and PICALM) without the use of expensive instrumentation and reagents. PMID:23419238

  16. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  17. DNMT1 and AIM1 Imprinting in human placenta revealed through a genome-wide screen for allele-specific DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetically regulated process wherein genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Many imprinted genes were initially identified in mice; some of these were subsequently shown not to be imprinted in humans. Such discrepancy reflects developmental, morphological and physiological differences between mouse and human tissues. This is particularly relevant for the placenta. Study of genomic imprinting thus needs to be carried out in a species and developmental stage-specific manner. We describe here a new strategy to study allele-specific DNA methylation in the human placenta for the discovery of novel imprinted genes. Results Using this methodology, we confirmed 16 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with known imprinted genes. We chose 28 genomic regions for further testing and identified two imprinted genes (DNMT1 and AIM1). Both genes showed maternal allele-specific methylation and paternal allele-specific transcription. Imprinted expression for AIM1 was conserved in the cynomolgus macaque placenta, but not in other macaque tissues or in the mouse. Conclusions Our study indicates that while there are many genomic regions with allele-specific methylation in tissues like the placenta, only a small sub-set of them are associated with allele-specific transcription, suggesting alternative functions for such genomic regions. Nonetheless, novel tissue-specific imprinted genes remain to be discovered in humans. Their identification may help us better understand embryonic and fetal development. PMID:24094292

  18. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE) is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA) and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes) remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%). Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes in the human term

  19. PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 65-MER OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoyong; Xiang, Charlie C.; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Bittner, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray fabrication using pre-synthesized long oligonucleotide is becoming increasingly important, but a study of large-scale array productions is not published yet. We addressed the issue of fabricating oligonucleotide microarrays by spotting commercial, pre-synthesized 65-mers with 5′ amines representing 7500 murine genes. Amine-modified oligonucleotides were immobilized on glass slides having aldehyde groups via transient Schiff base formation followed by reduction to produce a covalent conjugate. When RNA derived from the same source was used for Cy3 and Cy5 labeling and hybridized to the same array, signal intensities spanning three orders of magnitude were observed, and the coefficient of variation between the two channels for all spots was 8–10%. To ascertain the reproducibility of ratio determination of these arrays, two triplicate hybridizations (with fluorochrome reversal) comparing RNAs from a fibroblast (NIH3T3) and a breast cancer (JC) cell line were carried out. The 95% confidence interval for all spots in the six hybridizations was 0.60 – 1.66. This level of reproducibility allows use of the full range of pattern finding and discriminant analysis typically applied to cDNA microarrays. Further comparative testing was carried out with oligonucleotide microarrays, cDNA microarrays and RT-PCR assays to examine the comparability of results across these different methodologies. PMID:17617369

  20. Allele-specific expression of mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene and alternative susceptibility to colorectal cancer in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Cao, Yanfei; Huang, Xiaoye; Yu, Tao; Wei, Zhiyun; McGrath, John; Xu, Fei; Bi, Yan; Li, Xingwang; Yang, Fengping; Li, Weidong; Zou, Xia; Peng, Zhihai; Xiao, Yanzeng; Zhang, Yan; He, Lin; He, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among schizophrenia is lower than normal. To explore this potential protective effect, we employed an innovative strategy combining association study with allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis in MCC gene. We first genotyped four polymorphisms within MCC in 312 CRC patients, 270 schizophrenia patients and 270 controls. Using the MassArray technique, we performed ASE measurements in a second sample series consisting of 50 sporadic CRC patients, 50 schizophrenia patients and 52 controls. Rs2227947 showed significant differences between schizophrenia cases and controls, and haplotype analysis reported some significant discrepancies among these three subject groups. ASE values of rs2227948 and rs2227947 presented consistently differences between CRC (or schizophrenia) patients and controls. Of the three groups, highest frequencies of ASE in MCC were concordantly found in CRC group, whereas lowest frequencies of ASE were observed in schizophrenia group. Similar trends were confirmed in both haplotype frequencies and ASE frequencies (i.e. CRC > control > schizophrenia). We provide a first indication that MCC might confer alterative genetic susceptibility to CRC in individuals with schizophrenia promising to shed more light on the relationship between schizophrenia and cancer progression. PMID:27226254

  1. Allele-specific expression of mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene and alternative susceptibility to colorectal cancer in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Cao, Yanfei; Huang, Xiaoye; Yu, Tao; Wei, Zhiyun; McGrath, John; Xu, Fei; Bi, Yan; Li, Xingwang; Yang, Fengping; Li, Weidong; Zou, Xia; Peng, Zhihai; Xiao, Yanzeng; Zhang, Yan; He, Lin; He, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among schizophrenia is lower than normal. To explore this potential protective effect, we employed an innovative strategy combining association study with allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis in MCC gene. We first genotyped four polymorphisms within MCC in 312 CRC patients, 270 schizophrenia patients and 270 controls. Using the MassArray technique, we performed ASE measurements in a second sample series consisting of 50 sporadic CRC patients, 50 schizophrenia patients and 52 controls. Rs2227947 showed significant differences between schizophrenia cases and controls, and haplotype analysis reported some significant discrepancies among these three subject groups. ASE values of rs2227948 and rs2227947 presented consistently differences between CRC (or schizophrenia) patients and controls. Of the three groups, highest frequencies of ASE in MCC were concordantly found in CRC group, whereas lowest frequencies of ASE were observed in schizophrenia group. Similar trends were confirmed in both haplotype frequencies and ASE frequencies (i.e. CRC > control > schizophrenia). We provide a first indication that MCC might confer alterative genetic susceptibility to CRC in individuals with schizophrenia promising to shed more light on the relationship between schizophrenia and cancer progression. PMID:27226254

  2. Recommendations for Accurate Resolution of Gene and Isoform Allele-Specific Expression in RNA-Seq Data.

    PubMed

    Wood, David L A; Nones, Katia; Steptoe, Anita; Christ, Angelika; Harliwong, Ivon; Newell, Felicity; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Miller, David; Cloonan, Nicole; Grimmond, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation modulates gene expression transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally, and can profoundly alter an individual's phenotype. Measuring allelic differential expression at heterozygous loci within an individual, a phenomenon called allele-specific expression (ASE), can assist in identifying such factors. Massively parallel DNA and RNA sequencing and advances in bioinformatic methodologies provide an outstanding opportunity to measure ASE genome-wide. In this study, matched DNA and RNA sequencing, genotyping arrays and computationally phased haplotypes were integrated to comprehensively and conservatively quantify ASE in a single human brain and liver tissue sample. We describe a methodological evaluation and assessment of common bioinformatic steps for ASE quantification, and recommend a robust approach to accurately measure SNP, gene and isoform ASE through the use of personalized haplotype genome alignment, strict alignment quality control and intragenic SNP aggregation. Our results indicate that accurate ASE quantification requires careful bioinformatic analyses and is adversely affected by sample specific alignment confounders and random sampling even at moderate sequence depths. We identified multiple known and several novel ASE genes in liver, including WDR72, DSP and UBD, as well as genes that contained ASE SNPs with imbalance direction discordant with haplotype phase, explainable by annotated transcript structure, suggesting isoform derived ASE. The methods evaluated in this study will be of use to researchers performing highly conservative quantification of ASE, and the genes and isoforms identified as ASE of interest to researchers studying those loci. PMID:25965996

  3. Analysis of LMNB1 Duplications in Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy Provides Insights into Duplication Mechanisms and Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Kropp, Laura; Chakka, Anish Baswanth; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Gregorio, Eleonora Di; Lacerenza, Daniela; Vaula, Giovanna; Talarico, Flavia; Mandich, Paola; Toro, Camilo; Pierre, Eleonore Eymard; Labauge, Pierre; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Miguel, Diego; Stubbolo, Danielle; Marques, Lourenco Charles; Gahl, William; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Melberg, Atle; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Cohen, Oren S; Pjontek, Rastislav; Grau, Armin; Klopstock, Thomas; Fogel, Brent; Meijer, Inge; Rouleau, Guy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre L; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Vanderver, Adeline; Dahl, Niklas; Hobson, Grace; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro; Padiath, Quasar Saleem

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is an adult onset demyelinating disorder that is caused by duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene. However, as only a few cases have been analyzed in detail, the mechanisms underlying LMNB1 duplications are unclear. We report the detailed molecular analysis of the largest collection of ADLD families studied, to date. We have identified the minimal duplicated region necessary for the disease, defined all the duplication junctions at the nucleotide level and identified the first inverted LMNB1 duplication. We have demonstrated that the duplications are not recurrent; patients with identical duplications share the same haplotype, likely inherited from a common founder and that the duplications originated from intrachromosomal events. The duplication junction sequences indicated that nonhomologous end joining or replication-based mechanisms such fork stalling and template switching or microhomology-mediated break induced repair are likely to be involved. LMNB1 expression was increased in patients’ fibroblasts both at mRNA and protein levels and the three LMNB1 alleles in ADLD patients show equal expression, suggesting that regulatory regions are maintained within the rearranged segment. These results have allowed us to elucidate duplication mechanisms and provide insights into allele-specific LMNB1 expression levels. PMID:23649844

  4. Transcriptome analysis revealed chimeric RNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms and allele-specific expression in porcine prenatal skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yalan; Tang, Zhonglin; Fan, Xinhao; Xu, Kui; Mu, Yulian; Zhou, Rong; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal skeletal muscle development genetically determines postnatal muscle characteristics such as growth and meat quality in pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development remain unclear. Here, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of chimeric RNAs, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and allele-specific expression (ASE) in prenatal skeletal muscle in pigs. We identified 14,810 protein coding genes and 163 high-confidence chimeric RNAs expressed in prenatal skeletal muscle. More than 94.5% of the chimeric RNAs obeyed the canonical GT/AG splice rule and were trans-splicing events. Ten and two RNAs were aligned to human and mouse chimeric transcripts, respectively. We detected 106,457 high-quality SNPs (6,955 novel), which were mostly (89.09%) located within QTLs for production traits. The high proportion of non-exonic SNPs revealed the incomplete annotation status of the current swine reference genome. ASE analysis revealed that 11,300 heterozygous SNPs showed allelic imbalance, whereas 131 ASE variants were located in the chimeric RNAs. Moreover, 4 ASE variants were associated with various economically relevant traits of pigs. Taken together, our data provide a source for studies of chimeric RNAs and biomarkers for pig breeding, while illuminating the complex transcriptional events underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development in mammals. PMID:27352850

  5. Trans-species polymorphism and allele-specific expression in the CBF gene family of wild tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Mboup, Mamadou; Fischer, Iris; Lainer, Hilde; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, extreme temperatures, and salinity have a strong impact on plant adaptation. They act as selective forces on plant physiology and morphology. These selective pressures leave characteristic footprints that can be detected at the DNA sequence level using population genetic tools. On the basis of a candidate gene approach, we investigated signatures of adaptation in two wild tomato species, Solanum peruvianum and S. chilense. These species are native to western South America and constitute a model system for studying adaptation, due to their ability to colonize diverse habitats and the available genetic resources. We have determined the selective forces acting on the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) gene family, which consists of three genes, and is known to be involved in tolerance to abiotic stresses, in particular in cold tolerance. We also analyzed the expression pattern of these genes after drought and cold stresses. We found that CBF3 evolves under very strong purifying selection, CBF2 is under balancing selection in some populations of both species (S. peruvianum/Quicacha and S. chilense/Nazca) maintaining a trans-species polymorphism, and CBF1 is a pseudogene. In contrast to previous studies of cultivated tomatoes showing that only CBF1 was cold induced, we found that all three CBF genes are cold induced in wild tomatoes. All three genes are also drought induced. CBF2 exhibits an allele-specific expression pattern associated with the trans-species polymorphism. PMID:22787283

  6. Recommendations for Accurate Resolution of Gene and Isoform Allele-Specific Expression in RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David L. A.; Nones, Katia; Steptoe, Anita; Christ, Angelika; Harliwong, Ivon; Newell, Felicity; Bruxner, Timothy J. C.; Miller, David; Cloonan, Nicole; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation modulates gene expression transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally, and can profoundly alter an individual’s phenotype. Measuring allelic differential expression at heterozygous loci within an individual, a phenomenon called allele-specific expression (ASE), can assist in identifying such factors. Massively parallel DNA and RNA sequencing and advances in bioinformatic methodologies provide an outstanding opportunity to measure ASE genome-wide. In this study, matched DNA and RNA sequencing, genotyping arrays and computationally phased haplotypes were integrated to comprehensively and conservatively quantify ASE in a single human brain and liver tissue sample. We describe a methodological evaluation and assessment of common bioinformatic steps for ASE quantification, and recommend a robust approach to accurately measure SNP, gene and isoform ASE through the use of personalized haplotype genome alignment, strict alignment quality control and intragenic SNP aggregation. Our results indicate that accurate ASE quantification requires careful bioinformatic analyses and is adversely affected by sample specific alignment confounders and random sampling even at moderate sequence depths. We identified multiple known and several novel ASE genes in liver, including WDR72, DSP and UBD, as well as genes that contained ASE SNPs with imbalance direction discordant with haplotype phase, explainable by annotated transcript structure, suggesting isoform derived ASE. The methods evaluated in this study will be of use to researchers performing highly conservative quantification of ASE, and the genes and isoforms identified as ASE of interest to researchers studying those loci. PMID:25965996

  7. Transcriptome analysis revealed chimeric RNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms and allele-specific expression in porcine prenatal skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yalan; Tang, Zhonglin; Fan, Xinhao; Xu, Kui; Mu, Yulian; Zhou, Rong; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal skeletal muscle development genetically determines postnatal muscle characteristics such as growth and meat quality in pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development remain unclear. Here, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of chimeric RNAs, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and allele-specific expression (ASE) in prenatal skeletal muscle in pigs. We identified 14,810 protein coding genes and 163 high-confidence chimeric RNAs expressed in prenatal skeletal muscle. More than 94.5% of the chimeric RNAs obeyed the canonical GT/AG splice rule and were trans-splicing events. Ten and two RNAs were aligned to human and mouse chimeric transcripts, respectively. We detected 106,457 high-quality SNPs (6,955 novel), which were mostly (89.09%) located within QTLs for production traits. The high proportion of non-exonic SNPs revealed the incomplete annotation status of the current swine reference genome. ASE analysis revealed that 11,300 heterozygous SNPs showed allelic imbalance, whereas 131 ASE variants were located in the chimeric RNAs. Moreover, 4 ASE variants were associated with various economically relevant traits of pigs. Taken together, our data provide a source for studies of chimeric RNAs and biomarkers for pig breeding, while illuminating the complex transcriptional events underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development in mammals. PMID:27352850

  8. Bivariate segmentation of SNP-array data for allele-specific copy number analysis in tumour samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SNP arrays output two signals that reflect the total genomic copy number (LRR) and the allelic ratio (BAF), which in combination allow the characterisation of allele-specific copy numbers (ASCNs). While methods based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extended from array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) to jointly handle the two signals, only one method based on change-point detection, ASCAT, performs bivariate segmentation. Results In the present work, we introduce a generic framework for bivariate segmentation of SNP array data for ASCN analysis. For the matter, we discuss the characteristics of the typically applied BAF transformation and how they affect segmentation, introduce concepts of multivariate time series analysis that are of concern in this field and discuss the appropriate formulation of the problem. The framework is implemented in a method named CnaStruct, the bivariate form of the structural change model (SCM), which has been successfully applied to transcriptome mapping and aCGH. Conclusions On a comprehensive synthetic dataset, we show that CnaStruct outperforms the segmentation of existing ASCN analysis methods. Furthermore, CnaStruct can be integrated into the workflows of several ASCN analysis tools in order to improve their performance, specially on tumour samples highly contaminated by normal cells. PMID:23497144

  9. Effect of non-specific species competition from total RNA on the static mode hybridization response of nanomechanical assays of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rohit; Hegner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    We investigate here the nanomechanical response of microcantilever sensors in real-time for detecting a range of ultra-low concentrations of oligonucleotides in a complex background of total cellular RNA extracts from cell lines without labeling or amplification. Cantilever sensor arrays were functionalized with probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and reference ssDNA to obtain a differential signal. They were then exposed to complementary target ssDNA strands that were spiked in a fragmented total cellular RNA background in biologically relevant concentrations so as to provide clinically significant analysis. We present a model for prediction of the sensor behavior in competitive backgrounds with parameters that are indicators of the change in nanomechanical response with variation in the target and background concentration. For nanomechanical assays to compete with current technologies it is essential to comprehend such responses with eventual impact on areas like understanding non-coding RNA pharmacokinetics, nucleic acid biomarker assays and miRNA quantification for disease monitoring and diagnosis to mention a few. Additionally, we also achieved a femtomolar sensitivity limit for online oligonucleotide detection in a non-competitive environment with these sensors. PMID:24807191

  10. Effect of non-specific species competition from total RNA on the static mode hybridization response of nanomechanical assays of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohit; Hegner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    We investigate here the nanomechanical response of microcantilever sensors in real-time for detecting a range of ultra-low concentrations of oligonucleotides in a complex background of total cellular RNA extracts from cell lines without labeling or amplification. Cantilever sensor arrays were functionalized with probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and reference ssDNA to obtain a differential signal. They were then exposed to complementary target ssDNA strands that were spiked in a fragmented total cellular RNA background in biologically relevant concentrations so as to provide clinically significant analysis. We present a model for prediction of the sensor behavior in competitive backgrounds with parameters that are indicators of the change in nanomechanical response with variation in the target and background concentration. For nanomechanical assays to compete with current technologies it is essential to comprehend such responses with eventual impact on areas like understanding non-coding RNA pharmacokinetics, nucleic acid biomarker assays and miRNA quantification for disease monitoring and diagnosis to mention a few. Additionally, we also achieved a femtomolar sensitivity limit for online oligonucleotide detection in a non-competitive environment with these sensors.

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  12. Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 3 by single-base extension method and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed allele specific (AS) SNP primers for rapid detection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) race 3. FOV_BT_SNP_R3 and FOV_BT_AS_R3 primers were designed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial sequence alignment of the ß-tubulin (BT) gene from several FOV races. These ...

  13. Genome-wide identification and quantification of cis- and trans-regulated genes responding to Marek's disease virus infection via analysis of allele-specific expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Marek’s disease (MD) is a commercially important neoplastic disease of chickens caused by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a naturally-occurring oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. We attempted to identify genes conferring MD resistance, by completing a genome-wide screen for allele-specific expr...

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John

    2015-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  15. A GWAS SNP for Schizophrenia Is Linked to the Internal MIR137 Promoter and Supports Differential Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Alix; Breen, Gerome; Bubb, Vivien J.; Quinn, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MIR137 gene locus have been shown to confer risk for schizophrenia through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The expression levels of microRNA-137 (miR-137) and its validated gene targets have also been shown to be disrupted in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia. Regulation of miR-137 expression is thus imperative for normal neuronal functioning. We previously characterized an internal promoter domain within the MIR137 gene that contained a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and could alter the in vitro levels of miR-137 in a stimulus-induced and allele-specific manner. We now demonstrate that haplotype tagging-SNP analysis linked the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia to this internal MIR137 promoter through a proxy SNP rs2660304 located at this domain. We postulated that the rs2660304 promoter SNP may act as predisposing factor for schizophrenia through altering the levels of miR-137 expression in a genotype-dependent manner. Reporter gene analysis of the internal MIR137 promoter containing the common VNTR variant demonstrated genotype-dependent differences in promoter activity with respect to rs2660304. In line with previous reports, the major allele of the rs2660304 proxy SNP, which has previously been linked with schizophrenia risk through genetic association, resulted in downregulation of reporter gene expression in a tissue culture model. The genetic influence of the rs2660304 proxy SNP on the transcriptional activity of the internal MIR137 promoter, and thus the levels of miR-137 expression, therefore offers a distinct regulatory mechanism to explain the functional significance of the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia risk. PMID:26429811

  16. Comprehensively Evaluating cis-Regulatory Variation in the Human Prostate Transcriptome by Using Gene-Level Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nicholas B.; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J.; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A.; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E−5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate. PMID:25983244

  17. Recognition and Activation Domains Contribute to Allele-Specific Responses of an Arabidopsis NLR Receptor to an Oomycete Effector Protein

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrenner, Adam D.; Goritschnig, Sandra; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, specific recognition of pathogen effector proteins by nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) receptors leads to activation of immune responses. RPP1, an NLR from Arabidopsis thaliana, recognizes the effector ATR1, from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, by direct association via C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Two RPP1 alleles, RPP1-NdA and RPP1-WsB, have narrow and broad recognition spectra, respectively, with RPP1-NdA recognizing a subset of the ATR1 variants recognized by RPP1-WsB. In this work, we further characterized direct effector recognition through random mutagenesis of an unrecognized ATR1 allele, ATR1-Cala2, screening for gain-of-recognition phenotypes in a tobacco hypersensitive response assay. We identified ATR1 mutants that a) confirm surface-exposed residues contribute to recognition by RPP1, and b) are recognized by and activate the narrow-spectrum allele RPP1-NdA, but not RPP1-WsB, in co-immunoprecipitation and bacterial growth inhibition assays. Thus, RPP1 alleles have distinct recognition specificities, rather than simply different sensitivity to activation. Using chimeric RPP1 constructs, we showed that RPP1-NdA LRRs were sufficient for allele-specific recognition (association with ATR1), but insufficient for receptor activation in the form of HR. Additional inclusion of the RPP1-NdA ARC2 subdomain, from the central NB-ARC domain, was required for a full range of activation specificity. Thus, cooperation between recognition and activation domains seems to be essential for NLR function. PMID:25671309

  18. A GWAS SNP for Schizophrenia Is Linked to the Internal MIR137 Promoter and Supports Differential Allele-Specific Expression.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Alix; Breen, Gerome; Bubb, Vivien J; Quinn, John P

    2016-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MIR137 gene locus have been shown to confer risk for schizophrenia through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The expression levels of microRNA-137 (miR-137) and its validated gene targets have also been shown to be disrupted in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia. Regulation of miR-137 expression is thus imperative for normal neuronal functioning. We previously characterized an internal promoter domain within the MIR137 gene that contained a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and could alter the in vitro levels of miR-137 in a stimulus-induced and allele-specific manner. We now demonstrate that haplotype tagging-SNP analysis linked the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia to this internal MIR137 promoter through a proxy SNP rs2660304 located at this domain. We postulated that the rs2660304 promoter SNP may act as predisposing factor for schizophrenia through altering the levels of miR-137 expression in a genotype-dependent manner. Reporter gene analysis of the internal MIR137 promoter containing the common VNTR variant demonstrated genotype-dependent differences in promoter activity with respect to rs2660304. In line with previous reports, the major allele of the rs2660304 proxy SNP, which has previously been linked with schizophrenia risk through genetic association, resulted in downregulation of reporter gene expression in a tissue culture model. The genetic influence of the rs2660304 proxy SNP on the transcriptional activity of the internal MIR137 promoter, and thus the levels of miR-137 expression, therefore offers a distinct regulatory mechanism to explain the functional significance of the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia risk. PMID:26429811

  19. Oligonucleotide probe for detection and identification of Campylobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Morotomi, M; Hoshina, S; Green, P; Neu, H C; LoGerfo, P; Watanabe, I; Mutai, M; Weinstein, I B

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a novel and practical DNA-RNA hybridization assay for the detection and identification of Campylobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa. This technique utilizes a [32P]ddATP-labeled synthetic oligonucleotide probe complementary to a nucleotide sequence present in C. pylori 16S rRNA. This probe is very sensitive and reacted with all 23 strains of C. pylori tested. It is also highly specific, since there was no cross-reactivity with the heterologous organisms Campylobacter coli, C. fetus subsp. fetus, C. jejuni, and C. laridis or with Escherichia coli. Hybridization of the oligonucleotide probe with C. pylori RNA was completely inhibited by treatment of the membrane filters with RNase but not DNase. Although a gastric mucosa tissue homogenate slightly inhibited the hybridization, as few as 10(4) C. pylori cells could be detected even in the presence of 5 mg of gastric mucosa. Gastric biopsy specimens obtained from patients referred for upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy were tested for C. pylori infection by direct oligonucleotide hybridization, and the results were compared with those of bacteriological cultures, the urease test, and histological observations. A comparison of the urease test and the oligonucleotide hybridization results showed an excellent correlation between the two methods. The clinical usefulness of this oligonucleotide-RNA hybridization method is discussed. Images PMID:2480360

  20. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  1. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Folkert; Kudick, Rene; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert; Wippo, Harald

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether the remarkable chemical properties of the pyranosyl isomer of RNA as an informational Watson-Crick base-pairing system are unique to the pentopyranosyl-(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide isomer derived from the RNA-building block D-ribose, studies on the entire family of diastereoisomeric pyranosyL(4 - Z)-oligonucleotide systems deriving from D-ribose. L-lyxose. D-xylose, and L-arabinose were carried out. The result of these extended studies is unambiguous: not only pyranosyl-RNA, but all members of the pentopyranosyl(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide family are highly efficient Watson-Crick base-pairing systems. Their synthesis and pairing properties will be described in a series of publications in this journal.

  2. The delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Rudolph L

    2016-08-19

    The oligonucleotide therapeutics field has seen remarkable progress over the last few years with the approval of the first antisense drug and with promising developments in late stage clinical trials using siRNA or splice switching oligonucleotides. However, effective delivery of oligonucleotides to their intracellular sites of action remains a major issue. This review will describe the biological basis of oligonucleotide delivery including the nature of various tissue barriers and the mechanisms of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides. It will then examine a variety of current approaches for enhancing the delivery of oligonucleotides. This includes molecular scale targeted ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, lipid- and polymer-based nanoparticles, antibody conjugates and small molecules that improve oligonucleotide delivery. The merits and liabilities of these approaches will be discussed in the context of the underlying basic biology. PMID:27084936

  3. Rapid deoxyribonucleic acid analysis by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.C.; Wei, J.Q.; Cheng, K.C.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid DNA analysis based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mutation site-specific primers was developed to detect mutations in the CYP21 gene known to cause steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In contrast to the previous method, in which PCR of genomic DNA was followed by dot blot analysis with radio active probes and multiple rounds of stripping and reprobing for each of the 8 most common mutation sites, the results using this new method were immediately visualized after the PCR run by ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel electrophoresis. Using allele-specific PCR, mutation(s) were identified on 148 affected chromosomes out of 160 tested. Although mutation(s) were identified on only one chromosome of 11 of these patients, their parents showed a consistent pattern on DNA analysis. The only exception was that in one family, in which the parents each had a detectable mutation, a mutation was detected on only one allele of the patient. Most likely there is a mutation in the patient`s other allele that could have arisen de novo or was inherited from the parent and was not evident in the transmitting parent`s phenotype. When compared with the dot blot procedure, allele-specific PCR is more rapid, less labor-intensive, and avoids the use of radioactivity. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Dissection of expression-quantitative trait locus and allele specificity using a haploid/diploid plant system - insights into compensatory evolution of transcriptional regulation within populations.

    PubMed

    Verta, Jukka-Pekka; Landry, Christian R; MacKay, John

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression plays a central role in translating genotypic variation into phenotypic variation. Dissection of the genetic basis of expression variation is key to understanding how expression regulation evolves. Such analyses remain challenging in contexts where organisms are outbreeding, highly heterozygous and long-lived such as in the case of conifer trees. We developed an RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based approach for both expression-quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping and the detection of cis-acting (allele-specific) vs trans-acting (non-allele-specific) eQTLs. This method can be potentially applied to many conifers. We used haploid and diploid meiotic seed tissues of a single self-fertilized white spruce (Picea glauca) individual to dissect eQTLs according to linkage and allele specificity. The genetic architecture of local eQTLs linked to the expressed genes was particularly complex, consisting of cis-acting, trans-acting and, surprisingly, compensatory cis-trans effects. These compensatory effects influence expression in opposite directions and are neutral when combined in homozygotes. Nearly half of local eQTLs were under compensation, indicating that close linkage between compensatory cis-trans factors is common in spruce. Compensated genes were overrepresented in developmental and cell organization functions. Our haploid-diploid eQTL analysis in spruce revealed that compensatory cis-trans eQTLs segregate within populations and evolve in close genetic linkage. PMID:26891783

  5. A Highly Sensitive Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase with the Probes on a Gold Nanoparticles Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-zhi; Yu, Hong- Wei; Wang, Na; Zhang, Ze; Wan, Guang-Cai; Liu, Hao; Guan, Xue; Chang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    To develop a new electrochemical DNA biosensor for determination of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, a highly sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor for DNA detection was constructed based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with gold nanoparticles (Au-nano). The Au-nano/GCE was characterized by scanning electromicroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry using methylene blue as the hybridization indicator. The dynamic range of detection of the sensor for the target DNA sequences was from 1 × 10(-11) to 1 × 10(-8) M, with an LOD of 1 × 10(-12) M. The DNA biosensor had excellent specificity for distinguishing complementary DNA sequence in the presence of non-complementary and mismatched DNA sequence. The Au-nano/GCE showed significant improvement in electrochemical characteristics, and this biosensor was successfully applied for determination of K. pneumoniae. PMID:26651586

  6. Oligonucleotide Array for Identification and Detection of Pythium Species†

    PubMed Central

    Tambong, J. T.; de Cock, A. W. A. M.; Tinker, N. A.; Lévesque, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    A DNA array containing 172 oligonucleotides complementary to specific diagnostic regions of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of more than 100 species was developed for identification and detection of Pythium species. All of the species studied, with the exception of Pythium ostracodes, exhibited a positive hybridization reaction with at least one corresponding species-specific oligonucleotide. Hybridization patterns were distinct for each species. The array hybridization patterns included cluster-specific oligonucleotides that facilitated the recognition of species, including new ones, belonging to groups such as those producing filamentous or globose sporangia. BLAST analyses against 500 publicly available Pythium sequences in GenBank confirmed that species-specific oligonucleotides were unique to all of the available strains of each species, of which there were numerous economically important ones. GenBank entries of newly described species that are not putative synonyms showed no homology to sequences of the spotted species-specific oligonucleotides, but most new species did match some of the cluster-specific oligonucleotides. Further verification of the specificity of the DNA array was done with 50 additional Pythium isolates obtained by soil dilution plating. The hybridization patterns obtained were consistent with the identification of these isolates based on morphology and ITS sequence analyses. In another blind test, total DNA of the same soil samples was amplified and hybridized on the array, and the results were compared to those of 130 Pythium isolates obtained by soil dilution plating and root baiting. The 13 species detected by the DNA array corresponded to the isolates obtained by a combination of soil dilution plating and baiting, except for one new species that was not represented on the array. We conclude that the reported DNA array is a reliable tool for identification and detection of the majority of Pythium species in environmental samples

  7. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  8. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  9. Allele-specific chromatin remodeling in the ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus associated with the risk of asthma and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Verlaan, Dominique J; Berlivet, Soizik; Hunninghake, Gary M; Madore, Anne-Marie; Larivière, Mathieu; Moussette, Sanny; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Ouimet, Manon; Ge, Bing; Hoberman, Rose; Swiatek, Marcin; Dias, Joana; Lam, Kevin C L; Koka, Vonda; Harmsen, Eef; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Avila, Lydiana; Celedón, Juan C; Weiss, Scott T; Dewar, Ken; Sinnett, Daniel; Laprise, Catherine; Raby, Benjamin A; Pastinen, Tomi; Naumova, Anna K

    2009-09-01

    Common SNPs in the chromosome 17q12-q21 region alter the risk for asthma, type 1 diabetes, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Crohn disease. Previous reports by us and others have linked the disease-associated genetic variants with changes in expression of GSDMB and ORMDL3 transcripts in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). The variants also alter regulation of other transcripts, and this domain-wide cis-regulatory effect suggests a mechanism involving long-range chromatin interactions. Here, we further dissect the disease-linked haplotype and identify putative causal DNA variants via a combination of genetic and functional analyses. First, high-throughput resequencing of the region and genotyping of potential candidate variants were performed. Next, additional mapping of allelic expression differences in Yoruba HapMap LCLs allowed us to fine-map the basis of the cis-regulatory differences to a handful of candidate functional variants. Functional assays identified allele-specific differences in nucleosome distribution, an allele-specific association with the insulator protein CTCF, as well as a weak promoter activity for rs12936231. Overall, this study shows a common disease allele linked to changes in CTCF binding and nucleosome occupancy leading to altered domain-wide cis-regulation. Finally, a strong association between asthma and cis-regulatory haplotypes was observed in three independent family-based cohorts (p = 1.78 x 10(-8)). This study demonstrates the requirement of multiple parallel allele-specific tools for the investigation of noncoding disease variants and functional fine-mapping of human disease-associated haplotypes. PMID:19732864

  10. Fluorescent oligonucleotides can serve as suitable alternatives to radiolabeled oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Rahul; Cheema, Amrita; Ahmad, Waaqar; Rosen, Eliot M; Saha, Tapas

    2009-09-01

    Prolonged exposure to radiation from radionuclei used in medical research can cause DNA damage and mutation, which lead to several diseases including cancer. Radioactivity-based experiments are expensive and associated with specialized training, dedication of instruments, approvals, and cleanup with potential hazardous waste. The objective of this study was to find an alternative to the use of radioactivity in medical research using nucleic acid chemistry. FITC-labeled oligonucleotides that contain wild-type (wt) and modified base (8-oxo-G) at the same position and their complementary unlabeled strand were synthesized. Purified DNA repair enzyme, OGG1, and nuclear lysates from MCF-7 breast cancer cells were incubated with double-stranded FITC-labeled wt and 8-oxo-G oligonucleotide to demonstrate the OGG1 incision assay. We found that FITC-coupled oligonucleotides do not impose a steric hindrance during duplex formation, and the fluorescence intensity of the oligonucleotide is comparable with the intensity of the radioactive oligonucleotide. Moreover, we have seen that the OGG1 incision assay can be performed using these fluorescence oligonucleotides, replacing conventional use of radiolabeled oligonucleotides in the assay. Although the use of fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides was described in detail for incision assays, the technique can be applied to replace a broad range of experiments, where radioactive oligonucleotides are used, eliminating the hazardous consequences of radiation. PMID:19721820

  11. High-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization study and methylation status of the RPS14 gene in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Borze, Ioana; Juvonen, Eeva; Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Jee, Kowan Ja; Elonen, Erkki; Knuutila, Sakari

    2010-03-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), close to one half of patients do not have any visible karyotypic change. In order to study submicroscopic genomic alterations, we applied high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization techniques (aCGH) in 37 patients with de novo MDS. Furthermore, we studied the methylation status of the RPS14 gene in 5q deletion (5q21.3q33.1) in 24 patients. In all, 21 of the 37 patients (57%) had copy number alterations. The most frequent copy number losses with minimal common overlapping areas were 5q21.3q33.1 (21%) and 7q22.1q33 (19%); the most frequent copy number gain was gain of the whole chromosome 8 (8%). Recurrent, but less frequent copy number losses were detected in two cases each: 11q14.1q22.1, 11q22.3q24.2, 12p12.2p13.31, 17p13.2, 18q12.1q12.2, 18q12.3q21.3, 18q21.2qter, and 20q11.23q12; the gains 8p23.2pter, 8p22p23.1, 8p12p21.1, and 8p11.21q21.2 were similarly found in two cases each. No homozygous losses or amplifications were observed. The RPS14 gene was not methylated in any of the patients. PMID:20193850

  12. Selection strategy and the design of hybrid oligonucleotide primers for RACE-PCR: cloning a family of toxin-like sequences from Agelena orientalis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhensheng; Barry, Richard; Lipkin, Alexey; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2007-01-01

    Background the use of specific but partially degenerate primers for nucleic acid hybridisations and PCRs amplification of known or unknown gene families was first reported well over a decade ago and the technique has been used widely since then. Results here we report a novel and successful selection strategy for the design of hybrid partially degenerate primers for use with RT-PCR and RACE-PCR for the identification of unknown gene families. The technique (named PaBaLiS) has proven very effective as it allowed us to identify and clone a large group of mRNAs encoding neurotoxin-like polypeptide pools from the venom of Agelena orientalis species of spider. Our approach differs radically from the generally accepted CODEHOP principle first reported in 1998. Most importantly, our method has proven very efficient by performing better than an independently generated high throughput EST cloning programme. Our method yielded nearly 130 non-identical sequences from Agelena orientalis, whilst the EST cloning technique yielded only 48 non-identical sequences from 2100 clones obtained from the same Agelena material. In addition to the primer design approach reported here, which is almost universally applicable to any PCR cloning application, our results also indicate that venom of Agelena orientalis spider contains a much larger family of related toxin-like sequences than previously thought. Conclusion with upwards of 100,000 species of spider thought to exist, and a propensity for producing diverse peptide pools, many more peptides of pharmacological importance await discovery. We envisage that some of these peptides and their recombinant derivatives will provide a new range of tools for neuroscience research and could also facilitate the development of a new generation of analgesic drugs and insecticides. PMID:17498297

  13. Allele-specific extension allows base-pair neutral homozygotes to be discriminated by high-resolution melting of small amplicons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanning; Yuan, Yanpeng; Lin, Qingling; Chan, Piu

    2010-11-01

    Not all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be determined using high-resolution melting (HRM) of small amplicons, especially class 3 and 4 SNPs. This is due mainly to the small shift in the melting temperature (Tm) between two types of homozygote. Choosing rs1869458 (a class 4 SNP) as a sample, we developed a modified small amplicon HRM assay. An allele-specific extension (ASE) primer, which ended at an SNP site and matched only one of the alleles, was added to the reaction as well as additional thermal steps for ASE. Following asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis, heterozygotes were easily identified. Two types of homozygote were also distinguishable, indicating that extension primers 11 to 13 bases in length worked efficiently in an allele-specific way. Modification of the limiting amplification primer with locked nucleic acid increased the Tm difference between extension and amplification peaks and facilitated subsequent genotyping. In addition, 194 human genomic DNA samples were genotyped with the developed assay and by direct sequencing, with the different methods providing identical genotyping results. In conclusion, ASE-HRM is a simple, inexpensive, closed-tube genotyping method that can be used to examine all types of SNP. PMID:20599636

  14. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques. PMID:24705376

  15. siRNA-mediated Allele-specific Silencing of a COL6A3 Mutation in a Cellular Model of Dominant Ullrich Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Véronique; Zou, Yaqun; Ko, Dayoung; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy type Ullrich (UCMD) is a severe disorder of early childhood onset for which currently there is no effective treatment. UCMD commonly is caused by dominant-negative mutations in the genes coding for collagen type VI, a major microfibrillar component of the extracellular matrix surrounding the muscle fibers. To explore RNA interference (RNAi) as a potential therapy for UCMD, we designed a series of small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligos that specifically target the most common mutations resulting in skipping of exon 16 in the COL6A3 gene and tested them in UCMD-derived dermal fibroblasts. Transcript analysis by semiquantitative and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that two of these siRNAs were the most allele-specific, i.e., they efficiently knocked down the expression from the mutant allele, without affecting the normal allele. In HEK293T cells, these siRNAs selectively suppressed protein expression from a reporter construct carrying the mutation, with no or minimal suppression of the wild-type (WT) construct, suggesting that collagen VI protein levels are as also reduced in an allele-specific manner. Furthermore, we found that treating UCMD fibroblasts with these siRNAs considerably improved the quantity and quality of the collagen VI matrix, as assessed by confocal microscopy. Our current study establishes RNAi as a promising molecular approach for treating dominant COL6-related dystrophies. PMID:24518369

  16. Rapid Origin Determination of the Northern Mauxia Shrimp (Acetes chinensis) Based on Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction of Partial Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Noh, Eun-Soo; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Jin-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Acetes chinensis is an economically important shrimp that belongs to the Sergestidae family; following fermentation, A. chinensis′ economic value, however, is low in China, and much of the catch in China is exported to Korea at a low price, thus leading to potential false labeling. For this reason, we developed a simple method to identify A. chinensis′ origin using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from partial (i.e., 570 bp) DNA sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 16s rRNA gene in 96 Korean and 96 Chinese individual shrimp. Among 10 SNP sites, four sites were observed in populations from both countries, and two sites located in the middle with SNP sites at their 3′-ends were used to design allele-specific primers. Among the eight internal primers, the C220F primer specific to the Chinese A. chinensis population amplified a DNA fragment of 364 bp only from that population. We were able to identify the A. chinensis population origin with 100% accuracy using multiplex PCR performed with two external primers and C220F primers. These results show that the 16S rRNA gene that is generally used for the identification of species can be used for the identification of the origin within species of A. chinensis, which is an important finding for the fair trade of the species between Korea and China. PMID:25656197

  17. Rapid Origin Determination of the Northern Mauxia Shrimp (Acetes chinensis) Based on Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction of Partial Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Noh, Eun-Soo; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Jin-Koo

    2015-04-01

    Acetes chinensis is an economically important shrimp that belongs to the Sergestidae family; following fermentation, A. chinensis' economic value, however, is low in China, and much of the catch in China is exported to Korea at a low price, thus leading to potential false labeling. For this reason, we developed a simple method to identify A. chinensis' origin using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from partial (i.e., 570 bp) DNA sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 16s rRNA gene in 96 Korean and 96 Chinese individual shrimp. Among 10 SNP sites, four sites were observed in populations from both countries, and two sites located in the middle with SNP sites at their 3'-ends were used to design allele-specific primers. Among the eight internal primers, the C220F primer specific to the Chinese A. chinensis population amplified a DNA fragment of 364 bp only from that population. We were able to identify the A. chinensis population origin with 100% accuracy using multiplex PCR performed with two external primers and C220F primers. These results show that the 16S rRNA gene that is generally used for the identification of species can be used for the identification of the origin within species of A. chinensis, which is an important finding for the fair trade of the species between Korea and China. PMID:25656197

  18. Enhanced Specificity of TPMT*2 Genotyping Using Unidirectional Wild-Type and Mutant Allele-Specific Scorpion Primers in a Single Tube

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques. PMID:24705376

  19. Identification of Stmm3 locus Conferring Resistance to Late-stage Chemically Induced Skin Papillomas on Mouse Chromosome 4 by Congenic Mappingand Allele-specific Alteration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Megumi; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kominami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance cancer susceptibility loci are located throughout the genome; however, a very limited number of genes have been identified so far. Using a forward genetics approach to map such loci in a mouse skin cancer model, we previously identified strong genetic loci conferring resistance to chemically induced skin papillomas on chromosome 4 and 7 with a large number of [(FVB/N × MSM/Ms) F1 × FVB/N] backcross mice. In this report, we describe a combination of congenic mapping and allele-specific alteration analysis of the loci on chromosome 4. We used linkage analysis and a congenic mouse strain, FVB.MSM-Stmm3 to refine the location of Stmm3 (Skin tumor modifier of MSM 3) locus within a physical interval of about 34 Mb on distal chromosome 4. In addition, we used patterns of allele-specific imbalances in tumors from N2 and N10 congenic mice to narrow down further the region of Stmm3 locus to a physical distance of about 25 Mb. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed papillomas from congenic mice had less proliferative activity. These results suggest that Stmm3 responsible genes may have an influence on papilloma formation in the two-stage skin carcinogenesis by regulating papilloma growth rather than development. PMID:25077764

  20. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes. PMID:26567534

  1. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  2. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thorsten L; Beliveau, Brian J; Uca, Yavuz O; Theilmann, Mark; Da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes. PMID:26567534

  3. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. PMID:26783342

  4. Allele-specific malE mutations that restore interactions between maltose-binding protein and the inner-membrane components of the maltose transport system.

    PubMed

    Treptow, N A; Shuman, H A

    1988-08-20

    Active accumulation of maltose and maltodextrins by Escherichia coli depends on an outer-membrane protein. LamB, a periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MalE, MBP) and three inner-membrane proteins, MalF, MalG and MalK. MalF and MalG are integral transmembrane proteins, while MalK is associated with the inner aspect of the cytoplasmic membrane via an interaction with MalG. Previously we have shown that MBP is essential for movement of maltose across the inner membrane. We have taken advantage of malF and malG mutants in which MBP interacts improperly with the membrane proteins. We describe the properties of malE mutations in which a proper interaction between MBP and defective MalF and MalG proteins has been restored. We found that these malE suppressor mutations are able to restore transport activity in an allele-specific manner. That is, a given malE mutation restores transport activity to different extents in different malF and malG mutants. Since both malF and malG mutations could be suppressed by allele-specific malE suppressors, we propose that, in wild-type bacteria, MBP interacts with sites on both MalF and MalG during active transport. The locations of different malE suppressor mutations indicate specific regions on MBP that are important for interacting with MalF and MalG. PMID:3050132

  5. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  6. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  7. Stability measurements of antisense oligonucleotides by capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bruin, G J; Börnsen, K O; Hüsken, D; Gassmann, E; Widmer, H M; Paulus, A

    1995-08-11

    The approach of using antisense oligonucleotides as potential drugs is based on hybridization of a short chemically-modified oligonucleotide with complementary cellular DNA or RNA sequences. A critical question is the stability of chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides in cellular environments. In a model system, resistance against various nucleases was evaluated by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE). For some of the samples, matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used as an additional analytical tool to perform stability measurements. Using CGE, the enzymatic degradation of single nucleotides from the oligomer can be followed after different incubation times. 10% T polyacrylamide gels give baseline resolution for oligonucleotides ranging between 5 and 30 bases in length. The kinetic influence of a specific nuclease concentration and the antisense oligonucleotide structure on the cleavage reaction are discussed. Also, a simple desalting method to improve the injection efficiency and sensitivity of the method are described. Examples of measurements of chemically modified antisense 19-mers are presented. PMID:7581844

  8. Strategies in the preparation of DNA oligonucleotide arrays for diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Beaucage, S L

    2001-08-01

    This report emphasizes the interfacial chemistry that is required to ensure proper attachment of oligonucleotides onto the surface of microarrays. For example, strategies for the covalent attachment of pre-synthesized oligonucleotides to glass slides, gold films, polyacrylamide gel pads, polypyrrole films, and optical fibers are surveyed in an attempt to better define the parameters for optimal formation and detection of DNA hybrids. These parameters include among others, the nature and length of the linkers attaching oligonucleotides to the arrays, and the surface density of oligonucleotides required for unhindered hybridization with DNA targets. Sensitive detection methods such as the use of light-scattering techniques, molecular beacons, surface plasmon resonance, attenuated total internal reflection-FTIR, and the evanescent field excitation of fluorescence from surface-bound fluorophores have been developed to study the kinetics and specificity of hybridization events. Finally, the synthesis of oligonucleotides directly on glass surfaces and polypropylene sheets has been investigated to enable DNA sequencing by hybridization and achieve oligonucleotide densities of ca. 10(6) sequences per cm(2) on DNA chips. PMID:11472237

  9. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  10. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; Shi, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; et al

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of bindingmore » at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.« less

  11. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; Shi, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Zhou, Tongqing

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of binding at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.

  12. Bulk segregant RNA-seq reveals expression and positional candidate genes and allele-specific expression for disease resistance against enteric septicemia of catfish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The application of RNA-seq has accelerated gene expression profiling and identification of gene-associated SNPs in many species. However, the integrated studies of gene expression along with SNP mapping have been lacking. Coupling of RNA-seq with bulked segregant analysis (BSA) should allow correlation of expression patterns and associated SNPs with the phenotypes. Results In this study, we demonstrated the use of bulked segregant RNA-seq (BSR-Seq) for the analysis of differentially expressed genes and associated SNPs with disease resistance against enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC). A total of 1,255 differentially expressed genes were found between resistant and susceptible fish. In addition, 56,419 SNPs residing on 4,304 unique genes were identified as significant SNPs between susceptible and resistant fish. Detailed analysis of these significant SNPs allowed differentiation of significant SNPs caused by genetic segregation and those caused by allele-specific expression. Mapping of the significant SNPs, along with analysis of differentially expressed genes, allowed identification of candidate genes underlining disease resistance against ESC disease. Conclusions This study demonstrated the use of BSR-Seq for the identification of genes involved in disease resistance against ESC through expression profiling and mapping of significantly associated SNPs. BSR-Seq is applicable to analysis of genes underlining various performance and production traits without significant investment in the development of large genotyping platforms such as SNP arrays. PMID:24373586

  13. Evaluation of a blood-specific DNA methylated region and trial for allele-specific blood identification from mixed body fluid DNA.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Akutsu, Tomoko; Takamura, Ayari; Sakurada, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    The identification of blood samples obtained from crime scenes has been an important step in forensic investigation. Recently, a novel approach using the blood-specific methylated CpG site cg06379435 has been reported. In this study, we developed a real-time polymerase-chain-reaction-based method that can simply and rapidly quantitate the methylation ratio of cg06379435 and its neighboring CpGs and set the threshold ratios for blood identification by analyzing various body fluid samples. Blood identification using the thresholds was successfully performed in the analysis of a small amount (1ng) of DNA from blood and various aged blood samples, including 29-year-old stains. We also demonstrated a test for allele-specific blood identification from a mixed DNA sample by bisulfite sequencing analysis of these CpG sites and their neighboring single nucleotide polymorphism, rs7359943 (A/G), which is of relevance in cases where mixed samples are obtained from crime scenes. The stability of DNA methylation in aged samples and the usefulness of neighboring genetic information shown in this study suggest that DNA-methylation-based body fluid identification will play a major role in future forensic investigations. PMID:27591539

  14. A and MdMYB1 allele-specific markers controlling apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) skin color and suitability for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X J; Wang, L X; Chen, X X; Liu, Y L; Meng, R; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Z Y

    2014-01-01

    Pre-selection for fruit skin color at the seedling stage would be highly advantageous, with marker-assisted selection offering a potential method for apple pre-selection. A and MdMYB1 alleles are allele-specific DNA markers that are potentially associated with apple skin color, and co-segregate with the Rf and Rni loci, respectively. Here, we assessed the potential application of these 2 alleles for marker-assisted breeding across 30 diverse cultivars and 2 apple seedling progenies. The red skin color phenotype was usually associated with the MdMYB1-1 allele and A(1) allele, respectively, while the 2 molecular markers provided approximately 91% predictability in the 'Fuji' x 'Cripps Pink' and 'Fuji' x 'Gala' progenies. The results obtained from the 30 cultivars and 2 progenies were consistent for the 2 molecular markers. Hence, the results supported that Rf and Rni could be located in a gene cluster, or even correspond to alleles of the same gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that red/yellow dimorphism is controlled by a monogenic system, with the presence of the red anthocyanin pigmentation being dominant. In addition, our results supported that the practical utilization of the 2 function markers to efficiently and accurately select red-skinned apple cultivars in apple scion breeding programs. PMID:25366802

  15. From genes to phenotypes - evaluation of two methods for the SNP analysis in archaeological remains: pyrosequencing and competitive allele specific PCR (KASPar).

    PubMed

    Pruvost, Melanie; Reissmann, Monika; Benecke, Norbert; Ludwig, Arne

    2012-01-20

    The amplification length of the DNA fragments is one major limitation of most paleogenetic analyses. Routinely, only fragments below 200 bp can be amplified, significantly reducing the content of genetic information. Although overlapping PCR strategies and next generation sequencing techniques have strongly improved data mining recently, these methods are still expensive and time consuming. In contrast, SNP analyses are easy to handle, fast and cheap. In this study, we compare two methods of SNP detection as to efficiency, cost and reliability for their use in ancient DNA applications: pyrosequencing and competitive allele specific PCR (KASPar). Our sample set consisted of 16 horse bones from two Scythian graves (600-800 BC). In conclusion, both approaches produced reliable results for most allelic patterns. But an indel of 11 bp (ASIP) could not be detected in the KASPar approach and produced problems in the pyrosequencing method (70% success rate). In such cases, we recommend checking allelic distribution using a gel approach or capillary sequencing. Overall, in comparison with the traditional mode of ancient DNA investigations (PCR, cloning, capillary sequencing), both approaches are superior for SNP analyses especially of large sample sets. PMID:22154270

  16. Inactive allele-specific methylation and chromatin structure of the imprinted gene U2af1-rs1 on mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Hideo; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kamiya, Mamoru

    1996-07-01

    The imprinted U2Af1-rs1 gene that maps to mouse chromosome 11 is predominately expressed from the paternal allele. We examined the methylation of genomic sequences in and around the U2af1-rs1 locus to establish the extent of sequence modifications that accompanied the silencing of the maternal allele. The analysis of HapII or HhaI sites showed that the silent maternal allele was hypermethylated in a block of CpG sequences that covered more than 10 kb. By comparison, the expressed paternal allele was unmethylated from a CpG island upstream of the transcribed region through 2 kb. An analysis of DNaseI hypersensitivity of a putative promoter of U2af1-rs1 showed an open chromatin conformation only on the unmethylated, expressed paternal allele. These results suggest that allele-specific hypermethylation covering the gene and its upstream CpG island plays a role in maternal allele repression of U2af1-rs1, which is reflected in altered chromatin conformation of DNaseI hypersensitive sites. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  18. Rapid KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA Mutation Analysis of Fine Needle Aspirates from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Schrumpf, Melanie; Talebian Yazdi, Mehrdad; Ruano, Dina; Forte, Giusi I.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Veselic, Maud; Rabe, Klaus F.; Annema, Jouke T.; Smit, Vincent; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and Trans-esophageal Ultrasound Scanning with Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA) are important, novel techniques for the diagnosis and staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that have been incorporated into lung cancer staging guidelines. To guide and optimize treatment decisions, especially for NSCLC patients in stage III and IV, EGFR and KRAS mutation status is often required. The concordance rate of the mutation analysis between these cytological aspirates and histological samples obtained by surgical staging is unknown. Therefore, we studied the extent to which allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR with hydrolysis probes could be reliably performed on EBUS and EUS fine needle aspirates by comparing the results with histological material from the same patient. We analyzed a series of 43 NSCLC patients for whom cytological and histological material was available. We demonstrated that these standard molecular techniques can be accurately applied on fine needle cytological aspirates from NSCLC patients. Importantly, we show that all mutations detected in the histological material of primary tumor were also identified in the cytological samples. We conclude that molecular profiling can be reliably performed on fine needle cytology aspirates from NSCLC patients. PMID:21408138

  19. Detection of EGFR Mutations by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays Powered by Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR Technology

    PubMed Central

    Roma, Cristin; Esposito, Claudia; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Chicchinelli, Nicoletta; Mancini, Rita; Pisconti, Salvatore; Botti, Gerardo; Morabito, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are predictive of response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR (castPCR) is a highly sensitive and specific technology. EGFR mutations were assessed by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays (TMDA) based on castPCR technology in 64 tumor samples: a training set of 30 NSCLC and 6 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) samples and a validation set of 28 NSCLC cases. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were compared with routine diagnostic techniques including direct sequencing and the EGFR Therascreen RGQ kit. Analysis of the training set allowed the identification of the threshold value for data analysis (0.2); the maximum cycle threshold (Ct = 37); and the cut-off ΔCt value (7) for the EGFR TMDA. By using these parameters, castPCR technology identified both training and validation set EGFR mutations with similar frequency as compared with the Therascreen kit. Sequencing detected rare mutations that are not identified by either castPCR or Therascreen, but in samples with low tumor cell content it failed to detect common mutations that were revealed by real-time PCR based methods. In conclusion, our data suggest that castPCR is highly sensitive and specific to detect EGFR mutations in NSCLC clinical samples. PMID:24364033

  20. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; Shi, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Zhou, Tongqing

    2015-01-01

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (∼36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of binding at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo. PMID:26370782

  1. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  2. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Lu, Qing; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request. PMID:23505547

  3. Long synthetic oligonucleotides for microarray expression measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Heping; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Chunxiu; Lu, Zu-Hong; Gao, Xiang; Kong, Dong

    2001-09-01

    There are generally two kinds of DNA microarray used for genomic-scale gene expression profiling of mRNA: cDNA and DNA chip, but both of them suffer from some drawbacks. To meet more requirements, another oligonucleotide microarray with long was produced. This type of microarray had the advantages of low cost, minimal Cross-hybridization, flexible and easy to make, which is most fit for small laboratories with special purposes. In this paper, we devised different probes with different probe lengths, GC contents and gene positions to optimization the probe design. Experiments showed 70 mer probes are suitable for both sufficient sensitivity and reasonable costs. Higher G-C content produces stronger signal intensity thus better sensitivity and probes designed at 3 untranslated region of gene within the range of 300 pb should be best for both sensitivity and specificity.

  4. Phosphoramidate Ligation of Oligonucleotides in Nanoscale Structures.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Matthäus; Haug, Rüdiger; Said, Hassan; Piasecka, Sylwia; Kramer, Markus; Richert, Clemens

    2016-06-16

    The folding of long DNA strands into designed nanostructures has evolved into an art. Being based on linear chains only, the resulting nanostructures cannot readily be transformed into covalently linked frameworks. Covalently linking strands in the context of folded DNA structures requires a robust method that avoids sterically demanding reagents or enzymes. Here we report chemical ligation of the 3'-amino termini of oligonucleotides and 5'-phosphorylated partner strands in templated reactions that produce phosphoramidate linkages. These reactions produce inter-nucleotide linkages that are isoelectronic and largely isosteric to phosphodiesters. Ligations were performed at three levels of complexity, including the extension of branched DNA hybrids and the ligation of six scaffold strands in a small origami. PMID:27225865

  5. Rapid bacterial identification using evanescent-waveguide oligonucleotide microarray classification.

    PubMed

    Francois, Patrice; Charbonnier, Yvan; Jacquet, Jean; Utinger, Dominic; Bento, Manuela; Lew, Daniel; Kresbach, Gerhard M; Ehrat, Markus; Schlegel, Werner; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial identification relies primarily on culture-based methodologies and requires 48-72 h to deliver results. We developed and used i) a bioinformatics strategy to select oligonucleotide signature probes, ii) a rapid procedure for RNA labelling and hybridization, iii) an evanescent-waveguide oligoarray with exquisite signal/noise performance, and iv) informatics methods for microarray data analysis. Unique 19-mer signature oligonucleotides were selected in the 5'-end of 16s rDNA genes of human pathogenic bacteria. Oligonucleotides spotted onto a Ta(2)O(5)-coated microarray surface were incubated with chemically labelled total bacterial RNA. Rapid hybridization and stringent washings were performed before scanning and analyzing the slide. In the present paper, the eight most abundant bacterial pathogens representing >54% of positive blood cultures were selected. Hierarchical clustering analysis of hybridization data revealed characteristic patterns, even for closely related species. We then evaluated artificial intelligence-based approaches that outperformed conventional threshold-based identification schemes on cognate probes. At this stage, the complete procedure applied to spiked blood cultures was completed in less than 6 h. In conclusion, when coupled to optimal signal detection strategy, microarrays provide bacterial identification within a few hours post-sampling, allowing targeted antimicrobial prescription. PMID:16216356

  6. Application of oligonucleotide array technology for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria of foodborne infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bang-Xing; Jiang, Li-Fang; Hu, Yu-Shan; Fang, Dan-Yun; Guo, Hui-Yu

    2004-09-01

    A rapid and accurate method for detection for common pathogenic bacteria in foodborne infections was established by using oligonucleotide array technology. Nylon membrane was used as the array support. A mutation region of the 23S rRNA gene was selected as the discrimination target from 14 species (genera) of bacteria causing foodborne infections and two unrelated bacterial species. A pair of universal primers was designed for PCR amplification of the 23S rRNA gene. Twenty-one species (genera)-specific oligonucleotide detection probes were synthesized and spotted onto the nylon membranes. The 23S rRNA gene amplification products of 14 species of pathogenic bacteria were hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. Hybridization results were analyzed with digoxigenin-linked enzyme reaction. Results indicated that nine species of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella dysenteriae, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Clostridium botulinum) showed high sensitivity and specificity for the oligonucleotide array. Two other species (Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica) gave weak cross-reaction with E. coli, but the reaction did not affect their detection. After redesigning the probes, positive hybridization results were obtained with Staphylococcus aureus, but not with Clostridium perfringens and Streptococcus pyogenes. The oligonucleotide array can also be applied to samples collected in clinical settings of foodborne infections. The superiority of oligonucleotide array over other tests lies on its rapidity, accuracy and efficiency in the diagnosis, treatment and control of foodborne infections. PMID:15279944

  7. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake machanisms and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23883124

  8. Molecular Crowding Effects on Microgel-Tethered Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youlong; Libera, Matthew

    2016-06-28

    Microgel tethering is a nontraditional method with which to bind oligonucleotide hybridization probes to a solid surface. Microgel-tethering physically positions the probes away from the underlying hard substrate and maintains them in a highly waterlike environment. This paper addresses the question of whether molecular crowding affects the performance of microgel-tethered molecular beacon probes. The density of probe-tethering sites is controlled experimentally using thin-film blends of biotin-terminated [PEG-B] and hydroxyl-terminated [PEG-OH] poly(ethylene glycol) from which microgels are synthesized and patterned by electron beam lithography. Fluorescence measurements indicate that the number of streptavidins, linear DNA probes, hairpin probes, and molecular beacon probes bound to the microgels increases linearly with increasing PEG-B/PEG-OH ratio. For a given tethering-site concentration, more linear probes can bind than structured probes. Crowding effects emerge during the hybridization of microgel-tethered molecular beacons but not during the hybridization of linear probes, as the tethering density increases. Crowding during hybridization is associated with conformational constraints imposed by the close proximity of closed and hybridized structured probes. The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of hybridized beacons is highest and roughly constant for low tethering densities and decreases at the highest tethering densities. Despite differences between microgel tethering and traditional oligonucleotide surface-immobilization approaches, these results show that crowding defines an optimum tethering density for molecular beacon probes that is less than the maximum possible, which is consistent with previous studies involving various linear and structured oligonucleotide probes. PMID:27253904

  9. Fine mapping of QTL and genomic prediction using allele-specific expression SNPs demonstrates that the complex trait of genetic resistance to Marek’s disease is predominantly determined by transcriptional regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis that polymorphisms associated with transcriptional regulation are critical for viral disease resistance was tested by selecting birds using SNPs exhibiting allele-specific expression (ASE) in response to viral challenge. Analysis indicates ASE markers account for 83% of the disease re...

  10. Correction of Mutant p63 in EEC Syndrome Using siRNA Mediated Allele-Specific Silencing Restores Defective Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Vanessa; Nasti, Annamaria A; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Ferrari, Stefano; Migliorati, Angelo; Raffa, Paolo; Lariccia, Vincenzo; Nespeca, Patrizia; Biasolo, Mariangela; Willoughby, Colin E; Ponzin, Diego; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal dysplasia-Clefting (EEC) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by heterozygous mutations in the p63 gene and characterized by limb defects, orofacial clefting, ectodermal dysplasia, and ocular defects. Patients develop progressive total bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency, which eventually results in corneal blindness. Medical and surgical treatments are ineffective and of limited benefit. Oral mucosa epithelial stem cells (OMESCs) represent an alternative source of stem cells capable of regenerating the corneal epithelium and, combined with gene therapy, could provide an attractive therapeutic avenue. OMESCs from EEC patients carrying the most severe p63 mutations (p.R279H and p.R304Q) were characterized and the genetic defect of p.R279H silenced using allele-specific (AS) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Systematic screening of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-siRNAs against R279H-p63 allele in (i) stable WT-ΔNp63α-RFP and R279H-ΔNp63α-EGFP cell lines, (ii) transient doubly transfected cell lines, and (iii) p.R279H OMESCs, identified a number of potent siRNA inhibitors for the mutant allele, which had no effect on wild-type p63. In addition, siRNA treatment led to longer acquired life span of mutated stem cells compared to controls, less accelerated stem cell differentiation in vitro, reduced proliferation properties, and effective ability in correcting the epithelial hypoplasia, thus giving rise to full thickness stratified and differentiated epithelia. This study demonstrates the phenotypic correction of mutant stem cells (OMESCs) in EEC syndrome by means of siRNA mediated AS silencing with restoration of function. The application of siRNA, alone or in combination with cell-based therapies, offers a therapeutic strategy for corneal blindness in EEC syndrome. Stem Cells 2016;34:1588-1600. PMID:26891374

  11. Detection and molecular characterization of two FAD3 genes controlling linolenic acid content and development of allele-specific markers in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Tian, Entang; Zeng, Fangqin; MacKay, Kimberly; Roslinsky, Vicky; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Development of yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) with superior quality traits (low erucic and linolenic acid contents, and low glucosinolate content) can make this species as a potential oilseed crop. We have recently isolated three inbred lines Y1127, Y514 and Y1035 with low (3.8%), medium (12.3%) and high (20.8%) linolenic acid (C18∶3) content, respectively, in this species. Inheritance studies detected two fatty acid desaturase 3 (FAD3) gene loci controlling the variation of C18∶3 content. QTL mapping revealed that the two FAD3 gene loci responsible for 73.0% and 23.4% of the total variation and were located on the linkage groups Sal02 and Sal10, respectively. The FAD3 gene on Sal02 was referred to as SalFAD3.LA1 and that on Sal10 as SalFAD3.LA2. The dominant and recessive alleles were designated as LA1 and la1 for SalFAD3.LA1, and LA2 and la2 for SalFAD3.LA2. Cloning and alignment of the coding and genomic DNA sequences revealed that the SalFAD3.LA1 and SalFAD3.LA2 genes each contained 8 exons and 7 introns. LA1 had a coding DNA sequence (CDS) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids, whereas la1 was a loss-of-function allele due to an insertion of 584 bp in exon 3. Both LA2 and la2 had a CDS of 1152 bp encoding a polypeptide of 383 amino acids. Allele-specific markers for LA1, la1, LA2 and la2 co-segregated with the C18∶3 content in the F2 populations and will be useful for improving fatty acid composition through marker assisted selection in yellow mustard breeding. PMID:24823372

  12. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies. PMID:27492765

  13. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1) extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2) performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3) correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4) calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity. PMID:26583378

  14. Overall and allele-specific expression of the SMC1A gene in female Cornelia de Lange syndrome patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Ilaria; Rovina, Davide; Masciadri, Maura; Cereda, Anna; Azzollini, Jacopo; Picinelli, Chiara; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Finelli, Palma; Selicorni, Angelo; Russo, Silvia; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, limb anomalies, and growth and cognitive deficits. Mutations in genes encoding subunits (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8) of the cohesin complex account for approximately 65% of clinically diagnosed CdLS cases. The SMC1A gene (Xp11.22), responsible for 5% of CdLS cases, partially escapes X chromosome inactivation in humans and the allele on the inactive X chromosome is variably expressed. In this study, we evaluated overall and allele-specific SMC1A expression. Real-time PCR analysis conducted on 17 controls showed that SMC1A expression in females is 50% higher than in males. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed a 44% higher protein level in healthy females than in males, and showed no significant differences in SMC1A protein levels between controls and patients. Pyrosequencing was used to assess the reciprocal level of allelic expression in six female carriers of different SMC1A mutations and 15 controls who were heterozygous at a polymorphic transcribed SMC1A locus. The two alleles were expressed at a 1:1 ratio in the control group and at a 2:1 ratio in favor of the wild type allele in the test group. Since a dominant negative effect is considered the pathogenic mechanism in SMC1A-defective female patients, the level of allelic preferential expression might be one of the factors contributing to the wide phenotypic variability observed in these patients. An extension of this study to a larger cohort containing mild to borderline cases could enhance our understanding of the clinical spectrum of SMC1A-linked CdLS. PMID:24756084

  15. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  16. Proper Use of Allele-Specific Expression Improves Statistical Power for cis-eQTL Mapping with RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    HU, Yi-Juan; SUN, Wei; TZENG, Jung-Ying; PEROU, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) offer insight into the molecular mechanisms of loci that were found to be associated with complex diseases and the mechanisms can be classified into cis- and trans-acting regulation. At present, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is rapidly replacing expression microarrays to assess gene expression abundance. Unlike microarrays that only measure the total expression of each gene, RNA-seq also provides information on allele-specific expression (ASE), which can be used to distinguish cis-eQTLs from trans-eQTLs and, more importantly, enhance cis-eQTL mapping. However, assessing the cis-effect of a candidate eQTL on a gene requires knowledge of the haplotypes connecting the candidate eQTL and the gene, which cannot be inferred with certainty. The existing two-stage approach that first phases the candidate eQTL against the gene and then treats the inferred phase as observed in the association analysis tends to attenuate the estimated cis-effect and reduce the power for detecting a cis-eQTL. In this article, we provide a maximum-likelihood framework for cis-eQTL mapping with RNA-seq data. Our approach integrates the inference of haplotypes and the association analysis into a single stage, and is thus unbiased and statistically powerful. We also develop a pipeline for performing a comprehensive scan of all local eQTLs for all genes in the genome by controlling for false discovery rate, and implement the methods in a computationally efficient software program. The advantages of the proposed methods over the existing ones are demonstrated through realistic simulation studies and an application to empirical breast cancer data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project. PMID:26568645

  17. The genetic association of RUNX3 with ankylosing spondylitis can be explained by allele-specific effects on IRF4 recruitment that alter gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Vecellio, Matteo; Roberts, Amity R; Cohen, Carla J; Cortes, Adrian; Knight, Julian C; Bowness, Paul; Wordsworth, B Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the functional basis for the genetic association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), upstream of the RUNX3 promoter, with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods We performed conditional analysis of genetic association data and used ENCODE data on chromatin remodelling and transcription factor (TF) binding sites to identify the primary AS-associated regulatory SNP in the RUNX3 region. The functional effects of this SNP were tested in luciferase reporter assays. Its effects on TF binding were investigated by electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. RUNX3 mRNA levels were compared in primary CD8+ T cells of AS risk and protective genotypes by real-time PCR. Results The association of the RUNX3 SNP rs4648889 with AS (p<7.6×10−14) was robust to conditioning on all other SNPs in this region. We identified a 2 kb putative regulatory element, upstream of RUNX3, containing rs4648889. In reporter gene constructs, the protective rs4648889 ‘G’ allele increased luciferase activity ninefold but significantly less activity (4.3-fold) was seen with the AS risk ‘A’ allele (p≤0.01). The binding of Jurkat or CD8+ T-cell nuclear extracts to the risk allele was decreased and IRF4 recruitment was reduced. The AS-risk allele also affected H3K4Me1 histone methylation and associated with an allele-specific reduction in RUNX3 mRNA (p<0.05). Conclusion We identified a regulatory region upstream of RUNX3 that is modulated by rs4648889. The risk allele decreases TF binding (including IRF4) and reduces reporter activity and RUNX3 expression. These findings may have important implications for understanding the role of T cells and other immune cells in AS. PMID:26452539

  18. Allele-Specific Virulence Attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a Type III Effector via the Arabidopsis ZAR1 Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer D.; Wu, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Plant resistance (R) proteins provide a robust surveillance system to defend against potential pathogens. Despite their importance in plant innate immunity, relatively few of the ∼170 R proteins in Arabidopsis have well-characterized resistance specificity. In order to identify the R protein responsible for recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector (T3SE) HopZ1a, we assembled an Arabidopsis R gene T–DNA Insertion Collection (ARTIC) from publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana insertion lines and screened it for plants lacking HopZ1a-induced immunity. This reverse genetic screen revealed that the Arabidopsis R protein HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1 (ZAR1; At3g50950) is required for recognition of HopZ1a in Arabidopsis. ZAR1 belongs to the coiled-coil (CC) class of nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) containing R proteins; however, the ZAR1 CC domain phylogenetically clusters in a clade distinct from other related Arabidopsis R proteins. ZAR1–mediated immunity is independent of several genes required by other R protein signaling pathways, including NDR1 and RAR1, suggesting that ZAR1 possesses distinct signaling requirements. The closely-related T3SE protein, HopZ1b, is still recognized by zar1 Arabidopsis plants indicating that Arabidopsis has evolved at least two independent R proteins to recognize the HopZ T3SE family. Also, in Arabidopsis zar1 plants HopZ1a promotes P. syringae growth indicative of an ancestral virulence function for this T3SE prior to the evolution of recognition by the host resistance protein ZAR1. Our results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis resistance protein ZAR1 confers allele-specific recognition and virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE protein HopZ1a. PMID:20368970

  19. Inter- and Intra-Individual Variation in Allele-Specific DNA Methylation and Gene Expression in Children Conceived using Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nahid; Katari, Sunita; Gerson, Leigh F.; Chalian, Raffi; Foster, Michael W.; Gaughan, John P.; Coutifaris, Christos; Sapienza, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported a higher incidence of rare disorders involving imprinted genes among children conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART), suggesting that ART procedures may be disruptive to imprinted gene methylation patterns. We examined intra- and inter-individual variation in DNA methylation at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the IGF2/H19 and IGF2R loci in a population of children conceived in vitro or in vivo. We found substantial variation in allele-specific methylation at both loci in both groups. Aberrant methylation of the maternal IGF2/H19 DMR was more common in the in vitro group, and the overall variance was also significantly greater in the in vitro group. We estimated the number of trophoblast stem cells in each group based on approximation of the variance of the binomial distribution of IGF2/H19 methylation ratios, as well as the distribution of X chromosome inactivation scores in placenta. Both of these independent measures indicated that placentas of the in vitro group were derived from fewer stem cells than the in vivo conceived group. Both IGF2 and H19 mRNAs were significantly lower in placenta from the in vitro group. Although average birth weight was lower in the in vitro group, we found no correlation between birth weight and IGF2 or IGF2R transcript levels or the ratio of IGF2/IGF2R transcript levels. Our results show that in vitro conception is associated with aberrant methylation patterns at the IGF2/H19 locus. However, very little of the inter- or intra-individual variation in H19 or IGF2 mRNA levels can be explained by differences in maternal DMR DNA methylation, in contrast to the expectations of current transcriptional imprinting models. Extraembryonic tissues of embryos cultured in vitro appear to be derived from fewer trophoblast stem cells. It is possible that this developmental difference has an effect on placental and fetal growth. PMID:20661447

  20. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population. PMID:21608526

  1. Identification of Medically Important Molds by an Oligonucleotide Array†

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chen Ren; Huang, Liyin; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Barton, Richard; Li, Hsin Chieh; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2005-01-01

    Infections caused by fungi have increased in recent years. Accurate and rapid identification of fungal pathogens is important for appropriate treatment with antifungal agents. On the basis of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS 1) and ITS 2 sequences of the rRNA genes, an oligonucleotide array was developed to identify 64 species (32 genera) of clinically important filamentous (or dimorphic) fungi. These 64 species included fungi causing superficial, cutaneous, subcutaneous, and invasive infections. The method consisted of PCR amplification of the ITS regions using a pair of universal primers, followed by hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products to a panel of species- or group-specific oligonucleotides immobilized on a nylon membrane. Of 397 fungal strains (290 target and 107 nontarget strains) tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the array was 98.3% (285/290) and 98.1% (105/107), respectively. Misidentified strains were usually those belonging to the same genus of the target species or having partial homology with oligonucleotide probes on the membrane. The whole procedure can be finished within 24 h starting from isolated colonies; reproductive structures, which are essential for the conventional identification methods, are not needed. In conclusion, the present array is a powerful tool for identification of clinically important filamentous fungi and may have the potential to be continually extended by adding further oligonucleotides to the array without significantly increasing the cost or complexity. PMID:16081907

  2. Oligonucleotide primers, probes and molecular methods for the environmental monitoring of methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Summary For the identification and quantification of methanogenic archaea (methanogens) in environmental samples, various oligonucleotide probes/primers targeting phylogenetic markers of methanogens, such as 16S rRNA, 16S rRNA gene and the gene for the α‐subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), have been extensively developed and characterized experimentally. These oligonucleotides were designed to resolve different groups of methanogens at different taxonomic levels, and have been widely used as hybridization probes or polymerase chain reaction primers for membrane hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, rRNA cleavage method, gene cloning, DNA microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for studies in environmental and determinative microbiology. In this review, we present a comprehensive list of such oligonucleotide probes/primers, which enable us to determine methanogen populations in an environment quantitatively and hierarchically, with examples of the practical applications of the probes and primers. PMID:21375721

  3. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  4. Improved DNA microarray detection sensitivity through immobilization of preformed in solution streptavidin/biotinylated oligonucleotide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Mavrogiannopoulou, E; Petrou, P S; Koukouvinos, G; Yannoukakos, D; Siafaka-Kapadai, A; Fornal, K; Awsiuk, K; Budkowski, A; Kakabakos, S E

    2015-04-01

    A novel immobilization approach involving binding of preformed streptavidin/biotinylated oligonucleotide conjugates onto surfaces coated with biotinylated bovine serum albumin is presented. Microarrays prepared according to the proposed method were compared, in terms of detection sensitivity and specificity, with other immobilization schemes employing coupling of biotinylated oligonucleotides onto directly adsorbed surface streptavidin, or sequential coupling of streptavidin and biotinylated oligonucleotides onto a layer of adsorbed biotinylated bovine serum albumin. A comparison was performed employing biotinylated oligonucleotides corresponding to wild- and mutant-type sequences of seven single point mutations of the BRCA1 gene. With respect to the other immobilization protocols, the proposed oligonucleotide immobilization approach offered the highest hybridization signals (at least 5 times higher) and permitted more elaborative washings, thus providing considerably higher discrimination between complimentary and non-complementary DNA sequences for all mutations tested. In addition, the hybridization kinetics were significantly enhanced compared to two other immobilization protocols, permitting PCR sample analysis in less than 40 min. Thus, the proposed oligonucleotide immobilization approach offered improved detection sensitivity and discrimination ability along with considerably reduced analysis time, and it is expected to find wide application in DNA mutation detection. PMID:25805150

  5. Oligonucleotide-Functionalized Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Robert

    In this thesis, we describe the properties of oligonucleotide-functionalized gold colloids under the unique set of conditions where the particles are geometrically anisotropic and have nanometer-scale dimensions. While nearly two decades of previous work elucidated numerous unexpected and emergent phenomena arising from the combination of inorganic nanoparticles with surface-bound DNA strands, virtually nothing was known about how these properties are altered when the shape of the nanoparticle core is chosen to be non-spherical. In particular, we are interested in understanding, and ultimately controlling, the ways in which these DNA-conjugated anisotropic nanostructures interact when their attraction is governed by programmable DNA hybridization events. Chapter 1 introduces the field of DNA-based materials assembly by discussing how nanoscale building blocks which present rigid, directional interactions can be thought of as possessing artificial versions of the familiar chemical principles of "bonds" and "valency". In chapter 2 we explore the fundamental interparticle binding thermodynamics of DNA-functionalized spherical and anisotropic nanoparticles, which reveals enormous preferences for collective ligand interactions occurring between flat surfaces over those that occur between curved surfaces. Using these insights, chapter 3 demonstrates that when syntheses produce mixtures of different nanoparticle shapes, the tailorable nature of DNA-mediated interparticle association can be used to selectively crystallize and purify the desired anisotropic nanostructure products, leaving spherical impurity particles behind. Chapter 4 leverages the principle that the flat facets of anisotropic particles generate directional DNA-based hybridization interactions to assemble a variety of tailorable nanoparticle superlattices whose symmetry and dimensionality are a direct consequence of the shape of the nanoparticle building block used in their construction. Chapter 5 explores

  6. Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E; Mariella Jr., R P; Christian, A T; Gardner, S N; Williams, J M

    2003-11-24

    This report summarizes the work done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Oligonucleotide and Long Polymeric DNA Encoding project, part of the Microelectronic Bioprocesses Program at DARPA. The goal of the project was to develop a process by which long (circa 10,000 base-pair) synthetic DNA molecules could be synthesized in a timely and economic manner. During construction of the long molecule, errors in DNA sequence occur during hybridization and/or the subsequent enzymatic process. The work done on this project has resulted in a novel synthesis scheme that we call the parallel pyramid synthesis protocol, the development of a suit of computational tools to minimize and quantify errors in the synthesized DNA sequence, and experimental proof of this technique. The modeling consists of three interrelated modules: the bioinformatics code which determines the specifics of parallel pyramid synthesis for a given chain of long DNA, the thermodynamics code which tracks the products of DNA hybridization and polymerase extension during the later steps in the process, and the kinetics model which examines the temporal and spatial processes during one thermocycle. Most importantly, we conducted the first successful syntheses of a gene using small starting oligomers (tetramers). The synthesized sequence, 813 base pairs long, contained a 725 base pair gene, modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP), which has been shown to be a functional gene by cloning into cells and observing its green fluorescent product.

  7. [Study toward practical use of oligonucleotide therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takao; Yoshida, Tokuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, oligonucleotide-based therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been developed extensively. For example, mipomersen (Kynamro; ISIS Pharmaceuticals), which is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide administered by subcutaneous injection, has recently been approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hands, methods for the evaluation of quality, efficacy and safety of oligonucleotide therapeutics have not been fully discussed. Furthermore, the regulatory guidance specific for oligonucleotide therapeutics has not been established yet. Under these circumstances, we started to collaborate with Osaka University and PMDA to discuss regulatory science focused on oligonucleotide therapeutics. Through the collaboration, we would like to propose the possible design of quality evaluation and preclinical safety-evaluation of oligonucleotide therapeutics. PMID:25707197

  8. Portable system for microbial sample preparation and oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Bavykin, S G; Akowski, J P; Zakhariev, V M; Barsky, V E; Perov, A N; Mirzabekov, A D

    2001-02-01

    We have developed a three-component system for microbial identification that consists of (i) a universal syringe-operated silica minicolumn for successive DNA and RNA isolation, fractionation, fragmentation, fluorescent labeling, and removal of excess free label and short oligonucleotides; (ii) microarrays of immobilized oligonucleotide probes for 16S rRNA identification; and (iii) a portable battery-powered device for imaging the hybridization of fluorescently labeled RNA fragments with the arrays. The minicolumn combines a guanidine thiocyanate method of nucleic acid isolation with a newly developed hydroxyl radical-based technique for DNA and RNA labeling and fragmentation. DNA and RNA can also be fractionated through differential binding of double- and single-stranded forms of nucleic acids to the silica. The procedure involves sequential washing of the column with different solutions. No vacuum filtration steps, phenol extraction, or centrifugation is required. After hybridization, the overall fluorescence pattern is captured as a digital image or as a Polaroid photo. This three-component system was used to discriminate Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and human HL60 cells. The procedure is rapid: beginning with whole cells, it takes approximately 25 min to obtain labeled DNA and RNA samples and an additional 25 min to hybridize and acquire the microarray image using a stationary image analysis system or the portable imager. PMID:11157263

  9. Portable system for microbial sample preparation and oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Bavykin, S. G.; Akowski, J. P.; Zakhariev, V. M.; Barsky, V. E.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Perov, A. N.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2001-02-01

    We have developed a three-component system for microbial identification that consists of (i) a universal syringe-operated silica minicolumn for successive DNA and RNA isolation, fractionation, fragmentation, fluorescent labeling, and removal of excess free label and short oligonucleotides; (ii) microarrays of immobilized oligonucleotide probes for 16S rRNA identification; and (iii) a portable battery-powered device for imaging the hybridization of fluorescently labeled RNA fragments with the arrays. The minicolumn combines a guanidine thiocyanate method of nucleic acid isolation with a newly developed hydroxyl radical-based technique for DNA and RNA labeling and fragmentation. DNA and RNA can also be fractionated through differential binding of double- and single-stranded forms of nucleic acids to the silica. The procedure involves sequential washing of the column with different solutions. No vacuum filtration steps, phenol extraction, or centrifugation is required. After hybridization, the overall fluorescence pattern is captured as a digital image or as a Polaroid photo. This three-component system was used to discriminate Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and human HL60 cells. The procedure is rapid: beginning with whole cells, it takes approximately 25 min to obtain labeled DNA and RNA samples and an additional 25 min to hybridize and acquire the microarray image using a stationary image analysis system or the portable imager.

  10. Hybridization-Induced Aggregation Technology for Practical Clinical Testing: KRAS Mutation Detection in Lung and Colorectal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Hillary S; Landers, James P; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2016-07-01

    KRAS mutations have emerged as powerful predictors of response to targeted therapies in the treatment of lung and colorectal cancers; thus, prospective KRAS genotyping is essential for appropriate treatment stratification. Conventional mutation testing technologies are not ideal for routine clinical screening, as they often involve complex, time-consuming processes and/or costly instrumentation. In response, we recently introduced a unique analytical strategy for revealing KRAS mutations, based on the allele-specific hybridization-induced aggregation (HIA) of oligonucleotide probe-conjugated microbeads. Using simple, inexpensive instrumentation, this approach allows for the detection of any common KRAS mutation in <10 minutes after PCR. Here, we evaluate the clinical utility of the HIA method for mutation detection (HIAMD). In the analysis of 20 lung and colon tumor pathology specimens, we observed a 100% correlation between the KRAS mutation statuses determined by HIAMD and sequencing. In addition, we were able to detect KRAS mutations in a background of 75% wild-type DNA-a finding consistent with that reported for sequencing. With this, we show that HIAMD allows for the rapid and cost-effective detection of KRAS mutations, without compromising analytical performance. These results indicate the validity of HIAMD as a mutation-testing technology suitable for practical clinical testing. Further expansion of this platform may involve the detection of mutations in other key oncogenic pathways. PMID:27289420

  11. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

    PubMed Central

    Altimari, Annalisa; de Biase, Dario; De Maglio, Giovanna; Gruppioni, Elisa; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; D’Errico, Antonia; Pession, Annalisa; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tallini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen®) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03), percentage of mutation for pyrosequencing (P = 0.001), ratio for chip array hybridization (P = 0.003), and percentage of mutation for 454 next-generation sequencing (P = 0.004). Also, 454 next-generation sequencing showed the best cross correlation for quantification of mutation abundance compared with all the other methods (P < 0.001). Our comparison showed the superiority of next-generation sequencing over the other techniques in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Next-generation sequencing will replace Sanger sequencing as the reference technique for diagnostic detection of KRAS mutation in archival tumor tissues. PMID

  12. Species-Level Identification of Orthopoxviruses with an Oligonucleotide Microchip

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Sergey; Mikheev, Maxim; Shchelkunov, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Sobolev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Babkin, Igor; Guskov, Alexander; Sokunova, Elena; Zasedatelev, Alexander; Sandakhchiev, Lev; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2002-01-01

    A method for species-specific detection of orthopoxviruses pathogenic for humans and animals is described. The method is based on hybridization of a fluorescently labeled amplified DNA specimen with the oligonucleotide DNA probes immobilized on a microchip (MAGIChip). The probes identify species-specific sites within the crmB gene encoding the viral analogue of tumor necrosis factor receptor, one of the most important determinants of pathogenicity in this genus of viruses. The diagnostic procedure takes 6 h and does not require any sophisticated equipment (a portable fluorescence reader can be used). PMID:11880388

  13. The prebiotic synthesis of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is primarily a review of recent developments in the abiotic synthesis of nucleotides, short chain oligonucleotides, and their mode of replication in solution. It also presents preliminary results from this laboratory on the prebiotic synthesis of thymidine oligodeoxynucleotides. A discussion, based on the physicochemical properties of RNA and DNA oligomers, relevant to the molecular evolution of these compounds leads to the tentative hypothesis that oligodeoxyribonucleotides of about 12 units may have been of sufficient length to initiate a self replicating coding system. Two models are suggested to account for the synthesis of high molecular weight oligomers using short chain templates and primers.

  14. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  15. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries

    PubMed Central

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection–based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization. PMID:26054766

  16. Surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with thiolated oligonucleotides in 10 seconds using selective microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Abel, Biebele; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-11-01

    This study demonstrates the proof-of-principle of rapid surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with oligonucleotides using low power microwave heating. Due to their interesting optical and electronic properties, silver nanoparticle films (SNFs, 2 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides were used as the model plasmonic nanostructured materials. Rapid surface modification of SNFs with oligonucleotides was carried out using two strategies (1) Strategy 1: for ss-oligonucleotides, surface hybridization and (2) Strategy 2: for ds-oligonucleotides, solution hybridization), where the samples were exposed to 10, 15, 30 and 60 seconds microwave heating. To assess the efficacy of our new rapid surface modification technique, identical experiments carried out without the microwave heating (i.e., conventional method), which requires 24 hours for the completion of the identical steps. It was found that SNFs can be modified with ss- and ds-oligonucleotides in 10 seconds, which typically requires several hours of incubation time for the chemisorption of thiol groups on to the planar metal surface using conventional techniques. PMID:23645933

  17. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Oligonucleotides: Implications for Oligonucleotide Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Laing, Brian

    2014-01-01

    One of the major constraints on the therapeutic use of oligonucleotides is inefficient delivery to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Recently it has become evident that the pathways of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides can strongly influence their pharmacological actions. Here we provide background information on the basic processes of endocytosis and trafficking and then review recent literature on targeted delivery and subcellular trafficking of oligonucleotides in that context. A variety of approaches including molecular scale ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, ligand-targeted nanocarriers, and the use of small molecules to enhance oligonucleotide effects are discussed. PMID:24383421

  18. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  19. Fluorescent triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides labeled with a thiazole orange dimer unit

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yuki, Mizue; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent probes for the detection of a double-stranded DNA were prepared by labeling a triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotide with a thiazole orange (TO) dimer unit. They belong to ECHO (exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide) probes which we have previously reported. The excitonic interaction between the two TO molecules was expected to effectively suppress the background fluorescence of the probes. The applicability of the ECHO probes for the detection of double-stranded DNA was confirmed by examining the thermal stability and photophysical and kinetic properties of the DNA triplexes formed by the ECHO probes. PMID:23445822

  20. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  1. Synthesis of 5'-Aldehyde Oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Lartia, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of oligonucleotide ending with an aldehyde functional group at their 5'-end (5'-AON) is possible for both DNA (5'-AODN) and RNA (5'-AORN) series irrespectively of the nature of the last nucleobase. The 5'-alcohol of on-support ODN is mildly oxidized under Moffat conditions. Transient protection of the resulting aldehyde by N,N'-diphenylethylenediamine derivatives allows cleavage, deprotection, and RP-HPLC purification of the protected 5'-AON. Finally, 5'-AON is deprotected by usual acetic acid treatment. In the aggregates, 5'-AON can be now synthesized and purified as routinely as non-modified ODNs, following procedures similar to the well-known "DMT-On" strategy. PMID:26967469

  2. In situ Synthesis of Oligonucleotide Arrays on Surfaces Coated with Crosslinked Polymer Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Adam H; Lockett, Matthew R; Buck, Maren E; Yuan, Yuan; Smith, Lloyd M; Lynn, David M

    2012-03-13

    We report an approach to the in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide arrays on surfaces coated with crosslinked polymer multilayers. Our approach makes use of methods for the 'reactive' layer-by-layer assembly of thin, amine-reactive multilayers using branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) and the azlactone-functionalized polymer poly(2-vinyl-4,4'-dimethylazlactone) (PVDMA). Post-fabrication treatment of film-coated glass substrates with d-glucamine or 4-amino-1-butanol yielded hydroxyl-functionalized films suitable for the Maskless Array Synthesis (MAS) of oligonucleotide arrays. Glucamine-functionalized films yielded arrays of oligonucleotides with fluorescence intensities and signal-to-noise ratios (after hybridization with fluorescently labeled complementary strands) comparable to those of arrays fabricated on conventional silanized glass substrates. These arrays could be exposed to multiple hybridization-dehybridization cycles with only moderate loss of hybridization density. The versatility of the layer-by-layer approach also permitted synthesis directly on thin sheets of film-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) to yield flexible oligonucleotide arrays that could be readily manipulated (e.g., bent) and cut into smaller arrays. To our knowledge, this work presents the first use of polymer multilayers as a substrate for the multi-step synthesis of complex molecules. Our results demonstrate that these films are robust and able to withstand the ~450 individual chemical processing steps associated with MAS (as well as manipulations required to hybridize, image, and dehybridize the arrays) without large-scale cracking, peeling, or delamination of the thin films. The combination of layer-by-layer assembly and MAS provides a means of fabricating functional oligonucleotide arrays on a range of different materials and substrates. This approach may also prove useful for the fabrication of supports for the solid-phase synthesis and screening of other macromolecular or small

  3. Tandem oligonucleotide synthesis using linker phosphoramidites

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Richard T.; Yu, Shuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Multiple oligonucleotides of the same or different sequence, linked end-to-end in tandem can be synthesized in a single automated synthesis. A linker phosphoramidite [R. T. Pon and S. Yu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 623–631] is added to the 5′-terminal OH end of a support-bound oligonucleotide to introduce a cleavable linkage (succinic acid plus sulfonyldiethanol) and the 3′-terminal base of the new sequence. Conventional phosphoramidites are then used for the rest of the sequence. After synthesis, treatment with ammonium hydroxide releases the oligonucleotides from the support and cleaves the linkages between each sequence. Mixtures of one oligonucleotide with both 5′- and 3′-terminal OH ends and other oligonucleotides with 5′-phosphorylated and 3′-OH ends are produced, which are deprotected and worked up as a single product. Tandem synthesis can be used to make pairs of PCR primers, sets of cooperative oligonucleotides or multiple copies of the same sequence. When tandem synthesis is used to make two self-complementary sequences, double-stranded structures spontaneously form after deprotection. Tandem synthesis of oligonucleotide chains containing up to six consecutive 20mer (120 bases total), various trinucleotide codons and primer pairs for PCR, or self-complementary strands for in situ formation of double-stranded DNA fragments has been demonstrated. PMID:15814811

  4. Development of an allele-specific PCR assay for simultaneous sero-typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli predominant O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohui; Meng, Qingmei; Dai, Jianjun; Han, Xiangan; Han, Yue; Ding, Chan; Liu, Haiwen; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infections by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. E. coli strains belonging to serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 are preferentially associated with avian colibacillosis. The rfb gene cluster controlling O antigen synthesis is usually various among different E. coli serotypes. In present study, the rfb gene clusters of E. coli serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 were characterized and compared. Based on the serotype-specific genes in rfb gene cluster, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed. This PCR assay was highly specific and reliable for sero-typing of APEC O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains. The sensitivity of the assay was determined as 10 pg DNA or 10 colony forming units (CFUs) bacteria for serotypes O2 and O18 strains, and 500 pg DNA or 1,000 CFUs bacteria for serotypes O1 and O78 strains. Using this PCR system, APEC isolates and the infected tissue samples were categorized successfully. Furthermore, it was able to differentiate the serotypes for the samples with multi-agglutination in the traditional serum agglutination assay. Therefore, the allele-specific PCR is more simple, rapid and accurate assay for APEC diagnosis, epidemiologic study and vaccine development. PMID:24805368

  5. Development of a New Oligonucleotide Array To Identify Staphylococcal Strains at Species Level

    PubMed Central

    Giammarinaro, Philippe; Leroy, Sabine; Chacornac, Jean-Paul; Delmas, Julien; Talon, Regine

    2005-01-01

    The genus Staphylococcus is made up of 36 validated species which contain strains that are pathogenic, saprophytic, or used as starter cultures for the food industry. An oligonucleotide array targeting the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene was developed to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional methods of identification. Divergences of the sodA gene were used to design oligonucleotide probes, and we showed that each of the 36 species had a characteristic pattern of hybridization. To evaluate the array, we analyzed 38 clinical and 38 food or food plant Staphylococcus isolates identified by the phenotype-based system VITEK 2 (bioMérieux). This commercial kit failed to identify 8 (21%) of the clinical isolates and 32 (84%) of the food and food plant isolates. In contrast, the oligonucleotide array we designed provided an accurate and rapid method for the identification of staphylococcal strains, isolated from clinical, environmental, or food samples, at species level. PMID:16081895

  6. Smart polymeric micelles as nanocarriers for oligonucleotides and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Yamasaki, Yuichi; Oishi, Motoi; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    The development of in vivo delivery systems for oligonucleotides and siRNA is strongly desired to achieve their clinical applications. Recently, polyplex micelles, which are formed through an electrostatic interaction between nucleic acid compounds (DNA and RNA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-polycation block copolymers, have received much attention due to their nanometric-scaled size and excellent biocompatibility. Here, three types of newly engineered block copolymers were developed to construct polyplex micelles useful for oligonucleotides and siRNA delivery: (1) PEG-polycation diblock copolymers possessing diamine side-chain with distinctive pKa for siRNA encapsulation into polyplex micelles with high endosomal escaping ability, (2) Lactosylated PEG-(oligonucleotide or siRNA) conjugate through acid-labile beta-thiopropionate linkage to construct pH-sensitive PIC micelles, and (3) PEG-poly(methacrylic acid) block copolymer for the construction of organic/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles encapsulating siRNA. PMID:17150611

  7. Immobilization of DNA in polyacrylamide gel for the manufacture of DNA and DNA-oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Timofeev, E.; Mirzabekov, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    1998-05-15

    Activated DNA was immobilized in aldehyde-containing polyacrylamide gel for use in manufacturing the MAGIChip (microarrays of gel-immobilized compounds on a chip). First, abasic sites were generated in DNA by partial acidic depurination. Amino groups were then introduced into the abasic sites by reaction with ethylenediamine and reduction of the aldimine bonds formed. It was found that DNA could be fragmented at the site of amino group incorporation or preserved mostly unfragmented. In similar reactions, both amino-DNA and amino-oligonucleotides were attached through their amines to polyacrylamide gel derivatized with aldehyde groups. Single- and double-stranded DNA of 40 to 972 nucleotides or base pairs were immobilized on the gel pads to manufacture a DNA microchip. The microchip was hybridized with fluorescently labeled DNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. This procedure for immobilization of amino compounds was used to manufacture MAGIChips containing both DNA and oligonucleotides.

  8. Quantitation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Leeds, J M; Graham, M J; Truong, L; Cummins, L L

    1996-03-01

    Methods are presented for the extraction of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides from human plasma to permit quantitation by capillary gel electrophoresis. Extraction of the phosphorothioate oligonucleotides from plasma was accomplished using two solid-phase extraction columns, a strong anion-exchange column to remove plasma proteins and lipids, followed by a reverse-phase column to remove salts. A second desalting step, achieved by dialysis utilizing a membrane with a molecular weight cutoff of 2500 Da floating on distilled water, was required to remove residual ionic material from the extracted sample. This method should be generally applicable to the analysis and quantitation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. PMID:8850544

  9. Disulfide-tethered solid supports for synthesis of photoluminescent oligonucleotide conjugates: hydrolytic stability and labeling on the support.

    PubMed

    Salo, H; Guzaev, A; Lönnberg, H

    1998-01-01

    Several new disulfide-tethered solid supports (S1-S5) were synthesized, and their resistance against ammonolysis was tested. Among these supports, only the one bearing an N-[15-[(4, 4'-dimethoxytrityl)oxy]-12,13-dithiapentadecanoyl] linker (S4b) tolerated ammonolysis and exhibited properties compatible with the oligonucleotide synthesis by phosphoramidite strategy. The applicability of this disulfide linker structure in postsynthetic oligonucleotide labeling on the support was demonstrated by introduction of two photoluminescent lanthanide chelates or two dansyl groups to the N4-(6-aminohexyl) amino-modified cytosine residues at the 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. Subsequent release of the resulting conjugates as their 3'-phosphates was achieved by reductive cleavage of the disulfide bond and precipitation of the conjugate from the solution with ethanol. The fluorescently tagged oligomer obtained showed hybridization properties similar to those of oligonucleotides labeled in solution. PMID:9576811

  10. High-quality gene assembly directly from unpurified mixtures of microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Borovkov, Alex Y.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Robida, Mark D.; Day, Kristen M.; Cano, Jose A.; Le Olson, Tien; Patel, Hetal; Brown, Kevin; Hunter, Preston D.; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for synthetic genes more robust, scalable and inexpensive gene assembly technologies must be developed. Here, we present a protocol for high-quality gene assembly directly from low-cost marginal-quality microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. Significantly, we eliminated the time- and money-consuming oligonucleotide purification steps through the use of hybridization-based selection embedded in the assembly process. The protocol was tested on mixtures of up to 2000 oligonucleotides eluted directly from microarrays obtained from three different chip manufacturers. These mixtures containing <5% perfect oligos, and were used directly for assembly of 27 test genes of different sizes. Gene quality was assessed by sequencing, and their activity was tested in coupled in vitro transcription/translation reactions. Genes assembled from the microarray-eluted material using the new protocol matched the quality of the genes assembled from >95% pure column-synthesized oligonucleotides by the standard protocol. Both averaged only 2.7 errors/kb, and genes assembled from microarray-eluted material without clonal selection produced only 30% less protein than sequence-confirmed clones. This report represents the first demonstration of cost-efficient gene assembly from microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. The overall cost of assembly by this method approaches 5¢ per base, making gene synthesis more affordable than traditional cloning. PMID:20693531

  11. A novel, one-step amplification and oligonucleotide ligation procedure for multiplex genetic typing

    SciTech Connect

    Eggerding, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    A new technique, coupled amplification and oligonucleotide ligation (CAL), has been developed for simultaneous multiplex amplification and genotyping of DNA. CAL is a biphasic method which combines in one assay DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA genotyping by the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). By virtue of a difference in the melting temperatures of PCR primer-target DNA and OLA probe-target DNA hybrids, the method allows preferential amplification of DNA during stage I and oligonucleotide ligation during stage II of the reaction. In stage I target DNA is amplified using high-melting primers in a two-step PCR cycle that employs a 72{degrees}C anneal-elongation step. In stage II genotyping of PCR products by competitive oligonucleotide ligation with oligonucleotide probes located between PCR primers is accomplished by several cycles of denaturation at 94{degrees}C followed by anneal-ligation at 55{degrees}C. Ligation products are fluorochrome-labeled at their 3{prime}-ends and analyzed electrophoretically on a fluorescent DNA sequencer. The CAL procedure has been used for multiplex detection of 30 cystic fibrosis mutations and for analysis of ras gene point mutations. Because mutation detection occurs concurrently with target amplification, the technique is rapid, highly sensitive and specific, easily automatable, and requires minimal sample processing.

  12. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-15

    ,4,1 2). The hybridization pattern of a fluorescently labeled nucleic acid target is used to gain primary structure information of the target. This format can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid sequence analysis problems including pathogen identification, polymorphism detection, human identification, mRNA expression monitoring and de novo sequencing. In this review, we briefly describe the method of light-directed chemid synthesis to create high-density arrays of oligonucleotide probes, the method of fluorescently labeling target nucleic acids for hybridization to the probe arrays, the detection of hybridized targets by epi-fluorescence confocal scanning and the data analysis procedures used to interpret the hybridization signals. To illustrate the use of specific high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays, we describe their application to screening the reverse transcriptase (rt) and protease (pro) genes of HIV-I for polymorphisms and drug-resistance conferring mutations.

  13. Gene Assembly from Chip-Synthesized Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Kosuri, Sriram; Marblestone, Adam H; Conway, Nicholas; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo synthesis of long double-stranded DNA constructs has a myriad of applications in biology and biological engineering. However, its widespread adoption has been hindered by high costs. Cost can be significantly reduced by using oligonucleotides synthesized on high-density DNA chips. However, most methods for using off-chip DNA for gene synthesis have failed to scale due to the high error rates, low yields, and high chemical complexity of the chip-synthesized oligonucleotides. We have recently demonstrated that some commercial DNA chip manufacturers have improved error rates, and that the issues of chemical complexity and low yields can be solved by using barcoded primers to accurately and efficiently amplify subpools of oligonucleotides. This article includes protocols for computationally designing the DNA chip, amplifying the oligonucleotide subpools, and assembling 500-800 basepair (bp) constructs. PMID:25077042

  14. Transformation of yeast with synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Moerschell, R P; Tsunasawa, S; Sherman, F

    1988-01-01

    Genomic DNA of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be conveniently and specifically altered by transforming spheroplasts or lithium acetate-treated cells directly with synthetic oligonucleotides. Altered forms of iso-1-cytochrome c were generated by transforming a cyc1 mutant with oligonucleotides and selecting for at least partially functional revertants; the oligonucleotides contained a sequence that corrected the cyc1 mutation and produced additional alterations at nearby sites. Transformation has been accomplished with oligonucleotides as short as 20 nucleotides and with amounts as low as 100 micrograms. This method of site-directed mutagenesis in vivo has been used to produce alterations in the NH2-terminal region of iso-1-cytochrome c in which the NH2-terminal methionine is excised and the penultimate residue is acetylated. PMID:2829192

  15. Evolutionary sequence comparisons using high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hacia, J G; Makalowski, W; Edgemon, K; Erdos, M R; Robbins, C M; Fodor, S P; Brody, L C; Collins, F S

    1998-02-01

    We explored the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays (DNA chips) for obtaining sequence information from homologous genes in closely related species. Orthologues of the human BRCA1 exon 11, all approximately 3.4 kb in length and ranging from 98.2% to 83.5% nucleotide identity, were subjected to hybridization-based and conventional dideoxysequencing analysis. Retrospective guidelines for identifying high-fidelity hybridization-based sequence calls were formulated based upon dideoxysequencing results. Prospective application of these rules yielded base-calling with at least 98.8% accuracy over orthologous sequence tracts shown to have approximately 99% identity. For higher primate sequences with greater than 97% nucleotide identity, base-calling was made with at least 99.91% accuracy covering a minimum of 97% of the sequence. Using a second-tier confirmatory hybridization chip strategy, shown in several cases to confirm the identity of predicted sequence changes, the complete sequence of the chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan orthologues should be deducible solely through hybridization-based methodologies. Analysis of less highly conserved orthologues can still identify conserved nucleotide tracts of at least 15 nucleotides and can provide useful information for designing primers. DNA-chip based assays can be a valuable new technology for obtaining high-throughput cost-effective sequence information from related genomes. PMID:9462745

  16. Sequencing of megabase plus DNA by hybridization: Method development ENT. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-01-31

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is the only sequencing method based on the experimental determination of the content of oligonucleotide sequences. The data acquisition relies on the natural process of base pairing. It is possible to determine the content of complementary oligosequences in the target DNA by the process of hybridization with oligonucleotide probes of known sequences.

  17. Merlin: Computer-Aided Oligonucleotide Design for Large Scale Genome Engineering with MAGE.

    PubMed

    Quintin, Michael; Ma, Natalie J; Ahmed, Samir; Bhatia, Swapnil; Lewis, Aaron; Isaacs, Farren J; Densmore, Douglas

    2016-06-17

    Genome engineering technologies now enable precise manipulation of organism genotype, but can be limited in scalability by their design requirements. Here we describe Merlin ( http://merlincad.org ), an open-source web-based tool to assist biologists in designing experiments using multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE). Merlin provides methods to generate pools of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for MAGE experiments by performing free energy calculation and BLAST scoring on a sliding window spanning the targeted site. These oligos are designed not only to improve recombination efficiency, but also to minimize off-target interactions. The application further assists experiment planning by reporting predicted allelic replacement rates after multiple MAGE cycles, and enables rapid result validation by generating primer sequences for multiplexed allele-specific colony PCR. Here we describe the Merlin oligo and primer design procedures and validate their functionality compared to OptMAGE by eliminating seven AvrII restriction sites from the Escherichia coli genome. PMID:27054880

  18. Detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in serous ovarian tumors: a comparative analysis of immunohistochemistry with a mutation-specific monoclonal antibody and allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Bösmüller, Hans; Fischer, Anna; Pham, Deborah L; Fehm, Tanja; Capper, David; von Deimling, Andreas; Bonzheim, Irina; Staebler, Annette; Fend, Falko

    2013-03-01

    Mutations of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, mainly BRAF, are common in serous ovarian borderline tumors, whereas high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas rarely show this feature. With the advent of specific kinase inhibitors active against BRAF-mutated cancers, rapid and sensitive detection of the BRAF V600E, by far the most common mutation of this gene, is of great practical relevance. Currently, BRAF mutations are detected by DNA-based techniques. Recently, a monoclonal antibody (VE1) specific for the BRAF V600E protein suitable for archival tissues has been described. In this study, we compared detection of the V600E mutation in serous ovarian tumors by VE1 immunostaining and by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. All 141 cases of high-grade serous ovarian cancer showed negative or rarely weak, diffuse background VE1 immunostaining, and BRAF wild type was confirmed by molecular analysis in all tested cases. In contrast, 1 (14%) of 7 low-grade serous carcinomas and 22 (71%) of 31 serous borderline tumors revealed moderate to strong VE1 positivity. Immunostaining was clearly evaluable in all cases with sufficient tumor cells, and only rare cases with narrow cytoplasm were difficult to interpret. The V600E mutation was confirmed by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and sequencing in all VE1-positive cases. Two VE1-positive cases with low epithelial cell content required repeat microdissection to confirm the presence of the mutation. Immunohistochemistry with the VE1 antibody is a specific and sensitive tool for detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in serous ovarian tumors and may provide a practical screening test, especially in tumor samples with low epithelial content. PMID:23089489

  19. Identification of Dermatophytes by an Oligonucleotide Array▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsin Chieh; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Hsu, Mark Ming-Long; Barton, Richard; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2007-01-01

    Species of dermatophytes are classified into three anamorphic (asexual) genera, Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. Conventional methods used to identify dermatophytes are often lengthy and may be inconclusive because of atypical microscopic or colony morphology. Based on the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) and ITS-2 sequences of the rRNA genes, an oligonucleotide array was developed to identify 17 dermatophyte species. The method consisted of PCR amplification of the ITS regions using universal primers, followed by hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products to an array of oligonucleotides (17- to 30-mers) immobilized on a nylon membrane. Of 198 dermatophyte strains and 90 nontarget strains tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the array were 99.5% and 97.8%, respectively. The only strain not identified (Microsporum audouinii LMA 597) was found to have a nucleotide insertion at the ITS-2 region where the probe was designed. Two nontarget strains, Microsporum equinum LMA 40396666 and Trichophyton gourvilii var. intermedium CBS 170.65, were misidentified as Microsporum canis and Trichophyton soudanense, respectively. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions revealed that the two misidentified strains displayed high sequence homology with the probes designed for M. canis and T. soudanense, respectively. The present method can be used as a reliable alternative to conventional identification methods and can be completed with isolated colonies within 24 h. PMID:17687010

  20. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  1. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF THE SWINE PROTEIN-ANNOTATED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY AND UTILITY OF THE ARRAYS FOR EQTL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILING STUDIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the new Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray (http://www.pigoligoarray.org) by analyzing transcriptional profiles for longissimus dorsi muscle (LD), Bronchial lymph node (BLN) and Lung. Four LD samples were used to assess the stringency of hybridization conditions com...

  3. Rapid identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum using an oligonucleotide probe complementary to 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, J G; Gersdorf, H; Jansson, E; Hongslo, T; Göbel, U B; Johansson, K E

    1993-02-01

    Bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish is caused by the slow-growing Gram-positive rod, Renibacterium salmoninarum. The partial sequence of 16S rRNA from R. salmoninarum was determined and compared with published bacterial 16S rRNA sequences. From this sequence information, a 30-bases-long oligonucleotide was designed and used as a specific probe for identification of R. salmoninarum in filter hybridization experiments. Strong specific hybridization signals were observed for all strains of R. salmoninarum tested. Furthermore, no cross-hybridization could be seen against 22 other bacterial species, among them other salmonid fish pathogens. The detection limit for the probe in direct filter hybridization by the dot-blot technique was 2.5 x 10(4) bacteria. It was also possible to detect R. salmoninarum in clinical samples by direct filter hybridization. PMID:8455640

  4. Caged oligonucleotides for studying biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Brittani K.; Yeldell, Sean B.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2015-01-01

    Light-activated (“caged”) compounds have been widely employed for studying biological processes with high spatial and temporal control. In the past decade, several new approaches for caging the structure and function of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides have been developed. This review focuses on caged oligonucleotides that incorporate site-specifically one or two photocleavable linkers, whose photolysis yields oligonucleotides with dramatic structural and functional changes. This technique has been employed by our laboratory and others to photoregulate gene expression in cells and living organisms, typically using near UV-activated organic chromophores. To improve capabilities for in vivo studies, we harnessed the rich inorganic photochemistry of ruthenium bipyridyl complexes to synthesize Ru-caged morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that remain inactive in zebrafish embryos until uncaged with visible light. Expanding into new caged oligonucleotide applications, our lab has developed Transcriptome In Vivo Analysis (TIVA) technology, which provides the first noninvasive, unbiased method for isolating mRNA from single neurons in brain tissues. TIVA-isolated mRNA can be amplified and then analyzed using next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq). PMID:25865001

  5. Investigating the secondary structures for long oligonucleotides using attenuated-total-reflection nanoplasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, K.-C.; Yu, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, S.-J.

    2007-09-01

    This study utilizes a nanoplasmon-enhanced Raman scattering based on the attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) method to investigate the secondary structures of long oligonucleotides and their influence on the DNA hybridization. It is found that the ring-breathing modes of adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine in Raman fingerprint associated with three 60mer oligonucleotides with prominent secondary structures are lower than those observed for the two oligonucleotides with no obvious secondary structures. It is also determined that increasing the DNA hybridization temperature from 35 °C to 45 °C reduces secondary structure effects. The kinetics of biomolecular interaction analysis can be performed by using surface plasmons resonance biosensor, but the structural information of the oligonucleotides can not observed directly. The ATR-Raman spectrum can provide the structural information of the oligonucleotide monolayer on the sensing surface with the help of a silver patterned nanostructure film based on the finite-difference time-domain simulation and the e-beam lithography fabrication adapted as an ATR-Raman active substrate.

  6. A high density COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array for identification and detection of species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Seifert, K A; Lévesque, C A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array based on 358 sequences, including 58 known and two new species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium, and 12 allied species. The array was robotically spotted at near microarray density on membranes. Species and clade-specific oligonucleotides were selected using the computer programs SigOli and Array Designer. Robotic spotting allowed 768 spots with duplicate sets of perfect match and the corresponding mismatch and positive control oligonucleotides, to be printed on 2 × 6 cm(2) nylon membranes. The array was validated with hybridizations between the array and digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled COX1 polymerase chain reaction amplicons from 70 pure DNA samples, and directly from environmental samples (cheese and plants) without culturing. DNA hybridization conditions were optimized, but undesired cross-reactions were detected frequently, reflecting the relatively high sequence similarity of the COX1 gene among Penicillium species. Approximately 60% of the perfect match oligonucleotides were rejected because of low specificity and 76 delivered useful group-specific or species-specific reactions and could be used for detecting certain species of Penicillium in environmental samples. In practice, the presence of weak signals on arrays exposed to amplicons from environmental samples, which could have represented weak detections or weak cross reactions, made interpretation difficult for over half of the oligonucleotides. DNA regions with very few single nucleotide polymorphisms or lacking insertions/deletions among closely related species are not ideal for oligonucleotide-based diagnostics, and supplementing the COX1-based array with oligonucleotides derived from additional genes would result in a more robust hierarchical identification system. PMID:21564971

  7. Direct microcontact printing of oligonucleotides for biochip applications

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, C; Le Berre, V; Casimirius, S; Trévisiol, E; François, J; Vieu, C

    2005-01-01

    Background A critical step in the fabrication of biochips is the controlled placement of probes molecules on solid surfaces. This is currently performed by sequential deposition of probes on a target surface with split or solid pins. In this article, we present a cost-effective procedure namely microcontact printing using stamps, for a parallel deposition of probes applicable for manufacturing biochips. Results Contrary to a previous work, we showed that the stamps tailored with an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) material did not require any surface modification to be able to adsorb oligonucleotides or PCR products. The adsorbed DNA molecules are subsequently printed efficiently on a target surface with high sub-micron resolution. Secondly, we showed that successive stamping is characterized by an exponential decay of the amount of transferred DNA molecules to the surface up the 4th print, then followed by a second regime of transfer that was dependent on the contact time and which resulted in reduced quality of the features. Thus, while consecutive stamping was possible, this procedure turned out to be less reproducible and more time consuming than simply re-inking the stamps between each print. Thirdly, we showed that the hybridization signals on arrays made by microcontact printing were 5 to 10-times higher than those made by conventional spotting methods. Finally, we demonstrated the validity of this microcontact printing method in manufacturing oligonucleotides arrays for mutations recognition in a yeast gene. Conclusion The microcontact printing can be considered as a new potential technology platform to pattern DNA microarrays that may have significant advantages over the conventional spotting technologies as it is easy to implement, it uses low cost material to make the stamp, and the arrays made by this technology are 10-times more sensitive in term of hybridization signals than those manufactured by conventional spotting technology. PMID:15992404

  8. Chromosome-Specific Painting in Cucumis Species Using Bulked Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yonghua; Zhang, Tao; Thammapichai, Paradee; Weng, Yiqun; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a single chromosome of cucumber were identified using a newly developed bioinformatic pipeline and then massively synthesized de novo in parallel. The synthesized oligos were amplified and labeled with biotin or digoxigenin for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We developed three different probes with each containing 23,000–27,000 oligos. These probes spanned 8.3–17 Mb of DNA on targeted cucumber chromosomes and had the densities of 1.5–3.2 oligos per kilobases. These probes produced FISH signals on a single cucumber chromosome and were used to paint homeologous chromosomes in other Cucumis species diverged from cucumber for up to 12 million years. The bulked oligo probes allowed us to track a single chromosome in early stages during meiosis. We were able to precisely map the pairing between cucumber chromosome 7 and chromosome 1 of Cucumis hystrix in a F1 hybrid. These two homeologous chromosomes paired in 71% of prophase I cells but only 25% of metaphase I cells, which may provide an explanation of the higher recombination rates compared to the chiasma frequencies between homeologous chromosomes reported in plant hybrids. PMID:25971668

  9. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by amplification. Conclusions Our data suggest that directional loss and amplification exist in breast cancer. These are highly associated with grade, which may indicate that they are enforced with increasing number of cell divisions. Whether there is selective pressure for some loci to be preferentially amplified or deleted remains to be confirmed. PMID:22188678

  10. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity. PMID:24727531

  11. Inhibition of dengue virus by novel, modified antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Raviprakash, K; Liu, K; Matteucci, M; Wagner, R; Riffenburgh, R; Carl, M

    1995-01-01

    Five different target regions along the length of the dengue virus type 2 genome were compared for inhibition of the virus following intracellular injection of the cognate antisense oligonucleotides and their analogs. Unmodified phosphodiester oligonucleotides as well as the corresponding phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were ineffective in bringing about a significant inhibition of the virus. Novel modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in which the C-5 atoms of uridines and cytidines were replaced by propynyl groups caused a significant inhibition of the virus. Antisense oligonucleotide directed against the target region near the translation initiation site of dengue virus RNA was the most effective, followed by antisense oligonucleotide directed against a target in the 3' untranslated region of the virus RNA. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of these novel modified oligonucleotides is due to their increased affinity for the target sequences and that they probably function via an RNase H cleavage of the oligonucleotide:RNA heteroduplex. PMID:7983769

  12. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starska, Katarzyna; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina; Aleksandrowicz, Paweł; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  13. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides: selective killing of the intracellular parasite Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Ramazeilles, C; Mishra, R K; Moreau, S; Pascolo, E; Toulmé, J J

    1994-01-01

    We targeted the mini-exon sequence, present at the 5' end of every mRNA of the protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis, by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. A complementary 16-mer (16PS) was able to kill amastigotes--the intracellular stage of the parasite--in murine macrophages in culture. After 24 hr of incubation with 10 microM 16PS, about 30% infected macrophages were cured. The oligomer 16PS acted through antisense hybridization in a sequence-dependent way; no effect on parasites was observed with noncomplementary phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. The antisense oligonucleotide 16PS was a selective killer of the protozoans without any detrimental effect to the host macrophage. Using 16PS linked to a palmitate chain, which enabled it to complex with low density lipoproteins, improved the leishmanicidal efficiency on intracellular amastigotes, probably due to increased endocytosis. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides complementary to the intron part of the mini-exon pre-RNA were also effective, suggesting that antisense oligomers could prevent trans-splicing in these parasites. Images PMID:8058724

  14. Selection of optimal oligonucleotide probes for microarrays using multiple criteria, global alignment and parameter estimation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingyuan; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-01-01

    The oligonucleotide specificity for microarray hybridization can be predicted by its sequence identity to non-targets, continuous stretch to non-targets, and/or binding free energy to non-targets. Most currently available programs only use one or two of these criteria, which may choose ‘false’ specific oligonucleotides or miss ‘true’ optimal probes in a considerable proportion. We have developed a software tool, called CommOligo using new algorithms and all three criteria for selection of optimal oligonucleotide probes. A series of filters, including sequence identity, free energy, continuous stretch, GC content, self-annealing, distance to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) and melting temperature (Tm), are used to check each possible oligonucleotide. A sequence identity is calculated based on gapped global alignments. A traversal algorithm is used to generate alignments for free energy calculation. The optimal Tm interval is determined based on probe candidates that have passed all other filters. Final probes are picked using a combination of user-configurable piece-wise linear functions and an iterative process. The thresholds for identity, stretch and free energy filters are automatically determined from experimental data by an accessory software tool, CommOligo_PE (CommOligo Parameter Estimator). The program was used to design probes for both whole-genome and highly homologous sequence data. CommOligo and CommOligo_PE are freely available to academic users upon request. PMID:16246912

  15. Oligonucleotide and amplification fingerprinting of wild species and cultivars of banana (Musa spp.).

    PubMed

    Kaemmer, D; Afza, R; Weising, K; Kahl, G; Novak, F J

    1992-09-01

    DNA oligonucleotide and amplification fingerprinting have been successfully used to detect genetic polymorphisms in 15 representative species and cultivars of the genus Musa, comprising AA, AAA, AAAA, AAB, ABB, and BB genotypes. In-gel-hybridization of Hinf I-digested genomic banana DNA to the 32P-labeled synthetic oligonucleotides (GATA)4, (GTG)5, and (CA)8 revealed considerable polymorphisms between Musa species and cultivars. The fingerprint patterns proved to be somatically stable and did not show differences between individual plants of 'Grand Nain' (AAA genotype). Dendrograms based on oligonucleotide fingerprint band sharing data proved to be consistent with most of the known features of the history of banana and plantain cultivation and evolution, respectively. DNA samples from the same banana species and cultivars were also amplified by PCR using single or pairwise combinations of short oligonucleotide primers. Amplification products were separated on agarose or polyacrylamide gels and visualized by ethidium bromide or silver staining, respectively. Polymorphic patterns were obtained with some but not all primers. By using the CCCTCTGCGG primer in simplex and/or duplex PCR, the induced mutant 'GN60A' was clearly recognized from its original variety 'Grand Nain'. Both fingerprint techniques allowed the detection of bands characteristic for the A and B genome. This DNA fingerprinting technology has potential application in several areas of Musa improvement. PMID:1369000

  16. Highly specific identification of single nucleic polymorphism in M. tuberculosis using smart probes and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with blocking oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Müller, Matthias; Nolte, Oliver; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Sauer, Markus; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter; Marme, Nicole

    2008-02-01

    In this article we present a method for the highly specific identification of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) responsible for rifampicin resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This approach applies fluorescently labeled hairpin-structured oligonucleotides (smart probes) and confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Smart probes are fluorescently labeled at the 5'-end. The dye's fluorescence is quenched in the closed hairpin conformation due to close proximity of the guanosine residues located at the 3'-end. As a result of the hybridization to the complementary target sequence the hairpin structure and thus fluorescence quenching gets lost and a strong fluorescence increase appears. To enhance the specificity of the SNP detection unlabeled "blocking oligonucleotides" were added to the sample. These oligonucleotides hybridizes to the DNA sequence containing the mismatch thus masking this sequence and hereby preventing the smart probe from hybridizing to the mismatched sequence.

  17. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the phospholipid bilayer anchoring stability and kinetics of hydrophobically modified DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Dubacheva, Galina V; Dogterom, Marileen; Richter, Ralf P; Leunissen, Mirjam E

    2014-06-10

    Decorating lipid bilayers with oligonucleotides has great potential for both fundamental studies and applications, taking advantage of the membrane properties and the specific Watson-Crick base pairing. Here, we systematically studied the binding of DNA oligonucleotides with the frequently used hydrophobic anchors cholesterol, stearyl, and distearyl to supported lipid bilayers made of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). All three anchors were found to incorporate well into DOPC lipid membranes, yet only the distearyl-based anchor remained stable in the bilayer when it was rinsed. The unstable anchoring of the cholesterol- and stearyl-based oligonucleotides can, however, be stabilized by hybridization of the oligonucleotides to complementary DNA modified with a second hydrophobic anchor of the same type. In all cases, the incorporation into the lipid bilayer was found to be limited by mass transport, although micelle formation likely reduced the effective concentration of available oligonucleotides in some samples, leading to substantial differences in binding rates. Using a viscoelastic model to determine the thickness of the DNA layer and elucidating the surface coverage by SE, we found that at equal bulk concentrations double-stranded DNA constructs attached to the lipid bilayer establish a layer that is thicker than that of single-stranded oligonucleotides, whereas the DNA surface densities are similar. Shortening the length of the oligonucleotides, on the other hand, does alter both the thickness and surface density of the DNA layer. This indicates that at the bulk oligonucleotide concentrations employed in our experiments, the packing of the oligonucleotides is not affected by the anchor type, but rather by the length of the DNA. The results are useful for material and biomedical applications that require efficient linking of oligonucleotides to lipid membranes. PMID

  18. Oligonucleotide recombination in gram negative bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes several key aspects of a novel form of RecA-independent homologous recombination. We found that synthetic single stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced into bacteria by transformation can site-specifically recombine with bacterial chromosomes in the absence of any a...

  19. Improved allele-specific PCR assays for detection of clarithromycin and fluoroquinolone resistant of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies: identification of N87I mutation in GyrA.

    PubMed

    Trespalacios, Alba A; Rimbara, Emiko; Otero, William; Reddy, Rita; Graham, David Y

    2015-04-01

    Molecular testing can rapidly detect Helicobacter pylori susceptibility using gastric biopsies. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASP-PCR) was used to identify H. pylori 23S rRNA and gyrA mutation using gastric biopsies from Colombian patients and confirmed by PCR and sequencing of the 23S rRNA and gyrA genes. The sensitivity and specificity of ASP-PCR were compared with susceptibilities measured by agar dilution. Samples included gastric biopsies from 107 biopsies with H. pylori infections and 20 H. pylori negative. The sensitivity and specificity of ASP-PCR for the 23S rRNA gene were both 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of ASP-PCR for the gyrA gene, published in 2007 by Nishizawa et al., were 52% and 92.7%, respectively; the lower sensitivity was due to the presence of mutation N87I in our samples, which were not detected by the test. In this study, we designed new primers to detect the mutation N87I in GyrA. The ASP-PCR was performed with the original primers plus the new primers. The molecular test with the new primers improved the sensitivity to 100%. In conclusion, ASP-PCR provides a specific and rapid means of predicting resistance to clarithromycin and levofloxacin in gastric biopsies. PMID:25600075

  20. Hybridization thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides during microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Thomas M; McCallum, Christopher; Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Crisalli, Pete; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-03-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a powerful analytical tool for performing separations and characterizing properties of charged species. For reacting species during a CE separation, local concentrations change leading to nonequilibrium conditions. Interpreting experimental data with such nonequilibrium reactive species is nontrivial due to the large number of variables involved in the system. In this work we develop a COMSOL multiphysics-based numerical model to simulate the electrokinetic mass transport of short interacting ssDNAs in microchip capillary electrophoresis. We probe the importance of the dissociation constant, K(D), and the concentration of DNA on the resulting observed mobility of the dsDNA peak, μ(w), by using a full sweep of parametric simulations. We find that the observed mobility is strongly dependent on the DNA concentration and K(D), as well as ssDNA concentration, and develop a relation with which to understand this dependence. Furthermore, we present experimental microchip capillary electrophoresis measurements of interacting 10 base ssDNA and its complement with changes in buffer ionic strength, DNA concentration, and DNA sequence to vary the system equilibria. We then compare our results to thermodynamically calculated K(D) values. PMID:25634338

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Bacteria Inhabiting Surface Waters Monitored by mecA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Seyedmonir, Elnaz; Yilmaz, Fadime; Icgen, Bulent

    2016-08-01

    Part of a 20-60 kb staphylococcal chromosome cassette called mecA encodes low-affinity penicillin-binding protein PBP2a and causes methicillin resistance. Among all methicillin-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen and main concern worldwide. Although the origin of the mecA is not very well-defined, mecA homologues are also ubiquitous in methicillin-resistant non-staphylococcal bacteria. Due to the dissemination of methicillin resistance through the transmission of mecA gene among staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal bacteria inhabiting surface waters, there is a need to monitor mecA gene in these waters for public health safety. Therefore, this study aimed at monitoring mecA harboring bacteria inhabiting surface waters by using fluorescently labelled mecA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Under the hybridization conditions of 55 % formamide and 0.020 M NaCl at 46°C, the oligonucleotide probe used in the study showed high hybridization stringency to the mecA gene targeted. The strong linear relationships observed between the signal intensity and the target gene were used to assess the population dynamics of mecA harboring isolates over a 2-year-period. The results indicated that mecA-targeted oligonucleotide probes can be effectively used for in situ monitoring of methicillin resistant isolates inhabiting surface waters. PMID:27156085

  2. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  3. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods. PMID:24927399

  4. Efficient Targeting of Fatty-Acid Modified Oligonucleotides to Live Cell Membranes through Stepwise Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lipid modifications provide efficient targeting of oligonucleotides to live cell membranes in a range of applications. Targeting efficiency is a function of the rate of lipid DNA insertion into the cell surface and its persistence over time. Here we show that increasing lipid hydrophobicity increases membrane persistence, but decreases the rate of membrane insertion due to the formation of nonproductive aggregates in solution. To ameliorate this effect, we split the net hydrophobicity of the membrane anchor between two complementary oligonucleotides. When prehybridized in solution, doubly anchored molecules also aggregate due to their elevated hydrophobicity. However, when added sequentially to cells, aggregation does not occur so membrane insertion is efficient. Hybridization between the two strands locks the complexes at the cell surface by increasing net hydrophobicity, increasing their total concentration and lifetime, and dramatically improving their utility in a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:25325667

  5. Providing Oligonucleotides with Steric Selectivity by Brush-Polymer-Assisted Compaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueguang; Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Jia, Fei; Tan, Xuyu; Davis, Sage; Krishnan, Swathi; Amiji, Mansoor M; Zhang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    Difficult biopharmaceutical characteristics of oligonucleotides, such as poor enzymatic stability, rapid clearance by reticuloendothelial organs, immunostimulation, and coagulopathies, limit their application as therapeutics. Many of these side effects are initiated via sequence-specific or nonsequence-specific interactions with proteins. Herein, we report a novel form of brush-polymer/DNA conjugate that provides the DNA with nanoscale steric selectivity: Hybridization kinetics with complementary DNA remains nearly unaffected, but interactions with proteins are significantly retarded. The relative lengths of the brush side chain and the DNA strand are found to play a critical role in the degree of selectivity. Being able to evade protein adhesion also improves in vivo biodistribution, thus making these molecular nanostructures promising materials for oligonucleotide-based therapies. PMID:26378378

  6. Circulation of oligonucleotides by disulfide bridge formation.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, H; Yang, M; Patel, R; Cook, A F

    1995-01-01

    An effective, convenient method for the circularization of oligonucleotides has been developed. This procedure involved preparation of an oligonucleotide with backbone-linked 5'- and 3'-terminal hexamethylenethiol groups, followed by oxidation of the thiol groups with air of oxygen to produce the corresponding circular sequence bridged via a bis(hexamethylene)-disulfide moiety. The method has been applied to the circularization of oligodeoxynucleotide sequences of varying lengths (5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 bases), and the circularization process was highly efficient as shown by HPLC or gel electrophoresis of the crude reaction mixtures. Competing reactions such as dimerization were not significant except for the longer sequences (30 and 40 bases). The circularization of an eight base RNA sequence was also accomplished, as well as hexa-ethylene glycol bridged poly-T sequences capable of triplex formation. PMID:7596832

  7. Detection of BRAF Mutations Using a Fully Automated Platform and Comparison with High Resolution Melting, Real-Time Allele Specific Amplification, Immunohistochemistry and Next Generation Sequencing Assays, for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Harlé, Alexandre; Salleron, Julia; Franczak, Claire; Dubois, Cindy; Filhine-Tressarieu, Pierre; Leroux, Agnès; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic melanoma is a severe disease with one of the highest mortality rate in skin diseases. Overall survival has significantly improved with immunotherapy and targeted therapies. Kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF V600 showed promising results. BRAF genotyping is mandatory for the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies. Methods Fifty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanoma samples were assessed using High-Resolution-Melting (HRM) PCR, Real-time allele-specific amplification (RT-ASA) PCR, Next generation sequencing (NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the fully-automated molecular diagnostics platform IdyllaTM. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated using NGS as the reference standard to compare the different assays. Results BRAF mutations were found in 28(47.5%), 29(49.2%), 31(52.5%), 29(49.2%) and 27(45.8%) samples with HRM, RT-ASA, NGS, IdyllaTM and IHC respectively. Twenty-six (81.2%) samples were found bearing a c.1799T>A (p.Val600Glu) mutation, three (9.4%) with a c.1798_1799delinsAA (p.Val600Lys) mutation and one with c.1789_1790delinsTC (p.Leu597Ser) mutation. Two samples were found bearing complex mutations. Conclusions HRM appears the less sensitive assay for the detection of BRAF V600 mutations. The RT-ASA, IdyllaTM and IHC assays are suitable for routine molecular diagnostics aiming at the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies. IdyllaTM assay is fully-automated and requires less than 2 minutes for samples preparation and is the fastest of the tested assays. PMID:27111917

  8. Validation of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detection of KRAS Gene Mutations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seekhuntod, Sirirat; Thavarungkul, Paninee; Chaichanawongsaroj, Nuntaree

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with KRAS mutations do not respond to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and fail to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Mutation analysis of KRAS is needed before starting treatment with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The objective of this study is to develop a multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR) assay to detect KRAS mutations. Methods We developed a single-tube MAS-PCR assay for the detection of seven KRAS mutations (G12D, G12A, G12R, G12C, G12S, G12V, and G13D). We performed MAS-PCR assay analysis for KRAS on DNA isolated from 270 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues. Sequences of all 270 samples were determined by pyrosequencing. Seven known point-mutation DNA samples diluted with wild-type DNA were assayed to determine the limitation of detection and reproducibility of the MAS-PCR assay. Results Overall, the results of MAS-PCR assay were in good concordance with pyrosequencing, and only seven discordant samples were found. The MAS-PCR assay reproducibly detected 1 to 2% mutant alleles. The most common mutations were G13D in codon 13 (49.17%), G12D (25.83%) and G12V (12.50%) in codon 12. Conclusion The MAS-PCR assay provides a rapid, cost-effective, and reliable diagnostic tool for accurate detection of KRAS mutations in routine FFPE colorectal cancer tissues. PMID:26812617

  9. MYD88 L265P in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy, and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders using conventional and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lian; Hunter, Zachary R.; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xia; Morra, Enrica; Trojani, Alessandra; Greco, Antonino; Arcaini, Luca; Varettoni, Maria; Brown, Jennifer R.; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Manning, Robert J.; Tripsas, Christina K.; Lindeman, Neal I.

    2013-01-01

    By whole-genome and/or Sanger sequencing, we recently identified a somatic mutation (MYD88 L265P) that stimulates nuclear factor κB activity and is present in >90% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) patients. MYD88 L265P was absent in 90% of immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients. We therefore developed conventional and real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assays for more sensitive detection and quantification of MYD88 L265P. Using either assay, MYD88 L265P was detected in 97 of 104 (93%) WM and 13 of 24 (54%) IgM MGUS patients and was either absent or rarely expressed in samples from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (2/20; 10%), CLL (1/26; 4%), multiple myeloma (including IgM cases, 0/14), and immunoglobulin G MGUS (0/9) patients as well as healthy donors (0/40; P < 1.5 × 10−5 for WM vs other cohorts). Real-time AS-PCR identified IgM MGUS patients progressing to WM and showed a high rate of concordance between MYD88 L265P ΔCT and BM disease involvement (r = 0.89, P = .008) in WM patients undergoing treatment. These studies identify MYD88 L265P as a widely present mutation in WM and IgM MGUS patients using highly sensitive and specific AS-PCR assays with potential use in diagnostic discrimination and/or response assessment. The finding of this mutation in many IgM MGUS patients suggests that MYD88 L265P may be an early oncogenic event in WM pathogenesis. PMID:23321251

  10. The prebiotic synthesis of deoxythymidine oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen-Sherwood, E.; Odom, D. G.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate in the presence of deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate, cyanamide and 4-amino-5-imidazole carboxamide polymerizes under drying conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 90 C) to yield oligonucleotides of up to four units in length. Enzymatic analysis indicated that the majority of these oligomers contained natural 3 prime-5 prime phosphodiester bonds. This reaction offers a possible method for the formation of deoxyoligonucleotides under primitive earth conditions.

  11. Single-stranded oligonucleotide-mediated in vivo gene repair in the rd1 retina

    PubMed Central

    Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Halhal, Mounia; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Padove, Staci A.; Nickerson, John M.; Stodulkova, Eva; Stewart, Rachael E.; Ciavatta, Vincent T.; Doat, Marc; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; de Bizemont, Therèse; Sennlaub, Florian; Courtois, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to test whether oligonucleotide-targeted gene repair can correct the point mutation in genomic DNA of PDE6brd1 (rd1) mouse retinas in vivo. Methods Oligonucleotides (ODNs) of 25 nucleotide length and complementary to genomic sequence subsuming the rd1 point mutation in the gene encoding the β-subunit of rod photoreceptor cGMP-phosphodiesterase (β-PDE), were synthesized with a wild type nucleotide base at the rd1 point mutation position. Control ODNs contained the same nucleotide bases as the wild type ODNs but with varying degrees of sequence mismatch. We previously developed a repeatable and relatively non-invasive technique to enhance ODN delivery to photoreceptor nuclei using transpalpebral iontophoresis prior to intravitreal ODN injection. Three such treatments were performed on C3H/henJ (rd1) mouse pups before postnatal day (PN) 9. Treatment outcomes were evaluated at PN28 or PN33, when retinal degeneration was nearly complete in the untreated rd1 mice. The effect of treatment on photoreceptor survival was evaluated by counting the number of nuclei of photoreceptor cells and by assessing rhodopsin immunohistochemistry on flat-mount retinas and sections. Gene repair in the retina was quantified by allele-specific real time PCR and by detection of β-PDE-immunoreactive photoreceptors. Confirmatory experiments were conducted using independent rd1 colonies in separate laboratories. These experiments had an additional negative control ODN that contained the rd1 mutant nucleotide base at the rd1 point mutation site such that the sole difference between treatment with wild type and control ODN was the single base at the rd1 point mutation site. Results Iontophoresis enhanced the penetration of intravitreally injected ODNs in all retinal layers. Using this delivery technique, significant survival of photoreceptors was observed in retinas from eyes treated with wild type ODNs but not control ODNs as demonstrated by cell counting and

  12. miRNA-based therapies: Strategies and delivery platforms for oligonucleotide and non-oligonucleotide agents

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, V; Winkler, J

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs as important regulatory agents for gene expression has expanded the therapeutic opportunities for oligonucleotides. In contrast to siRNA, miRNA-targeted therapy is able to influence not only a single gene, but entire cellular pathways or processes. It is possible to supplement down regulated or non-functional miRNAs by synthetic oligonucleotides, as well as alleviating effects caused by overexpression of malignant miRNAs through artificial antagonists, either oligonucleotides or small molecules. Chemical oligonucleotide modifications together with an efficient delivery system seem to be mandatory for successful therapeutic application. While miRNA-based therapy benefits from the decades of research spent on other therapeutic oligonucleotides, there are some specific challenges associated with miRNA therapy, mainly caused by the short target sequence. The current status and recent progress of miRNA-targeted therapeutics is described and future challenges and potential applications in treatment of cancer and viral infections are discussed. PMID:25495987

  13. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  14. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  15. Analysis of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles in Graves' disease by oligonucleotide probing of enzymatically amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Weetman, A P; Zhang, L; Webb, S; Shine, B

    1990-07-01

    We have tested the possible association of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles with Graves' thyrotoxicosis, with or without severe ophthalmopathy, by polymerase chain amplification of genomic DNA and allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. There was no significantly abnormal distribution of DQB alleles compared to 50 control subjects except for a reduced prevalence of DQw 3.1 in the Graves' patients with severe ophthalmopathy (X2 = 6.23, P less than 0.02). HLA-DPB 2.1/8 was found in only 1 of 40 of these patients compared with 15 of the controls (X2 = 11.49, P less than 0.001). Ten of 48 patients with Graves' disease but without clinically significant eye involvement were HLA-DPB 2.1/8 positive, not significantly different from controls, but significantly different from the ophthalmopathy group (X2 = 6.70, P less than 0.01). The other DPB alleles in both groups of Graves' disease patients were the same as controls. These results suggest that HLA-DPB 2.1/8 may confer a protective effect in Graves' disease with respect to ophthalmopathy. PMID:2401099

  16. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  17. Bifunctional phosphoramidite reagents for the introduction of histidyl and dihistidyl residues into oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Smith, T H; LaTour, J V; Bochkariov, D; Chaga, G; Nelson, P S

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of reagents for the incorporation of histidyl residues into oligonucleotides by automated chemical synthesis is described. Automated oligonucleotide synthesis utilizing a bifunctional reagent for the incorporation of a dihistidyl residue into oligonucleotides is described. Oligonucleotides incorporating one to three dihistidyl residues were prepared and characterized. The interaction of these oligonucleotides with a metal chelating IMAC matrix was explored. PMID:10411463

  18. Direct detection of 16S rRNA in soil extracts by using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Small, J; Call, D R; Brockman, F J; Straub, T M; Chandler, D P

    2001-10-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 microg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 x 10(6) Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  19. Construction and Evaluation of a Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven D.; Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K.; Kale, Shubha P.; He, Zhili; Mielenz, Jonathan R.

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that can directly convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to gain insights into cellular processes by examining gene expression under various physiological states. Oligonucleotide microarray probes were designed for 96.7% of the 3163 C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 candidate protein-encoding genes and then a partial-genome microarray containing 70 C. thermocellum specific probes was constructed and evaluated. We detected a signal-to-noise ratio of three with as little as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA and only low signals from negative control probes (nonclostridial DNA), indicating the probes were sensitive and specific. In order to further test the specificity of the array we amplified and hybridized 10 C. thermocellum polymerase chain reaction products that represented different genes and found gene specific hybridization in each case. We also constructed a whole-genome microarray and prepared total cellular RNA from the same point in early-logarithmic growth phase from two technical replicates during cellobiose fermentation. The reliability of the microarray data was assessed by cohybridization of labeled complementary DNA from the cellobiose fermentation samples and the pattern of hybridization revealed a linear correlation. These results taken together suggest that our oligonucleotide probe set can be used for sensitive and specific C. thermocellum transcriptomic studies in the future.

  20. Non-radioactive detection of oligonucleotide probes by photochemical amplification of dioxetanes.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, F; Knaf, A; Möller, U; Cech, D

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new method of non-radioactive labelling and detection of oligonucleotide probes. The approach is based on a simple chemical principle. Oligonucleotides labelled with methylene blue (a photosensitizer) are hybridized on a membrane to immobilized DNA target sequences. After hybridization and stringency washing 2(-)[3-(hydroxyphenyl)methoxymethylene] adamantane is added to the membrane and the membrane is irradiated with a tungsten lamp light source through a cut-off filter. Thermally stable dioxetanes are amplified during irradiation at the positions of the labelled probe. These amplified dioxetanes are detected using chemically triggered chemiluminescent decay. Signals are recorded on commercial X-ray film. Detection is possible immediately after the last washing step and a hard copy of the blot is obtained within 1 h. Dependent on the level of the target sequences, the sensitivity of the method allows detection of 0.3 pg single-stranded M13mp18(+) plasmid DNA in dot blots and 75 pg in Southern blots. Additional immunological reaction steps and washing steps with blocking reagents and buffers are avoided. Furthermore, expensive reagents and equipment for physical detection are not necessary. The method might be particularly useful for fast routine analysis in forensic and medical applications. The synthesis of the olefin, conditions of hybridization and the protocol of detection are described in detail. Images PMID:8524657

  1. Multivalent linkers for improved covalent binding of oligonucleotides to dye-doped silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, S. M.; Nooney, R. I.; Flynn, S. P.; Clancy, E.; Burke, M.; Daly, S.; Smith, T. J.; Daniels, S.; McDonagh, C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of oligonucleotide-coated Cy5-doped silica nanoparticles using a combination of multivalent linkers and their use in surface-based DNA sandwich hybridization assays. Dipodal silane is introduced as a means to fabricate amine-coated silica nanoparticles and its advantages compared to monopodal silanes are discussed. The use of dipodal silane in conjunction with three different polymer linkers (oxidized dextran, linear and 8-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)) to immobilize single-stranded DNA to Cy5-doped nanoparticles is investigated and dynamic light scattering measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to follow the progression of the functionalization of the nanoparticles. We observe a significant improvement in the binding stability of the single-stranded DNA when the dipodal silane and 8-arm PEG are used in combination, when compared to alternative conjugation strategies. Both 8mer and 22mer oligonucleotides are securely conjugated to the high-brightness nanoparticles and their availability to hybridize with a complementary strand is confirmed using solution-based DNA hybridization experiments. In addition, a full surface-based sandwich assay demonstrates the potential these nanoparticles have in the detection of less than 500 femtomolar of a DNA analogue of micro RNA, miR-451.

  2. Multivalent linkers for improved covalent binding of oligonucleotides to dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, S M; Nooney, R I; Flynn, S P; Clancy, E; Burke, M; Daly, S; Smith, T J; Daniels, S; McDonagh, C

    2015-09-11

    This paper describes the fabrication of oligonucleotide-coated Cy5-doped silica nanoparticles using a combination of multivalent linkers and their use in surface-based DNA sandwich hybridization assays. Dipodal silane is introduced as a means to fabricate amine-coated silica nanoparticles and its advantages compared to monopodal silanes are discussed. The use of dipodal silane in conjunction with three different polymer linkers (oxidized dextran, linear and 8-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)) to immobilize single-stranded DNA to Cy5-doped nanoparticles is investigated and dynamic light scattering measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to follow the progression of the functionalization of the nanoparticles. We observe a significant improvement in the binding stability of the single-stranded DNA when the dipodal silane and 8-arm PEG are used in combination, when compared to alternative conjugation strategies. Both 8mer and 22mer oligonucleotides are securely conjugated to the high-brightness nanoparticles and their availability to hybridize with a complementary strand is confirmed using solution-based DNA hybridization experiments. In addition, a full surface-based sandwich assay demonstrates the potential these nanoparticles have in the detection of less than 500 femtomolar of a DNA analogue of micro RNA, miR-451. PMID:26294441

  3. Construction and evaluation of a Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven David; Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K; Kale, Shubhangi P; He, Zhili; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2007-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that can directly convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to gain insights into cellular processes by examining gene expression under various physiological states. Oligonucleotide microarray probes were designed for 96.7% of the 3163 C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 candidate protein-encoding genes and then a partial-genome microarray containing 70 C. thermocellum specific probes was constructed and evaluated. We detected a signal-to-noise ratio of three with as little as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA and only low signals from negative control probes (nonclostridial DNA), indicating the probes were sensitive and specific. In order to further test the specificity of the array we amplified and hybridized 10 C. thermocellum polymerase chain reaction products that represented different genes and found gene specific hybridization in each case. We also constructed a whole-genome microarray and prepared total cellular RNA from the same point in early-logarithmic growth phase from two technical replicates during cellobiose fermentation. The reliability of the microarray data was assessed by cohybridization of labeled complementary DNA from the cellobiose fermentation samples and the pattern of hybridization revealed a linear correlation. These results taken together suggest that our oligonucleotide probe set can be used for sensitive and specific C. thermocellum transcriptomic studies in the future.

  4. Selective alleviation of Mitomycin C sensitivity in lexA3 strains of Escherichia coli demands allele specificity of rif-nal mutations: a pivotal role for rpoB87-gyrA87 mutations.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Vinod; Meenakshi, Shanmugaraja; Munavar, M Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, we have reported about an unconventional mode of elicitation of Mitomycin C (MMC) specific resistance in lexA3 (SOS repair deficient) mutants due to a combination of Rif-Nal mutations (rpoB87-gyrA87). We have clearly shown that UvrB is mandatory for this unconventional MMC resistance in rpoB87-gyrA87-lexA3 strains and uvrB is expressed more even without DNA damage induction from its LexA dependent promoter despite the uncleavable LexA3 repressor. The rpoB87 allele is same as the rpoB3595 which is known to give rise to a fast moving RNA Polymerase and gyrA87 is a hitherto unreported Nal(R) allele. Thus, it is proposed that the RNA Polymerase with higher elongation rate with the mutant DNA Gyrase is able to overcome the repressional hurdle posed by LexA3 to express uvrB. In this study we have systematically analysed the effect of three other rpoB (rif) mutations-two known to give rise to fast moving RNAP (rpoB2 and rpoB111) and one to a slow moving RNAP (rpoB8) and four different alleles of gyrA Nal(R) mutations (gyrA199, gyrA247, gyrA250, gyrA259) isolated spontaneously, on elicitation of MMC resistance in lexA3 strains. Our results indicate that in order to acquire resistance to 0.5 µg/ml MMC cells require both rpoB87 and gyrA87 but resistance to 0.25 µg/ml of MMC can be brought about by either rpoB87, gyrA87, fast moving rpoB mutations or other nal mutations also. We have also depicted increased constitutive uvrB expression in strains carrying fast moving RNAP (rpoB2 and rpoB111) with gyrA87 and another nal mutation with rpoB87 and expression level in these strains is lesser than rpoB87-gyrA87 strain. These results evidently suggest an allele specific role for the rif-nal mutations to acquire MMC resistance in lexA3 strains via increased constitutive uvrB expression and a pivotal role for rpoB87-gyrA87 combination to elicit higher levels of resistance. PMID:24498357

  5. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Kunz, Andrea; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Nitsche, Andreas; Theuring, Stefanie; Bannert, Norbert; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Harms, Gundel; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Methods Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F). In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System. Results Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29) of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29) by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24). By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41). The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2–3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml), resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage. Conclusions Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in

  6. Comparison and contrast of genes and biological pathways responding to Marek’s disease virus infection using allele-specific expression and differential expression in broiler and layer chickens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marek’s disease (MD) is a commercially important neoplastic disease of chickens caused by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a naturally occurring oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. Enhancing MD genetic resistance is desirable to augment current vaccines and other MD control measures. High throughput sequencing was used to profile splenic transcriptomes from individual F1 progeny infected with MDV at 4 days of age from both outbred broilers (meat-type) and inbred layer (egg-type) chicken lines that differed in MD genetic resistance. The resulting information was used to identify SNPs, genes, and biological pathways exhibiting allele-specific expression (ASE) in response to MDV infection in each type of chicken. In addition, we compared and contrasted the results of pathway analyses (ASE and differential expression (DE)) between chicken types to help inform on the biological response to MDV infection. Results With 7 individuals per line and treatment group providing high power, we identified 6,132 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4,768 genes and 4,528 SNPs in 3,718 genes in broilers and layers, respectively, that exhibited ASE in response to MDV infection. Furthermore, 548 and 434 genes in broilers and layers, respectively, were found to show DE following MDV infection. Comparing the datasets, only 72 SNPs and 850 genes for ASE and 20 genes for DE were common between the two bird types. Although the chicken types used in this study were genetically different, at the pathway level, both TLR receptor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways were enriched as well as exhibiting a high proportion of ASE genes, especially at the beginning of both above mentioned regulatory pathways. Conclusions RNA sequencing with adequate biological replicates is a powerful approach to identify high confidence SNPs, genes, and pathways that are associated with transcriptional response to MDV infection. In addition, the SNPs exhibiting ASE in response to MDV infection provide a

  7. Monitoring of microenvironmental changes in the major and minor grooves of DNA by dan-modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takumi; Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2005-12-22

    [graph: see text] We describe the synthesis of new environmentally sensitive fluorescence probes to elucidate DNA structures. DNA oligonucleotides containing fluorophore dan (6-(dimethylamino)-2-acylnaphthalene)-modified dC or dG were able to monitor the microenvironmental changes in both the major and minor grooves of DNA with a B- to A-DNA conformational transition and RNA hybridization. PMID:16354077

  8. Synthesis and triplex formation of oligonucleotides containing 8-thioxodeoxyadenosine and 5-methyl-2-thiodeoxycytosine.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Akihiro; Miyata, Kenichi; Tsunoda, Hirosuke; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    For more effective DNA triplex formation under neutral conditions, we synthesized triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) containing 8-thioxodeoxyadenine (s(8)A) residues in place of the protonated cytosines (Cs) required for the third base pairing with DNA duplexes. Consequently, it was found that s(8)A exhibited much stronger hybridization ability than C under neutral conditions when four s(8)A bases were arranged in a consecutive sequence. Moreover, we also synthesized TFOs containing 5-methyl-2-thiocytosines and examined their ability of triplex formation. PMID:19749240

  9. Identification and classification of Oxalobacter formigenes strains by using oligonucleotide probes and primers.

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, H; Allison, M; Peck, A B

    1997-01-01

    Genomic DNAs of various strains of Oxalobacter formigenes were subjected to restriction endonuclease fragment length polymorphism- and PCR-based amplification analyses with DNA probes and primers complementary to sequences within either the oxc gene, encoding oxalyl coenzyme A (oxalyl-CoA) decarboxylase, or the frc gene, encoding formyl-CoA transferase. Oligonucleotide probes based on nonconserved sequences of oxc or frc were able to divide O. formigenes strains into at least two groups, consistent with the current separation of O. formigenes strains into groups I and II on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence similarities and lipid content. In contrast, an oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved 5' end of oxc appeared to bind all group I and the majority of group II strains. PCR amplification of the oxc gene showed even greater sensitivity in detecting O. formigenes and provided support for further division of the strains into subgroups. In addition, these oligonucleotides failed to hybridize to or amplify PCR products from whole fecal DNA isolated from fresh stool samples from an individual not colonized with O. formigenes, indicating unique specificity. Thus, these DNA analyses permit both detection as well as classification of O. formigenes strains. PMID:9003594

  10. Photocleavable Peptide-Oligonucleotide Conjugates for Protein Kinase Assays by MALDI-TOF MS†

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangchang; Khan, Faraz; Dai, Qing; Sylvester, Juliesta E.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Robust methods for highly parallel, quantitative analysis of cellular protein tyrosine kinase activities may provide tools critically needed to decipher oncogenic signaling, discover new targeted drugs, diagnose cancer and monitor patients. Here, we describe proof-of-principle for a novel protein kinase assay with potential to answer these challenges. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry provides an ideal tool for label-free multiplexed analysis of peptide phosphorylation, but is poorly matched to homogeneous assays and complex samples. Thus, we conjugated a common oligonucleotide tag to multiple peptide substrates, offering efficient capture from solution-phase kinase reactions by annealing to the complementary sequence tethered to PEG-passivated superparamagnetic microparticles. To enable reversible conjugation, we developed a novel bifunctional cross-linker allowing simple and efficient preparation of photocleavable peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates. After washing away contaminants and photorelease, MALDI-TOF analysis yielded relative phosphorylation of each peptide with high sensitivity and specificity. Validating the hybridization-mediated multiplexed kinase assay, when three peptide substrate-oligonucleotide conjugates were mixed with the tyrosine kinase c-Abl and ATP, we readily observed their differential phosphorylation yet measured a common IC50 for the Abl kinase inhibitor imatinib. This new assay enables analysis of protein kinase activities in a multiplexed format amenable to screening inhibitors against multiple kinases in parallel, an important capability for drug discovery and predictive diagnostics. PMID:22772337

  11. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum. PMID:27427698

  12. Optically Triggered Immune Response through Photocaged Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Young, Douglas D.; Lively, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and viral CpG oligonculeotides are unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanosine dinucleotide sequences and trigger an innate immune response through activation of the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). We have developed synthetic photocaged CpGs via site-specific incorporation of nitropiperonyloxymethyl (NPOM)-caged thymidine residues. These oligonucleotides enable the optical control of TLR9 function and thereby provide light-activation of an immune response. We provide a proof-of-concept model by applying a reporter assay in live cells and by quantification of endogenous production of interleukin 6. PMID:26034339

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy of oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjie; Huang, Qing; Wei, Dongshan; Zhao, Guozhong; Chang, Tianying; Kou, Kuan; Wang, Min; Du, Chunlei; Fu, Wei-ling; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    A terahertz (THz) spectroscopic study is carried out to analyze DNA mutations in a label-free manner. Three newly designed liquid sample cells are considered and the best is selected as the sample carrier for THz transmission spectroscopic analyses. Discrimination based on spectral signatures of single-base mutations on single-stranded 20 nt oligonucleotides has been shown possible experimentally. The results clearly attest the ability of this promising approach for label-free analyses of single-base mutations of DNA molecules. This study has demonstrated that the THz spectroscopic technology can be considered as a potential diagnostic tool for investigating molecular reactions, such as DNA mutations. PMID:26385423

  14. Bioconjugation of oligonucleotides for treating liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Houssein, Houssam S Hajj; Mahato, Ram I

    2007-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is urgently needed to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remain the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of alpha1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in-depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  15. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of α1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  16. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  17. Uptake and antifungal activity of oligonucleotides in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Matthew D.; Haidaris, Constantine G.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is a significant cause of disease in immunocompromised humans. Because the number of people infected by fungal pathogens is increasing, strategies are being developed to target RNAs in fungi. This work shows that oligonucleotides can serve as therapeutics against C. albicans. In particular, oligonucleotides are taken up from cell culture medium in an energy-dependent process. After uptake, oligonucleotides, including RNA, remain mostly intact after 12 h in culture. For culture conditions designed for mammalian cells, intracellular concentrations of oligonucleotides in C. albicans exceed those in COS-7 mammalian cells, suggesting that uptake can provide selective targeting of fungi over human cells. A 19-mer 2′OMe (oligonucleotide with a 2′-O-methyl backbone) hairpin is described that inhibits growth of a C. albicans strain at pH < 4.0. This pH is easily tolerated in some parts of the body subject to C. albicans infections. In vivo dimethyl sulfate modification of ribosomal RNA and the decreased rate of protein synthesis suggest that this hairpin's activity may be due to targeting the ribosome in a way that does not depend on base pairing. Addition of anti-C. albicans oligonucleotides to COS-7 mammalian cells has no effect on cell growth. Evidently, oligonucleotides can selectively serve as therapeutics toward C. albicans and, presumably, other pathogens. Information from genome sequencing and functional genomics studies on C. albicans and other pathogens should allow rapid design and testing of other approaches for oligonucleotide therapies. PMID:12552085

  18. Disulfide-linked oligonucleotide phosphorothioates - Novel analogues of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of phosphorothioate analogs of oligonucleotides by the oxidation of deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphorothioate (3) was attempted. Cyclization of 3 is much more efficient than oligomerization under all the conditions investigated. However, a preformed oligonucleotide carrying a 5'-terminal phosphorotioate group undergoes efficient chain-extension when oxidized in the presence of 3.

  19. 2'-modified nucleosides for site-specific labeling of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, Elizabeth S.; Miller, Jeremiah E.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the synthesis of 2'-modified nucleosides designed specifically for incorporating labels into oligonucleotides. Conversion of these nucleosides to phosphoramidite and solid support-bound derivatives proceeds in good yield. Large-scale synthesis of 11-mer oligonucleotides possessing the 2'-modified nucleosides is achieved using these derivatives. Thermal denaturation studies indicate that the presence of 2'-modified nucleosides in 11-mer duplexes has minimal destabilizing effects on the duplex structure when the nucleosides are placed at the duplex termini. The powerful combination of phosphoramidite and support-bound derivatives of 2'-modified nucleosides affords the large-scale preparation of an entirely new class of oligonucleotides. The ability to synthesize oligonucleotides containing label attachment sites at 3', intervening, and 5' locations of a duplex is a significant advance in the development of oligonucleotide conjugates.

  20. Innovative instrumentation for microarray scanning and analysis: application for characterization of oligonucleotide duplexes behavior.

    PubMed

    Khomyakova, E B; Dreval, E V; Tran-Dang, M; Potier, M C; Soussaline, F P

    2004-05-01

    Accuracy in microarray technology requires new approaches to microarray reader development. A microarray reader system (optical scanning array or OSA reader) based on automated microscopy with large field of view, high speed 3 axis scanning at multiple narrow-band spectra of excitation light has been developed. It allows fast capture of high-resolution, multi-fluorescence images and is characterized by a linear dynamic range and sensitivity comparable to commonly used photo-multiplier tube (PMT)-based laser scanner. Controlled by high performance software, the instrument can be used for scanning and quantitative analysis of any type of dry microarray. Studies implying temperature-controlled hybridization chamber containing a microarray can also be performed. This enables the registration of kinetics and melting curves. This feature is required in a wide range of on-chip chemical and enzymatic reactions including on-chip PCR amplification. We used the OSA reader for the characterization of hybridization and melting behaviour of oligonucleotide:oligonucleotide duplexes on three-dimensional Code Link slides. PMID:15209342

  1. Structure-Specific Liquid Crystal Anchoring Induced by the Molecular Combing of Short Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saonti; Noonan, Patrick S; Monserud, Jon; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-12-01

    Surface-immobilized oligonucleotides were "combed" by meniscus motion and exposed to a nematic liquid crystal (LC). Although the oligonucleotides were as short as 16 bases, they were apparently oriented by this process and, in turn, successfully biased the orientation of the adjacent LC material. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced LC orientation in the combing direction, while hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) rotated the azimuthal LC orientation by ∼30° from the combing direction. The sensitivity of the chiral response to mixed ssDNA/dsDNA surfaces was characterized by employing complementary DNA that was longer than the immobilized DNA, resulting in single-stranded overhangs of various lengths. A rotated LC orientation was observed even when more than 70% of the DNA was single-stranded, and the transition from the rotated to nonrotated response was apparently discontinuous as a function of ssDNA surface coverage. These phenomena represent a sensitive DNA hybridization detection strategy that can potentially comprise a multiplexed assay. PMID:26562585

  2. MALDI analysis of oligonucleotides directly from montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Zagorevskii, Dmitri V; Aldersley, Michael F; Ferris, James P

    2006-09-01

    Oligonucleotides synthesized on a montmorillonite catalyst were analyzed directly. By mixing the catalyst with a matrix (2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone or 6-aza-2-thiothymine) and dibasic ammonium citrate, higher molecular weight products were detected compared with "classical" methods such as gel electrophoresis and HPLC with UV as a detector. The oligomers (30-mers and higher) were detected by mass spectrometry even though their concentration was less than 10(-4)% of the total content of the RNA. This method is different from the (MALDI) analysis of the eluates from montmorillonite, which otherwise requires desalting. Placing reaction mixtures with a high concentration of buffers on homoionic, preferably Li-containing, montmorillonite does not require desalting. PMID:16809045

  3. Use of nanoparticles to deliver immunomodulatory oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Dennis M; Sato, Takashi; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated 'CpG motifs' stimulate the innate immune system to produce cytokines, chemokines, and polyreactive antibodies. CpG ODNs have shown promise as vaccine adjuvants and for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. The immunostimulatory activity of CpG ODNs is inhibited by DNA-containing 'suppressive' motifs. ODNs expressing suppressive motifs (Sup ODNs) reduce ongoing immune reactions and show promise in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. This work reviews recent progress in the use of nanoparticles as carriers of CpG and Sup ODNs to target their delivery to the GI tract and lungs. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:631-637. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1382 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26663867

  4. Preparation and application of triple helix forming oligonucleotides and single strand oligonucleotide donors for gene correction.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rowshon; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Strategies for site-specific modulation of genomic sequences in mammalian cells require two components. One must be capable of recognizing and activating a specific target sequence in vivo, driving that site into an exploitable repair pathway. Information is transferred to the site via participation in the pathway by the second component, a donor nucleic acid, resulting in a permanent change in the target sequence. We have developed biologically active triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as site-specific gene targeting reagents. These TFOs, linked to DNA reactive compounds (such as a cross-linking agent), activate pathways that can engage informational donors. We have used the combination of a psoralen-TFO and single strand oligonucleotide donors to generate novel cell lines with directed sequence changes at the target site. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of bioactive psoralen-linked TFOs, their co-introduction into mammalian cells with donor nucleic acids, and the identification of cells with sequence conversion of the target site. We have emphasized details in the synthesis and purification of the oligonucleotides that are essential for preparation of reagents with optimal activity. PMID:24557899

  5. Combined use of RFLP and PCR-ASO typing for HLA-DR-Dw and DQw typing.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Bidwell, J L

    1991-01-01

    Due to some limitations of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in HLA-DR-DQ typing, we present a combined use of RFLP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing. This scheme consists in selectively amplifying the few RFLP ill-defined genes (DR1/DR'Br' and DR4-Dw subsets) using PCR with allele specific primers to avoid cross-hybridization. PMID:1676910

  6. DNA Oligonucleotide 3'-Phosphorylation by a DNA Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Camden, Alison J; Walsh, Shannon M; Suk, Sarah H; Silverman, Scott K

    2016-05-10

    T4 polynucleotide kinase is widely used for 5'-phosphorylation of DNA and RNA oligonucleotide termini, but no natural protein enzyme is capable of 3'-phosphorylation. Here, we report the in vitro selection of deoxyribozymes (DNA enzymes) capable of DNA oligonucleotide 3'-phosphorylation, using a 5'-triphosphorylated RNA transcript (pppRNA) as the phosphoryl donor. The basis of selection was the capture, during each selection round, of the 3'-phosphorylated DNA substrate terminus by 2-methylimidazole activation of the 3'-phosphate (forming 3'-MeImp) and subsequent splint ligation with a 5'-amino DNA oligonucleotide. Competing and precedented DNA-catalyzed reactions were DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis or deglycosylation, each also leading to a 3'-phosphate but at a different nucleotide position within the DNA substrate. One oligonucleotide 3'-kinase deoxyribozyme, obtained from an N40 random pool and named 3'Kin1, can 3'-phosphorylate nearly any DNA oligonucleotide substrate for which the 3'-terminus has the sequence motif 5'-NKR-3', where N denotes any oligonucleotide sequence, K = T or G, and R = A or G. These results establish the viabilty of in vitro selection for identifying DNA enzymes that 3'-phosphorylate DNA oligonucleotides. PMID:27063020

  7. The frequency of oligonucleotides in mammalian genic regions.

    PubMed

    Volinia, S; Gambari, R; Bernardi, F; Barrai, I

    1989-02-01

    The large body of nucleic acid sequence data now available offers a unique opportunity for the characterization of individual oligonucleotides which may be specific to sequence functional domains. We have prepared algorithms for the study of the frequency distribution of all oligonucleotides of length 2-6 in DNA sequences. We have implemented them in the study of 634 mammalian DNA sequences spanning 1.782 Mb, and have obtained the distribution of the ratio between the observed frequency of oligonucleotides and their expected frequency based on independent nucleotide probabilities. We then studied the distribution of oligonucleotides (or k-tuples) of each length in a subset of 129 complete mammalian genes spanning 0.607 Mb. Eight distinct genomic regions, namely 5'-non-transcribed, first exon, first intron, intermediate exons, intermediate introns, last intron, last exon and 3'-non-transcribed, were considered. We observed that some oligonucleotides show a statistical behaviour and a regional distribution similar to that of known signal sequences. Moreover the frequency distribution of oligonucleotides of length 5 and 6 tends to become bimodal, indicating the existence of a population of very frequent oligonucleotides. PMID:2924169

  8. Ca2+ enrichment in culture medium potentiates effect of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Noda, Mio; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-10-30

    Antisense and RNAi-related oligonucleotides have gained attention as laboratory tools and therapeutic agents based on their ability to manipulate biological events in vitro and in vivo. We show that Ca(2+) enrichment of medium (CEM) potentiates the in vitro activity of multiple types of oligonucleotides, independent of their net charge and modifications, in various cells. In addition, CEM reflects in vivo silencing activity more consistently than conventional transfection methods. Microscopic analysis reveals that CEM provides a subcellular localization pattern of oligonucleotides resembling that obtained by unassisted transfection, but with quantitative improvement. Highly monodispersed nanoparticles ~100 nm in size are found in Ca(2+)-enriched serum-containing medium regardless of the presence or absence of oligonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the 100-nm particles are in fact an ensemble of much smaller nanoparticles (ϕ ∼ 15 nm). The presence of these nanoparticles is critical for the efficient uptake of various oligonucleotides. In contrast, CEM is ineffective for plasmids, which are readily transfected via the conventional calcium phosphate method. Collectively, CEM enables a more accurate prediction of the systemic activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides, while enhancing the broad usability of oligonucleotides in the laboratory. PMID:26101258

  9. Ca2+ enrichment in culture medium potentiates effect of oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Shin-ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Waki, Reiko; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Noda, Mio; Obika, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antisense and RNAi-related oligonucleotides have gained attention as laboratory tools and therapeutic agents based on their ability to manipulate biological events in vitro and in vivo. We show that Ca2+ enrichment of medium (CEM) potentiates the in vitro activity of multiple types of oligonucleotides, independent of their net charge and modifications, in various cells. In addition, CEM reflects in vivo silencing activity more consistently than conventional transfection methods. Microscopic analysis reveals that CEM provides a subcellular localization pattern of oligonucleotides resembling that obtained by unassisted transfection, but with quantitative improvement. Highly monodispersed nanoparticles ∼100 nm in size are found in Ca2+-enriched serum-containing medium regardless of the presence or absence of oligonucleotides. Transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the 100-nm particles are in fact an ensemble of much smaller nanoparticles (ϕ ∼ 15 nm). The presence of these nanoparticles is critical for the efficient uptake of various oligonucleotides. In contrast, CEM is ineffective for plasmids, which are readily transfected via the conventional calcium phosphate method. Collectively, CEM enables a more accurate prediction of the systemic activity of therapeutic oligonucleotides, while enhancing the broad usability of oligonucleotides in the laboratory. PMID:26101258

  10. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  11. Sensitive detection of glucose in human serum with oligonucleotide modified gold nanoparticles by using dynamic light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiangmin; Ling, Liansheng; Shuai, Xintao

    2013-03-15

    Dynamic light scattering based sensor for glucose was developed with oligonucleotide functionalized gold nanoparticles (Oligo-AuNPs). Oligonucleotide 5'-SH-(A)(12)-AGACAAGAGAGG-3' (Oligo 1) modified AuNPs and oligonucleotide 5'-CAACAGAGAACG-(A)(12)-HS-3' (Oligo 2) modified AuNPs could hybridize with oligonulceotide 5'-CGTTCTCTGTTGCCTCTCTTGTCT-3' (Oligo 3), which resulted in the aggregation of Oligo-AuNPs probes, and triggered the increase of their average diameter. However, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by the mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase (GOD) and Fe(2+), and the DNA fragments could not hybridize with Oligo-AuNPs probes. Under the conditions of 3.7 nM Oligo 1-AuNPs, 3.7 nM Oligo 2-AuNPs, 8.0 μg/mL GOD, 100 nM Oligo 3 and 900 nM Fe(2+), the average diameter of Oligo-AuNPs probes decreased linearly with the increasing concentration of glucose over the range from 50 pmol/L to 5.0 nmol/L, with a detection limit of 38 pmol/L (3σ/slope). Moreover, five sugars had no effect on the average diameter of mixture of Oligo-AuNPs probes, GOD and Fe(2+), which demonstrated the good selectivity of the assay. PMID:23084753

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Adams, Abbie M; Johnsen, Russell D; Fletcher, Sue; Mastaglia, Frank L; Wilton, Steve D

    2014-01-01

    We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA) transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150) lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model to investigate

  13. Polyphosphorylation and non-enzymatic template-directed ligation of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Oligonucleotide 5'-polyphosphates are formed under potentially prebiotic conditions from oligonucleotide 5'-phosphates and sodium trimetaphosphate. Oligonucleotides activated as polyphosphates undergo template-directed ligation. We believe that these reactions could have produced longer oligonucleotide products from shorter substrates under prebiotic conditions.

  14. Molecular Selection, Modification and Development of Therapeutic Oligonucleotide Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lv, Quanxia; Li, Defang; Xu, Xuegong; Liu, Baoqin; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are the dominant agents used in inhibition of biological target molecules for disease therapeutics, but there are concerns of immunogenicity, production, cost and stability. Oligonucleotide aptamers have comparable affinity and specificity to targets with monoclonal antibodies whilst they have minimal immunogenicity, high production, low cost and high stability, thus are promising inhibitors to rival antibodies for disease therapy. In this review, we will compare the detailed advantages and disadvantages of antibodies and aptamers in therapeutic applications and summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and modification approaches. We will present therapeutic oligonucleotide aptamers in preclinical studies for skeletal diseases and further discuss oligonucleotide aptamers in different stages of clinical evaluation for various disease therapies including macular degeneration, cancer, inflammation and coagulation to highlight the bright commercial future and potential challenges of therapeutic oligonucleotide aptamers. PMID:26978355

  15. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  16. Micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide sensors.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, David C; Shaver, Michael P; Hands, Philip J W

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a review of micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide detection and quantification techniques. The characteristics of such devices make them very attractive for Point-of-Care or On-Site-Testing biosensing applications. Their small scale means that they can be robust and portable, their compatibility with modern CMOS electronics means that they can easily be incorporated into hand-held devices and their suitability for mass production means that, out of the different approaches to oligonucleotide detection, they are the most suitable for commercialisation. This review discusses the advantages of micro- and nano-structure based sensors and covers the various oligonucleotide detection techniques that have been developed to date. These include: Bulk Acoustic Wave and Surface Acoustic Wave devices, micro- and nano-cantilever sensors, gene Field Effect Transistors, and nanowire and nanopore based sensors. Oligonucleotide immobilisation techniques are also discussed. PMID:25655465

  17. Highly parallel oligonucleotide purification and functionalization using reversible chemistry

    PubMed Central

    York, Kerri T.; Smith, Ryan C.; Yang, Rob; Melnyk, Peter C.; Wiley, Melissa M.; Turk, Casey M.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Steemers, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, highly parallel method for purification and functionalization of 5′-labeled oligonucleotides. The approach is based on 5′-hexa-His phase tag purification, followed by exchange of the hexa-His tag for a functional group using reversible reaction chemistry. These methods are suitable for large-scale (micromole to millimole) production of oligonucleotides and are amenable to highly parallel processing of many oligonucleotides individually or in high complexity pools. Examples of the preparation of 5′-biotin, 95-mer, oligonucleotide pools of >40K complexity at micromole scale are shown. These pools are prepared in up to ~16% yield and 90–99% purity. Approaches for using this method in other applications are also discussed. PMID:22039155

  18. Highly parallel oligonucleotide purification and functionalization using reversible chemistry.

    PubMed

    York, Kerri T; Smith, Ryan C; Yang, Rob; Melnyk, Peter C; Wiley, Melissa M; Turk, Casey M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gunderson, Kevin L; Steemers, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, highly parallel method for purification and functionalization of 5'-labeled oligonucleotides. The approach is based on 5'-hexa-His phase tag purification, followed by exchange of the hexa-His tag for a functional group using reversible reaction chemistry. These methods are suitable for large-scale (micromole to millimole) production of oligonucleotides and are amenable to highly parallel processing of many oligonucleotides individually or in high complexity pools. Examples of the preparation of 5'-biotin, 95-mer, oligonucleotide pools of >40K complexity at micromole scale are shown. These pools are prepared in up to ~16% yield and 90-99% purity. Approaches for using this method in other applications are also discussed. PMID:22039155

  19. Oligonucleotide-based theranostic nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Reza; Ozpolat, Bulent; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2016-05-01

    Theranostic approaches, combining the functionality of both therapy and imaging, have shown potential in cancer nanomedicine. Oligonucleotides such as small interfering RNA and microRNA, which are powerful therapeutic agents, have been effectively employed in theranostic systems against various cancers. Nanoparticles are used to deliver oligonucleotides into tumors by passive or active targeting while protecting the oligonucleotides from nucleases in the extracellular environment. The use of quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles and tagging with contrast agents, like fluorescent dyes, optical or magnetic agents and various radioisotopes, has facilitated early detection of tumors and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we review the advantages of theranostic applications in cancer therapy and imaging, with special attention to oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. PMID:27102380

  20. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyoyeon; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. PMID:26449454

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphorescent oligonucleotide probes for hybridisation assays.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Paul J; Burke, Martina; Soini, Aleksi E; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2002-11-01

    Monofunctional, p-isothiocyanatophenyl-derivatives of platinum (II)-coproporphyrin-I (PtCP-NCS) were evaluated as phosphorescent labelling reagents for synthetic oligonucleotides containing a 3'- or 5'-amino modification. Synthesis and purification conditions were optimised to generate high yields and purity of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide probes. Phosphorescent properties of the PtCP label have been shown to be largely unaffected by conjugation to oligonucleotides of various length, GC composition and label attachment site. 5'-PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides were shown to work efficiently as primers in a standard PCR. A dedicated 532 nm laser-based time-resolved fluorescence plate reader enabled highly sensitive detection of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides and PCR products, both in solution and in agarose gels, with limits of detection in the order of 0.3 pM. A model system employing two complementary oligonucleotides labelled with PtCP and QSY 7 dye (dark quencher) showed strong (approximately 20-fold) and specific proximity quenching of PtCP label upon hybridisation in solution. The potential applications of PtCP-labelled probes in hybridisation assays were discussed. PMID:12409473

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphorescent oligonucleotide probes for hybridisation assays

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Paul J.; Burke, Martina; Soini, Aleksi E.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2002-01-01

    Monofunctional, p-isothiocyanatophenyl-derivatives of platinum (II)-coproporphyrin-I (PtCP-NCS) were evaluated as phosphorescent labelling reagents for synthetic oligonucleotides containing a 3′- or 5′-amino modification. Synthesis and purification conditions were optimised to generate high yields and purity of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide probes. Phosphorescent properties of the PtCP label have been shown to be largely unaffected by conjugation to oligonucleotides of various length, GC composition and label attachment site. 5′-PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides were shown to work efficiently as primers in a standard PCR. A dedicated 532 nm laser-based time-resolved fluorescence plate reader enabled highly sensitive detection of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides and PCR products, both in solution and in agarose gels, with limits of detection in the order of 0.3 pM. A model system employing two complementary oligonucleotides labelled with PtCP and QSY® 7 dye (dark quencher) showed strong (∼20-fold) and specific proximity quenching of PtCP label upon hybridisation in solution. The potential applications of PtCP-labelled probes in hybridisation assays were discussed. PMID:12409473

  3. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications. PMID:27521696

  4. Oligonucleotide Therapies: The Past and the Present

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Karin E.; Gissberg, Olof; Smith, C.I. Edvard

    2015-01-01

    In this review we address the development of oligonucleotide (ON) medicines from a historical perspective by listing the landmark discoveries in this field. The various biological processes that have been targeted and the corresponding ON interventions found in the literature are discussed together with brief updates on some of the more recent developments. Most ON therapies act through antisense mechanisms and are directed against various RNA species, as exemplified by gapmers, steric block ONs, antagomirs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro-RNA mimics, and splice switching ONs. However, ONs binding to Toll-like receptors and those forming aptamers have completely different modes of action. Similar to other novel medicines, the path to success has been lined with numerous failures, where different therapeutic ONs did not stand the test of time. Since the first ON drug was approved for clinical use in 1998, the therapeutic landscape has changed considerably, but many challenges remain until the expectations for this new form of medicine are met. However, there is room for cautious optimism. PMID:26160334

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  6. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  7. Development of Therapeutic Splice-Switching Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kryczka, Adrianna; Liu, Yuqi; Badi, Yusef E.; Wong, Jessie J.; Owen, James S.; Khoo, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Synthetic splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) target nuclear pre-mRNA molecules to change exon splicing and generate an alternative protein isoform. Clinical trials with two competitive SSO drugs are underway to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Beyond DMD, many additional therapeutic applications are possible, with some in phase 1 clinical trials or advanced preclinical evaluation. Here, we present an overview of the central factors involved in developing therapeutic SSOs for the treatment of diseases. The selection of susceptible pre-mRNA target sequences, as well as the design and chemical modification of SSOs to increase SSO stability and effectiveness, are key initial considerations. Identification of effective SSO target sequences is still largely empirical and published guidelines are not a universal guarantee for success. Specifically, exon-targeted SSOs, which are successful in modifying dystrophin splicing, can be ineffective for splice-switching in other contexts. Chemical modifications, importantly, are associated with certain characteristic toxicities, which need to be addressed as target diseases require chronic treatment with SSOs. Moreover, SSO delivery in adequate quantities to the nucleus of target cells without toxicity can prove difficult. Last, the means by which these SSOs are administered needs to be acceptable to the patient. Engineering an efficient therapeutic SSO, therefore, necessarily entails a compromise between desirable qualities and effectiveness. Here, we describe how the application of optimal solutions may differ from case to case. PMID:24826963

  8. Optimizing antisense oligonucleotides using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Linda J; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations that disrupt the reading frame of the human DMD gene. Selective removal of exons flanking an out-of-frame DMD mutation can result in an in-frame mRNA transcript that may be translated into an internally deleted Becker muscular dystrophy-like functionally active dystrophin protein with therapeutic activity. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) can be designed to bind to complementary sequences in the targeted mRNA and modify pre-mRNA splicing to correct the reading frame of a mutated transcript. AO-induced exon skipping resulting in functional truncated dystrophin has been demonstrated in animal models of DMD both in vitro and in vivo, in DMD patient cells in vitro in culture, and in DMD muscle explants. The recent advances made in this field suggest that it is likely that AO-induced exon skipping will be the first gene therapy for DMD to reach the clinic. However, it should be noted that personalized molecular medicine may be necessary, since the various reading frame-disrupting mutations are spread across the DMD gene. The different deletions that cause DMD would require skipping of different exons, which would require the optimization and clinical trial workup of many specific AOs. This chapter describes the methodologies available for the optimization of AOs, in particular phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers, for the targeted skipping of specific exons on the DMD gene. PMID:22454060

  9. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult

  10. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  11. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Decorated with Carbosilane Dendrons as New Non-viral Oligonucleotide Delivery Carriers.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ángel; Fuentes-Paniagua, Elena; Baeza, Alejandro; Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; Cicuéndez, Mónica; Gómez, Rafael; de la Mata, F Javier; González, Blanca; Vallet-Regí, María

    2015-10-26

    A novel nanosystem based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles covered with carbosilane dendrons grafted on the external surface of the nanoparticles is reported. This system is able to transport single-stranded oligonucleotide into cells, avoiding an electrostatic repulsion between the cell membrane and the negatively charged nucleic acids thanks to the cationic charge provided by the dendron coating under physiological conditions. Moreover, the presence of the highly ordered pore network inside the silica matrix would make possible to allocate other therapeutic agents within the mesopores with the aim of achieving a double delivery. First, carbosilane dendrons of second and third generation possessing ammonium or tertiary amine groups as peripheral functional groups were prepared. Hence, different strategies were tested in order to obtain their suitable grafting on the outer surface of the nanoparticles. As nucleic acid model, a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide tagged with a fluorescent Cy3 moiety was used to evaluate the DNA adsorption capacity. The hybrid material functionalised with the third generation of a neutral dendron showed excellent DNA binding properties. Finally, the cytotoxicity as well as the capability to deliver DNA into cells, was tested in vitro by using a human osteoblast-like cell line, achieving good levels of internalisation of the vector DNA/carbosilane dendron-functionalised material without affecting the cellular viability. PMID:26361378

  12. Optimization of an oligonucleotide microchip for microbial identification studies: a non-equilibrium dissociation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Stahl, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray (microchip) for identifying strains of five closely related bacilli (Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus medusa and Bacillus subtilis) was demonstrated using an approach that compares the non-equilibrium dissociation rates ('melting curves') of all probe-target duplexes simultaneously. For this study, a hierarchical set of 30 oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA of these bacilli at multiple levels of specificity (approximate taxonomic ranks of domain, kingdom, order, genus and species) was designed and immobilized in a high-density matrix of gel pads on a glass slide. Reproducible melting curves for probes with different levels of specificity were obtained using an optimized salt concentration. Clear discrimination between perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) duplexes was achieved. By normalizing the signals to an internal standard (a universal probe), a more than twofold discrimination (> 2.4x) was achieved between PM and 1-MM duplexes at the dissociation temperature at which 50% of the probe-target duplexes remained intact. This provided excellent differentiation among representatives of different Bacillus species, both individually and in mixtures of two or three. The overall pattern of hybridization derived from this hierarchical probe set also provided a clear 'chip fingerprint' for each of these closely related Bacillus species.

  13. Oligonucleotide recombination in corynebacteria without the expression of exogenous recombinases.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Alexander A; Kolontaevsky, Egor E; Mashko, Sergey V

    2014-10-01

    Brevibacterium lactofermentum and Corynebacterium glutamicum are important biotechnology species of the genus Corynebacterium. The single-strand DNA annealing protein (SSAP)-independent oligonucleotide-mediated recombination procedure was successfully applied to the commonly used wild-type strains B. lactofermentum AJ1511 and C. glutamicum ATCC13032. When the rpsL gene was used as a target, the optimized protocol yielded up to (1.4±0.3)×10(3) and (6.7±1.3)×10(3) streptomycin-resistant colonies per 10(8) viable cells for the corresponding strains. We tested the influence of several parameters that are known to enhance the efficiency of oligonucleotide-mediated recombination in other bacterial species. Among them, increasing the concentration of oligonucleotides and targeting the lagging strand of the chromosome have proven to have positive effects on both of the tested species. No difference in the efficiency of recombination was observed between the oligonucleotides phosphorothiorated at the 5' ends and the unmodified oligonucleotides or between the oligonucleotides with four mutated nucleotides and those with one mutated nucleotide. The described approach demonstrates that during the adaptation of the recombineering technique, testing SSAP-independent oligonucleotide-mediated recombination could be a good starting point. Such testing could decrease the probability of an incorrect interpretation of the effect of exogenous protein factors (such as SSAP and/or corresponding exonucleases) due to non-optimal experimental conditions. In addition, SSAP-independent recombination itself could be useful in combination with suitable selection/enrichment methods. PMID:25087479

  14. Injection site reactions after subcutaneous oligonucleotide therapy.

    PubMed

    van Meer, Leonie; Moerland, Matthijs; Gallagher, Jolie; van Doorn, Martijn B A; Prens, Errol P; Cohen, Adam F; Rissmann, Robert; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2016-08-01

    Oligonucleotides (ONs) are short fragments of nucleic acids, currently being investigated as therapeutic agents. When administered subcutaneously (sc), ONs cause a specific local reaction originating around the injection site, such as erythema, itching, discomfort and pain, including more severe manifestations such as ulceration or necrosis. These injection site reactions (ISRs) are common, but rather poorly described in the literature. With this review, we aim to provide an overview on the extent of the problem of ISRs, based on reported incidence. A structured literature search was performed to identify reported incidence and clinical features of ISRs which yielded 70 manuscripts that contained information regarding ISRs. The data from literature was combined with data on file available at our institution. All sc administered ONs described in the literature lead to the occurrence of ISRs. The percentage of trial subjects that developed ISRs ranged from 22 to 100% depending on ON. The majority of ONs caused ISRs in more than 70% of the trial subjects. The severity of the observed reactions varied between different ONs. Occurrence rate as well as severity of ISRs increases with higher doses. For chemistry and target of the compounds, no clear association regarding ISR incidence or severity was identified. All ONs developed to date are associated with ISRs. Overcoming the problem of ISRs might add greatly to the potential success of sc-administered ONs. Knowledge of these skin reactions and their specific immunostimulatory properties should be increased in order to obtain ONs that are more suitable for long-term use and clinically applicable in a broader patient population. PMID:27061947

  15. Mechanism of oligonucleotide release from cationic liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Zelphati, O; Szoka, F C

    1996-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for oligonucleotide (ODN) release from cationic lipid complexes in cells that accounts for various observations on cationic lipid-nucleic acid-cell interactions. Fluorescent confocal microscopy of cells treated with rhodamine-labeled cationic liposome/ fluorescein-labeled ODN (F-ODN) complexes show the F-ODN separates from the lipid after internalization and enters the nucleus leaving the fluorescent lipid in cytoplasmic structures. ODN displacement from the complex was studied by fluorescent resonance energy transfer. Anionic liposome compositions (e.g., phosphatidylserine) that mimic the cytoplasmic facing monolayer of the cell membrane released ODN from the complex at about a 1:1 (-/+) charge ratio. Release was independent of ionic strength and pH. Physical separation of the F-ODN from monovalent and multivalent cationic lipids was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Fluid but not solid phase anionic liposomes are required, whereas the physical state of the cationic lipids does not effect the release. Water soluble molecules with a high negative linear charge density, dextran sulfate, or heparin also release ODN. However, ATP, spermidine, spermine, tRNA, DNA, polyglutamic acid, polylysine, bovine serum albumin, or histone did not release ODN, even at 100-fold charge excess (-/+). Based upon these results, we propose that the complex, after internalization by endocytosis, induces flip-flop of anionic lipids from the cytoplasmic facing monolayer. Anionic lipids laterally diffuse into the complex and form a charged neutralized ion-pair with the cationic lipids. This leads to displacement of the ODN from the cationic lipid and its release into the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8876163

  16. In situ identification of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge using fluorescent rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Wagner, M; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1998-01-01

    Hitherto, few environmental samples have been investigated by a 'full cycle rRNA analysis'. Here the results of in situ hybridization experiments with specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes developed on the basis of new sequences derived from a previously described comparative 16S rRNA analysis of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge are reported. Application of the specific probes enabled identification and discrimination of the distinct populations of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge. One of the specific probes (DLP) detected rod-shaped bacteria which were found in 13 of the 16 investigated sludge samples from various wastewater treatment plants, suggesting their importance in the wastewater treatment process. Another probe (GLP2) hybridized with typically branched filaments of nocardioforms mainly found in samples from enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants, suggesting that these bacteria are involved in sludge foaming. The combination of in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and confocal laser scanning microscopy improved the detection of nocardioform actinomycetes, which often showed only weak signals inside the activated-sludge flocs. PMID:9467916

  17. Quantification of mixed-phase hybridization on polymer microparticles by europium(III) ion fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ketomäki, Kaisa; Lönnberg, Harri

    2007-01-01

    A protocol for quantification of oligonucleotide hybridization on polymer microparticles by europium(III) ion fluorescence is described. The procedure involves modification of commercially available amino-functionalized microparticles in such a manner that oligonucleotide probes may be assembled in situ on these particles or, alternatively, they may be immobilized postsynthetically. The oligonucleotide-coated particles obtained are then used as the solid phase in a mixed-phase hybridization assay. The efficiency of hybridization is quantified with the aid of oligonucleotides tagged with a europium(III) chelate. Either, the fluorescently tagged probe is hybridized directly to a complementary particle-anchored oligonucleotide, or a sandwich-type assay set up, where a third oligonucleotide complementary both to the tagged and particle-bound probe mediates the attachment to the particles, is exploited. The number of europium(III) ions attached to the solid-phase is determined by the DELFIA protocol, involving release of the europium(III) ions in solution and development of the fluorescence by addition of an enhancement solution. Alternatively, the fluorescence intensity of the photoluminescent chelate may be measured directly from a single particle. PMID:17984531

  18. probeBase--an online resource for rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers: new features 2016.

    PubMed

    Greuter, Daniel; Loy, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    probeBase http://www.probebase.net is a manually maintained and curated database of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers. Contextual information and multiple options for evaluating in silico hybridization performance against the most recent rRNA sequence databases are provided for each oligonucleotide entry, which makes probeBase an important and frequently used resource for microbiology research and diagnostics. Here we present a major update of probeBase, which was last featured in the NAR Database Issue 2007. This update describes a complete remodeling of the database architecture and environment to accommodate computationally efficient access. Improved search functions, sequence match tools and data output now extend the opportunities for finding suitable hierarchical probe sets that target an organism or taxon at different taxonomic levels. To facilitate the identification of complementary probe sets for organisms represented by short rRNA sequence reads generated by amplicon sequencing or metagenomic analysis with next generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina and IonTorrent, we introduce a novel tool that recovers surrogate near full-length rRNA sequences for short query sequences and finds matching oligonucleotides in probeBase. PMID:26586809

  19. Strand-Specificity in the Transformation of Yeast with Synthetic Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Moerschell, R. P.; Wakem, L. P.; Komar-Panicucci, S.; Sherman, F.

    1992-01-01

    Cyc1 mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were directly transformed with both sense and antisense oligonucleotides to examine the involvement of the two genomic DNA strands in transformation. Sense oligonucleotides yielded approximately 20-fold more transformants than antisense oligonucleotides. This differential effect was observed with oligonucleotides designed to make alterations at six different sites along the gene and was independent of the oligonucleotide sequence and length, number of mismatches and the host strain. Competition studies showed that antisense oligonucleotides did not inhibit transformation. Although the mechanism for this strand specificity is unknown, this difference was maintained even when CYC1 transcription was diminished to approximately 2% of the normal level. PMID:1325385

  20. Characteristic archaebacterial 16S rRNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, T. J.; Jurka, J.; Sobieski, J. M.; Pickett, M. H.; Woese, C. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A method of analyzing 16S rRNA catalog data has been developed in which groupings at various taxonomic levels can be characterized in terms of specific "signature" oligonucleotides. This approach provides an alternative means for evaluating higher order branching possibilities and can be used to assess the phylogenetic position of isolates that are poorly placed by the usual clustering procedures. This signature approach has been applied to forty archaebacterial catalogs and every oligonucleotide with significant signature value has been identified. Sets of specific oligonucleotides were identified for every major group on a dendrogram produced by cluster analysis procedures. Signatures that would establish between group relationships were also sought and found. In the case of the Methanobacteriaceae the clustering methods suggest a specific relationship to the Methanococcaceae. This inclusion is in fact supported by six strong signature oligonucleotides. However there are also significant numbers of signature oligonucleotides supporting a specific relationship of the Methanobacteriaceae to either the Halobacteriaceae or the Methanomicrobiaceae. Thus the placement of the Methanobacteriaceae is less certain than the usual dendrograms imply. The signature approach also was used to assess the phylogenetic position of Thermoplasma acidophilum which is found to be more closely related to the methanogen/halophile Division than to the sulfur dependent Division of the archaebacteria. This does not imply however that Thermoplasma acidophilum is properly regarded as being in the methanogen/halophile Division.

  1. A status update of modified oligonucleotides for chemotherapeutics applications.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Yogesh S

    2011-09-01

    This unit presents an update of recent developments and clinical progress in chemically modified oliogonucleotides useful for therapeutic applications. During the last decade, the number of therapeutic oligonucleotides in clinical trials has nearly tripled. This is primarily due to advances in the synthesis protocols, better understanding of the biology, improved delivery, and better formulation technologies. Currently, over 100 clinical trials with oligonucleotide-based drugs are ongoing in the United States for potential treatment of a variety of life-threatening diseases. Among various oligonucleotides, antisense technology has been at the forefront, with one product on the market. Antisense technologies represent about half of the active clinical trials. Similarly, siRNA, aptamers, spiegelmers microRNA, shRNA, IMO, and CpG have been other active classes of oligonucleotides that are also undergoing clinical trials. This review attempts to summarize the current status of synthesis, chemical modifications, purification, and analysis in light of the rapid progress with multitude of oligonucleotides pursued as therapeutic modality. PMID:21901670

  2. N-Branched acyclic nucleoside phosphonates as monomers for the synthesis of modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hocková, Dana; Rosenbergová, Šárka; Ménová, Petra; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Novák, Pavel; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2015-04-21

    Protected N-branched nucleoside phosphonates containing adenine and thymine bases were prepared as the monomers for the introduction of aza-acyclic nucleotide units into modified oligonucleotides. The phosphotriester and phosphoramidite methods were used for the incorporation of modified and natural units, respectively. The solid phase synthesis of a series of nonamers containing one central modified unit was successfully performed in both 3'→5' and 5'→3' directions. Hybridization properties of the prepared oligoribonucleotides and oligodeoxyribonucleotides were evaluated. The measurement of thermal characteristics of the complexes of modified nonamers with the complementary strand revealed a considerable destabilizing effect of the introduced units. We also examined the substrate/inhibitory properties of aza-acyclic nucleoside phosphono-diphosphate derivatives (analogues of nucleoside triphosphates) but neither inhibition of human and bacterial DNA polymerases nor polymerase-mediated incorporation of these triphosphate analogues into short DNA was observed. PMID:25766752

  3. Biorecognition by DNA oligonucleotides after exposure to photoresists and resist removers.

    PubMed

    Dean, Stacey L; Morrow, Thomas J; Patrick, Susan; Li, Mingwei; Clawson, Gary A; Mayer, Theresa S; Keating, Christine D

    2013-09-10

    Combining biological molecules with integrated circuit technology is of considerable interest for next generation sensors and biomedical devices. Current lithographic microfabrication methods, however, were developed for compatibility with silicon technology rather than bioorganic molecules, and consequently it cannot be assumed that biomolecules will remain attached and intact during on-chip processing. Here, we evaluate the effects of three common photoresists (Microposit S1800 series, PMGI SF6, and Megaposit SPR 3012) and two photoresist removers (acetone and 1165 remover) on the ability of surface-immobilized DNA oligonucleotides to selectively recognize their reverse-complementary sequence. Two common DNA immobilization methods were compared: adsorption of 5'-thiolated sequences directly to gold nanowires and covalent attachment of 5'-thiolated sequences to surface amines on silica coated nanowires. We found that acetone had deleterious effects on selective hybridization as compared to 1165 remover, presumably due to incomplete resist removal. Use of the PMGI photoresist, which involves a high temperature bake step, was detrimental to the later performance of nanowire-bound DNA in hybridization assays, especially for DNA attached via thiol adsorption. The other three photoresists did not substantially degrade DNA binding capacity or selectivity for complementary DNA sequences. To determine whether the lithographic steps caused more subtle damage, we also tested oligonucleotides containing a single base mismatch. Finally, a two-step photolithographic process was developed and used in combination with dielectrophoretic nanowire assembly to produce an array of doubly contacted, electrically isolated individual nanowire components on a chip. Postfabrication fluorescence imaging indicated that nanowire-bound DNA was present and able to selectively bind complementary strands. PMID:23952639

  4. Biorecognition by DNA oligonucleotides after Exposure to Photoresists and Resist Removers

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Stacey L.; Morrow, Thomas J.; Patrick, Sue; Li, Mingwei; Clawson, Gary; Mayer, Theresa S.; Keating, Christine D.

    2013-01-01

    Combining biological molecules with integrated circuit technology is of considerable interest for next generation sensors and biomedical devices. Current lithographic microfabrication methods, however, were developed for compatibility with silicon technology rather than bioorganic molecules and consequently it cannot be assumed that biomolecules will remain attached and intact during on-chip processing. Here, we evaluate the effects of three common photoresists (Microposit S1800 series, PMGI SF6, and Megaposit SPR 3012) and two photoresist removers (acetone and 1165 remover) on the ability of surface-immobilized DNA oligonucleotides to selectively recognize their reverse-complementary sequence. Two common DNA immobilization methods were compared: adsorption of 5′-thiolated sequences directly to gold nanowires and covalent attachment of 5′-thiolated sequences to surface amines on silica coated nanowires. We found that acetone had deleterious effects on selective hybridization as compared to 1165 remover, presumably due to incomplete resist removal. Use of the PMGI photoresist, which involves a high temperature bake step, was detrimental to the later performance of nanowire-bound DNA in hybridization assays, especially for DNA attached via thiol adsorption. The other three photoresists did not substantially degrade DNA binding capacity or selectivity for complementary DNA sequences. To determine if the lithographic steps caused more subtle damage, we also tested oligonucleotides containing a single base mismatch. Finally, a two-step photolithographic process was developed and used in combination with dielectrophoretic nanowire assembly to produce an array of doubly-contacted, electrically isolated individual nanowire components on a chip. Post-fabrication fluorescence imaging indicated that nanowire-bound DNA was present and able to selectively bind complementary strands. PMID:23952639

  5. Detection of DNA damage: effect of thymidine glycol residues on the thermodynamic, substrate and interfacial acoustic properties of oligonucleotide duplexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Romanova, E; Kubareva, E; Dolinnaya, N; Gajdos, V; Burenina, O; Fedotova, E; Ellis, J S; Oretskaya, T; Hianik, T; Thompson, M

    2009-01-01

    Thymidine glycol residues in DNA are biologically active oxidative molecular damage sites caused by ionizing radiation and other factors. One or two thymidine glycol residues were incorporated in 19- to 31-mer DNA fragments during automatic oligonucleotide synthesis. These oligonucleotide models were used to estimate the effect of oxidized thymidines on the thermodynamic, substrate and interfacial acoustic properties of DNA. UV-monitoring melting data revealed that modified residues in place of thymidines destabilize the DNA double helix by 8-22 degrees C, depending on the number of lesions, the length of oligonucleotide duplexes and their GC-content. The diminished hybridizing capacity of modified oligonucleotides is presumably due to the loss of aromaticity and elevated hydrophilicity of thymine glycol in comparison to the thymine base. According to circular dichroism (CD) data, the modified DNA duplexes retain B-form geometry, and the thymidine glycol residue introduces only local perturbations limited to the lesion site. The rate of DNA hydrolysis by restriction endonucleases R.MvaI, R.Bst2UI, R.MspR9I and R.Bme1390I is significantly decreased as the thymidine glycol is located in the central position of the double-stranded recognition sequences 5'-CC / WGG-3' (W = A, T) or 5'-CC / NGG-3' (N = A, T, G, C) adjacent to the cleavage site. On the other hand, the catalytic properties of enzymes R.Psp6I and R.BstSCI recognizing the similar sequence are not changed dramatically, since their cleavage site is separated from the point of modification by several base-pairs. Data obtained by gel-electrophoretic analysis of radioactive DNA substrates were confirmed by direct spectrophotometric assay developed by the authors. The effect of thymidine glycol was also observed on DNA hybridization at the surface of a thickness-shear mode acoustic wave device. A 1.9-fold decrease in the rate of duplex formation was noted for oligonucleotides carrying one or two thymidine glycol

  6. An in vitro selection scheme for oligonucleotide probes to discriminate between closely related DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Ivan; El-Ramahi, Razan; Gorska-Flipot, Izabella; Krajinovic, Maja; Labuda, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Using an in vitro selection, we have obtained oligonucleotide probes with high discriminatory power against multiple, similar nucleic acid sequences, which is often required in diagnostic applications for simultaneous testing of such sequences. We have tested this approach, referred to as iterative hybridizations, by selecting probes against six 22-nt-long sequence variants representing human papillomavirus, (HPV). We have obtained probes that efficiently discriminate between HPV types that differ by 3–7 nt. The probes were found effective to recognize HPV sequences of the type 6, 11, 16, 18 and a pair of type 31 and 33, either when immobilized on a solid support or in a reverse configuration, as well to discriminate HPV types from the clinical samples. This methodology can be extended to generate diagnostic kits that rely on nucleic acid hybridization between closely related sequences. In this approach, instead of adjusting hybridization conditions to the intended set of probe–target pairs, we ‘adjust’, through in vitro selection, the probes to the conditions we have chosen. Importantly, these conditions have to be ‘relaxed’, allowing the formation of a variety of not fully complementary complexes from which those that efficiently recognize and discriminate intended from non-intended targets can be readily selected. PMID:17426126

  7. Inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription by triple-helix forming oligonucleotides with viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, S; Jendis, J; Frauendorf, A; Moelling, K

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral RNA into double-stranded DNA is catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT). A highly conserved polypurine tract (PPT) on the viral RNA serves as primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis and is a possible target for triple-helix formation. Triple-helix formation during reverse transcription involves either single-stranded RNA or an RNA.DNA hybrid. The effect of triple-helix formation on reverse transcription has been analyzed here in vitro using a three-strand-system consisting of an RNA.DNA hybrid and triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) consisting either of DNA or RNA. Three strand triple-helices inhibit RNase H cleavage of the PPT-RNA.DNA hybrid and initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis in vitro. Triple-helix formation on a single-stranded RNA target has also been tested in a two-strand-system with TFOs comprising Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base-pairing sequences, both targeted to the PPT-RNA, on a single strand connected by a linker (T)4. TFOs prevent RNase H cleavage of the PPT-RNA and initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis in vitro. In cell culture experiments one TFO is an efficient inhibitor of retrovirus replication, leading to a block of p24 synthesis and inhibition of syncytia formation in newly infected cells. Images PMID:7537875

  8. Secondary binding sites for heavily modified triplex forming oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Cardew, Antonia S.; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance DNA triple helix stability synthetic oligonucleotides have been developed that bear amino groups on the sugar or base. One of the most effective of these is bis-amino-U (B), which possesses 5-propargylamino and 2′-aminoethoxy modifications. Inclusion of this modified nucleotide not only greatly enhances triplex stability, but also increases the affinity for related sequences. We have used a restriction enzyme protection, selection and amplification assay (REPSA) to isolate sequences that are bound by the heavily modified 9-mer triplex-forming oligonucleotide B6CBT. The isolated sequences contain An tracts (n = 6), suggesting that the 5′-end of this TFO was responsible for successful triplex formation. DNase I footprinting with these sequences confirmed triple helix formation at these secondary targets and demonstrated no interaction with similar oligonucleotides containing T or 5-propargylamino-dU. PMID:22180535

  9. Current progress on aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the power of the RNAi pathway through the use of therapeutic siRNA drugs has remarkable potential for treating a vast array of human disease conditions. However, difficulties in delivery of these and similar nucleic acid-based pharmacological agents to appropriate organs or tissues, remains a major impediment to their broad clinical application. Synthetic nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) have emerged as effective delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including siRNAs. In this review, we summarize recent attractive developments in creatively employing cell-internalizing aptamers to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides (e.g., siRNAs, miRNAs, anti-miRs and antisense oligos) to target cells. We also discuss advancements in aptamer-siRNA chimera technology, as well as, aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide drugs for clinical translation are further highlighted. PMID:24304250

  10. Synthesis of chimeric oligonucleotides containing phosphodiester, phosphorothioate, and phosphoramidate linkages.

    PubMed

    Maier, M A; Guzaev, A P; Manoharan, M

    2000-06-29

    [reaction: see text] H-Phosphonate monomers of 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) ribonucleosides have been synthesized. Oxidation of oligonucleotide H-phosphonates has been optimized to allow the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing either 2'-deoxy or 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) ribonucleoside residues combined with three different phosphate modifications in the backbone, i.e., phosphodiester (PO), phosphorothioate (PS), and phosphoramidate (PN). Phosphodiester linkages were introduced by oxidation with a cocktail of 0.1 M Et(3)N in CCl(4)/Pyr/H(2)O (5:9:1) without affecting phosphorothioate or phosphoramidate linkages. For the synthesis of phosphoramidate-modified oligonucleotides, N(4)-acetyl deoxycytidine-3'-H-phosphonate monomers were used to avoid transamination during the oxidation step. PMID:10891166

  11. Use of phosphorus oxychloride in synthesizing nucleotides and oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, W.S.; Greene, G.L.; Miller, P.S.; Letsinger, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    Procedures are described for phosphorylating protected nucleotides, oligonucleotides and phosphoramidate oligonucleotide derivatives at the 3′-hydroxyl group. The conditions (phosphorylation with phosphorus oxychloride and pyridine in dioxane followed by hydrolysis with aqueous pyridine) are sufficiently mild that base labile (trifluoroacetylamino; β-cyanoethyl phosphotriester) and acid labile (O-monomethoxytrityl; phosphoramidate) functions are retained intact. Application of the technique is illustrated by the synthesis of dpT, dTp, d(CF3CONH)Tp, dTpNTp, and dTpNTpNTp. In addition, the utilization of phosphorus oxychloride in joining thymidine derivatives and dinucleoside phosphotriester blocks via phosphodiester links is described. PMID:10793743

  12. A Comparative Study of Normalization Methods Used in Statistical Analysis of Oligonucleotide Microarray Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Normalization methods used in the statistical analysis of oligonucleotide microarray data were evaluated. The oligonucleotide microarray is considered an efficient analytical tool for analyzing thousands of genes simultaneously in a single experiment. However, systematic variation in microarray, ori...

  13. Molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus maculatus-X. couchianus interspecies hybrid skin to UVB exposure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Bowswell, Mikki; Bowswell, William; Yang, Kuan; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    The phenotypic and genetic similarities between Xiphophorus and human melanoma render Xiphophorus a useful animal model for studying the genetic basis of melanoma etiology. In the Xiphophorus model, melanoma has been shown to be inducible by ultraviolet light (UVB) exposure among interspecies hybrids, but not in parental line fish similarly treated. This leads to questions of what genes are responsive to UVB exposure in the skin of the interspecies hybrids, as well as how parental alleles in hybrids may be differentially regulated and the potential roles they may play in induced melanomagenesis. To address these questions, we produced X. maculatus Jp 163 B×X. couchianus (Sp-Couch) F1 hybrid fish, exposed both hybrid and parental fish to UVB, and performed gene expression profiling of the skin using RNA-Seq methodology. We characterized a group of unique UVB-responsive genes in Sp-Couch hybrid including dct, pmela, tyr, tyrp1a, slc2a11b, rab38a, rab27, tspan10, slc45a2, oca2, slc24a5, ptn and mitfa. These genes are associated with melanin production and melanocyte proliferation. They were also up-regulated in Sp-Couch hybrid, indicating that their UVB response is hybridization initiated. In the hybrid, several melanin production and pigmentation related genes, including slc45a2, tspan10, dct, slc2a11b and ptn showed either X. couchianus or X. maculatus allele specific expression. The finding that these genes exhibit allele specific expression regulatory mechanisms in Sp-Couch hybrids, but do not exhibit a corresponding UVB response in either one of the parental fishes, may suggest UVB targets and imply mechanisms regarding the susceptibility of Sp-Couch to induced melanomagenesis. PMID:26254713

  14. Rapid oligonucleotide-templated fluorogenic tetrazine ligations

    PubMed Central

    Šečkutė, Jolita; Yang, Jun; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2013-01-01

    Template driven chemical ligation of fluorogenic probes represents a powerful method for DNA and RNA detection and imaging. Unfortunately, previous techniques have been hampered by requiring chemistry with sluggish kinetics and background side reactions. We have developed fluorescent DNA probes containing quenched fluorophore-tetrazine and methyl-cyclopropene groups that rapidly react by bioorthogonal cycloaddition in the presence of complementary DNA or RNA templates. Ligation increases fluorescence with negligible background signal in the absence of hybridization template. Reaction kinetics depend heavily on template length and linker structure. Using this technique, we demonstrate rapid discrimination between single template mismatches both in buffer and cell media. Fluorogenic bioorthogonal ligations offer a promising route towards the fast and robust fluorescent detection of specific DNA or RNA sequences. PMID:23775794

  15. Solid-phase-supported synthesis of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide mimics

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Sergey S; Tarasenko, Yulia V; Silnikov, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    Summary An efficient solid-phase-supported peptide synthesis (SPPS) of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide (MorGly) mimics has been developed. The proposed strategy includes a novel specially designed labile linker group containing the oxalyl residue and the 2-aminomethylmorpholino nucleoside analogues as first subunits. PMID:24991266

  16. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed. PMID:26503400

  17. Gene expression profiling in peanut using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently have a moderately significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for the oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate l...

  18. Chromosome-specific painting in Cucumis species using bulked oligonucleotides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a sing...

  19. Molecular Probe Data Base: a database on synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, P; Aresu, O; Parodi, B; Manniello, A; Campi, G; Angelini, G; Romani, M; Iannotta, B; Rondanina, G; Ruzzon, T

    1993-01-01

    The Molecular Probe Data Base (MPDB) was designed to collect and make information on synthetic oligonucleotides available on-line. This paper briefly describes its purpose, contents and structure, forms and mode of data distribution. Particular emphasis is given to recent data extension and system enhancements that have been carried out in order to simplify access to MPDB for unskilled users. PMID:8332523

  20. Molecular Probe Database: a database on synthetic oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Aresu, Ottavia; Parodi, Barbara; Romano, Paolo; Romani, Massimo; Angelini, Giovanna; Manniello, Assunta; Ianotta, Beatrice; Rondanina, Gabriella; Ruzzon, Tiziana; Santi, Leonardo

    1992-01-01

    The Molecular Probe Data Base (MPDB) is designed to collect and make available on-line information on synthetic oligonucleotides. This paper briefly describes the purpose of MPDB, its content and structure, forms and mode of data distribution, and a series of additional services available to scientists using MPDB. PMID:1598231

  1. Discovery of Genomic DNA Polymorphisms using oligonucleotide arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are applying oligonucleotide microarray technology as a means of rapidly discovering DNA-based markers for genetic mapping in finger millet and rice. A test genome scan was conducted using the full genome sequences of rice varieties 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica) compared with the Affy...

  2. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  3. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems. Part 11: Systems with Shortened Backbones: D)-beta-Ribopyranosyl-(4 yields 3 )- and (L)-alpha - Lyxopyranosyl-(4 yields 3 )-oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wippo, Harald; Reck, Folkert; Kudick, Rene; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Ceulemans, Griet; Bolli, Martin; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert

    2001-01-01

    The (L)-a-lyxopyranosyl-(4'yields 3')-oligonucleotide system-a member of a pentopyranosyl oligonucleotide family containing a shortened backbone-is capable of cooperative base-pairing and of cross-pairing with DNA and RNA. In contrast, corresponding (D)-beta-ribopyransoyl-(4' yields 3')-oligonucleotides do not show base-pairing under similar conditions. We conclude that oligonucleotide systems can violate the six-bonds-per-backbone-unit rule by having five bonds instead, if their vicinally bound phosphodiester bridges can assume an antiperiplanar conformation. An additional structural feature that seems relevant to the cross-pairing capability of the (L)-a-lyxopyranosyl-(4' yields 3')-oligonucleotide system is its (small) backbone/basepair axes inclination. An inclination which is similar to that in B-DNA seems to be a prerequisite for an oligonucleotide system s capability to cross-pair with DNA.

  4. Development of Polymer-Coated Glass Slides as Optical Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Pourjahed, Atefeh; Rabiee, Mohammad; Tahriri, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Background The microarray technology is in needed of cost-effective, low background noise and stable substrates for successful hybridization and analysis. Methods In this research, we developed a three-dimentional stable and mechanically reliable microarray substrates by coating of two polymeric layers on standard microscope glass slides. For fabrication of these substrates, a thin film of oxidized agarose was prepared on the Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) coated glass slides. Unmodified oligonucleotide probes were spotted and immobilized on these double layered thin films by adsorption on the porous structure of the agarose film. Some of the aldehyde groups of the activated agarose linked covalently to PLL amine groups; on the other side, they bound to amino groups of adsorbed tail of biomolecules. These linkages were fixed by UV irradiation at 254 nm using a CL-1000 UV. These prepared substrates were compared to only agarose-coated and PLL-coated slides Results Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) results demonstrated that agarose provided three-dimensional surface which had higher loading and bindig capacity for biomolecules than PLL-coated surface which had two-dimensional surface. The nano-indentation tests demonstrated the prepared double coating was more reliable and flexible for mechanical robotic spotting. In addition, the repeated indentation on different substrates showed uniformity of coatings. The stability of novel coating was sufficient for hybridization process. The signal-to-noise ratio in hybridization reactions performed on the agarose-PLL coated substrates increased two fold and four fold compared to agarose and PLL coated substrates, respectively. Conclusion Finally, the agarose-PLL microarrays had the highest signal (2920) and lowest background signal (205) in hybridization, suggesting that the prepared slides are suitable in analyzing wide concentration range of analytes. PMID:24285999

  5. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  6. In Situ Accessibility of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S rRNA to Cy3-Labeled Oligonucleotide Probes Comprising the D1 and D2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Behrens, Sebastian; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Fonseca, Álvaro; Spencer-Martins, Isabel; Amann, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has proven to be most useful for the identification of microorganisms. However, species-specific oligonucleotide probes often fail to give satisfactory results. Among the causes leading to low hybridization signals is the reduced accessibility of the targeted rRNA site to the oligonucleotide, mainly for structural reasons. In this study we used flow cytometry to determine whole-cell fluorescence intensities with a set of 32 Cy3-labeled oligonucleotide probes covering the full length of the D1 and D2 domains in the 26S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC 4455T. The brightest signal was obtained with a probe complementary to positions 223 to 240. Almost half of the probes conferred a fluorescence intensity above 60% of the maximum, whereas only one probe could hardly detect the cells. The accessibility map based on the results obtained can be extrapolated to other yeasts, as shown experimentally with 27 additional species (14 ascomycetes and 13 basidiomycetes). This work contributes to a more rational design of species-specific probes for yeast identification and monitoring. PMID:12732564

  7. Synthesis of 4'-Methoxy 2'-Deoxynucleoside Phosphoramidites for Incorporation into Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Petrová, Magdalena; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    This unit contains detailed synthetic protocols for the preparation of 4'-methoxy 2'-deoxynucleoside phosphoramidite monomers for A, G, C, T, and U. First, 3'-silyl-protected 2'-deoxynucleosides (dNs) are converted in two steps to 4',5'-enol acetates as the key starting compounds. Next, 4'-methoxy dNs are prepared by a one-pot procedure comprising N-iodosuccinimide-promoted methoxylation, hydrolysis, and reduction of the formed intermediates. Finally, 3'-phosphoramidites of 4'-methoxy dNs are obtained by a routine three-step procedure. Title phosphoramidite monomers are suitable for the synthesis of oligonucleotides on solid phase according to conventional amidite chemistry. 4'-Methoxy substitution represents a simple modification of the sugar part of dNs, where β-D-erythro epimers preferentially adopt N-type (C3'-endo, RNA-like) conformation. Moreover, it imparts superior chemical stability, nuclease resistance, and excellent hybridization properties to modified 4'-methoxyoligodeoxynucleotides. The strong tendency toward RNA-selective hybridization suggests its potential utilization in antisense and/or RNAi technologies. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584701

  8. Evaluation of inhibition of miRNA expression induced by anti-miRNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chae, Dong-Kyu; Ban, Eunmi; Yoo, Young Sook; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules that control the expression of mRNAs associated with various biological processes. Therefore, deregulated miRNAs play an important role in the pathogenesis of diseases. Numerous studies aimed at developing novel miRNA-based drugs or determining miRNA functions have been conducted by inhibiting miRNAs using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs), which inhibit the function by hybridizing with miRNA. To increase the binding affinity and specificity to target miRNA, AMOs with various chemical modifications have been developed. Evaluating the potency of these various types of AMOs is an essential step in their development. In this study, we developed a capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) method to evaluate the potency of AMOs by measuring changes in miRNA levels with fluorescence-labeled ssDNA probes using AMO-miR-23a, which inhibits miR-23a related to lung cancer. In order to eliminate interference by excess AMOs during hybridization of the ssDNA probe with the miR-23a, the concentration of the ssDNA probe was optimized. This newly developed method was used to compare the potency of two different modified AMOs. The data were supported by the results of a luciferase assay. This study demonstrated that CE-LIF analysis could be used to accurately evaluate AMO potency in biological samples. PMID:27178549

  9. probeCheck--a central resource for evaluating oligonucleotide probe coverage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Arnold, Roland; Tischler, Patrick; Rattei, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    The web server probeCheck, freely accessible at http://www.microbial-ecology.net/probecheck, provides a pivotal forum for rapid specificity and coverage evaluations of probes and primers against selected databases of phylogenetic and functional marker genes. Currently, 24 widely used sequence collections including the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) II, Greengenes, SILVA and the Functional Gene Pipeline/Repository can be queried. For this purpose, probeCheck integrates a new online version of the popular ARB probe match tool with free energy (DeltaG) calculations for each perfectly matched and mismatched probe-target hybrid, allowing assessment of the theoretical binding stabilities of oligo-target and non-target hybrids. For each output sequence, the accession number, the GenBank taxonomy and a link to the respective entry at GenBank, EMBL and, if applicable, the query database are displayed. Filtering options allow customizing results on the output page. In addition, probeCheck is linked with probe match tools of RDP II and Greengenes, NCBI blast, the Oligonucleotide Properties Calculator, the two-state folding tool of the DINAMelt server and the rRNA-targeted probe database probeBase. Taken together, these features provide a multifunctional platform with maximal flexibility for the user in the choice of databases and options for the evaluation of published and newly developed probes and primers. PMID:18647333

  10. PhylOPDb: a 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probe database for prokaryotic identification

    PubMed Central

    Jaziri, Faouzi; Parisot, Nicolas; Abid, Anis; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Ribière, Céline; Gasc, Cyrielle; Boucher, Delphine; Brugère, Jean-François; Mahul, Antoine; Hill, David R.C.; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, high-throughput molecular tools have led to an exponential growth of available 16S rRNA gene sequences. Incorporating such data, molecular tools based on target-probe hybridization were developed to monitor microbial communities within complex environments. Unfortunately, only a few 16S rRNA gene-targeted probe collections were described. Here, we present PhylOPDb, an online resource for a comprehensive phylogenetic oligonucleotide probe database. PhylOPDb provides a convivial and easy-to-use web interface to browse both regular and explorative 16S rRNA-targeted probes. Such probes set or subset could be used to globally monitor known and unknown prokaryotic communities through various techniques including DNA microarrays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), targeted gene capture or in silico rapid sequence identification. PhylOPDb contains 74 003 25-mer probes targeting 2178 genera including Bacteria and Archaea. Database URL: http://g2im.u-clermont1.fr/phylopdb/ PMID:24771669

  11. [Preparative isolation of tetra-, penta- and hexapurine oligonucleotides from partial hydrolysates of depyrimidinated herring sperm DNA].

    PubMed

    Schott, H; Schrade, H

    1984-02-01

    Herring sperm DNA is chemically degraded to a complex mixture of purine nucleotides. The oligonucleotides are separated from the partial hydrolysates by column chromatography. The resulting mixture of trimer to hexamer purine oligonucleotides is subsequently fractionated on QAE-Sephadex into different mixtures of sequence-isomeric purine oligonucleotides. In a final separation, which uses reversed-phase (Nucleosil C18) high-performance liquid chromatography, these mixtures are separated under isocratic conditions into 35 pure defined purine oligonucleotides with four to six monomer units, 14 defined mixtures of sequence-isomeric purine oligonucleotides and several unidentified products. Purity and sequence of the isolated oligonucleotides are determined by the "fingerprint" method. The results of the high-performance liquid chromatographic and the "fingerprint" methods of the isolated oligonucleotides are discussed. PMID:6707126

  12. Microenvironmental Effect of 2'-O-(1-Pyrenylmethyl)uridine Modified Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Sensitive and Selective Detection of Target RNA.

    PubMed

    Imincan, Gülnur; Pei, Fen; Yu, Lijia; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Yang, Xiaoda; Zhang, Lihe; Tang, XinJing

    2016-04-19

    2'-O-(1-Pyrenylmethyl)uridine modified oligoribonucleotides provide highly sensitive pyrene fluorescent probes for detecting specific nucleotide mutation of RNA targets. To develop more stable and cost-effective oligonucleotide probes, we investigated the local microenvironmental effects of nearby nucleobases on pyrene fluorescence in duplexes of RNAs and 2'-O-(1-pyrenylmethyl)uridine modified oligonucleotides. By incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides, ribonucleotides, 2'-MeO-nucleotides and 2'-F-nucleotides at both sides of 2'-O-(1-pyrenylmethyl)uridine (Up) in oligodeoxynucleotide probes, we synthesized a series of pyrene modified oligonucleotide probes. Their pyrene fluorescence emission spectra indicated that only two proximal nucleotides have a substantial effect on the pyrene fluorescence properties of these oligonucleotide probes hybridized with target RNA with an order of fluorescence sensitivity of 2'-F-nucleotides > 2'-MeO-nucleotides > ribonucleotides ≫ deoxyribonucleotides. While based on circular dichroism spectra, overall helix conformations (either A- or B-form) of the duplexes have marginal effects on the sensitivity of the probes. Instead, the local substitution reflected the propensity of the nucleotide sugar ring to adopt North type conformation and, accordingly, shifted their helix geometry toward a more A-type like conformation in local microenvironments. Thus, higher enhancement of pyrene fluorescence emission favored local A-type helix structures and more polar and hydrophobic environments (F > MeO > OH at 2' substitution) of duplex minor grooves of probes with the target RNA. Further dynamic simulation revealed that local microenvironmental effect of 2'-F-nucleotides or ribonucleotides was enough for pyrene moiety to move out of nucleobases to the minor groove of duplexes; in addition, 2'-F-nucleotide had less effect on π-stack of pyrene-modified uridine with upstream and downstream nucleobases. The present oligonucleotide probes

  13. Use of a multiplexed CMOS microarray to optimize and compare oligonucleotide binding to DNA probes synthesized or immobilized on individual electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode. PMID:22163607

  14. Use of a Multiplexed CMOS Microarray to Optimize and Compare Oligonucleotide Binding to DNA Probes Synthesized or Immobilized on Individual Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode. PMID:22163607

  15. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Selective release of multiple DNA oligonucleotides from gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Andy; Schaffer, Stefan B; Pallares, Ivan G; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2009-01-27

    Combination therapy, or the use of multiple drugs, has been proven to be effective for complex diseases, but the differences in chemical properties and pharmacokinetics can be challenging in terms of the loading, delivering, and releasing multiple drugs. Here we demonstrate that we can load and selectively release two different DNA oligonucleotides from two different gold nanorods. DNA was loaded on the nanorods via thiol conjugation. Selective releases were induced by selective melting of gold nanorods via ultrafast laser irradiation at the nanorods' longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks. Excitation at one wavelength could selectively melt one type of gold nanorods and selectively release one type of DNA strand. Releases were efficient (50-80%) and externally tunable by laser fluence. Released oligonucleotides were still functional. This proof of concept is potentially a powerful method for multiple-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19206252

  17. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+). PMID:24334186

  18. Synthesis and properties of oligonucleotides containing aminodeoxythymidine units.

    PubMed Central

    Gryaznov, S M; Letsinger, R L

    1992-01-01

    Procedures are described for synthesis via solid support methodology of oligonucleotide analogues derived in part from 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine or 5'-amino-5'-deoxythymidine. Oligothymidylate decamers terminated with a 3'-amino group or containing a 3'-NHP(O)(O-)O-5' internucleoside link are found to form unusually stable complexes with poly(dA), poly(A), and oligo(dA). For related derivatives of 5'-amino-5'-deoxythymidine enhancement is less or absent, and in the case of multiple substitution destabilization of the heteroduplex may be observed. That the effect of the 3'-amino group is general for oligonucleotide derivatives is indicated by enhanced Tm values for heteroduplex complexes of the mixed-base oligomer, d(TATTCAGTCAT(NH2)), and the methyl phosphonate derivatives, TmTmTmTmTmTmTmTmTmT(NH2) and d(TmAmTmTmCmAmGmTmCmAmT(NH2)). PMID:1630911

  19. Oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Banga, S S; Boyd, J B

    1992-01-01

    An efficient technique has been developed for performing in vivo site-directed mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. This procedure involves directed repair of P-element-induced DNA lesions after injection of a modified DNA sequence into early embryos. An oligonucleotide of 50 base pairs, whose sequence spans the P-element insertion site, mediates base replacement in the endogenous gene. Restriction mapping, DNA sequencing, and polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrate that base substitutions present in an injected oligonucleotide are incorporated into genomic sequences flanking a P insertion site in the white gene. This analysis suggests that progeny bearing directed mutations are recovered with a frequency of about 0.5 x 10(-3). Because Drosophila remains a premier organism for the analysis of eukaryotic gene regulation, this system should find strong application in that analysis as well as in the analysis of DNA recombination, conversion, repair, and mutagenesis. Images PMID:1311850

  20. Cell-penetrating Peptides as Versatile Vehicles for Oligonucleotide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Margus, Helerin; Padari, Kärt; Pooga, Margus

    2012-01-01

    Short regulatory oligonucleotides (ONs) have a great therapeutic potential for the modulation of gene expression due to their high specificity and low toxicity. The major obstacles for in vivo clinical applications of ONs are the poor permeability of plasma membrane to nucleic acids and the sensitivity of ONs to enzymatic degradation. Hence, various delivery vehicles have been developed to ensure the transduction of ONs into cells. Among these, the cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have gained quickly broadening popularity as promising nonviral transmembrane delivery vectors. For coupling of nucleic acids to CPPs, two distinct strategies may be applied—covalent and noncovalent. The majority of earlier studies have used covalent coupling of CPPs to ONs. However, the number of studies demonstrating very high therapeutic potential of noncovalent complexes of ONs with novel CPP-based delivery vehicles is explosively increasing. In this review, the recent developments in the application of CPP-mediated oligonucleotide delivery by noncovalent strategy will be discussed. PMID:22233581

  1. Cationic carbosilane dendrimers and oligonucleotide binding: an energetic affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, D.; Laurini, E.; Posocco, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Pricl, S.

    2015-02-01

    Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction.Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04510f

  2. Regulation of Gene Editing Activity Directed by Single-Stranded Oligonucleotides and CRISPR/Cas9 Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialk, Pawel; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Strouse, Bryan; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. While the regulation of this gene editing reaction has been partially elucidated, the low frequency with which repair occurs has hampered development toward clinical application. In this work a CRISPR/Cas9 complex is employed to induce double strand DNA breakage at specific sites surrounding the nucleotide designated for exchange. The result is a significant elevation in ssODN-directed gene repair, validated by a phenotypic readout. By analysing reaction parameters, we have uncovered restrictions on gene editing activity involving CRISPR/Cas9 complexes. First, ssODNs that hybridize to the non-transcribed strand direct a higher level of gene repair than those that hybridize to the transcribed strand. Second, cleavage must be proximal to the targeted mutant base to enable higher levels of gene editing. Third, DNA cleavage enables a higher level of gene editing activity as compared to single-stranded DNA nicks, created by modified Cas9 (Nickases). Fourth, we calculated the hybridization potential and free energy levels of ssODNs that are complementary to the guide RNA sequences of CRISPRs used in this study. We find a correlation between free energy potential and the capacity of single-stranded oligonucleotides to inhibit specific DNA cleavage activity, thereby indirectly reducing gene editing activity. Our data provide novel information that might be taken into consideration in the design and usage of CRISPR/Cas9 systems with ssODNs for gene editing. PMID:26053390

  3. Therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides against cancer: hurdling to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Pêgo, Ana P.

    2014-01-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90's and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics has not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given toward a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field. PMID:25353019

  4. Particle-Based Microarrays of Oligonucleotides and Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Maerkle, Frieder; Hahn, Lothar; Foertsch, Tobias; Schillo, Sebastian; Bykovskaya, Valentina; Sedlmayr, Martyna; Weber, Laura K.; Ridder, Barbara; Soehindrijo, Miriam; Muenster, Bastian; Striffler, Jakob; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we describe different methods of microarray fabrication based on the use of micro-particles/-beads and point out future tendencies in the development of particle-based arrays. First, we consider oligonucleotide bead arrays, where each bead is a carrier of one specific sequence of oligonucleotides. This bead-based array approach, appearing in the late 1990s, enabled high-throughput oligonucleotide analysis and had a large impact on genome research. Furthermore, we consider particle-based peptide array fabrication using combinatorial chemistry. In this approach, particles can directly participate in both the synthesis and the transfer of synthesized combinatorial molecules to a substrate. Subsequently, we describe in more detail the synthesis of peptide arrays with amino acid polymer particles, which imbed the amino acids inside their polymer matrix. By heating these particles, the polymer matrix is transformed into a highly viscous gel, and thereby, imbedded monomers are allowed to participate in the coupling reaction. Finally, we focus on combinatorial laser fusing of particles for the synthesis of high-density peptide arrays. This method combines the advantages of particles and combinatorial lithographic approaches.

  5. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  6. Recursive construction of perfect DNA molecules from imperfect oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Linshiz, Gregory; Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Kaplan, Shai; Gronau, Ilan; Ravid, Sivan; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Making faultless complex objects from potentially faulty building blocks is a fundamental challenge in computer engineering, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, we show for the first time how recursion can be used to address this challenge and demonstrate a recursive procedure that constructs error-free DNA molecules and their libraries from error-prone oligonucleotides. Divide and Conquer (D&C), the quintessential recursive problem-solving technique, is applied in silico to divide the target DNA sequence into overlapping oligonucleotides short enough to be synthesized directly, albeit with errors; error-prone oligonucleotides are recursively combined in vitro, forming error-prone DNA molecules; error-free fragments of these molecules are then identified, extracted and used as new, typically longer and more accurate, inputs to another iteration of the recursive construction procedure; the entire process repeats until an error-free target molecule is formed. Our recursive construction procedure surpasses existing methods for de novo DNA synthesis in speed, precision, amenability to automation, ease of combining synthetic and natural DNA fragments, and ability to construct designer DNA libraries. It thus provides a novel and robust foundation for the design and construction of synthetic biological molecules and organisms. PMID:18463615

  7. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  8. Targeting Several CAG Expansion Diseases by a Single Antisense Oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Melvin M.; Pepers, Barry A.; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.; Mulders, Susan A. M.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUG)n triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG)7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well. PMID:21909428

  9. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Pepers, Barry A; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Mulders, Susan A M; den Dunnen, Johan T; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUG)n triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG)(7), also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well. PMID:21909428

  10. Sequence-selective metal ion binding to DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Frøystein, N A; Davis, J T; Reid, B R; Sletten, E

    1993-07-01

    Metal ion titrations of several DNA oligonucleotides, 10 dodecamers and one decamer have been monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy in order to elucidate metal ion binding patterns. Also, the effects of paramagnetic impurities on resonance linewidths and NOESY cross-peak intensities have been reversed by EDTA back-titration experiments. 1H 1D NMR spectra were recorded after successive additions of aliquots of different metal salts to oligonucleotide samples. Paramagnetic manganese(II) salts were used in most cases, but a few samples were also titrated with diamagnetic zinc(II). From this study, we conclude that there exists a sequence-selective metal ion binding pattern. The metal ions bind predominantly to 5'-G in the contexts 5'-GC and 5'-GA. The order of preference seems to be GG > or = GA > GT > > GC. No evidence of metal ion binding to 5'-G in 5'-GC steps or to non-G residues was found. The H6 or H8 resonances on preceding (5'-) bases were affected by the adjacent bound paramagnetic metal ion, but no effect was observed on the protons of the succeeding (3'-) base. The metal binding site in the duplexes is most likely at G-N7, as manifested by the pronounced paramagnetic line broadening or diamagnetic shift of the G-H8 signal. This sequence selectivity may be qualitatively explained by a sequence-dependent variation in the molecular electrostatic potentials of guanine residues (MEPs) along the oligonucleotide chain. PMID:8363924

  11. Peroxide-mediated desulfurization of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Krotz, Achim H; Mehta, Rahul C; Hardee, Gregory E

    2005-02-01

    Desulfurization at the internucleotide phosphorothioate linkage of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in dermatological formulations has been investigated using strong ion exchange chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The formation of phosphate diester linkages appeared to arise from a reaction between the phosphorothioate oligonucleotide and a potent oxidizing agent. Screening of excipients used in the formulation indicated that the cause of desulfurization was related to the presence of polyethylene glycol-derived nonionic surfactants MYRJ 52 or BRIJ 58. Autoxidation of the polyethylene glycol chain is suggested as the probable origin for the observed incompatibility. The ability of various antioxidants to prevent oxidative degradation of ASO-1 in simple test systems and in oil-in-water emulsions is described. It is found that in test systems both lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants are effective. However, in cream formulation (oil-in-water emulsions) of ASO-1 the addition of hydrophilic antioxidants L-cysteine or DL-alpha-lipoic acid has been shown to be superior in protecting the oligonucleotide from desulfurization upon storage. PMID:15614814

  12. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains using the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hailang; Shen, Li; Yin, Huaqun; Li, Qian; Chen, Qijiong; Luo, Yanjie; Liao, Liqin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Liu, Xueduan

    2009-05-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an important microorganism used in biomining operations for metal recovery. Whole-genomic diversity analysis based on the oligonucleotide microarray was used to analyze the gene content of 12 strains of A. ferrooxidans purified from various mining areas in China. Among the 3100 open reading frames (ORFs) on the slides, 1235 ORFs were absent in at least 1 strain of bacteria and 1385 ORFs were conserved in all strains. The hybridization results showed that these strains were highly diverse from a genomic perspective. The hybridization results of 4 major functional gene categories, namely electron transport, carbon metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides, and detoxification, were analyzed. Based on the hybridization signals obtained, a phylogenetic tree was built to analyze the evolution of the 12 tested strains, which indicated that the geographic distribution was the main factor influencing the strain diversity of these strains. Based on the hybridization signals of genes associated with bioleaching, another phylogenetic tree showed an evolutionary relationship from which the co-relation between the clustering of specific genes and geochemistry could be observed. The results revealed that the main factor was geochemistry, among which the following 6 factors were the most important: pH, Mg, Cu, S, Fe, and Al. PMID:19483787

  14. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established. PMID:26593127

  15. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  16. Nanoparticle-bridge assay for amplification-free electrical detection of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Manouchehr

    The aim of this research is to investigate a highly sensitive, fast, inexpensive, and field-applicable amplification-free nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide detection method which does not rely on any enzymatic or signal amplification process. In this approach, target oligonucleotide strands are detected through the formation of nanoparticle satellites which make an electrical path between two electrodes. This method enables an extremely sensitive oligonucleotide detection because even a few oligonucleotide strands can form a single nanoparticle satellite which can solely generates an electrical output signal. Results showed that this oligonucleotide detection method can detect oligonucleotide single strands at concentrations as low as 50 femtomolar without any amplification process. This detection method can be implemented in many fields such as biodefense, food safety, clinical research, and forensics.

  17. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I. PMID:27111839

  18. MALDI MS analysis of oligonucleotides: desalting by functional magnetite beads using microwave-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-11-01

    The presence of alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides commonly deteriorates matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra. Thus, desalting is required for oligonucleotide samples prior to MALDI MS analysis in order to prevent the mass spectra from developing poor quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to extract traces of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of salts using microwave-assisted extraction. The C18-presenting magnetite beads, capable of absorbing microwave irradiation, are used as affinity probes for oligonucleotides with the addition of triethylammonium acetate as the counterions. This new microwave-assisted extraction approach using magnetite beads as the trapping agents and as microwave-absorbers has been demonstrated to be very effective in the selective binding of oligonucleotides from aqueous solutions. The extraction of oligonucleotides from solutions onto the C18-presenting magnetite beads takes only 30 s to enrich oligonucleotides in sufficient quantities for MALDI MS analysis. After using this desalting approach, alkali cation adductions of oligonucleotides are dramatically reduced in the MALDI mass spectra. The presence of saturated NaCl (approximately 6 M) in the oligonucleotide sample is tolerated without degrading the mass spectra. The detection limit for d(A)6 is approximately 2.8 fmol. PMID:17902633

  19. Direct measurement of oligonucleotide binding stoichiometry of gene V protein by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, X; Harms, A C; Goudreau, P N; Terwilliger, T C; Smith, R D

    1996-01-01

    The binding stoichiometry of gene V protein from bacteriophage f1 to several oligonucleotides was studied using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Using mild mass spectrometer interface conditions that preserve noncovalent associations in solution, gene V protein was observed as dimer ions from a 10 mM NH4OAc solution. Addition of oligonucleotides resulted in formation of protein-oligonucleotide complexes with stoichiometry of approximately four nucleotides (nt) per protein monomer. A 16-mer oligonucleotide gave predominantly a 4:1 (protein monomer: oligonucleotide) complex while oligonucleotides shorter than 15 nt showed stoichiometries of 2:1. Stoichiometries and relative binding constants for a mixture of oligonucleotides were readily measured using mass spectrometry. The binding stoichiometry of the protein with the 16-mer oligonucleotide was measured independently using size-exclusion chromatography and the results were consistent with the mass spectrometric data. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the observation and stoichiometric measurement of protein-oligonucleotide complexes using ESI-MS. The sensitivity and high resolution of ESI-MS should make it a useful too] in the study of protein-DNA interactions. PMID:8692937

  20. 2'-O-[2-(guanidinium)ethyl]-modified oligonucleotides: stabilizing effect on duplex and triplex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, T.P.; Puschl, A.; Lesnik, E.; Mohan, V.; Tereshko, V.; Egli, M.; Manoharan, M.

    2010-03-08

    Oligonucleotides with a novel 2'-O-[2-(guanidinium)ethyl] (2'-O-GE) modification have been synthesized using a novel protecting group strategy for the guanidinium group. This modification enhances the binding affinity of oligonucleotides to RNA as well as duplex DNA ({Delta}T{sub m} 3.2 C per modification). The 2'-O-GE modified oligonucleotides exhibited exceptional resistance to nuclease degradation. The crystal structure of a palindromic duplex formed by a DNA oligonucleotide with a single 2'-O-GE modification was solved at 1.16 {angstrom} resolution.

  1. In situ detection of bacteria in continuous-flow cultures of seawater sediment suspensions with fluorescently labelled rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Bruns, A; Berthe-Corti, L

    1998-10-01

    rRNA-targeted and fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes were used to study the composition of natural bacterial populations in continuous-flow cultures of seawater sediment suspensions. The cultures were run as enrichment cultures with increasing dilution rates, and hexadecane as the sole carbon source. Total cell numbers were analysed by counting DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole)-stained cells. To differentiate the population composition, oligonucleotide probes for eubacteria, for Cytophaga/Flavobacteria, and for four subclasses of the Proteobacteria (alpha, beta, gamma and delta) were used. About 40-80% of the DAPI-stained cells could be detected with the EUB338 probe. Moreover, it was possible to detect a shift in the composition of the natural bacterial population with increasing dilution rate of the continuous culture, from large amounts of Cytophaga/Flavobacteria to large numbers of members of the gamma-Proteobacteria. The cell recovery rate for bacteria labelled with specific oligonucleotide probes was analysed with defined cell numbers of Rhodospirillum rubrum, Comamonas testosteroni and Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris introduced into the seawater sediment suspension, and was determined to be 13.9-33.5%. The standard deviation determined for this method applied to sediment suspensions was +/- 8.3%. The results suggest that the application of the in situ hybridization technique allows a good insight into the structure of populations growing in sediment suspensions. PMID:9802019

  2. Poly(o-phenylenediamine) colloid-quenched fluorescent oligonucleotide as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Li, Hailong; Luo, Yonglan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingwei; Sun, Xuping

    2011-02-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that chemical oxidation polymerization of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) by potassium bichromate at room temperature results in the formation of submicrometer-scale poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD) colloids. Such colloids can absorb and quench dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) very effectively. In the presence of a target, a hybridization event occurs, which produces a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that detaches from the POPD surface, leading to recovery of dye fluorescence. With the use of an oligonucleotide (OND) sequence associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system, we demonstrate the proof of concept that POPD colloid-quenched fluorescent OND can be used as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection with selectivity down to single-base mismatch. PMID:21186809

  3. Repair of DNA lesions associated with triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Glazer, Peter M

    2009-04-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are gene targeting tools that can bind in the major groove of duplex DNA in a sequence-specific manner. When bound to DNA, TFOs can inhibit gene expression, can position DNA-reactive agents to specific locations in the genome, or can induce targeted mutagenesis and recombination. There is evidence that third strand binding, alone or with an associated cross-link, is recognized and metabolized by DNA repair factors, particularly the nucleotide excision repair pathway. This review examines the evidence for DNA repair of triplex-associated lesions. PMID:19072762

  4. A convenient and efficient purification method for chemically labeled oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jihee; Kang, Junhee; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Younggyu

    2013-05-01

    We developed an efficient, cost-effective, and rapid purification method for chemically-labeled oligonucleotides that requires less time than conventional procedures such as ethanol precipitation or size-exclusion chromatography. Based on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of DNA and amine-reactive fluorophores, we show that n-butanol saturated with distilled water may be used to remove unreacted fluorophores by sequestering them in the organic phase, while labeled DNA remains in the aqueous phase. This phase extraction method is simple, fast, and allows for processing multiple samples simultaneously, a necessity for high-throughput labeling strategies. PMID:23662899

  5. On the rapid deprotection of synthetic oligonucleotides and analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Polushin, N N; Morocho, A M; Chen, B C; Cohen, J S

    1994-01-01

    The efficiency of oligodeoxynucleotide deprotection is greatly enhanced using a combination of: (a) ethanolamine, and especially a mixture of hydrazine, ethanolamine and methanol, in place of the usual aqueous ammonia; (b) tert-butylphenoxyacetyl amino protecting groups, and (c) oxalyl link between the first nucleotide and the polymeric support. The extent of base modification, particularly of C, is shown to be extremely low, and the quality of deprotected oligonucleotides is as high as in the case of ammonia deprotection. This method is also shown to be applicable to the preparation of phosphorothioate and methylphosphonate oligodeoxynucleotides and oligoribonucleotides. Images PMID:8127712

  6. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  7. Inhibition Of Molecular And Biological Processes Using Modified Oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Malykh, Andrei G.; Polouchine, Nikolai N.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2003-04-15

    A method of inhibiting at least one molecular process in a sample, comprising administering to the sample an oligonucleotide or polynucleotide containing at least one monomeric unit having formula (I): wherein A is an organic moiety, n is at least 1, and each X is independently selected from the group consisting of --NRCOCONu, --NHCOCR.sub.2 CR.sub.2 CONu, --NHCOCR.dbd.CRCONu, and --NHCOSSCONu, wherein each R independently represents H or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, and Nu represents a nucleophile, or a salt of the compound.

  8. Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza A viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotchenko, S. A.; Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Smirnova, E. A.; Kushnareva, E. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Sansyzbay, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Influenza is one of the most widespread respiratory viral diseases, infecting humans, horses, pigs, poultry and some other animal populations. Influenza A viruses (IAV) are classified into subtypes on the basis of the surface hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) glycoproteins. The correct determination of IAV subtype is necessary for clinical and epidemiological studies. In this article we propose an oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of IAV using universal one-step multisegment RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of viral gene segments. It showed to be an advanced approach for fast detection and identification of IAV.

  9. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kolganova, N. A.; Shchyolkina, A. K.; Chudinov, A. V.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Florentiev, V. L.; Timofeev, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-directed DNA recognition is strictly limited by polypurine sequences. In an attempt to address this problem with synthetic biology tools, we designed a panel of short chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and studied their interaction with fluorescently labelled duplex hairpins using various techniques. The hybridization of hairpin with an array of chimeric probes suggests that recognition of double-stranded DNA follows complicated rules combining reversed Hoogsteen and non-canonical homologous hydrogen bonding. In the presence of magnesium ions, chimeric TFOs are able to form highly stable α,β-triplexes, as indicated by native gel-electrophoresis, on-array thermal denaturation and fluorescence-quenching experiments. CD spectra of chimeric triplexes exhibited features typically observed for anti-parallel purine triplexes with a GA or GT third strand. The high potential of chimeric α,β-TFOs in targeting double-stranded DNA was demonstrated in the EcoRI endonuclease protection assay. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the recognition of base pair inversions in a duplex by chimeric TFOs containing α-thymidine and α-deoxyguanosine. PMID:22641847

  10. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kolganova, N A; Shchyolkina, A K; Chudinov, A V; Zasedatelev, A S; Florentiev, V L; Timofeev, E N

    2012-09-01

    Triplex-directed DNA recognition is strictly limited by polypurine sequences. In an attempt to address this problem with synthetic biology tools, we designed a panel of short chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and studied their interaction with fluorescently labelled duplex hairpins using various techniques. The hybridization of hairpin with an array of chimeric probes suggests that recognition of double-stranded DNA follows complicated rules combining reversed Hoogsteen and non-canonical homologous hydrogen bonding. In the presence of magnesium ions, chimeric TFOs are able to form highly stable α,β-triplexes, as indicated by native gel-electrophoresis, on-array thermal denaturation and fluorescence-quenching experiments. CD spectra of chimeric triplexes exhibited features typically observed for anti-parallel purine triplexes with a GA or GT third strand. The high potential of chimeric α,β-TFOs in targeting double-stranded DNA was demonstrated in the EcoRI endonuclease protection assay. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the recognition of base pair inversions in a duplex by chimeric TFOs containing α-thymidine and α-deoxyguanosine. PMID:22641847

  11. Optimizing anti-gene oligonucleotide ‘Zorro-LNA’ for improved strand invasion into duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Eman M.; Madsen, Andreas S.; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Oprea, Iulian I.; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Bestas, Burcu; Gupta, Pankaj; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lundin, Karin E.; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2011-01-01

    Zorro-LNA (Zorro) is a newly developed, oligonucleotide (ON)-based, Z-shaped construct with the potential of specific binding to each strand of duplex DNA. The first-generation Zorros are formed by two hybridized LNA/DNA mixmers (2-ON Zorros) and was hypothesized to strand invade. We have now established a method, which conclusively demonstrates that an LNA ON can strand invade into duplex DNA. To make Zorros smaller in size and easier to design, we synthesized 3′–5′–5′–3′ single-stranded Zorro-LNA (ssZorro) by using both 3′- and 5′-phosphoramidites. With ssZorro, a significantly greater extent and rate of double-strand invasion (DSI) was obtained than with conventional 2-ON Zorros. Introducing hydrophilic PEG-linkers connecting the two strands did not significantly change the rate or extent of DSI as compared to ssZorro with a nucleotide-based linker, while the longest alkyl-chain linker tested (36 carbons) resulted in a very slow DSI. The shortest alkyl-chain linker (3 carbons) did not reduce the extent of DSI of ssZorro, but significantly decreased the DSI rate. Collectively, ssZorro is smaller in size, easier to design and more efficient than conventional 2-ON Zorro in inducing DSI. Analysis of the chemical composition of the linker suggests that it could be of importance for future therapeutic considerations. PMID:20860997

  12. Synthetic oligonucleotides recruit ILF2/3 to RNA transcripts to modulate splicing

    PubMed Central

    Rigo, Frank; Hua, Yimin; Chun, Seung J; Prakash, Thazha P; Krainer, Adrian R; Bennett, C Frank

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new technology for recruiting specific proteins to RNA through selective recognition of heteroduplexes formed with chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Typically, ASOs function by hybridizing to their RNA targets and blocking the binding of single-stranded RNA–binding proteins. Unexpectedly, we found that ASOs with 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro (2′-F) nucleotides, but not with other 2′ chemical modifications, have an additional property: they form heteroduplexes with RNA that are specifically recognized by the interleukin enhancer-binding factor 2 and 3 complex (ILF2/3). 2′-F ASO–directed recruitment of ILF2/3 to RNA can be harnessed to control gene expression by modulating alternative splicing of target transcripts. ILF2/3 recruitment to precursor mRNA near an exon results in omission of the exon from the mature mRNA, both in cell culture and in mice. We discuss the possibility of using chemically engineered ASOs that recruit specific proteins to modulate gene expression for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22504300

  13. Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum strain SS14 determined with oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Matějková, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy; Petrosino, Joseph F; Sodergren, Erica; Norton, Jason E; Singh, Jaz; Richmond, Todd A; Molla, Michael N; Albert, Thomas J; Weinstock, George M

    2008-01-01

    Background Syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum remains the enigmatic pathogen, since no virulence factors have been identified and the pathogenesis of the disease is poorly understood. Increasing rates of new syphilis cases per year have been observed recently. Results The genome of the SS14 strain was sequenced to high accuracy by an oligonucleotide array strategy requiring hybridization to only three arrays (Comparative Genome Sequencing, CGS). Gaps in the resulting sequence were filled with targeted dideoxy-terminators (DDT) sequencing and the sequence was confirmed by whole genome fingerprinting (WGF). When compared to the Nichols strain, 327 single nucleotide substitutions (224 transitions, 103 transversions), 14 deletions, and 18 insertions were found. On the proteome level, the highest frequency of amino acid-altering substitution polymorphisms was in novel genes, while the lowest was in housekeeping genes, as expected by their evolutionary conservation. Evidence was also found for hypervariable regions and multiple regions showing intrastrain heterogeneity in the T. pallidum chromosome. Conclusion The observed genetic changes do not have influence on the ability of Treponema pallidum to cause syphilitic infection, since both SS14 and Nichols are virulent in rabbit. However, this is the first assessment of the degree of variation between the two syphilis pathogens and paves the way for phylogenetic studies of this fascinating organism. PMID:18482458

  14. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  15. Synthetic oligonucleotides recruit ILF2/3 to RNA transcripts to modulate splicing.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Frank; Hua, Yimin; Chun, Seung J; Prakash, Thazha P; Krainer, Adrian R; Bennett, C Frank

    2012-06-01

    We describe a new technology for recruiting specific proteins to RNA through selective recognition of heteroduplexes formed with chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Typically, ASOs function by hybridizing to their RNA targets and blocking the binding of single-stranded RNA-binding proteins. Unexpectedly, we found that ASOs with 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) nucleotides, but not with other 2' chemical modifications, have an additional property: they form heteroduplexes with RNA that are specifically recognized by the interleukin enhancer-binding factor 2 and 3 complex (ILF2/3). 2'-F ASO-directed recruitment of ILF2/3 to RNA can be harnessed to control gene expression by modulating alternative splicing of target transcripts. ILF2/3 recruitment to precursor mRNA near an exon results in omission of the exon from the mature mRNA, both in cell culture and in mice. We discuss the possibility of using chemically engineered ASOs that recruit specific proteins to modulate gene expression for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22504300

  16. Genome-wide expression analysis of Saccharomyces pastorianus orthologous genes using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takaaki; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Kawaide, Risa; Furusawa, Chikara; Nakao, Yoshihiro; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    The lager brewing yeast, Saccharomyces pastorianus, an allopolyploid species hybrid, contains 2 diverged sub-genomes; one derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc-type) and the other from Saccharomyces bayanus (Sb-type). We analyzed the functional roles of these orthologous genes in determining the phenotypic features of S. pastorianus. We used a custom-made oligonucleotide microarray containing probes designed for both Sc-type and Sb-type ORFs for a comprehensive expression analysis of S. pastorianus in a pilot-scale fermentation. We showed a high degree of correlation between the expression levels and the expression changes for a majority of orthologous gene sets during the fermentation process. We screened the functional categories and metabolic pathways where Sc- or Sb-type genes have higher expression levels than the corresponding orthologous genes. Our data showed that, for example, pathways for sulfur metabolism, cellular import, and production of branched amino acids are dominated by Sb-type genes. This comprehensive expression analysis of orthologous genes can provide valuable insights on understanding the phenotype of S. pastorianus. PMID:20547377

  17. An oligonucleotide-functionalized carbon nanotube chemiresistor for sensitive detection of mercury in saliva.

    PubMed

    Wordofa, Dawit N; Ramnani, Pankaj; Tran, Thien-Toan; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2016-04-25

    Divalent mercuric (Hg(2+)) ion and monomethyl mercury (CH3Hg(+)) are two forms of mercury that are known to be highly toxic to humans. In this work, we present a highly selective, sensitive and label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of both, Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) ions using DNA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNTs were functionalized with the capture oligonucleotide, polyT, using a linker molecule. The polyT was hybridized with polyA to form a polyT:polyA duplex. Upon exposure to mercury ions, the polyT:polyA duplex dehybridizes and a T-Hg(2+)-T duplex is formed. This structure switch leads to the release of polyA from the SWNT surface and correspondingly a change in the resistance of the chemiresistive biosensor is observed, which is used to quantify the mercury ion concentration. The biosensor showed a wide dynamic range of 0.5 to 100 nM for the detection of CH3Hg(+) ions in buffer solution with a sensitivity of 28.34% per log (nM) of CH3Hg(+). Finally, real world application of the biosensor was demonstrated by the detection of Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) ions in simulated saliva samples spiked with a known concentration of mercury ions. PMID:26902487

  18. Development of low-density oligonucleotide microarrays for detecting mutations causing Wilson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Manjula; Singh, Ekta; Poduval, T.B.; Rao, Akkipeddi V.S.S.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in ATP7B, a copper transporter gene, leading to hepatic and neuropsychiatric manifestations due to copper accumulation. If diagnosed early, WD patients can be managed by medicines reducing morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of this disease requires a combination of tests and at times is inconclusive due to overlap of the symptoms with other disorders. Genetic testing is the preferred alternative in such cases particularly for individuals with a family history. Use of DNA microarray for detecting mutations in ATP7B gene is gaining popularity because of the advantages it offers in terms of throughput and sensitivity. This study attempts to establish the quality analysis procedures for microarray based diagnosis of Wilson's disease. Methods: A home-made microarrayer was used to print oligonucleotide based low-density microarrays for addressing 62 mutations causing Wilson's disease reported from Indian population. Inter- and intra- array comparisons were used to study quality of the arrays. The arrays were validated by using mutant samples generated by site directed mutagenesis. Results: The hybridization reaction were found to be consistent across the surface of a given microarray. Our results have shown that 52 °C post-hybridization wash yields better reproducibility across experiments compared to 42 °C. Our arrays have shown > 80 per cent sensitivity in detecting these 62 mutations. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results demonstrate the design and evaluation of a low-density microarray for the detection of 62 mutations in ATP7B gene, and show that a microarray based approach can be cost-effective for detecting a large number of mutations simultaneously. This study also provides information on some of the important parameters required for microarray based diagnosis of genetic disorders. PMID:25900953

  19. Design and Verification of a Pangenome Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Set for Dehalococcoides spp. ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hug, Laura A.; Salehi, Maryam; Nuin, Paulo; Tillier, Elisabeth R.; Edwards, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Dehalococcoides spp. are an industrially relevant group of Chloroflexi bacteria capable of reductively dechlorinating contaminants in groundwater environments. Existing Dehalococcoides genomes revealed a high level of sequence identity within this group, including 98 to 100% 16S rRNA sequence identity between strains with diverse substrate specificities. Common molecular techniques for identification of microbial populations are often not applicable for distinguishing Dehalococcoides strains. Here we describe an oligonucleotide microarray probe set designed based on clustered Dehalococcoides genes from five different sources (strain DET195, CBDB1, BAV1, and VS genomes and the KB-1 metagenome). This “pangenome” probe set provides coverage of core Dehalococcoides genes as well as strain-specific genes while optimizing the potential for hybridization to closely related, previously unknown Dehalococcoides strains. The pangenome probe set was compared to probe sets designed independently for each of the five Dehalococcoides strains. The pangenome probe set demonstrated better predictability and higher detection of Dehalococcoides genes than strain-specific probe sets on nontarget strains with <99% average nucleotide identity. An in silico analysis of the expected probe hybridization against the recently released Dehalococcoides strain GT genome and additional KB-1 metagenome sequence data indicated that the pangenome probe set performs more robustly than the combined strain-specific probe sets in the detection of genes not included in the original design. The pangenome probe set represents a highly specific, universal tool for the detection and characterization of Dehalococcoides from contaminated sites. It has the potential to become a common platform for Dehalococcoides-focused research, allowing meaningful comparisons between microarray experiments regardless of the strain examined. PMID:21666017

  20. Oligonucleotide and polymer functionalized nanoparticles for amplification-free detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Thomson, David A C; Tee, Ernest H L; Tran, Nguyen T D; Monteiro, Michael J; Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-06-11

    Sensitive and quantitative nucleic acid testing from complex biological samples is now an important component of clinical diagnostics. Whereas nucleic acid amplification represents the gold standard, its utility in resource-limited and point-of-care settings can be problematic due to assay interferants, assay time, engineering constraints, and costs associated with both wetware and hardware. In contrast, amplification-free nucleic acid testing can circumvent these limitations by enabling direct target hybridization within complex sample matrices. In this work, we grew random copolymer brushes from the surface of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles using azide-modified and hydroxyl oligo ethylene glycol methacrylate (OEGMA) monomers. The azide-functionalized polymer brush was first conjugated, via copper-catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific oligonucleotides and then with alkyne-substituted polyethylene glycol to eliminate all residual azide groups. Our methodology enabled control over brush thickness and probe density and enabled multiple consecutive coupling reactions on the particle grafted brush. Brush- and probe-modified particles were then combined in a 20 min hybridization with fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles modified with HSV-specific reporter probes. Following magnetic capture and washing, the particles were analyzed with an aggregate fluorescence measurement, which yielded a limit of detection of 6 pM in buffer and 60 pM in 50% fetal bovine serum. Adoption of brush- and probe-modified particles into a particle counting assay will result in the development of diagnostic assays with significant improvements in sensitivity. PMID:22612382

  1. Functionalization of silicon oxide using supercritical fluid deposition of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane for the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, Jordi; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Costa, Guillaume; Fontelaye, Caroline; Marchi-Delapierre, Caroline; Ménage, Stéphane; Marchand, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The functionalization of silicon oxide based substrates using silanes is generally performed through liquid phase methodologies. These processes involve a huge quantity of potentially toxic solvents and present some important disadvantages for the functionalization of microdevices or porous materials, for example the low diffusion. To overcome this drawback, solvent-free methodologies like molecular vapor deposition (MVD) or supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) have been developed. In this paper, the deposition process of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane (EBTMOS) on silicon oxide using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent is studied for the first time. The oxirane ring of epoxy silanes readily reacts with amine group and is of particular interest for the grafting of amino-modified oligonucleotides or antibodies for diagnostic application. Then the ability of this specific EBTMOS layer to react with amine functions has been evaluated using the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide probes. The presence of the probes is revealed by fluorescence using hybridization with a fluorescent target oligonucleotide. The performances of SFD of EBTMOS have been optimized and then compared with the dip coating and molecular vapor deposition methods, evidencing a better grafting efficiency and homogeneity, a lower reaction time in addition to the eco-friendly properties of the supercritical carbon dioxide. The epoxysilane layers have been characterized by surface enhanced ellipsometric contrast optical technique, atomic force microscopy, multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The shelf life of the 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane coating layer has also been studied. Finally, two different strategies of NH2-oligonucleotide grafting on EBTMOS coating layer have been compared, i.e. reductive amination and nucleophilic substitution, SN2. This EBTMOS based coating layer can be used for a wide range of applications

  2. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Zhu, Xun; Lu, Patrick Y; Rosato, Roberto R; Tan, Wen; Zu, Youli

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy. PMID:25093706

  3. DOTAP/UDCA vesicles: novel approach in oligonucleotide delivery.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, Barbara; Battini, Renata; Montanari, Monica; Mucci, Adele; Tosi, Giovanni; Forni, Flavio; Vandelli, Maria Angela

    2007-03-01

    The relatively hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), was used as an additive to DOTAP cationic liposomes to evaluate the effect on the cellular uptake of an oligonucleotide. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies were applied to estimate the relative amount of incorporated UDCA into the lipidic bilayers. DOTAP or DOTAP-UDCA vesicles (MixVes; DOTAP/UDCA molar ratios 1:0.25, 1:0.5, 1:1, and 1:2) formed complexes with 5'-fluorescein conjugated 29-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs) and studied using gel electrophoresis. In addition, the complexes were tested after transfection to assess the cellular uptake and the localization of the oligo in a HaCaT cell line by the use of cytofluorimetric and confocal microscopic analysis. DOTAP lipid formulated in the presence of a defined amount of UDCA forms more stable, flexible, and active MixVes. In particular, the MixVes at 1:0.25 and 1:0.5 molar ratios increase and modify the cellular uptake of PS-ODNs if compared with DOTAP liposomes 3 hours after the transfection studies. Moreover, the in vitro data suggest that these new formulations are not toxic. PMID:17379164

  4. Multiplex pairwise assembly of array-derived DNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jason C.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Schwartz, Jerrod J.; Strauch, Eva-Maria; Nelson, Jorgen; Baker, David; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    While the cost of DNA sequencing has dropped by five orders of magnitude in the past decade, DNA synthesis remains expensive for many applications. Although DNA microarrays have decreased the cost of oligonucleotide synthesis, the use of array-synthesized oligos in practice is limited by short synthesis lengths, high synthesis error rates, low yield and the challenges of assembling long constructs from complex pools. Toward addressing these issues, we developed a protocol for multiplex pairwise assembly of oligos from array-synthesized oligonucleotide pools. To evaluate the method, we attempted to assemble up to 2271 targets ranging in length from 192–252 bases using pairs of array-synthesized oligos. Within sets of complexity ranging from 131–250 targets, we observed error-free assemblies for 90.5% of all targets. When all 2271 targets were assembled in one reaction, we observed error-free constructs for 70.6%. While the assembly method intrinsically increased accuracy to a small degree, we further increased accuracy by using a high throughput ‘Dial-Out PCR’ protocol, which combines Illumina sequencing with an in-house set of unique PCR tags to selectively amplify perfect assemblies from complex synthetic pools. This approach has broad applicability to DNA assembly and high-throughput functional screens. PMID:26553805

  5. Dendritic nanoconjugates for intracellular delivery of neutral oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xin; Wu, Lin; Carver, Kyle; Yuan, Ahu; Min, Yuanzeng

    2015-07-01

    Dendrimer-based gene delivery has been constrained by intrinsic toxicity and suboptimal nanostructure. Conjugation of neutral morpholino oligonucleotides (ONs) with PAMAM dendrimers resulted in neutral, uniform, and ultra-small (~10 nm) nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates dramatically enhanced cellular delivery of the ONs in cancer cells. After release from the dendrimer in the cytosol, the ONs produced potent functional activity without causing significant cytotoxicity. When carrying an apoptosis-promoting ON, the nanoconjugates produced cancer cell killing directly. Thus, the dendritic nanoconjugates may provide an effective tool for delivering ONs to tumors and other diseased tissues.Dendrimer-based gene delivery has been constrained by intrinsic toxicity and suboptimal nanostructure. Conjugation of neutral morpholino oligonucleotides (ONs) with PAMAM dendrimers resulted in neutral, uniform, and ultra-small (~10 nm) nanoconjugates. The nanoconjugates dramatically enhanced cellular delivery of the ONs in cancer cells. After release from the dendrimer in the cytosol, the ONs produced potent functional activity without causing significant cytotoxicity. When carrying an apoptosis-promoting ON, the nanoconjugates produced cancer cell killing directly. Thus, the dendritic nanoconjugates may provide an effective tool for delivering ONs to tumors and other diseased tissues. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01665g

  6. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  7. Multiplex pairwise assembly of array-derived DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jason C; Lajoie, Marc J; Schwartz, Jerrod J; Strauch, Eva-Maria; Nelson, Jorgen; Baker, David; Shendure, Jay

    2016-03-18

    While the cost of DNA sequencing has dropped by five orders of magnitude in the past decade, DNA synthesis remains expensive for many applications. Although DNA microarrays have decreased the cost of oligonucleotide synthesis, the use of array-synthesized oligos in practice is limited by short synthesis lengths, high synthesis error rates, low yield and the challenges of assembling long constructs from complex pools. Toward addressing these issues, we developed a protocol for multiplex pairwise assembly of oligos from array-synthesized oligonucleotide pools. To evaluate the method, we attempted to assemble up to 2271 targets ranging in length from 192-252 bases using pairs of array-synthesized oligos. Within sets of complexity ranging from 131-250 targets, we observed error-free assemblies for 90.5% of all targets. When all 2271 targets were assembled in one reaction, we observed error-free constructs for 70.6%. While the assembly method intrinsically increased accuracy to a small degree, we further increased accuracy by using a high throughput 'Dial-Out PCR' protocol, which combines Illumina sequencing with an in-house set of unique PCR tags to selectively amplify perfect assemblies from complex synthetic pools. This approach has broad applicability to DNA assembly and high-throughput functional screens. PMID:26553805

  8. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  9. Synthesis of 3'-, or 5'-, or internal methacrylamido-modified oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Golova, Julia B.; Chernov, Boris K.

    2010-04-27

    New modifiers were synthesized for incorporation of a methacrylic function in 3'-, 5'- and internal positions of oligonucleotides during solid phase synthesis. A modifier was used for synthesis of 5'-methacrylated oligonucleotides for preparation of microarrays by a co-polymerization method.

  10. HELP (high efficiency liquid phase) new oligonucleotide synthesis on soluble polymeric support.

    PubMed

    Bonora, G M; Scremin, C L; Colonna, F P; Garbesi, A

    1990-06-11

    A simple, rapid and high-yielding method for the synthesis of oligonucleotides by the phosphotriesters approach is described. The use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) as soluble polymeric support preserves some convenient features of the solid-phase synthesis with new interesting advantages. Short oligonucleotides in hundred milligrams scale can be obtained from few grams of functionalized PEG. PMID:2356115

  11. HELP (high efficiency liquid phase) new oligonucleotide synthesis on soluble polymeric support.

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, G M; Scremin, C L; Colonna, F P; Garbesi, A

    1990-01-01

    A simple, rapid and high-yielding method for the synthesis of oligonucleotides by the phosphotriesters approach is described. The use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) as soluble polymeric support preserves some convenient features of the solid-phase synthesis with new interesting advantages. Short oligonucleotides in hundred milligrams scale can be obtained from few grams of functionalized PEG. PMID:2356115

  12. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis on hairpin oligonucleotides. II - Templates containing cytidine and guanosine residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1992-01-01

    Hairpin oligonucleotides were prepared with 5-prime-terminal single-stranded sequments containing cytidylate (C) and guanylate (G) residues. It was found that incubation of these hairpin oligonucleotides with a mixutre of cytidine and guanosine 5-prime-phosphoro (2-methyl)imidazolides results in sequence-specific addition of C and G residues to the 3-prime terminus of the hairpin.

  13. Application of Equilibrium Models of Solution Hybridization to Microarray Design and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Newton, Joshua M.; Weller, Jennifer W.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The probe percent bound value, calculated using multi-state equilibrium models of solution hybridization, is shown to be useful in understanding the hybridization behavior of microarray probes having 50 nucleotides, with and without mismatches. These longer oligonucleotides are in widespread use on microarrays, but there are few controlled studies of their interactions with mismatched targets compared to 25-mer based platforms. Principal Findings 50-mer oligonucleotides with centrally placed single, double and triple mismatches were spotted on an array. Over a range of target concentrations it was possible to discriminate binding to perfect matches and mismatches, and the type of mismatch could be predicted accurately in the concentration midrange (100 pM to 200 pM) using solution hybridization modeling methods. These results have implications for microarray design, optimization and analysis methods. Conclusions Our results highlight the importance of incorporating biophysical factors in both the design and the analysis of microarrays. Use of the probe “percent bound” value predicted by equilibrium models of hybridization is confirmed to be important for predicting and interpreting the behavior of long oligonucleotide arrays, as has been shown for short oligonucleotide arrays. PMID:20548788

  14. Utility of array comparative genomic hybridization in cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi R; Cheung, K-John J; Horsman, Douglas E

    2011-01-01

    Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), high-resolution oligonucleotide, and BAC array CGH have modernized the field of cytogenetics to enable access to unbalanced genomic aberrations such as whole or partial chromosomal gains and losses. The basic principle of array CGH involves hybridizing differentially labeled proband/test (e.g., tumor) and normal reference DNA on an array of oligonucleotide or BAC clones instead of normal metaphases as in conventional CGH. The sub-megabase resolution tiling BAC arrays are extremely useful for the analysis of acquired aberrations in cancer genomes. Array CGH can be extremely useful to identify the chromosomal makeup of marker and ring chromosomes, to define/delineate the precise location/bands involved in structural aberrations and the accurate localization of translocation breakpoints in both simple and complex karyotypes either alone or in combination with standard karyotype analysis. PMID:21431645

  15. Stable dye-labelled oligonucleotide-nanoparticle conjugates for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Lee; Dougan, Jennifer A.; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2011-08-01

    Metallic nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides are used for a number of nucleic acid detection strategies. However, oligonucleotide-nanoparticle conjugates suffer from a lack of stability when exposed to certain conditions associated with DNA detection assays. In this study, we report the synthesis of thiol and thioctic acid-modified oligonucleotide gold nanoparticle (OGNs) conjugates functionalized with a dye label and varying spacer groups. The thioctic acid-modified conjugates exhibit increased stability when treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) compared to the more commonly used thiol modification. When the dye labelled oligonucleotide nanoparticle conjugates are exposed to the same conditions there is a pronounced increase in the stability for both thioctic acid and thiol modified sequences. These results open up the possibility of simply using a dye label to enhance the stability of oligonucleotide-nanoparticle conjugates in DNA detection assays where the enhanced stability of the conjugate system can be advantageous in more complex biological environments.

  16. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears.

    PubMed Central

    Nordentoft, S; Christensen, H; Wegener, H C

    1997-01-01

    A method for the detection of Salmonella based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been developed and applied for the direct detection of Salmonella in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. On the basis of the 23S rRNA gene sequences representing all of the S. enterica subspecies and S. bongori, an 18-mer oligonucleotide probe was selected. The specificity of the probe was tested by in situ hybridization to bacterial cell smears of pure cultures. Forty-nine of 55 tested Salmonella serovars belonging to subspecies I, II, IIIb, IV, and VI hybridized with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from experimentally infected mice or from animals with a history of clinical salmonellosis. In these tissue sections the probe hybridized specifically to Salmonella serovars, allowing for the detection of single bacterial cells. The development of a fluorescence-labelled specific oligonucleotide probe makes the FISH technique a promising tool for the rapid identification of S. enterica in bacterial smears, as well as for the detection of S. enterica in histological tissue sections. PMID:9316923

  17. Tabu search algorithm for DNA sequencing by hybridization with isothermic libraries.

    PubMed

    Błazewicz, Jacek; Formanowicz, Piotr; Kasprzak, Marta; Markiewicz, Wojciech T; Swiercz, Aleksandra

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, a problem of isothermic DNA sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is considered. In isothermic SBH a new type of oligonucleotide libraries is used. The library consists of oligonucleotides of different lengths depending on an oligonucleotide content. It is assumed that every oligonucleotide in such a library has an equal melting temperature. Each nucleotide adds its increment to the oligonucleotide temperature and it is assumed that A and T add 2 degrees C and C and G add 4 degrees C. The hybridization experiment using isothermic libraries should provide data with a lower number of errors due to an expected similarity of melting temperatures. From the computational point of view the problem of isothermic DNA sequencing with errors is hard, similarly like its classical counterpart. Hence, there is a need for developing heuristic algorithms that construct good suboptimal solutions. The aim of the paper is to propose a heuristic algorithm based on tabu search approach. The algorithm solves the problem with both positive and negative errors. Results of an extensive computational experiment are presented, which prove the high quality of the proposed method. PMID:14871640

  18. Recommendations for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Berman, Cindy L; Cannon, Keri; Cui, Yi; Kornbrust, Douglas J; Lagrutta, Armando; Sun, Sunny Z; Tepper, Jeff; Waldron, Gareth; Younis, Husam S

    2014-08-01

    This document was prepared by the Safety Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG), a group of industry and regulatory scientists involved in the development and regulation of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The mission of the Subcommittee was to develop scientific recommendations for the industry regarding the appropriate scope and strategies for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotides (ONs). These recommendations are the consensus opinion of the Subcommittee and do not necessarily reflect the current expectations of regulatory authorities. 1) Safety pharmacology testing, as described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7 guidance, is as applicable to ONs as it is to small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. 2) Study design considerations for ONs are similar to those for other classes of drugs. In general, as with other therapeutics, studies should evaluate the drug product administered via the clinical route. Species selection should ideally consider relevance of the model with regard to the endpoints of interest, pharmacological responsiveness, and continuity with the nonclinical development program. 3) Evaluation of potential effects in the core battery (cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems) is recommended. In general: a. In vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) testing does not provide any specific value and is not warranted. b. Emphasis should be placed on in vivo evaluation of cardiovascular function, typically in nonhuman primates (NHPs). c. Due to the low level of concern, neurologic and respiratory function can be assessed concurrently with cardiovascular safety pharmacology evaluation in NHPs, within repeat-dose toxicity studies, or as stand-alone studies. In the latter case, rodents are most commonly used. 4) Other dedicated safety pharmacology studies, beyond the core battery, may have limited value for ONs. Although ONs can accumulate in the kidney and liver

  19. Frequent oligonucleotides and peptides of the Haemophilus influenzae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Mrázek, J; Campbell, A M

    1996-01-01

    The complete Haemophilus influenzae genome (1.83 Mb, Rd strain) provides opportunities for characterizing global genomic inhomogeneities and for detecting important sequence signals. Along these lines, new methods for identifying frequent words (oligonucleotides and/or peptides) and their distributions are applied to the H.influenzae genome with some comparisons and contrasts made with frequent words of other bacterial genomes. Three major classes of frequent oligonucleotides stand out: (i) oligos related to the familiar uptake signal sequences (USSs), AAGTGCGGT (USS+) and its inverted complement (USS-), (ii) multiple tetranucleotide iterations and (iii) intergenic dyad sequences (ISDs) found as AAGCCCACCCTAC and its dyad form. The USS+ and USS- occur in almost equal counts, are remarkably evenly spaced around the genome, and appear predominantly in the same reading frame of protein coding domains (USS+ translated to Ser-Ala-Val, USS- translated to Thr-Ala-Leu). These observations suggest that USSs contribute to global genomic functions, for example, in replication and/or repair processes, or as membrane attachment sites, or as sequences helping to pack DNA. The long tetranucleotide iterations, virtually unique to H.influenzae (i.e., unknown in other prokaryotes), through polymerase slippage during replication and/or homologous recombination may produce subpopulations expressing alternative proteins. The 13 bp frequent IDS words, invariably intergenic, occur mostly in clusters and provide potential for complex secondary structures suggesting that these sequences may be important signals for regulating the activity of their flanking genes. The frequent oligopeptides of H.influenzae are principally of two kinds--those induced by oligonucleotide frequent words (USSs, tetranucleotide iterations), and those associated with ATP or GTP binding sites that are generally composed of three motifs: the A-box which contributes to delineating the binding pocket; the B-box which

  20. 18S rRNA Gene Variation among Common Airborne Fungi, and Development of Specific Oligonucleotide Probes for the Detection of Fungal Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihong; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Blomquist, Göran; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced 18S rRNA genes (rDNA) from 49 fungal strains representing 31 species from 15 genera. Most of these species are common airborne fungi and pathogens that may cause various public health concerns. Sequence analysis revealed distinct divergence between Zygomycota and Ascomycota. Within Ascomycota, several strongly supported clades were identified that facilitate the taxonomic placement of several little-studied fungi. Wallemia appeared as the group most diverged from all the other Ascomycota species. Based on the 18S rDNA sequence variation, 108 oligonucleotide probes were designed for each genus and species included in this study. After homology searches and DNA hybridization evaluations, 33 probes were verified as genus or species specific. The optimal hybridization temperatures to achieve the best specificity for these 33 probes were determined. These new probes can contribute to the molecular diagnostic research for environmental monitoring. PMID:12957927

  1. Hybridization triggered cross-linking of deoxyoligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T R; Matteucci, M D

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports details of the synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides containing the modified base 5-methyl-N4,N4-ethanocytosine (Ce). The 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl group is used as a protecting group for the exocyclic amines of dA and dC. This group can be removed rapidly under very mild conditions. Oligomers containing the Ce base form a cross-link when hybridized to their complementary deoxyoligonucleotides. Some of the scope and limitations of these cross-link forming oligonucleotides are reported. Images PMID:3774542

  2. Development of an rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe specific for the genus Acinetobacter and its application for in situ monitoring in activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M; Erhart, R; Manz, W; Amann, R; Lemmer, H; Wedi, D; Schleifer, K H

    1994-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphate removal in an anaerobic-aerobic activated sludge system has generally been ascribed to members of the genus Acinetobacter. A genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe was developed to investigate the role of Acinetobacter spp. in situ. Nonisotopic dot blot hybridization to 66 reference strains, including the seven described Acinetobacter spp., demonstrated the expected probe specificity. Fluorescent derivatives were used for in situ monitoring of Acinetobacter spp. in the anaerobic and aerobic compartments of a sewage treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphate removal. Microbial community structures were further analyzed with oligonucleotide probes specific for the alpha, beta, or gamma subclasses of the class Proteobacteria, for the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster, for gram-positive bacteria with a high G + C DNA content, and for all bacteria. Total cell counts were determined by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. In both the anaerobic and the aerobic basins, the activated sludge samples were dominated by members of the class Proteobacteria belonging to the beta subclass and by gram-positive bacteria with a high G + C DNA content. Acinetobacter spp. constituted less than 10% of all bacteria. For both basins, the microbial community structures determined with molecular techniques were compared with the compositions of the heterotrophic saprophytic microbiota determined with agar plating techniques. Isolates on nutrient-rich medium were classified by whole-cell hybridization with rRNA-targeted probes and fatty acid analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7512807

  3. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. PMID:26454462

  4. L-DNAs as potential antimessenger oligonucleotides: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Garbesi, A; Capobianco, M L; Colonna, F P; Tondelli, L; Arcamone, F; Manzini, G; Hilbers, C W; Aelen, J M; Blommers, M J

    1993-09-11

    Unnatural L-2'-deoxyribonucleosides L-T, L-dC, L-dA and L-dG were prepared from L-arabinose and assembled, by solution or solid phase synthesis, to give L-oligonucleotides (L-DNAs), which contain all four natural bases. The affinity of these modified oligomers for complementary D-ribo- and D-deoxyribo-oligomers was studied with NMR, UV and CD spectroscopies and mobility shift assay on native PAGE. All experimental results indicate that L-DNAs do not, in general, recognize single-stranded, natural DNA and RNA. Hence, contrary to previous suggestions, it is not possible to envisage their use as wide scope antimessenger agents in the selective control of gene expression. PMID:8414968

  5. L-DNAs as potential antimessenger oligonucleotides: a reassessment.

    PubMed Central

    Garbesi, A; Capobianco, M L; Colonna, F P; Tondelli, L; Arcamone, F; Manzini, G; Hilbers, C W; Aelen, J M; Blommers, M J

    1993-01-01

    Unnatural L-2'-deoxyribonucleosides L-T, L-dC, L-dA and L-dG were prepared from L-arabinose and assembled, by solution or solid phase synthesis, to give L-oligonucleotides (L-DNAs), which contain all four natural bases. The affinity of these modified oligomers for complementary D-ribo- and D-deoxyribo-oligomers was studied with NMR, UV and CD spectroscopies and mobility shift assay on native PAGE. All experimental results indicate that L-DNAs do not, in general, recognize single-stranded, natural DNA and RNA. Hence, contrary to previous suggestions, it is not possible to envisage their use as wide scope antimessenger agents in the selective control of gene expression. Images PMID:8414968

  6. Synthesis of oligonucleotides on cellulose by a phosphotriester method.

    PubMed Central

    Crea, R; Horn, T

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis of oligothymidilic acids, (dT)m (where m = 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, and 25), was carried out using a solid phase approach in combination with the modified phosphotriester methodology developed in solution. Cellulose was used as the solid support after its functionalization with a specially featured dinucleoside diphosphate, 5'-0-p-chlorophenylphospho-2'(3')-0-acetyluridilyl-[2'(3')-3']-5'-0-dimethoxytritylthymidine p-chlorophenylester. The fully protected trideoxynucleoside triphosphate containing only thymidine was repeatedly used to elongate the oligonucleotide chain in the 3'-5' direction. Individual coupling yields ranged from 45% to 75%. The total time needed to prepare (dT)25 was four days. Similarly, the tridecanucleotide d(AGAAGGTACTTTT) was synthesized in good yield. The results show that this approach can be used for a fast and economic way to synthesize oligodeoxynucleotides. Images PMID:7433092

  7. [Research progress of probe design software of oligonucleotide microarrays].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Zhengchun

    2014-02-01

    DNA microarray has become an essential medical genetic diagnostic tool for its high-throughput, miniaturization and automation. The design and selection of oligonucleotide probes are critical for preparing gene chips with high quality. Several sets of probe design software have been developed and are available to perform this work now. Every set of the software aims to different target sequences and shows different advantages and limitations. In this article, the research and development of these sets of software are reviewed in line with three main criteria, including specificity, sensitivity and melting temperature (Tm). In addition, based on the experimental results from literatures, these sets of software are classified according to their applications. This review will be helpful for users to choose an appropriate probe-design software. It will also reduce the costs of microarrays, improve the application efficiency of microarrays, and promote both the research and development (R&D) and commercialization of high-performance probe design software. PMID:24804514

  8. Efficient site-directed saturation mutagenesis using degenerate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David L; Williams, John G K

    2007-07-01

    We describe a reliable protocol for constructing single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries consisting of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids at a specific site within a protein. Such libraries are useful for structure-function studies and directed evolution. This protocol extends the utility of Stratagene's QuikChange Site-Directed Mutagenesis Kit, which is primarily recommended for single amino acid substitutions. Two complementary primers are synthesized, containing a degenerate mixture of the four bases at the three positions of the selected codon. These primers are added to starting plasmid template and thermal cycled to produce mutant DNA molecules, which are subsequently transformed into competent bacteria. The protocol does not require purification of mutagenic oligonucleotides or PCR products. This reduces both the cost and turnaround time in high-throughput directed evolution applications. We have utilized this protocol to generate over 200 site-saturation libraries in a DNA polymerase, with a success rate of greater than 95%. PMID:17595310

  9. Oligonucleotide synthesis catalyzed by the Zn/2+/ ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawai, H.; Orgel, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments are reported in which Zn(2+) ion catalyzed the formation of oligonucleotides from nucleoside phosphorimidazolides in aqueous solution, even in the absence of a template. Specifically, the imidazolides (ImpU or ImpA) polymerized to form ImpApA, and pApA, pApApA, and pApApApA, or the analogous uracil compounds. In addition, the expected hydrolysis products of the hydrolysis of ImpA were formed (pA, imidazole). Judging from the ratio of pA(n) over pA (with and without zinc ion), this ion increased the efficiency of phosphodiester-bond formation by up to 10 times. Possible mechanisms for the reaction are tentatively proposed.

  10. Computer simulation in template-directed oligonucleotide synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Benasconi, Claude F.

    1990-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that template-directed polymerizations have played a key role in prebiotic evolution. A computer simulation that models up to 33 competing reactions was used to investigate the product distribution in a template-directed oligonucleotide synthesis as a function of time and concentration of the reactants. The study focuses on the poly(C)-directed elongation reaction of oligoguanylates, and how it is affected by the competing processes of hydrolysis and dimerization of the activated monomer, which have the potential of severely curtailing the elongation and reducing the size and yield of the synthesized polymers. The simulations show that realistic and probably prebiotically plausible conditions can be found where hydrolysis and dimerization are either negligible or where a high degree of polymerization can be attained even in the face of substantial hydrolysis and/or dimerization.

  11. Insights to primitive replication derived from structures of small oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. K.; Fox, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Available information on the structure of small oligonucleotides is surveyed. It is observed that even small oligomers typically exhibit defined structures over a wide range of pH and temperature. These structures rely on a plethora of non-standard base-base interactions in addition to the traditional Watson-Crick pairings. Stable duplexes, though typically antiparallel, can be parallel or staggered and perfect complementarity is not essential. These results imply that primitive template directed reactions do not require high fidelity. Hence, the extensive use of Watson-Crick complementarity in genes rather than being a direct consequence of the primitive condensation process, may instead reflect subsequent selection based on the advantage of accuracy in maintaining the primitive genetic machinery once it arose.

  12. DNA Oligonucleotide Fragment Ion Rearrangements Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of m/z-isolated w type fragment ions and an intact 5' phosphorylated DNA oligonucleotide generated rearranged product ions. Of the 21 studied w ions of various nucleotide sequences, fragment ion sizes, and charge states, 18 (~86%) generated rearranged product ions upon CID in a Synapt G2-S HDMS (Waters Corporation, Manchester, England, UK) ion mobility-mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometry (MS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and theoretical modeling data suggest that purine bases can attack the free 5' phosphate group in w type ions and 5' phosphorylated DNA to generate sequence permuted [phosphopurine]- fragment ions. We propose and discuss a potential mechanism for generation of rearranged [phosphopurine]- and complementary y-B type product ions.

  13. Targeting DNA with "light-up" pyrimidine triple-helical forming oligonucleotides conjugated to stabilizing fluorophores (LU-TFOs).

    PubMed

    Renard, Brice-Loïc; Lartia, Rémy; Asseline, Ulysse

    2008-12-01

    The synthesis of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) linked to a series of cyanine monomethines has been performed. Eight cyanines including one thiocyanine, four thiazole orange analogues, and three quinocyanines were attached to the 5'-end of 10-mer pyrimidine TFOs. The binding properties of these modified TFOs with their double-stranded DNA target were studied by absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The stability of the triplex structures depended on the cyanine structure and the linker size used to connect both entities. The most efficient cyanines able to stabilize the triplex structures, when attached at the 5'-end of the TFO, have been incorporated at both ends and provided triplex structures with increased stability. Fluorescence studies have shown that for the TFOs involving one cyanine, an important intensity increase (up to 37-fold) in the fluorescent signal was observed upon their hybridization with the double-stranded target, proving hybridization. The conjugates involving thiazole orange attached by the benzothiazole ring provided the most balanced properties in terms of triplex stabilization, fluorescence intensity and fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization with the double-stranded target. In order to test the influence of different parameters such as the TFO sequence and length, thiazole orange was used to label 17-mer TFOs. Hybridizations of these TFOs with different duplexes, designed to study the influence of mismatches at both internal and terminal positions on the triplex structures, confirmed the possibility of triplex formation without loss of specificity together with a strong fluorescence enhancement (up to 13-fold). PMID:19005602

  14. Enzymatic synthesis of modified oligonucleotides by PEAR using Phusion and KOD DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuxiang; Zhang, Jianye; Li, Yingjia; Chen, Gang; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-02-01

    Antisense synthetic oligonucleotides have been developed as potential gene-targeted therapeutics. We previously reported polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR) for amplification of natural and 5'-O-(1-thiotriphosphate) (S)-modified oligonucleotides. Here, we extended the PEAR technique for enzymatic preparation of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-(2'-F) and 2'-F/S double-modified oligonucleotides. The result showed that KOD and Phusion DNA polymerase could synthesize oligonucleotides with one or two modified nucleotides, and KOD DNA polymerase is more suitable than Phusion DNA polymerase for PEAR amplification of 2'-F and 2'-F/S double modified oligonucleotides. The composition of PEAR products were analyzed by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (ESI/LC/MS) detection and showed that the sequence of the PEAR products are maintained at an extremely high accuracy (>99.9%), and after digestion the area percent of full-length modified oligonucleotides reaches 89.24%. PEAR is suitable for synthesis of modified oligonucleotides efficiently and with high purity. PMID:25517220

  15. Oligonucleotides Designed to Inhibit TLR9 Block Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 Infection at Multiple Steps

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Monica M.; Gauger, Joshua J. L.; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen which requires activation of nuclear factor–kappa B (NFκB) during its replication cycle. The persistent nature of HSV-1 infection, and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, highlights the importance of research to develop new antiviral agents. Toll-like receptors (TLR) play a prominent role during the early antiviral response by recognizing viral nucleic acid and gene products, activating NFκB, and stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate a significant effect on HSV-1 replication in ARPE-19 and Vero cells when oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 are added 2 hours prior to infection. A greater than 90% reduction in the yield of infectious virus was achieved at oligonucleotide concentrations of 10 to 20 micromolar. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides prevented expression of essential immediate early herpes gene products as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. TLR9 oligonucleotides also interfered with viral attachment and entry. A TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide containing five adjacent guanosine residues (G-ODN) exhibited virucidal activity and inhibited HSV-1 replication when added post-infection. The antiviral effect of the TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides did not depend on the presence of TLR9 protein, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition that is not TLR9 specific. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides also reduced NFκB activity in nuclear extracts. Studies using these TLR inhibitors in the context of viral infection should be interpreted with caution. PMID:24995383

  16. Fast and accurate determination of sites along the FUT2 in vitro transcript that are accessible to antisense oligonucleotides by application of secondary structure predictions and RNase H in combination with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Angelika; Krebs, Stefan; Seichter, Doris; Förster, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Alteration of gene expression by use of antisense oligonucleotides has considerable potential for therapeutic purposes and scientific studies. Although applied for almost 25 years, this technique is still associated with difficulties in finding antisense-effective regions along the target mRNA. This is mainly due to strong secondary structures preventing binding of antisense oligonucleotides and RNase H, playing a major role in antisense-mediated degradation of the mRNA. These difficulties make empirical testing of a large number of sequences complementary to various sites in the target mRNA a very lengthy and troublesome procedure. To overcome this problem, more recent strategies to find efficient antisense sites are based on secondary structure prediction and RNase H-dependent mechanisms. We were the first who directly combined these two strategies; antisense oligonucleotides complementary to predicted unpaired target mRNA regions were designed and hybridized to the corresponding RNAs. Incubation with RNase H led to cleavage of the RNA at the respective hybridization sites. Analysis of the RNA fragments by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, which has not been used in this context before, allowed exact determination of the cleavage site. Thus the technique described here is very promising when searching for effective antisense sites. PMID:12888531

  17. Imaging of multiple mRNA targets using quantum dot based in situ hybridization and spectral deconvolution in clinical biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; Hoyland, Judith A.; Di Vizio, Dolores; O'Connell, Fionnuala; MacDermott, Sarah A.; Twomey, David; Levenson, Richard; Yin, John A. Liu; Golub, Todd R.; Loda, Massimo; Byers, Richard . E-mail: r.byers@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-09-22

    Gene expression mapping using microarray analysis has identified useful gene signatures for predicting outcome. However, little of this has been translated into clinically effective diagnostic tools as microarrays require high quality fresh-frozen tissue samples. We describe a methodology of multiplexed in situ hybridization (ISH) using a novel combination of quantum dot (QD)-labeled oligonucleotide probes and spectral imaging analysis in routinely processed, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human biopsies. The conditions for QD-ISH were optimized using a poly d(T) oligonucleotide in decalcified bone marrow samples. Single and multiplex QD-ISH was performed in samples with acute leukemia and follicular lymphoma using oligonucleotide probes for myeloperoxidase, bcl-2, survivin, and XIAP. Spectral imaging was used for post hybridization tissue analysis, enabling separation of spatially colocalized signals. The method allows quantitative characterization of multiple gene expression using non-bleaching fluorochromes. This is expected to facilitate multiplex in situ transcript detection in routinely processed human clinical tissue.

  18. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    SciTech Connect

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  19. 2′-Fluoro-modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotide can cause rapid degradation of P54nrb and PSF

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen; Liang, Xue-hai; Sun, Hong; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are used to regulate gene expression through different mechanisms. Chemical modifications of the backbone of the nucleic acid and/or of the 2′ moiety of the ribose can increase nuclease stability and/or binding affinity of oligonucleotides to target molecules. Here we report that transfection of 2′-F-modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides into cells can reduce the levels of P54nrb and PSF proteins through proteasome-mediated degradation. Such deleterious effects of 2′-F-modified oligonucleotides were observed in different cell types from different species, and were independent of oligonucleotide sequence, positions of the 2′-F-modified nucleotides in the oligonucleotides, method of delivery or mechanism of action of the oligonucleotides. Four 2′-F-modified nucleotides were sufficient to cause the protein reduction. P54nrb and PSF belong to Drosophila behavior/human splicing (DBHS) family. The third member of the family, PSPC1, was also reduced by the 2′-F-modified oligonucleotides. Preferential association of 2′-F-modified oligonucleotides with P54nrb was observed, which is partially responsible for the protein reduction. Consistent with the role of DBHS proteins in double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair, elevated DSBs were observed in cells treated with 2′-F-modified oligonucleotides, which contributed to severe impairment in cell proliferation. These results suggest that oligonucleotides with 2′-F modifications can cause non-specific loss of cellular protein(s). PMID:25855809

  20. Synthetic Method for Oligonucleotide Block by Using Alkyl-Chain-Soluble Support.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yuki; Shoji, Takao; Kim, Shokaku; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-19

    A straightforward method for the synthesis of oligonucleotide blocks using a Cbz-type alkyl-chain-soluble support (Z-ACSS) attached to the 3'-OH group of 3'-terminal nucleosides was developed. The Z-ACSS allowed for the preparation of fully protected deoxyribo- and ribo-oligonucleotides without chromatographic purification and released dimer- to tetramer-size oligonucleotide blocks via hydrogenation using a Pd/C catalyst without significant loss or migration of protective groups such as 5'-end 4,4'-dimethoxtrityl, 2-cyanoethyl on internucleotide bonds, or 2'-TBS. PMID:26845521

  1. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  2. Antisense c-myb oligonucleotides inhibit intimal arterial smooth muscle cell accumulation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Michael; Edelman, Elazer R.; Dekeyser, Jean-Luc; Langer, Robert; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    1992-09-01

    SYNTHETIC antisense oligonucleotides have been used to dissect gene function in vitro. Technical difficulties prevented the use of this approach for investigating the effect of gene products in vivo. Here we report the use of local delivery of antisense c-myb oligonu-cleotide to suppress intimal accumulation of rat carotid arterial smooth muscle cells. Our results suggest that antisense oligonucleotides can be used to define the in vivo biological role of specific macromolecules in the blood vessel wall and could potentially serve as a new class of therapeutic agents for cardiovascular disorders.

  3. Method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Kieleczawa, Jan; Dunn, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on a nucleic acid polymer. The nucleic acid polymer is incubated in a solution containing a single-stranded DNA-binding protein and a plurality of oligonucleotides which are perfectly complementary to distinct but adjacent regions of a predetermined contiguous nucleotide sequence in the nucleic acid polymer. The plurality of oligonucleotides anneal to the nucleic acid polymer to form a contiguous region of double stranded nucleic acid. Specific application of the methods disclosed include priming DNA synthesis and template-directed ligation.

  4. Spacer oligonucleotide typing of Mycobacterium bovis strains from cattle and other animals: a tool for studying epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Aranaz, A; Liébana, E; Mateos, A; Dominguez, L; Vidal, D; Domingo, M; Gonzolez, O; Rodriguez-Ferri, E F; Bunschoten, A E; Van Embden, J D; Cousins, D

    1996-01-01

    The spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) method was evaluated for its ability to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis strains. This method detects the presence or absence of spacers of the direct repeat locus of the M. bovis genome. The spacers in the direct repeat locus are amplified by PCR and are detected by hybridization of the biotin-labelled PCR product with a membrane containing oligonucleotides derived from spacer sequences that have previously been bound to a membrane. One hundred eighty-two M. bovis isolates from domestic animals (cattle, goat, sheep, and cats) and wild animals (deer and wild boar) were spoligotyped, and the results were compared with those obtained by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Two rather homogeneous clusters of isolates containing 20 and 4 types, respectively, were identified by spoligotyping. The first cluster included isolates from cattle, cats, and feral animals. By spoligotyping, isolates from the Spanish wild boar and deer had the same pattern as some bovine isolates, suggesting transmission between these animals and cattle and highlighting the importance of the study of these reservoirs. The second cluster included all the caprine and ovine isolates. Within each cluster, the patterns of the different strains differed only slightly, suggesting that the spoligotypes may be characteristic of strains from particular animal species. Spoligotyping proved to be useful for studying the epidemiology of bovine M. bovis isolates, especially of those isolates containing only a single copy of IS6110. In view of our results, we suggest fingerprinting all M. bovis strains by the spoligotyping method initially and then by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of the strains belonging to the most common spoligotypes. PMID:8897175

  5. Comparative Analysis of Human Conjunctival and Corneal Epithelial Gene Expression with Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Helen C.; Budak, Murat T.; Murat Akinci, M. A.; Wolosin, J. Mario

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine global mRNA expression levels in corneal and conjunctival epithelia and identify transcripts that exhibit preferential tissue expression. Methods cDNA samples derived from human conjunctival and corneal epithelia were hybridized in three independent experiments to a commercial oligonucleotide array representing more than 22,000 transcripts. The resultant signal intensities and microarray software transcript present/absent calls were used in conjunction with the local pooled error (LPE) statistical method to identify transcripts that are preferentially or exclusively expressed in one of the two tissues at significant levels (expression >1% of the β-actin level). EASE (Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer software) was used to identify biological systems comparatively overrepresented in either epithelium. Immuno-, and cytohistochemistry was performed to validate or expand on selected results of interest. Results The analysis identified 332 preferential and 93 exclusive significant corneal epithelial transcripts. The corresponding numbers of conjunctival epithelium transcripts were 592 and 211, respectively. The overrepresented biological processes in the cornea were related to cell adhesion and oxiredox equilibria and cytoprotection activities. In the conjunctiva, the biological processes that were most prominent were related to innate immunity and melanogenesis. Immunohistochemistry for antigen-presenting cells and melanocytes was consistent with these gene signatures. The transcript comparison identified a substantial number of genes that have either not been identified previously or are not known to be highly expressed in these two epithelia, including testican-1, ECM1, formin, CRTAC1, and NQO1 in the cornea and, in the conjunctiva, sPLA2-IIA, lipocalin 2, IGFBP3, multiple MCH class II proteins, and the Na-Pi cotransporter type IIb. Conclusions Comparative gene expression profiling leads to the identification of many biological processes

  6. Application of custom-designed oligonucleotide array CGH in 145 patients with autistic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Kastory-Bronowska, Monika; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwińska, Katarzyna; Dymczak-Domini, Wanda; Szumbarska, Dorota; Ziemka, Ewa; Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Sykulski, Maciej; Gambin, Tomasz; Gambin, Anna; Shaw, Chad A; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders, including childhood autism, atypical autism, and Asperger syndrome, with an estimated prevalence of 1.0-2.5% in the general population. ASDs have a complex multifactorial etiology, with genetic causes being recognized in only 10-20% of cases. Recently, copy-number variants (CNVs) have been shown to contribute to over 10% of ASD cases. We have applied a custom-designed oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization with an exonic coverage of over 1700 genes, including 221 genes known to cause autism and autism candidate genes, in a cohort of 145 patients with ASDs. The patients were classified according to ICD-10 standards and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale protocol into three groups consisting of 45 individuals with and 69 individuals without developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), and 31 patients, in whom DD/ID could not be excluded. In 12 patients, we have identified 16 copy-number changes, eight (5.5%) of which likely contribute to ASDs. In addition to known recurrent CNVs such as deletions 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) and 3q13.31 (including DRD3 and ZBTB20), and duplications 15q13.3 and 16p13.11, our analysis revealed two novel genes clinically relevant for ASDs: ARHGAP24 (4q21.23q21.3) and SLC16A7 (12q14.1). Our results further confirm the diagnostic importance of array CGH in detection of CNVs in patients with ASDs and demonstrate that CNVs are an important cause of ASDs as a heterogeneous condition with a variety of contributory genes. PMID:23032108

  7. An oligonucleotide-tagged microarray for routine diagnostics of colon cancer by genotyping KRAS mutations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuliang; Gudnason, Haukur; Li, Yi-Ping; Bang, Dang Duong; Wolff, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent types of cancer, causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. CRC is curable if diagnosed at an early stage. Mutations in the oncogene KRAS play a critical role in early development of CRC. Detection of activated KRAS is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. In this study, KRAS gene fragments containing mutations in codon 12 were amplified by multiplex PCR using a 5'-Cy5-labeled reverse primer in combination with 3'-mutation-specific forward primers that were linked with four unique nucleotide-sequence tags at the 5'-end. The Cy5-labeled reverse primer was extended under PCR amplification to the 5'-end of the mutation-specific forward primers and thus included the complimentary sequence of the tag. PCR products were hybridized to tag-probes immobilized on various substrates and detected by a scanner. Our results indicate that all mutations at codon 12 of KRAS derived from cancer cells and clinical samples could be unambiguously detected. KRAS mutations were accurately detected when the mutant DNA was present only in 10% of the starting mixed materials including wild-type genomic DNA, which was isolated from either cancer cells or spiked fecal samples. The immobilized tag-probes were stable under multiple thermal cycling treatments, allowing re-use of the tag-microarray and further optimization to solid PCR. Our results demonstrated that a novel oligonucleotide-tagged microarray system has been developed which would be suitable to be used for detection of KRAS mutations and clinical diagnosis of CRC. PMID:25018048

  8. Use of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Rapid Detection and Serotyping of Acute Respiratory Disease-Associated Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J.; Thach, Dzung; Walter, Elizabeth; Metzgar, David; Tibbetts, Clark; Stenger, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The cessation of the adenovirus vaccination program for military trainees has resulted in several recent acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. In the absence of vaccination, rapid detection methods are necessary for the timely implementation of measures to prevent adenovirus transmission within military training facilities. To this end, we have combined a fluorogenic real-time multiplex PCR assay with four sets of degenerate PCR primers that target the E1A, fiber, and hexon genes with a long oligonucleotide microarray capable of identifying the most common adenovirus serotypes associated with adult respiratory tract infections (serotypes 3, 4, 7, 16, and 21) and a representative member of adenovirus subgroup C (serotype 6) that is a common cause of childhood ARD and that often persists into adulthood. Analyses with prototype strains demonstrated unique hybridization patterns for representative members of adenovirus subgroups B1, B2, C, and E, thus allowing serotype determination. Microarray-based sensitivity assessments revealed lower detection limits (between 1 and 100 genomic copies) for adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4) and Ad7 cell culture lysates, clinical nasal washes, and throat swabs and purified DNA from clinical samples. When adenovirus was detected from coded clinical samples, the results obtained by this approach demonstrated an excellent concordance with those obtained by the more established method of adenovirus identification as well as by cell culture with fluorescent-antibody staining. Finally, the utility of this method was further supported by its ability to detect adenoviral coinfections, contamination, and, potentially, recombination events. Taken together, the results demonstrate the usefulness of the simple and rapid diagnostic method developed for the unequivocal identification of ARD-associated adenoviral serotypes from laboratory or clinical samples that can be completed in 1.5 to 4.0 h. PMID:15243087

  9. Design, Validation and Annotation of Transcriptome-Wide Oligonucleotide Probes for the Oligochaete Annelid Eisenia fetida

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Guan, Xin; Perkins, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    High density oligonucleotide probe arrays have increasingly become an important tool in genomics studies. In organisms with incomplete genome sequence, one strategy for oligo probe design is to reduce the number of unique probes that target every non-redundant transcript through bioinformatic analysis and experimental testing. Here we adopted this strategy in making oligo probes for the earthworm Eisenia fetida, a species for which we have sequenced transcriptome-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our objectives were to identify unique transcripts as targets, to select an optimal and non-redundant oligo probe for each of these target ESTs, and to annotate the selected target sequences. We developed a streamlined and easy-to-follow approach to the design, validation and annotation of species-specific array probes. Four 244K-formatted oligo arrays were designed using eArray and were hybridized to a pooled E. fetida cRNA sample. We identified 63,541 probes with unsaturated signal intensities consistently above the background level. Target transcripts of these probes were annotated using several sequence alignment algorithms. Significant hits were obtained for 37,439 (59%) probed targets. We validated and made publicly available 63.5K oligo probes so the earthworm research community can use them to pursue ecological, toxicological, and other functional genomics questions. Our approach is efficient, cost-effective and robust because it (1) does not require a major genomics core facility; (2) allows new probes to be easily added and old probes modified or eliminated when new sequence information becomes available, (3) is not bioinformatics-intensive upfront but does provide opportunities for more in-depth annotation of biological functions for target genes; and (4) if desired, EST orthologs to the UniGene clusters of a reference genome can be identified and selected in order to improve the target gene specificity of designed probes. This approach is particularly

  10. Application of custom-designed oligonucleotide array CGH in 145 patients with autistic spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Kastory-Bronowska, Monika; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwińska, Katarzyna; Dymczak-Domini, Wanda; Szumbarska, Dorota; Ziemka, Ewa; Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Sykulski, Maciej; Gambin, Tomasz; Gambin, Anna; Shaw, Chad A; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders, including childhood autism, atypical autism, and Asperger syndrome, with an estimated prevalence of 1.0–2.5% in the general population. ASDs have a complex multifactorial etiology, with genetic causes being recognized in only 10–20% of cases. Recently, copy-number variants (CNVs) have been shown to contribute to over 10% of ASD cases. We have applied a custom-designed oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization with an exonic coverage of over 1700 genes, including 221 genes known to cause autism and autism candidate genes, in a cohort of 145 patients with ASDs. The patients were classified according to ICD-10 standards and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale protocol into three groups consisting of 45 individuals with and 69 individuals without developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), and 31 patients, in whom DD/ID could not be excluded. In 12 patients, we have identified 16 copy-number changes, eight (5.5%) of which likely contribute to ASDs. In addition to known recurrent CNVs such as deletions 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) and 3q13.31 (including DRD3 and ZBTB20), and duplications 15q13.3 and 16p13.11, our analysis revealed two novel genes clinically relevant for ASDs: ARHGAP24 (4q21.23q21.3) and SLC16A7 (12q14.1). Our results further confirm the diagnostic importance of array CGH in detection of CNVs in patients with ASDs and demonstrate that CNVs are an important cause of ASDs as a heterogeneous condition with a variety of contributory genes. PMID:23032108

  11. Competitive hybridization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepinsky, Vera; Hashmi, Ghazala; Mishra, Bud

    2010-11-01

    Microarray technology, in its simplest form, allows one to gather abundance data for target DNA molecules, associated with genomes or gene-expressions, and relies on hybridizing the target to many short probe oligonucleotides arrayed on a surface. While for such multiplexed reactions conditions are optimized to make the most of each individual probe-target interaction, subsequent analysis of these experiments is based on the implicit assumption that a given experiment yields the same result regardless of whether it was conducted in isolation or in parallel with many others. It has been discussed in the literature that this assumption is frequently false, and its validity depends on the types of probes and their interactions with each other. We present a detailed physical model of hybridization as a means of understanding probe interactions in a multiplexed reaction. Ultimately, the model can be derived from a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE’s) describing kinetic mass action with conservation-of-mass equations completing the system. We examine pairwise probe interactions in detail and present a model of “competition” between the probes for the target—especially, when the target is effectively in short supply. These effects are shown to be predictable from the affinity constants for each of the four probe sequences involved, namely, the match and mismatch sequences for both probes. These affinity constants are calculated from the thermodynamic parameters such as the free energy of hybridization, which are in turn computed according to the nearest neighbor (NN) model for each probe and target sequence. Simulations based on the competitive hybridization model explain the observed variability in the signal of a given probe when measured in parallel with different groupings of other probes or individually. The results of the simulations can be used for experiment design and pooling strategies, based on which probes have been shown to have a strong

  12. [Molecular identification of intergeneric somatic hybrid plants between alfalfa and sainfoin].

    PubMed

    Xu, Z Q; Jia, J F

    2000-03-01

    Somatic hybrid plants between alfalfa and sainfoin were regenerated by protoplast fusion and culture. DNA samples of the hybrid plants, hydroxyproline-resistant sainfoin plants, alfalfa cell line transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens 702 were isolated with a new and simple method. The hybridity was identified by random amplified polymorphic DNAs and Southern hybridization. Significant differences can be seen in the sequences amplified, which are specific for each parent/primer combination under the amplification conditions used. In 20 random oligonucleotide primers used, six could amplified more DNA fragments and had better polymorphisms. The results suggested that besides containing nuclear substances of two parents, the hybrid genome was inclined to eliminate sainfoin chromosome with DNA reconstruction. However, the somatic genome also could produce the sainfoin-specified DNA fragments which further confirmed by Southern hybridization. The hybrids were asymmetric and had certain regeneration ability just because the intervention of sainfoin DNA. PMID:10976321

  13. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D