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Sample records for allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization

  1. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Østergaard, Michael E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, C Frank; Swayze, Eric E; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  2. Allele-Specific Suppression of Mutant Huntingtin Using Antisense Oligonucleotides: Providing a Therapeutic Option for All Huntington Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Skotte, Niels H.; Southwell, Amber L.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Warby, Simon C.; Doty, Crystal N.; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P.; Bennett, C. Frank; Swayze, Eric E.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder. PMID:25207939

  3. Robust and accurate single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH): design criteria and assay validation.

    PubMed

    Prince, J A; Feuk, L; Howell, W M; Jobs, M; Emahazion, T; Blennow, K; Brookes, A J

    2001-01-01

    We recently introduced a generic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping method, termed DASH (dynamic allele-specific hybridization), which entails dynamic tracking of probe (oligonucleotide) to target (PCR product) hybridization as reaction temperature is steadily increased. The reliability of DASH and optimal design rules have not been previously reported. We have now evaluated crudely designed DASH assays (sequences unmodified from genomic DNA) for 89 randomly selected and confirmed SNPs. Accurate genotype assignment was achieved for 89% of these worst-case-scenario assays. Failures were determined to be caused by secondary structures in the target molecule, which could be reliably predicted from thermodynamic theory. Improved design rules were thereby established, and these were tested by redesigning six of the failed DASH assays. This involved reengineering PCR primers to eliminate amplified target sequence secondary structures. This sophisticated design strategy led to complete functional recovery of all six assays, implying that SNPs in most if not all sequence contexts can be effectively scored by DASH. Subsequent empirical support for this inference has been evidenced by approximately 30 failure-free DASH assay designs implemented across a range of ongoing genotyping programs. Structured follow-on studies employed standardized assay conditions, and revealed that assay reproducibility (733 duplicated genotypes, six different assays) was as high as 100%, with an assay accuracy (1200 genotypes, three different assays) that exceeded 99.9%. No post-PCR assay failures were encountered. These findings, along with intrinsic low cost and high flexibility, validate DASH as an effective procedure for SNP genotyping.

  4. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish.

  5. An oligonucleotide hybridization approach to DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khrapko, K R; Lysov YuP; Khorlyn, A A; Shick, V V; Florentiev, V L; Mirzabekov, A D

    1989-10-09

    We have proposed a DNA sequencing method based on hybridization of a DNA fragment to be sequenced with the complete set of fixed-length oligonucleotides (e.g., 4(8) = 65,536 possible 8-mers) immobilized individually as dots of a 2-D matrix [(1989) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 303, 1508-1511]. It was shown that the list of hybridizing octanucleotides is sufficient for the computer-assisted reconstruction of the structures for 80% of random-sequence fragments up to 200 bases long, based on the analysis of the octanucleotide overlapping. Here a refinement of the method and some experimental data are presented. We have performed hybridizations with oligonucleotides immobilized on a glass plate, and obtained their dissociation curves down to heptanucleotides. Other approaches, e.g., an additional hybridization of short oligonucleotides which continuously extend duplexes formed between the fragment and immobilized oligonucleotides, should considerably increase either the probability of unambiguous reconstruction, or the length of reconstructed sequences, or decrease the size of immobilized oligonucleotides.

  6. RNA-Seq Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression, Hybrid Effects, and Regulatory Divergence in Hybrids Compared with Their Parents from Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graeme D.M.; Kane, Nolan C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Adams, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization is a prominent process among natural plant populations that can result in phenotypic novelty, heterosis, and changes in gene expression. The effects of intraspecific hybridization on F1 hybrid gene expression were investigated using parents from divergent, natural populations of Cirsium arvense, an invasive Compositae weed. Using an RNA-seq approach, the expression of 68,746 unigenes was quantified in parents and hybrids. The expression levels of 51% of transcripts differed between parents, a majority of which had less than 1.25× fold-changes. More unigenes had higher expression in the invasive parent (P1) than the noninvasive parent (P2). Of those that were divergently expressed between parents, 10% showed additive and 81% showed nonadditive (transgressive or dominant) modes of gene action in the hybrids. A majority of the dominant cases had P2-like expression patterns in the hybrids. Comparisons of allele-specific expression also enabled a survey of cis- and trans-regulatory effects. Cis- and trans-regulatory divergence was found at 70% and 68% of 62,281 informative single-nucleotide polymorphism sites, respectively. Of the 17% of sites exhibiting both cis- and trans-effects, a majority (70%) had antagonistic regulatory interactions (cis x trans); trans-divergence tended to drive higher expression of the P1 allele, whereas cis-divergence tended to increase P2 transcript abundance. Trans-effects correlated more highly than cis with parental expression divergence and accounted for a greater proportion of the regulatory divergence at sites with additive compared with nonadditive inheritance patterns. This study explores the nature of, and types of mechanisms underlying, expression changes that occur in upon intraspecific hybridization in natural populations. PMID:23677938

  7. IDP-ASE: haplotyping and quantifying allele-specific expression at the gene and gene isoform level by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deonovic, Benjamin; Wang, Yunhao; Weirather, Jason; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Au, Kin Fai

    2016-11-28

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) is a fundamental problem in studying gene regulation and diploid transcriptome profiles, with two key challenges: (i) haplotyping and (ii) estimation of ASE at the gene isoform level. Existing ASE analysis methods are limited by a dependence on haplotyping from laborious experiments or extra genome/family trio data. In addition, there is a lack of methods for gene isoform level ASE analysis. We developed a tool, IDP-ASE, for full ASE analysis. By innovative integration of Third Generation Sequencing (TGS) long reads with Second Generation Sequencing (SGS) short reads, the accuracy of haplotyping and ASE quantification at the gene and gene isoform level was greatly improved as demonstrated by the gold standard data GM12878 data and semi-simulation data. In addition to methodology development, applications of IDP-ASE to human embryonic stem cells and breast cancer cells indicate that the imbalance of ASE and non-uniformity of gene isoform ASE is widespread, including tumorigenesis relevant genes and pluripotency markers. These results show that gene isoform expression and allele-specific expression cooperate to provide high diversity and complexity of gene regulation and expression, highlighting the importance of studying ASE at the gene isoform level. Our study provides a robust bioinformatics solution to understand ASE using RNA sequencing data only.

  8. Limited gene misregulation is exacerbated by allele-specific upregulation in lethal hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kevin H-C; Clark, Andrew G; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Misregulation of gene expression is often observed in interspecific hybrids and is generally attributed to regulatory incompatibilities caused by divergence between the two genomes. However, it has been challenging to distinguish effects of regulatory divergence from secondary effects including developmental and physiological defects common to hybrids. Here, we use RNA-Seq to profile gene expression in F1 hybrid male larvae from crosses of Drosophila melanogaster to its sibling species D. simulans. We analyze lethal and viable hybrid males, the latter produced using a mutation in the X-linked D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) gene and compare them with their parental species and to public data sets of gene expression across development. We find that Hmr has drastically different effects on the parental and hybrid genomes, demonstrating that hybrid incompatibility genes can exhibit novel properties in the hybrid genetic background. Additionally, we find that D. melanogaster alleles are preferentially affected between lethal and viable hybrids. We further determine that many of the differences between the hybrids result from developmental delay in the Hmr(+) hybrids. Finally, we find surprisingly modest expression differences in hybrids when compared with the parents, with only 9% and 4% of genes deviating from additivity or expressed outside of the parental range, respectively. Most of these differences can be attributed to developmental delay and differences in tissue types. Overall, our study suggests that hybrid gene misexpression is prone to overestimation and that even between species separated by approximately 2.5 Ma, regulatory incompatibilities are not widespread in hybrids.

  9. DASH-2: flexible, low-cost, and high-throughput SNP genotyping by dynamic allele-specific hybridization on membrane arrays.

    PubMed

    Jobs, Magnus; Howell, W Mathias; Stromqvist, Linda; Mayr, Torsten; Brookes, Anthony J

    2003-05-01

    Genotyping technologies need to be continually improved in terms of their flexibility, cost-efficiency, and throughput, to push forward genome variation analysis. To this end, we have leveraged the inherent simplicity of dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH) and coupled it to recent innovations of centrifugal arrays and iFRET. We have thereby created a new genotyping platform we term DASH-2, which we demonstrate and evaluate in this report. The system is highly flexible in many ways (any plate format, PCR multiplexing, serial and parallel array processing, spectral-multiplexing of hybridization probes), thus supporting a wide range of application scales and objectives. Precision is demonstrated to be in the range 99.8-100%, and assay costs are 0.05 USD or less per genotype assignment. DASH-2 thus provides a powerful new alternative for genotyping practice, which can be used without the need for expensive robotics support.

  10. Use of an interspecific hybrid in identifying a new allelic specificity generated at the self-incompatibility locus after inbreeding in Lycopersicon peruvianum.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, G; Perryman, T; Williams, E G

    1986-12-01

    An interspecific hybrid between Lycopersicon esculentum (♀) and L. peruvianum has been raised by embryo rescue in vitro and used to confirm the presence of a new S-allelic specificity in its inbred L. peruvianum parent, a plant derived by enforced bud self-pollination of a self-incompatible clone with the genotype S 1 S 2. The inbred plant showed breeding behavior characteristic of both S 2 and a second specificity which was not S 1, S 2, S 3 or S f. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of stylar proteins, however, showed only a single typical S-associated component with the Mr and pI characteristic of S2. The alteration in specificity, therefore, was not associated with a detectable change in an S-associated protein. The F1 interspecific hybrid showed intermediacy of vegetative and reproductive characters, relatively high fertility and full self-incompatibility. Backcrossing to L. esculentum produced only abortive seeds requiring embryo culture. Backcrosses to L. peruvianum produced a very low proportion of filled germinable seeds. Pollen of the hybrid showed superior viability and tube growth rate compared with pollen of the two parent plants.

  11. Sequence-dependent theory of oligonucleotide hybridization kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-05-07

    A theoretical approach to the prediction of the sequence and temperature-dependent rate constants for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions has been developed based on the theory of relaxation kinetics. One-sided and two-sided melting reaction mechanisms for oligonucleotide hybridization reactions have been considered, analyzed, modified, and compared to select a physically consistent as well as robust model for prediction of the relaxation times of DNA hybridization reactions that agrees with the experimental evidence. The temperature- and sequence-dependent parameters of the proposed model have been estimated using available experimental data. The relaxation time model that we developed has been combined with the nearest neighbor model of hybridization thermodynamics to estimate the temperature- and sequence-dependent rate constants of an oligonucleotide hybridization reaction. The model-predicted rate constants are compared to experimentally determined rate constants for the same oligonucleotide hybridization reactions. Finally, we consider a few important applications of kinetically controlled DNA hybridization reactions.

  12. Simultaneous detection of several oligonucleotides by time-resolved fluorometry: the use of a mixture of categorized microparticles in a sandwich type mixed-phase hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Hakala, H; Virta, P; Salo, H; Lönnberg, H

    1998-12-15

    Porous, uniformly sized (50 micrometer) glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate particles (SINTEF) were used as a solid phase to construct a sandwich type hybridization assay that allowed simultaneous detection of up to six oligonucleotides from a single sample. The assay was based on categorization of the particles by two organic prompt fluorophores, viz. fluorescein and dansyl, and quantification of the oligonucleotide hybridization by time-resolved fluorometry. Accordingly, allele-specific oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes were assembled on the particles by conventional phosphoramidite strategy using a non-cleavable linker, and the category defining fluorescein and/or dansyl tagged building blocks were inserted in the 3'-terminal sequence. An oligonucleotide bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate was hybridized to the complementary 3'-terminal sequence of the target oligonucleotide, and the resulting duplex was further hybridized to the particle-bound allele-specific probes via the 5'-terminal sequence of the target. After hybridization each individual particle was subjected to three different fluorescence intensity measurements. The intensity of the prompt fluorescence signals of fluorescein and dansyl defined the particle category, while the europium(III) chelate emission quantified the hybridization. The length of the complementary region between the target oligonucleotide and the particle-bound probe was optimized to achieve maximal selectivity. Furthermore, the kinetics of hybridization and the effect of the concentration of the target oligomer on the efficiency of hybridization were evaluated. By this approach the possible presence of a three base deletion (DeltaF508), point mutation (G542X) and point deletion (1078delT) related to cystic fibrosis could unequivocally be detected from a single sample.

  13. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  14. Oligonucleotide Immobilization and Hybridization on Aldehyde-Functionalized Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Brushes.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Tugba; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-11-09

    DNA biosensing requires high oligonucleotide binding capacity interface chemistries that can be tuned to maximize probe presentation as well as hybridization efficiency. This contribution investigates the feasibility of aldehyde-functionalized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brush-based interfaces for oligonucleotide binding and hybridization. These polymer brushes, which allow covalent immobilization of oligonucleotides, are prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of HEMA followed by a postpolymerization oxidation step to generate side chain aldehyde groups. A series of polymer brushes covering a range of film thicknesses and grafting densities was investigated with regard to their oligonucleotide binding capacity as well as their ability to support oligonucleotide hybridization. Densely grafted brushes were found to have probe oligonucleotide binding capacities of up to ∼30 pmol/cm(2). Increasing the thickness of these densely grafted brush films, however, resulted in a decrease in the oligonucleotide binding capacity. Less densely grafted brushes possess binding capacities of ∼10 pmol/cm(2), which did not significantly depend on film thickness. The oligonucleotide hybridization efficiencies, however, were highest (93%) on those brushes that present the lowest surface concentration of the probe oligonucleotide. These results highlight the importance of optimizing the probe oligonucleotide surface concentration and binding interface chemistry. The versatility and tunability of the PHEMA-based brushes presented herein makes these films a very attractive platform for the immobilization and hybridization of oligonucleotides.

  15. Elasticity of the transition state for oligonucleotide hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Kevin D.; Comstock, Matthew J.; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance in cellular processes and abundant use in biotechnology, we lack a detailed understanding of the kinetics of nucleic acid hybridization. In particular, the identity of the transition state, which determines the kinetics of the two-state reaction, remains poorly characterized. Here, we used optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence to observe directly the binding and unbinding of short oligonucleotides (7–12 nt) to a complementary strand held under constant force. Binding and unbinding rate constants measured across a wide range of forces (1.5–20 pN) deviate from the exponential force dependence expected from Bell's equation. Using a generalized force dependence model, we determined the elastic behavior of the transition state, which we find to be similar to that of the pure single-stranded state. Our results indicate that the transition state for hybridization is visited before the strands form any significant amount of native base pairs. Such a transition state supports a model in which the rate-limiting step of the hybridization reaction is the alignment of the two strands prior to base pairing. PMID:27903889

  16. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization on a single microparticle by time-resolved fluorometry: hybridization assays on polymer particles obtained by direct solid phase assembly of the oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Hakala, H; Heinonen, P; Iitiä, A; Lönnberg, H

    1997-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides were assembled by conventional phosphoramidite chemistry on uniformly sized (50 microns) porous glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate (SINTEF) and compact polystyrene (Dynosphere) particles, the aminoalkyl side chains of which were further derivatized with DMTrO-acetyl groups. The linker was completely resistant toward ammonolytic deprotection of the base moieties. The quality of oligonucleotides was assessed by repeating the synthesis on the same particles derivatized with a cleavable ester linker. The ability of the oligonucleotide-coated particles to bind complementary sequences via hybridization was examined by following the attachment of oligonucleotides bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate to the particles. The fluorescence emission was measured directly on a single particle. The effects of the following factors on the kinetics and efficiency of hybridization were studied: number of particles in a given volume of the assay solution, loading of oligonucleotide on the particle, concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution, length of the hybridizing sequence, presence of noncomplementary sequences, and ionic strength. The fluorescence signal measured on a single particle after hybridization was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution over a concentration range of 5 orders of magnitude.

  17. Stereospecificity of Oligonucleotide Interactions Revisited: No Evidence for Heterochiral Hybridization and Ribozyme/DNAzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hoehlig, Kai; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for the application of RNA- or DNA-oligonucleotides in biotechnology and molecular medicine is their susceptibility to abundant nucleases. One intriguing possibility to tackle this problem is the use of mirror-image (l-)oligonucleotides. For aptamers, this concept has successfully been applied to even develop therapeutic agents, so-called Spiegelmers. However, for technologies depending on RNA/RNA or RNA/DNA hybridization, like antisense or RNA interference, it has not been possible to use mirror-image oligonucleotides because Watson-Crick base pairing of complementary strands is (thought to be) stereospecific. Many scientists consider this a general principle if not a dogma. A recent publication proposing heterochiral Watson-Crick base pairing and sequence-specific hydrolysis of natural RNA by mirror-image ribozymes or DNAzymes (and vice versa) prompted us to systematically revisit the stereospecificity of oligonucleotides hybridization and catalytic activity. Using hyperchromicity measurements we demonstrate that hybridization only occurs among homochiral anti-parallel complementary oligonucleotide strands. As expected, achiral PNA hybridizes to RNA and DNA irrespective of their chirality. In functional assays we could not confirm an alleged heterochiral hydrolytic activity of ribozymes or DNAzymes. Our results confirm a strict stereospecificity of oligonucleotide hybridization and clearly argue against the possibility to use mirror-image oligonucleotides for gene silencing or antisense applications. PMID:25679211

  18. Molecular architectures for electrocatalytic amplification of oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mònica; Alvarez, Marta; Azzaroni, Omar; Tiefenauer, Louis; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    In this work, we describe a new platform suitable for electrocatalytic amplification of oligonucleotide hybridization based on the use of supramolecular bioconjugates incorporating ferrocene-labeled streptavidin. Our goals were aimed at designing a biosensing platform which could support highly reproducible and stable electrocatalytic amplification with maximum efficiency. The use of nonlabeled streptavidin as an underlying layer promotes a major improvement on the characteristics of the amplified electrochemical signal. In addition, the electrocatalytic current can be easily amplified by tuning the concentration of electron donor species in solution. Because of the fact that the redox labels are bioconjugated to the DNA strands, increasing the ionic strength does not lead to the loss of redox labels. More importantly, increasing the concentration of donors only involves the magnification of the signal without implying the permeation of donors (thus reducing the efficient electrocatalysis). This approach represents a major improvement on the use of electrocatalytically amplified DNA-sensing platforms, thus overcoming any possible limitation in connection with the reproducibility and reliability of this well-established method.

  19. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype

    SciTech Connect

    Martell, M.; Le Gall, I.; Millasseau, P.; Dausset, J.; Cohen, D.

    1988-04-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ..beta..gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. The authors used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period.

  20. [Design, synthesis and evaluation of polyamide-nucleoside hybrids and oligonucleotides conjugated hybrid as a novel gene expression control compound].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Etsuko; Kamaike, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    On the basis of reports that a minor groove binder pyrrolepolyamide can interfere with gene expression by the sequence-specific recognition of DNA, we expected that nucleoside bearing a pyrrolepolyamide would be able to regulate gene expression. Therefore, we designed and synthesized the pyrrolepolyamide-adenosine (Hybrid 1) and -2'-deoxyguanosine hybrids (Hybrid 2 and Hybrid 3) as lead compounds for gene expression control compounds. The pyrrolepolyamide frame of Hybrid 2 and Hybrid 3 combines at the 2-exocyclic amino group of the 2'-deoxyguanosine by a linker and the 2-exocyclic amino group of guanine exists in the minor groove side of the duplex. Hybrid 2 is the 2'-deoxyguanosine-pyrrolepolyamide hybrid using the 3-aminopropionyl linker, while Hybrid 3 uses the 3-aminopropyl linker. An evaluation of the DNA binding sequence selectivity was performed by analysis of T(m) values and CD spectra, using distamycin A as a contrast. Hybrid 3 has provided more excellent sequence-distinguishable ability than other hybrids and Distamycin A. Moreover, on the basis of these results, we synthesized oligonucleotides conjugated to Hybrid 4, which is stable under conditions of DNA oligonucleotide solid phase synthesis, arranged from Hybrid 3. From T(m) values and CD spectral analysis, it was found that oligonucleotides conjugating Hybrid 4 possess high recognition ability and very high binding ability for the DNA that includes the pyrrolepolyamide binding sequence.

  1. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  2. Cell Surface Self-Assembly of Hybrid Nanoconjugates via Oligonucleotide Hybridization Induces Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Te-Wei; Yang, Jiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Sima, Monika; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials composed of synthetic and biological building blocks possess high potential for the design of nanomedicines. The use of self-assembling nanomaterials as “bio-mimics” may trigger cellular events and result in new therapeutic effects. Motivated by this rationale, we designed a therapeutic platform that mimics the mechanism of immune effector cells to crosslink surface receptors of target cells and induce apoptosis. This platform was tested against B-cell lymphomas that highly express the surface antigen CD20. Here, two nanoconjugates were synthesized: (1) an anti-CD20 Fab’ fragment covalently linked to a single-stranded morpholino oligonucleotide (MORF1), and (2) a linear polymer of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) grafted with multiple copies of the complementary oligonucleotide MORF2. We show that the two conjugates self-assemble via MORF1-MORF2 hybridization at the surface of CD20+ malignant B-cells, which crosslinks CD20 antigens and initiates apoptosis. When tested in a murine model of human non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the two conjugates, either administered consecutively or as a premixture, eradicated cancer cells and produced long-term survivors. The designed therapeutics contains no small-molecule cytotoxic compounds and is immune-independent, aiming to improve over chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy. This therapeutic platform can be applied to crosslink any non-internalizing receptor and potentially treat other diseases. PMID:24308267

  3. DNA sequence analysis by hybridization with oligonucleotide microchips: MALDI mass spectrometry identification of 5mers contiguously stacked to microchip oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Stomakhin, Andrey A.; Vasiliskov, Vadim A.; Timofeev, Edward; Schulga, Dennis; Cotter, Richard J.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) has been applied to increase the informational output from DNA sequence analysis. It has been used to analyze DNA by hybridization with microarrays of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides extended with stacked 5mers. In model experiments, a 28 nt long DNA fragment was hybridized with 10 immobilized, overlapping 8mers. Then, in a second round of hybridization DNA–8mer duplexes were hybridized with a mixture of 10 5mers. The stability of the 5mer complex with DNA was increased to raise the melting temperature of the duplex by 10–15°C as a result of stacking interaction with 8mers. Contiguous 13 bp duplexes containing an internal break were formed. MALDI MS identified one or, in some cases, two 5mers contiguously stacked to each DNA–8mer duplex formed on the microchip. Incorporating a mass label into 5mers optimized MALDI MS monitoring. This procedure enabled us to reconstitute the sequence of a model DNA fragment and identify polymorphic nucleotides. The application of MALDI MS identification of contiguously stacked 5mers to increase the length of DNA for sequence analysis is discussed. PMID:10666462

  4. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. I. Covalent immobilization of oligonucleotide probes onto the nylon].

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, E V; Pyshnaia, I A; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The features of UV-induced immobilization of oligonucleotides on a nylon membranes and the effectiveness of enzymatic labeling of immobilized probes at heterophase detection of nucleic acids are studied. Short terminal oligothymidilate (up to 10 nt) sequences are suggested to attach to the probe via a flexible ethylene glycol based linker. The presence of such fragment enhances the intensity of immobilization and reduces UV-dependent degradation of the targeted (sequence-specific) part of the probe by reducing the dose needed for the immobilization of DNA. The optimum dose of UV-irradiation is determined to be ~0.4 J/cm(2) at the wavelength 254 nm. This dose provides high level of hybridization signal for immobilized probes with various nucleotide composition of the sequence specific moiety. The amide groups of the polyamide are shown to play the key role in the photoinduced immobilization of nucleic acids, whereas the primary amino groups in the structure of PA is not the center responsible for the covalent binding of DNA by UV-irradiation, as previously believed. Various additives in the soaking solution during the membrane of UV-dependent immobilization of probes are shown to influence its effectiveness. The use of alternative to UV-irradiation system of radical generation are shown to provide the immobilization of oligonucleotides onto the nylon membrane.

  5. Inference of subgenomic origin of BACs in an interspecific hybrid sugarcane cultivar by overlapping oligonucleotide hybridizations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changsoo; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2011-09-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeders in the early 20th century made remarkable progress in increasing yield and disease resistance by crossing Saccharum spontaneum L., a wild relative, to Saccharum officinarum L., a traditional cultivar. Modern sugarcane cultivars have approximately 71%-83% of their chromosomes originating from S. officinarum, approximately 10%-21% from S. spontaneum, and approximately 2%-13% recombinant or translocated chromosomes. In the present work, C(0)t-based cloning and sequencing (CBCS) was implemented to further explore highly repetitive DNA and to seek species-specific repeated DNA in both S. officinarum and S. spontaneum. For putatively species-specific sequences, overlappping oligonucleotide probes (overgos) were designed and hybridized to BAC filters from the interspecific hybrid sugarcane cultivar 'R570' to try to deduce parental origins of BAC clones. We inferred that 12 967 BACs putatively originated from S. officinarum and 5117 BACs from S. spontaneum. Another 1103 BACs were hybridized by both species-specific overgos, too many to account for by conventional recombination, thus suggesting ectopic recombination and (or) translocation of DNA elements. Constructing a low C(0)t library is useful to collect highly repeated DNA sequences and to search for potentially species-specific molecular markers, especially among recently diverged species. Even in the absence of repeat families that are species-specific in their entirety, the identification of localized variations within consensus sequences, coupled with the site specificity of short synthetic overgos, permits researchers to monitor species-specific or species-enriched variants.

  6. Purification of specific chromatin regions using oligonucleotides: capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART).

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher P; West, Jason A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genomic binding sites and proteins associated with noncoding RNAs will lead to more complete mechanistic characterization of the regulatory activities of noncoding RNAs. Capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART) is a powerful technique wherein specific RNA molecules are isolated from cross-linked nuclear extracts using complementary, biotinylated capture oligonucleotides, allowing subsequent identification of genomic DNA and proteins cross-linked to the RNA of interest. Here, we describe the procedure for CHART and list strategies to optimize nuclear extract preparation, capture oligonucleotide design, and isolation of nucleic acids and proteins enriched through CHART.

  7. 'Specific' oligonucleotides often recognize more than one gene: the limits of in situ hybridization applied to GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, M; Didelon, F; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-05-15

    As exquisite probes for gene sequences, oligonucleotides are one of the most powerful tools of recombinant molecular biology. In studying the GABA receptor subunits in the neonatal hippocampus we have used oligonucleotide probes in in situ hybridization and cloning techniques. The oligonucleotides used and assumed to be specific for the target gene, actually recognized more than one gene, leading to surprising and contradictory results. In particular, we found that a GABA(A)-rho specific oligonucleotide recognized an abundant, previously unknown, transcription factor in both in situ and library screening, while oligos 'specific' for GABA(A) subunits were able to recognize 30 additional unrelated genes in library screening. This suggests that positive results obtained with oligonucleotides should be interpreted with caution unless confirmed by identical results with oligonucleotides from different parts of the same gene, or cDNA library screening excludes the presence of other hybridizing species.

  8. Kinetics of hybridization on surface oligonucleotide microchips: theory, experiment, and comparison with hybridization on gel-based microchips.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, N V; Chechetkin, V R; Pan'kov, S V; Somova, O G; Livshits, M A; Donnikov, M Y; Turygin, A Y; Barsky, V E; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-08-01

    The optimal design of oligonucleotide microchips and efficient discrimination between perfect and mismatch duplexes strongly depend on the external transport of target DNA to the cells with immobilized probes as well as on respective association and dissociation rates at the duplex formation. In this paper we present the relevant theory for hybridization of DNA fragments with oligonucleotide probes immobilized in the cells on flat substrate. With minor modifications, our theory also is applicable to reaction-diffusion hybridization kinetics for the probes immobilized on the surface of microbeads immersed in hybridization solution. The main theoretical predictions are verified with control experiments. Besides that, we compared the characteristics of the surface and gel-based oligonucleotide microchips. The comparison was performed for the chips printed with the same pin robot, for the signals measured with the same devices and processed by the same technique, and for the same hybridization conditions. The sets of probe oligonucleotides and the concentrations of probes in respective solutions used for immobilization on each platform were identical as well. We found that, despite the slower hybridization kinetics, the fluorescence signals and mutation discrimination efficiency appeared to be higher for the gel-based microchips with respect to their surface counterparts even for the relatively short hybridization time about 0.5-1 hour. Both the divergence between signals for perfects and the difference in mutation discrimination efficiency for the counterpart platforms rapidly grow with incubation time. In particular, for hybridization during 3 h the signals for gel-based microchips surpassed their surface counterparts in 5-20 times, while the ratios of signals for perfect-mismatch pairs for gel microchips exceeded the corresponding ratios for surface microchips in 2-4 times. These effects may be attributed to the better immobilization efficiency and to the higher

  9. Theoretical analysis of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with gel-immobilized oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Livshits, M A; Mirzabekov, A D

    1996-01-01

    A new method of DNA sequencing by hybridization using a microchip containing a set of immobilized oligonucleotides is being developed. A theoretical analysis is presented of the kinetics of DNA hybridization with deoxynucleotide molecules chemically tethered in a polyacrylamide gel layer. The analysis has shown that long-term evolution of the spatial distribution and of the amount of DNA bound in a hybridization cell is governed by "retarded diffusion," i.e., diffusion of the DNA interrupted by repeated association and dissociation with immobile oligonucleotide molecules. Retarded diffusion determines the characteristic time of establishing a final equilibrium state in a cell, i.e., the state with the maximum quantity and a uniform distribution of bound DNA. In the case of cells with the most stable, perfect duplexes, the characteristic time of retarded diffusion (which is proportional to the equilibrium binding constant and to the concentration of binding sites) can be longer than the duration of the real hybridization procedure. This conclusion is indirectly confirmed by the observation of nonuniform fluorescence of labeled DNA in perfect-match hybridization cells (brighter at the edges). For optimal discrimination of perfect duplexes from duplexes with mismatches the hybridization process should be brought to equilibrium under low-temperature nonsaturation conditions for all cells. The kinetic differences between perfect and nonperfect duplexes in the gel allow further improvement in the discrimination through additional washing at low temperature after hybridization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913616

  10. Detection and identification of intestinal pathogenic bacteria by hybridization to oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lian-Qun; Li, Jun-Wen; Wang, Sheng-Qi; Chao, Fu-Huan; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yuan, Zheng-Quan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the common intestinal pathogenic bacteria quickly and accurately. METHODS: A rapid (<3 h) experimental procedure was set up based upon the gene chip technology. Target genes were amplified and hybridized by oligonucleotide microarrays. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy strains of bacteria in pure culture belonging to 11 genera were successfully discriminated under comparatively same conditions, and a series of specific hybridization maps corresponding to each kind of bacteria were obtained. When this method was applied to 26 divided cultures, 25 (96.2%) were identified. CONCLUSION: Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus sp., Bacillus cereus, Vibrio cholerae, Enterococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Campylobacter jejuni can be detected and identified by our microarrays. The accuracy, range, and discrimination power of this assay can be continually improved by adding further oligonucleotides to the arrays without any significant increase of complexity or cost. PMID:16437687

  11. A simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide hybridization probes from heterologous gene sequences and probes.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, E S; Sarge, K D

    1988-11-30

    We describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide probes for hybridization analysis and/or cDNA/genomic library screening. With this method, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide derived from a known heterologous DNA/RNA/protein sequence is annealed to an RNA preparation containing the gene transcript of interest. Any unpaired 3'-terminal oligonucleotides of the heterologous DNA primer are then removed using the 3' exonuclease activity of the DNA Polymerase I Klenow fragment before primer extension/dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the annealed RNA species with AMV reverse transcriptase. From the determined RNA sequence, a completely homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe is then prepared. This approach has been used to prepare a homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe for the successful library screening of the yeast hybRNA gene starting with a heterologous mouse hybRNA DNA oligonucleotide probe.

  12. Near-infrared silver cluster optically signaling oligonucleotide hybridization and assembling two DNA hosts.

    PubMed

    Petty, Jeffrey T; Nicholson, David A; Sergev, Orlin O; Graham, Stuart K

    2014-09-16

    Silver clusters with ~10 atoms form within DNA strands, and the conjugates are chemical sensors. The DNA host hybridizes with short oligonucleotides, and the cluster moieties optically respond to these analytes. Our studies focus on how the cluster adducts perturb the structure of their DNA hosts. Our sensor is comprised of an oligonucleotide with two components: a 5'-cluster domain that complexes silver clusters and a 3'-recognition site that hybridizes with a target oligonucleotide. The single-stranded sensor encapsulates an ~11 silver atom cluster with violet absorption at 400 nm and with minimal emission. The recognition site hybridizes with complementary oligonucleotides, and the violet cluster converts to an emissive near-infrared cluster with absorption at 730 nm. Our key finding is that the near-infrared cluster coordinates two of its hybridized hosts. The resulting tertiary structure was investigated using intermolecular and intramolecular variants of the same dimer. The intermolecular dimer assembles in concentrated (~5 μM) DNA solutions. Strand stoichiometries and orientations were chromatographically determined using thymine-modified complements that increase the overall conjugate size. The intramolecular dimer develops within a DNA scaffold that is founded on three linked duplexes. The high local cluster concentrations and relative strand arrangements again favor the antiparallel dimer for the near-infrared cluster. When the two monomeric DNA/violet cluster conjugates transform to one dimeric DNA/near-infrared conjugate, the DNA strands accumulate silver. We propose that these correlated changes in DNA structure and silver stoichiometry underlie the violet to near-infrared cluster transformation.

  13. Detection of genetically modified canola using multiplex PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anna-Mary; Sahota, Robert; Pope, Derek S; Lawrence, Tracy S; Belton, Mark P; Rott, Michael E

    2008-08-27

    A rapid method was developed for concurrent screening of transgenic elements in GM canola. This method utilizes a single multiplex PCR coupled with an oligonucleotide DNA array capable of simultaneously detecting the 12 approved GM canola lines in Canada. The assay includes construct-specific elements for identification of approved lines, common elements (e.g., CaMV 35S promoter, Agrobacterium tumefaciens nos terminator, or nptII gene) for screening of approved or unapproved lines, a canola-specific endogenous gene, and endogenous genes from heterologous crops to serve as additional controls. Oligonucleotide probes were validated individually for functionality and specificity by amplification of specific transgene sequences from appropriate GM canola lines corresponding to each probe sequence, and hybridization of amplicons to the array. Each target sequence hybridized to its corresponding oligonucleotide probe and no significant cross-hybridization was observed. The limit of detection was examined for the GM lines GT73, T45, and MS8/RF3, and was determined to be 0.1%, 0.1%, and 0.5%, respectively, well within the European food and feed labeling threshold level of 0.9% for approved GM product. Practically, the method was demonstrated to be effective for the detection of GM canola in several types of animal feed, as well as in commercial canola meal.

  14. Base Composition-Independent Hybridization in Tetramethylammonium Chloride: A Method for Oligonucleotide Screening of Highly Complex Gene Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, William I.; Gitschier, Jane; Lasky, Laurence A.; Lawn, Richard M.

    1985-03-01

    An oligonucleotide hybridization procedure has been developed that eliminates the preferential melting of A\\cdot T versus G\\cdot C base pairs, allowing the stringency of the hybridization to be controlled as a function of probe length only. This technique, which uses tetramethylammonium chloride, is especially helpful whenever a highly complex library is screened with a pool of oligonucleotide probes, which usually vary widely in base composition. The procedure can also be applied advantageously whenever an exact match to an oligonucleotide probe is desired, such as in screening for clones having as little as a single-base alteration generated by in vitro mutagenesis.

  15. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. III. Synthesis and investigation of properties of oligonucleotides, bearing bifunctional non-nucleotide insert].

    PubMed

    Kupriushkin, M S; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2012-01-01

    Non-nucleotide phosporamidites were synthetized, having branched backbone with different position of functional groups. Obtained phosphoramidite monomers contain intercalator moiety--6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine, and additional hydroxyl residue protected with dimethoxytrityl group or with tert-butyldimethylsilyl group for post-synthetic modification. Synthesized oligothymidilates contain one or more modified units in different positions of sequence. Melting temperature and thermodynamic parameters of formation of complementary duplexes formed by modified oligonucleotides was defined (change in enthalpy and entropy). The introduction of intercalating residue causes a significant stabilization of DNA duplexes. It is shown that the efficiency of the fluorescence of acridine residue in the oligonucleotide conjugate significantly changes upon hybridization with DNA.

  16. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  17. Electrochemical Detection of a Dengue-related Oligonucleotide Sequence Using Ferrocenium as a Hybridization Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Teles, Fernando Rodrigues; França dos Prazeres, Duarte Miguel; de Lima-Filho, José Luiz

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for electrochemical detection of a synthetic 20-bp oligonucleotide sequence related with dengue virus genome was developed. A complimentary DNA probe sequence was electrostatically immobilized onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with chitosan. Electrochemical detection of hybridization between probe and target was performed by cyclic voltammetry, using ferrocene (Fc+) as a hybridization label. After hybridization, the peak current response of Fc+ oxidation increased around 26%. A higher voltammetric decay rate constant (kd) and a lower half-life period (t1/2) for the interaction of Fc+ with dsDNA compared to those with ssDNA quantitatively characterize the different strengths of interaction with both types of DNA. By combining the simplicity of DNA immobilization onto a chitosan film and suitable voltammetric detection of hybridization concomitant with ferrocene attachment, a good discrimination between ssDNA and dsDNA was obtained.

  18. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  19. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  20. Effect of Molecular Crowding and Ionic Strength on the Isothermal Hybridization of Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Markarian, Marie Z.; Schlenoff, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal hybridization of complimentary oligonucleotides, 15-mer, 25-mer, 35-mer, and a molecular beacon, was investigated under varying conditions of molecular crowding and ionic strength, using hypochromicity to follow strand pairing and polyethylene glycol as a crowding agent. Thermodynamic analysis of the results revealed the addition of counterions to the oligonucleotide backbones, Δψ, to be dependent on the strand G-C content and the molecular crowding. A decrease in Δψ was observed with both increasing GC% and solution PEG content. In contrast, the number of bound water molecules depended on the activity of Na+, where two regimes were observed. At aNa+⟨0.05 and increasing molecular crowding, water molecules were released into the DNA solutions and oligonucleotide pairing was favored with both increasing hydrophobic forces, while at aNa+≥0.05, water molecules were bound to the strands and the extent of double strand formation decreased with increasing PEG wt%. PMID:20701389

  1. Permeabilization of mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes for in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, S J; O'Donnell, A G; Embley, T M

    1994-10-01

    The application of whole-cell hybridization using labelled oligonucleotide probes in microbial systematics and ecology is limited by difficulties in permeabilizing many Gram-positive organisms. In this investigation paraformaldehyde treatment, acid methanolysis and acid hydrolysis were evaluated as a means of permeabilizing mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes prior to hybridization with a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probe designed to bind to a conserved sequence of bacterial 16S rRNA. Methods were evaluated on stationary-phase cultures of Gordona bronchialis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Nocardia asteroides, N. brasiliensis, Rhodococcus equi, R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous and Tsukamurella paurometabola, none of which could be probed following 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde fixation. For comparison and to test the general applicability of mild acid pretreatments, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida were also studied. The data showed that most of the mycolic-acid-containing organisms were successfully permeabilized by mild acid hydrolysis in 1 M HCl at 37 degrees C. Cells were treated for different lengths of time. In general, the mycolic-acid-containing organisms required between 30 and 50 min hydrolysis, whereas B. subtilis, E. coli and P. putida were rendered permeable in only 10 min. Interestingly, L. plantarum could not be permeabilized using acid hydrolysis even after 60 min exposure to 1 M HCl.

  2. Whole-cell hybridization of Methanosarcina cells with two new oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, A H; Torsvik, V L; Torsvik, T; Poulsen, L K; Ahring, B K

    1997-01-01

    Two new oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of the methanogenic genus Methanosarcina were developed. The probes have the following sequences (Escherichia coli numbering): probe SARCI551, 5'-GAC CCAATAATCACGATCAC-3', and probe SARCI645, 5'-TCCCGGTTCCAAGTCTGGC-3'. In situ hybridization with the fluorescently labelled probes required several modifications of standard procedures. Cells of Methanosarcina mazeii S-6 were found to lyse during the hybridization step if fixed in 3% formaldehyde and stored in 50% ethanol. Lysis was, however, not observed with cells fixed and stored in 1.6% formaldehyde-0.85% NaCl. Extensive autofluorescence of the cells was found upon hybridization in the presence of 5 mM EDTA, but successful hybridization could be obtained without addition of this compound. The mounting agent Citifluor AF1, often used in conjugation with the fluorochrome fluorescein, was found to wash the labelled probes out of the cells. Stable labelling could be obtained with rhodamine-labelled probes when the specimen was mounted in immersion oil, and high hybridization intensities of the Methanosarcina cells were found even in the presence of biomass from an anaerobic reactor. The inherent high autofluorescence of the biomass could be lowered by use of a highly specific narrow-band filter. The probes were found to be specific for Methanosarcina and useful for detection of this genus in samples from anaerobic reactors. PMID:9251192

  3. Changes in the end-to-end distance distribution in an oligonucleotide following hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Parkhurst, Kay M.

    1994-08-01

    A 16-mer deoxy oligonucleotide was labeled at the 5' end with x- rhodamine and at the 3' end with fluorescein. The fluorescence lifetime of the donor, fluorescein, under conditions for resonance energy transfer, was studied using the SLM 4850 multiharmonic frequency phase fluorometer in order to obtain information on the end-to-end distance distribution P(R) in the oligomer. When this doubly labeled oligonucleotide was hybridized to its 16-mer complement, the fluorescein fluorescence decay could be very well described by a P(R) that was a symmetric shifted Gaussian with center at 68.4 angstrom and (sigma) equals6.4 angstrom. Simulations suggested that part of the width might be attributable to a distribution in (kappa) 2. In the single- stranded labeled oligomer, there was enhanced energy transfer from the fluorescein to the rhodamine and the best fitting symmetrical shifted Gaussian representation of P(R) was centered at 53.8 angstrom with (kappa) equals6.9 angstrom. There was significant lack of fit with this model, however. A model independent procedure was developed for extracting P(R) as a sum of weighted Hermite polynomials. This procedure gave a P(R) with a large negative region at R<20 angstrom, suggesting that rotational averaging for (kappa) 2 was not quite complete prior to significant decay of the donor excited state.

  4. An anchored framework BAC map of mouse chromosome 11 assembled using multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cai, W W; Reneker, J; Chow, C W; Vaishnav, M; Bradley, A

    1998-12-15

    Despite abundant library resources for many organisms, physical mapping of these organisms has been seriously limited due to lack of efficient library screening techniques. We have developed a highly efficient strategy for large-scale screening of genomic libraries based on multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization on high-density genomic filters. We have applied this strategy to generate a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) anchored map of mouse chromosome 11. Using the MIT mouse SSLP data, 320 pairs of oligonucleotide probes were designed with an "overgo" computer program that selects new primer sequences that avoid the microsatellite repeat. BACs identified by these probes are automatically anchored to the chromosome. Ninety-two percent of the probes identified positive clones from a 5.9-fold coverage mouse BAC library with an average of 7 positive clones per marker. An average of 4.2 clones was confirmed for 204 markers by PCR. Our data show that a large number of clones can be efficiently isolated from a large genomic library using this strategy with minimal effort. This strategy will have wide application for large-scale mapping and sequencing of human and other large genomes.

  5. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  6. Localization of miRNAs by In Situ Hybridization in Plants Using Conventional Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellano, Sara; Nic-Can, Geovanny I; De-la-Peña, Clelia

    2017-01-01

    Among the epigenetic mechanisms studied with a greater interest in the last decade are the microRNAs (miRNAs). These small noncoding RNA sequences that are approximately 17-22 nucleotides in length play an essential role in many biological processes of various organisms, including plants. The analysis of spatiotemporal expression of miRNAs provides a better understanding of the role of these small molecules in plant development, cell differentiation, and other processes; but such analysis is also an important method for the validation of biological functions. In this work, we describe the optimization of an efficient protocol for the spatiotemporal analysis of miRNA by in situ hybridization using different plant tissues embedded in paraffin. Instead of LNA-modified probes that are typically used for this work, we use conventional oligonucleotide probes that yield a high specificity and clean distribution of miRNAs.

  7. Direct profiling of environmental microbial populations by thermal dissociation analysis of native rRNAs hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El Fantroussi, Said; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Bernhard, Anne E.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Smidt, H.; Yershov, G. M.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile directly extracted rRNA from environmental microbial populations without PCR amplification. In our initial inspection of two distinct estuarine study sites, the hybridization patterns were reproducible and varied between estuarine sediments of differing salinities. The determination of a thermal dissociation curve (i.e., melting profile) for each probe-target duplex provided information on hybridization specificity, which is essential for confirming adequate discrimination between target and nontarget sequences.

  8. Consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers for amplification of distantly related sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, T M; Schultz, E R; Henikoff, J G; Pietrokovski, S; McCallum, C M; Henikoff, S

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new primer design strategy for PCR amplification of unknown targets that are related to multiply-aligned protein sequences. Each primer consists of a short 3' degenerate core region and a longer 5' consensus clamp region. Only 3-4 highly conserved amino acid residues are necessary for design of the core, which is stabilized by the clamp during annealing to template molecules. During later rounds of amplification, the non-degenerate clamp permits stable annealing to product molecules. We demonstrate the practical utility of this hybrid primer method by detection of diverse reverse transcriptase-like genes in a human genome, and by detection of C5DNA methyltransferase homologs in various plant DNAs. In each case, amplified products were sufficiently pure to be cloned without gel fractionation. This COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) strategy has been implemented as a computer program that is accessible over the World Wide Web (http://blocks.fhcrc.org/codehop.html) and is directly linked from the BlockMaker multiple sequence alignment site for hybrid primer prediction beginning with a set of related protein sequences. PMID:9512532

  9. Analysis of microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotide probes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Robert C.; Deo, Monika; Turner, David L.

    2007-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an important tool for analyzing gene expression and developing hypotheses about gene functions. The discovery of hundreds of microRNA (miRNA) genes in animals has provided new challenges for analyzing gene expression and functions. The small size of the mature miRNAs (∼20-24 nucleotides in length) presents difficulties for conventional in situ hybridization methods. However, we have developed a modified in situ hybridization method for detection of mammalian miRNAs in tissue sections, based upon the use of RNA oligonucleotide probes in combination with highly specific wash conditions. Here we present detailed procedures for detection of miRNAs in tissue sections or cultured cells. The methods described can utilize either nonradioactive hapten-conjugated probes that are detected by enzyme-coupled antibodies, or radioactively labeled probes that are detected by autoradiography. The ability to visualize miRNA expression patterns in tissue sections provides an additional tool for the analyses of miRNA expression and function. In addition, the use of radioactively labeled probes should facilitate quantitative analyses of changes in miRNA gene expression. PMID:17889803

  10. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  11. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-09-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples.

  12. Genotyping male-specific RNA coliphages by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, F C; Shieh, Y S; van Duin, J; Beekwilder, M J; Sobsey, M D

    1995-01-01

    F-specific (F+) RNA coliphages are prevalent in sewage and other fecal wastes of humans and animals. There are four antigenically distinct serogroups of F+ RNA coliphages, and those predominating in humans (groups II and III) differ from those predominating in animals (groups I and IV). Hence, it may be possible to distinguish between human and animal wastes by serotyping F+ RNA coliphage isolates. Because serotyping is laborious and requires scarce antiserum reagents, we investigated genotyping using synthetic oligonucleotide probes as an alternative approach to distinguishing the four groups of F+ RNA coliphages. Oligoprobes I, II, III, IV, A, and B were selected to detect group I, II, III, IV, I plus II, and III plus IV phages, respectively. Methods for phage transfer from zones of lysis on a host cell lawn to candidate membrane filters and fixation of genomic nucleic acid on the membranes were optimized. The oligoprobes, which were end labeled with digoxigenin, were applied in DNA-RNA hybridization, and hybrids were observed by colorimetric, immunoenzymatic detection. Of 203 isolates of F+ RNA coliphages from environmental samples of water, wastes, and shellfish, 99.5 and 96.6% could be classified into each group by serotyping and genotyping, respectively. Probes A and B correctly identified 100% of the isolates. On the basis of these results, this method for genotyping F+ RNA coliphages appears to be practical and reliable for typing isolates in field samples. PMID:8526509

  13. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  14. Detection of mammalian microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Deo, Monika; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Tippens, Melissa; Turner, David L

    2006-09-01

    We have developed an in situ hybridization procedure for the detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) in tissue sections from mouse embryos and adult organs. The method uses highly specific washing conditions for RNA oligonucleotide probes conjugated to a fluorescein hapten. We show that this method detects predominantly mature miRNAs rather than the miRNA precursors or primary transcripts. We have determined expression patterns for several miRNAs expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, including miR-124a, miR-9, miR-92, and miR-204. Whereas miR-124a is expressed in neurons, miR-9 is expressed in neural progenitors and some neurons, and miR-204 is expressed in the choroid plexus, retinal pigment epithelium, and ciliary body. miR-204 is located in an intron of the TRPM3 gene, and the TRPM3 mRNA is coexpressed with miR-204 in the choroid plexus. We also find that primary transcripts for miR-124a and miR-9 genes are expressed in patterns similar to their respective mature miRNAs. The ability to visualize expression of specific miRNAs in embryos and tissues should aid studies on miRNA function.

  15. Structured oligonucleotides for target indexing to allow single-vessel PCR amplification and solid support microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Girard, Laurie D; Boissinot, Karel; Peytavi, Régis; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-02-07

    The combination of molecular diagnostic technologies is increasingly used to overcome limitations on sensitivity, specificity or multiplexing capabilities, and provide efficient lab-on-chip devices. Two such techniques, PCR amplification and microarray hybridization are used serially to take advantage of the high sensitivity and specificity of the former combined with high multiplexing capacities of the latter. These methods are usually performed in different buffers and reaction chambers. However, these elaborate methods have high complexity and cost related to reagent requirements, liquid storage and the number of reaction chambers to integrate into automated devices. Furthermore, microarray hybridizations have a sequence dependent efficiency not always predictable. In this work, we have developed the concept of a structured oligonucleotide probe which is activated by cleavage from polymerase exonuclease activity. This technology is called SCISSOHR for Structured Cleavage Induced Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide Hybridization Reaction. The SCISSOHR probes enable indexing the target sequence to a tag sequence. The SCISSOHR technology also allows the combination of nucleic acid amplification and microarray hybridization in a single vessel in presence of the PCR buffer only. The SCISSOHR technology uses an amplification probe that is irreversibly modified in presence of the target, releasing a single-stranded DNA tag for microarray hybridization. Each tag is composed of a 3-nucleotide sequence-dependent segment and a unique "target sequence-independent" 14-nucleotide segment allowing for optimal hybridization with minimal cross-hybridization. We evaluated the performance of five (5) PCR buffers to support microarray hybridization, compared to a conventional hybridization buffer. Finally, as a proof of concept, we developed a multiplexed assay for the amplification, detection, and identification of three (3) DNA targets. This new technology will facilitate the design

  16. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  17. Methods of DNA sequencing by hybridization based on optimizing concentration of matrix-bound oligonucleotide and device for carrying out same

    DOEpatents

    Khrapko, Konstantin R.; Khorlin, Alexandr A.; Ivanov, Igor B.; Ershov, Gennady M.; Lysov, Jury P.; Florentiev, Vladimir L.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    1996-09-03

    A method for sequencing DNA by hybridization that includes the following steps: forming an array of oligonucleotides at such concentrations that either ensure the same dissociation temperature for all fully complementary duplexes or allows hybridization and washing of such duplexes to be conducted at the same temperature; hybridizing said oligonucleotide array with labeled test DNA; washing in duplex dissociation conditions; identifying single-base substitutions in the test DNA by analyzing the distribution of the dissociation temperatures and reconstructing the DNA nucleotide sequence based on the above analysis. A device for carrying out the method comprises a solid substrate and a matrix rigidly bound to the substrate. The matrix contains the oligonucleotide array and consists of a multiplicity of gel portions. Each gel portion contains one oligonucleotide of desired length. The gel portions are separated from one another by interstices and have a thickness not exceeding 30 .mu.m.

  18. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  19. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  20. Huntingtin Haplotypes Provide Prioritized Target Panels for Allele-specific Silencing in Huntington Disease Patients of European Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Warby, Simon C; Caron, Nicholas S; Doty, Crystal N; Nguyen, Betty; Griguoli, Annamaria; Ross, Colin J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Heterozygous polymorphisms in cis with the mutation allow for allele-specific suppression of the pathogenic HTT transcript as a therapeutic strategy. To prioritize target selection, precise heterozygosity estimates are needed across diverse HD patient populations. Here we present the first comprehensive investigation of all common target alleles across the HTT gene, using 738 reference haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and 2364 haplotypes from HD patients and relatives in Canada, Sweden, France, and Italy. The most common HD haplotypes (A1, A2, and A3a) define mutually exclusive sets of polymorphisms for allele-specific therapy in the greatest number of patients. Across all four populations, a maximum of 80% are treatable using these three target haplotypes. We identify a novel deletion found exclusively on the A1 haplotype, enabling potent and selective silencing of mutant HTT in approximately 40% of the patients. Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the deletion reduce mutant A1 HTT mRNA by 78% in patient cells while sparing wild-type HTT expression. By suppressing specific haplotypes on which expanded CAG occurs, we demonstrate a rational approach to the development of allele-specific therapy for a monogenic disorder.

  1. Huntingtin Haplotypes Provide Prioritized Target Panels for Allele-specific Silencing in Huntington Disease Patients of European Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Warby, Simon C; Caron, Nicholas S; Doty, Crystal N; Nguyen, Betty; Griguoli, Annamaria; Ross, Colin J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Heterozygous polymorphisms in cis with the mutation allow for allele-specific suppression of the pathogenic HTT transcript as a therapeutic strategy. To prioritize target selection, precise heterozygosity estimates are needed across diverse HD patient populations. Here we present the first comprehensive investigation of all common target alleles across the HTT gene, using 738 reference haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and 2364 haplotypes from HD patients and relatives in Canada, Sweden, France, and Italy. The most common HD haplotypes (A1, A2, and A3a) define mutually exclusive sets of polymorphisms for allele-specific therapy in the greatest number of patients. Across all four populations, a maximum of 80% are treatable using these three target haplotypes. We identify a novel deletion found exclusively on the A1 haplotype, enabling potent and selective silencing of mutant HTT in approximately 40% of the patients. Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the deletion reduce mutant A1 HTT mRNA by 78% in patient cells while sparing wild-type HTT expression. By suppressing specific haplotypes on which expanded CAG occurs, we demonstrate a rational approach to the development of allele-specific therapy for a monogenic disorder. PMID:26201449

  2. Comparison of nucleic acid targets prepared from total RNA or poly(A) RNA for DNA oligonucleotide microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kjell; Oyan, Anne Margrete; Rostad, Kari; Olsen, Sue; Bø, Trond Hellem; Salvesen, Helga B; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bruserud, Oystein; Halvorsen, Ole Johan; Akslen, Lars Andreas; Steen, Vidar M; Jonassen, Inge; Kalland, Karl-Henning

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work was to compare DNA microarray results using either total RNA or affinity-purified poly(A) RNA from the same biological sample for target preparation. The high-density oligonucleotide microarrays of both Agilent Technologies (based on two-color detection) and Applied Biosystems (based on single-color detection) were evaluated. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at different stages of target preparations. Poly(A) RNA versus total RNA target hybridizations exhibited slightly lower correlation coefficients than did self versus self hybridizations (i.e., poly(A) RNA targets vs. poly(A) RNA targets or total RNA targets vs. total RNA targets). Only a small fraction of all transcripts appeared to be significantly over- or underrepresented when total RNA targets or poly(A) RNA targets from the same biological sample were compared. Therefore, the conclusion is that poly(A) affinity purification from total RNA can be omitted during target preparation for routine mRNA expression analysis using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Among consistently overrepresented transcripts in total RNA targets were histone mRNAs known to lack poly(A) tails. Therefore, structurally exceptional RNA species can be identified by comparing targets derived from either poly(A) RNA or total RNA using microarray hybridization.

  3. Human leukocyte antigen haplotype phasing by allele-specific enrichment with peptide nucleic acid probes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Pouton, Colin W; Irving, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Targeted capture of large fragments of genomic DNA that enrich for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system haplotypes has utility in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current methods of HLA matching are based on inference or familial studies of inheritance; and each approach has its own inherent limitations. We have designed and tested a probe–target-extraction method for capturing specific HLA haplotypes by hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to alleles of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Short target fragments contained in plasmids were initially used to optimize the method followed by testing samples of genomic DNA from human subjects with preselected HLA haplotypes and obtained approximately 10% enrichment for the specific haplotype. When performed with high-molecular-weight genomic DNA, 99.0% versus 84.0% alignment match was obtained for the specific haplotype probed. The allele-specific target enrichment that we obtained can facilitate the elucidation of haplotypes between the 65 kb separating the HLA-DRB1 and the HLA-DQA1 genes, potentially spanning a total distance of at least 130 kb. Allele-specific target enrichment with PNA probes is a straightforward technique that has the capability to improve the resolution of DNA and whole genome sequencing technologies by allowing haplotyping of enriched DNA and crucially, retaining the DNA methylation profile. PMID:24936514

  4. Multiplexed quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA by solution hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Satokari, Reetta M; Kataja, Kari; Söderlund, Hans

    2005-07-01

    Multiplexed and quantitative analysis of nucleic acid sequences in complex mixtures is essential in various applications of microbiological research. We have developed a method based on solution hybridization between biotinylated nucleic acid targets and multiple fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes of distinct sizes. The biotin-nucleic acid-probe complexes are captured on magnetic streptavidin-coated microparticles and washed. The hybridized probes are eluted and their identity and quantity are determined by capillary electrophoresis. The signal intensities of the recorded probes correspond to the amount of target nucleic acid in the mixture, and the size indicates the target. Based on this principle and 16S rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes, we set up an application for the relative quantification of different groups of clostridia and related organisms in a mixed bacterial population. The lower detection limit is 0.05 ng of total RNA and the linear range of measurement is 10(2). The method allowed accurate and highly repeatable quantification of the proportion of clostridia in human feces. Further, we discuss other applications of the method such as quantitative transcriptional analysis of eukaryotic microorganisms, which can be performed without conversion of mRNA to cDNA.

  5. Hybridization of different antisense oligonucleotides on the surface of gold nanoparticles to silence zinc metalloproteinase gene after uptake by Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Anvari-Tafti, Mohammad Hosssein

    2015-05-01

    The use of antisense oligonucleotides is a novel strategy to treat infectious diseases. In this approach, vital mRNAs are targeted by antisense oligonucleotides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gold nanoparticles hybridized with different antisense oligonucleotides on Leishmania (L) major. In this project, gold nanoparticles were first synthesized, and then conjugated with primary oligonucleotides, 3'-AAA-5'. Next, conjugated gold nanoparticles (NP1) were separately hybridized with three types of antisense oligonucleotide from coding reign of GP63 gene (NP2), non-coding reign of GP63 gene (NP3), and both coding and non-coding reigns of GP63 (NP4). Then, 1mL of L. major suspension was separately added to 1mL of different hybridized gold nanoparticles at serial concentrations (1-200μg/mL), and incubated for 24, 48, and 72h at 37°C. Next, the uptake of each nanoparticle was separately measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. After incubation, the cell viability was separately evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Also, the expression of GP63 gene was read out by quantitative-real-time PCR. This study showed that NP2 and NP3 had higher (5-fold) uptake than NP1 and NP4. Moreover, NP2 and NP3 led to less cell viability and gene expression, compared with NP1 and NP4. It could be concluded that both sequence and size of antisense oligonucleotide were important for transfection of L. major. Importantly, these antisense oligonucleotides can be obtained from both coding and non-coding reign of GP63 gene. Moreover, hybridized gold nanoparticles not only could silence GP63 gene, but also could kill L. major.

  6. Allele-specific chemical genetics: concept, strategies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kabirul

    2015-02-20

    The relationship between DNA and protein sequences is well understood, yet because the members of a protein family/subfamily often carry out the same biochemical reaction, elucidating their individual role in cellular processes presents a challenge. Forward and reverse genetics have traditionally been employed to understand protein functions with considerable success. A fundamentally different approach that has gained widespread application is the use of small organic molecules, known as chemical genetics. However, the slow time-scale of genetics and inherent lack of specificity of small molecules used in chemical genetics have limited the applicability of these methods in deconvoluting the role of individual proteins involved in fast, dynamic biological events. Combining the advantages of both the techniques, the specificity achieved with genetics along with the reversibility and tunability of chemical genetics, has led to the development of a powerful approach to uncover protein functions in complex biological processes. This technique is known as allele-specific chemical genetics and is rapidly becoming an essential toolkit to shed light on proteins and their mechanism of action. The current review attempts to provide a comprehensive description of this approach by discussing the underlying principles, strategies, and successful case studies. Potential future implications of this technology in expanding the frontiers of modern biology are discussed.

  7. RNA-FISH to analyze allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the analysis of imprinted gene expression is the need to distinguish RNA synthesis occurring at the maternal vs the paternally inherited copy of the gene. Most of the techniques used to examine allele-specific expression exploit naturally occurring polymorphisms and measure steady-state levels of RNA isolated from a pool of cells. Hence, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) an be exploited in a heterozygote, by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)- based procedure, to analyze maternal vs paternal gene expression. The human IGF2R gene was analyzed in this way. Smrzka et al. (1) were thus able to show that the IGF2R gene possesses a hemimethylated, intronic CpG island analogous to the mouse imprinting box. However, IGF2R mRNA was detected that possessed the RFLP from both the maternal and paternal alleles in all but one of the 70 lymphoblastoid samples. (The one monoallelic sample reactivated its paternal allele with continued cell culturing.) It was concluded that monoallelic expression of the human gene is a polymorphic trait occurring in a small minority of all tested samples (reviewed in refs. 2,3). Although this is a sound conclusion, the question remains: Is the human IGF2R gene imprinted?

  8. Regulatory Divergence in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, a Genomewide Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Graze, Rita M.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Main, Bradley J.; Wayne, Marta L.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    Species-specific regulation of gene expression contributes to the development and maintenance of reproductive isolation and to species differences in ecologically important traits. A better understanding of the evolutionary forces that shape regulatory variation and divergence can be developed by comparing expression differences among species and interspecific hybrids. Once expression differences are identified, the underlying genetics of regulatory variation or divergence can be explored. With the goal of associating cis and/or trans components of regulatory divergence with differences in gene expression, overall and allele-specific expression levels were assayed genomewide in female adult heads of Drosophila melanogaster, D. simulans, and their F1 hybrids. A greater proportion of cis differences than trans differences were identified for genes expressed in heads and, in accordance with previous studies, cis differences also explained a larger number of species differences in overall expression level. Regulatory divergence was found to be prevalent among genes associated with defense, olfaction, and among genes downstream of the Drosophila sex determination hierarchy. In addition, two genes, with critical roles in sex determination and micro RNA processing, Sxl and loqs, were identified as misexpressed in hybrid female heads, potentially contributing to hybrid incompatibility. PMID:19667135

  9. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    PubMed

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  10. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  11. Oligonucleotides with conjugated dihydropyrroloindole tripeptides: base composition and backbone effects on hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Kutyavin, I V; Lukhtanov, E A; Gamper, H B; Meyer, R B

    1997-01-01

    The ability of conjugated minor groove binding (MGB) residues to stabilize nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by synthesis of oligonucleotides bearing a tethered dihydropyrroloindole tripeptide (CDPI3). Duplexes bearing one or more of these conjugated MGBs were varied by base composition (AT- or GC-rich oligonucleotides), backbone modifications (phosphodiester DNA, 2'-O-methyl phosphodiester RNA or phosphorothioate DNA) and site of attachment of the MGB moiety (5'- or 3'-end of either duplex strand). Melting temperatures of the duplexes were determined. The conjugated CDPI3 residue enhanced the stability of virtually all duplexes studied. The extent of stabilization was backbone and sequence dependent and reached a maximum value of 40-49 degrees C for d(pT)8. d(pA)8. Duplexes with a phosphorothioate DNA backbone responded similarly on CDPI3 conjugation, although they were less stable than analogous phosphodiesters. Modest stabilization was obtained for duplexes with a 2'-O-methyl RNA backbone. The conjugated CDPI3 residue stabilized GC-rich DNA duplexes, albeit to a lesser extent than for AT-rich duplexes of the same length. PMID:9278496

  12. Distance-dependent emission from dye-labeled oligonucleotides on striped Au/Ag nanowires: effect of secondary structure and hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoermer, Rebecca L; Keating, Christine D

    2006-10-11

    When fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides are located near metal surfaces, their emission intensity is impacted by both electromagnetic effects (i.e., quenching and/or enhancement of emission) and the structure of the nucleic acids (e.g., random coil, hairpin, or duplex). We present experiments exploring the effect of label position and secondary structure in oligonucleotide probes as a function of hybridization buffer, which impacts the percentage of double-stranded probes on the surface after exposure to complementary DNA. Nanowires containing identifiable patterns of Au and Ag segments were used as the metal substrates in this work, which enabled us to directly compare different dye positions in a single multiplexed experiment and differences in emission for probes attached to the two metals. The observed metal-dye separation dependence for unstructured surface-bound oligonucleotides is highly sensitive to hybridization efficiency, due to substantial changes in DNA extension from the surface upon hybridization. In contrast, fluorophore labeled oligonucleotides designed to form hairpin secondary structures analogous to solution-phase molecular beacon probes are relatively insensitive to hybridization efficiency, since the folded form is quenched and therefore does not appreciably impact the observed distance-dependence of the response. Differences in fluorescence patterning on Au and Ag were noted as a function of not only chromophore identity but also metal-dye separation. For example, emission intensity for TAMRA-labeled oligonucleotides changed from brighter on Ag for 24-base probes to brighter on Au for 48-base probes. We also observed fluorescence enhancement at the ends of nanowires and at surface defects where heightened electromagnetic fields affect the fluorescence.

  13. Real-time detection of DNA hybridization and melting on oligonucleotide arrays by using optical wave guides.

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, D I; Hoijer, J V; Hsieh, W T; Jou, C; Gordon, J; Theriault, T; Gamble, R; Baldeschwieler, J D

    1995-01-01

    The challenge of the Human Genome Project is to increase the rate of DNA sequence acquisition by two orders of magnitude to complete sequencing of the human genome by the year 2000. The present work describes a rapid detection method using a two-dimensional optical wave guide that allows measurement of real-time binding or melting of a light-scattering label on a DNA array. A particulate label on the target DNA acts as a light-scattering source when illuminated by the evanescent wave of the wave guide and only the label bound to the surface generates a signal. Imaging/visual examination of the scattered light permits interrogation of the entire array simultaneously. Hybridization specificity is equivalent to that obtained with a conventional system using autoradiography. Wave guide melting curves are consistent with those obtained in the liquid phase and single-base discrimination is facile. Dilution experiments showed an apparent lower limit of detection at 0.4 nM oligonucleotide. This performance is comparable to the best currently known fluorescence-based systems. In addition, wave guide detection allows manipulation of hybridization stringency during detection and thereby reduces DNA chip complexity. It is anticipated that this methodology will provide a powerful tool for diagnostic applications that require rapid cost-effective detection of variations from known sequences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7603999

  14. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Clark, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  15. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  16. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RIBO-, DEOXYRIBO-, AND HYBRID OLIGONUCLEOTIDE HELICES BY NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, Arthur; Martin, Francis H.; Tinoco, Jr., Ignacio

    1980-11-01

    The nonexchangeable base protons and the hydrogen- bonding NH-N imino protons were used to study the conformations and the helix-coil transitions in the following oligonucleotides: (I) dCT{sub 5}G + dCA{sub 5}G, (II) rCU{sub 5}G + rCA{sub 5}G, (III) dCT{sub 5}G + rCA{sub 5}G, (IV) rCU{sub 5}G + dCA{sub 5}G. The first three mixtures all form stable double-helical structures at 5{degrees}C, whereas IV forms a triple strand with a ratio of 2:1 rCU{sub 5}G:dCA{sub 5}G. The chemical shifts of the imino protons in the double strands indicate that I, II, and III have different conformations in solution. For example, the hydrogen-bonded proton of one of the C-G base pairs is more shielded (a 0.4-ppm upfield shift) in helix I than in helix II or III. This implies a significant change in helical parameters, such as the winding angle, the distance between base pairs, or overlap of the bases. The coupling constants of the H1’ sugar protons show that helix I has 90% 2’-endo sugar conformation, whereas helix III has greater than 85% 3’-endo conformation for the observed sugar rings. The sugar pucker data are consistent with helix I having B-family geometry; III has A-family geometry. The chemical shifts of the nonexchangeable base protons in system I were followed with increasing temperature. The midpoints for the transitions, T{sub m}’s, for all the base protons were 28-30 {degrees}C; this indicates an all-or-none transition.

  17. Consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers (CODEHOPs) for the detection of novel viruses in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Staheli, Jeannette P; Ryan, Jonathan T; Bruce, A Gregory; Boyce, Richard; Rose, Timothy M

    2009-09-01

    Consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers (CODEHOPs) have proven to be a powerful tool for the identification of novel genes. CODEHOPs are designed from highly-conserved regions of multiply-aligned protein sequences from members of a gene family and are used in PCR amplification to identify distantly-related genes. The CODEHOP approach has been used to identify novel pathogens by targeting amino acid motifs conserved in specific pathogen families. We initiated a program utilizing the CODEHOP approach to develop PCR-based assays targeting a variety of viral families that are pathogens in non-human primates. We have also developed and further improved a computer program and website to facilitate the design of CODEHOP PCR primers. Here, we detail the method for the development of pathogen-specific CODEHOP PCR assays using the papillomavirus family as a target. Papillomaviruses constitute a diverse virus family infecting a wide variety of mammalian species, including humans and non-human primates. We demonstrate that our pan-papillomavirus CODEHOP assay is broadly reactive with all major branches of the virus family and show its utility in identifying a novel non-human primate papillomavirus in cynomolgus macaques.

  18. iCODEHOP: a new interactive program for designing COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers from multiply aligned protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Richard; Chilana, Parmit; Rose, Timothy M.

    2009-01-01

    PCR amplification using COnsensus DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOPs) has proven to be highly effective for identifying unknown pathogens and characterizing novel genes. We describe iCODEHOP; a new interactive web application that simplifies the process of designing and selecting CODEHOPs from multiply-aligned protein sequences. iCODEHOP intelligently guides the user through the degenerate primer design process including uploading sequences, creating a multiple alignment, deriving CODEHOPs and calculating their annealing temperatures. The user can quickly scan over an entire set of degenerate primers designed by the program to assess their relative quality and select individual primers for further analysis. The program displays phylogenetic information for input sequences and allows the user to easily design new primers from selected sequence sub-clades. It also allows the user to bias primer design to favor specific clades or sequences using sequence weights. iCODEHOP is freely available to all interested researchers at https://icodehop.cphi.washington.edu/i-codehop-context/Welcome. PMID:19443442

  19. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify small phytoplankton by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, N; LeBot, N; Marie, D; Partensky, F; Vaulot, D

    1995-01-01

    Because of their tiny size (0.2 to 2 microns), oceanic picophytoplanktonic cells (either cultured strains or natural communities) are difficult to identify, and some basic questions concerning their taxonomy, physiology, and ecology are still largely unanswered. The present study was designed to test the suitability of in situ hybridization with rRNA fluorescent probes detected by flow cytometry for the identification of small photosynthetic eukaryotes. Oligonucleotide probes targeted against regions of the 18S rRNAs of Chlorophyta lineage (CHLO probe) and of non-Chlorophyta (NCHLO probe) algal species were designed. The CHLO and NCHLO probes, which differed by a single nucleotide, allowed discrimination of chlorophyte from nonchlorophyte cultured strains. The sensitivity of each probe was dependent upon the size of the cells and upon their growth stage. The mean fluorescence was 8 to 80 times higher for specifically labeled than for nonspecifically labeled cells in exponential growth phase, but it decreased sharply in stationary phase. Such taxon-specific probes should increase the applicability of flow cytometry for the rapid identification of cultured pico- and nanoplanktonic strains, especially those that lack taxonomically useful morphological features. PMID:7618862

  20. Identification of ςB-Dependent Genes in Bacillus subtilis Using a Promoter Consensus-Directed Search and Oligonucleotide Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Petersohn, Anja; Bernhardt, Jörg; Gerth, Ulf; Höper, Dirk; Koburger, Torsten; Völker, Uwe; Hecker, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A consensus-directed search for ςB promoters was used to locate potential candidates for new ςB-dependent genes in Bacillus subtilis. Screening of those candidates by oligonucleotide hybridizations with total RNA from exponentially growing or ethanol-stressed cells of the wild type as well as a sigB mutant revealed 22 genes that required ςB for induction by ethanol. Although almost 50% of the proteins encoded by the newly discovered ςB-dependent stress genes seem to be membrane localized, biochemical functions have so far not been defined for any of the gene products. Allocation of the genes to the ςB-dependent stress regulon may indicate a potential function in the establishment of a multiple stress resistance. AldY and YhdF show similarities to NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases and YdbP to thioredoxins, supporting our suggestion that ςB-dependent proteins may be involved in the maintenance of the intracellular redox balance after stress. PMID:10482513

  1. Quantification of Syntrophic Fatty Acid-β-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor by Oligonucleotide Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kaare H.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S. wolfei LYB was closely related to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, of which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas. PMID:10543784

  2. SNP-Based Quantification of Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Patterns by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of allele-specific DNA methylation patterns has recently attracted much interest as loci of allele-specific DNA methylation overlap with known risk loci for complex diseases and the analysis might contribute to the fine-mapping and interpretation of non-coding genetic variants associated with complex diseases and improve the understanding between genotype and phenotype. In the presented protocol, we present a method for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns on both alleles separately using heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) as anchor for allele-specific PCR amplification followed by analysis of the allele-specific DNA methylation patterns by Pyrosequencing(®). Pyrosequencing is an easy-to-handle, quantitative real-time sequencing method that is frequently used for genotyping as well as for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns. The protocol consists of three major steps: (1) identification of individuals heterozygous for a SNP in a region of interest using Pyrosequencing; (2) analysis of the DNA methylation patterns surrounding the SNP on bisulfite-treated DNA to identify regions of potential allele-specific DNA methylation; and (3) the analysis of the DNA methylation patterns associated with each of the two alleles, which are individually amplified using allele-specific PCR. The enrichment of the targeted allele is re-enforced by modification of the allele-specific primers at the allele-discriminating base with Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA). For the proof-of-principle of the developed approach, we provide assay details for three imprinted genes (IGF2, IGF2R, and PEG3) within this chapter. The mean of the DNA methylation patterns derived from the individual alleles corresponds well to the overall DNA methylation patterns and the developed approach proved more reliable compared to other protocols for allele-specific DNA methylation analysis.

  3. Chromosome-wide analysis of parental allele-specific chromatin and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Wu, Xiwei; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Li, Arthur X; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Mann, Jeffrey R; Szabó, Piroska E

    2011-04-01

    To reveal the extent of domain-wide epigenetic features at imprinted gene clusters, we performed a high-resolution allele-specific chromatin analysis of over 100 megabases along the maternally or paternally duplicated distal chromosome 7 (Chr7) and Chr15 in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). We found that reciprocal allele-specific features are limited to imprinted genes and their differentially methylated regions (DMRs), whereas broad local enrichment of H3K27me3 (BLOC) is a domain-wide feature at imprinted clusters. We uncovered novel allele-specific features of BLOCs. A maternally biased BLOC was found along the H19-Igf2 domain. A paternal allele-specific gap was found along Kcnq1ot1, interrupting a biallelic BLOC in the Kcnq1-Cdkn1c domain. We report novel allele-specific chromatin marks at the Peg13 and Slc38a4 DMRs, Cdkn1c upstream region, and Inpp5f_v2 DMR and paternal allele-specific CTCF binding at the Peg13 DMR. Additionally, we derived an imprinted gene predictor algorithm based on our allele-specific chromatin mapping data. The binary predictor H3K9ac and CTCF or H3K4me3 in one allele and H3K9me3 in the reciprocal allele, using a sliding-window approach, recognized with precision the parental allele specificity of known imprinted genes, H19, Igf2, Igf2as, Cdkn1c, Kcnq1ot1, and Inpp5f_v2 on Chr7 and Peg13 and Slc38a4 on Chr15. Chromatin features, therefore, can unequivocally identify genes with imprinted expression.

  4. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  5. Absolute quantification of the alleles in somatic point mutations by bioluminometric methods based on competitive polymerase chain reaction in the presence of a locked nucleic acid blocker or an allele-specific primer.

    PubMed

    Iliadi, Alexandra; Petropoulou, Margarita; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos I; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan

    2011-09-01

    In somatic (acquired) point mutations, the challenge is to quantify minute amounts of the mutant allele in the presence of a large excess of the normal allele that differs only in a single base pair. We report two bioluminometric methods that enable absolute quantification of the alleles. The first method exploits the ability of a locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotide to bind to and inhibit effectively the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the normal allele while the amplification of the mutant allele remains unaffected. The second method employs allele-specific PCR primers, thereby allowing the amplification of the corresponding allele only. DNA internal standards (competitors) are added to the PCR mixture to compensate for any sample-to-sample variation in the amplification efficiency. The amplification products from the two alleles and the internal standards are quantified by a microtiter well-based bioluminometric hybridization assay using the photoprotein aequorin as a reporter. The methods allow absolute quantification of less than 300 copies of the mutant allele even in samples containing less than 1% of the mutant allele.

  6. Genome profiling of chondrosarcoma using oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Meera; Ulger, Celal; Yasar, Duygu; Limaye, Neha; Kurvathi, Rohini; Streck, Deanna; Benevenia, Joseph; Patterson, Francis; Dermody, James J; Toruner, Gokce A

    2009-07-15

    Chondrosarcomas of the bone are malignant hyaline cartilage-forming tumors with an annual incidence rate of 3.6% of all primary bone malignancies in the United States. Specimens of 25 chondrosarcomas (10 grade I, 9 grade II, 1 grade III, and 5 dedifferentiated) from 23 patients were collected from the Department of Pathology at the University Hospital at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School from 1996 to 2007. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies were performed on frozen tumor specimens. Recurrent deletions observed in at least in six tumors were 5q13.2, 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q12 approximately q13, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There was a statistically significant association between high-grade tumor (grade III and dedifferentiated) and the recurrent genetic deletions at 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There is consistency between increased levels of aneuploidy and the progression of chondrosarcoma from lower to higher grades.

  7. A majority of Huntington's disease patients may be treatable by individualized allele-specific RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Jaspers, Leonie; Spronkmans, Christine; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Di Maria, Emilio; Donato, Stefano Di; Kaemmerer, William F

    2009-06-01

    Use of RNA interference to reduce huntingtin protein (htt) expression in affected brain regions may provide an effective treatment for Huntington disease (HD), but it remains uncertain whether suppression of both wild-type and mutant alleles in a heterozygous patient will provide more benefit than harm. Previous research has shown suppression of just the mutant allele is achievable using siRNA targeted to regions of HD mRNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To determine whether more than a minority of patients may be eligible for an allele-specific therapy, we genotyped DNA from 327 unrelated European Caucasian HD patients at 26 SNP sites in the HD gene. Over 86% of the patients were found to be heterozygous for at least one SNP among those tested. Because the sites are genetically linked, one cannot use the heterozygosity rates of the individual SNPs to predict how many sites (and corresponding allele-specific siRNA) would be needed to provide at least one treatment possibility for this percentage of patients. By computing all combinations, we found that a repertoire of allele-specific siRNA corresponding to seven sites can provide at least one allele-specific siRNA treatment option for 85.6% of our sample. Moreover, we provide evidence that allele-specific siRNA targeting these sites are readily identifiable using a high throughput screening method, and that allele-specific siRNA identified using this method indeed show selective suppression of endogenous mutant htt protein in fibroblast cells from HD patients. Therefore, allele-specific siRNA are not so rare as to be impractical to find and use therapeutically.

  8. Dominant microbial composition and its vertical distribution in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike (Japan) as revealed by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-08-01

    Vertical distributions of dominant bacterial populations in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike were investigated throughout the water column and sediment by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization. Three oligonucleotide probes specific for the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA of three groups of Chlorobiaceae were newly designed. In addition, three general domain (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya)-specific probes, two delta-Proteobacteria-specific probes, a Chlorobiaceae-specific probe, and a Chloroflexi-specific probe were used after optimization of their washing conditions. The abundance of the sum of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with probes specific for three groups of Chlorobiaceae relative to total SSU rRNA peaked in the chemocline, accounting for up to 68%. The abundance of the delta-proteobacterial SSU rRNA relative to total SSU rRNA rapidly increased just below the chemocline up to 29% in anoxic water and peaked at the 2- to 3-cm sediment depth at ca. 34%. The abundance of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with the probe specific for the phylum Chloroflexi relative to total SSU rRNA was highest (31 to 54%) in the top of the sediment but then steeply declined with depth and became stable at 11 to 19%, indicating the robust coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and Chloroflexi in the top of the sediment. Any SSU rRNA of Chloroflexi in the water column was under the detection limit. The summation of the signals of group-specific probes used in this study accounted for up to 89% of total SSU rRNA, suggesting that the DGGE-oligonucleotide probe hybridization approach, in contrast to conventional culture-dependent approaches, was very effective in covering dominant populations.

  9. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization on a single microparticle by time-resolved fluorometry: quantitation and optimization of a sandwich type assay.

    PubMed

    Hakala, H; Mäki, E; Lönnberg, H

    1998-01-01

    Uniformly sized (50 micro m) porous glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate particles (SINTEF) were used as the solid phase in a sandwich type mixed-phase hybridization assay based on time-resolved fluorescence detection on a single particle. These particles were coated with oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes by conventional phosphoramidite chain assembly. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate, ¿2,2',2",2"'-¿¿4'-¿4"'-[(4, 6-dichloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]phenyl¿-2,2':6',2"-terpyrid ine-6, 6"-diyl¿bis(methylenenitrilo)¿tetrakis(acetato)¿eur opi um(III), was hybridized to a complementary sequence of the target oligonucleotide, and the resulting duplex was further hybridized to the particle-bound probes. The latter binding was quantified by time-resolved measurement of the emission signal of a single particle. Kinetics of hybridization and the effect of the concentration of the target oligomer and the fluorescently tagged probe on the efficiency of hybridization were studied. The intensity of the emission signal was linearly related to the concentration of the target oligomer over a range of 5 orders of magnitude. The length of the complementary region between the target oligomer and the particle-bound probe was varied, and the effect of point mutations and deletions on the hybridization efficiency was determined in each case. The maximal selectivity was observed with 10-16-base pair complementary sequences, the optimal length depending on the oligonucleotide loading on the particle. Discrimination between the complete matches and point mismatches was unequivocal, a single point mutation and/or deletion decreasing the efficiency of hybridization by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  10. Sensitive detection of SARS coronavirus RNA by a novel asymmetric multiplex nested RT-PCR amplification coupled with oligonucleotide microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-wei; Zhou, Yi-ming; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Yong; Tao, Sheng-ce; Li, Ze; Zhang, Qiong; Cheng, Jing

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive method for the detection of specific genes simultaneously. First, DNA was amplified by a novel asymmetric multiplex PCR with universal primer(s). Second, the 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-labeled PCR products were hybridized specifically with oligonucleotide microarrays. Finally, matched duplexes were detected by using a laser-induced fluorescence scanner. The usefulness of this method was illustrated by analyzing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus RNA. The detection limit was 10(0) copies/microL. The results of the asymmetric multiplex nested reverse transcription-PCR were in agreement with the results of the microarray hybridization; no hybridization signal was lost as happened with applicons from symmetric amplifications. This reliable method can be used to the identification of other microorganisms, screening of genetic diseases, and other applications.

  11. Heritable Individual-Specific and Allele-Specific Chromatin Signatures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    McDaniell, Ryan; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Song, Lingyun; Liu, Zheng; Boyle, Alan P.; Erdos, Michael R.; Scott, Laura J.; Morken, Mario A.; Kucera, Katerina S.; Battenhouse, Anna; Keefe, Damian; Collins, Francis S.; Willard, Huntington F.; Lieb, Jason D.; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Birney, Ewan

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which variation in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding may influence gene expression, and thus underlie or contribute to variation in phenotype, is unknown. To address this question, we cataloged both individual-to-individual variation and differences between homologous chromosomes within the same individual (allele-specific variation) in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding in lymphoblastoid cells derived from individuals of geographically diverse ancestry. Ten percent of active chromatin sites were individual-specific; a similar proportion were allele-specific. Both individual-specific and allele-specific sites were commonly transmitted from parent to child, which suggests that they are heritable features of the human genome. Our study shows that heritable chromatin status and transcription factor binding differ as a result of genetic variation and may underlie phenotypic variation in humans. PMID:20299549

  12. A novel technique for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms by analyzing consumed allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Sato, M; Sakabe, M; Naito, E; Yamanouchi, H; Suzuki, T

    2001-02-01

    We present a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique, termed consumed allele-specific primer analysis (CASPA), as a new strategy for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The method involves the use of labeled allele-specific primers, differing in length, with several noncomplementary nucleotides added in the 5'-terminal region. After PCR amplification, the amounts of the remaining primers not incorporated into the PCR products are determined. Thus, nucleotide substitutions are identified by measuring the consumption of primers. In this study, the CASPA method was successfully applied to ABO genotyping. In the present method, the allele-specific primer only anneals with the target polymorphic site on the DNA, so it is not necessary to analyze the PCR products. Therefore, this method is only little affected by modification of the PCR products. The CASPA method is expected to be a useful tool for typing of SNPs.

  13. High-Throughput Genotyping with TaqMan Allelic Discrimination and Allele-Specific Genotyping Assays.

    PubMed

    Heissl, Angelika; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Real-time PCR-based genotyping methods, such as TaqMan allelic discrimination assays and allele-specific genotyping, are particularly useful when screening a handful of single nucleotide polymorphisms in hundreds of samples; either derived from different individuals, tissues, or pre-amplified DNA. Although real-time PCR-based methods such as TaqMan are well-established, alternative methods, like allele-specific genotyping, are powerful alternatives, especially for genotyping short tandem repeat (STR) length polymorphisms. Here, we describe all relevant aspects when developing an assay for a new SNP or STR using either TaqMan or allele-specific genotyping, respectively, such as primer and probe design, optimization of reaction conditions, the experimental procedure for typing hundreds of samples, and finally the data evaluation. Our goal is to provide a guideline for developing genotyping assays using these two approaches that render reliable and reproducible genotype calls involving minimal optimization.

  14. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  15. Allele-specific copy number profiling by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bell, John M; Zavala, Nicolas A; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-02-27

    The progression and clonal development of tumors often involve amplifications and deletions of genomic DNA. Estimation of allele-specific copy number, which quantifies the number of copies of each allele at each variant loci rather than the total number of chromosome copies, is an important step in the characterization of tumor genomes and the inference of their clonal history. We describe a new method, falcon, for finding somatic allele-specific copy number changes by next generation sequencing of tumors with matched normals. falcon is based on a change-point model on a bivariate mixed Binomial process, which explicitly models the copy numbers of the two chromosome haplotypes and corrects for local allele-specific coverage biases. By using the Binomial distribution rather than a normal approximation, falcon more effectively pools evidence from sites with low coverage. A modified Bayesian information criterion is used to guide model selection for determining the number of copy number events. Falcon is evaluated on in silico spike-in data and applied to the analysis of a pre-malignant colon tumor sample and late-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma from the same individual. The allele-specific copy number estimates obtained by falcon allows us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the clonal history of the individual's colon cancer.

  16. Toward an on-chip multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized quantum dot-oligonucleotide conjugates and fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Algar, W. Russ; Vannoy, Charles H.; Chen, Lu; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2011-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QD) are a class of NP with photophysical properties that are ideally suited for optical multiplexing and use as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A new strategy is presented for the development of multiplexed DNA hybridization assays using immobilized QDs in a microfluidic system. Green- or red-emitting QDs were immobilized via self-assembly with a multidentate-thiol-derivatized glass slide, and subsequently conjugated with amine-terminated probe oligonucleotides using carbodiimide activation. Immobilized QD-probe conjugates were then passivated with adsorbed non-complementary oligonucleotides to achieve selectivity in microfluidic assays. Target nucleic acid sequences hybridized with QD-probe conjugates and were labeled with Cy3 or Alexa Fluor 647 as acceptor dyes for the QD donors, where FRET-sensitized dye emission provided a signal for the detection of picomolar quantities of target. The simultaneous immobilization of green- and red-emitting QDs at different ratios within a microfluidic channel was demonstrated as a step toward multiplexed assays.

  17. Dry-reagent disposable biosensor for visual genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by oligonucleotide ligation reaction: application to pharmacogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C; Gravanis, Achille

    2008-08-01

    Most genotyping methods for known single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are based on hybridization with allele-specific probes, oligonucleotide ligation reaction (OLR), primer extension or invasive cleavage. OLR offers superior specificity because it involves two recognition events; namely, the hybridization of an allele-specific probe and a common probe to adjacent positions on target DNA. OLR products can be detected by microtiter well-based colorimetric, time-resolved fluorimetric or chemiluminometric assays, electrophoresis, microarrays, microspheres, and homogeneous fluorimetric or colorimetric assays. We have developed a simple, robust, and low-cost disposable biosensor in dry-reagent format, which allows visual genotyping with no need for instrumentation. The OLR mixture contains a biotinylated common probe and an allele-specific probe with a (dA)(20) segment at the 3'-end. OLR products are denatured and applied to the biosensor next to gold nanoparticles that are decorated with oligo(dT) strands. The sensor is immersed in the appropriate buffer and all components migrate by capillary action. The OLR product is captured by immobilized streptavidin at the test zone (TZ) of the sensor and hybridizes with the oligo(dT) strands of the nanoparticles. A characteristic red line is generated due to the accumulation of nanoparticles. The excess nanoparticles are captured by immobilized oligo(dA) at the control zone of the strip, giving a second red line. We have applied successfully the proposed OLR-dipstick assay to the genotyping of four SNPs in the drug-metabolizing enzyme genes CYP2D6 ((*)3 and (*)4) and CYP2C19 ((*)2 and (*)3). The results were in agreement with direct sequencing.

  18. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  19. Pmp22 mutant allele-specific siRNA alleviates demyelinating neuropathic phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Su; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Koo, Ok Jae; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Mo, Won Min; Kwak, Geon; Moon, Hyo Won; Park, Hwan Tae; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2017-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a genetic disorder that can be caused by aberrations in >80 genes. CMT has heterogeneous modes of inheritance, including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, and X-linked recessive. Over 95% of cases are dominantly inherited. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of a mutant allele by an allele-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) can alleviate the demyelinating neuropathic phenotype of CMT. We designed 19 different allele-specific siRNAs for Trembler J (Tr-J) mice harboring a naturally occurring mutation (Leu16Pro) in Pmp22. Using a luciferase assay, we identified an siRNA that specifically and selectively reduced the expression level of the mutant allele and reversed the low viability of Schwann cells caused by mutant Pmp22 over-expression in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of the allele-specific siRNA was assessed by its intraperitoneal injection to postnatal day 6 of Tr-J mice. Administration of the allele-specific siRNA to Tr-J mice significantly enhanced motor function and muscle volume, as assessed by the rotarod test and magnetic resonance imaging analysis, respectively. Increases in motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials were also observed in the treated mice. In addition, myelination, as evidenced by toluidine blue staining and electron microscopy, was augmented in the sciatic nerves of the mice after allele-specific siRNA treatment. After validating suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele at the mRNA level in the Schwann cells of Tr-J mice, we observed increased expression levels of myelinating proteins such as myelin basic protein and myelin protein zero. These data indicate that selective suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele by non-viral delivery of siRNA alleviates the demyelinating neuropathic phenotypes of CMT in vivo, implicating allele-specific siRNA treatment as a potent therapeutic strategy for dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Oligonucleotide-directed self-assembly of proteins: semisynthetic DNA--streptavidin hybrid molecules as connectors for the generation of macroscopic arrays and the construction of supramolecular bioconjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, C M; Sano, T; Smith, C L; Cantor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Modified biomolecules were used for the non-covalent assembly of novel bioconjugates. Hybrid molecules were synthesized from short single-stranded DNA and streptavidin by chemical methods using a heterobispecific crosslinker. The covalent attachment of an oligonucleotide moiety to streptavidin provides a specific recognition domain for a complementary nucleic acid sequence, in addition to the four native biotin-binding sites. These bispecific binding capabilities allow the hybrid molecules to serve as versatile connectors in a variety of applications. Bifunctional constructs have been prepared from two complementary hybrid molecules, each previously conjugated to biotinylated immunoglobulin G or alkaline phosphatase. The use of nucleic acid sequences as a template for the formation of an array of proteins is further demonstrated on two size scales. A macroscopic DNA array on a microtiter plate has been transformed into a comparable protein chip. A nano-scale array was made by hybridizing DNA-tagged proteins to specific positions along a RNA or DNA sequence. The generation of supramolecular bioconjugates was shown by quantitative measurements and gel-retardation assays. Images PMID:7530841

  1. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  2. Correction of hair shaft defects through allele-specific silencing of mutant Krt75

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R.; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yan-Feng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A.; Roop, Dennis R.; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele specific siRNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific shRNA persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of the mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  3. Predictive long-range allele-specific mapping of regulatory variants and target transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibaick; Lee, Seulkee; Bang, Hyoeun; Choi, Jung Kyoon

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a large number of noncoding associations, calling for systematic mapping to causal regulatory variants and their distal target genes. A widely used method, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for chromatin or expression traits, suffers from sample-to-sample experimental variation and trans-acting or environmental effects. Instead, alleles at heterozygous loci can be compared within a sample, thereby controlling for those confounding factors. Here we introduce a method for chromatin structure-based allele-specific pairing of regulatory variants and target transcripts. With phased genotypes, much of allele-specific expression could be explained by paired allelic cis-regulation across a long range. This approach showed approximately two times greater sensitivity than QTL mapping. There are cases in which allele imbalance cannot be tested because heterozygotes are not available among reference samples. Therefore, we employed a machine learning method to predict missing positive cases based on various features shared by observed allele-specific pairs. We showed that only 10 reference samples are sufficient to achieve high prediction accuracy with a low sampling variation. In conclusion, our method enables highly sensitive fine mapping and target identification for trait-associated variants based on a small number of reference samples.

  4. AlleleSeq: analysis of allele-specific expression and binding in a network framework.

    PubMed

    Rozowsky, Joel; Abyzov, Alexej; Wang, Jing; Alves, Pedro; Raha, Debasish; Harmanci, Arif; Leng, Jing; Bjornson, Robert; Kong, Yong; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Rubin, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2011-08-02

    To study allele-specific expression (ASE) and binding (ASB), that is, differences between the maternally and paternally derived alleles, we have developed a computational pipeline (AlleleSeq). Our pipeline initially constructs a diploid personal genome sequence (and corresponding personalized gene annotation) using genomic sequence variants (SNPs, indels, and structural variants), and then identifies allele-specific events with significant differences in the number of mapped reads between maternal and paternal alleles. There are many technical challenges in the construction and alignment of reads to a personal diploid genome sequence that we address, for example, bias of reads mapping to the reference allele. We have applied AlleleSeq to variation data for NA12878 from the 1000 Genomes Project as well as matched, deeply sequenced RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq data sets generated for this purpose. In addition to observing fairly widespread allele-specific behavior within individual functional genomic data sets (including results consistent with X-chromosome inactivation), we can study the interaction between ASE and ASB. Furthermore, we investigate the coordination between ASE and ASB from multiple transcription factors events using a regulatory network framework. Correlation analyses and network motifs show mostly coordinated ASB and ASE.

  5. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes.

  6. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R.; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring ‘allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable ‘allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  7. Fluorescent Whole-Cell Hybridization with 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes To Identify Brucella spp. by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Lago, Luis; Vallejo, F. Javier; Trujillano, Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2000-01-01

    A whole-cell hybridization assay with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes derived from the 16S rRNA sequence of Brucella abortus in combination with flow cytometry has been developed. With the three fluorescent probes selected, a positive signal was observed with all the representative strains of the species and biovars of Brucella and with a total of nine different Brucella clinical isolates. Using the B9 probe in the hybridization assay, it was possible to discriminate between Brucella suis biovars 2, 3, 4, and 5 and almost all the other Brucella spp. On the basis of differences in fluorescence intensities, no discrimination was established between Brucella spp. and other phylogenetically related microorganisms. No positive fluorescence signals were detected with any of the bacteria showing serological cross-reactions with Brucella spp. and with a total of 17 clinical isolates not belonging to the genus Brucella. These results suggest that the 16S rRNA whole-cell hybridization technique could be a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection and identification of Brucella spp. PMID:10878084

  8. Synthesis, hybridization characteristics, and fluorescence properties of oligonucleotides modified with nucleobase-functionalized locked nucleic acid adenosine and cytidine monomers.

    PubMed

    Kaura, Mamta; Kumar, Pawan; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-07-03

    Conformationally restricted nucleotides such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) are very popular as affinity-, specificity-, and stability-enhancing modifications in oligonucleotide chemistry to produce probes for nucleic acid targeting applications in molecular biology, biotechnology, and medicinal chemistry. Considerable efforts have been devoted in recent years to optimize the biophysical properties of LNA through additional modification of the sugar skeleton. We recently introduced C5-functionalization of LNA uridines as an alternative and synthetically more straightforward approach to improve the biophysical properties of LNA. In the present work, we set out to test the generality of this concept by studying the characteristics of oligonucleotides modified with four different C5-functionalized LNA cytidine and C8-functionalized LNA adenosine monomers. The results strongly suggest that C5-functionalization of LNA pyrimidines is indeed a viable approach for improving the binding affinity, target specificity, and/or enzymatic stability of LNA-modified ONs, whereas C8-functionalization of LNA adenosines is detrimental to binding affinity and specificity. These insights will impact the future design of conformationally restricted nucleotides for nucleic acid targeting applications.

  9. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  10. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  11. Ratiometric fluorescence transduction by hybridization after isothermal amplification for determination of zeptomole quantities of oligonucleotide biomarkers with a paper-based platform and camera-based detection.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Hrovat, David; Moazami-Goudarzi, Maryam; Espie, George S; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-07-23

    Paper is a promising platform for the development of decentralized diagnostic assays owing to the low cost and ease of use of paper-based analytical devices (PADs). It can be challenging to detect on PADs very low concentrations of nucleic acid biomarkers of lengths as used in clinical assays. Herein we report the use of thermophilic helicase-dependent amplification (tHDA) in combination with a paper-based platform for fluorescence detection of probe-target hybridization. Paper substrates were patterned using wax printing. The cellulosic fibers were chemically derivatized with imidazole groups for the assembly of the transduction interface that consisted of immobilized quantum dot (QD)-probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as the acceptor dye in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based transduction method. After probe-target hybridization, a further hybridization event with a reporter sequence brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs, triggering a FRET sensitized emission that served as an analytical signal. Ratiometric detection was evaluated using both an epifluorescence microscope and a low-cost iPad camera as detectors. Addition of the tHDA method for target amplification to produce sequences of ∼100 base length allowed for the detection of zmol quantities of nucleic acid targets using the two detection platforms. The ratiometric QD-FRET transduction method not only offered improved assay precision, but also lowered the limit of detection of the assay when compared with the non-ratiometric QD-FRET transduction method. The selectivity of the hybridization assays was demonstrated by the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism.

  12. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  13. Allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show genetic influence on chromatin state in human genome.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Mitsutaka; Yang, Howard H; Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Hu, Ying; Taylor, Philip R; Buetow, Kenneth H; Lee, Maxwell P

    2007-05-18

    Several recent studies have shown a genetic influence on gene expression variation, including variation between the two chromosomes within an individual and variation between individuals at the population level. We hypothesized that genetic inheritance may also affect variation in chromatin states. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed chromatin states in 12 lymphoblastoid cells derived from two Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families using an allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-chip) assay with Affymetrix 10K SNP chip. We performed the allele-specific ChIP-on-chip assays for the 12 lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies targeting at RNA polymerase II and five post-translation modified forms of the histone H3 protein. The use of multiple cell lines from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families allowed us to evaluate variation of chromatin states across pedigrees. These studies demonstrated that chromatin state clustered by family. Our results support the idea that genetic inheritance can determine the epigenetic state of the chromatin as shown previously in model organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration in humans that genetics may be an important factor that influences global chromatin state mediated by histone modification, the hallmark of the epigenetic phenomena.

  14. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  15. Multifunctional silver nanocluster-hybrid oligonucleotide vehicle for cell imaging and microRNA-targeted gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hau-Yun; Albert, Karunya; Wen, Cheng-Che; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Chen, Sih-Yu; Huang, Nei-Chung; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Hsin-Yun

    2017-04-01

    Novel therapeutics is urgently needed to prevent cancer-related deaths. MicroRNAs that act as tumor suppressors have been recognized as a next-generation tumor therapy, and the restoration of tumor-suppressive microRNAs using microRNA replacements or mimics may be a less toxic, more effective strategy due to fewer off-target effects. Here, we designed the novel multifunctional oligonucleotide nanocarrier complex composed of a tumor-targeting aptamer sequence specific to mucin 1 (MUC1), poly-cytosine region for fluorescent silver nanocluster (AgNC) synthesis, and complimentary sequence for microRNA miR-34a loading. MiR-34a was employed because of its therapeutic effect of inhibiting oncogene expression and inducing apoptosis in carcinomas. By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of AgNC, it was clearly shown that the constructed complex (MUC1-AgNCm-miR-34a) enters MCF-7 cells. To evaluate the efficacy of this nanocarrier for microRNA delivery, we investigated the gene and protein expression levels of downstream miR-34a targets (BCL-2, CDK6, and CCND1) by quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively, and the results indicated their effective inhibition by miR-34a. This novel multifunctional AgNC-based nanocarrier can aid in improving the efficacy of breast cancer theranostics.

  16. Mutant allele specific imbalance in oncogenes with copy number alterations: Occurrence, mechanisms, and potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Chieh; Qiu, Wanglong; Juang, Caroline S; Mansukhani, Mahesh M; Halmos, Balazs; Su, Gloria H

    2017-01-01

    Mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI) was initially coined to describe copy number alterations associated with the mutant allele of an oncogene. The copy number gain (CNG) specific to the mutant allele can be readily observed in electropherograms. With the development of genome-wide analyses at base-pair resolution with copy number counts, we can now further differentiate MASI into those with CNG, with copy neutral alteration (also termed acquired uniparental disomy; UPD), or with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to the loss of the wild-type (WT) allele. Here we summarize the occurrence of MASI with CNG, aUPD, or MASI with LOH in some major oncogenes (such as EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF). We also discuss how these various classifications of MASI have been demonstrated to impact tumorigenesis, progression, metastasis, prognosis, and potentially therapeutic responses in cancer, notably in lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers.

  17. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  18. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  19. Determination of ABO genotypes by real-time PCR using allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Muro, Tomonori; Fujihara, Junko; Imamura, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Kimura-Kataoka, Kaori; Toga, Tomoko; Iida, Reiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Takeshita, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    ABO grouping of biological specimens is informative for identifying victims and narrowing down suspects. In Japan and elsewhere, ABO grouping as well as DNA profiling plays an essential role in crime investigations. In the present study, we developed a new method for ABO genotyping using allele-specific primers and real-time PCR. The method allows for the detection of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nucleotide positions 261, 796, and 803 in the ABO gene and the determination of six major ABO genotypes. This method required less than 2 h for accurate ABO genotyping using 2.0 ng of DNA. This method could be applicable for rapid and simple screening of forensic samples.

  20. Allele-Specific Interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED Control Abscission in Arabidopsis Flowers.

    PubMed

    Groner, William D; Christy, Megan E; Kreiner, Catherine M; Liljegren, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV) gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST), which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  1. Genotyping of benzimidazole resistant and susceptible isolates of Haemonchus contortus from sheep by allele specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Karthik; Subhadra, Subhra; Kalyanasundaram, Aravindan; Ilangopathy, Manikkavasagan; Raman, Muthusamy

    2017-03-01

    Extensive and indiscriminate use of the benzimidazole class of drugs has led to the onset of anthelmintic resistance. In tropical countries like India, Haemonchus contortus is the most pathogenic parasite infecting sheep and goats. The widespread presence of resistant helminths (especially H. contortus) threatens the livestock farming. The use of various drugs has led to single nucleotide polymorphism that causes specific amino acid substitutions in β-tubulin protein of H. contortus to confer resistance. This emphasizes the need for a survey on the present status of resistance in India. In this study, allele specific PCR was employed to screen the presence of a SNP, a thymine-to-adenine transversion which leads to substitution of amino acid in codon 200 of β-tubulin gene that is correlated specifically with BZ resistance. Third stage larvae (L3) from pooled faecal cultures of four organized sheep farms served as a source of genomic DNA for identification of H. contortus and further genotype analysis. A total of 1000 larvae was screened, out of which 673 larvae were identified as H. contortus. Among 673 H. contortus larvae, 539 larvae (80 %) were genotyped as homozygous resistant (rr) and remaining 134 (20 %) were heterozygous susceptible (Sr) by allele specific PCR. The concluded resistance status reasons out the failure of anthelmintic drug in treating ruminants. Immediate steps are needed to avoid further aggravation of the problem. Target selective treatment by reviewing the resistance status of individual drugs, appropriate use of anthelmintic drugs and other control strategies will provide a pragmatic option for delaying the further spread of anthelmintic resistance.

  2. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. II. Isothermal signal amplification in process of DNA analysis by minisequencing].

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, E V; Khomiakova, E A; Pyshnaia; Bragin, A G; Vedernikov, V E; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal amplification of reporter signal via limited probe extension (minisequencing) upon hybridization of nucleic acids has been studied. The intensity of reporter signal has been shown to increase due to enzymatic labeling of multiple probes upon consecutive hybridization with one DNA template both in homophase and heterophase assays using various kinds of detection signal: radioisotope label, fluorescent label, and enzyme-linked assay. The kinetic scheme of the process has been proposed and kinetic parameters for each step have been determined. The signal intensity has been shown to correlate with physicochemical characteristics of both complexes: probe/DNA and product/DNA. The maximum intensity has been observed at minimal difference between the thermodynamic stability of these complexes, provided the reaction temperature has been adjusted near their melting temperature values; rising or lowering the reaction temperature reduces the amount of reporting product. The signal intensity has been shown to decrease significantly upon hybridization with the DNA template containing single-nucleotide mismatches. Limited probe extension assay is useful not only for detection of DNA template but also for its quantitative characterization.

  3. Design and validation of an oligonucleotide probe for the detection of protozoa from the order Trichomonadida using chromogenic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mostegl, Meike Marissa; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Dinhopl, Nora; Kulda, Jaroslav; Liebhart, Dieter; Hess, Michael; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2010-07-15

    Infections with protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida are often observed in veterinary medicine. Based on the trichomonad species involved these infections are either asymptomatic or can lead to sometimes serious disease. To further study protozoal agents of the order Trichomonadida the establishment of a method to detect trichomonads directly in the tissue, allowing parasite-lesion correlation, is necessary. Here we describe the design and evaluation of an oligonucleotide probe for chromogenic in situ hybridization, theoretically allowing detection of all hitherto known members of the order Trichomonadida. The probe was designed on a region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene homologue for all representatives of the order Trichomonadida available in the GenBank. Functionality of the probe was proven using protozoal cultures containing different trichomonads (Monocercomonas colubrorum, Hypotrichomonas acosta, Pentatrichomonas hominis, Trichomitus batrachorum, Trichomonas gallinae, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Tritrichomonas augusta). Furthermore, three different tissue sections containing either T. gallinae, T. foetus or Histomonas meleagridis were tested positive. Additionally, to rule out cross-reactivity of the probe a large number of different pathogenic protozoal agents, fungi, bacteria and viruses were tested and gave negative results. The probe presented here can be considered an important tool for diagnosis of all to date described relevant protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida in tissue samples.

  4. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Characteristics of Hybridization of Species-Specific Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes to rRNA of Marine Nanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rice, J.; Sleigh, M. A.; Burkill, P. H.; Tarran, G. A.; O'Connor, C. D.; Zubkov, M. V.

    1997-01-01

    Identification problems restrict quantitative ecological research on specific nanoflagellates. Identification by specific oligonucleotide probes permits use of flow cytometry for enumeration and measurement of size of nanoflagellates in statistically meaningful samples. Flow cytometry also permits measurement of intensity of probe binding by cells. Five fluorescent probes targeted to different regions of the small subunit rRNA of the common marine flagellate Paraphysomonas vestita all hybridized with cells of this flagellate. Cells fixed with trichloroacetic acid gave detectable signals at a probe concentration of 15 aM and specific fluorescence increased almost linearly to 1.5 fM, but at higher concentrations nonspecific binding increased sharply. Three flagellates, P. vestita, Paraphysomonas imperforata, and Pteridomonas danica, all bound a general eukaryotic probe approximately in proportion to their cell size, but the specific P. vestita probe gave 14 times more fluorescence with P. vestita than with either of the other flagellates. Cell fluorescence increased during the early growth of a batch culture and decreased toward the stationary phase; cell size changed in a comparable manner. Cell fluorescence intensity may allow inferences about growth rate, but whether fluorescence (assumed to reflect ribosome number) merely correlates with cell biomass or changes in a more complex manner remains unresolved. PMID:16535558

  5. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

    SciTech Connect

    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M.

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  6. OligoHeatMap (OHM): an online tool to estimate and display hybridizations of oligonucleotides onto DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Croce, Olivier; Chevenet, François; Christen, Richard

    2008-07-01

    The efficiency of molecular methods involving DNA/DNA hybridizations depends on the accurate prediction of the melting temperature (T(m)) of the duplex. Many softwares are available for T(m) calculations, but difficulties arise when one wishes to check if a given oligomer (PCR primer or probe) hybridizes well or not on more than a single sequence. Moreover, the presence of mismatches within the duplex is not sufficient to estimate specificity as it does not always significantly decrease the T(m). OHM (OligoHeatMap) is an online tool able to provide estimates of T(m) for a set of oligomers and a set of aligned sequences, not only as text files of complete results but also in a graphical way: T(m) values are translated into colors and displayed as a heat map image, either stand alone or to be used by softwares such as TreeDyn to be included in a phylogenetic tree. OHM is freely available at http://bioinfo.unice.fr/ohm/, with links to the full source code and online help.

  7. Identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by the oligonucleotide ligation reaction: a DNA biosensor for simultaneous visual detection of both alleles.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C; Flordellis, Christodoulos S

    2009-01-01

    Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be identified by direct hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes, enzyme-based genotyping methods offer much higher specificity and robustness. Among enzymatic methods, the oligonucleotide ligation reaction (OLR) offers the highest specificity for allele discrimination because two hybridization events are required for ligation. We report the development of a DNA biosensor that offers significant advantages over currently available methods for detection of OLR products: It allows simultaneous visual discrimination of both alleles using a single ligation reaction. Detection is complete within minutes without the need for any specialized instruments. It does not involve multiple cycles of incubation and washing. The dry-reagent format minimizes the pipetting steps. The need for qualified personnel is much lower than current methods. The principle of the assay is as follows: Following PCR amplification, a single OLR is performed using a biotinylated common probe and two allele-specific probes labeled with the haptens digoxigenin and fluorescein. Ligation products corresponding to the normal and mutant allele are double-labeled with biotin and either digoxigenin or fluorescein, respectively. The products are captured by antidigoxigenin or antifluorescein antibodies, or both, that are immobilized at the two test zones of the biosensor and react with antibiotin-functionalized gold nanoparticle reporters. The excess nanoparticles bind to biotinylated albumin that is immobilized at the control zone of the biosensor. The genotype is assigned by the characteristic red lines that appear at the two test zones. The proposed DNA biosensor constitutes a significant step toward point-of-care SNP genotyping.

  8. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John N; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  9. Allele-specific analysis of DNA replication origins in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Boris; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lajugie, Julien; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Bouhassira, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the location and timing of firing of replication origins are poorly understood. Using a novel functional genomic approach based on the analysis of SNPs and indels in phased human genomes, we observe that replication asynchrony is associated with small cumulative variations in the initiation efficiency of multiple origins between the chromosome homologues, rather than with the activation of dormant origins. Allele-specific measurements demonstrate that the presence of G-quadruplex-forming sequences does not correlate with the efficiency of initiation. Sequence analysis reveals that the origins are highly enriched in sequences with profoundly asymmetric G/C and A/T nucleotide distributions and are almost completely depleted of antiparallel triplex-forming sequences. We therefore propose that although G4-forming sequences are abundant in replication origins, an asymmetry in nucleotide distribution, which increases the propensity of origins to unwind and adopt non-B DNA structure, rather than the ability to form G4, is directly associated with origin activity. PMID:25987481

  10. Pseudoexons provide a mechanism for allele-specific expression of APC in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Taina T; Pavicic, Walter; Porkka, Noora; Kankainen, Matti; Järvinen, Heikki J; Lepistö, Anna; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-10-25

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene occurs in up to one-third of families with adenomatous polyposis (FAP) that have screened mutation-negative by conventional techniques. To advance our understanding of the genomic basis of this phenomenon, 54 APC mutation-negative families (21 with classical FAP and 33 with attenuated FAP, AFAP) were investigated. We focused on four families with validated ASE and scrutinized these families by sequencing of the blood transcriptomes (RNA-seq) and genomes (WGS). Three families, two with classical FAP and one with AFAP, revealed deep intronic mutations associated with pseudoexons. In all three families, intronic mutations (c.646-1806T>G in intron 6, c.1408+729A>G in intron 11, and c.1408+731C>T in intron 11) created new splice donor sites resulting in the insertion of intronic sequences (of 127 bp, 83 bp, and 83 bp, respectively) in the APC transcript. The respective intronic mutations were absent in the remaining polyposis families and the general population. Premature stop of translation as the predicted consequence as well as co-segregation with polyposis supported the pathogenicity of the pseudoexons. We conclude that next generation sequencing on RNA and genomic DNA is an effective strategy to reveal and validate pseudoexons that are regularly missed by traditional screening methods and is worth considering in apparent mutation-negative polyposis families.

  11. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene–childhood trauma interactions

    PubMed Central

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma–dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  12. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Capon, Samuel J.; Baillie, Gregory J.; Bower, Neil I.; da Silva, Jason A.; Paterson, Scott; Hogan, Benjamin M.; Simons, Cas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The advent of genome editing has significantly altered genetic research, including research using the zebrafish model. To better understand the selectivity of the commonly used CRISPR/Cas9 system, we investigated single base pair mismatches in target sites and examined how they affect genome editing in the zebrafish model. Using two different zebrafish strains that have been deep sequenced, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites containing polymorphisms between the two strains were identified. These strains were crossed (creating heterozygotes at polymorphic sites) and CRISPR/Cas9 complexes that perfectly complement one strain injected. Sequencing of targeted sites showed biased, allele-specific editing for the perfectly complementary sequence in the majority of cases (14/19). To test utility, we examined whether phenotypes generated by F0 injection could be internally controlled with such polymorphisms. Targeting of genes bmp7a and chordin showed reduction in the frequency of phenotypes in injected ‘heterozygotes’ compared with injecting the strain with perfect complementarity. Next, injecting CRISPR/Cas9 complexes targeting two separate sites created deletions, but deletions were biased to selected chromosomes when one CRISPR/Cas9 target contained a polymorphism. Finally, integration of loxP sequences occurred preferentially in alleles with perfect complementarity. These experiments demonstrate that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present throughout the genome can be utilised to increase the efficiency of in cis genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 in the zebrafish model. PMID:27895053

  13. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  14. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Capon, Samuel J; Baillie, Gregory J; Bower, Neil I; da Silva, Jason A; Paterson, Scott; Hogan, Benjamin M; Simons, Cas; Smith, Kelly A

    2017-01-15

    The advent of genome editing has significantly altered genetic research, including research using the zebrafish model. To better understand the selectivity of the commonly used CRISPR/Cas9 system, we investigated single base pair mismatches in target sites and examined how they affect genome editing in the zebrafish model. Using two different zebrafish strains that have been deep sequenced, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites containing polymorphisms between the two strains were identified. These strains were crossed (creating heterozygotes at polymorphic sites) and CRISPR/Cas9 complexes that perfectly complement one strain injected. Sequencing of targeted sites showed biased, allele-specific editing for the perfectly complementary sequence in the majority of cases (14/19). To test utility, we examined whether phenotypes generated by F0 injection could be internally controlled with such polymorphisms. Targeting of genes bmp7a and chordin showed reduction in the frequency of phenotypes in injected 'heterozygotes' compared with injecting the strain with perfect complementarity. Next, injecting CRISPR/Cas9 complexes targeting two separate sites created deletions, but deletions were biased to selected chromosomes when one CRISPR/Cas9 target contained a polymorphism. Finally, integration of loxP sequences occurred preferentially in alleles with perfect complementarity. These experiments demonstrate that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present throughout the genome can be utilised to increase the efficiency of in cis genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 in the zebrafish model.

  15. Human Y-chromosome haplotyping by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Martinez, Laisel; Cadenas, Alicia M; Herrera, Rene J

    2008-06-01

    We describe the application of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) for screening biallelic markers, including SNPs, within the nonrecombining region of the human Y-chromosome (NRY). The AS-PCR method is based on the concept that the perfectly annealed primer-template complex is more stable, and therefore, more efficiently amplified under the appropriate annealing temperature than the complex with a mismatched 3'-residue. Furthermore, a mismatched nucleotide at the primer's 3'-OH end provides for a poor extension substrate for Taq DNA polymerase, allowing for discrimination between the two alleles. This method has the dual advantage of amplification and detection of alleles in a single expeditious and inexpensive procedure. The amplification conditions of over 50 binary markers, mostly SNPs, that define the major Y-haplogroups as well as their derived lineages were optimized and are provided for the first time. In addition, artificial restriction sites were designed for those markers that are not selectively amplified by AS-PCR. Our results are consistent with allele designations derived from other techniques such as RFLP and direct sequencing of PCR products.

  16. Molecular genetic mechanisms of allelic specific regulation of murine Comt expression

    PubMed Central

    Segall, Samantha K.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Meloto, Carolina B.; Wen, Xia; Cunningham, Danielle; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Wiltshire, Tim; Gauthier, Josée; Tohyama, Sarasa; Martin, Loren J.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A functional allele of the mouse catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) gene is defined by the insertion of a B2 short interspersed repeat element in its 3′-untranslated region (UTR). This allele has been associated with a number of phenotypes, such as pain and anxiety. In comparison with mice carrying the ancestral allele (Comt+), ComtB2i mice show higher Comt mRNA and enzymatic activity levels. Here, we investigated the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying this allelic specific regulation of Comt expression. Insertion of the B2 element introduces an early polyadenylation signal generating a shorter Comt transcript, in addition to the longer ancestral mRNA. Comparative analysis and in silico prediction of Comt mRNA potential targets within the transcript 3′ to the B2 element was performed and allowed choosing microRNA (miRNA) candidates for experimental screening: mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667. Cell transfection with each miRNA downregulated the expression of the ancestral transcript and COMT enzymatic activity. Our in vivo experiments showed that mmu-miR-667-3p is strongly correlated with decreasing amounts of Comt mRNA in the brain, and lentiviral injections of mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667 increase hypersensitivity in the mouse formalin model, consistent with reduced COMT activity. In summary, our data demonstrate that the Comt+ transcript contains regulatory miRNA signals in its 3′-untranslated region leading to mRNA degradation; these signals, however, are absent in the shorter transcript, resulting in higher mRNA expression and activity levels. PMID:26067582

  17. High-throughput allele-specific expression across 250 environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Richards, Allison L.; Kurtz, Daniel; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Davis, Gordon O.; Harvey, Chris T.; Alazizi, Adnan; Watza, Donovan; Sorokin, Yoram; Hauff, Nancy; Zhou, Xiang; Wen, Xiaoquan; Pique-Regi, Roger; Luca, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions determine common disease risk factors and biomedically relevant complex traits. However, quantifying how the environment modulates genetic effects on human quantitative phenotypes presents unique challenges. Environmental covariates are complex and difficult to measure and control at the organismal level, as found in GWAS and epidemiological studies. An alternative approach focuses on the cellular environment using in vitro treatments as a proxy for the organismal environment. These cellular environments simplify the organism-level environmental exposures to provide a tractable influence on subcellular phenotypes, such as gene expression. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping studies identified GxE interactions in response to drug treatment and pathogen exposure. However, eQTL mapping approaches are infeasible for large-scale analysis of multiple cellular environments. Recently, allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis emerged as a powerful tool to identify GxE interactions in gene expression patterns by exploiting naturally occurring environmental exposures. Here we characterized genetic effects on the transcriptional response to 50 treatments in five cell types. We discovered 1455 genes with ASE (FDR < 10%) and 215 genes with GxE interactions. We demonstrated a major role for GxE interactions in complex traits. Genes with a transcriptional response to environmental perturbations showed sevenfold higher odds of being found in GWAS. Additionally, 105 genes that indicated GxE interactions (49%) were identified by GWAS as associated with complex traits. Examples include GIPR–caffeine interaction and obesity and include LAMP3–selenium interaction and Parkinson disease. Our results demonstrate that comprehensive catalogs of GxE interactions are indispensable to thoroughly annotate genes and bridge epidemiological and genome-wide association studies. PMID:27934696

  18. Characterization and machine learning prediction of allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    He, Jianlin; Sun, Ming-an; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Qianfei; Li, Qing; Xie, Hehuang

    2015-12-01

    A large collection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) has been identified in the human genome. Currently, the epigenetic influences of SNPs on their neighboring CpG sites remain elusive. A growing body of evidence suggests that locus-specific information, including genomic features and local epigenetic state, may play important roles in the epigenetic readout of SNPs. In this study, we made use of mouse methylomes with known SNPs to develop statistical models for the prediction of SNP associated allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). ASM has been classified into parent-of-origin dependent ASM (P-ASM) and sequence-dependent ASM (S-ASM), which comprises scattered-S-ASM (sS-ASM) and clustered-S-ASM (cS-ASM). We found that P-ASM and cS-ASM CpG sites are both enriched in CpG rich regions, promoters and exons, while sS-ASM CpG sites are enriched in simple repeat and regions with high frequent SNP occurrence. Using Lasso-grouped Logistic Regression (LGLR), we selected 21 out of 282 genomic and methylation related features that are powerful in distinguishing cS-ASM CpG sites and trained the classifiers with machine learning techniques. Based on 5-fold cross-validation, the logistic regression classifier was found to be the best for cS-ASM prediction with an ACC of 0.77, an AUC of 0.84 and an MCC of 0.54. Lastly, we applied the logistic regression classifier on human brain methylome and predicted 608 genes associated with cS-ASM. Gene ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that these cS-ASM associated genes are significantly enriched in the category coding for transcripts with alternative splicing forms. In summary, this study provided an analytical procedure for cS-ASM prediction and shed new light on the understanding of different types of ASM events.

  19. Efficient and Allele-Specific Genome Editing of Disease Loci in Human iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cory; Abalde-Atristain, Leire; He, Chaoxia; Brodsky, Brett R; Braunstein, Evan M; Chaudhari, Pooja; Jang, Yoon-Young; Cheng, Linzhao; Ye, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and precise genome editing is crucial for realizing the full research and therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Engineered nucleases including CRISPR/Cas9 and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) provide powerful tools for enhancing gene-targeting efficiency. In this study, we investigated the relative efficiencies of CRISPR/Cas9 and TALENs in human iPSC lines for inducing both homologous donor-based precise genome editing and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated gene disruption. Significantly higher frequencies of NHEJ-mediated insertions/deletions were detected at several endogenous loci using CRISPR/Cas9 than using TALENs, especially at nonexpressed targets in iPSCs. In contrast, comparable efficiencies of inducing homologous donor-based genome editing were observed at disease-associated loci in iPSCs. In addition, we investigated the specificity of guide RNAs used in the CRISPR/Cas9 system in targeting disease-associated point mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. Using myeloproliferative neoplasm patient-derived iPSCs that carry an acquired JAK2-V617F point mutation and α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency patient-derived iPSCs that carry an inherited Z-AAT point mutation, we demonstrate that Cas9 can specifically target either the mutant or the wild-type allele with little disruption at the other allele differing by a single nucleotide. Overall, our results demonstrate the advantages of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in allele-specific genome targeting and in NHEJ-mediated gene disruption. PMID:25418680

  20. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F.; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P.; Goland, Robin S.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G.; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M.; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A∗-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  1. Molecular basis of allele-specific efficacy of a blood-stage malaria vaccine: vaccine development implications.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Thera, Mahamadou A; Coulibaly, Drissa; Niangaly, Amadou; Saye, Renion; Tolo, Youssouf; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D Gray; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L; Vekemans, Johan; Cohen, Joe; Blackwelder, William C; Dube, Tina; Laurens, Matthew B; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V

    2013-02-01

    The disappointing efficacy of blood-stage malaria vaccines may be explained in part by allele-specific immune responses that are directed against polymorphic epitopes on blood-stage antigens. FMP2.1/AS02(A), a blood-stage candidate vaccine based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, had allele-specific efficacy against clinical malaria in a phase II trial in Malian children. We assessed the cross-protective efficacy of the malaria vaccine and inferred which polymorphic amino acid positions in AMA1 were the targets of protective allele-specific immune responses. FMP2.1/AS02(A) had the highest efficacy against AMA1 alleles that were identical to the 3D7 vaccine-type allele at 8 highly polymorphic amino acid positions in the cluster 1 loop (c1L) but differed from 3D7 elsewhere in the molecule. Comparison of the incidence of vaccine-type alleles before and after vaccination in the malaria vaccine and control groups and examination of the patterns of allele change at polymorphic positions in consecutive malaria episodes suggest that the highly polymorphic amino acid position 197 in c1L was the most critical determinant of allele-specific efficacy. These results indicate that a multivalent AMA1 vaccine with broad efficacy could include only a limited set of key alleles of this extremely polymorphic antigen.

  2. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  3. Syntheses of oligonucleotide derivatives with P(V) porphyrin and their properties.

    PubMed

    Shimidzu, T; Segawa, H; Kitamura, M; Nimura, A

    1992-01-01

    Two types of oligonucleotide derivatives which are substituted by P(V) porphyrin at the phosphorus atom of an internucleotidic linkage and at the 5'-terminal internucleotidic linkage via a spacer were synthesized (Fig. 1), and hybridization capabilities of them with complementary oligonucleotides were evaluated. A novel method for a sensing of oligonucleotide by the fluorescence quenching via photo-induced electron transfer between the P(V) porphyrin labeled oligonucleotide and pyrene-labeled one on the oligonucleotide template is reported.

  4. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Huyuh, Hoan K.; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert

    2002-01-01

    Beta-D-Xylopyranosyl-(4 - 2 )-oligonucleotides containing adenine and thymine as nucleohases were synthesized as a part of a systematic study of the pairing properties of pentopyranosyl oligonucleotides. Contrary to earlier expectations based on qualitative conformational criteria, Beta-D-xylopyranosyl(4 - 2 )- oligonucleotides show Watson-Crick pairing comparable in strength to that shown by pyranosyl-RNA.

  5. Molecular genetic survey of European mistletoe (Viscum album) subspecies with allele-specific and dCAPS type markers specific for chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Stefanowicz, Justyna; ŁUczkiewicz, Maria

    2003-10-01

    The qualitative and quantitative content of mistletoe metabolites, and bioactivity of extracts is related to the subspecies of Viscum album L. These were indicated to be genetically distinct and host specific. We aimed to check (i) whether the specificity is strict and (ii) how frequently hybridization occurs among the subspecies. We designed two sets of allele-specific and dCAPS molecular genetic markers that would facilitate identification of Viscum album L. subspecies and their hybrid derivatives on the basis of chloroplast trnH(GUG)- trnK(UUU) and nuclear rDNA ITS1&2 sequences. Out of 118 plants surveyed, 103 displayed characteristics that confirmed strict host specificity of the subspecies, in addition, the results were compliant between nuclear and chloroplast markers showing no indication of hybridization among subspecies. From 15 samples that showed deviations from this model 13 came from the Mediterranean Sea basin, and only two originated from Central and Western Europe. Abbreviations. dCAPS:derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence ITS1&2:Internal Transcribed Spacers 1&2 MAMA:Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay

  6. Analysis of genomic imprinting by quantitative allele-specific expression by Pyrosequencing(®).

    PubMed

    McKeown, Peter C; Fort, Antoine; Spillane, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a parent-of-origin phenomenon whereby gene expression is restricted to the allele inherited from either the maternal or paternal parent. It has been described from flowering plants and eutherian mammals and may have evolved due to parental conflicts over resource allocation. In mammals, imprinted genes are responsible for ensuring correct rates of embryo development and for preventing parthenogenesis. The molecular basis of imprinting depends upon the presence of differential epigenetic marks on the alleles inherited from each parent, although in plants the exact mechanisms that control imprinting are still unclear in many cases. Recent studies have identified large numbers of candidate imprinted genes from Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants (see Chap. 7 by Köhler and colleagues elsewhere in this volume) providing the tools for more thorough investigation into how imprinted gene networks (IGNs) are regulated. Analysis of genomic imprinting in animals has revealed important information on how IGNs are regulated during development, which often involves intermediate levels of imprinting. In some instances, small but significant changes in the degree of parental bias in gene expression have been linked to developmental traits, livestock phenotypes, and human disease. As some of the imprinted genes recently reported from plants show differential rather than complete (binary) imprinting, there is a clear need for tools that can quantify the degree of allelic expression bias occurring at a transcribed locus. In this chapter, we describe the use of Quantification of Allele-Specific Expression by Pyrosequencing(®) (QUASEP) as a tool suitable for this challenge. We describe in detail the factors which ensure that a Pyrosequencing(®) assay will be suitable for giving robust QUASEP and the problems which may be encountered during the study of imprinted genes by Pyrosequencing(®), with particular reference to our work in A. thaliana and in cattle

  7. One-year monitoring of an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel laboratory-developed test for bladder cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; King, Lauren; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Ng, Carrie; Kahl, Josh; Dion, Jacqueline; Young, Chris; Schervish, Edward W; Frontera, J Rene; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth M; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously, we had developed and manufactured an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization (OligoFISH) probe panel based on the most clinically sensitive chromosomes found in a reference set of bladder carcinoma cases. The panel was clinically validated for use as a diagnostic and monitoring assay for bladder cancer, reaching 100% correlation with the results of the UroVysion test. After 1 year of using this probe panel, we present here the comparison of cytology, cystoscopy, and pathology findings to the OligoFISH probe panel results to calculate its clinical performance. Materials and methods In order to calculate clinical performance, we compared the OligoFISH results to the cytology and cystoscopy/pathology findings for 147 initial diagnoses and 399 recurrence monitorings. Finally, we compared clinical performance to published values for the UroVysion test, including both low- and high-grade tumors. Results Chromosomes 3, 6, 7, and 20 were highly involved in bladder carcinoma aneuploidy. At the initial diagnosis, we obtained 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.5%–94.7%) accuracy, 96.8% sensitivity (95% CI: 91.0%–99.3%), 79.2% specificity (95% CI: 65.9%–87.8%), 89.2% positive predictive value (PPV; 95% CI: 81.5%–94.5%), and 93.3% negative predictive value (NPV; 95% CI: 81.7%–97.3%). When monitoring for recurrence, we obtained 85.2% accuracy (95% CI: 81.3%–88.5%), 82.0% sensitivity (95% CI: 76.0%–87.1%), 88.4% specificity (95% CI: 83.2%–92.5%), 87.7% PPV (95% CI: 82.1%–92.0%), and 83.0% NPV (95% CI: 77.3%–87.8%). When looking at low- and high-grade tumors, the test showed 100% sensitivity for high-grade tumors (95% CI: 92.5%–100%) and 87.5% sensitivity (95% CI: 68.8%–95.5%) for low-grade tumors. All the clinical parameters for the OligoFISH panel were higher than the UroVysion test’s published performance. We found significantly higher clinical sensitivity and NPV at initial diagnosis and significantly higher

  8. [Microchip electrophoresis coupled with multiplex allele-specific am-plification for typing multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Peng; Zhou, Guo-Hua

    2009-02-01

    A new method of DNA adapter ligation-mediated allele-specific amplification (ALM-ASA) was developed for typing multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the platform of microchip electrophoresis. Using seven SNPs of 794C>T, 1274C>T, 2143T>C, 2766T>del, 3298G>A, 5200G>A, and 5277C>T in the interleukin 1B (IL1B) gene as a target object, a long DNA fragment containing the seven SNPs of interest was pre-amplified to enhance the specificity. The pre-amplified DNA fragment was digested by a restriction endonuclease to form sticky ends; and then the adapter was ligated to either end of the digested fragment. Using the adapter-ligated fragments as templates, a 7-plex allele-specific amplification was performed by 7 allele-specific primers and a universal primer in one tube. The allele-specific products amplified were separated by chip electrophoresis and the types of SNPs were easily discriminated by the product sizes. The seven SNPs in IL1B gene in 48 healthy Chinese were successfully typed by microchip electrophoresis and the results coincided with those by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing method. The method established was accurate and can be used to type multiple SNPs simultaneously. In combination with microchip electrophoresis for readout, ALM-ASA assay can be used for fast SNP detection with a small amount of sample. Using self-prepared gel matrix and reused chips for analysis, the SNP can be typed at an ultra low cost.

  9. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  10. Developing mixed films of immobilized oligonucleotides and quantum dots for the multiplexed detection of nucleic acid hybridization using a combination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and direct excitation of fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2010-04-20

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous and selective detection of three target nucleic acid sequences based on mixed films of immobilized quantum dots (QDs) and oligonucleotide probes. CdSe/ZnS QDs were immobilized on optical fibers and conjugated with mixtures of different probe oligonucleotides. Hybridization events were detected using a combination of fluorescence from direct excitation and fluorescence sensitized by resonance energy transfer (FRET). A sandwich assay format was used to associate dye labeled reporter oligonucleotides with probe-target hybrids formed at the surface of the optical fiber. One detection channel utilized direct excitation of Pacific Blue and the two other detection channels were based on FRET. In one strategy, green emitting QDs were used as donors with Cy3 and Rhodamine Red-X acceptors. In a second strategy, green and red emitting QDs were coimmobilized and used as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 acceptors, respectively. Selective three-plex detection was demonstrated with both strategies. Several key design criteria that were explored to optimize the relative signal magnitude between channels included: the ratio of probe associated with direct excitation versus probes associated with FRET; the relative amounts of each FRET probe and corresponding spectral overlap; and the photoluminescence ratio between immobilized green and red emitting QDs (where applicable). Careful selection of probe sequences and lengths were important for the discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms in one channel without suppressing binding of target in the other two channels. This work provides a basis for the development of multiplexed biosensors that are ensemble compatible and do not require discrete sensor elements, spatial registration, sorting technology, or single molecule spectroscopy.

  11. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  13. Semi-automated, reverse-hybridization detection of multiple mutations causing hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kriegshäuser, Gernot; Halsall, David; Rauscher, Bettina; Oberkanins, Christian

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal nutritional disease that is caused by mutations in the liver isoenzyme of fructoaldolase (aldolase B). Our aim was to evaluate a diagnostic assay capable of simultaneously analyzing three-point mutations and a small deletion in the aldolase B (ALDOB) gene. The test under investigation is based on multiplex DNA amplification and hybridization to membrane strips presenting a parallel array of allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. We used the novel reverse-hybridization (RH) protocol to analyze 54 individuals previously genotyped by direct sequencing. RH genotyping for ALDOB mutations Delta4E4, A149P, A174D, and N334K was in complete concordance with results obtained by DNA sequencing. The procedure is rapid (<6h) and may be automated to a large extent. The RH assay tested in this study represents an accurate and robust screening tool to identify common ALDOB mutations.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  15. Synthesis of triazole-linked oligonucleotides with high affinity to DNA complements and an analysis of their compatibility with biosystems.

    PubMed

    Varizhuk, Anna M; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Novikov, Roman A; Chizhov, Alexandr O; Smirnov, Igor P; Chuvilin, Andrey N; Tatarinova, Olga N; Fisunov, Gleb Y; Pozmogova, Galina E; Florentiev, Vladimir L

    2013-06-21

    New oligonucleotide analogues with triazole internucleotide linkages were synthesized, and their hybridization properties were studied. The analogues demonstrated DNA binding affinities similar to those of unmodified oligonucleotides. The modification was shown to protect the oligonucleotides from nuclease hydrolysis. The modified oligonucleotides were tested as PCR primers. Modifications remote from the 3'-terminus were tolerated by polymerases. Our results suggest that these new oligonucleotide analogues are among the most promising triazole DNA mimics characterized to date.

  16. Identification of self-incompatibility genotypes of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) by S-allele-specific PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qi; Shupeng, Gai; Jixiang, Zhang; Manru, Gu; Huairui, Shu

    2005-08-01

    A cDNA of 417 bp encoding an S-RNase gene, named PA S3, was isolated from apricot, Prunus aremeniaca. Nine S-alleles, S1-S9, were recognized by S-allele-specific PCR and confirmed by Southern blot analysis using PA S3 as probe. The S-genotypes of the six cultivars were determined and the results of self- and cross-pollination tests among the six cultivars were consistent with the predicted S-haplotypes by PCR analysis.

  17. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)’s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list. PMID:25621316

  18. Allele-specific RNA interference rescues the long-QT syndrome phenotype in human-induced pluripotency stem cell cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matsa, Elena; Dixon, James E.; Medway, Christopher; Georgiou, Orestis; Patel, Minal J.; Morgan, Kevin; Kemp, Paul J.; Staniforth, Andrew; Mellor, Ian; Denning, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aims Long-QT syndromes (LQTS) are mostly autosomal-dominant congenital disorders associated with a 1:1000 mutation frequency, cardiac arrest, and sudden death. We sought to use cardiomyocytes derived from human-induced pluripotency stem cells (hiPSCs) as an in vitro model to develop and evaluate gene-based therapeutics for the treatment of LQTS. Methods and results We produced LQTS-type 2 (LQT2) hiPSC cardiomyocytes carrying a KCNH2 c.G1681A mutation in a IKr ion-channel pore, which caused impaired glycosylation and channel transport to cell surface. Allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) directed towards the mutated KCNH2 mRNA caused knockdown, while leaving the wild-type mRNA unaffected. Electrophysiological analysis of patient-derived LQT2 hiPSC cardiomyocytes treated with mutation-specific siRNAs showed normalized action potential durations (APDs) and K+ currents with the concurrent rescue of spontaneous and drug-induced arrhythmias (presented as early-afterdepolarizations). Conclusions These findings provide in vitro evidence that allele-specific RNAi can rescue diseased phenotype in LQTS cardiomyocytes. This is a potentially novel route for the treatment of many autosomal-dominant-negative disorders, including those of the heart. PMID:23470493

  19. Design of allele-specific primers and detection of the human ABO genotyping to avoid the pseudopositive problem.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Yukimasa, Tetsuo; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Oka, Hiroaki

    2008-11-01

    PCR experiments using DNA primers forming mismatch pairing with template lambda DNA at the 3' end were carried out in order to develop allele-specific primers capable of detecting SNP in genomes without generating pseudopositive amplification products, and thus avoiding the so-called pseudopositive problem. Detectable amounts of PCR products were obtained when primers forming a single or two mismatch pairings at the 3' end were used. In particular, 3' terminal A/C or T/C (primer/template) mismatches tended to allow PCR amplification to proceed, resulting in pseudopositive results in many cases. While less PCR product was observed for primers forming three terminal mismatch pairings, target DNA sequences were efficiently amplified by primers forming two mismatch pairings next to the terminal G/C base pairing. These results indicate that selecting a primer having a 3' terminal nucleotide that recognizes the SNP nucleotide and the next two nucleotides that form mismatch pairings with the template sequence can be used as an allele-specific primer that eliminates the pseudopositive problem. Trials with the human ABO genes demonstrated that this primer design is also useful for detecting a single base pair difference in gene sequences with a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 45.

  20. Rapid quantification of single-nucleotide mutations in mixed influenza A viral populations using allele-specific mixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cindy M; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Schupp, James; Kelley, Erin; Nguyen, Jack T; McSharry, James J; Weng, Qingmei; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring antiviral resistance in influenza is critical to public health epidemiology and pandemic preparedness activities. Effective monitoring requires methods to detect low-level resistance and to monitor the change in resistance as a function of time and drug treatment. Resistance-conferring single-nucleotide mutations in influenza virus are ideal targets for such methods. In the present study, fives sets of paired TaqMan allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays were developed and validated for quantitative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This novel method using Delta Ct is termed allele-specific mixture analysis (ASMA) or FluASMA. The FluASMA assays target L26F, V27A, A30T, and S31N mutations in the A/Albany/1/98 (H3N2) M2 gene and H275Y mutation in the A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) NA gene and have a limit of quantification of 0.25-0.50% mutant. The error for % mutant estimation was less than 10% in all FluASMA assays, with intra-run Delta Ct coefficient of variance (CoV) at

  1. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  2. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2012-10-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)'s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list.

  3. Efficient Identification of Clinically Relevant Candida Yeast Species by Use of an Assay Combining Panfungal Loop-Mediated Isothermal DNA Amplification with Hybridization to Species-Specific Oligonucleotide Probes▿

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Flores, Orfeu; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of invasive mycoses has progressively increased in recent years. Yeasts of the genus Candida remain the leading etiologic agents of those infections. Early identification of opportunistic yeasts may contribute significantly to improved disease management and the selection of appropriate antifungal therapy. We developed a rapid and reliable molecular identification system for clinically relevant yeasts that makes use of nonspecific primers to amplify a region of the 26S rRNA gene, followed by reverse hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled products to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotide probes arranged on a nylon membrane macroarray format. DNA amplification was achieved by the recently developed loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification technology, a promising option for the development of improved laboratory diagnostic kits. The newly developed method was successful in distinguishing among the major clinically relevant yeasts associated with bloodstream infections by using simple, rapid, and cost-effective procedures and equipment. PMID:18077626

  4. Effect of non-specific species competition from total RNA on the static mode hybridization response of nanomechanical assays of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohit; Hegner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    We investigate here the nanomechanical response of microcantilever sensors in real-time for detecting a range of ultra-low concentrations of oligonucleotides in a complex background of total cellular RNA extracts from cell lines without labeling or amplification. Cantilever sensor arrays were functionalized with probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and reference ssDNA to obtain a differential signal. They were then exposed to complementary target ssDNA strands that were spiked in a fragmented total cellular RNA background in biologically relevant concentrations so as to provide clinically significant analysis. We present a model for prediction of the sensor behavior in competitive backgrounds with parameters that are indicators of the change in nanomechanical response with variation in the target and background concentration. For nanomechanical assays to compete with current technologies it is essential to comprehend such responses with eventual impact on areas like understanding non-coding RNA pharmacokinetics, nucleic acid biomarker assays and miRNA quantification for disease monitoring and diagnosis to mention a few. Additionally, we also achieved a femtomolar sensitivity limit for online oligonucleotide detection in a non-competitive environment with these sensors.

  5. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  6. Allele-specific impairment of GJB2 expression by GJB6 deletion del(GJB6-D13S1854).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Tamayo, Marta L; Gelvez, Nancy; Schrijver, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene, which encodes connexin 26, are a frequent cause of congenital non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Two large deletions, del(GJB6-D13S1830) and del(GJB6-D13S1854), which truncate GJB6 (connexin 30), cause hearing loss in individuals homozygous, or compound heterozygous for these deletions or one such deletion and a mutation in GJB2. Recently, we have demonstrated that the del(GJB6-D13S1830) deletion contributes to hearing loss due to an allele-specific lack of GJB2 mRNA expression and not as a result of digenic inheritance, as was postulated earlier. In the current study we investigated the smaller del(GJB6-D13S1854) deletion, which disrupts the expression of GJB2 at the transcriptional level in a manner similar to the more common del(GJB6-D13S1830) deletion. Interestingly, in the presence of this deletion, GJB2 expression remains minimally but reproducibly present. The relative allele-specific expression of GJB2 was assessed by reverse-transcriptase PCR and restriction digestions in three probands who were compound heterozygous for a GJB2 mutation and del(GJB6-D13S1854). Each individual carried a different sequence variant in GJB2. All three individuals expressed the mutated GJB2 allele in trans with del(GJB6-D13S1854), but expression of the GJB2 allele in cis with the deletion was almost absent. Our study clearly corroborates the hypothesis that the del(GJB6-D13S1854), similar to the larger and more common del(GJB6-D13S1830), removes (a) putative cis-regulatory element(s) upstream of GJB6 and narrows down the region of location.

  7. Powerful Identification of Cis-regulatory SNPs in Human Primary Monocytes Using Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Lundmark, Anders; Ge, Bing; Maouche, Seraya; Göring, Harald H. H.; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Enström, Camilla; Brocheton, Jessy; Proust, Carole; Godefroy, Tiphaine; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Jolley, Jennifer; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Foad, Nicola; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Stephens, Jonathan; Gwilliam, Rhian; Rice, Catherine M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Samani, Nilesh J.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Pastinen, Tomi; Deloukas, Panos; Goodall, Alison H.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Cambien, François; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed during the past five years to identify associations between SNPs and human complex diseases and traits. The assignment of a functional role for the identified disease-associated SNP is not straight-forward. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis is frequently used as the initial step to define a function while allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis has not yet gained a wide-spread use in disease mapping studies. We compared the power to identify cis-acting regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNPs) by genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis with that of traditional expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. Our study included 395 healthy blood donors for whom global gene expression profiles in circulating monocytes were determined by Illumina BeadArrays. ASE was assessed in a subset of these monocytes from 188 donors by quantitative genotyping of mRNA using a genome-wide panel of SNP markers. The performance of the two methods for detecting cis-rSNPs was evaluated by comparing associations between SNP genotypes and gene expression levels in sample sets of varying size. We found that up to 8-fold more samples are required for eQTL mapping to reach the same statistical power as that obtained by ASE analysis for the same rSNPs. The performance of ASE is insensitive to SNPs with low minor allele frequencies and detects a larger number of significantly associated rSNPs using the same sample size as eQTL mapping. An unequivocal conclusion from our comparison is that ASE analysis is more sensitive for detecting cis-rSNPs than standard eQTL mapping. Our study shows the potential of ASE mapping in tissue samples and primary cells which are difficult to obtain in large numbers. PMID:23300628

  8. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wassman, Christopher D.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lathrop, Richard H.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed ‘cross-hybridization’, as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries. PMID:15585664

  9. KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance is associated with worse prognosis in pancreatic cancer and progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Moser, A James; Saka, Burcu; Adsay, N Volkan; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-10-01

    KRAS codon 12 mutations are present in about 90% of ductal adenocarcinomas and in undifferentiated carcinomas of the pancreas. The role of KRAS copy number changes and resulting KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) in ductal adenocarcinoma (n=94), and its progression into undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas (n=25) was studied by direct sequencing and KRAS fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Semi-quantitative evaluation of sequencing electropherograms showed KRAS MASI (ie, mutant allele peak higher than or equal to the wild-type allele peak) in 22 (18.4%) cases. KRAS FISH (performed on 45 cases) revealed a trend for more frequent KRAS amplification among cases with KRAS MASI (7/20, 35% vs 3/25, 12%, P=0.08). KRAS amplification by FISH was seen only in undifferentiated carcinomas (10/24, 42% vs 0/21 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 0%, P=0.0007). In 6 of 11 cases with both undifferentiated and well-differentiated components, transition to undifferentiated carcinoma was associated with an increase in KRAS copy number, due to amplification and/or chromosome 12 hyperploidy. Pancreatic carcinomas with KRAS MASI (compared to those without MASI) were predominantly undifferentiated (16/22, 73% vs 9/97, 9%, P<0.001), more likely to present at clinical stage IV (5/22, 23% vs 7/97, 7%, P=0.009), and were associated with shorter overall survival (9 months, 95% confidence interval, 5-13, vs 22 months, 95% confidence interval, 17-27; P=0.015) and shorter disease-free survival (5 months, 95% confidence interval, 2-8 vs 13 months, 95% confidence interval, 10-16; P=0.02). Our findings suggest that in a subset of ductal adenocarcinomas, KRAS MASI correlates with the progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

  10. Methods to Characterize the Oligonucleotide Functionalization of Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Weichelt, Richard; Leubner, Susanne; Henning-Knechtel, Anja; Mertig, Michael; Gaponik, Nikolai; Schmidt, Thorsten-Lars; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Currently, DNA nanotechnology offers the most programmable, scalable, and accurate route for the self-assembly of matter with nanometer precision into 1, 2, or 3D structures. One example is DNA origami that is well suited to serve as a molecularly defined "breadboard", and thus, to organize various nanomaterials such as nanoparticles into hybrid systems. Since the controlled assembly of quantum dots (QDs) is of high interest in the field of photonics and other optoelectronic applications, a more detailed view on the functionalization of QDs with oligonucleotides shall be achieved. In this work, four different methods are presented to characterize the functionalization of thiol-capped cadmium telluride QDs with oligonucleotides and for the precise quantification of the number of oligonucleotides bound to the QD surface. This study enables applications requiring the self-assembly of semiconductor-oligonucleotide hybrid materials and proves the conjugation success in a simple and straightforward manner.

  11. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Folkert; Kudick, Rene; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert; Wippo, Harald

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether the remarkable chemical properties of the pyranosyl isomer of RNA as an informational Watson-Crick base-pairing system are unique to the pentopyranosyl-(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide isomer derived from the RNA-building block D-ribose, studies on the entire family of diastereoisomeric pyranosyL(4 - Z)-oligonucleotide systems deriving from D-ribose. L-lyxose. D-xylose, and L-arabinose were carried out. The result of these extended studies is unambiguous: not only pyranosyl-RNA, but all members of the pentopyranosyl(4 + 2)-oligonucleotide family are highly efficient Watson-Crick base-pairing systems. Their synthesis and pairing properties will be described in a series of publications in this journal.

  12. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  13. The delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Rudolph L.

    2016-01-01

    The oligonucleotide therapeutics field has seen remarkable progress over the last few years with the approval of the first antisense drug and with promising developments in late stage clinical trials using siRNA or splice switching oligonucleotides. However, effective delivery of oligonucleotides to their intracellular sites of action remains a major issue. This review will describe the biological basis of oligonucleotide delivery including the nature of various tissue barriers and the mechanisms of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides. It will then examine a variety of current approaches for enhancing the delivery of oligonucleotides. This includes molecular scale targeted ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, lipid- and polymer-based nanoparticles, antibody conjugates and small molecules that improve oligonucleotide delivery. The merits and liabilities of these approaches will be discussed in the context of the underlying basic biology. PMID:27084936

  14. The allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay, a new real-time PCR method for fine quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Billard, A; Laval, V; Fillinger, S; Leroux, P; Lachaise, H; Beffa, R; Debieu, D

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of fungicide resistance within populations of plant pathogens must be monitored to develop management strategies. Such monitoring often is based on microbiological tests, such as microtiter plate assays. Molecular monitoring methods can be considered if the mutations responsible for resistance have been identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR approaches, such as amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, are, despite their moderate efficacy, among the most precise methods for refining SNP quantification. We describe here a new real-time PCR method, the allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay (ASPPAA PCR). This method makes use of mixtures of allele-specific minor groove binder (MGB) TaqMan probes and allele-specific primers for the fine quantification of SNPs from a pool of DNA extracted from a mixture of conidia. It was developed for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is responsible for resistance to the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide fenhexamid, resulting in the replacement of the phenylalanine residue (encoded by the TTC codon) in position 412 of the enzymatic target (3-ketoreductase) by a serine (TCC), valine (GTC), or isoleucine (ATC) residue. The levels of nonspecific amplification with the ASPPAA PCR were reduced at least four times below the level of currently available allele-specific real-time PCR approaches due to strong allele specificity in amplification cycles, including two allele selectors. This new method can be used to quantify a complex quadriallelic SNP in a DNA pool with a false discovery rate of less than 1%.

  15. Bivariate segmentation of SNP-array data for allele-specific copy number analysis in tumour samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SNP arrays output two signals that reflect the total genomic copy number (LRR) and the allelic ratio (BAF), which in combination allow the characterisation of allele-specific copy numbers (ASCNs). While methods based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extended from array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) to jointly handle the two signals, only one method based on change-point detection, ASCAT, performs bivariate segmentation. Results In the present work, we introduce a generic framework for bivariate segmentation of SNP array data for ASCN analysis. For the matter, we discuss the characteristics of the typically applied BAF transformation and how they affect segmentation, introduce concepts of multivariate time series analysis that are of concern in this field and discuss the appropriate formulation of the problem. The framework is implemented in a method named CnaStruct, the bivariate form of the structural change model (SCM), which has been successfully applied to transcriptome mapping and aCGH. Conclusions On a comprehensive synthetic dataset, we show that CnaStruct outperforms the segmentation of existing ASCN analysis methods. Furthermore, CnaStruct can be integrated into the workflows of several ASCN analysis tools in order to improve their performance, specially on tumour samples highly contaminated by normal cells. PMID:23497144

  16. Authentication of official Da-huang by sequencing and multiplex allele-specific PCR of a short maturase K gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guojie; Wang, Xueyong; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Weidong; Wei, Shengli; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoli; Liu, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Rhubarb (official Da-huang) is an important medicinal herb in Asia. Many adulterants of official Da-huang have been discovered in Chinese markets in recent years, which has resulted in adverse effects in medicinal treatment. Here, novel molecular markers based on a short maturase K (matK) gene were developed for authenticating official Da-huang. This study showed that all the species from official Da-huang were clustered together in one clade in the polygenetic trees based on short matK. Two highly conserved single nucleotide polymorphisms of short matK were mined in the species from official Da-huang. Based on these polymophisms, four improved specific primers of official Da-huang were successfully developed that generated reproducible specific bands. These results suggest that the short matK sequence can be considered as a favorable candidate for distinguishing official Da-huang from its adulterants. The established multiplex allele-specific PCR was determined to be simple and accurate and may serve as a preferable tool for authentication of official Da-huang. In addition, we suggest that short-sized specific bands be developed to authenticate materials used in traditional Chinese medicine.

  17. Analysis of LMNB1 Duplications in Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy Provides Insights into Duplication Mechanisms and Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Kropp, Laura; Chakka, Anish Baswanth; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Gregorio, Eleonora Di; Lacerenza, Daniela; Vaula, Giovanna; Talarico, Flavia; Mandich, Paola; Toro, Camilo; Pierre, Eleonore Eymard; Labauge, Pierre; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Miguel, Diego; Stubbolo, Danielle; Marques, Lourenco Charles; Gahl, William; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Melberg, Atle; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Cohen, Oren S; Pjontek, Rastislav; Grau, Armin; Klopstock, Thomas; Fogel, Brent; Meijer, Inge; Rouleau, Guy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre L; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Vanderver, Adeline; Dahl, Niklas; Hobson, Grace; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro; Padiath, Quasar Saleem

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is an adult onset demyelinating disorder that is caused by duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene. However, as only a few cases have been analyzed in detail, the mechanisms underlying LMNB1 duplications are unclear. We report the detailed molecular analysis of the largest collection of ADLD families studied, to date. We have identified the minimal duplicated region necessary for the disease, defined all the duplication junctions at the nucleotide level and identified the first inverted LMNB1 duplication. We have demonstrated that the duplications are not recurrent; patients with identical duplications share the same haplotype, likely inherited from a common founder and that the duplications originated from intrachromosomal events. The duplication junction sequences indicated that nonhomologous end joining or replication-based mechanisms such fork stalling and template switching or microhomology-mediated break induced repair are likely to be involved. LMNB1 expression was increased in patients’ fibroblasts both at mRNA and protein levels and the three LMNB1 alleles in ADLD patients show equal expression, suggesting that regulatory regions are maintained within the rearranged segment. These results have allowed us to elucidate duplication mechanisms and provide insights into allele-specific LMNB1 expression levels. PMID:23649844

  18. Transcriptome analysis revealed chimeric RNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms and allele-specific expression in porcine prenatal skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yalan; Tang, Zhonglin; Fan, Xinhao; Xu, Kui; Mu, Yulian; Zhou, Rong; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal skeletal muscle development genetically determines postnatal muscle characteristics such as growth and meat quality in pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development remain unclear. Here, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of chimeric RNAs, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and allele-specific expression (ASE) in prenatal skeletal muscle in pigs. We identified 14,810 protein coding genes and 163 high-confidence chimeric RNAs expressed in prenatal skeletal muscle. More than 94.5% of the chimeric RNAs obeyed the canonical GT/AG splice rule and were trans-splicing events. Ten and two RNAs were aligned to human and mouse chimeric transcripts, respectively. We detected 106,457 high-quality SNPs (6,955 novel), which were mostly (89.09%) located within QTLs for production traits. The high proportion of non-exonic SNPs revealed the incomplete annotation status of the current swine reference genome. ASE analysis revealed that 11,300 heterozygous SNPs showed allelic imbalance, whereas 131 ASE variants were located in the chimeric RNAs. Moreover, 4 ASE variants were associated with various economically relevant traits of pigs. Taken together, our data provide a source for studies of chimeric RNAs and biomarkers for pig breeding, while illuminating the complex transcriptional events underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development in mammals. PMID:27352850

  19. Allele-specific expression of mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene and alternative susceptibility to colorectal cancer in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Cao, Yanfei; Huang, Xiaoye; Yu, Tao; Wei, Zhiyun; McGrath, John; Xu, Fei; Bi, Yan; Li, Xingwang; Yang, Fengping; Li, Weidong; Zou, Xia; Peng, Zhihai; Xiao, Yanzeng; Zhang, Yan; He, Lin; He, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among schizophrenia is lower than normal. To explore this potential protective effect, we employed an innovative strategy combining association study with allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis in MCC gene. We first genotyped four polymorphisms within MCC in 312 CRC patients, 270 schizophrenia patients and 270 controls. Using the MassArray technique, we performed ASE measurements in a second sample series consisting of 50 sporadic CRC patients, 50 schizophrenia patients and 52 controls. Rs2227947 showed significant differences between schizophrenia cases and controls, and haplotype analysis reported some significant discrepancies among these three subject groups. ASE values of rs2227948 and rs2227947 presented consistently differences between CRC (or schizophrenia) patients and controls. Of the three groups, highest frequencies of ASE in MCC were concordantly found in CRC group, whereas lowest frequencies of ASE were observed in schizophrenia group. Similar trends were confirmed in both haplotype frequencies and ASE frequencies (i.e. CRC > control > schizophrenia). We provide a first indication that MCC might confer alterative genetic susceptibility to CRC in individuals with schizophrenia promising to shed more light on the relationship between schizophrenia and cancer progression. PMID:27226254

  20. TFIIB/SUA7(E202G) is an allele-specific suppressor of TBP1(E186D)

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon Shang; Lehming, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    The TBP (TATA-box-binding protein), Tbp1p, plays a vital role in all three classes of transcription by RNA polymerases I–III. A TBP1(E186D) mutation had been described that affected interaction of Tbp1p with TFIIB (transcription factor IIB) and that caused slow-growth, temperature-sensitivity, 3-aminotriazole-sensitivity as well as a gal− phenotype. We used the TBP1(E186D) mutant for suppressor screens, and we isolated TFIIB/SUA7(E202G) as an allele-specific suppressor of all phenotypes caused by the TBP1(E186D) mutation. Our results show that the SUA7(E202G) mutation restored binding of TFIIB to Tbp1(E186D)p. In addition, we observed that Tbp1(E186D)p was expressed at a lower level than wild-type Tbp1p, and that SUA7(E202G) restored the protein level of Tbp1(E186D)p. This suggested that the TBP1(E186D) mutation might have generated its phenotypes by making Tbp1p the limiting factor for activated transcription. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the TBP1(E186D) temperature-sensitivity and slow-growth phenotypes might have been caused by insufficient amounts of Tbp1p for efficient transcription of the rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I. PMID:17680779

  1. EGFR mutant allelic-specific imbalance assessment in routine samples of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Malapelle, Umberto; Vatrano, Simona; Russo, Stefania; Bellevicine, Claudio; de Luca, Caterina; Sgariglia, Roberta; Rocco, Danilo; de Pietro, Livia; Riccardi, Fernando; Gobbini, Elisa; Righi, Luisella; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene may undergo both mutations and copy number gains. EGFR mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) occurs when the ratio of mutant-to-wild-type alleles increases significantly. In this study, by using a previously validated microfluidic-chip-based technology, EGFR-MASI occurred in 25/67 mutant cases (37%), being more frequently associated with EGFR exon 19 deletions (p=0.033). In a subset of 49 treated patients, we assessed whether MASI is a modifier of anti-EGFR treatment benefit. The difference in progression-free survival and overall survival between EGFR-MASI-positive and EGFR-MASI-negative groups of patients did not show a statistical significance. In conclusion, EGFR-MASI is a significant event in NSCLC, specifically associated with EGFR exon 19 deletions. However, EGFR-MASI does not seem to play a role in predicting the response to first-generation EGFR small molecules inhibitors.

  2. Allele-specific PCR typing and sequencing of the mitochondrial D-loop region in four layer breeds.

    PubMed

    Harumi, Takashi; Sano, Akiko; Minematsu, Takeo; Naito, Mitsuru

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the ability of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes in chicken mtDNA for presumption of the origins of chicken meat. We typed five SNPs of the D-loop region in mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) in 556 hens, that is 233 White Leghorn (WL), 50 Dekalb-TX35 (D-TX), 140 Barred Plymouth Rock (BPR) and 133 Rhode Island Red (RIR) kept in the National Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science (NILGS, Tsukuba, Japan). Five haplotypes were observed among those chickens by AS-PCR. WL, D-TX, BPR and RIR displayed three, two, one and four SNP haplotypes, respectively. By a combination of the haplotypes by AS-PCR and the breeds, these chickens were classified into 10 groups. After the D-loop was sequenced in two chickens from every group (20 individuals), 15 SNP sites (including one insertion) and eight sequence haplotypes were observed. In conclusion, haplotype variation was observed in and among the layer breeds of the NILGS. This study demonstrates that SNP haplotypes in mtDNA should be appropriate for the presumption of the origins of chicken meat.

  3. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction typing and sequencing of mitochondrial D-loop region in broiler chickens in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harumi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Naito, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to comprehend a feature of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mainly of general broiler chickens in Japan. We typed two SNP sites (199C/T and 792A/G) of the D-loop region in mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) in 359 broiler (182 chunky and 177 cobb) and 506 layer (233 White Leghorn, 140 Barred Plymouth Rock and 133 Rhode Island Red) chickens. The SNP of 199C or 792A by AS-PCR was observed in the chunky and cobb chickens, and not in the layers. The haplotype 199T/792G was observed in a part of cobb and all layers. By the result of AS-PCR haplotyping and the broiler brands, the D-loop region was sequenced in 44 broiler chickens (20 chunky and 24 cobb) and compared with the layers' sequence data. Among the broiler and layer chickens, 21 SNP sites (including one insertion) and 11 sequence haplotypes were observed. Haplotype variation or correspondence was observed in and between the broiler brands. This study provides important information to establish a chicken meat traceability system by SNP haplotyping of mtDNA in Japan.

  4. Simple and sensitive method for identification of human DNA by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction of FOXP2.

    PubMed

    Hiroshige, Kenichi; Soejima, Mikiko; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kamimura, Shigeo; Koda, Yoshiro

    2009-07-01

    The forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) gene is specifically involved in speech and language development in humans. The sequence is well conserved among many vertebrate species but has accumulated amino acid changes in the human lineage. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to discriminate between human and nonhuman vertebrate DNA in forensic specimens by amplification of a human-specific genomic region. In the present study, we designed an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers to amplify smaller than 70-bp regions of FOXP2 to identify DNA as being of human or nonhuman, including ape, origin. PCR amplification was also successfully performed using fluorescence-labeled primers, and this method allows a single PCR reaction with a genomic DNA sample as small as 0.01 ng. This system also identified the presence of human DNA in two blood stains stored for 20 and 38 years. The results suggested the potential usefulness of FOXP2 as an identifier of human DNA in forensic samples.

  5. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Tzintzuni I; Matos, Isa; Shen, Yingjia; Pabuwal, Vagmita; Coelho, Maria Manuela; Wakamatsu, Yuko; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-01-01

    Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE) on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types) and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues). In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82%) shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18%) displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78%) displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  6. Molecular structure of three mutations at the maize sugary1 locus and their allele-specific phenotypic effects.

    PubMed

    Dinges, J R; Colleoni, C; Myers, A M; James, M G

    2001-03-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required.

  7. Molecular Structure of Three Mutations at the Maize sugary1 Locus and Their Allele-Specific Phenotypic Effects1

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Jason R.; Colleoni, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2001-01-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required. PMID:11244120

  8. Comprehensively Evaluating cis-Regulatory Variation in the Human Prostate Transcriptome by Using Gene-Level Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nicholas B.; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J.; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A.; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E−5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate. PMID:25983244

  9. Comprehensively evaluating cis-regulatory variation in the human prostate transcriptome by using gene-level allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicholas B; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2015-06-04

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E-5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate.

  10. Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 3 by single-base extension method and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed allele specific (AS) SNP primers for rapid detection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) race 3. FOV_BT_SNP_R3 and FOV_BT_AS_R3 primers were designed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial sequence alignment of the ß-tubulin (BT) gene from several FOV races. These ...

  11. A facile method for the construction of oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Dalip; Kumar, A; Gupta, K C; Kumar, P

    2008-11-19

    In recent years, the oligonucleotide-based microarray technique has emerged as a powerful and promising tool for various molecular biological studies. Here, a facile protocol for the construction of an oligonucleotide microarray is demonstrated that involves immobilization of oligonucleotide-trimethoxysilyl conjugates onto virgin glass microslides. The projected immobilization strategy reflects high immobilization efficiency ( approximately 36-40%) and signal-to-noise ratio ( approximately 98), and hybridization efficiency ( approximately 32-35%). Using the proposed protocol, aminoalkyl, mercaptoalkyl, and phosphorylated oligonucleotides were immobilized onto virgin glass microslides. Briefly, modified oligonucleotides were reacted first with 3-glycidyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (GOPTS), and subsequently, the resultant conjugates were directly immobilized onto the virgin glass surface by making use of silanization chemistry. The constructed microarrays were then used for discrimination of base mismatches. On subjecting to different pH and thermal conditions, the microarray showed sufficient stability. Application of this chemistry to manufacture oligonucleotide probe-based microarrays for detection of bacterial meningitis is demonstrated. Single-step reaction for the formation of conjugates with the commercially available reagent (GOPTS), omission of capping step and surface modification, and efficient immobilization of oligonucleotides onto the virgin glass surface are the key features of the proposed strategy.

  12. Allele-specific effects of ecSOD on asbestos-induced fibroproliferative lung disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sujung; Fattman, Cheryl L; Kim, Byung-Jin; Jones, Harlan; Dory, Ladislav

    2011-05-15

    resistance to asbestos-induced lung injury reported for the 129/J strain of mice. The data further suggest allele-specific differences in the regulation of ecSOD expression. These congenic mice therefore represent a very useful model to study the role of this enzyme in all inflammatory diseases. Polymorphisms in human ecSOD have also been reported and it appears logical to assume that such variations may have a profound effect on disease susceptibility.

  13. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  14. Requisite analytic and diagnostic performance characteristics for the clinical detection of BRAF V600E in hairy cell leukemia: a comparison of 2 allele-specific PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Noah A; Weigelin, Helmut C; Bailey, Nathanael; Laliberte, Julie; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Lim, Megan S; Betz, Bryan L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of high-frequency BRAF V600E mutations in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) has important diagnostic utility. However, the requisite analytic performance for a clinical assay to routinely detect BRAF V600E mutations in HCL has not been clearly defined. In this study, we sought to determine the level of analytic sensitivity needed for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and frozen samples and to compare the performance of 2 allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Twenty-nine cases of classic HCL, including 22 FFPE bone marrow aspirates and 7 frozen specimens from blood or bone marrow were evaluated using a laboratory-developed allele-specific PCR assay and a commercially available allele-specific quantitative PCR assay-myT BRAF Ultra. Also included were 6 HCL variant and 40 non-HCL B-cell lymphomas. Two cases of classic HCL, 1 showing CD5 expression, were truly BRAF V600E-negative based on negative results by PCR and sequencing despite high-level leukemic involvement. Among the remaining 27 specimens, V600E mutations were detected in 88.9% (17/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen) and 81.5% (15/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen), for the laboratory-developed and commercial assays, respectively. No mutations were detected among the 46 non-HCL lymphomas. Both assays showed an analytic sensitivity of 0.3% involvement in frozen specimens and 5% in FFPE tissue. On the basis of these results, an assay with high analytic sensitivity is required for the clinical detection of V600E mutations in HCL specimens. Two allele-specific PCR assays performed well in both frozen and FFPE bone marrow aspirates, although detection in FFPE tissue required 5% or more involvement.

  15. Capillary and microchip gel electrophoresis for simultaneous detection of Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum by rfbS allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seonsook; Eo, Seong Kug; Kim, Yongseong; Yoo, Dong Jin; Kang, Seong Ho

    2007-09-30

    We report the use of capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) based on a rfbS allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the analysis and simultaneous detection of Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum, which are the major bacterial pathogens in poultry. rfbS allele-specific PCR was used to concurrently amplify two specific 147- and 187-bp DNA fragments for the simultaneous detection of S. pullorum and S. gallinarum at an annealing temperature of 54+/-1 degrees C and an MgCl(2) concentration of 2.8-5.6mM. Under an electric field of 333.3V/cm and a sieving matrix of 1.0% poly(ethyleneoxide) (M(r) 600000), the amplified PCR products were analyzed within 6min by CGE separation. This CGE assay could be translated to microchip format using programmed field strength gradients (PFSG). In the microchip gel electrophoresis with PFSG, both of the Salmonella analyses were completed within 30s, without decreasing the resolution efficiency. rfbS allele-specific PCR-microchip gel electrophoresis with the PFSG technique might be a new tool for the simultaneous detection of both S. pullorum and S. gallinarum, due to its ultra-speed and high efficiency.

  16. Scalable amplification of strand subsets from chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Beliveau, Brian J.; Uca, Yavuz O.; Theilmann, Mark; da Cruz, Felipe; Wu, Chao-Ting; Shih, William M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides are the main cost factor for studies in DNA nanotechnology, genetics and synthetic biology, which all require thousands of these at high quality. Inexpensive chip-synthesized oligonucleotide libraries can contain hundreds of thousands of distinct sequences, however only at sub-femtomole quantities per strand. Here we present a selective oligonucleotide amplification method, based on three rounds of rolling-circle amplification, that produces nanomole amounts of single-stranded oligonucleotides per millilitre reaction. In a multistep one-pot procedure, subsets of hundreds or thousands of single-stranded DNAs with different lengths can selectively be amplified and purified together. These oligonucleotides are used to fold several DNA nanostructures and as primary fluorescence in situ hybridization probes. The amplification cost is lower than other reported methods (typically around US$ 20 per nanomole total oligonucleotides produced) and is dominated by the use of commercial enzymes.

  17. Polyamine-oligonucleotide conjugates: a promising direction for nucleic acid tools and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Menzi, Mirjam; Lightfoot, Helen L; Hall, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and/or the conjugation of small functional molecules to oligonucleotides have significantly improved their biological and biophysical properties, addressing issues such as poor cell penetration, stability to nucleases and low affinity for their targets. Here, the authors review the literature reporting on the biophysical, biochemical and biological properties of one particular class of modification - polyamine-oligonucleotide conjugates. Naturally derived and synthetic polyamines have been grafted onto a variety of oligonucleotide formats, including antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs. In many cases this has had beneficial effects on their properties such as target hybridization, nuclease resistance, cellular uptake and activity. Polyamine-oligonucleotide conjugation, therefore, represents a promising direction for the further development of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics and tools.

  18. Oligonucleotide microchips as genosensors for determinative and environmental studies in microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Guschin, D Y; Mobarry, B K; Proudnikov, D; Stahl, D A; Rittmann, B E; Mirzabekov, A D

    1997-01-01

    The utility of parallel hybridization of environmental nucleic acids to many oligonucleotides immobilized in a matrix of polyacrylamide gel pads on a glass slide (oligonucleotide microchip) was evaluated. Oligonucleotides complementary to small-subunit rRNA sequences of selected microbial groups, encompassing key genera of nitrifying bacteria, were shown to selectively retain labeled target nucleic acid derived from either DNA or RNA forms of the target sequences. The utility of varying the probe concentration to normalize hybridization signals and the use of multicolor detection for simultaneous quantitation of multiple probe-target populations were demonstrated. PMID:9172361

  19. Transcriptomes and shRNA Suppressors in a TP53 Allele-specific Model of Early-onset Colon Cancer in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Weige, Charles C.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Mallick, Himel; Yi, Nengjun; Berrong, Zuzana; Cloessner, Emily; Duff, Keely; Tidwell, Josephine; Clendenning, Megan; Wilkerson, Brent; Farrell, Christopher; Bunz, Fred; Ji, Hao; Shtutman, Michael; Creek, Kim E.; Banister, Carolyn E.; Buckhaults, Phillip J.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by early-onset, high-grade malignancies. A fraction of this cancer health disparity can be explained by genetic differences between individuals of African or European descent. Here the wild-type Pro/Pro genotype at the TP53Pro72Arg (P72R) polymorphism (SNP: rs1042522) is more frequent in African Americans with cancer than in African Americans without cancer (51% vs 37%), and is associated with a significant increase in the rates of cancer diagnosis in African Americans. To test the hypothesis that p53 allele-specific gene expression may contribute to African American cancer disparities, p53 hemizygous knockout variants were generated and characterized in the RKO colon carcinoma cell line, which is wild-type for p53 and heterozygous at the TP53Pro72Arg locus. Transcriptome profiling, using RNAseq, in response to the DNA-damaging agent etoposide revealed a large number of p53-regulated transcripts, but also a subset of transcripts that were TP53Pro72Arg allele specific. In addition, a shRNA-library suppressor screen for p53 allele-specific escape from p53-induced arrest was performed. Several novel RNAi suppressors of p53 were identified, one of which, PRDM1β (BLIMP-1), was confirmed to be an Arg-specific transcript. PRDM1β silences target genes by recruiting H3K9 trimethyl (H3K9me3) repressive chromatin marks, and is necessary for stem cell differentiation. These results reveal a novel model for African American cancer disparity, in which the TP53 codon 72 allele influences lifetime cancer risk by driving damaged cells to differentiation through an epigenetic mechanism involving gene silencing. Implications TP53 P72R polymorphism significantly contributes to increased African American cancer disparity. PMID:24743655

  20. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  1. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of a mutation in the relax circular DNA and the covalently closed circular DNA of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wan-Long; Hu, Jie-Li; Fang, Yan; Luo, Qiang; Xu, Ge; Xu, Lei; Jing, Zhou-Hong; Shan, Xue-Feng; Zhu, Yan-Ling; Huang, Ai-Long

    2013-12-01

    The relax circle DNA (rcDNA) sequence and the covalently closed circle DNA (cccDNA) sequence in hepatitis B virus (HBV) are crucial regions for HBV infections. To analyze mutations in rcDNA and cccDNA, DNA sequencing is often used, although it is time-consuming and expensive. Herein, we report a simple, economic, albeit accurate allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) to detect mutations in these regions of HBV. This method can be extensively used to screen for mutations at specific positions of HBV genome.

  2. Simultaneous genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in alcoholism-related genes using duplex and triplex allele-specific PCR with two-step thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Naoto; Kuroki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    We developed a time- and cost-effective multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) method based on the two-step PCR thermal cycles for genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms in three alcoholism-related genes: alcohol dehydrogenase 1B, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and μ-opioid receptor. Applying MightyAmp(®) DNA polymerase with optimized AS-primers and PCR conditions enabled us to achieve effective and selective amplification of the target alleles from alkaline lysates of a human hair root, and simultaneously to determine the genotypes within less than 1.5 h using minimal lab equipment.

  3. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  4. Oligonucleotide-arrayed TFT photosensor applicable for DNA chip technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Sawaguchi, Masahiro; Iwadate, Akihito; Mizutani, Yasushi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Tateishi, Naofumi; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-09-05

    A thin film transistor (TFT) photosensor fabricated by semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology was applied to DNA chip technology. The surface of the TFT photosensor was coated with TiO2 using a vapor deposition technique for the fabrication of optical filters. The immobilization of thiolated oligonucleotide probes onto a TiO2-coated TFT photosensor using gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and N-(gamma-maleimidobutyloxy) sulfosuccinimide ester (GMBS) was optimized. The coverage value of immobilized oligonucleotides reached a plateau at 33.7 pmol/cm2, which was similar to a previous analysis using radioisotope-labeled oligonucleotides. The lowest detection limits were 0.05 pmol/cm2 for quantum dot and 2.1 pmol/cm2 for Alexa Fluor 350. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection was examined using the oligonucleotide-arrayed TFT photosensor. A SNP present in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene was used as a target. The SNPs in ALDH2*1 and ALDH2*2 target DNA were detected successfully using the TFT photosensor. DNA hybridization in the presence of both ALDH2*1 and ALDH2*2 target DNA was observed using both ALDH2*1 and ALDH2*2 detection oligonucleotides-arrayed TFT photosensor. Use of the TFT photosensor will allow the development of a disposable photodetecting device for DNA chip systems.

  5. Diverse Non-genetic, Allele-Specific Expression Effects Shape Genetic Architecture at the Cellular Level in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chao; Ferris, Elliott; Cheng, Tong; Hörndli, Cornelia Stacher; Gleason, Kelly; Tamminga, Carol; Wagner, Janice D; Boucher, Kenneth M; Christian, Jan L; Gregg, Christopher

    2017-03-08

    Interactions between genetic and epigenetic effects shape brain function, behavior, and the risk for mental illness. Random X inactivation and genomic imprinting are epigenetic allelic effects that are well known to influence genetic architecture and disease risk. Less is known about the nature, prevalence, and conservation of other potential epigenetic allelic effects in vivo in the mouse and primate brain. Here we devise genomics, in situ hybridization, and mouse genetics strategies to uncover diverse allelic effects in the brain that are not caused by imprinting or genetic variation. We found allelic effects that are developmental stage and cell type specific, that are prevalent in the neonatal brain, and that cause mosaics of monoallelic brain cells that differentially express wild-type and mutant alleles for heterozygous mutations. Finally, we show that diverse non-genetic allelic effects that impact mental illness risk genes exist in the macaque and human brain. Our findings have potential implications for mammalian brain genetics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  6. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  7. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques.

  8. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-10-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction.

  9. Determination of cis/trans phase of variations in the MC1R gene with allele-specific PCR and single base extension.

    PubMed

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J; Eiberg, Hans; Morling, Niels

    2008-12-01

    The MC1R gene encodes a protein with key regulatory functions in the melanin synthesis. A multiplex PCR and a multiplex single base extension protocol were established for genotyping six exonic MC1R variations highly penetrant for red hair (R), four exonic MC1R variations weakly penetrant for red hair (r), two frameshift variations highly penetrant for red hair (R) and three variations in the promoter region. We genotyped 600 individuals from Denmark using either CE or MALDI-TOF MS as the detection platform. A total of 62 individuals were genotyped R/R and among the 62 individuals, 57 had red hair and five had blond hair colour. Two different R alleles may be located in cis (RR/-) position or trans (R/R) position, and the phenotype associated with RR/- and R/R may be different. Two allele-specific PCRs were established with primers targeting the -G445A variation in the MC1R promoter and the allele-specific PCR products were used in the multiplex single base extension assay. In all 62 individuals, the MC1R variants were situated in trans position. Another 18 individuals with red hair colour were either genotyped R/- or R/r, suggesting that other genes influence hair colour.

  10. A two-step method for identification of the Chinese glutinous rice Suyunuo, based on ISSR-SCAR and allele-specific markers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y B; Zhang, Y M; Hang, Y Y; Li, M M; Zhou, G C; Shen, X L; Sun, X Q

    2016-10-05

    Suyunuo is a valuable glutinous rice variety cultivated mainly in the Lake Taihu area of China. Historically, Suyunuo was presented to emperors as a tribute, and, still today, enjoys a great reputation in China. This study aimed to develop a unique, specific molecular marker for the identification of Suyunuo rice. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers was performed on Suyunuo and 11 other glutinous rice varieties that are mainly cultivated in the Yangtze River Delta region. A Suyunuo-specific band was detected in the PCR products generated from primer ISSR-807. A sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) primer pair targeting a Suyunuo-specific band was subsequently designed. The SCAR primers amplified a target band in all individuals of Suyunuo and in four glutinous indica varieties, whereas no bands were found in the seven glutinous japonica varieties. Subsequently, sequences amplified by the SCAR primer pair were analyzed to facilitate the design of Suyunuo allele-specific primers. The allele-specific primer pair produced target bands in all individuals of Suyunuo rice but no bands in individuals of any of the other 11 rice varieties. This study provides a theoretical guideline for rice germplasm identification and innovation of other valuable rice landraces.

  11. Analysis of allele-specific RNA transcription in FSHD by RNA-DNA FISH in single myonuclei.

    PubMed

    Masny, Peter S; Chan, On Ying A; de Greef, Jessica C; Bengtsson, Ulla; Ehrlich, Melanie; Tawil, Rabi; Lock, Leslie F; Hewitt, Jane E; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Martin, Jorge H; van der Maarel, Silvere M; Winokur, Sara T

    2010-04-01

    Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is likely caused by epigenetic alterations in chromatin involving contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array near the telomere of chromosome 4q. The precise mechanism by which deletions of D4Z4 influence gene expression in FSHD is not yet resolved. Regulatory models include a cis effect on proximal gene transcription (position effect), DNA looping, non-coding RNA, nuclear localization and trans-effects. To directly test whether deletions of D4Z4 affect gene expression in cis, nascent RNA was examined in single myonuclei so that transcription from each allele could be measured independently. FSHD and control myotubes (differentiated myoblasts) were subjected to sequential RNA-DNA FISH. A total of 16 genes in the FSHD region (FRG2, TUBB4Q, FRG1, FAT1, F11, KLKB1, CYP4V2, TLR3, SORBS2, PDLIM3 (ALP), LRP2BP, ING2, SNX25, SLC25A4 (ANT1), HELT and IRF2) were examined for interallelic variation in RNA expression within individual myonuclei. Sequential DNA hybridization with a unique 4q35 chromosome probe was then applied to confirm the localization of nascent RNA to 4q. A D4Z4 probe, labeled with a third fluorochrome, distinguished between the deleted and normal allele in FSHD nuclei. Our data do not support an FSHD model in which contracted D4Z4 arrays induce altered transcription in cis from 4q35 genes, even for those genes (FRG1, FRG2 and SLC25A4 (ANT1)) for which such an effect has been proposed.

  12. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake machanisms and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23883124

  13. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake mechanisms and pharmacokinetic properties.

  14. Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression in Mouse Liver by RNA-Seq: A Comparison With Cis-eQTL Identified Using Genetic Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Martin, Lisa; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Roux, Pierre-François; Pan, Calvin; van Nas, Atila; Demeure, Olivier; Cantor, Rita; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Eskin, Eleazar; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) and parent-of-origin expression in adult mouse liver using next generation sequencing (RNA-Seq) of reciprocal crosses of heterozygous F1 mice from the parental strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. We found a 60% overlap between genes exhibiting ASE and putative cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) identified in an intercross between the same strains. We discuss the various biological and technical factors that contribute to the differences. We also identify genes exhibiting parental imprinting and complex expression patterns. Our study demonstrates the importance of biological replicates to limit the number of false positives with RNA-Seq data. PMID:24026101

  15. CalMaTe: a method and software to improve allele-specific copy number of SNP arrays for downstream segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Aramburu, Ander; Bengtsson, Henrik; Neuvial, Pierre; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: CalMaTe calibrates preprocessed allele-specific copy number estimates (ASCNs) from DNA microarrays by controlling for single-nucleotide polymorphism-specific allelic crosstalk. The resulting ASCNs are on average more accurate, which increases the power of segmentation methods for detecting changes between copy number states in tumor studies including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity. CalMaTe applies to any ASCNs regardless of preprocessing method and microarray technology, e.g. Affymetrix and Illumina. Availability: The method is available on CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/) in the open-source R package calmate, which also includes an add-on to the Aroma Project framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22576175

  16. Detection of cariogenic bacteria genes by a combination of allele-specific polymerase chain reactions and a novel bioluminescent pyrophosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Karasawa, Koji; Igarashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shigeya; Goto, Nobuichi; Maeda, Masako

    2004-10-15

    We developed a novel bioluminescent assay for detection of pyrophosphate in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product. The principle of this method is as follows: pyrophosphate released by PCR is converted to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by pyruvate phosphate dikinase in the presence of the substrate pyruvate phosphate and the coenzyme adenosine 5'-monophosphate; subsequently, ATP concentration is determined by firefly luciferase reaction. The detection limit of pyrophosphate is 1.56 x 10(-15)mol/assay. Additionally, luminescent intensity reached a maximum at approximately 100 s and remained elevated beyond 10 min. This approach is applicable to the detection of cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque. Thus, the allele-specific PCR products of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus developed in this study were measured via the proposed bioluminescent assay. This protocol, which does not require expensive equipment, can be utilized to rapidly monitor cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque.

  17. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with idiopathic achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Michela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Pesce, Marcella; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Annese, Vito; Petruzzelli, Raffaella; Izzo, Paola; Sepulveres, Rossana; Bruzzese, Dario; Esposito, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of genes involved in the regulation of the immune response are risk factors for achalasia, but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Nitric oxide is involved both in immune function and inhibitory neurotransmission. Objective The objective of this article is to assess the association and the functional relevance of the CCTTT-inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) gene promoter polymorphism in achalasia. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from 181 achalasia patients and 220 controls. Genotyping of the (CCTTT)n repeats was performed by PCR and capillary electrophoresis, and data analyzed by considering the frequency of the different alleles. HT29 cells were transfected with iNOS luciferase promoter-reporter plasmids containing different (CCTTT)n. Results The alleles’ distribution ranged from 7 to 18, with a peak frequency at 12 repeats. Analysis of the allele frequencies revealed that individuals carrying 10 and 13 CCTTT repeats were respectively less and more frequent in achalasia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.5 and OR 1.6, 95% CI 1–2.4, all p < 0.05). Long repeats were also significantly associated with an earlier onset of the disease (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.13–2.53, p = 0.01). Transfection experiments revealed a similar allele-specific iNOS transcriptional activity. Conclusion The functional polymorphism (CCTTT) of NOS2 promoter is associated with achalasia, likely by an allele-specific modulation of nitric oxide production. PMID:28344787

  18. Fully automated sample preparation microsystem for genetic testing of hereditary hearing loss using two-color multiplex allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bin; Gan, Wupeng; Wang, Shuaiqin; Han, Junping; Xiang, Guangxin; Li, Cai-Xia; Sun, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-20

    A fully automated microsystem consisting of a disposable DNA extraction and PCR microchip, as well as a compact control instrument, has been successfully developed for genetic testing of hereditary hearing loss from human whole blood. DNA extraction and PCR were integrated into a single 15-μL reaction chamber, where a piece of filter paper was embedded for capturing genomic DNA, followed by in-situ PCR amplification without elution. Diaphragm microvalves actuated by external solenoids together with a "one-way" fluidic control strategy operated by a modular valve positioner and a syringe pump were employed to control the fluids and to seal the chamber during thermal cycling. Fully automated DNA extractions from as low as 0.3-μL human whole blood followed by amplifications of 59-bp β-actin fragments can be completed on the microsystem in about 100 min. Negative control tests that were performed between blood sample analyses proved the successful elimination of any contamination or carryover in the system. To more critically test the microsystem, a two-color multiplex allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assay for detecting c.176_191del16, c.235delC, and c.299_300delAT mutations in GJB2 gene that accounts for hereditary hearing loss was constructed. Two allele-specific primers, one labeled with TAMRA for wild type and the other with FAM for mutation, were designed for each locus. DNA extraction from blood and ASPCR were performed on the microsystem, followed by an electrophoretic analysis on a portable microchip capillary electrophoresis system. Blood samples from a healthy donor and five persons with genetic mutations were all accurately analyzed with only two steps in less than 2 h.

  19. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  20. Application of oligonucleotide array technology for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria of foodborne infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bang-Xing; Jiang, Li-Fang; Hu, Yu-Shan; Fang, Dan-Yun; Guo, Hui-Yu

    2004-09-01

    A rapid and accurate method for detection for common pathogenic bacteria in foodborne infections was established by using oligonucleotide array technology. Nylon membrane was used as the array support. A mutation region of the 23S rRNA gene was selected as the discrimination target from 14 species (genera) of bacteria causing foodborne infections and two unrelated bacterial species. A pair of universal primers was designed for PCR amplification of the 23S rRNA gene. Twenty-one species (genera)-specific oligonucleotide detection probes were synthesized and spotted onto the nylon membranes. The 23S rRNA gene amplification products of 14 species of pathogenic bacteria were hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. Hybridization results were analyzed with digoxigenin-linked enzyme reaction. Results indicated that nine species of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella dysenteriae, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Clostridium botulinum) showed high sensitivity and specificity for the oligonucleotide array. Two other species (Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica) gave weak cross-reaction with E. coli, but the reaction did not affect their detection. After redesigning the probes, positive hybridization results were obtained with Staphylococcus aureus, but not with Clostridium perfringens and Streptococcus pyogenes. The oligonucleotide array can also be applied to samples collected in clinical settings of foodborne infections. The superiority of oligonucleotide array over other tests lies on its rapidity, accuracy and efficiency in the diagnosis, treatment and control of foodborne infections.

  1. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  2. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  3. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  4. Oligonucleotide primers, probes and molecular methods for the environmental monitoring of methanogenic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Summary For the identification and quantification of methanogenic archaea (methanogens) in environmental samples, various oligonucleotide probes/primers targeting phylogenetic markers of methanogens, such as 16S rRNA, 16S rRNA gene and the gene for the α‐subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), have been extensively developed and characterized experimentally. These oligonucleotides were designed to resolve different groups of methanogens at different taxonomic levels, and have been widely used as hybridization probes or polymerase chain reaction primers for membrane hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, rRNA cleavage method, gene cloning, DNA microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for studies in environmental and determinative microbiology. In this review, we present a comprehensive list of such oligonucleotide probes/primers, which enable us to determine methanogen populations in an environment quantitatively and hierarchically, with examples of the practical applications of the probes and primers. PMID:21375721

  5. Oligonucleotide-Functionalized Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Robert

    In this thesis, we describe the properties of oligonucleotide-functionalized gold colloids under the unique set of conditions where the particles are geometrically anisotropic and have nanometer-scale dimensions. While nearly two decades of previous work elucidated numerous unexpected and emergent phenomena arising from the combination of inorganic nanoparticles with surface-bound DNA strands, virtually nothing was known about how these properties are altered when the shape of the nanoparticle core is chosen to be non-spherical. In particular, we are interested in understanding, and ultimately controlling, the ways in which these DNA-conjugated anisotropic nanostructures interact when their attraction is governed by programmable DNA hybridization events. Chapter 1 introduces the field of DNA-based materials assembly by discussing how nanoscale building blocks which present rigid, directional interactions can be thought of as possessing artificial versions of the familiar chemical principles of "bonds" and "valency". In chapter 2 we explore the fundamental interparticle binding thermodynamics of DNA-functionalized spherical and anisotropic nanoparticles, which reveals enormous preferences for collective ligand interactions occurring between flat surfaces over those that occur between curved surfaces. Using these insights, chapter 3 demonstrates that when syntheses produce mixtures of different nanoparticle shapes, the tailorable nature of DNA-mediated interparticle association can be used to selectively crystallize and purify the desired anisotropic nanostructure products, leaving spherical impurity particles behind. Chapter 4 leverages the principle that the flat facets of anisotropic particles generate directional DNA-based hybridization interactions to assemble a variety of tailorable nanoparticle superlattices whose symmetry and dimensionality are a direct consequence of the shape of the nanoparticle building block used in their construction. Chapter 5 explores

  6. SERS beacons for multiplexed oligonucleotide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Cullum, Brian M.

    2007-09-01

    Gold-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) beacons have been developed, which represent a simple, biocompatible and rapid means of performing multiplexed DNA sequence detection in a non-arrayed format. These SERS beacons consist of a simple stem-loop oligonucleotide probe in its native form with one end attached to a SERS active dye molecule and the other to a gold nanoparticle, approximately 50 nm in diameter. The probe sequence is designed to achieve a stem-loop structure, with the loop portion complementary to the target sequence, similar to fluorescent molecular beacons. In the absence of the target DNA sequence, the SERS signal of the associated dye molecule is detected, representing the "ON" state of the probe. When the target sequence is hybridized to the probe, which results in an open conformation, its respective reporter dye is separated from the gold nanoparticle, producing diminished SERS signal. In this paper, the fabrication and characterization of these SERS beacons is described. We also demonstrate selective hybridization of a target sequence to one beacon in a mixture, revealing their potential for use in a multiplexed fashion.

  7. Allele-specific suppression of a defective trans-Golgi network (TGN) localization signal in Kex2p identifies three genes involved in localization of TGN transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, K; Brickner, J H; Marschall, L G; Nichols, J W; Fuller, R S

    1996-01-01

    Kex2 protease (Kex2p) and Ste13 dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (Ste13p) are required in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for maturation of the alpha-mating factor in a late Golgi compartment, most likely the yeast trans-Golgi network (TGN). Previous studies identified a TGN localization signal (TLS) in the C-terminal cytosolic tail of Kex2p consisting of Tyr-713 and contextual sequences. Further analysis of the Kex2p TLS revealed similarity to the Ste13p TLS. Mutation of the Kex2p TLS results in transport of Kex2p to the vacuole by default. When expression of a GAL1 promoter-driven KEX2 gene is shut off in MAT(alpha) cells, the TGN becomes depleted of Kex2p, resulting in a gradual decline in mating competence which is greatly accelerated by TLS mutations. To identify the genes involved in localization of Kex2p, we isolated second-site suppressors of the rapid loss of mating competence observed upon shutting off expression of a TLS mutant form of Kex2p (Y713A). Seven of 58 suppressors were allele specific, suppressing point mutations at Tyr-713 but not deletions of the TLS or entire C-terminal cytosolic tail. By linkage analysis, the allele-specific suppressors defined three genetic loci, SOI1, S0I2, and S0I3. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that these suppressors increased net TGN retention of both Y713A Kex2p and a Ste13p-Pho8p fusion protein containing a point mutation in the Ste13p TLS. SOI1 suppressor alleles reduced the efficiency of localization of wild-type Kex2p to the TGN, implying an impaired ability to discriminate between the normal TLS and a mutant TLS. soi1 mutants also exhibited a recessive defect in vacuolar protein sorting. Suppressor alleles of S0I2 were dominant. These results suggest that the SOI1 and S0I2 genes encode regulators or components of the TLS recognition machinery. PMID:8887651

  8. Improving signal intensities for genes with low-expression on oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ramdas, Latha; Cogdell, David E; Jia, Jack Y; Taylor, Ellen E; Dunmire, Valerie R; Hu, Limei; Hamilton, Stanley R; Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays using long oligonucleotide probes are widely used to evaluate gene expression in biological samples. These oligonucleotides are pre-synthesized and sequence-optimized to represent specific genes with minimal cross-hybridization to homologous genes. Probe length and concentration are critical factors for signal sensitivity, particularly when genes with various expression levels are being tested. We evaluated the effects of oligonucleotide probe length and concentration on signal intensity measurements of the expression levels of genes in a target sample. Results Selected genes of various expression levels in a single cell line were hybridized to oligonucleotide arrays of four lengths and four concentrations of probes to determine how these critical parameters affected the intensity of the signal representing their expression. We found that oligonucleotides of longer length significantly increased the signals of genes with low-expression in the target. High-expressing gene signals were also boosted but to a lesser degree. Increasing the probe concentration, however, did not linearly increase the signal intensity for either low- or high-expressing genes. Conclusions We conclude that the longer the oligonuclotide probe the better the signal intensities of low expressing genes on oligonucleotide arrays. PMID:15196312

  9. Inhibition of HTLV-III by exogenous oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Goodchild, J.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1989-02-21

    A method is described of detecting the presence of HTLV-III virus in a sample by demonstrating inhibition of replication of the virus in cells which are normally killed by the HTLV-III virus after the cells have been (a) combined with the sample and an oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication and capable of hybridizing with at least the highly conserved region, the highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome being a nucleotide sequence present in the genomes of HTLV-III isolates and the oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication being complementary to a region of the HTLV-III genome.

  10. Oligonucleotide-based antiviral strategies.

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Kurreck, J

    2006-01-01

    In the age of extensive global traffic systems, the close neighborhood of man and livestock in some regions of the world, as well as inadequate prevention measures and medical care in poorer countries, greatly facilitates the emergence and dissemination of new virus strains. The appearance of avian influenza viruses that can infect humans, the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus, and the unprecedented raging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) illustrate the threat of a global virus pandemic. In addition, viruses like hepatitis B and C claim more than one million lives every year for want of efficient therapy. Thus, new approaches to prevent virus propagation are urgently needed. Antisense strategies are considered a very attractive means of inhibiting viral replication, as oligonucleotides can be designed to interact with any viral RNA, provided its sequence is known. The ensuing targeted destruction of viral RNA should interfere with viral replication without entailing negative effects on ongoing cellular processes. In this review, we will give some examples of the employment of antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, and RNA interference strategies for antiviral purposes. Currently, in spite of encouraging results in preclinical studies, only a few antisense oligonucleotides and ribozymes have turned out to be efficient antiviral compounds in clinical trials. The advent of RNA interference now seems to be refueling hopes for decisive progress in the field of therapeutic employment of antisense strategies.

  11. Functionalization of PVC membrane with ss oligonucleotides for a potentiometric biosensor.

    PubMed

    Shishkanova, T V; Volf, R; Krondak, M; Král, V

    2007-05-15

    A novel application of a single stranded (ss) oligonucleotide as an active component of polymeric membrane in an ion-selective electrode (ISE) is described. The original oligonucleotides, oligo(dA)(15), modified by cholesterol, triphenylmethyl and hexadecyl derivatives, were immobilized into poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane using extraction protocol. In parallel, the adsorption protocol was used to immobilize unmodified oligo(dA)(15) on the PVC membrane based on tridodecylmethyammonium chloride (TDDMA(+)Cl(-)). Immobilization of ss oligonucleotide probe through spacer was more effective for the potentiometric detection of the hybridization between complementary oligonucleotides. It was found that cholesterol-oligo(dA)(15) modified membranes were sensitive toward complementary oligo(dT)(15) in the concentration range 2-80 nM at pH 7. An explanation for the detection mechanism is proposed.

  12. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; ...

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of bindingmore » at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.« less

  13. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; Shi, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Zhou, Tongqing

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of binding at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.

  14. Detection of EGFR mutations by TaqMan mutation detection assays powered by competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR technology.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Esposito, Claudia; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Iannaccone, Alessia; Chicchinelli, Nicoletta; Franco, Renato; Mancini, Rita; Pisconti, Salvatore; De Luca, Antonella; Botti, Gerardo; Morabito, Alessandro; Normanno, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are predictive of response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR (castPCR) is a highly sensitive and specific technology. EGFR mutations were assessed by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays (TMDA) based on castPCR technology in 64 tumor samples: a training set of 30 NSCLC and 6 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) samples and a validation set of 28 NSCLC cases. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were compared with routine diagnostic techniques including direct sequencing and the EGFR Therascreen RGQ kit. Analysis of the training set allowed the identification of the threshold value for data analysis (0.2); the maximum cycle threshold (Ct = 37); and the cut-off ΔCt value (7) for the EGFR TMDA. By using these parameters, castPCR technology identified both training and validation set EGFR mutations with similar frequency as compared with the Therascreen kit. Sequencing detected rare mutations that are not identified by either castPCR or Therascreen, but in samples with low tumor cell content it failed to detect common mutations that were revealed by real-time PCR based methods. In conclusion, our data suggest that castPCR is highly sensitive and specific to detect EGFR mutations in NSCLC clinical samples.

  15. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats in 5' region of the DRD4 gene is stimulus specific in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Paredes, U M; Quinn, J P; D'Souza, U M

    2013-03-01

    The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene includes several variable number of tandem repeat loci that have been suggested to modulate DRD4 gene expression patterns. Previous studies showed differential basal activity of the two most common variants of a tandem repeat (120 bp per repeat unit) located in the 5' region adjacent to the DRD4 promoter in human cell lines. In this communication, we further characterized the ability of this polymorphic repeat to elicit tissue-, allele- and stimuli-specific transcriptional activity in vitro. The short and long variants of the DRD4 5' tandem repeat were cloned into a luciferase reporter gene construct containing the SV40 promoter. The luciferase constructs were cotransfected with expression vectors of two ubiquitously expressed human transcription factors (TFs), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), into human cell lines and primary cultures of neonate rat cortex and luciferase activity measured. Overexpression with these TFs resulted in differential cell- and allele-specific transcriptional activities of the luciferase constructs. The results of our experiments show that variants of this tandem repeat in the 5' promoter of the DRD4 gene will direct differential reporter gene transcriptional activity in a cell-type-specific manner dependent on the signal pathways activated.

  16. A and MdMYB1 allele-specific markers controlling apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) skin color and suitability for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X J; Wang, L X; Chen, X X; Liu, Y L; Meng, R; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Z Y

    2014-10-31

    Pre-selection for fruit skin color at the seedling stage would be highly advantageous, with marker-assisted selection offering a potential method for apple pre-selection. A and MdMYB1 alleles are allele-specific DNA markers that are potentially associated with apple skin color, and co-segregate with the Rf and Rni loci, respectively. Here, we assessed the potential application of these 2 alleles for marker-assisted breeding across 30 diverse cultivars and 2 apple seedling progenies. The red skin color phenotype was usually associated with the MdMYB1-1 allele and A(1) allele, respectively, while the 2 molecular markers provided approximately 91% predictability in the 'Fuji' x 'Cripps Pink' and 'Fuji' x 'Gala' progenies. The results obtained from the 30 cultivars and 2 progenies were consistent for the 2 molecular markers. Hence, the results supported that Rf and Rni could be located in a gene cluster, or even correspond to alleles of the same gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that red/yellow dimorphism is controlled by a monogenic system, with the presence of the red anthocyanin pigmentation being dominant. In addition, our results supported that the practical utilization of the 2 function markers to efficiently and accurately select red-skinned apple cultivars in apple scion breeding programs.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by mini-primer allele-specific amplification with universal reporter primers for identification of degraded DNA.

    PubMed

    Asari, Masaru; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Shiono, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Keiko

    2009-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is informative for human identification, and much shorter regions are targeted in analysis of biallelic SNP compared with highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR). Therefore, SNP genotyping is expected to be more sensitive than STR genotyping of degraded human DNA. To achieve simple, economical, and sensitive SNP genotyping for identification of degraded human DNA, we developed 18 loci for a SNP genotyping technique based on the mini-primer allele-specific amplification (ASA) combined with universal reporter primers (URP). The URP/ASA-based genotyping consisted of two amplifications followed by detection using capillary electrophoresis. The sizes of the target genome fragments ranged from 40 to 67bp in length. In the Japanese population, the frequencies of minor alleles of 18 SNPs ranged from 0.36 to 0.50, and these SNPs are informative for identification. The success rate of SNP genotyping was much higher than that of STR genotyping of artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, we applied this genotyping method to case samples and showed successful SNP genotyping of severely degraded DNA from a 4-year buffered formalin-fixed tissue sample for human identification.

  18. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  19. MHC allele-specific binding of a malaria peptide makes it become promiscuous on fitting a glycine residue into pocket 6.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Parra, Carlos Alberto; Salazar, Luz Mary; Guzmán, Fanny; Pinto, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-18

    Peptide 1585 (EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKKQLE) has a highly conserved amino-acid sequence located in the Plasmodium falciparum main merozoite surface protein (MSP-1) C-terminal region, required for merozoite entry into human erythrocytes and therefore represents a vaccine candidate for P. falciparum malaria. Original sequence-specific binding to five HLA DRB1* alleles (0101, 0102, 0401, 0701, and 1101) revealed this peptide's specific HLA DRB1*0102 allele binding. This peptide's allele-specific binding to HLA DRB1*0102 took on broader specificity for the DRB1*0101, -0401, and -1101 alleles when lysine was replaced by glycine in position 17 (peptide 5198: EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKG(17)QLE). Binding of the identified G(10)VYRSLKGQLE(20) C-terminal register to these alleles suggests that peptide promiscuous binding relied on fitting Y(12), L(15), and G(17) into P-1, P-4, and P-6, respectively. The implications of the findings and the future of this synthetic vaccine candidate are discussed.

  20. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  1. Allele-specific expression at the RET locus in blood and gut tissue of individuals carrying risk alleles for Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Matera, Ivana; Musso, Marco; Griseri, Paola; Rusmini, Marta; Di Duca, Marco; So, Man-Ting; Mavilio, Domenico; Miao, Xiaoping; Tam, Paul Hk; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Ceccherini, Isabella; Garcia-Barcelo, Merce

    2013-05-01

    RET common variants are associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; colon aganglionosis), a congenital defect of the enteric nervous system. We analyzed a well-known HSCR-associated RET haplotype that encompasses linked alleles in coding and noncoding/regulatory sequences. This risk haplotype correlates with reduced level of RET expression when compared with the wild-type counterpart. As allele-specific expression (ASE) contributes to phenotypic variability in health and disease, we investigated whether RET ASE could contribute to the overall reduction of RET mRNA detected in carriers. We tested heterozygous neuroblastoma cell lines, ganglionic gut tissues (18 HSCR and 14 non-HSCR individuals) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs; 16 HSCR and 14 non-HSCR individuals). Analysis of the data generated by SNaPshot and Pyrosequencing revealed that the RET risk haplotype is significantly more expressed in gut than in PBMCs (P = 0.0045). No ASE difference was detected between patients and controls, irrespective of the sample type. Comparison of total RET expression levels between gut samples with and without ASE, correlated reduced RET expression with preferential transcription from the RET risk haplotype. Nonrandom RET ASE occurs in ganglionic gut regardless of the disease status. RET ASE should not be excluded as a disease mechanism acting during development.

  2. Inactive allele-specific methylation and chromatin structure of the imprinted gene U2af1-rs1 on mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Hideo; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kamiya, Mamoru

    1996-07-01

    The imprinted U2Af1-rs1 gene that maps to mouse chromosome 11 is predominately expressed from the paternal allele. We examined the methylation of genomic sequences in and around the U2af1-rs1 locus to establish the extent of sequence modifications that accompanied the silencing of the maternal allele. The analysis of HapII or HhaI sites showed that the silent maternal allele was hypermethylated in a block of CpG sequences that covered more than 10 kb. By comparison, the expressed paternal allele was unmethylated from a CpG island upstream of the transcribed region through 2 kb. An analysis of DNaseI hypersensitivity of a putative promoter of U2af1-rs1 showed an open chromatin conformation only on the unmethylated, expressed paternal allele. These results suggest that allele-specific hypermethylation covering the gene and its upstream CpG island plays a role in maternal allele repression of U2af1-rs1, which is reflected in altered chromatin conformation of DNaseI hypersensitive sites. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Allele-specific gene expression patterns in primary leukemic cells reveal regulation of gene expression by CpG site methylation

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica; Kiialainen, Anna; Flaegstad, Trond; Jonmundsson, Gudmundur; Kanerva, Jukka; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2009-01-01

    To identify genes that are regulated by cis-acting functional elements in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we determined the allele-specific expression (ASE) levels of 2529 genes by genotyping a genome-wide panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms in RNA and DNA from bone marrow and blood samples of 197 children with ALL. Using a reproducible, quantitative genotyping method and stringent criteria for scoring ASE, we found that 16% of the analyzed genes display ASE in multiple ALL cell samples. For most of the genes, the level of ASE varied largely between the samples, from 1.4-fold overexpression of one allele to apparent monoallelic expression. For genes exhibiting ASE, 55% displayed bidirectional ASE in which overexpression of either of the two SNP alleles occurred. For bidirectional ASE we also observed overall higher levels of ASE and correlation with the methylation level of these sites. Our results demonstrate that CpG site methylation is one of the factors that regulates gene expression in ALL cells. PMID:18997001

  4. Natural variation in male-induced ‘cost-of-mating’ and allele-specific association with male reproductive genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Anthony C; Dumont, Bethany L; Clark, Andrew G

    2006-01-01

    One of the most sharply defined sexual conflicts arises when the act of mating is accompanied by an inflated risk of death. Several reports have documented an increased death rate of female Drosophila as a result of recurrent mating. Transgenic and mutation experiments have further identified components of seminal fluid that are at least in part responsible for this toxicity. Variation among males in their tendency for matings to be toxic to their partners has also been documented, but here for the first time we identify polymorphism within particular genes conferring differential post-mating female mortality. Such polymorphism is important, as it raises the challenge of whether sexual conflict models can provide means for maintenance of polymorphism. Using a set of second chromosome extraction lines, we scored differences in post-mating female fecundity and longevity subsequent to mating, and identified significant among-line differences. Seventy polymorphisms in ten male reproductive genes were scored and permutation tests were used to identify significant associations between genotype and phenotype. One polymorphism upstream of PEBII and an amino acid substitution in CG17331 were both associated with male-induced female mortality. The same allele of CG17331 that is toxic to females also induces greater refractoriness to remating in the females, providing an example of an allele-specific sexual conflict. Postcopulatory sexual selection could lead to sexual conflict by favouring males that prevent their mates from mating, even when there is a viability cost to those females. PMID:16612893

  5. Kinetic effects on signal normalization in oligonucleotide microchips with labeled immobilized probes.

    PubMed

    Pan'kov, S V; Chechetkin, V R; Somova, O G; Antonova, O V; Moiseeva, O V; Prokopenko, D V; Yurasov, R A; Gryadunov, D A; Chudinov, A V

    2009-10-01

    Among various factors affecting operation of oligonucleotide microchips, the variations in concentration and in homogeneous distribution of immobilized probes over the cells are one of the most important. The labeling of immobilized probes ensures the complete current monitoring on the probe distribution and is reliable and convenient. Using hydrogel-based oligonucleotide microchips, the applicability of Cy3-labeled immobilized probes for quality control and signal normalization after hybridization with Cy5-labeled target DNA was investigated. This study showed that proper signal normalization should be different in thermodynamic conditions and in transient regime with hybridization far from saturation. This kinetic effect holds for both hydrogel-based and surface oligonucleotide microchips. Besides proving basic features, the technique was assessed on a sampling batch of 50 microchips developed for identifying mutations responsible for rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  6. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1) extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2) performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3) correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4) calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity. PMID:26583378

  7. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population.

  8. Development of Nuclear Microsatellite Loci and Mitochondrial Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms for the Natterjack Toad, Bufo (Epidalea) calamita (Bufonidae), Using Next Generation Sequencing and Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar).

    PubMed

    Faucher, Leslie; Godé, Cécile; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are undergoing a major decline worldwide and the steady increase in the number of threatened species in this particular taxa highlights the need for conservation genetics studies using high-quality molecular markers. The natterjack toad, Bufo (Epidalea) calamita, is a vulnerable pioneering species confined to specialized habitats in Western Europe. To provide efficient and cost-effective genetic resources for conservation biologists, we developed and characterized 22 new nuclear microsatellite markers using next-generation sequencing. We also used sequence data acquired from Sanger sequencing to develop the first mitochondrial markers for KASPar assay genotyping. Genetic polymorphism was then analyzed for 95 toads sampled from 5 populations in France. For polymorphic microsatellite loci, number of alleles and expected heterozygosity ranged from 2 to 14 and from 0.035 to 0.720, respectively. No significant departures from panmixia were observed (mean multilocus F IS = -0.015) and population differentiation was substantial (mean multilocus F ST = 0.222, P < 0.001). From a set of 18 mitochondrial SNPs located in the 16S and D-loop region, we further developed a fast and cost-effective SNP genotyping method based on competitive allele-specific PCR amplification (KASPar). The combination of allelic states for these mitochondrial DNA SNP markers yielded 10 different haplotypes, ranging from 2 to 5 within populations. Populations were highly differentiated (G ST = 0.407, P < 0.001). These new genetic resources will facilitate future parentage, population genetics and phylogeographical studies and will be useful for both evolutionary and conservation concerns, especially for the set-up of management strategies and the definition of distinct evolutionary significant units.

  9. Allele specific-PCR and melting curve analysis showed relatively high frequency of β-casein gene A1 allele in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cows.

    PubMed

    Gholami, M; Hafezian, S H; Rahimi, G; Farhadi, A; Rahimi, Z; Kahrizi, D; Kiani, S; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Muhammadi, S; Veisi, F; Ghadiri, K; Shetabi, H; Zargooshi, J

    2016-10-31

    There are two allelic forms of A1 and A2 of β-casein gene in dairy cattle. Proteolytic digestion of bovine β-casein A1 type produces bioactive peptide of β-casomorphin-7 known as milk devil. β-casomorphin-7 causes many diseases, including type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease syndrome, sudden death and madness. The aim of the present study was to determine the different allelic forms of β-casein gene in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cattle in order to identify A1 and A2 variants. The blood samples were collected randomly and DNA was extracted using modified salting out method. An 854 bp fragment including part of exon 7 and part of intron 6 of β-casein gene was amplified by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). Also, the accuracy of AS-PCR genotyping has been confirmed by melting temperature curve analysis using Real-time PCR machinery. The comparison of observed allele and genotype frequency among the studied breeds was performed using the Fisher exact and Chi-squared test, respectively by SAS program. Obtained results showed the A1 allele frequencies of 50, 51.57, 54.5, 49.4 and 46.6% in Holstein, Simmental, Sistani, Taleshi and Mazandarani cattle populations, respectively. The chi-square test was shown that no any populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for studied marker locus. Comparison and analysis of the test results for allelic frequency showed no any significant differences between breeds (P>0.05). The frequency of observed genotypes only differs significantly between Holstein and Taleshi breeds but no any statistically significant differences were found for other breeds (P>0.05). A relatively high frequency of β-casein A1 allele was observed in Iranian native cattle. Therefore, determine the genotypes and preference alleles A2 in these native and commercial cattle is recommended.

  10. Regulatory hierarchy of photomorphogenic loci: allele-specific and light-dependent interaction between the HY5 and COP1 loci.

    PubMed Central

    Ang, L H; Deng, X W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) gene product represses photomorphogenic development in darkness and that light signals reverse this action. In this report, we used genetic analysis to investigate the regulatory hierarchical relationship of COP1 and the loci encoding the photoreceptors and other signaling components. Our results showed that cop1 mutations are epistatic to the long hypocotyl mutations hy1, hy2, hy3, and hy4, suggesting that COP1 acts downstream of the phytochromes and a blue light receptor. Although epistasis of a putative null cop1-5 mutation over a hy5 mutation implied that COP1 acts downstream of HY5, the same hy5 mutation can suppress the dark photomorphogenic phenotypes (including hypocotyl elongation and cotyledon cellular differentiation) of the weak cop1-6 mutation. This, and other allele-specific interactions between COP1 and HY5, may suggest direct physical contact of their gene products. In addition, the synthetic lethality of the weak deetiolated1 (det1) and cop1 mutations and the fact that the cop1-6 mutation is epistatic to the det1-1 mutation with respect to light control of seed germination and dark-adaptative gene expression suggested that DET1 and COP1 may act in the same pathway, with COP1 being downstream. These results, together with previous epistasis studies, support models in which light signals, once perceived by different photoreceptors, converge downstream and act through a common cascade(s) of regulatory steps, as defined by DET1, HY5, COP1, and likely others, to derepress photomorphogenic development. PMID:8038602

  11. Fine mapping of QTL and genomic prediction using allele-specific expression SNPs demonstrates that the complex trait of genetic resistance to Marek’s disease is predominantly determined by transcriptional regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis that polymorphisms associated with transcriptional regulation are critical for viral disease resistance was tested by selecting birds using SNPs exhibiting allele-specific expression (ASE) in response to viral challenge. Analysis indicates ASE markers account for 83% of the disease re...

  12. The prebiotic synthesis of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is primarily a review of recent developments in the abiotic synthesis of nucleotides, short chain oligonucleotides, and their mode of replication in solution. It also presents preliminary results from this laboratory on the prebiotic synthesis of thymidine oligodeoxynucleotides. A discussion, based on the physicochemical properties of RNA and DNA oligomers, relevant to the molecular evolution of these compounds leads to the tentative hypothesis that oligodeoxyribonucleotides of about 12 units may have been of sufficient length to initiate a self replicating coding system. Two models are suggested to account for the synthesis of high molecular weight oligomers using short chain templates and primers.

  13. Light-generated oligonucleotide arrays for rapid DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, A C; Solas, D; Sullivan, E J; Cronin, M T; Holmes, C P; Fodor, S P

    1994-01-01

    In many areas of molecular biology there is a need to rapidly extract and analyze genetic information; however, current technologies for DNA sequence analysis are slow and labor intensive. We report here how modern photolithographic techniques can be used to facilitate sequence analysis by generating miniaturized arrays of densely packed oligonucleotide probes. These probe arrays, or DNA chips, can then be applied to parallel DNA hybridization analysis, directly yielding sequence information. In a preliminary experiment, a 1.28 x 1.28 cm array of 256 different octanucleotides was produced in 16 chemical reaction cycles, requiring 4 hr to complete. The hybridization pattern of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide targets was then detected by epifluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence signals from complementary probes were 5-35 times stronger than those with single or double base-pair hybridization mismatches, demonstrating specificity in the identification of complementary sequences. This method should prove to be a powerful tool for rapid investigations in human genetics and diagnostics, pathogen detection, and DNA molecular recognition. Images PMID:8197176

  14. Portable system for microbial sample preparation and oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Bavykin, S. G.; Akowski, J. P.; Zakhariev, V. M.; Barsky, V. E.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Perov, A. N.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2001-02-01

    We have developed a three-component system for microbial identification that consists of (i) a universal syringe-operated silica minicolumn for successive DNA and RNA isolation, fractionation, fragmentation, fluorescent labeling, and removal of excess free label and short oligonucleotides; (ii) microarrays of immobilized oligonucleotide probes for 16S rRNA identification; and (iii) a portable battery-powered device for imaging the hybridization of fluorescently labeled RNA fragments with the arrays. The minicolumn combines a guanidine thiocyanate method of nucleic acid isolation with a newly developed hydroxyl radical-based technique for DNA and RNA labeling and fragmentation. DNA and RNA can also be fractionated through differential binding of double- and single-stranded forms of nucleic acids to the silica. The procedure involves sequential washing of the column with different solutions. No vacuum filtration steps, phenol extraction, or centrifugation is required. After hybridization, the overall fluorescence pattern is captured as a digital image or as a Polaroid photo. This three-component system was used to discriminate Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and human HL60 cells. The procedure is rapid: beginning with whole cells, it takes approximately 25 min to obtain labeled DNA and RNA samples and an additional 25 min to hybridize and acquire the microarray image using a stationary image analysis system or the portable imager.

  15. Reproducible and inexpensive probe preparation for oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Price, B D; Tetradis, S; Chakrabarti, S; Maulik, G; Makrigiorgos, G M

    2001-07-01

    We present a new protocol for the preparation of nucleic acids for microarray hybridization. DNA is fragmented quantitatively and reproducibly by using a hydroxyl radical-based reaction, which is initiated by hydrogen peroxide, iron(II)-EDTA and ascorbic acid. Following fragmentation, the nucleic acid fragments are densely biotinylated using a biotinylated psoralen analog plus UVA light and hybridized on microarrays. This non-enzymatic protocol circumvents several practical difficulties associated with DNA preparation for microarrays: the lack of reproducible fragmentation patterns associated with enzymatic methods; the large amount of labeled nucleic acids required by some array designs, which is often combined with a limited amount of starting material; and the high cost associated with currently used biotinylation methods. The method is applicable to any form of nucleic acid, but is particularly useful when applying double-stranded DNA on oligonucleotide arrays. Validation of this protocol is demonstrated by hybridizing PCR products with oligonucleotide-coated microspheres and PCR amplified cDNA with Affymetrix Cancer GeneChip microarrays.

  16. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  17. Mutational analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hacia, J.; Collins, F.

    1999-01-01

    The development of inexpensive high throughput methods to identify individual DNA sequence differences is important to the future growth of medical genetics. This has become increasingly apparent as epidemiologists, pathologists, and clinical geneticists focus more attention on the molecular basis of complex multifactorial diseases. Such undertakings will rely upon genetic maps based upon newly discovered, common, single nucleotide polymorphisms. Furthermore, candidate gene approaches used in identifying disease associated genes necessitate screening large sequence blocks for changes tracking with the disease state. Even after such genes are isolated, large scale mutational analyses will often be needed for risk assessment studies to define the likely medical consequences of carrying a mutated gene.
This review concentrates on the use of oligonucleotide arrays for hybridisation based comparative sequence analysis. Technological advances within the past decade have made it possible to apply this technology to many different aspects of medical genetics. These applications range from the detection and scoring of single nucleotide polymorphisms to mutational analysis of large genes. Although we discuss published scientific reports, unpublished work from the private sector12 could also significantly affect the future of this technology.


Keywords: mutational analysis; oligonucleotide microarrays; DNA chips PMID:10528850

  18. Oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1997-01-01

    The concept of antisense oligonucleotide 'therapeutics' has generated a great deal of controversy. Questions abound regarding the mechanism of action of these compounds, their reliability and their ultimate utility. These problems are compounded by the 'hype', which has attended their development, and the inability of workers in this area to meet the expectations raised by its most zealous proponents. Nevertheless, it is worth pointing out that there have been some notable gene disruption successes with this technique that have stood up to rigorous scrutiny. Our own work with c-myb as a target is perhaps a reasonable example. Though much remains to be accomplished before antisense drugs are commonly, and usefully, employed in the clinic, it is important to remember what motivates their development. Gene-targeted drugs have the promise of exquisite specificity and the potential to do much good with little toxicity. Accordingly, antisense oligonucleotides can serve as a paradigm of rational drug development. For all these reasons then, we believe that efforts should be increased to decipher the mechanism of action of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, and to learn how they may be successfully employed in the clinic.

  19. Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Oligonucleotides: Implications for Oligonucleotide Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Carver, Kyle; Laing, Brian

    2014-01-01

    One of the major constraints on the therapeutic use of oligonucleotides is inefficient delivery to their sites of action in the cytosol or nucleus. Recently it has become evident that the pathways of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides can strongly influence their pharmacological actions. Here we provide background information on the basic processes of endocytosis and trafficking and then review recent literature on targeted delivery and subcellular trafficking of oligonucleotides in that context. A variety of approaches including molecular scale ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, ligand-targeted nanocarriers, and the use of small molecules to enhance oligonucleotide effects are discussed. PMID:24383421

  20. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled oligonucleotides as tools for oligonucleotide uptake studies.

    PubMed

    Maszewska, Maria; Kobylańska, Anna; Gendaszewska-Darmach, Edyta; Koziołkiewicz, Maria

    2002-12-01

    The mechanisms by which various oligonucleotides (ODNs) and their analogs enter cells are not fully understood. A common technique used in studies on cellular uptake of ODNs is their conjugation with fluorochromes. However, fluorescently labeled ODNs may vary from the parent compounds in charge and hydrophilicity, and they may interact differently with some components of cellular membranes. In this report, we present an alternative method based on the immunofluorescent detection of ODNs with incorporated 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd). Localization of BrdUrd-modified ODNs has been achieved using FITC-labeled anti-BrdUrd antibodies. This technique allowed determination of the differences in cellular uptake of phosphodiester (PO) and phosphorothioate (PS) ODNs and their derivatives conjugated with cholesterol and menthol. The immunocytochemical method also has shown that the cellular uptake of some ODNs may be influenced by specific sequences that are responsible for the formation of higher-order structures.

  1. Surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with thiolated oligonucleotides in 10 seconds using selective microwave heating

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Biebele; Aslan, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the proof-of-principle of rapid surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with oligonucleotides using low power microwave heating. Due to their interesting optical and electronic properties, silver nanoparticle films (SNFs, 2 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides were used as the model plasmonic nanostructured materials. Rapid surface modification of SNFs with oligonucleotides was carried out using two strategies (1) Strategy 1: for ss-oligonucleotides, surface hybridization and (2) Strategy 2: for ds-oligonucleotides, solution hybridization), where the samples were exposed to 10, 15, 30 and 60 seconds microwave heating. To assess the efficacy of our new rapid surface modification technique, identical experiments carried out without the microwave heating (i.e., conventional method), which requires 24 hours for the completion of the identical steps. It was found that SNFs can be modified with ss- and ds-oligonucleotides in 10 seconds, which typically requires several hours of incubation time for the chemisorption of thiol groups on to the planar metal surface using conventional techniques. PMID:23645933

  2. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    PubMed

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  3. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  4. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Netz, Paulo A; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-21

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  5. Customized oligonucleotide microchips that convert multiple genetic information to simple patterns, are portable and reusable

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei; Guschin, Dmitry Y.; Chik, Valentine; Drobyshev, Aleksei; Fotin, Alexander; Yershov, Gennadiy; Lysov, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to using customized oligonucleotide microchips as biosensors for the detection and identification of nucleic acids specific for different genes, organisms and/or individuals in the environment, in food and in biological samples. The microchips are designed to convert multiple bits of genetic information into simpler patterns of signals that are interpreted as a unit. Because of an improved method of hybridizing oligonucleotides from samples to microchips, microchips are reusable and transportable. For field study, portable laser or bar code scanners are suitable.

  6. An allele-specific PCR system for rapid detection and discrimination of the CYP2C19∗4A, ∗4B, and ∗17 alleles: implications for clopidogrel response testing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stuart A; Tan, Qian; Baber, Usman; Yang, Yao; Martis, Suparna; Bander, Jeffrey; Kornreich, Ruth; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Desnick, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    CYP2C19 is involved in the metabolism of clinically relevant drugs, including the antiplatelet prodrug clopidogrel, which has prompted interest in clinical CYP2C19 genotyping. The CYP2C19∗4B allele is defined by both gain-of-function [c.-806C>T (∗17)] and loss-of-function [c.1A>G (∗4)] variants on the same haplotype; however, current genotyping and sequencing assays are unable to determine the phase of these variants. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an assay that could rapidly detect and discriminate the related ∗4A, ∗4B, and ∗17 alleles. An allele-specific PCR assay, composed of four unique primer mixes that specifically interrogate the defining ∗17 and ∗4 variants, was developed by using samples (n = 20) with known genotypes, including the ∗4A, ∗4B, and/or ∗17 alleles. The assay was validated by testing 135 blinded samples, and the results were correlated with CYP2C19 genotyping and allele-specific cloning/sequencing. Importantly, among the six ∗4 carriers in the validation cohort, after allele-specific PCR testing both samples with a ∗1/∗4 genotype were reclassified to ∗1/∗4A, all three samples with a ∗4/∗17 genotype were reclassified to ∗1/∗4B, and a sample with a ∗4/∗17/∗17 genotype was reclassified to ∗4B/∗17. In conclusion, this rapid and robust allele-specific PCR assay can refine CYP2C19 genotyping and metabolizer phenotype classification by determining the phase of the defining ∗17 and ∗4 variants, which may have utility when testing CYP2C19 for clopidogrel response.

  7. Complex DNA nanostructures from oligonucleotide ensembles.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Divita; Henderson, Eric R

    2013-04-19

    The first synthetic DNA nanostructures were created by self-assembly of a small number of oligonucleotides. Introduction of the DNA origami method provided a new paradigm for designing and creating two- and three-dimensional DNA nanostructures by folding a large single-stranded DNA and 'stapling' it together with a library of oligonucleotides. Despite its power and wide-ranging implementation, the DNA origami technique suffers from some limitations. Foremost among these is the limited number of useful single-stranded scaffolds of biological origin. This report describes a new approach to creating large DNA nanostructures exclusively from synthetic oligonucleotides. The essence of this approach is to replace the single-stranded scaffold in DNA origami with a library of oligonucleotides termed "scaples" (scaffold staples). Scaples eliminate the need for scaffolds of biological origin and create new opportunities for producing larger and more diverse DNA nanostructures as well as simultaneous assembly of distinct structures in a "single-pot" reaction.

  8. Spatially Defined Oligonucleotide Arrays. Technical Report for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-15

    ,4,1 2). The hybridization pattern of a fluorescently labeled nucleic acid target is used to gain primary structure information of the target. This format can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid sequence analysis problems including pathogen identification, polymorphism detection, human identification, mRNA expression monitoring and de novo sequencing. In this review, we briefly describe the method of light-directed chemid synthesis to create high-density arrays of oligonucleotide probes, the method of fluorescently labeling target nucleic acids for hybridization to the probe arrays, the detection of hybridized targets by epi-fluorescence confocal scanning and the data analysis procedures used to interpret the hybridization signals. To illustrate the use of specific high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays, we describe their application to screening the reverse transcriptase (rt) and protease (pro) genes of HIV-I for polymorphisms and drug-resistance conferring mutations.

  9. A novel, one-step amplification and oligonucleotide ligation procedure for multiplex genetic typing

    SciTech Connect

    Eggerding, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    A new technique, coupled amplification and oligonucleotide ligation (CAL), has been developed for simultaneous multiplex amplification and genotyping of DNA. CAL is a biphasic method which combines in one assay DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA genotyping by the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). By virtue of a difference in the melting temperatures of PCR primer-target DNA and OLA probe-target DNA hybrids, the method allows preferential amplification of DNA during stage I and oligonucleotide ligation during stage II of the reaction. In stage I target DNA is amplified using high-melting primers in a two-step PCR cycle that employs a 72{degrees}C anneal-elongation step. In stage II genotyping of PCR products by competitive oligonucleotide ligation with oligonucleotide probes located between PCR primers is accomplished by several cycles of denaturation at 94{degrees}C followed by anneal-ligation at 55{degrees}C. Ligation products are fluorochrome-labeled at their 3{prime}-ends and analyzed electrophoretically on a fluorescent DNA sequencer. The CAL procedure has been used for multiplex detection of 30 cystic fibrosis mutations and for analysis of ras gene point mutations. Because mutation detection occurs concurrently with target amplification, the technique is rapid, highly sensitive and specific, easily automatable, and requires minimal sample processing.

  10. Avian oncogenic virus differential diagnosis in chickens using oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Huang, Dean; Pu, Chang-En; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2014-12-15

    Avian oncogenic viruses include the avian leukosis virus (ALV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV). Multiple oncogenic viral infections are frequently seen, with even Marek's disease vaccines reported to be contaminated with ALV and REV. The gross lesions caused by avian oncogenic viruses often overlap, making differentiation diagnosis based on histopathology difficult. The objective of this study is to develop a rapid approach to simultaneously differentiate, subgroup and pathotype the avian oncogenic viruses. The oligonucleotide microarray was employed in this study. Particular DNA sequences were recognized using specific hybridization between the DNA target and probe on the microarray, followed with colorimetric development through enzyme reaction. With 10 designed probes, ALV-A, ALV-E, ALV-J, REV, MDV pathogenic and vaccine strains were clearly discriminated on the microarray with the naked eyes. The detection limit was 27 copy numbers, which was 10-100 times lower than multiplex PCR. Of 102 field samples screened using the oligonucleotide microarray, 32 samples were positive for ALV-E, 17 samples were positive for ALV-J, 6 samples were positive for REV, 4 samples were positive for MDV, 7 samples were positive for both ALV-A and ALV-E, 5 samples were positive for ALV-A, ALV-E and ALV-J, one sample was positive for both ALV-J and MDV, and 3 samples were positive for both REV and MDV. The oligonucleotide microarray, an easy-to-use, high-specificity, high-sensitivity and extendable assay, presents a potent technique for rapid differential diagnosis of avian oncogenic viruses and the detection of multiple avian oncogenic viral infections under field conditions.

  11. Multipathogen oligonucleotide microarray for environmental and biodefense applications.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, Nikolay; Distler, Margaret; Courtney, Shannon; Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Volokhov, Dmitriy; Chizhikov, Vladimir; Rasooly, Avraham

    2004-11-01

    Food-borne pathogens are a major health problem. The large and diverse number of microbial pathogens and their virulence factors has fueled interest in technologies capable of detecting multiple pathogens and multiple virulence factors simultaneously. Some of these pathogens and their toxins have potential use as bioweapons. DNA microarray technology allows the simultaneous analysis of thousands of sequences of DNA in a relatively short time, making it appropriate for biodefense and for public health uses. This paper describes methods for using DNA microarrays to detect and analyze microbial pathogens. The FDA-1 microarray was developed for the simultaneous detection of several food-borne pathogens and their virulence factors including Listeria spp., Campylobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin genes and Clostridium perfringens toxin genes. Three elements were incorporated to increase confidence in the microarray detection system: redundancy of genes, redundancy of oligonucleotide probes (oligoprobes) for a specific gene, and quality control oligoprobes to monitor array spotting and target DNA hybridization. These elements enhance the reliability of detection and reduce the chance of erroneous results due to the genetic variability of microbes or technical problems with the microarray. The results presented demonstrate the potential of oligonucleotide microarrays for detection of environmental and biodefense relevant microbial pathogens.

  12. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  13. Allele-specific conventional reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction as a screening assay for discriminating influenza a H1N1 (H275Y) oseltamivir-resistant and wild-type viruses.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Karry L K; Lam, Wai-Yip; Lee, Nelson; Leung, Ting Fan; Hui, David S C; Chan, Paul K S

    2010-08-01

    In early 2008, a sudden increase in oseltamivir (Tamiflu)-resistant influenza A H1N1 viruses was reported from several European countries. This resistant virus has spread globally and accounted for more than 95% of H1N1 viruses isolated in the following influenza season. A continuous close monitoring on the prevalence of this resistant virus is necessary to rationalize the choice of antiviral agents. The resistance of this novel strain to oseltamivir is conferred by an amino acid substitution from histidine to tyrosine at position 275 (H275Y) of the neuraminidase protein. This study developed and evaluated allele-specific conventional reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) assays to provide a simple, rapid, and low-cost option for discriminating oseltamivir-resistant influenza A H1N1 (H275Y) mutant from wild-type viruses. The evaluation was based on 90 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens collected before, during the initial phase and at the peak of emergence of resistance. Thirty-six (40%) of these specimens were H275Y mutant, whereas the other 54 (60%) were wild-type viruses as confirmed by sequencing of the neuraminidase gene. When applied directly on the 90 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens, the allele-specific cRT-PCR assays achieved an unequivocal discrimination for 82 (91%) specimens. Further improvement in performance is expected when applied to cell culture isolates with a higher viral titer. These allele-specific cRT-PCR assays can be a simple, low-cost option for large-scale screening of influenza isolates.

  14. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  15. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  16. Targeted gene correction with 5' acridine-oligonucleotide conjugates.

    PubMed

    de Piédoue, G; Andrieu-Soler, C; Concordet, J P; Maurisse, R; Sun, J-S; Lopez, B; Kuzniak, I; Leboulch, P; Feugeas, J-P

    2007-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides (SSOs) mediate gene repair of punctual chromosomal mutations at a low frequency. We hypothesized that enhancement of DNA binding affinity of SSOs by intercalating agents may increase the number of corrected cells. Several biochemical modifications of SSOs were tested for their capability to correct a chromosomally integrated and mutated GFP reporter gene in human 293 cells. SSOs of 25 nucleotide length conjugated with acridine at their 5' end increased the efficiency of gene correction up to 10-fold compared to nonmodified SSOs. Acridine and psoralen conjugates were both evaluated, and acridine-modified SSOs were the most effective. Conjugation with acridine at the 3' end of the SSO inhibited gene correction, whereas flanking the SSO by acridine on both sides provided an intermediate level of correction. These results suggest that increasing the stability of hybridization between SSO and its target without hampering a 3' extension improves gene targeting, in agreement with the "annealing-integration" model of DNA repair.

  17. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Mulle, Jennifer G; Patel, Viren C; Warren, Stephen T; Hegde, Madhuri R; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-03-29

    DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF THE SWINE PROTEIN-ANNOTATED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY AND UTILITY OF THE ARRAYS FOR EQTL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILING STUDIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the new Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray (http://www.pigoligoarray.org) by analyzing transcriptional profiles for longissimus dorsi muscle (LD), Bronchial lymph node (BLN) and Lung. Four LD samples were used to assess the stringency of hybridization conditions com...

  19. Lipid-modified oligonucleotide conjugates: Insights into gene silencing, interaction with model membranes and cellular uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Uribe, Begoña; Grijalvo, Santiago; Pertíñez, Samuel Núñez; Busto, Jon V; Martín, César; Alagia, Adele; Goñi, Félix M; Eritja, Ramón; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    The ability of oligonucleotides to silence specific genes or inhibit the biological activity of specific proteins has generated great interest in their use as research tools and therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, their biological applications meet the limitation of their poor cellular accessibility. Developing an appropriate delivery system for oligonucleotides is essential to achieve their efficient cellular uptake. In the present work a series of phosphorothioate lipid-oligonucleotide hybrids were synthesized introducing covalently single or double lipid tails at both 3'- and 5'-termini of an antisense oligonucleotide. Gene transfections in cultured cells showed antisense luciferase inhibition without the use of a transfecting agent for conjugates modified with the double-lipid tail at 5'-termini. The effect of the double lipid-tailed modification was further studied in detail in several model membrane systems as well as in cellular uptake experiments. During these studies the spontaneous formation of self-assembled microstructures is clearly observed. Lipidation allowed the efficient incorporation of the oligonucleotide in HeLa cells by a macropinocytosis mechanism without causing cytotoxicity in cells or altering the binding properties of the oligonucleotide conjugates. In addition, both single- and double-tailed compounds showed a similar behavior in lipid model membranes, making them useful in nucleotide-based technologies.

  20. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity.

  1. Application of oligonucleotide microarrays for bacterial source tracking of environmental Enterococcus sp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Indest, Karl J; Betts, Kelley; Furey, John S

    2005-04-01

    In an effort towards adapting new and defensible methods for assessing and managing the risk posed by microbial pollution, we evaluated the utility of oligonucleotide microarrays for bacterial source tracking (BST) of environmental Enterococcus sp. isolates derived from various host sources. Current bacterial source tracking approaches rely on various phenotypic and genotypic methods to identify sources of bacterial contamination resulting from point or non-point pollution. For this study Enterococcus sp. isolates originating from deer, bovine, gull, and human sources were examined using microarrays. Isolates were subjected to Box PCR amplification and the resulting amplification products labeled with Cy5. Fluorescent-labeled templates were hybridized to in-house constructed nonamer oligonucleotide microarrays consisting of 198 probes. Microarray hybridization profiles were obtained using the ArrayPro image analysis software. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) were compared for their ability to visually cluster microarray hybridization profiles based on the environmental source from which the Enterococcus sp. isolates originated. The PCA was visually superior at separating origin-specific clusters, even for as few as 3 factors. A Soft Independent Modeling (SIM) classification confirmed the PCA, resulting in zero misclassifications using 5 factors for each class. The implication of these results for the application of random oligonucleotide microarrays for BST is that, given the reproducibility issues, factor-based variable selection such as in PCA and SIM greatly outperforms dendrogram-based similarity measures such as in HCA and K-Nearest Neighbor KNN.

  2. Application of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Bacterial Source Tracking of Environmental Enterococcus sp. Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Indest, Karl J.; Betts, Kelley; Furey, John S.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort towards adapting new and defensible methods for assessing and managing the risk posed by microbial pollution, we evaluated the utility of oligonucleotide microarrays for bacterial source tracking (BST) of environmental Enterococcus sp. isolates derived from various host sources. Current bacterial source tracking approaches rely on various phenotypic and genotypic methods to identify sources of bacterial contamination resulting from point or non-point pollution. For this study Enterococcus sp. isolates originating from deer, bovine, gull, and human sources were examined using microarrays. Isolates were subjected to Box PCR amplification and the resulting amplification products labeled with Cy5. Fluorescent-labeled templates were hybridized to in-house constructed nonamer oligonucleotide microarrays consisting of 198 probes. Microarray hybridization profiles were obtained using the ArrayPro image analysis software. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) were compared for their ability to visually cluster microarray hybridization profiles based on the environmental source from which the Enterococcus sp. isolates originated. The PCA was visually superior at separating origin-specific clusters, even for as few as 3 factors. A Soft Independent Modeling (SIM) classification confirmed the PCA, resulting in zero misclassifications using 5 factors for each class. The implication of these results for the application of random oligonucleotide microarrays for BST is that, given the reproducibility issues, factor-based variable selection such as in PCA and SIM greatly outperforms dendrogram-based similarity measures such as in HCA and K-Nearest Neighbor KNN. PMID:16705816

  3. Genome-wide and parental allele-specific analysis of CTCF and cohesin DNA binding in mouse brain reveals a tissue-specific binding pattern and an association with imprinted differentially methylated regions.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Adam R; Barkas, Nikolaos; McCole, Ruth B; Hughes, Siobhan; Amante, Samuele M; Schulz, Reiner; Oakey, Rebecca J

    2013-10-01

    DNA binding factors are essential for regulating gene expression. CTCF and cohesin are DNA binding factors with central roles in chromatin organization and gene expression. We determined the sites of CTCF and cohesin binding to DNA in mouse brain, genome wide and in an allele-specific manner with high read-depth ChIP-seq. By comparing our results with existing data for mouse liver and embryonic stem (ES) cells, we investigated the tissue specificity of CTCF binding sites. ES cells have fewer unique CTCF binding sites occupied than liver and brain, consistent with a ground-state pattern of CTCF binding that is elaborated during differentiation. CTCF binding sites without the canonical consensus motif were highly tissue specific. In brain, a third of CTCF and cohesin binding sites coincide, consistent with the potential for many interactions between cohesin and CTCF but also many instances of independent action. In the context of genomic imprinting, CTCF and/or cohesin bind to a majority but not all differentially methylated regions, with preferential binding to the unmethylated parental allele. Whether the parental allele-specific methylation was established in the parental germlines or post-fertilization in the embryo is not a determinant in CTCF or cohesin binding. These findings link CTCF and cohesin with the control regions of a subset of imprinted genes, supporting the notion that imprinting control is mechanistically diverse.

  4. A high density COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array for identification and detection of species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Seifert, K A; Lévesque, C A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array based on 358 sequences, including 58 known and two new species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium, and 12 allied species. The array was robotically spotted at near microarray density on membranes. Species and clade-specific oligonucleotides were selected using the computer programs SigOli and Array Designer. Robotic spotting allowed 768 spots with duplicate sets of perfect match and the corresponding mismatch and positive control oligonucleotides, to be printed on 2 × 6 cm(2) nylon membranes. The array was validated with hybridizations between the array and digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled COX1 polymerase chain reaction amplicons from 70 pure DNA samples, and directly from environmental samples (cheese and plants) without culturing. DNA hybridization conditions were optimized, but undesired cross-reactions were detected frequently, reflecting the relatively high sequence similarity of the COX1 gene among Penicillium species. Approximately 60% of the perfect match oligonucleotides were rejected because of low specificity and 76 delivered useful group-specific or species-specific reactions and could be used for detecting certain species of Penicillium in environmental samples. In practice, the presence of weak signals on arrays exposed to amplicons from environmental samples, which could have represented weak detections or weak cross reactions, made interpretation difficult for over half of the oligonucleotides. DNA regions with very few single nucleotide polymorphisms or lacking insertions/deletions among closely related species are not ideal for oligonucleotide-based diagnostics, and supplementing the COX1-based array with oligonucleotides derived from additional genes would result in a more robust hierarchical identification system.

  5. Oligonucleotide recombination in gram negative bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes several key aspects of a novel form of RecA-independent homologous recombination. We found that synthetic single stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced into bacteria by transformation can site-specifically recombine with bacterial chromosomes in the absence of any a...

  6. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  7. Highly specific identification of single nucleic polymorphism in M. tuberculosis using smart probes and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with blocking oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Müller, Matthias; Nolte, Oliver; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Sauer, Markus; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter; Marme, Nicole

    2008-02-01

    In this article we present a method for the highly specific identification of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) responsible for rifampicin resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This approach applies fluorescently labeled hairpin-structured oligonucleotides (smart probes) and confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Smart probes are fluorescently labeled at the 5'-end. The dye's fluorescence is quenched in the closed hairpin conformation due to close proximity of the guanosine residues located at the 3'-end. As a result of the hybridization to the complementary target sequence the hairpin structure and thus fluorescence quenching gets lost and a strong fluorescence increase appears. To enhance the specificity of the SNP detection unlabeled "blocking oligonucleotides" were added to the sample. These oligonucleotides hybridizes to the DNA sequence containing the mismatch thus masking this sequence and hereby preventing the smart probe from hybridizing to the mismatched sequence.

  8. Drug targeting: synthesis and endocytosis of oligonucleotide-neoglycoprotein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Bonfils, E; Depierreux, C; Midoux, P; Thuong, N T; Monsigny, M; Roche, A C

    1992-01-01

    Inhibition of gene expression by antisense oligonucleotides is limited by their low ability to enter cells. Knowing that sugar binding receptors, also called membrane lectins, efficiently internalize neoglycoproteins bearing the relevant sugar, 6-phosphomannose, for instance, oligonucleotides--substituted on their 5'-end with either a fluorescent probe or a radioactive label on the one hand, and bearing a thiol function on their 3'-end, on the other hand,--were coupled onto 6-phosphomannosylated proteins via a disulfide bridge. The oligonucleotide bound to 6-phosphomannosylated serum albumin is much more efficiently internalized roughly 20 times than the free oligonucleotide. Although most of the oligonucleotides are associated with vesicular compartments, oligonucleotides after releasing from the carrier by reduction of the disulfide bridge may find their way to reach the cytosol and then lead to an increase in the efficiency of the oligonucleotides. Images PMID:1408764

  9. Microfabrication of encoded microparticle array for multiplexed DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Morita, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Shouhei; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2005-05-21

    A strategy for the high-sensitivity, high-selectivity, and multiplexed detection of oligonucleotide hybridizations has been developed with an encoded Ni microparticle random array that was manufactured by a "top-down" approach using micromachining and microfabrication techniques.

  10. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation.

  11. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  12. The prebiotic synthesis of deoxythymidine oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen-Sherwood, E.; Odom, D. G.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate in the presence of deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate, cyanamide and 4-amino-5-imidazole carboxamide polymerizes under drying conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 90 C) to yield oligonucleotides of up to four units in length. Enzymatic analysis indicated that the majority of these oligomers contained natural 3 prime-5 prime phosphodiester bonds. This reaction offers a possible method for the formation of deoxyoligonucleotides under primitive earth conditions.

  13. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    PubMed

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted.

  14. In situ oligonucleotide synthesis on carbon materials: stable substrates for microarray fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret F.; Lockett, Matthew R.; Rodesch, Matthew J.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cerrina, Franco; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Glass has become the standard substrate for the preparation of DNA arrays. Typically, glass is modified using silane chemistries to provide an appropriate functional group for nucleic acid synthesis or oligonucleotide immobilization. We have found substantial issues with the stability of these surfaces as manifested in the unwanted release of oligomers from the surface when incubated in aqueous buffers at moderate temperatures. To address this issue, we have explored the use of carbon-based substrates. Here, we demonstrate in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on carbon-based substrates using light-directed photolithographic phosphoramidite chemistry and evaluate the stabilities of the resultant DNA arrays compared to those fabricated on silanized glass slides. DNA arrays on carbon-based substrates are substantially more stable than arrays prepared on glass. This superior stability enables the use of high-density DNA arrays for applications involving high temperatures, basic conditions, or where serial hybridization and dehybridization is desired. PMID:18084027

  15. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods.

  16. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by amplification. Conclusions Our data suggest that directional loss and amplification exist in breast cancer. These are highly associated with grade, which may indicate that they are enforced with increasing number of cell divisions. Whether there is selective pressure for some loci to be preferentially amplified or deleted remains to be confirmed. PMID:22188678

  17. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  18. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-07-04

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency.

  19. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  20. Detection of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes from mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Keeney, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The SPO11 protein generates programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination. Endonucleolytic cleavage 3' to the DSB sites releases SPO11 from DNA, leaving SPO11 covalently associated with an oligonucleotide. This chapter describes detection of the release product, SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, from mouse testis lysates. The method for determining the size of SPO11-associated oligonucleotides is also provided.

  1. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starska, Katarzyna; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina; Aleksandrowicz, Paweł; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  2. Direct Detection of 16S rRNA in Soil Extracts by Using Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Small, Jack; Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Straub, Timothy M.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of a simple microarray method for the direct detection of intact 16S rRNA from unpurified soil extracts. Total RNAs from Geobacter chapellei and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were hybridized to an oligonucleotide array consisting of universal and species-specific 16S rRNA probes. PCR-amplified products from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio were easily and specifically detected under a range of hybridization times, temperatures, and buffers. However, reproducible, specific hybridization and detection of intact rRNA could be accomplished only by using a chaperone-detector probe strategy. With this knowledge, assay conditions were developed for rRNA detection using a 2-h hybridization time at room temperature. Hybridization specificity and signal intensity were enhanced using fragmented RNA. Formamide was required in the hybridization buffer in order to achieve species-specific detection of intact rRNA. With the chaperone detection strategy, we were able to specifically hybridize and detect G. chapellei 16S rRNA directly from a total-RNA soil extract, without further purification or removal of soluble soil constituents. The detection sensitivity for G. chapellei 16S rRNA in soil extracts was at least 0.5 μg of total RNA, representing approximately 7.5 × 106 Geobacter cell equivalents of RNA. These results suggest that it is now possible to apply microarray technology to the direct detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, without using PCR. PMID:11571176

  3. Construction and evaluation of a Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven David; Raman, Babu; McKeown, Catherine K; Kale, Shubhangi P; He, Zhili; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2007-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium that can directly convert cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to gain insights into cellular processes by examining gene expression under various physiological states. Oligonucleotide microarray probes were designed for 96.7% of the 3163 C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 candidate protein-encoding genes and then a partial-genome microarray containing 70 C. thermocellum specific probes was constructed and evaluated. We detected a signal-to-noise ratio of three with as little as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA and only low signals from negative control probes (nonclostridial DNA), indicating the probes were sensitive and specific. In order to further test the specificity of the array we amplified and hybridized 10 C. thermocellum polymerase chain reaction products that represented different genes and found gene specific hybridization in each case. We also constructed a whole-genome microarray and prepared total cellular RNA from the same point in early-logarithmic growth phase from two technical replicates during cellobiose fermentation. The reliability of the microarray data was assessed by cohybridization of labeled complementary DNA from the cellobiose fermentation samples and the pattern of hybridization revealed a linear correlation. These results taken together suggest that our oligonucleotide probe set can be used for sensitive and specific C. thermocellum transcriptomic studies in the future.

  4. Non-radioactive detection of oligonucleotide probes by photochemical amplification of dioxetanes.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, F; Knaf, A; Möller, U; Cech, D

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new method of non-radioactive labelling and detection of oligonucleotide probes. The approach is based on a simple chemical principle. Oligonucleotides labelled with methylene blue (a photosensitizer) are hybridized on a membrane to immobilized DNA target sequences. After hybridization and stringency washing 2(-)[3-(hydroxyphenyl)methoxymethylene] adamantane is added to the membrane and the membrane is irradiated with a tungsten lamp light source through a cut-off filter. Thermally stable dioxetanes are amplified during irradiation at the positions of the labelled probe. These amplified dioxetanes are detected using chemically triggered chemiluminescent decay. Signals are recorded on commercial X-ray film. Detection is possible immediately after the last washing step and a hard copy of the blot is obtained within 1 h. Dependent on the level of the target sequences, the sensitivity of the method allows detection of 0.3 pg single-stranded M13mp18(+) plasmid DNA in dot blots and 75 pg in Southern blots. Additional immunological reaction steps and washing steps with blocking reagents and buffers are avoided. Furthermore, expensive reagents and equipment for physical detection are not necessary. The method might be particularly useful for fast routine analysis in forensic and medical applications. The synthesis of the olefin, conditions of hybridization and the protocol of detection are described in detail. Images PMID:8524657

  5. Multivalent linkers for improved covalent binding of oligonucleotides to dye-doped silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, S. M.; Nooney, R. I.; Flynn, S. P.; Clancy, E.; Burke, M.; Daly, S.; Smith, T. J.; Daniels, S.; McDonagh, C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of oligonucleotide-coated Cy5-doped silica nanoparticles using a combination of multivalent linkers and their use in surface-based DNA sandwich hybridization assays. Dipodal silane is introduced as a means to fabricate amine-coated silica nanoparticles and its advantages compared to monopodal silanes are discussed. The use of dipodal silane in conjunction with three different polymer linkers (oxidized dextran, linear and 8-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)) to immobilize single-stranded DNA to Cy5-doped nanoparticles is investigated and dynamic light scattering measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to follow the progression of the functionalization of the nanoparticles. We observe a significant improvement in the binding stability of the single-stranded DNA when the dipodal silane and 8-arm PEG are used in combination, when compared to alternative conjugation strategies. Both 8mer and 22mer oligonucleotides are securely conjugated to the high-brightness nanoparticles and their availability to hybridize with a complementary strand is confirmed using solution-based DNA hybridization experiments. In addition, a full surface-based sandwich assay demonstrates the potential these nanoparticles have in the detection of less than 500 femtomolar of a DNA analogue of micro RNA, miR-451.

  6. Linear model for fast background subtraction in oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background One important preprocessing step in the analysis of microarray data is background subtraction. In high-density oligonucleotide arrays this is recognized as a crucial step for the global performance of the data analysis from raw intensities to expression values. Results We propose here an algorithm for background estimation based on a model in which the cost function is quadratic in a set of fitting parameters such that minimization can be performed through linear algebra. The model incorporates two effects: 1) Correlated intensities between neighboring features in the chip and 2) sequence-dependent affinities for non-specific hybridization fitted by an extended nearest-neighbor model. Conclusion The algorithm has been tested on 360 GeneChips from publicly available data of recent expression experiments. The algorithm is fast and accurate. Strong correlations between the fitted values for different experiments as well as between the free-energy parameters and their counterparts in aqueous solution indicate that the model captures a significant part of the underlying physical chemistry. PMID:19917117

  7. Ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR reveals rare preexisting drug-resistant variants and a large replicating virus population in macaques infected with a simian immunodeficiency virus containing human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Valerie F; Ambrose, Zandrea; Kearney, Mary F; Shao, Wei; Kewalramani, Vineet N; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Coffin, John M

    2012-12-01

    It has been proposed that most drug-resistant mutants, resulting from a single-nucleotide change, exist at low frequency in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) populations in vivo prior to the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To test this hypothesis and to investigate the emergence of resistant mutants with drug selection, we developed a new ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR (UsASP) assay, which can detect drug resistance mutations at a frequency of ≥0.001% of the virus population. We applied this assay to plasma samples obtained from macaques infected with an SIV variant containing HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) (RT-simian-human immunodeficiency [SHIV](mne)), before and after they were exposed to a short course of efavirenz (EFV) monotherapy. We detected RT inhibitor (RTI) resistance mutations K65R and M184I but not K103N in 2 of 2 RT-SHIV-infected macaques prior to EFV exposure. After three doses over 4 days of EFV monotherapy, 103N mutations (AAC and AAT) rapidly emerged and increased in the population to levels of ∼20%, indicating that they were present prior to EFV exposure. The rapid increase of 103N mutations from <0.001% to 20% of the viral population indicates that the replicating virus population size in RT-SHIV-infected macaques must be 10(6) or more infected cells per replication cycle.

  8. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with synthetic alkaline phosphatase-conjugated oligonucleotide DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Seriwatana, J; Echeverria, P; Taylor, D N; Sakuldaipeara, T; Changchawalit, S; Chivoratanond, O

    1987-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase-conjugated (AP) 26-base oligonucleotide DNA probes were compared with the same probes labeled with gamma-32P for the identification of heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The AP oligonucleotide probes were as sensitive as the radiolabeled (RL) probes in detecting LT and STA-2 target cell DNA, but the AP ST probe, which differed from STA-1 by two bases, was less sensitive than the RL probe in detecting STA-1 DNA (6.25 versus 0.78 ng). Of 94 ETEC that were identified with the RL probe, the AP probes detected 93% (28 of 30) of ST, 73% (25 of 34) of LT, and 67% (20 of 30) of LTST ETEC. When colony lysates of these ETEC were examined, the AP probes identified all 94 ETEC. In examinations of stool blots, the RL and AP probes were shown to have sensitivities of 71 and 59%, specificities of 91 and 86%, positive predictive values of 87 and 73%, and negative predictive values of 86 and 74%, respectively. AP oligonucleotide probes to detect ETEC were less sensitive in detecting ETEC by colony or stool blot hybridization than the RL probes but could be used by laboratories without access to radioisotopes to examine colony lysates. Images PMID:3305559

  9. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.

  10. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  11. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of α1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  12. Disulfide-linked oligonucleotide phosphorothioates - Novel analogues of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of phosphorothioate analogs of oligonucleotides by the oxidation of deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphorothioate (3) was attempted. Cyclization of 3 is much more efficient than oligomerization under all the conditions investigated. However, a preformed oligonucleotide carrying a 5'-terminal phosphorotioate group undergoes efficient chain-extension when oxidized in the presence of 3.

  13. Oligonucleotide therapies for disorders of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Khorkova, Olga; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2017-03-01

    Oligonucleotide therapies are currently experiencing a resurgence driven by advances in backbone chemistry and discoveries of novel therapeutic pathways that can be uniquely and efficiently modulated by the oligonucleotide drugs. A quarter of a century has passed since oligonucleotides were first applied in living mammalian brain to modulate gene expression. Despite challenges in delivery to the brain, multiple oligonucleotide-based compounds are now being developed for treatment of human brain disorders by direct delivery inside the blood brain barrier (BBB). Notably, the first new central nervous system (CNS)-targeted oligonucleotide-based drug (nusinersen/Spinraza) was approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in late 2016 and several other compounds are in advanced clinical trials. Human testing of brain-targeted oligonucleotides has highlighted unusual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these compounds, including complex active uptake mechanisms, low systemic exposure, extremely long half-lives, accumulation and gradual release from subcellular depots. Further work on oligonucleotide uptake, development of formulations for delivery across the BBB and relevant disease biology studies are required for further optimization of the oligonucleotide drug development process for brain applications.

  14. Manipulation of oligonucleotides immobilized on solid supports - DNA computations on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinghua

    The manipulation of DNA oligonucleotides immobilized on various solid supports has been studied intensively, especially in the area of surface hybridization. Recently, surface-based biotechnology has been applied to the area of molecular computing. These surface-based methods have advantages with regard to ease of handling, facile purification, and less interference when compared to solution methodologies. This dissertation describes the investigation of molecular approaches to DNA computing. The feasibility of encoding a bit (0 or 1) of information for DNA-based computations at the single nucleotide level was studied, particularly with regard to the efficiency and specificity of hybridization discrimination. Both gold and glass surfaces, with addressed arrays of 32 oligonucleotides, were employed with similar hybridization results. Although single-base discrimination may be achieved in the system, it is at the cost of a severe decrease in the efficiency of hybridization to perfectly matched sequences. This compromises the utility of single nucleotide encoding for DNA computing applications in the absence of some additional mechanism for increasing specificity. Several methods are suggested including a multiple-base encoding strategy. The multiple-base encoding strategy was employed to develop a prototype DNA computer. The approach was demonstrated by solving a small example of the Satisfiability (SAT) problem, an NP-complete problem in Boolean logic. 16 distinct DNA oligonucleotides, encoding all candidate solutions to the 4-variable-4-clause-3-SAT problem, were immobilized on a gold surface in the non-addressed format. Four cycles of MARK (hybridization), DESTROY (enzymatic destruction) and UNMARK (denaturation) were performed, which identified and eliminated members of the set which were not solutions to the problem. Determination of the answer was accomplished in the READOUT (sequence identification) operation by PCR amplification of the remaining molecules and

  15. Chaotic mixer improves microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    McQuain, Mark K; Seale, Kevin; Peek, Joel; Fisher, Timothy S; Levy, Shawn; Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, Frederick R

    2004-02-15

    Hybridization is an important aspect of microarray experimental design which influences array signal levels and the repeatability of data within an array and across different arrays. Current methods typically require 24h and use target inefficiently. In these studies, we compare hybridization signals obtained in conventional static hybridization, which depends on diffusional target delivery, with signals obtained in a dynamic hybridization chamber, which employs a fluid mixer based on chaotic advection theory to deliver targets across a conventional glass slide array. Microarrays were printed with a pattern of 102 identical probe spots containing a 65-mer oligonucleotide capture probe. Hybridization of a 725-bp fluorescently labeled target was used to measure average target hybridization levels, local signal-to-noise ratios, and array hybridization uniformity. Dynamic hybridization for 1h with 1 or 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities approximately threefold over a 24-h static hybridization. Similarly, a 10- or 60-min dynamic hybridization of 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities fourfold over a 24h static hybridization. In time course studies, static hybridization reached a maximum within 8 to 12h using either 1 or 10ng of target. In time course studies using the dynamic hybridization chamber, hybridization using 1ng of target increased to a maximum at 4h and that using 10ng of target did not vary over the time points tested. In comparison to static hybridization, dynamic hybridization reduced the signal-to-noise ratios threefold and reduced spot-to-spot variation twofold. Therefore, we conclude that dynamic hybridization based on a chaotic mixer design improves both the speed of hybridization and the maximum level of hybridization while increasing signal-to-noise ratios and reducing spot-to-spot variation.

  16. 2'-modified nucleosides for site-specific labeling of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, Elizabeth S.; Miller, Jeremiah E.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the synthesis of 2'-modified nucleosides designed specifically for incorporating labels into oligonucleotides. Conversion of these nucleosides to phosphoramidite and solid support-bound derivatives proceeds in good yield. Large-scale synthesis of 11-mer oligonucleotides possessing the 2'-modified nucleosides is achieved using these derivatives. Thermal denaturation studies indicate that the presence of 2'-modified nucleosides in 11-mer duplexes has minimal destabilizing effects on the duplex structure when the nucleosides are placed at the duplex termini. The powerful combination of phosphoramidite and support-bound derivatives of 2'-modified nucleosides affords the large-scale preparation of an entirely new class of oligonucleotides. The ability to synthesize oligonucleotides containing label attachment sites at 3', intervening, and 5' locations of a duplex is a significant advance in the development of oligonucleotide conjugates.

  17. The spherulites™: a promising carrier for oligonucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mignet, Nathalie; Brun, Armelle; Degert, Corinne; Delord, Brigitte; Roux, Didier; Hélène, Claude; Laversanne, René; François, Jean-Christophe

    2000-01-01

    Concentric multilamellar microvesicles, named spherulites™, were evaluated as an oligonucleotide carrier. Up to 80% oligonucleotide was encapsulated in these vesicles. The study was carried out on two different spherulite™ formulations. The spherulite™ size and stability characteristics are presented. Delivery of encapsulated oligonucleotide was performed on a rat hepatocarcinoma and on a lymphoblastoid T cell line, both expressing the luciferase gene. We showed that spherulites™ were able to transfect both adherent and suspension cell lines and deliver the oligonucleotide to the nucleus. Moreover, 48–62% luciferase inhibition was obtained in the rat hepatocarcinoma cell line when the antisense oligonucleotide targeted to the luciferase coding region was encapsulated at 500 nM concentration in spherulites™ of different compositions. PMID:10931929

  18. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  19. Conjugation of fluorescent proteins with DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lapiene, Vidmantas; Kukolka, Florian; Kiko, Kathrin; Arndt, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-05-19

    This work describes the synthesis of covalent ssDNA conjugates of six fluorescent proteins, ECFP, EGFP, E(2)GFP, mDsRed, Dronpa, and mCherry, which were cloned with an accessible C-terminal cystein residue to enable site-selective coupling using a heterobispecific cross-linker. The resulting conjugates revealed similar fluorescence emission intensity to the unconjugated proteins, and the functionality of the tethered oligonucleotide was proven by specific Watson-Crick base pairing to cDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the fluorescence of the FP is quenched by the gold particle, and the extent of quenching varied with the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of FP as well as with the configuration of surface attachment. Since this study demonstrates that biological fluorophores can be selectively incorporated into and optically coupled with nanoparticle-based devices, applications in DNA-based nanofabrication can be foreseen.

  20. Abiotic formation of oligonucleotides on basalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otroshchenko, V. A.; Vasilyeva, N. V.; Kopilov, A. M.

    1985-06-01

    The complication and further evolution of abiotic syntheses products occurred under environmental influences at the prebiological stage. From this point of view, the influence of some types of irradiation on the organic molecules adsorbed on the surfaces of volcanic rocks, appeared to be of great importance. In this connection, the effect of gamma rays on the AMP molecules adsorbed on mineral surfaces such as cinders and ashes has been studied. It has been shown that they can polymerize with the formation of oligonucleotides. The treatment of oligomers obtained by venom phosphodiesterase has shown that a polymeric product has mainly 3' 5' and 2' 5' bonds between nucleotides. The results obtained have been discussed from the evolutionary aspect.

  1. High frequency of SLC22A12 variants causing renal hypouricemia 1 in the Czech and Slovak Roma population; simple and rapid detection method by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gabrikova, Dana; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Sokolova, Jitka; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2015-10-01

    Renal hypouricemia is a rare heterogeneous inherited disorder characterized by impaired tubular uric acid transport with severe complications, such as acute kidney injury. Type 1 and 2 are caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 gene, respectively. A cohort of 881 randomly chosen ethnic Roma from two regions in Eastern Slovakia and two regions in the Czech Republic participated. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs and/or from blood samples. The c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction with allele-specific primers in a multiplex arrangement and/or direct sequencing of exon 7 and 9. Allele frequencies and genotypes were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium using the Chi-square test. 25 subjects were heterozygous and three were homozygous for the c.1245_1253del, while 92 subjects were heterozygous and two were homozygous for the c.1400C>T. Moreover, two participants were compound heterozygotes. Frequencies of the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were 1.87 and 5.56 %, respectively. Our finding confirms an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of SLC22A12 mutant variants. We found that the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were present in the Czech and Slovak Roma population at unexpectedly high frequencies. Renal hypouricemia should be kept in mind during differential diagnostic on Roma patients with low serum uric acid concentrations.

  2. MYD88 L265P in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy, and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders using conventional and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lian; Hunter, Zachary R.; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xia; Morra, Enrica; Trojani, Alessandra; Greco, Antonino; Arcaini, Luca; Varettoni, Maria; Brown, Jennifer R.; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Manning, Robert J.; Tripsas, Christina K.; Lindeman, Neal I.

    2013-01-01

    By whole-genome and/or Sanger sequencing, we recently identified a somatic mutation (MYD88 L265P) that stimulates nuclear factor κB activity and is present in >90% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) patients. MYD88 L265P was absent in 90% of immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients. We therefore developed conventional and real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assays for more sensitive detection and quantification of MYD88 L265P. Using either assay, MYD88 L265P was detected in 97 of 104 (93%) WM and 13 of 24 (54%) IgM MGUS patients and was either absent or rarely expressed in samples from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (2/20; 10%), CLL (1/26; 4%), multiple myeloma (including IgM cases, 0/14), and immunoglobulin G MGUS (0/9) patients as well as healthy donors (0/40; P < 1.5 × 10−5 for WM vs other cohorts). Real-time AS-PCR identified IgM MGUS patients progressing to WM and showed a high rate of concordance between MYD88 L265P ΔCT and BM disease involvement (r = 0.89, P = .008) in WM patients undergoing treatment. These studies identify MYD88 L265P as a widely present mutation in WM and IgM MGUS patients using highly sensitive and specific AS-PCR assays with potential use in diagnostic discrimination and/or response assessment. The finding of this mutation in many IgM MGUS patients suggests that MYD88 L265P may be an early oncogenic event in WM pathogenesis. PMID:23321251

  3. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas: a pilot case-control analysis.

    PubMed

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso; Magrin, José; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rainho, Cláudia Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2006-02-01

    Aberrant methylation of seven potential binding sites of the CTCF factor in the differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene (H19-DMR) has been suggested as critical for the regulation of IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes. In this study, we analyzed the allele-specific methylation pattern of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic methylation pattern was maintained in CTCF binding site 5 in 22 heterozygous out of 91 samples analyzed. Nevertheless, a biallelic methylation pattern was detected in CTCF binding site 6 in a subgroup of HNSCC patients as a somatic acquired feature of tumor cells. An atypical biallelic methylation was also observed in both tumor and lymphocyte DNA from two patients, and at a high frequency in the control group (29 out of 64 informative controls). Additionally, we found that the C/T transition detected by HhaI RFLP suppressed one dinucleotide CpG in critical CTCF binding site 6, of a mutation showing polymorphic frequencies. Although a heterogeneous methylation pattern was observed after DNA sequencing modified by sodium bisulfite, the biallelic methylation pattern was confirmed in 9 out of 10 HNSCCs. These findings are likely to be relevant in the epigenetic regulation of the DMR, especially in pathological conditions in which the imprinting of IGF2 and H19 genes is disrupted.

  4. [Detection of JAK2V617F mutation rate by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR using allele specific primer and TaqMan-MGB probe for dual inhibiting amplification of wild type alleles].

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo-Wei; Shao, Dong-Hua; He, Mei-Ling; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2012-12-01

    This study was purposed to develop a real-time PCR assay for sensitive quantification of JAK2V617F allele burden in peripheral blood and to evaluate the clinical value of this method. Both allele-specific mutant reverse primer and wild-type TaqMan-MGB probe were used for dual-inhibiting amplification of wild-type alleles in a real-time PCR, and then the JAK2V617F mutant alleles were amplified specially. The standard curve for quantification of JAK2V617F was established by percentages of JAK2V617F alleles with threshold cycle (Ct) values in a real-time PCR. Furthermore, 89 apparent healthy donors were tested by this method. The results showed that the quantitative lower limit of this method for JAK2V617F was 0.1%, and the intra- and inter-assay average variability for quantifying percentage of JAK2V617F in total DNA was 4.1% and 6.1%, respectively. Two JAK2V617F-positive individuals were identified (the percentage of JAK2V617F alleles were 0.64% and 0.98%, respectively) using this method in blood from 89 apparently healthy donors. It is concluded that the developed method with highly sensitive and reproducible quantification of JAK2V617F mutant burden can be used clinically for diagnosis and evaluation of disease prognosis and efficacy of therapy in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Moreover, this technique can be also used for quantitative detection of variety of single nucleotide mutation.

  5. Direct oligonucleotide-photosensitizer conjugates for photochemical delivery of antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ahu; Laing, Brian; Hu, Yiqiao; Ming, Xin

    2015-04-18

    Activation of photosensitizers in endosomes enables release of therapeutic macromolecules into the cytosol of the target cells for pharmacological actions. In this study, we demonstrate that direct conjugation of photosensitizers to oligonucleotides (ONs) allows spatial and temporal co-localization of the two modalities in the target cells, and thus leads to superior functional delivery of ONs. Further, light-activated delivery of an anticancer ON caused cancer cell killing via modulation of an oncogene and photodynamic therapy.

  6. Environment-responsive fluorescent nucleoside analogue probe for studying oligonucleotide dynamics in a model cell-like compartment.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Maroti G; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2013-11-21

    The majority of fluorescent nucleoside analogue probes that have been used in the in vitro study of nucleic acids are not suitable for cell-based biophysical assays because they exhibit excitation maxima in the UV region and low quantum yields within oligonucleotides. Therefore, we propose that the photophysical characterization of oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorescent nucleoside analogue in reverse micelles (RM), which are good biological membrane models and UV-transparent, could provide an alternative approach to studying the properties of nucleic acids in a cell-like confined environment. In this context, we describe the photophysical properties of an environment-sensitive fluorescent uridine analogue (1), based on the 5-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrimidine core, in micelles and RM. The emissive nucleoside, which is polarity- and viscosity-sensitive, reports the environment of the surfactant assemblies via changes in its fluorescence properties. The nucleoside analogue, incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide and hybridized to its complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides, exhibits a significantly higher fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and anisotropy in RM than in aqueous buffer, which is consistent with the environment of RM. Collectively, our results demonstrate that nucleoside 1 could be utilized as a fluorescent label to study the function of nucleic acids in a model cellular milieu.

  7. Preparation and application of triple helix forming oligonucleotides and single strand oligonucleotide donors for gene correction.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rowshon; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Strategies for site-specific modulation of genomic sequences in mammalian cells require two components. One must be capable of recognizing and activating a specific target sequence in vivo, driving that site into an exploitable repair pathway. Information is transferred to the site via participation in the pathway by the second component, a donor nucleic acid, resulting in a permanent change in the target sequence. We have developed biologically active triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as site-specific gene targeting reagents. These TFOs, linked to DNA reactive compounds (such as a cross-linking agent), activate pathways that can engage informational donors. We have used the combination of a psoralen-TFO and single strand oligonucleotide donors to generate novel cell lines with directed sequence changes at the target site. Here we describe the synthesis and purification of bioactive psoralen-linked TFOs, their co-introduction into mammalian cells with donor nucleic acids, and the identification of cells with sequence conversion of the target site. We have emphasized details in the synthesis and purification of the oligonucleotides that are essential for preparation of reagents with optimal activity.

  8. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  9. Method for the preparation of size marker for synthetic oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, G.Z.; Liu, A.; Leung, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase was used for the addition of (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dCTP to the 3'-OH termini of oligo(dT)/sub 12-18/. A collection of oligonucleotides with chain lengths ranging continuously from 13-mer to over 100-mer was generated. The reaction mixture was then mixed with oligo(dT)/sub 12-18/ labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP by T/sub 4/ polynucleotide kinase. A sequence ladder with the bottom base as 12-mer was then formed. These oligonucleotides served as size marker for the purification and identification of oligonucleotides on polyacrylamide gel.

  10. Retro-1 Analogues Differentially Affect Oligonucleotide Delivery and Toxin Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Ming, Xin; Abdelkafi, Hajer; Pons, Valerie; Michau, Aurelien; Gillet, Daniel; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Barbier, Julien; Juliano, Rudy

    2016-11-21

    Retro-1 is a small molecule that displays two important biological activities: First, it blocks the actions of certain toxins by altering their intracellular trafficking. Second, it enhances the activity of oligonucleotides by releasing them from entrapment in endosomes. This raises the question of whether the two actions involve the same cellular target. Herein we report the effects of several Retro-1 analogues on both toxins and oligonucleotides. We found analogues that affect toxins but not oligonucleotides and vice-versa, while Retro-1 is the only compound that affects both. This indicates that the molecular target(s) involved in the two processes are distinct.

  11. Therapeutic oligonucleotides and delivery technologies: Research topics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotides have been gaining considerable attention as promising and effective candidate therapeutics against various diseases. This special issue is aimed at providing a better understanding of the recent progress in the development of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics to encourage further research and innovation in this field to achieve these advancements. Several Japanese scientists have been invited to contribute to this issue by describing their recent findings, overviews, insights, or commentaries on rational designing of therapeutic oligonucleotide molecules and their novel delivery technologies, especially nanocarrier systems.

  12. Strategies for optimizing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Kashanian, Soheila; Sanadgol, Nima; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Karami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Specific and predictable hybridization of the polynucleotide sequences to their complementary counterparts plays a fundamental role in the rational design of new nucleic acid nanodevices. Generally, nucleic acid hybridization can be performed using two major strategies, namely hybridization of DNA or RNA targets to surface-tethered oligonucleotide probes (solid-phase hybridization) and hybridization of the target nucleic acids to randomly distributed probes in solution (solution-phase hybridization). Investigations into thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of these two strategies showed that hybridization on surfaces is less favorable than that of the same sequence in solution. Indeed, the efficiency of DNA hybridization on surfaces suffers from three constraints: (1) electrostatic repulsion between DNA strands on the surface, (2) steric hindrance between tethered DNA probes, and (3) nonspecific adsorption of the attached oligonucleotides to the solid surface. During recent years, several strategies have been developed to overcome the problems associated with DNA hybridization on surfaces. Optimizing the probe surface density, application of a linker between the solid surface and the DNA-recognizing sequence, optimizing the pH of DNA hybridization solutions, application of thiol reagents, and incorporation of a polyadenine block into the terminal end of the recognizing sequence are among the most important strategies for enhancing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

  13. Detection of the V1016G mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) by allele-specific PCR assay, and its distribution and effect on deltamethrin resistance in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides is widespread among populations of Aedes aegypti, the main vector for the dengue virus. Several different point mutations within the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene contribute to such resistance. A mutation at position 1016 in domain II, segment 6 of the VGSC gene in Ae. aegypti leads to a valine to glycine substitution (V1016G) that confers resistance to deltamethrin. Methods This study developed and utilized an allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) assay that could be used to detect the V1016G mutation. The assay was validated against a number of sequenced DNA samples of known genotype and was determined to be in complete agreement. Larvae and pupae were collected from various localities throughout Thailand. Samples were reared to adulthood and their resistance status against deltamethrin was determined by standard WHO susceptibility bioassays. Deltamethrin-resistant and susceptible insects were then genotyped for the V1016G mutation. Additionally, some samples were genotyped for a second mutation at position 1534 in domain III (F1534C) which is also known to confer pyrethroid resistance. Results The bioassay results revealed an overall mortality of 77.6%. Homozygous 1016G individuals survived at higher rates than either heterozygous or wild-type (1016 V) mosquitoes. The 1016G mutation was significantly and positively associated with deltamethrin resistance and was widely distributed throughout Thailand. Interestingly, wild-type 1016 V mosquitoes tested were homozygous for the 1534C mutation, and all heterozygous mosquitoes were also heterozygous for 1534C. Mutant homozygous (G/G) mosquitoes expressed the wild-type (F/F) at position 1534. However, the presence of the 1534C mutation was not associated with deltamethrin resistance. Conclusions Our bioassay results indicate that all populations sampled display some degree of resistance to deltamethrin. Homozygous 1016G mosquitoes were far likelier to survive such

  14. Polyphosphorylation and non-enzymatic template-directed ligation of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Oligonucleotide 5'-polyphosphates are formed under potentially prebiotic conditions from oligonucleotide 5'-phosphates and sodium trimetaphosphate. Oligonucleotides activated as polyphosphates undergo template-directed ligation. We believe that these reactions could have produced longer oligonucleotide products from shorter substrates under prebiotic conditions.

  15. Micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide sensors.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, David C; Shaver, Michael P; Hands, Philip J W

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a review of micro- and nano-structure based oligonucleotide detection and quantification techniques. The characteristics of such devices make them very attractive for Point-of-Care or On-Site-Testing biosensing applications. Their small scale means that they can be robust and portable, their compatibility with modern CMOS electronics means that they can easily be incorporated into hand-held devices and their suitability for mass production means that, out of the different approaches to oligonucleotide detection, they are the most suitable for commercialisation. This review discusses the advantages of micro- and nano-structure based sensors and covers the various oligonucleotide detection techniques that have been developed to date. These include: Bulk Acoustic Wave and Surface Acoustic Wave devices, micro- and nano-cantilever sensors, gene Field Effect Transistors, and nanowire and nanopore based sensors. Oligonucleotide immobilisation techniques are also discussed.

  16. Tritium labeling of antisense oligonucleotides by exchange with tritiated water.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, M J; Freier, S M; Crooke, R M; Ecker, D J; Maslova, R N; Lesnik, E A

    1993-01-01

    We describe a simple, efficient, procedure for labeling oligonucleotides to high specific activity (< 1 x 10(8) cpm/mumol) by hydrogen exchange with tritiated water at the C8 positions of purines in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol, an effective radical scavenger. Approximately 90% of the starting material is recovered as intact, labeled oligonucleotide. The radiolabeled compounds are stable in biological systems; greater than 90% of the specific activity is retained after 72 hr incubation at 37 degrees C in serum-containing media. Data obtained from in vitro cellular uptake experiments using oligonucleotides labeled by this method are similar to those obtained using 35S or 14C-labeled compounds. Because this protocol is solely dependent upon the existence of purine residues, it should be useful for radiolabeling modified as well as unmodified phosphodiester oligonucleotides. Images PMID:8367289

  17. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  18. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion.

  19. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1998-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinary important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time because much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regard to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia and other neoplastic disorders.

  20. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, A M

    1997-01-01

    The development of reliable gene disruption strategies, and their application in living cells, has proven to be an extraordinarily important advance for cell and molecular biologists. Using the various available approaches, the specific functions of any given gene may now be investigated directly in the relevant cell type. Application of similar experimental tools in a clinical setting might prove to be equally valuable and could well form the basis of a monumental advance in the practice of clinical medicine. This seems particularly true at the present time since much progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer. For these reasons a tremendous amount of interest has been generated in the use of oligodeoxynucleotides to modify gene expression. However, in spite of some notable successes which are detailed in this review, oligonucleotides have generated controversy in regards to their mechanism of action, reliability, and ultimate therapeutic utility. Nevertheless, the potential power of the "antisense" approach remains undisputed, and its ultimate therapeutic utility is far reaching. Accordingly, the problems associated with the use of these compounds are clearly worth solving. It remains the hope of many laboratories that the day will soon come when these techniques will make an important contribution to the management of CML and other neoplastic disorders.

  1. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  2. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications.

  3. Highly specific and sensitive electrochemical genotyping via gap ligation reaction and surface hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Li; Xu, Xiangmin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-02-25

    This paper developed a novel electrochemical genotyping strategy based on gap ligation reaction with surface hybridization detection. This strategy utilized homogeneous enzymatic reactions to generate molecular beacon-structured allele-specific products that could be cooperatively annealed to capture probes stably immobilized on the surface via disulfide anchors, thus allowing ultrasensitive surface hybridization detection of the allele-specific products through redox tags in close proximity to the electrode. Such a unique biphasic architecture provided a universal methodology for incorporating enzymatic discrimination reactions in electrochemical genotyping with desirable reproducibility, high efficiency and no interferences from interficial steric hindrance. The developed technique was demonstrated to show intrinsic high sensitivity for direct genomic analysis, and excellent specificity with discriminativity of single nucleotide variations.

  4. How is it that microsatellites and random oligonucleotides uncover DNA fingerprint patterns?

    PubMed

    Kashi, Y; Nave, A; Darvasi, A; Gruenbaum, Y; Soller, M; Beckmann, J S

    1994-09-01

    Minisatellites, microsatellites, and short random oligonucleotides all uncover highly polymorphic DNA fingerprint patterns in Southern analysis of genomic DNA that has been digested with a restriction enzyme having a 4-bp specificity. The polymorphic nature of the fragments is attributed to tandem repeat number variation of embedded minisatellite sequences. This explains why DNA fingerprint fragments are uncovered by minisatellite probes, but does not explain how it is that they are also uncovered by microsatellite and random oligonucleotide probes. To clarify this phenomenon, we sequenced a large bovine genomic BamHI restriction fragment hybridizing to the Jeffreys 33.6 minisatellite probe and consisting of small and large Sau3A-resistant subfragments. The large Sau3A subfragment was found to have a complex architecture, consisting of two different minisatellites, flanked and separated by stretches of unique DNA. The three unique sequences were characterized by sequence simplicity, that is, a higher than chance occurrence of tandem or dispersed repetition of simple sequence motifs. This complex repetitive structure explains the absence of Sau3A restriction sites in the large Sau3A subfragment, yet provides this subfragment with the ability to hybridize to a variety of probe sequences. It is proposed that a large class of interspersed tracts sharing this complex yet simplified sequence structure is found in the genome. Each such tract would have a broad ability to hybridize to a variety of probes, yet would exhibit a dearth of restriction sites. For each restriction enzyme having 4-bp specificity, a subclass of such tracts, completely lacking the corresponding restriction sites, will be present. On digestion with the given restriction enzyme, each such tract would form a large fragment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Evaluation of "at risk" alpha 1-antitrypsin genotype SZ with synthetic oligonucleotide gene probes.

    PubMed Central

    Nukiwa, T; Brantly, M; Garver, R; Paul, L; Courtney, M; LeCocq, J P; Crystal, R G

    1986-01-01

    Alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT), a 52,000-mol-wt serum glycoprotein produced by hepatocytes and mononuclear phagocytes, functions as the major inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. The alpha 1AT haplotype S is associated with childhood liver disease and/or adult emphysema when inherited with the Z haplotype to give the phenotype SZ. To accurately identify the SZ phenotype at the level of genomic DNA, four 32P-labeled 19-mer synthetic oligonucleotide probes were prepared; two to identify the M and S difference in exon III, and two to identify the M and Z difference in exon V. These probes were hybridized with various cloned DNAs and genomic DNAs cut with the restriction endonucleases BgII and EcoRI; the genomic DNAs represented all six possible phenotype combinations of the M, S, and Z haplotypes (MM, MS, MZ, SS, ZZ, and SZ). Using the four probes to evaluate 42 samples of genomic DNA, the "at risk" SZ and ZZ phenotypes were correctly identified in all cases, as were the "not at risk" phenotypes SS, MS, MM, and MZ, demonstrating that both exon III and exon V directed probes are necessary to properly identify all of the major "at risk" alpha 1AT genes. However, when used to evaluate a very rare family carrying a null allele, these four oligonucleotide probes misidentified the "at risk" null-null and S null phenotypes as "not at risk" MM and SM combinations. These observations indicate that oligonucleotide gene probes yielded reliable and accurate assessment of "at risk" alpha 1AT genotypes in almost all situations, but in the context of prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling this approach must be used with caution and in combination with family studies so as not to misidentify rare genotypes that may be associated with a risk for disease. Images PMID:3484754

  6. Therapeutic potentialities of EWS-Fli-1 mRNA-targeted vectorized antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A; Lambert, G; Bertrand, J R; Fattal, E; Couvreur, P; Malvy, C

    2003-12-01

    We have used structured antisense oligonucleotides (AON), which are protected against extra and intracellular degradation by their internal structure. We have shown that if correctly designed this structure does not prevent them from hybridizing to the mRNA target. This concept allows reducing the number of thioate groups in the oligonucleotide and therefore the potential toxicity. Junction oncogenes are found in cancers such as certain leukemias, Ewing sarcoma, and thyroid papillary carcinomas. Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of children and young adults with bone metastasis. It is caused by a chromosomic translocation t(11;22) (q24;q12) creating a fusion gene between the genes EWS and Fli-1 giving rise to a chimeric protein which is an unnatural transcription factor. Immortalized NIH/3T3 cells transfected by the EWS-Fli-1 cDNA under the control of the LTR retroviral promoter--which do not undergo apoptosis and which became tumoral--were used for this study. As a model of Ewing sarcoma in nude mice, we have used permanently expressing human EWS-Fli-1 cells grafted to nude mice. The nanospheres or nanocapsules have been used to deliver two different AON: a phosphorothioate, and a structured chimeric AON, both targeted toward the junction area of EWS-Fli-1. Both types of AON-loaded nanoparticles inhibited the growth of the xenografted tumor after intratumoral injections into nude mice, whereas similar nanoparticles with control oligonucleotides had no effect. With AON in nanospheres, we have shown after 24 hours that the mRNA of EWS-Fli-1 was specifically down-regulated, confirming the antisense activity of the targeted AON.

  7. Nanogels for Oligonucleotide Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.; Batrakova, Elena V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic delivery of oligonucleotides (ODN) to the central nervous system is needed for development of therapeutic and diagnostic modalities for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Macromolecules injected in blood are poorly transported across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and rapidly cleared from circulation. In this work we propose a novel system for ODN delivery to the brain based on nanoscale network of cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) and polyethylenimine (“nanogel”). The methods of synthesis of nanogel and its modification with specific targeting molecules are described. Nanogels can bind and encapsulate spontaneously negatively charged ODN, resulting in formation of stable aqueous dispersion of polyelectrolyte complex with particle sizes less than 100 nm. Using polarized monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells as an in vitro model this study demonstrates that ODN incorporated in nanogel formulations can be effectively transported across the BBB. The transport efficacy is further increased when the surface of the nanogel is modified with transferrin or insulin. Importantly the ODN is transported across the brain microvessel cells through the transcellular pathway; after transport, ODN remains mostly incorporated in the nanogel and ODN displays little degradation compared to the free ODN. Using mouse model for biodistribution studies in vivo, this work demonstrated that as a result of incorporation into nanogel 1 h after intravenous injection the accumulation of a phosphorothioate ODN in the brain increases by over 15 fold while in liver and spleen decreases by 2-fold compared to the free ODN. Overall, this study suggests that nanogel is a promising system for delivery of ODN to the brain. PMID:14733583

  8. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  9. Multiplexed hybridization detection with multicolor colocalization of quantum dot nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Ping; Kung, Matthew C; Yang, Samuel; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a hybridization detection method using multicolor oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dots as nanoprobes. In the presence of various target sequences, combinatorial self-assembly of the nanoprobes via independent hybridization reactions leads to the generation of discernible sequence-specific spectral codings. Detection of single-molecule hybridization is achieved by measuring colocalization of individual nanoprobes. Genetic analysis for anthrax pathogenicity through simultaneous detection of multiple relevant sequences is demonstrated using this novel biosensing method as proof-of-concept.

  10. Optimization of an oligonucleotide microchip for microbial identification studies: a non-equilibrium dissociation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Stahl, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray (microchip) for identifying strains of five closely related bacilli (Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus medusa and Bacillus subtilis) was demonstrated using an approach that compares the non-equilibrium dissociation rates ('melting curves') of all probe-target duplexes simultaneously. For this study, a hierarchical set of 30 oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA of these bacilli at multiple levels of specificity (approximate taxonomic ranks of domain, kingdom, order, genus and species) was designed and immobilized in a high-density matrix of gel pads on a glass slide. Reproducible melting curves for probes with different levels of specificity were obtained using an optimized salt concentration. Clear discrimination between perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) duplexes was achieved. By normalizing the signals to an internal standard (a universal probe), a more than twofold discrimination (> 2.4x) was achieved between PM and 1-MM duplexes at the dissociation temperature at which 50% of the probe-target duplexes remained intact. This provided excellent differentiation among representatives of different Bacillus species, both individually and in mixtures of two or three. The overall pattern of hybridization derived from this hierarchical probe set also provided a clear 'chip fingerprint' for each of these closely related Bacillus species.

  11. Target mRNA inhibition by oligonucleotide drugs in man

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide delivery in vivo is commonly seen as the principal hurdle to the successful development of oligonucleotide drugs. In an analysis of 26 oligonucleotide drugs recently evaluated in late-stage clinical trials we found that to date at least half have demonstrated suppression of the target mRNA and/or protein levels in the relevant cell types in man, including those present in liver, muscle, bone marrow, lung, blood and solid tumors. Overall, this strongly implies that the drugs are being delivered to the appropriate disease tissues. Strikingly we also found that the majority of the drug targets of the oligonucleotides lie outside of the drugable genome and represent new mechanisms of action not previously investigated in a clinical setting. Despite the high risk of failure of novel mechanisms of action in the clinic, a subset of the targets has been validated by the drugs. While not wishing to downplay the technical challenges of oligonucleotide delivery in vivo, here we demonstrate that target selection and validation are of equal importance for the success of this field. PMID:22989709

  12. DNA sequencing by hybridization to microchip octa-and decanucleotides extended by stacked pentanucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Parinov, S; Barsky, V; Yershov, G; Kirillov, E; Timofeev, E; Belgovskiy, A; Mirzabekov, A

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of sequencing by hybridization to an oligonucleotide microchip grows with an increase in the number and in the length of the oligonucleotides; however, such increases raise enormously the complexity of the microchip and decrease the accuracy of hybridization. We have been developing the technique of contiguous stacking hybridization (CSH) to circumvent these shortcomings. Stacking interactions between adjacent bases of two oligonucleotides stabilize their contiguous duplex with DNA. The use of such stacking increases the effective length of microchip oligonucleotides, enhances sequencing accuracy and allows the sequencing of longer DNA. The effects of mismatches, base composition, length and other factors on the stacking are evaluated. Contiguous stacking hybridization of DNA with immobilized 8mers and one or two 5mers labeled with two different fluorescent dyes increases the effective length of sequencing oligonucleotides from 8 to 13 and 18 bases, respectively. The incorporation of all four bases or 5-nitroindole as a universal base into different positions of the 5mers permitted a decrease in the number of additional rounds of hybridization. Contiguous stacking hybridization appears to be a promising approach to significantly increasing the efficiency of sequencing by hybridization. PMID:8760885

  13. New Oligonucleotide Probes for ND-FISH Analysis to Identify Barley Chromosomes and to Investigate Polymorphisms of Wheat Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuyao; Qiu, Ling; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Fu, Shulan; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide probes that can be used for non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) analysis are convenient tools for identifying chromosomes of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its relatives. New oligonucleotide probes, Oligo-HvT01, Oligo-pTa71-1, Oligo-s120.1, Oligo-s120.2, Oligo-s120.3, Oligo-275.1, Oligo-275.2, Oligo-k566 and Oligo-713, were designed based on the repetitive sequences HVT01, pTa71, pTa-s120, pTa-275, pTa-k566 and pTa-713. All these probes can be used for ND-FISH analysis and some of them can be used to detect polymorphisms of wheat chromosomes. Probes Oligo-HvT01, Oligo-pTa71-1, Oligo-s120.3, Oligo-275.1, Oligo-k566 and Oligo-713 can, respectively, replace the roles of their original sequences to identify chromosomes of some barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) and the common wheat variety Chinese Spring. Oligo-s120.1, Oligo-s120.2 and Oligo-275.2 produced different hybridization patterns from the ones generated by their original sequences. In addition, Oligo-s120.1, Oligo-s120.2 and Oligo-s120.3, which were derived from pTa-s120, revealed different signal patterns. Likewise, Oligo-275.1 and Oligo-275.2, which were derived from pTa-275, also displayed different hybridization patterns. These results imply that differently arranged or altered structural statuses of tandem repeats might exist on different chromosome regions. These new oligonucleotide probes provide extra convenience for identifying some wheat and barley chromosomes, and they can display polymorphisms of wheat chromosomes. PMID:27929398

  14. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis as a general and powerful method for studies of protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Dalbadie-McFarland, G; Cohen, L W; Riggs, A D; Morin, C; Itakura, K; Richards, J H

    1982-01-01

    We have used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to make a specific change in the beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6) (ampicillin resistance) gene of the plasmid pBR322. Evidence suggests that the active site for this enzyme may include a serine-threonine dyad (residues 70 and 71). By priming in vitro DNA synthesis with a chemically synthesized 16-base oligodeoxyribonucleotide, we have inverted the Ser-Thr dyad to Thr-Ser and thereby generated a mutant with an ampicillin-sensitive phenotype. This "double-mismatch" method is relatively simple and also very general because detection of mutants is at the level of DNA and involves only colony hybridization. Accordingly, the procedure can be applied to any DNA sequence and does not depend on the phenotype of the mutant. Images PMID:6983070

  15. Automated synthesis of new ferrocenyl-modified oligonucleotides: study of their properties in solution

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Aude-Emmanuelle; Spinelli, Nicolas; Moustrou, Corinne; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Brisset, Hugues

    2004-01-01

    We have developed new ferrocenyl-modified oligonucleotide (ODN) probes for electrochemical DNA sensors. A monofunctional ferrocene containing phosphoramidite group has been prepared, and a new bisfunctional ferrocene containing phosphoramidite and dimethoxytrityl (DMT) groups has been developed. These ferrocenyl-phosphoramidites have been directly employed in an automated solid-phase DNA synthesizer using phosphoramidite chemistry. The advantages of this method are that it allows a non-specialist in nucleotide chemistry to access labeled ODNs and that it has demonstrated good results. ODNs modified at the 3′ and/or 5′ extremities have been prepared, with the incorporation of the ferrocenyl group into the chain. The 5′ position appears to be more important due to its particular behavior. The thermal stability and electrochemical properties of these new ODN ferrocenes were analyzed before and after hybridization with different ODNs. The feasibility of using these new ferrocenyl-labeled ODNs in DNA sensors has been demonstrated. PMID:15466597

  16. probeBase—an online resource for rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers: new features 2016

    PubMed Central

    Greuter, Daniel; Loy, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    probeBase http://www.probebase.net is a manually maintained and curated database of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and primers. Contextual information and multiple options for evaluating in silico hybridization performance against the most recent rRNA sequence databases are provided for each oligonucleotide entry, which makes probeBase an important and frequently used resource for microbiology research and diagnostics. Here we present a major update of probeBase, which was last featured in the NAR Database Issue 2007. This update describes a complete remodeling of the database architecture and environment to accommodate computationally efficient access. Improved search functions, sequence match tools and data output now extend the opportunities for finding suitable hierarchical probe sets that target an organism or taxon at different taxonomic levels. To facilitate the identification of complementary probe sets for organisms represented by short rRNA sequence reads generated by amplicon sequencing or metagenomic analysis with next generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina and IonTorrent, we introduce a novel tool that recovers surrogate near full-length rRNA sequences for short query sequences and finds matching oligonucleotides in probeBase. PMID:26586809

  17. Discrimination of heterogenous mRNAs encoding strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in Xenopus oocytes by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, H; Patton, D E; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Three synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to different parts of an RNA encoding a glycine receptor subunit were used to discriminate heterogenous mRNAs coding for glycine receptors in adult and neonatal rat spinal cord. Injection of the three antisense oligonucleotides into Xenopus oocytes specifically inhibited the expression of glycine receptors by adult spinal cord mRNA. In contrast, the antisense oligonucleotides were much less potent in inhibiting the expression of glycine receptors encoded by neonatal spinal cord mRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed that the oligonucleotides hybridized mostly to an adult cord transcript of approximately 10 kilobases in size. This band was also present in neonatal spinal cord mRNA but its density was about one-fourth of the adult cord message. There was no intense band in the low molecular weight position (approximately 2 kilobases), the existence of which was expected from electrophysiological studies with size-fractionated mRNA of neonatal spinal cord. Our results suggest that in the rat spinal cord there are at least three different types of mRNAs encoding functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. Images PMID:2479016

  18. Safety of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xuan; Gatti, Philip; Papoian, Thomas

    2017-01-31

    Oligonucleotide-based therapy is an active area of drug development designed to treat a variety of gene-specific diseases. Two of the more promising platforms are the antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), both of which are often directed against similar targets. In light of recent reports on clinical trials of severe thrombocytopenia with two different ASO drugs and increased peripheral neuropathy with an siRNA drug, we compared and contrasted the specific safety characteristics of these two classes of oligonucleotide therapeutic. The objectives were to assess factors that could contribute to the specific toxicities observed with these two classes of promising drugs, and get a better understanding of the potential mechanism(s) responsible for these rare, but serious, adverse events.

  19. Current progress on aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the power of the RNAi pathway through the use of therapeutic siRNA drugs has remarkable potential for treating a vast array of human disease conditions. However, difficulties in delivery of these and similar nucleic acid-based pharmacological agents to appropriate organs or tissues, remains a major impediment to their broad clinical application. Synthetic nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) have emerged as effective delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including siRNAs. In this review, we summarize recent attractive developments in creatively employing cell-internalizing aptamers to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides (e.g., siRNAs, miRNAs, anti-miRs and antisense oligos) to target cells. We also discuss advancements in aptamer-siRNA chimera technology, as well as, aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide drugs for clinical translation are further highlighted. PMID:24304250

  20. Versatile functionalization of nanoelectrodes by oligonucleotides via pyrrole electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Emeline; Nguyen, Khoa; Bouchain-Gautier, Christelle; Filoramo, Arianna; Goux-Capes, Laurence; Goffman, Marcello; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Mailley, Pascal; Livache, Thierry

    2010-11-15

    Surface modification at the nanometer scale is a challenge for the future of molecular electronics. In particular, the precise anchoring and electrical addressing of biological scaffolds such as complex DNA nanonetworks is of importance for generating bio-directed assemblies of nano-objects for nanocircuit purposes. Herein, we consider the individual modification of nanoelectrodes with different oligonucleotide sequences by an electrochemically driven co-polymerization process of pyrrole and modified oligonucleotide sequences bearing pyrrole monomers. We demonstrate that this one-step technique presents the advantages of simplicity, localization of surface modification, mechanical, biological and chemical stability of the coatings, and high lateral resolution.

  1. Optical fiber hybridization assay fluorosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilevar, Saeed; Davis, Christopher C.; Hodzic, Vildana; Portugal, Frank

    1999-04-01

    The present work describes an all-fiber hybridization assay sensor that relies on the evanescent field excitation of fluorescence from surface-bound fluorophores. The evanescent field is made accessible through the use of a long adiabatically tapered single-mode fiber probe. A semiconductor laser operating at 785 nm wavelength is used in a pulsed mode to excite fluorescence in the tapered region of a fiber probe using the near-infrared fluorophore IRD 41. We have carried out real-time hybridization tests for IRD 41-labeled oligonucleotide at various probe concentrations binding to complementary oligonucleotide cross-linked to the tapered fiber surface. Short oligonucleotides (20-mer) bound to the fiber surface have been used to detect near-infrared dye labeled complementary sequences at sub-nanomolar levels. Sandwich assays with total RNA were conducted to examine the capability of the biosensor for detecting bacterial cells using rRNA as the target. The results indicate that this fluorosensor is capable of detecting H. pylori in a sandwich assay at picomolar concentrations.

  2. Detection of latent pseudorabies virus by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of pseudorabies virus (PRV) nucleic acid in brain tissue sections of acutely and latently infected swine was detected by an in situ hybridization procedure using /sup 35/S-nick translated PRV DNA probes. PRV nucleic acid was detected in three of four naturally infected pigs. Tissues found to be infected with PRV were the pons/medulla region, frontal cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. In a related study, an attempt was made to increase the sensitivity and specificity of a dot blot hybridization assay with the use of synthetic oligonucleotides as probes for the detection of PRV DNA. Three 25-base-long oligonucleotides, complementary to three DNA sequences within the Sph 1 subfragment p7 of BAM H1 fragment 2, were end-labeled with gamma /sup 32/P-ATP using T/sub 4/ polynucleotide kinase. The oligonucleotide probes were hybridized to swine cellular DNA and purified PRV-DNA that had been bound to a nitrocellulose paper. Hybridizations were performed at varying temperatures and at various salt concentrations. The three oligonucleotide probes, which were rich in guanine and cytosine, hybridized to swine cellular DNA at all temperatures under varying conditions of stringency.

  3. Oligonucleotide labelling using a fluorogenic "click" reaction with a hemicarboxonium salt.

    PubMed

    Maether, Marie-Pierre; Lapin, Kristie; Muntean, Andreea; Payrastre, Corinne; Escudier, Jean-Marc

    2013-10-17

    Two fluorescent streptocyanine labelled oligonucleotides have been synthesized by a simple "click" reaction between a non-fluorescent hemicarboxonium salt and aminoalkyl functionalized thymidines within the oligonucleotide and their spectrophotometric properties have been studied.

  4. Validation of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specificity and utility of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray, or Pigoligoarray (www.pigoligoarray.org), has been evaluated by profiling the expression of transcripts from four porcine tissues. Tools for comparative analyses of expression on the Pigoligoarray were developed i...

  5. Gene expression profiling in peanut using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently have a moderately significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for the oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate l...

  6. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  7. Chromosome-specific painting in Cucumis species using bulked oligonucleotides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a sing...

  8. Solid-phase-supported synthesis of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide mimics

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Sergey S; Tarasenko, Yulia V; Silnikov, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    Summary An efficient solid-phase-supported peptide synthesis (SPPS) of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide (MorGly) mimics has been developed. The proposed strategy includes a novel specially designed labile linker group containing the oxalyl residue and the 2-aminomethylmorpholino nucleoside analogues as first subunits. PMID:24991266

  9. Regioselective immobilization of short oligonucleotides to acrylic copolymer gels.

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, E; Kochetkova, S V; Mirzabekov, A D; Florentiev, V L

    1996-01-01

    Four types of polyacrylamide or polydimethyl-acrylamide gels for regioselective (by immobilization at the 3' end) of short oligonucleotides have been designed for use in manufacturing oligonucleotide microchips. Two of these supports contain amino or aldehyde groups in the gel, allowing coupling with oligonucleotides bearing aldehyde or amino groups, respectively, in the presence of a reducing agent. The aldehyde gel support showed a higher immobilization efficiency relative to the amino gel. Of all reducing agents tested, the best results were obtained with a pyridine-borane complex. The other supports are based on an acrylamide gel activated with glutaraldehyde or a hydroxyalkyl-functionalized gel treated with mesyl chloride. The use of dimethylacrylamide instead of acrylamide allows subsequent gel modifications in organic solvents. All the immobilization methods are easy and simple to perform, give high and reproducible yields, allow long durations of storage of the activated support, and provide high stability of attachment and low non-specific binding. Although these gel supports have been developed for preparing oligonucleotide microchips, they may be used for other purposes as well. PMID:8774893

  10. Effects of fluid flow on the oligonucleotide folding in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lim, M C G; Zhong, Z W

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA oligonucleotide and water molecules translocating through carbon nanotube (CNT) channels. An induced pressure difference is applied to the system by pushing a layer of water molecules toward the flow direction to drive the oligonucleotide and other molecules. This MD simulation investigates the changes that occur in the conformation of the oligonucleotide due to water molecules in nanochannels while controlling the temperature and volume of the system in a canonical ensemble. The results show that the oligonucleotide in the (8,8)-(12,12) CNT channel forms a folded state at a lower pressure, whereas the oligonucleotide in the (10,10)-(14,14) CNT channel forms a folded state at a higher pressure instead. The van der Waals forces between the water molecules and the oligonucleotide suggest that the attraction between these two types of molecules results in the linear arrangements of the bases of the oligonucleotide. For a larger nanotube channel, the folding of the oligonucleotide is mainly dependent on the solvent (water molecules), whereas pressure, the size of the nanotube junction, and water molecules are the considering factors of the folding of the oligonucleotide at a smaller nanotube channel. For a folded oligonucleotide, the water distribution around the oligonucleotide is concentrated at a smaller range than that for the distribution around an unfolded oligonucleotide.

  11. Ratiometric detection of oligonucleotide stoichiometry on multifunctional gold nanoparticles by whispering gallery mode biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, F C; Wu, Y; Niu, Z; Vollmer, F

    2015-05-07

    A label-free method is developed to ratiometrically determine the stoichiometry of oligonucleotides attached to the surface of gold nanoparticle (GNP) by whispering gallery mode biosensing. Utilizing this scheme, it is furthermore shown that the stoichiometric ratio of GNP attached oligonucleotide species can be controlled by varying the concentration ratio of thiolated oligonucleotides that are used to modify the GNP.

  12. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of thiocholesteryl-coupled phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides incorporated into immunoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Zelphati, O; Wagner, E; Leserman, L

    1994-09-01

    Encapsulation of oligonucleotides in antibody-targeted liposomes (immunoliposomes) which bind to target cells permits intracellular delivery of the oligonucleotides. This approach circumvents problems of extracellular degradation by nucleases and poor membrane permeability which free phosphodiester oligonucleotides are subject to, but leaves unresolved the inefficiency of encapsulation of oligonucleotides in liposomes. We have coupled oligonucleotides to cholesterol via a reversible disulfide bond. This modification of oligonucleotides improved their association with immunoliposomes by a factor of about 10 in comparison to unmodified oligonucleotides. The presence of cholesteryl-modified oligonucleotides incorporated in the bilayer of liposomes did not interfere with the coupling of the targeting protein to the liposome surface. Free or cholesterol coupled oligonucleotides associated with liposomes and directed against the tat gene of HIV-1 were tested for inhibition of HIV-1 proliferation in acutely infected cells. We demonstrate that the cholesteryl-modified as well as unmodified oligonucleotides acquire the target specificity of the antibody on the liposome. Their antiviral activity when delivered into cells is sequence-specific. The activity of these modified or unmodified oligonucleotides to inhibit the replication of HIV was the same on an equimolar basis (EC50 around 0.1 microM). Cholesterol coupled oligonucleotides thus offer increased liposome association without loss of antiviral activity.

  13. Oligonucleotides with "clickable" sugar residues: synthesis, duplex stability, and terminal versus central interstrand cross-linking of 2'-O-propargylated 2-aminoadenosine with a bifunctional azide.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Suresh S; Leonard, Peter; Seela, Frank

    2014-05-16

    Duplex DNA with terminal and internal sugar cross-links were synthesized by the CuAAC reaction from oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-propargyl-2-aminoadenosine as a clickable site and a bifunctional azide (4). Stepwise click chemistry was employed to introduce cross-links at internal and terminal positions. Copper turnings were used as catalyst, reducing the copper load of the reaction mixture and avoiding complexing agents. For oligonucleotide building block synthesis, a protecting group strategy was developed for 2'-O-propargyl-2-aminoadenosine owing to the rather different reactivities of the two amino groups. Phosphoramidites were synthesized bearing clickable 2'-O-propargyl residues (14 and 18) as well as a 2'-deoxyribofuranosyl residue (10). Hybridization experiments of non-cross-linked oligonucleotides with 2,6-diaminopurine as nucleobase showed no significant thermal stability changes over those containing adenine. Surprisingly, an isobutyryl group protecting the 2-amino function has no negative impact on the stability of DNA-DNA and DNA-RNA duplexes. Oligonucleotide duplexes with cross-linked 2'-O-propargylated 2-aminoadenosine (1) and 2'-O-propargylated adenosine (3) at terminal positions are significantly stabilized (ΔT(m) = +29 °C). The stability results from a molecularity change from duplex to hairpin melting and is influenced by the ligation position. Terminal ligation led to higher melting duplexes than corresponding hairpins, while duplexes with central ligation sites were less stable.

  14. Glycoclusters on oligonucleotide and PNA scaffolds: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Nicolas; Defrancq, Eric; Morvan, François

    2013-06-07

    Conjugation of oligonucleotides (ONs) to a variety of reporter groups has been the subject of intensive research during the last decade. Conjugation is indeed of great interest because it can be used not only to improve the existing ONs properties but also to impart new ones. In this context tremendous efforts have been made to conjugate carbohydrate moieties to ONs. Indeed carbohydrates play an important role in biological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion through the recognition with sugar-binding proteins (i.e. lectins) located on the surface of cells. For this reason, carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates (COCs) have been first developed for improving the poor cellular uptake or tissue specific delivery of ONs through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Besides the targeted ONs delivery, carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates (COCs) are also evaluated in the context of carbohydrate biochips in which surface coating with carbohydrates is achieved by using the DNA-directed immobilization strategy (DDI). Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have also been extensively investigated as a surrogate of DNA for diverse applications. Therefore attachment of carbohydrate moieties to this class of molecules has been studied. The aforementioned applications of COCs require mimicking of the natural processes, in which the weak individual protein-carbohydrate binding is overcome by using multivalent interactions. This tutorial review focuses on the recent advances in carbohydrate-oligonucleotide conjugates and describes the major synthetic approaches available. In addition, an overview of applications that have been developed using various scaffolds allowing multivalent interactions is provided. Finally recent results on the use of peptide nucleic acids as oligonucleotides surrogate are described.

  15. Development and evaluation of two novel oligonucleotide probes based on 16S rRNA sequence for the identification of Salmonella in foods.

    PubMed

    Lin, C K; Tsen, H Y

    1995-05-01

    DNA sequence in the V3 to V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene of Salmonella enteritidis was determined. By comparison of this sequence with those of Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris obtained from GenBank/EMBL database, three oligonucleotides termed as 16S I, 16S II and 16S III were synthesized. Hybridization of these oligonucleotides with 325 Salmonella isolates and some non-Salmonella isolates including the Salmonella closely related species of the family of Enterobacteriaceae showed that 16S II could not be used as a Salmonella specific-probe. 16S I and 16S III hybridized with all the Salmonella isolates tested, the former also hybridizing with Citrobacter spp. and the latter hybridizing with Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as Serratia marcescens. Since enrichment of the target cells in food samples was usually required prior to the DNA hybridization assay, the interference from those non-Salmonella isolates could be prevented by enrichment by culturing in lactose-combined tetrathionate (CTET) broth followed by Gram-negative (GN) broth at 37 degrees C and/or 43 degrees C. Such a culture step could inhibit the growth of Klebsiella spp., Ser. marcescens and/or Citrobacter spp. and allowed the specific detection of Salmonella.

  16. Pentopyranosyl Oligonucleotide Systems. Part 11: Systems with Shortened Backbones: D)-beta-Ribopyranosyl-(4 yields 3 )- and (L)-alpha - Lyxopyranosyl-(4 yields 3 )-oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wippo, Harald; Reck, Folkert; Kudick, Rene; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Ceulemans, Griet; Bolli, Martin; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert

    2001-01-01

    The (L)-a-lyxopyranosyl-(4'yields 3')-oligonucleotide system-a member of a pentopyranosyl oligonucleotide family containing a shortened backbone-is capable of cooperative base-pairing and of cross-pairing with DNA and RNA. In contrast, corresponding (D)-beta-ribopyransoyl-(4' yields 3')-oligonucleotides do not show base-pairing under similar conditions. We conclude that oligonucleotide systems can violate the six-bonds-per-backbone-unit rule by having five bonds instead, if their vicinally bound phosphodiester bridges can assume an antiperiplanar conformation. An additional structural feature that seems relevant to the cross-pairing capability of the (L)-a-lyxopyranosyl-(4' yields 3')-oligonucleotide system is its (small) backbone/basepair axes inclination. An inclination which is similar to that in B-DNA seems to be a prerequisite for an oligonucleotide system s capability to cross-pair with DNA.

  17. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  18. Universal strategies for the DNA-encoding of libraries of small molecules using the chemical ligation of oligonucleotide tags.

    PubMed

    Litovchick, Alexander; Clark, Matthew A; Keefe, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The affinity-mediated selection of large libraries of DNA-encoded small molecules is increasingly being used to initiate drug discovery programs. We present universal methods for the encoding of such libraries using the chemical ligation of oligonucleotides. These methods may be used to record the chemical history of individual library members during combinatorial synthesis processes. We demonstrate three different chemical ligation methods as examples of information recording processes (writing) for such libraries and two different cDNA-generation methods as examples of information retrieval processes (reading) from such libraries. The example writing methods include uncatalyzed and Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloadditions and a novel photochemical thymidine-psoralen cycloaddition. The first reading method "relay primer-dependent bypass" utilizes a relay primer that hybridizes across a chemical ligation junction embedded in a fixed-sequence and is extended at its 3'-terminus prior to ligation to adjacent oligonucleotides. The second reading method "repeat-dependent bypass" utilizes chemical ligation junctions that are flanked by repeated sequences. The upstream repeat is copied prior to a rearrangement event during which the 3'-terminus of the cDNA hybridizes to the downstream repeat and polymerization continues. In principle these reading methods may be used with any ligation chemistry and offer universal strategies for the encoding (writing) and interpretation (reading) of DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

  19. Universal strategies for the DNA-encoding of libraries of small molecules using the chemical ligation of oligonucleotide tags

    PubMed Central

    Litovchick, Alexander; Clark, Matthew A; Keefe, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The affinity-mediated selection of large libraries of DNA-encoded small molecules is increasingly being used to initiate drug discovery programs. We present universal methods for the encoding of such libraries using the chemical ligation of oligonucleotides. These methods may be used to record the chemical history of individual library members during combinatorial synthesis processes. We demonstrate three different chemical ligation methods as examples of information recording processes (writing) for such libraries and two different cDNA-generation methods as examples of information retrieval processes (reading) from such libraries. The example writing methods include uncatalyzed and Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloadditions and a novel photochemical thymidine-psoralen cycloaddition. The first reading method “relay primer-dependent bypass” utilizes a relay primer that hybridizes across a chemical ligation junction embedded in a fixed-sequence and is extended at its 3′-terminus prior to ligation to adjacent oligonucleotides. The second reading method “repeat-dependent bypass” utilizes chemical ligation junctions that are flanked by repeated sequences. The upstream repeat is copied prior to a rearrangement event during which the 3′-terminus of the cDNA hybridizes to the downstream repeat and polymerization continues. In principle these reading methods may be used with any ligation chemistry and offer universal strategies for the encoding (writing) and interpretation (reading) of DNA-encoded chemical libraries. PMID:25483841

  20. Electrophoresis for genotyping: temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis for profiling of oligonucleotide dissociation.

    PubMed Central

    Day, I N; O'Dell, S D; Cash, I D; Humphries, S E; Weavind, G P

    1995-01-01

    Traditional use of an oligonucleotide probe to determine genotype depends on perfect base pairing to a single-stranded target which is stable to a higher temperature than when imperfect binding occurs due to a mismatch in the target sequence. Bound oligonucleotide is detected at a predetermined single temperature 'snapshot' of the melting profile, allowing the distinction of perfect from imperfect base pairing. In heterozygotes, the presence of the alternative sequence must be verified with a second oligonucleotide complementary to the variant. Here we describe a system of real-time variable temperature electrophoresis during which the oligonucleotide dissociates from its target. In 20% polyacrylamide the target strand has minimal mobility and released oligonucleotide migrates extremely quickly so that the 'freed' rather than the 'bound' is displayed. The full profile of oligonucleotide dissociation during gel electrophoresis is represented along the gel track, and a single oligonucleotide is sufficient to confirm heterozygosity, since the profile displays two separate peaks. Resolution is great, with use of short track lengths enabling analysis of dense arrays of samples. Each gel track can contain a different target or oligonucleotide and the temperature gradient can accommodate oligonucleotides of different melting temperatures. This provides a convenient system to examine the interaction of many different oligonucleotides and target sequences simultaneously and requires no prior knowledge of the mutant sequence(s) nor of oligonucleotide melting temperatures. The application of the technique is described for screening of a hotspot for mutations in the LDL receptor gene in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia. Images PMID:7630718

  1. Rapid and multiplexed transcript analysis of microbial cultures using capillary electophoresis-detectable oligonucleotide probe pools.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jari J; Kataja, Kari; Satokari, Reetta; Penttilä, Merja; Söderlund, Hans; Saloheimo, Markku

    2006-06-01

    A rapid assay for multiplex transcript analysis based on solution hybridization with pools of oligonucleotide probes was developed. In this assay called TRAC (transcript analysis with aid of affinity capture) the mRNAs to be studied are hybridized with gene-specific detection probe pools and biotinylated oligo(dT) and captured on streptavidin-coated magnetic particles. Unbound sample material and nonspecifically bound detection probes are removed and the target-specific probes are eluted and detected by capillary electrophoresis. Simultaneous treatment of 96 samples was automated using a magnetic bead particle processor. The assay enabled detection of in vitro transcribed RNA at the level of 30 amol (20 pg) and over a 300-fold linear range. Besides extracted RNA, crude cell lysates were directly used as samples. The assay was used for transcriptional analysis of selected mRNAs in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei in two experimental conditions. TRAC analysis was highly reproducible, providing expression results that were consistent with conventional Northern blot analysis. The whole procedure starting from sample collecting can be carried out in 2 h, making this assay suitable for high-throughput analysis of a limited set of mRNAs e.g. in gene expression monitoring of production organism in microbial bioprocesses.

  2. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of Newcastle disease and avian influenza viruses using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Severinghaus, Lucia Liu; Liu, Lu-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Tsong; Pu, Chang-En; Huang, Dean; Lir, Jihn-Tsair; Chin, Shih-Chien; Cheng, Ming-Chu; Lee, Shu-Hwae; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2008-03-18

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza (AI) are two of the most important zoonotic viral diseases of birds throughout the world. These two viruses often have a great impact upon the poultry industry. Both viruses are associated with transmission from wild to domestic birds, and often display similar signs that need to be differentiated. A rapid surveillance among wild and domestic birds is important for early disease detection and intervention, and is the basis for what measures should be taken. The surveillance, thus, should be able to differentiate the diseases and provide a detailed analysis of the virus strains. Here, we described a fast, simultaneous and inexpensive approach to the detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian influenza virus (AIV) using oligonucleotide microarrays. The NDV pathotypes and the AIV haemagglutinin subtypes H5 and H7 were determined at the same time. Different probes on a microarray targeting the same gene were implemented in order to encompass the diversified virus strains or provide multiple confirmations of the genotype. This ensures good sensitivity and specificity among divergent viruses. Twenty-four virus isolates and twenty-four various combinations of the viruses were tested in this study. All viruses were successfully detected and typed. The hybridization results on microarrays were clearly identified with the naked eyes, with no further imaging equipment needed. The results demonstrate that the detection and typing of multiple viruses can be performed simultaneously and easily using oligonucleotide microarrays. The proposed method may provide potential for rapid surveillance and differential diagnosis of these two important zoonoses in both wild and domestic birds.

  3. Oligonucleotide Microarray for the Study of Functional Gene Diversity in the Nitrogen Cycle in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Taroncher-Oldenburg, Gaspar; Griner, Erin M.; Francis, Chris A.; Ward, Bess B.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of functional diversity and its dynamics in the environment is essential for understanding the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of aquatic systems. Here we describe the development and optimization of a DNA microarray method for the detection and quantification of functional genes in the environment and report on their preliminary application to the study of the denitrification gene nirS in the Choptank River-Chesapeake Bay system. Intergenic and intragenic resolution constraints were determined by an oligonucleotide (70-mer) microarray approach. Complete signal separation was achieved when comparing unrelated genes within the nitrogen cycle (amoA, nifH, nirK, and nirS) and detecting different variants of the same gene, nirK, corresponding to organisms with two different physiological modes, ammonia oxidizers and denitrifying halobenzoate degraders. The limits of intragenic resolution were investigated with a microarray containing 64 nirS sequences comprising 14 cultured organisms and 50 clones obtained from the Choptank River in Maryland. The nirS oligonucleotides covered a range of sequence identities from approximately 40 to 100%. The threshold values for specificity were determined to be 87% sequence identity and a target-to-probe perfect match-to-mismatch binding free-energy ratio of 0.56. The lower detection limit was 10 pg of DNA (equivalent to approximately 107 copies) per target per microarray. Hybridization patterns on the microarray differed between sediment samples from two stations in the Choptank River, implying important differences in the composition of the denitirifer community along an environmental gradient of salinity, inorganic nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon. This work establishes a useful set of design constraints (independent of the target gene) for the implementation of functional gene microarrays for environmental applications. PMID:12571043

  4. Palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Kevin H

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  5. Detection of high-resolution Raman spectra in short oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairamov, F. B.; Poloskin, E. D.; Chernev, A. L.; Toporov, V. V.; Dubina, M. V.; Lahderanta, E.; Lipsanen, H.; Bairamov, B. Kh.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution spectra of single-chain short oligonucleotides d(20G, 20T), where d is a deoxyribonucleoside, G is guanine, and T is thymine, have been obtained by the highly sensitive nonresonant Raman scattering method of biomacromolecules. In addition to their own multifunctional significance, short oligonucleotides attract interest as ideal model objects for revealing poorly studied peculiarities of tertiary and quaternary structures of DNA. The detection of narrow spectral lines has allowed determining the characteristic time scale and makes it possible to study the dynamics of fast relaxation processes of vibrational motions of atoms in biomacromolecules. It has been found that the FWHM of the narrowest 1355.4 cm-1 spectral line attributed to the vibrations of the dT methyl group is 14.6 cm-1. The corresponding lifetime is 0.38 ps.

  6. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  7. P-chiral oligonucleotides in biological recognition processes.

    PubMed

    Guga, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    Internucleotide phosphodiester linkages in non-modified oligonucleotides are quickly degraded by nucleolytic enzymes present in the cells and this feature practically eliminates natural DNA and RNA molecules from medical applications and from many structural and mechanistic studies. P-chiral oligonucleotide analogs, in which one of the non-bridging phosphate oxygen atoms is substituted with another heteroatom (e.g. S, Se) or a chemical group (e.g. CH3, BH3(-)), have significantly greater nuclease resistance and also offer important possibilities for detailed studies of interactions with other biomolecules at the molecular level. Notably, these substitutions do not disrupt hydrogen bonding between nucleobases and affect the overall geometry of the oligomers to only low or moderate extent, although important changes of hydration patterns and changes of interactions with metal ions are observed. Such the probes, including isotopomeric species labeled with a heavy oxygen isotope, possessing phosphorus atoms of selected absolute configurations, have been used for elucidation of the mode of action of many enzymes (nucleases, transferases, kinases), ribozymes and DNA-zymes, as well as for investigations on thermodynamic stability of nucleic acids complexes (duplexes, triplexes, i-motif) and for studies on a mechanism of conformational changes of B-Z type. They are also useful tools for analysis of interactions of the phosphoryl oxygen atoms in natural precursors with functional groups of proteins. The synthetic routes to stereodefined forms of selected types of P-chiral oligonucleotides are presented, as well as recently developed methods for their configurational analysis at micromolar concentration. Selected examples of application of diastereomerically pure P-chiral oligonucleotides for structural, biochemical and biological experiments are discussed.

  8. Induction of Radiosensitization by Antisense Oligonucleotide Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Miraglia L and Strobl JS: Sensitization of breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by protein kinase C inhibition. Proc. of the 9 0 ,h American Assoc...sensitizes human tumor cells to ionizing radiation . Radiat Res 129:345-350. O’Brian C, Vogel VG, Singletary SE and Ward NE (1989) Elevated protein...Antisense Oligonucleotides, Ionizing Radiation , Breast Cancer, Abbreviations: IR, ionizing radiation ; PKC, protein kinase C; MCF-7, Michigan Cancer

  9. Cationic carbosilane dendrimers and oligonucleotide binding: an energetic affair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, D.; Laurini, E.; Posocco, P.; Fermeglia, M.; Pricl, S.

    2015-02-01

    Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction.Generation 2 cationic carbosilane dendrimers hold great promise as internalizing agents for gene therapy as they present low toxicity and retain and internalize the genetic material as an oligonucleotide or siRNA. In this work we carried out complete in silico structural and energetical characterization of the interactions of a set of G2 carbosilane dendrimers, showing different affinity towards two single strand oligonucleotide (ODN) sequences in vitro. Our simulations predict that these four dendrimers and the relevant ODN complexes are characterized by similar size and shape, and that the molecule-specific ODN binding ability can be rationalized only by considering a critical molecular design parameter: the normalized effective binding energy ΔGbind,eff/Neff, i.e. the performance of each active individual dendrimer branch directly involved in a binding interaction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04510f

  10. Sex determination of bovine preimplantation embryos by oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Zhong, Fagang; Yang, Yonglin; Wang, Xinhua; Liu, Shouren; Zhu, Bin

    2013-06-01

    The aim has been to set up a rapid and accurate microarray assay using sandwich mode for sex determination of bovine preimplantation embryos. Twelve sequence-specific oligonucleotide capture probes used to discriminate 12 samples were spotted onto the aldehyde-modified glass slides by Arrayer. The 2 recognition probes used to identify coding regions of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome gene (SRY) and β-casein (CSN2) reference gene were coupled with biotin. The assay was optimized by using genomic DNA extracted from blood samples of known sex individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the fragments in the HMG box region of SRY gene and CSN2 gene with sequence-specific primers. The sex of samples was identified by detecting both the SRY and CSN2 genes simultaneously in 2 reaction cells of microarrays, with the male having SRY and CSN2 signals and the female only CSN2. The sex of 20 bovine preimplantation embryos was determined by oligonucleotide microarray. The protocol was run with a blind test that showed a 100% (82/82) specificity and accuracy in sexing of leukocytes. The bovine embryos were transferred into 20 bovine recipients, with a pregnant rate of 40% (8/20). Three calves were born at term, and 5 fetuses were miscarried. Their sexes were fully in accordance with the embryonic sex predetermination predicted by oligonucleotide microarray. This suggests that the oligonucleotide microarray method of SRY gene analysis can be used in early sex prediction of bovine embryos in breeding programs.

  11. Serotyping of Human Group A Rotavirus with Oligonucleotide Probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Cold Spring Harbor , other oligonucleotides, HuG8Ac and HuG9Ac...HuG8Ac (5’ NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1988;5l1-159 CGA ACT ATC TUC TAT CTC TGT CTC T 3’) was based 9. Bastardo JW, McKimm-Bresckin JL, Sonza...Coulson BS, Unicomb LE, Pitson GA, Bishop RE Simple and specific manual. Cold Spring Harbor , NY Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. enzyme

  12. The Design of Oligonucleotides Which Attack Specific Gene Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-08

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP ’" DNA Recognition; 06 03 Triplet helix formation, <r: " 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and...Such local triplet bonding schemes give rise to H bonding between the triplex forming oligonucleotide and the purine of the underlying Watson Crick ...identify by block number) During the first year of Navy support, we have refined our understanding of triple helix formation and in the process, have

  13. What controls the hybridization thermodynamics of spherical nucleic acids?

    PubMed

    Randeria, Pratik S; Jones, Matthew R; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Banga, Resham J; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-03-18

    The hybridization of free oligonucleotides to densely packed, oriented arrays of DNA modifying the surfaces of spherical nucleic acid (SNA)-gold nanoparticle conjugates occurs with negative cooperativity; i.e., each binding event destabilizes subsequent binding events. DNA hybridization is thus an ever-changing function of the number of strands already hybridized to the particle. Thermodynamic quantification of this behavior reveals a 3 orders of magnitude decrease in the binding constant for the capture of a free oligonucleotide by an SNA conjugate as the fraction of pre-hybridized strands increases from 0 to ∼30%. Increasing the number of pre-hybridized strands imparts an increasing enthalpic penalty to hybridization that makes binding more difficult, while simultaneously decreasing the entropic penalty to hybridization, which makes binding more favorable. Hybridization of free DNA to an SNA is thus governed by both an electrostatic barrier as the SNA accumulates charge with additional binding events and an effect consistent with allostery, where hybridization at certain sites on an SNA modify the binding affinity at a distal site through conformational changes to the remaining single strands. Leveraging these insights allows for the design of conjugates that hybridize free strands with significantly higher efficiencies, some of which approach 100%.

  14. Use of a multiplexed CMOS microarray to optimize and compare oligonucleotide binding to DNA probes synthesized or immobilized on individual electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode.

  15. Oligonucleotide Frequencies of Barcoding Loci Can Discriminate Species across Kingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Virendra; Tuli, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding refers to the use of short DNA sequences for rapid identification of species. Genetic distance or character attributes of a particular barcode locus discriminate the species. We report an efficient approach to analyze short sequence data for discrimination between species. Methodology and Principal Findings A new approach, Oligonucleotide Frequency Range (OFR) of barcode loci for species discrimination is proposed. OFR of the loci that discriminates between species was characteristic of a species, i.e., the maxima and minima within a species did not overlap with that of other species. We compared the species resolution ability of different barcode loci using p-distance, Euclidean distance of oligonucleotide frequencies, nucleotide-character based approach and OFR method. The species resolution by OFR was either higher or comparable to the other methods. A short fragment of 126 bp of internal transcribed spacer region in ribosomal RNA gene was sufficient to discriminate a majority of the species using OFR. Conclusions/Significance Oligonucleotide frequency range of a barcode locus can discriminate between species. Ability to discriminate species using very short DNA fragments may have wider applications in forensic and conservation studies. PMID:20808837

  16. Recursive construction of perfect DNA molecules from imperfect oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Linshiz, Gregory; Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Kaplan, Shai; Gronau, Ilan; Ravid, Sivan; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Making faultless complex objects from potentially faulty building blocks is a fundamental challenge in computer engineering, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, we show for the first time how recursion can be used to address this challenge and demonstrate a recursive procedure that constructs error-free DNA molecules and their libraries from error-prone oligonucleotides. Divide and Conquer (D&C), the quintessential recursive problem-solving technique, is applied in silico to divide the target DNA sequence into overlapping oligonucleotides short enough to be synthesized directly, albeit with errors; error-prone oligonucleotides are recursively combined in vitro, forming error-prone DNA molecules; error-free fragments of these molecules are then identified, extracted and used as new, typically longer and more accurate, inputs to another iteration of the recursive construction procedure; the entire process repeats until an error-free target molecule is formed. Our recursive construction procedure surpasses existing methods for de novo DNA synthesis in speed, precision, amenability to automation, ease of combining synthetic and natural DNA fragments, and ability to construct designer DNA libraries. It thus provides a novel and robust foundation for the design and construction of synthetic biological molecules and organisms.

  17. G-Quadruplex Forming Oligonucleotides as Anti-HIV Agents.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Riccardi, Claudia; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-09-22

    Though a variety of different non-canonical nucleic acids conformations have been recognized, G-quadruplex structures are probably the structural motifs most commonly found within known oligonucleotide-based aptamers. This could be ascribed to several factors, as their large conformational diversity, marked responsiveness of their folding/unfolding processes to external stimuli, high structural compactness and chemo-enzymatic and thermodynamic stability. A number of G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides having relevant in vitro anti-HIV activity have been discovered in the last two decades through either SELEX or rational design approaches. Improved aptamers have been obtained by chemical modifications of natural oligonucleotides, as terminal conjugations with large hydrophobic groups, replacement of phosphodiester linkages with phosphorothioate bonds or other surrogates, insertion of base-modified monomers, etc. In turn, detailed structural studies have elucidated the peculiar architectures adopted by many G-quadruplex-based aptamers and provided insight into their mechanism of action. An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge of the relevance of putative G-quadruplex forming sequences within the viral genome and of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers, selectively targeting HIV proteins, is here presented.

  18. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Payton, Paxton; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Rowland, Diane; Faircloth, Wilson; Guo, Baozhu; Burow, Mark; Puppala, Naveen; Gallo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B), oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues. PMID:19523230

  19. Microarray oligonucleotide probe designer (MOPeD): A web service.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viren C; Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Horner, Vanessa L; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Martin, Donna; Caspary, Tamara; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-11-01

    Methods of genomic selection that combine high-density oligonucleotide microarrays with next-generation DNA sequencing allow investigators to characterize genomic variation in selected portions of complex eukaryotic genomes. Yet choosing which specific oligonucleotides to be use can pose a major technical challenge. To address this issue, we have developed a software package called MOPeD (Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Designer), which automates the process of designing genomic selection microarrays. This web-based software allows individual investigators to design custom genomic selection microarrays optimized for synthesis with Roche NimbleGen's maskless photolithography. Design parameters include uniqueness of the probe sequences, melting temperature, hairpin formation, and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We generated probe databases for the human, mouse, and rhesus macaque genomes and conducted experimental validation of MOPeD-designed microarrays in human samples by sequencing the human X chromosome exome, where relevant sequence metrics indicated superior performance relative to a microarray designed by the Roche NimbleGen proprietary algorithm. We also performed validation in the mouse to identify known mutations contained within a 487-kb region from mouse chromosome 16, the mouse chromosome 16 exome (1.7 Mb), and the mouse chromosome 12 exome (3.3 Mb). Our results suggest that the open source MOPeD software package and website (http://moped.genetics.emory.edu/) will make a valuable resource for investigators in their sequence-based studies of complex eukaryotic genomes.

  20. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  1. Oligonucleotide probes for detection and differentiation of Staphylococcus aureus strains containing genes for enterotoxins A, B, and C and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Neill, R J; Fanning, G R; Delahoz, F; Wolff, R; Gemski, P

    1990-01-01

    Different synthetic DNA nucleotide sequences were evaluated as gene probes for the specific detection and differentiation of Staphylococcus aureus strains encoding enterotoxins A (SEA), B (SEB), and C (SEC) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Identification of sequences unique to each toxin, based on knowledge of their nucleotide sequences, led to preparation of the specific 18-base oligonucleotide probes EA1 (encoding amino acids 177 to 182 of SEA), EB2 (encoding amino acids 105 to 110 of SEB), EC5 (encoding amino acids 125 to 131 of SEC1), and TS1 (encoding amino acids 160 to 166 of TSST-1). In colony blot hybridization analyses, these probes hybridized specifically with DNA from strains that produced the respective toxin serotypes. An excellent (greater than or equal to 93%) correlation between hybridization results (genotype) and toxin protein detection by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (phenotype) was observed in the characterization of both reference and clinical strains of S. aureus for SEA, SEB, and TSST-1. A lower correlation (64%) for SEC reflected a lack of sensitivity in detecting toxin production. Our findings demonstrate that molecular DNA hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes provides another approach for establishing the toxigenicity of S. aureus. Images PMID:2380378

  2. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  3. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer.

  4. Regulation of Gene Editing Activity Directed by Single-Stranded Oligonucleotides and CRISPR/Cas9 Systems.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Strouse, Bryan; Kmiec, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can direct the repair of a single base mutation in human genes. While the regulation of this gene editing reaction has been partially elucidated, the low frequency with which repair occurs has hampered development toward clinical application. In this work a CRISPR/Cas9 complex is employed to induce double strand DNA breakage at specific sites surrounding the nucleotide designated for exchange. The result is a significant elevation in ssODN-directed gene repair, validated by a phenotypic readout. By analysing reaction parameters, we have uncovered restrictions on gene editing activity involving CRISPR/Cas9 complexes. First, ssODNs that hybridize to the non-transcribed strand direct a higher level of gene repair than those that hybridize to the transcribed strand. Second, cleavage must be proximal to the targeted mutant base to enable higher levels of gene editing. Third, DNA cleavage enables a higher level of gene editing activity as compared to single-stranded DNA nicks, created by modified Cas9 (Nickases). Fourth, we calculated the hybridization potential and free energy levels of ssODNs that are complementary to the guide RNA sequences of CRISPRs used in this study. We find a correlation between free energy potential and the capacity of single-stranded oligonucleotides to inhibit specific DNA cleavage activity, thereby indirectly reducing gene editing activity. Our data provide novel information that might be taken into consideration in the design and usage of CRISPR/Cas9 systems with ssODNs for gene editing.

  5. Targeting DNA with "light-up" pyrimidine triple-helical forming oligonucleotides conjugated to stabilizing fluorophores (LU-TFOs).

    PubMed

    Renard, Brice-Loïc; Lartia, Rémy; Asseline, Ulysse

    2008-12-07

    The synthesis of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) linked to a series of cyanine monomethines has been performed. Eight cyanines including one thiocyanine, four thiazole orange analogues, and three quinocyanines were attached to the 5'-end of 10-mer pyrimidine TFOs. The binding properties of these modified TFOs with their double-stranded DNA target were studied by absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The stability of the triplex structures depended on the cyanine structure and the linker size used to connect both entities. The most efficient cyanines able to stabilize the triplex structures, when attached at the 5'-end of the TFO, have been incorporated at both ends and provided triplex structures with increased stability. Fluorescence studies have shown that for the TFOs involving one cyanine, an important intensity increase (up to 37-fold) in the fluorescent signal was observed upon their hybridization with the double-stranded target, proving hybridization. The conjugates involving thiazole orange attached by the benzothiazole ring provided the most balanced properties in terms of triplex stabilization, fluorescence intensity and fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization with the double-stranded target. In order to test the influence of different parameters such as the TFO sequence and length, thiazole orange was used to label 17-mer TFOs. Hybridizations of these TFOs with different duplexes, designed to study the influence of mismatches at both internal and terminal positions on the triplex structures, confirmed the possibility of triplex formation without loss of specificity together with a strong fluorescence enhancement (up to 13-fold).

  6. Investigation of the structural organization of cationic nanoemulsion/antisense oligonucleotide complexes.

    PubMed

    Bruxel, Fernanda; Vilela, José Mario Carneiro; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Malachias, Ângelo; Perez, Carlos A; Magalhães-Paniago, Rogério; Oliveira, Mônica Cristina; Teixeira, Helder F

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments were used to investigate the structural organization of cationic nanoemulsion/oligonucleotide complexes. Oligonucleotides targeting topoisomerase II gene were adsorbed on cationic nanoemulsions obtained by means of spontaneous emulsification procedure. Topographical analysis by atomic force microscopy allowed the observation of the nanoemulsion/oligonucleotide complexes through three-dimensional high-resolution images. Flattening of the oil droplets was observed, which was reduced in the complexes obtained at high amount of adsorbed oligonucleotides. In such conditions, complexes exhibit droplet size in the 600nm range. The oligonucleotides molecules were detected on the surface of the droplets, preventing their fusion during aggregation. A lamellar structure organization was identified by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments. The presence of the nucleic acid molecules led to a disorganization of the lipid arrangement and an expansion in the lattice spacing, which was proportional to the amount of oligonucleotides added.

  7. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  8. Nanoparticle-bridge assay for amplification-free electrical detection of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Manouchehr

    The aim of this research is to investigate a highly sensitive, fast, inexpensive, and field-applicable amplification-free nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide detection method which does not rely on any enzymatic or signal amplification process. In this approach, target oligonucleotide strands are detected through the formation of nanoparticle satellites which make an electrical path between two electrodes. This method enables an extremely sensitive oligonucleotide detection because even a few oligonucleotide strands can form a single nanoparticle satellite which can solely generates an electrical output signal. Results showed that this oligonucleotide detection method can detect oligonucleotide single strands at concentrations as low as 50 femtomolar without any amplification process. This detection method can be implemented in many fields such as biodefense, food safety, clinical research, and forensics.

  9. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a material derived from 4-mercaptobenzoic acid: A novel platform for oligonucleotide immobilization.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rafael da Fonseca; da Silva, Amanda Gonçalves; Ferreira, Lucas Franco; Franco, Diego Leoni

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports the electrochemical modification of pencil carbon graphite electrodes with a polymeric material derived from 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. Acidic solutions (pH 0 and 5.02) yielded an insulating polymeric film with anionic permselective properties. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed a complete coverage of the carbon graphite electrodes with a laminar-like polymeric structure. Different characterization studies indicate that the carboxyl group remained unchanged since the absorbance peak and oxidation potential did not change with the increase in pH at the pKa accounting for the carboxyl/carboxylate redox transition. The functionalized matrix was activated using carbodiimide, succinimide and an amine-modified oligonucleotide. The immobilization and hybridization processes were successfully verified using the redox electroactive indicator methylene blue, where better electrochemical signals were obtained when compared with the traditional self-assembled monolayer system. The selectivity of the system was verified using a noncomplementary target where no significant difference in electric current was observed when compared to the system containing only the probe. The method showed a good linear correlation coefficient (r(2)=0.9915), low limit of detection (1.17nmolL(-1)), and an acceptable precision (RSD=2.75%). The proposed method is suitable for further studies using different sequences of oligonucleotides.

  11. Development of an oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray for transcriptional analysis of Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan-Hui; Barari, Mehrnoosh; Arif, Basil M; Krell, Peter J

    2007-08-01

    A modified oligonucleotide-based two-channel DNA microarray was developed for characterization of temporal expression profiles of select Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) ORFs including its 7 unique ORFs. The microarray chip contained oligonucleotide probes for 23 CfMNPV ORFs and their complements as well as five host genes. Total RNA was isolated at different times post infection from Cf203 insect cells infected with CfMNPV. The cDNA was synthesized, fluorescent labelled with Cy3, and co-hybridized to the microarray chips along with Cy5-labelled viral genomic DNA, which served as equimolar reference standards for each probe. Transcription of the 7 CfMNPV unique ORFs was detected using DNA microarray analysis and their temporal expression profiles suggest that they are functional genes. The expression levels of three host genes varied throughout virus infection and therefore were unsuitable for normalization between microarrays. The DNA microarray results were compared to quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Transcription of the non-coding (antisense) strands of some of the CfMNPV select genes including the polyhedrin gene, was also detected by array analysis and confirmed by qRT-PCR. The polyhedrin antisense transcript, based on long-range RT-PCR analysis, appeared to be a read-through product of an adjacent ORF in the same orientation as the antisense transcript.

  12. Empirical Establishment of Oligonucleotide Probe Design Criteria; Use of Microarrays with Different Probe Sizes for Monitoring Gene Expression; Temporal Transcriptomic Analysis as Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Transitions into Stationary Phase during Electron Donor Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Huang, K. H.; Alm, E. J.; Wan, X. F.; Hazen, T. C.; Arkin, A. P.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J. Z.; Fields, M. W.

    2005-07-15

    In order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes........Based on the experimental results, a set of criteria are suggested for the design of gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes, and these criteria should provide valuable information for the development of new software and algorithms for microarray-based studies.; Microarrays with oligonucleotides of different lengths were used to monitor gene expression at a wholegenome level. To determine what length of oligonucleotide is a better alternative to PCR-generated probes, the performance of oligonucleotide probes was systematically compared to that of their PCR-generated counterparts for 96 genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in terms of overall signal intensity, numbers of genes detected, specificity, sensitivity, and differential gene expression under experimental conditions. .......To evaluate differential gene expression under experimental conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 cells were exposed to low- or high-pH conditions for 30 and 60 min, and the transcriptional profiles detected by oligonucleotide probes (50-mer, 60-mer, and 70-mer) were closely correlated with those detected by the PCR probes. The results demonstrated that 70-mer oligonucleotides can provide the performance most comparable to the performance obtained with PCR-generated probes.; Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the

  13. New strategies for cyclization and bicyclization of oligonucleotides by click chemistry assisted by microwaves.

    PubMed

    Lietard, Jory; Meyer, Albert; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Morvan, François

    2008-01-04

    The synthesis of cyclic, branched, and bicyclic oligonucleotides was performed by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition assisted by microwaves in solution and on solid support. For that purpose, new phosphoramidite building blocks and new solid supports were designed to introduce alkyne and bromo functions into the same oligonucleotide by solid-phase synthesis on a DNA synthesizer. The bromine atom was then substituted by sodium azide to yield azide oligonucleotides. Cyclizations were found to be more efficient in solution than on solid support. This method allowed the efficient preparation of cyclic (6- to 20-mers), branched (with one or two dangling sequences), and bicyclic (2 x 10-mers) oligonucleotides.

  14. Diels-Alder cycloadditions in water for the straightforward preparation of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Marchán, Vicente; Ortega, Samuel; Pulido, Daniel; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between diene-modified oligonucleotides and maleimide-derivatized peptides afforded peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates with high purity and yield. Synthesis of the reagents was easily accomplished by on-column derivatization of the corresponding peptides and oligonucleotides. The cycloaddition reaction was carried out in mild conditions, in aqueous solution at 37°C. The speed of the reaction was found to vary depending on the size of the reagents, but it can be completed in 8–10 h by reacting the diene-oligonucleotide with a small excess of maleimide-peptide. PMID:16478710

  15. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis using oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Storici, F; Lewis, L K; Resnick, M A

    2001-08-01

    Functional characterization of the genes of higher eukaryotes has been aided by their expression in model organisms and by analyzing site-specific changes in homologous genes in model systems such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modifying sequences in yeast or other organisms such that no heterologous material is retained requires in vitro mutagenesis together with subcloning. PCR-based procedures that do not involve cloning are inefficient or require multistep reactions that increase the risk of additional mutations. An alternative approach, demonstrated in yeast, relies on transformation with an oligonucleotide, but the method is restricted to the generation of mutants with a selectable phenotype. Oligonucleotides, when combined with gap repair, have also been used to modify plasmids in yeast; however, this approach is limited by restriction-site availability. We have developed a mutagenesis approach in yeast based on transformation by unpurified oligonucleotides that allows the rapid creation of site-specific DNA mutations in vivo. A two-step, cloning-free process, referred to as delitto perfetto, generates products having only the desired mutation, such as a single or multiple base change, an insertion, a small or a large deletion, or even random mutations. The system provides for multiple rounds of mutation in a window up to 200 base pairs. The process is RAD52 dependent, is not constrained by the distribution of naturally occurring restriction sites, and requires minimal DNA sequencing. Because yeast is commonly used for random and selective cloning of genomic DNA from higher eukaryotes such as yeast artificial chromosomes, the delitto perfetto strategy also provides an efficient way to create precise changes in mammalian or other DNA sequences.

  16. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  17. Inhibition Of Molecular And Biological Processes Using Modified Oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Malykh, Andrei G.; Polouchine, Nikolai N.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2003-04-15

    A method of inhibiting at least one molecular process in a sample, comprising administering to the sample an oligonucleotide or polynucleotide containing at least one monomeric unit having formula (I): wherein A is an organic moiety, n is at least 1, and each X is independently selected from the group consisting of --NRCOCONu, --NHCOCR.sub.2 CR.sub.2 CONu, --NHCOCR.dbd.CRCONu, and --NHCOSSCONu, wherein each R independently represents H or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, and Nu represents a nucleophile, or a salt of the compound.

  18. Oligonucleotide primers for PCR amplification of coelomate introns.

    PubMed

    Jarman, Simon N; Ward, Robert D; Elliott, Nicholas G

    2002-09-01

    Abstract Seven novel oligonucleotide primer pairs for polymerase chain reaction amplification of introns from nuclear genes in coelomates were designed and tested. Each pair bound to adjacent exons that are separated by a single intron in most coelomate species. The primer sets amplified introns in species as widely separated by the course of evolution as oysters (Mollusca: Protostoma) and salmon (Chordata: Deuterostoma). Each primer set was tested on a further 6 coelomate species and found to amplify introns in most cases. These primer sets may therefore be useful tools for developing nuclear DNA markers in diverse coelomate species for studies of population genetics, phylogenetics, or genome mapping.

  19. Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza A viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotchenko, S. A.; Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Smirnova, E. A.; Kushnareva, E. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Sansyzbay, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Influenza is one of the most widespread respiratory viral diseases, infecting humans, horses, pigs, poultry and some other animal populations. Influenza A viruses (IAV) are classified into subtypes on the basis of the surface hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) glycoproteins. The correct determination of IAV subtype is necessary for clinical and epidemiological studies. In this article we propose an oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of IAV using universal one-step multisegment RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of viral gene segments. It showed to be an advanced approach for fast detection and identification of IAV.

  20. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Craig, Stephen L

    2005-09-28

    Dynamic light scattering is used as a sensitive probe of hybridization on DNA-functionalized colloidal gold nanoparticles. When a target DNA strand possesses an 8 base "dangling end", duplex formation on the surface of the nanoparticles leads to an increase in hydrodynamic radius. Duplex melting is manifested in a drop in hydrodynamic radius with increasing temperature, and the concentration dependence of the melting temperature provides a measure of the thermodynamics of binding. The hybridization thermodynamics are found to be significantly lower at higher hybridization densities than those previously reported for initial hybridization events. The pronounced deviation from Langmuir adsorption behavior is greater for longer duplexes, and it is, therefore, consistent with electrostatic repulsion between densely packed oligonucleotides. The results have implications for sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  1. Mapping RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides of avian tumor virus RNAs: sarcoma-specific oligonucleotides are near the poly(A) end and oligonucleotides common to sarcoma and transformation-defective viruses are at the poly(A) end.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L H; Duesberg, P; Beemon, K; Vogt, P K

    1975-01-01

    The large RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides of the nondefective (nd) Rous sarcoma virus (RSV): Prague RSV of subgroup B (PR-B), PR-C and B77 of subgroup C; of their transformation-defective (td0 deletion mutants: td PR-B, td PR-C, and td B77; and of replication-defective (rd) RSV(-) were completely or partially mapped on the 30 to 40S viral RNAs. The location of a given oligonucleotide relative to the poly(A) terminus of the viral RNAs was directly deduced from the smallest size of the poly(A)-tagged RNA fragment from which it could be isolated. Identification of distinct oligonucleotides was based on their location in the electrophoretic/chromatographic fingerprint pattern and on analysis of their RNase A-resistant fragments. The following results were obtained. (i) The number of large oligonucleotides per poly(A)-tagged ffagment increased with increasing size of the fragment. This implies that the genetic map is linear and that a given RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides has, relative to the poly(A) end, the same location on all 30 to 40S RNA subunits of a given 60 to 70S viral RNA complex, (ii) Three sarcoma-specific oligonucleotides were identified in the RNAs of Pr-B, PR-C and B77 by comparison with the RNAs of the corresponding td viruses... Images PMID:170411

  2. [Identification of genetically modified vegetable sources in food and feed using hydrogel oligonucleotide microchip].

    PubMed

    Griadunov, D A; Getman, I A; Chizhova, S I; Mikhaĭlovich, V M; Zasedatelev, A S; Romanov, G A

    2011-01-01

    A method of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by the hybridization on a hydrogel oligonucleotide biochip was developed for simultaneous identification of ten different transgenic elements of plant DNA in feed and food products. The biochip contained 22 immobilized probes intended for (i) detection of plant DNA; (ii) plant species determination (soybean, maize, potato, rice); (iii) identification of transgenic elements, including 35S CaMV, 35S FMV, rice actine gene promoters, nos, 35S CaMV, ocs, pea rbcS1 gene terminators, and bar, gus, nptII marker genes. The limit of detection was 0.5% of genetically modified (GM) soybean and maize in analyzed samples. Identification of transgenic DNA in food and feed products using either the developed approach or real-time PCR led to virtually identical results. The assay can be used for selection of GM samples by screening food and feed products for subsequent quantitative determination of the GM component based on the identified transgene.

  3. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  4. Identification of Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens Using Electrochemical Detection on an Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lodes, Michael J.; Suciu, Dominic; Wilmoth, Jodi L.; Ross, Marty; Munro, Sandra; Dix, Kim; Bernards, Karen; Stöver, Axel G.; Quintana, Miguel; Iihoshi, Naomi; Lyon, Wanda J.; Danley, David L.; McShea, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial and viral upper respiratory infections (URI) produce highly variable clinical symptoms that cannot be used to identify the etiologic agent. Proper treatment, however, depends on correct identification of the pathogen involved as antibiotics provide little or no benefit with viral infections. Here we describe a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay and microarray for URI identification using standard amplification and hybridization techniques, with electrochemical detection (ECD) on a semiconductor-based oligonucleotide microarray. The assay was developed to detect four bacterial pathogens (Bordetella pertussis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae) and 9 viral pathogens (adenovirus 4, coronavirus OC43, 229E and HK, influenza A and B, parainfluinza types 1, 2, and 3 and respiratory syncytial virus. This new platform forms the basis for a fully automated diagnostics system that is very flexible and can be customized to suit different or additional pathogens. Multiple probes on a flexible platform allow one to test probes empirically and then select highly reactive probes for further iterative evaluation. Because ECD uses an enzymatic reaction to create electrical signals that can be read directly from the array, there is no need for image analysis or for expensive and delicate optical scanning equipment. We show assay sensitivity and specificity that are excellent for a multiplexed format. PMID:17895966

  5. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kolganova, N. A.; Shchyolkina, A. K.; Chudinov, A. V.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Florentiev, V. L.; Timofeev, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-directed DNA recognition is strictly limited by polypurine sequences. In an attempt to address this problem with synthetic biology tools, we designed a panel of short chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and studied their interaction with fluorescently labelled duplex hairpins using various techniques. The hybridization of hairpin with an array of chimeric probes suggests that recognition of double-stranded DNA follows complicated rules combining reversed Hoogsteen and non-canonical homologous hydrogen bonding. In the presence of magnesium ions, chimeric TFOs are able to form highly stable α,β-triplexes, as indicated by native gel-electrophoresis, on-array thermal denaturation and fluorescence-quenching experiments. CD spectra of chimeric triplexes exhibited features typically observed for anti-parallel purine triplexes with a GA or GT third strand. The high potential of chimeric α,β-TFOs in targeting double-stranded DNA was demonstrated in the EcoRI endonuclease protection assay. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the recognition of base pair inversions in a duplex by chimeric TFOs containing α-thymidine and α-deoxyguanosine. PMID:22641847

  6. Electrochemiluminescent biosensor of ATP using tetrahedron structured DNA and a functional oligonucleotide for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation and target identification.

    PubMed

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Gao, Ai; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2013-05-15

    Restricted target accessibility and surface-induced perturbation of the aptamer structure are the main limitations in single-stranded DNA aptamer-based electrochemical sensors. Chemical labeling of the aptamer with a probe at the end of aptamer is inefficient and time-consuming. In this work, tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) and a functionalized oligonucleotide (FO) were used to develop an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a model target. The ts-DNA was formed with three thiolated oligonucleotides and one oligonucleotide containing anti-ATP aptamer. The FO contained a complementary strand to the anti-ATP aptamer and an intermolecular duplex for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation. After the ts-DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through gold-thiol interactions, hybridization between the anti-ATP aptamer and its complementary strand introduced the intercalated Ru(phen)3(2+) to the electrode. ECL emission from Ru(phen)3(2+) was observed with tripropylamine as a co-reactant. Once ATP reacted with its aptamer, the aptamer-complimentary strand duplex dissociated and the intermolecular duplex containing Ru(phen)3(2+) was released. The difference in emission before and after reaction with ATP was used to quantify ATP with a detection limit of 0.2nM. The ts-DNA increased the sensitivity compared to conventional methods, and the intercalation strategy avoided a complex chemical labeling procedure.

  7. Periostin antisense oligonucleotide prevents adhesion formation after surgery in mice.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shinji; Yoshino, Masafumi; Takao, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Kazunori; Jin, Denan

    2017-02-09

    To study the role of periostin in adhesion formation, the effect of periostin antisense oligonucleotide (PAO) on adhesion formation was evaluated in mice. Under anesthesia, the serous membrane of the cecum was abraded, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels of periostin and its related factors were determined after surgery. Saline, 40 mg/kg of negative sense oligonucleotide (NSO), or 40 mg/kg of PAO were injected into the abdomen after surgery, and the adhesion score and mRNA levels were evaluated 14 days later. Filmy adhesion formation was observed 1 day after surgery, and the adhesion score increased gradually to 14 days. The mRNA levels of periostin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and collagen I increased gradually from 3 days to 14 days. The adhesion score of PAO was significantly lower than of saline or NSO 14 days after surgery. The mRNA levels of periostin, TGF-β, and collagen I were also significantly attenuated by treatment with PAO compared with saline or NSO. Thus, these results demonstrated that the periostin mRNA level increased in the abraded cecum, and PAO prevented adhesion formation along with attenuation of the periostin mRNA level.

  8. Oligonucleotide bias in Bacillus subtilis: general trends and taxonomic comparisons.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E P; Viari, A; Danchin, A

    1998-01-01

    We present a general analysis of oligonucleotide usage in the complete genome of Bacillus subtilis . Several datasets were built in order to assign various biological contexts to the biased use of words and to reveal local asymmetries in word usage that may be coupled with replication, the control of gene expression and the restriction/modification system. This analysis was complemented by cross-comparisons with the complete genomes of Escherichia coli , Haemophilus influenzae and Methanococcus jannaschii . We have observed a large number of biased oligonucleotides for words of size up to 8, throughout the datasets and species, indicating that such long strict words play an important role as biological signals. We speculate that some of them are involved in interactions with DNA and/or RNA polymerases. An extensive analysis of palindrome abundances and distributions provides the surprising result that prophage-like elements embedded in the genome exhibit a smaller avoidance of restriction sites. This may reinforce a recently proposed hypothesis of a selfish gene phenomena in the transfer of restriction/modification systems in bacteria. PMID:9611243

  9. DOTAP/UDCA vesicles: novel approach in oligonucleotide delivery.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, Barbara; Battini, Renata; Montanari, Monica; Mucci, Adele; Tosi, Giovanni; Forni, Flavio; Vandelli, Maria Angela

    2007-03-01

    The relatively hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), was used as an additive to DOTAP cationic liposomes to evaluate the effect on the cellular uptake of an oligonucleotide. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies were applied to estimate the relative amount of incorporated UDCA into the lipidic bilayers. DOTAP or DOTAP-UDCA vesicles (MixVes; DOTAP/UDCA molar ratios 1:0.25, 1:0.5, 1:1, and 1:2) formed complexes with 5'-fluorescein conjugated 29-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs) and studied using gel electrophoresis. In addition, the complexes were tested after transfection to assess the cellular uptake and the localization of the oligo in a HaCaT cell line by the use of cytofluorimetric and confocal microscopic analysis. DOTAP lipid formulated in the presence of a defined amount of UDCA forms more stable, flexible, and active MixVes. In particular, the MixVes at 1:0.25 and 1:0.5 molar ratios increase and modify the cellular uptake of PS-ODNs if compared with DOTAP liposomes 3 hours after the transfection studies. Moreover, the in vitro data suggest that these new formulations are not toxic.

  10. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Zhu, Xun; Lu, Patrick Y; Rosato, Roberto R; Tan, Wen; Zu, Youli

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy. PMID:25093706

  11. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  12. Functionalization of silicon oxide using supercritical fluid deposition of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane for the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, Jordi; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Costa, Guillaume; Fontelaye, Caroline; Marchi-Delapierre, Caroline; Ménage, Stéphane; Marchand, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The functionalization of silicon oxide based substrates using silanes is generally performed through liquid phase methodologies. These processes involve a huge quantity of potentially toxic solvents and present some important disadvantages for the functionalization of microdevices or porous materials, for example the low diffusion. To overcome this drawback, solvent-free methodologies like molecular vapor deposition (MVD) or supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) have been developed. In this paper, the deposition process of 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane (EBTMOS) on silicon oxide using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent is studied for the first time. The oxirane ring of epoxy silanes readily reacts with amine group and is of particular interest for the grafting of amino-modified oligonucleotides or antibodies for diagnostic application. Then the ability of this specific EBTMOS layer to react with amine functions has been evaluated using the immobilization of amino-modified oligonucleotide probes. The presence of the probes is revealed by fluorescence using hybridization with a fluorescent target oligonucleotide. The performances of SFD of EBTMOS have been optimized and then compared with the dip coating and molecular vapor deposition methods, evidencing a better grafting efficiency and homogeneity, a lower reaction time in addition to the eco-friendly properties of the supercritical carbon dioxide. The epoxysilane layers have been characterized by surface enhanced ellipsometric contrast optical technique, atomic force microscopy, multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The shelf life of the 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane coating layer has also been studied. Finally, two different strategies of NH2-oligonucleotide grafting on EBTMOS coating layer have been compared, i.e. reductive amination and nucleophilic substitution, SN2. This EBTMOS based coating layer can be used for a wide range of applications

  13. Synthesis of 3'-, or 5'-, or internal methacrylamido-modified oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Golova, Julia B.; Chernov, Boris K.

    2010-04-27

    New modifiers were synthesized for incorporation of a methacrylic function in 3'-, 5'- and internal positions of oligonucleotides during solid phase synthesis. A modifier was used for synthesis of 5'-methacrylated oligonucleotides for preparation of microarrays by a co-polymerization method.

  14. In vivo generation of highly abundant sequence-specific oligonucleotides for antisense and triplex gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Noonberg, S B; Scott, G K; Garovoy, M R; Benz, C C; Hunt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Antisense and triplex oligonucleotides continue to demonstrate potential as mediators of gene-specific repression of protein synthesis. However, inefficient and heterogeneous cellular uptake, intracellular sequestration, and rapid intracellular and extracellular degradation represent obstacles to their eventual clinical utility. Efficient cellular delivery of targeted ribozymes can present similar problems. In this report we describe a system for circumventing these obstacles and producing large quantities of short, sequence-specific RNA oligonucleotides for use in these gene regulation strategies. The oligonucleotides are generated from a vector containing promoter, capping, and termination sequences from the human small nuclear U6 gene, surrounding a synthetic sequence incorporating the oligonucleotide of interest. In vivo, these oligonucleotides are produced constitutively and without cell type specificity in levels up to 5 x 10(6) copies per cell, reach steady-state levels of expression within 9 hours post-transfection, and are still readily detectable 7 days post-transfection. In addition, these oligonucleotides are retained in the nucleus, obtain a 5' gamma-monomethyl phosphate cap, and have an intracellular half-life of approximately one hour. This expression vector provides a novel and efficient method of intracellular delivery of antisense or triplex RNA oligonucleotides (and/or ribozymes) for gene regulation, as well as a cost-effective means of comparing the biological activity arising from a variety of different potential oligonucleotide sequences. Images PMID:8052538

  15. Ex vivo regulation of specific gene expression by nanomolar concentration of double-stranded dumbbell oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Clusel, C; Ugarte, E; Enjolras, N; Vasseur, M; Blumenfeld, M

    1993-01-01

    Inhibition of specific transcriptional regulatory proteins is a new approach to control gene expression. Transcriptional activity of DNA-binding proteins can be inhibited by the use of double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxynucleotides that compete for the binding to their specific target sequences in promoters and enhancers. As a model, we used phosphodiester dumbbell oligonucleotides containing a binding site for the liver-enriched transcription factor HNF-1 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1). Binding affinity of HNF-1 to dumbbell oligonucleotides was the same as that to ds oligonucleotides, as determined by gel retardation assays. HNF-1 dumbbells specifically inhibited in vitro transcription driven by the albumin promoter by more than 90%. HNF-1-dependent activation of a CAT reporter plasmid was specifically inhibited when the HNF-1 dumbbell oligonucleotide was added at nM concentration to transiently transfected C33 cells. On the contrary, HNF-1 ds oligonucleotides, which displayed the same activity as the dumbbell oligonucleotides in the in vitro assays, were no more effective in the ex vivo experiments. These results might reflect the increased stability of the circular dumbbell oligonucleotides towards cellular nuclease degradation, as shown in vitro with nucleolytic enzymes. Dumbbell oligonucleotides containing unmodified phosphodiester bonds may efficiently compete for binding of specific transcription factors within cells, then providing a potential therapeutic tool to control disease-causing genes. Images PMID:7688452

  16. The MOX/SUC precursor strategies: robust ways to construct functionalized oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Polushin, N

    2001-01-01

    The use of phosphoramidites bearing one or more methoxyoxalamido (MOX) or succinimido (SUC) reactive groups for construction of functionalized oligonucleotides is described. The efficiency of the new precursor strategy was demonstrated in the synthesis of oligonucleotide containing up to 16 imidazole residues.

  17. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Optical detection and discrimination of cystic fibrosis-related genetic mutations using oligonucleotide-nanoparticle conjugates.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Deirdre; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-03-01

    Novel methods for application of oligonucleotide-gold nanoparticle conjugates to selective colorimetric detection and discrimination of cystic fibrosis (CF) related genetic mutations in model oligonucleotide systems are presented. Three-strand oligonucleotide complexes are employed, wherein two probe oligonucleotide-gold nanoparticle conjugates are linked together by a third target oligonucleotide strand bearing the CF-related mutation(s). By monitoring the temperature dependence of the optical properties of the complexes, either in solution or on silica gel plates, melting behaviors may be accurately and reproducibly compared. Using this approach, fully complementary sequences are successfully distinguished from mismatched sequences, with single base mismatch resolution, for Delta F 508, M470V, R74W and R75Q mutations.

  19. Recommendations for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Berman, Cindy L; Cannon, Keri; Cui, Yi; Kornbrust, Douglas J; Lagrutta, Armando; Sun, Sunny Z; Tepper, Jeff; Waldron, Gareth; Younis, Husam S

    2014-08-01

    This document was prepared by the Safety Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG), a group of industry and regulatory scientists involved in the development and regulation of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The mission of the Subcommittee was to develop scientific recommendations for the industry regarding the appropriate scope and strategies for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotides (ONs). These recommendations are the consensus opinion of the Subcommittee and do not necessarily reflect the current expectations of regulatory authorities. 1) Safety pharmacology testing, as described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7 guidance, is as applicable to ONs as it is to small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. 2) Study design considerations for ONs are similar to those for other classes of drugs. In general, as with other therapeutics, studies should evaluate the drug product administered via the clinical route. Species selection should ideally consider relevance of the model with regard to the endpoints of interest, pharmacological responsiveness, and continuity with the nonclinical development program. 3) Evaluation of potential effects in the core battery (cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems) is recommended. In general: a. In vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) testing does not provide any specific value and is not warranted. b. Emphasis should be placed on in vivo evaluation of cardiovascular function, typically in nonhuman primates (NHPs). c. Due to the low level of concern, neurologic and respiratory function can be assessed concurrently with cardiovascular safety pharmacology evaluation in NHPs, within repeat-dose toxicity studies, or as stand-alone studies. In the latter case, rodents are most commonly used. 4) Other dedicated safety pharmacology studies, beyond the core battery, may have limited value for ONs. Although ONs can accumulate in the kidney and liver

  20. Monitoring integrity and localization of modified single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides using ultrasensitive fluorescence methods

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Philipp; Wagner, Ernst; Lamb, Don C.

    2017-01-01

    Short single-stranded oligonucleotides represent a class of promising therapeutics with diverse application areas. Antisense oligonucleotides, for example, can interfere with various processes involved in mRNA processing through complementary base pairing. Also RNA interference can be regulated by antagomirs, single-stranded siRNA and single-stranded microRNA mimics. The increased susceptibility to nucleolytic degradation of unpaired RNAs can be counteracted by chemical modification of the sugar phosphate backbone. In order to understand the dynamics of such single-stranded RNAs, we investigated their fate after exposure to cellular environment by several fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. First, we elucidated the degradation of four differently modified, dual-dye labeled short RNA oligonucleotides in HeLa cell extracts by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer. We observed that the integrity of the oligonucleotide sequence correlates with the extent of chemical modifications. Furthermore, the data showed that nucleolytic degradation can only be distinguished from unspecific effects like aggregation, association with cellular proteins, or intramolecular dynamics when considering multiple measurement and analysis approaches. We also investigated the localization and integrity of the four modified oligonucleotides in cultured HeLa cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. No intracellular accumulation could be observed for unmodified oligonucleotides, while completely stabilized oligonucleotides showed strong accumulation within HeLa cells with no changes in fluorescence lifetime over 24 h. The integrity and accumulation of partly modified oligonucleotides was in accordance with their extent of modification. In highly fluorescent cells, the oligonucleotides were transported to the nucleus. The lifetime of the RNA in the cells could be explained by a balance between

  1. Rapid large-scale oligonucleotide selection for microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rahmann, Sven

    2002-01-01

    We present the first algorithm that selects oligonucleotide probes (e.g. 25-mers) for microarray experiments on a large scale. For example, oligos for human genes can be found within 50 hours. This becomes possible by using the longest common substring as a specificity measure for candidate oligos. We present an algorithm based on a suffix array with additional information that is efficient both in terms of memory usage and running time to rank all candidate oligos according to their specificity. We also introduce the concept of master sequences to describe the sequences from which oligos are to be selected. Constraints such as oligo length, melting temperature, and self-complementarity are incorporated in the master sequence at a preprocessing stage and thus kept separate from the main selection problem. As a result, custom oligos can now be designed for any sequenced genome, just as the technology for on-site chip synthesis is becoming increasingly mature.

  2. DNA Oligonucleotide Fragment Ion Rearrangements Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of m/z-isolated w type fragment ions and an intact 5' phosphorylated DNA oligonucleotide generated rearranged product ions. Of the 21 studied w ions of various nucleotide sequences, fragment ion sizes, and charge states, 18 (~86%) generated rearranged product ions upon CID in a Synapt G2-S HDMS (Waters Corporation, Manchester, England, UK) ion mobility-mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometry (MS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and theoretical modeling data suggest that purine bases can attack the free 5' phosphate group in w type ions and 5' phosphorylated DNA to generate sequence permuted [phosphopurine]- fragment ions. We propose and discuss a potential mechanism for generation of rearranged [phosphopurine]- and complementary y-B type product ions.

  3. Association of branched oligonucleotides into the i-motif.

    PubMed

    Robidoux, S; Klinck, R; Gehring, K; Damha, M J

    1997-12-01

    The unique architecture of branched oligonucleotides mimicking lariat RNA introns [Wallace and Edmons, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 950-954 (1983)] was exploited to study compounds that associate as two parallel duplexes with intercalating C/C+ base pairs (i-motif DNA) [Gehring et al. Nature 363, 561-565 (1993)]. The formation of a branched cytosine tetrad was induced by joining the 5'-ends of pair of pentadeoxycytidine strands with a branching riboadenosine (rA) linker. This arrangement causes the orientation of the dC strands to be parallel, and forces the formation of a C/C+ duplex that self-associates into i-DNA. Presence of the i-motif in this structure is supported by thermal denaturation, native gel electrophoresis, CD, and NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Recent Methods for Purification and Structure Determination of Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiulong; Lv, Huanhuan; Wang, Lili; Chen, Man; Li, Fangfei; Liang, Chao; Yu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can interact with target molecules through specific three-dimensional structures. The excellent features, such as high specificity and affinity for target proteins, small size, chemical stability, low immunogenicity, facile chemical synthesis, versatility in structural design and engineering, and accessible for site-specific modifications with functional moieties, make aptamers attractive molecules in the fields of clinical diagnostics and biopharmaceutical therapeutics. However, difficulties in purification and structural identification of aptamers remain a major impediment to their broad clinical application. In this mini-review, we present the recently attractive developments regarding the purification and identification of aptamers. We also discuss the advantages, limitations, and prospects for the major methods applied in purifying and identifying aptamers, which could facilitate the application of aptamers. PMID:27999357

  5. Predicting the Kinetics of RNA Oligonucleotides Using Markov State Models.

    PubMed

    Pinamonti, Giovanni; Zhao, Jianbo; Condon, David E; Paul, Fabian; Noè, Frank; Turner, Douglas H; Bussi, Giovanni

    2017-02-14

    Nowadays different experimental techniques, such as single molecule or relaxation experiments, can provide dynamic properties of biomolecular systems, but the amount of detail obtainable with these methods is often limited in terms of time or spatial resolution. Here we use state-of-the-art computational techniques, namely, atomistic molecular dynamics and Markov state models, to provide insight into the rapid dynamics of short RNA oligonucleotides, to elucidate the kinetics of stacking interactions. Analysis of multiple microsecond-long simulations indicates that the main relaxation modes of such molecules can consist of transitions between alternative folded states, rather than between random coils and native structures. After properly removing structures that are artificially stabilized by known inaccuracies of the current RNA AMBER force field, the kinetic properties predicted are consistent with the time scales of previously reported relaxation experiments.

  6. OligoCalc: an online oligonucleotide properties calculator

    PubMed Central

    Kibbe, Warren A.

    2007-01-01

    We developed OligoCalc as a web-accessible, client-based computational engine for reporting DNA and RNA single-stranded and double-stranded properties, including molecular weight, solution concentration, melting temperature, estimated absorbance coefficients, inter-molecular self-complementarity estimation and intra-molecular hairpin loop formation. OligoCalc has a familiar ‘calculator’ look and feel, making it readily understandable and usable. OligoCalc incorporates three common methods for calculating oligonucleotide-melting temperatures, including a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model for melting temperature. Since it first came online in 1997, there have been more than 900 000 accesses of OligoCalc from nearly 200 000 distinct hosts, excluding search engines. OligoCalc is available at http://basic.northwestern.edu/biotools/OligoCalc.html, with links to the full source code, usage patterns and statistics at that link as well. PMID:17452344

  7. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, J. Ramon; de la Cruz, Xavier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    The existence of sequences in the human genome which can be a target for triplex formation, and accordingly are candidates for anti-gene therapies, has been studied by using bioinformatics tools. It was found that the population of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences (TTS) is much more abundant than that expected from simple random models. The population of TTS is large in all the genome, without major differences between chromosomes. A wide analysis along annotated regions of the genome allows us to demonstrate that the largest relative concentration of TTS is found in regulatory regions, especially in promoter zones, which suggests a tremendous potentiality for triplex strategy in the control of gene expression. The dependence of the stability and selectivity of the triplexes on the length of the TTS is also analysed using knowledge-based rules. PMID:14726484

  8. Insights to primitive replication derived from structures of small oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. K.; Fox, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Available information on the structure of small oligonucleotides is surveyed. It is observed that even small oligomers typically exhibit defined structures over a wide range of pH and temperature. These structures rely on a plethora of non-standard base-base interactions in addition to the traditional Watson-Crick pairings. Stable duplexes, though typically antiparallel, can be parallel or staggered and perfect complementarity is not essential. These results imply that primitive template directed reactions do not require high fidelity. Hence, the extensive use of Watson-Crick complementarity in genes rather than being a direct consequence of the primitive condensation process, may instead reflect subsequent selection based on the advantage of accuracy in maintaining the primitive genetic machinery once it arose.

  9. Oligonucleotide synthesis catalyzed by the Zn/2+/ ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawai, H.; Orgel, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments are reported in which Zn(2+) ion catalyzed the formation of oligonucleotides from nucleoside phosphorimidazolides in aqueous solution, even in the absence of a template. Specifically, the imidazolides (ImpU or ImpA) polymerized to form ImpApA, and pApA, pApApA, and pApApApA, or the analogous uracil compounds. In addition, the expected hydrolysis products of the hydrolysis of ImpA were formed (pA, imidazole). Judging from the ratio of pA(n) over pA (with and without zinc ion), this ion increased the efficiency of phosphodiester-bond formation by up to 10 times. Possible mechanisms for the reaction are tentatively proposed.

  10. A note on oligonucleotide expression values not being normally distributed.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Johanna; Wilson, Jason

    2009-07-01

    Novel techniques for analyzing microarray data are constantly being developed. Though many of the methods contribute to biological discoveries, inability to properly evaluate the novel techniques limits their ability to advance science. Because the underlying distribution of microarray data is unknown, novel methods are typically tested against the assumed normal distribution. However, microarray data are not, in fact, normally distributed, and assuming so can have misleading consequences. Using an Affymetrix technical replicate spike-in data set, we show that oligonucleotide expression values are not normally distributed for any of the standard methods for calculating expression values. The resulting data tend to have a large proportion of skew and heavy tailed genes. Additionally, we show that standard methods can give unexpected and misleading results when the data are not well approximated by the normal distribution. Robust methods are therefore recommended when analyzing microarray data. Additionally, new techniques should be evaluated with skewed and/or heavy-tailed data distributions.

  11. Patterns of oligonucleotide distribution within DNA and RNA functional sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchanov, N.A.; Kel, A.E.; Ponomarenko, M.P.; Romachenko, A.G.; Likchachev, J.; Milanesi, L.; Lim, H.

    1993-12-31

    Patterns of short oligonucleotide distribution within DNA and RNA functional sites have been analyzed using ``Site-Video`` computer system. The group of DNA functional sites involved nucleosome binding sites, gyrase cleavage sites, promoters of E. coli and men. The group of RNA functional sites involved donor and acceptor splice sites of men, translation initiation sites of E. coli and men and translation frame shift site sites. Analysis of these samples of nucleotide sequences have been carried out by the ``Site-Video`` computer system. For each type of site specific set of patterns of oligonucleotide distribution important for the functioning and recognition have been revealed. At the same time, the number of specific patterns revealed in RNA sites was significantly higher than those in DNA sites. On the base of the results obtained, the script of functional sites for evolutionary emergency have been prompted. According to it, two types of context feature selection took place: (1) positive selection targeted to the appearance of the definite types of context features in particular regions of functional sites;and (2) negative selection targeted to the elimination of definite types of context features in particular regions of functional sites. The authors suppose that evolutionary formation of any functional site is a multistep process realized via combination of positive and negative selections. Negative selection, via fixation of a specific pattern of mutations, eliminates false signals of regulatory proteins binding with the functional site. Positive selection leads to the appearance of local context features (signals) which provide for the specificity and efficiency of the site functioning.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide-based therapy in human erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc'h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-04-03

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315-48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315-48C allele increases usage of the 3' cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals.

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy in Human Erythropoietic Protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Oustric, Vincent; Manceau, Hana; Ducamp, Sarah; Soaid, Rima; Karim, Zoubida; Schmitt, Caroline; Mirmiran, Arienne; Peoc’h, Katell; Grandchamp, Bernard; Beaumont, Carole; Lyoumi, Said; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; de Verneuil, Hubert; Marie, Joëlle; Puy, Herve; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In 90% of people with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the disease results from the inheritance of a common hypomorphic FECH allele, encoding ferrochelatase, in trans to a private deleterious FECH mutation. The activity of the resulting FECH enzyme falls below the critical threshold of 35%, leading to the accumulation of free protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in bone marrow erythroblasts and in red cells. The mechanism of low expression involves a biallelic polymorphism (c.315−48T>C) localized in intron 3. The 315−48C allele increases usage of the 3′ cryptic splice site between exons 3 and 4, resulting in the transcription of an unstable mRNA with a premature stop codon, reducing the abundance of wild-type FECH mRNA, and finally reducing FECH activity. Through a candidate-sequence approach and an antisense-oligonucleotide-tiling method, we identified a sequence that, when targeted by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-V1), prevented usage of the cryptic splice site. In lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from symptomatic EPP subjects, transfection of ASO-V1 reduced the usage of the cryptic splice site and efficiently redirected the splicing of intron 3 toward the physiological acceptor site, thereby increasing the amount of functional FECH mRNA. Moreover, the administration of ASO-V1 into developing human erythroblasts from an overtly EPP subject markedly increased the production of WT FECH mRNA and reduced the accumulation of PPIX to a level similar to that measured in asymptomatic EPP subjects. Thus, EPP is a paradigmatic Mendelian disease in which the in vivo correction of a common single splicing defect would improve the condition of most affected individuals. PMID:24680888

  14. 18S rRNA Gene Variation among Common Airborne Fungi, and Development of Specific Oligonucleotide Probes for the Detection of Fungal Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihong; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Blomquist, Göran; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced 18S rRNA genes (rDNA) from 49 fungal strains representing 31 species from 15 genera. Most of these species are common airborne fungi and pathogens that may cause various public health concerns. Sequence analysis revealed distinct divergence between Zygomycota and Ascomycota. Within Ascomycota, several strongly supported clades were identified that facilitate the taxonomic placement of several little-studied fungi. Wallemia appeared as the group most diverged from all the other Ascomycota species. Based on the 18S rDNA sequence variation, 108 oligonucleotide probes were designed for each genus and species included in this study. After homology searches and DNA hybridization evaluations, 33 probes were verified as genus or species specific. The optimal hybridization temperatures to achieve the best specificity for these 33 probes were determined. These new probes can contribute to the molecular diagnostic research for environmental monitoring. PMID:12957927

  15. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    PubMed

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Janssen, Irene M; Smeets, Dominique; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Veltman, Joris A

    2007-02-28

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a higher resolution have resulted in the generation of additional microarray platforms encompassing larger numbers of shorter DNA targets (oligonucleotides). Here, we present a novel method to estimate the ability of a microarray to detect genomic copy-number variations of different sizes and types (i.e. deletions or duplications). We applied our method, which is based on statistical power analysis, to four widely used high-density genomic microarray platforms. By doing so, we found that the high-density oligonucleotide platforms are superior to the BAC platform for the genome-wide detection of copy-number variations smaller than 1 Mb. The capacity to reliably detect single copy-number variations below 100 kb, however, appeared to be limited for all platforms tested. In addition, our analysis revealed an unexpected platform-dependent difference in sensitivity to detect a single copy-number loss and a single copy-number gain. These analyses provide a first objective insight into the true capacities and limitations of different genomic microarrays to detect and define DNA copy-number variations.

  16. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Safiye; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh; Ajloo, Davood; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10(-15) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL(-1) with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization.

  17. Oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 block Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Monica M; Gauger, Joshua J L; Brandt, Curtis R

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen which requires activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) during its replication cycle. The persistent nature of HSV-1 infection, and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, highlights the importance of research to develop new antiviral agents. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a prominent role during the early antiviral response by recognizing viral nucleic acid and gene products, activating NFκB, and stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate a significant effect on HSV-1 replication in ARPE-19 and Vero cells when oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 are added 2h prior to infection. A greater than 90% reduction in the yield of infectious virus was achieved at oligonucleotide concentrations of 10-20 μM. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides prevented expression of essential immediate early herpes gene products as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. TLR9 oligonucleotides also interfered with viral attachment and entry. A TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide containing five adjacent guanosine residues (G-ODN) exhibited virucidal activity and inhibited HSV-1 replication when added post-infection. The antiviral effect of the TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides did not depend on the presence of TLR9 protein, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition that is not TLR9 specific. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides also reduced NFκB activity in nuclear extracts. Studies using these TLR inhibitors in the context of viral infection should be interpreted with caution.

  18. Resonant raman scattering in complexes of nc-Si/SiO2 quantum dots and oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairamov, F. B.; Poloskin, E. D.; Kornev, A. A.; Chernev, A. L.; Toporov, V. V.; Dubina, M. V.; Röder, C.; Sprung, C.; Lipsanen, H.; Bairamov, B. Kh.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the functionalization of nanocrystalline nc-Si/SiO2 semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) by short d(20G, 20T) oligonucleotides. The obtained complexes have been studied by Raman spectroscopy techniques with high spectral and spatial resolution. A new phenomenon of multiband resonant light scattering on single oligonucleotide molecules has been discovered, and peculiarities of this effect related to the nonradiative transfer of photoexcitation from nc-Si/SiO2 quantum dots to d(20G, 20T) oligonucleotide molecules have been revealed.

  19. Method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Kieleczawa, Jan; Dunn, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on a nucleic acid polymer. The nucleic acid polymer is incubated in a solution containing a single-stranded DNA-binding protein and a plurality of oligonucleotides which are perfectly complementary to distinct but adjacent regions of a predetermined contiguous nucleotide sequence in the nucleic acid polymer. The plurality of oligonucleotides anneal to the nucleic acid polymer to form a contiguous region of double stranded nucleic acid. Specific application of the methods disclosed include priming DNA synthesis and template-directed ligation.

  20. Oligonucleotide-mediated gene repair at DNA level: the potential applications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Mei; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in gene sequence can cause many genetic disorders, and researchers have attempted to develop treatments or cures at the DNA level for these diseases. Several strategies including triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotide (RDO), and short single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) have been used to correct the dysfunctional genes in situ in the chromosome. Experimental data from cells and animal models suggest that all these strategies can repair the mutations in situ at DNA level. More effective structures of oligonucleotide, efficient delivery systems, and gene correction efficiency should be improved. Development of these strategies holds great potentials for treatments of genetic defects and other disorders.

  1. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  2. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    SciTech Connect

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  3. Unique Combination of 22q11 and 14qter Microdeletion Syndromes Detected Using Oligonucleotide Array-CGH

    PubMed Central

    Zrnová, E.; Vranová, V.; Šoukalová, J.; Slámová, I.; Vilémová, M.; Gaillyová, R.; Kuglík, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report an infant with a unique combination of 22q11 deletion syndrome and 14q terminal deletion syndrome. The proband had clinical symptoms compatible with diagnosis of 22q11 deletion syndrome: microcephaly, micrognathia, high-arched palate, hypertelorism, short palpebral fissures, square nasal root, prominent tubular nose, hypoplastic nasal alae, bulbous nasal tip, dysplastic low-set ears, short philtrum, and heart defect, but no cell-mediated immunodeficiency typical for the syndrome. G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed a karyotype 45,XY,der(14)t(14;22)(q32.3;q11.2),-22.ish del(14)(q32.33)(D14S1420-),del(22)(q11.2q11.2)(N25-). Subsequent analyses disclosed a translocation between chromosomes 14 and 22 in the proband's mother with a deleted 14q telomere. Using comparative genome hybridization on oligonucleotide-based microarray (array-CGH), the deletion at 22q11.21 in the size of ∼4.25 Mb was revealed in the proband as well as the deletion of the telomeric area at 14q32.33qter (∼3.24 Mb) in the proband and his mother. However, both the proband and his mother showed mild symptoms (microcephaly, thin lips, carp-shaped mouth) typical for patients with the described terminal 14q deletion syndrome. PMID:22511897

  4. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lifeng; Wang, Cassie T; Sun, Xiaofang; Liu, Lian; Li, Man; Witz, Craig; Williams, Daniel; Griffith, Jason; Skorupski, Josh; Haddad, Ghassan; Gill, Jimmy; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2013-01-01

    A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo) microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1%) of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s), partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal embryos.

  5. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  6. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  7. Orthogonal ion pairing reversed phase liquid chromatography purification of oligonucleotides with bulky fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Anacleto, Concordio; Ouye, Randall; Schoenbrunner, Nancy

    2014-02-14

    A dual labeled oligonucleotide used as TaqMan® or 5' nuclease probe for in vitro diagnostic has been purified through orthogonal ion-pairing reversed phase chromatography, using polymeric semi-preparative and preparative PRP-1 column. We studied the mechanism of separation of oligonucleotides using ion-pairing reversed phase chromatography. We found that elution profiles of dye labeled oligonucleotides can be controlled by use of specific ion-pairing reagents. Here, we report a method for purification of an oligonucleotide containing an internally positioned rhodamine dye using two orthogonal chromatographic steps, in which the primary step resolves mostly by differences in hydrophobicity by using a weak ion-pairing reagent, and a secondary step uses a strong ion-pairing reagent for separation of length variants. Purification is demonstrated for both 1 and 15μmol scale syntheses, and amenable to further scale up for commercial lot production.

  8. The Fidelity of Template-Directed Oligonucleotide Ligation and the Inevitability of Polymerase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kenneth D.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    1999-08-01

    The first living systems may have employed template-directed oligonucleotide ligation for replication. The utility of oligonucleotide ligation as a mechanism for the origin and evolution of life is in part dependent on its fidelity. We have devised a method for evaluating ligation fidelity in which ligation substrates are selected from random sequence libraries. The fidelities of chemical and enzymatic ligation are compared under a variety of conditions. While reaction conditions can be found that promote high fidelity copying, departure from these conditions leads to error-prone copying. In particular, ligation reactions with shorter oligonucleotide substrates are less efficient but more faithful. These results support a model for origins in which there was selective pressure for template-directed oligonucleotide ligation to be gradually supplanted by mononucleotide polymerization.

  9. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors for in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Il Young; Lee, Eun Hee; Suh, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-04-01

    Oligonucleotide-based biosensors have drawn much attention because of their broad applications in in vitro diagnostics and environmental hazard detection. They are particularly of interest to many researchers because of their high specificity as well as excellent sensitivity. Recently, oligonucleotide-based biosensors have been used to achieve not only genetic detection of targets but also the detection of small molecules, peptides, and proteins. This has further broadened the applications of these sensors in the medical and health care industry. In this review, we highlight various examples of oligonucleotide-based biosensors for the detection of diseases, drugs, and environmentally hazardous chemicals. Each example is provided with detailed schematics of the detection mechanism in addition to the supporting experimental results. Furthermore, future perspectives and new challenges in oligonucleotide-based biosensors are discussed.

  10. Oligonucleotides with rapid turnover of the phosphate groups occur endogenously in eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Plesner, P.; Goodchild, J.; Kalckar, H.M.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Endogenous oligonucleotides were found in trichloroacetic acid extracts of hamster lung fibroblasts and Tetrahymena cells. Peaks of radioactivity that eluted with retention times similar to oligonucleotide markers (5- to 50-mer) were found by HPLC in cells labeled briefly with /sup 32/Pi. Only minute amounts of UV-absorbing material were detected, consistent with a rapid turnover of phosphate groups. The /sup 32/P-labeled material also migrated as oligonucleotides on 20% polyacrylamide gels; it was not hydrolyzed by alkaline phosphatase but was digested by snake venom phosphodiesterase, S1 nuclease, and pancreatic RNase and was phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase. The /sup 32/P-labeled material isolated by HPLC was alkali labile and the hydrolyzate ran as nucleotides on paper chromatography. It is concluded that the oligonucleotides are mainly oligoribonucleotides, but it is possible that oligodeoxynucleotides are also present.

  11. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours. PMID:27217242

  12. Kinetic Hairpin Oligonucleotide Blockers for Selective Amplification of Rare Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanwei; Sanchez, J. Aquiles; Wangh, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of rare mutant alleles in an excess of wild type alleles is increasingly important in cancer diagnosis. Several methods for selective amplification of a mutant allele via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported, but each of these methods has its own limitations. A common problem is that Taq DNA polymerase errors early during amplification generate false positive mutations which also accumulate exponentially. In this paper, we described a novel method using hairpin oligonucleotide blockers that can selectively inhibit the amplification of wild type DNA during LATE-PCR amplification. LATE-PCR generates double-stranded DNA exponentially followed by linear amplification of single-stranded DNA. The efficiency of the blocker is optimized by adjusting the LATE-PCR temperature cycling profile. We also demonstrate that it is possible to minimize false positive signals caused by Taq DNA polymerase errors by using a mismatched excess primer plus a modified PCR profile to preferentially enrich for mutant target sequences prior to the start of the exponential phase of LATE-PCR amplification. In combination these procedures permit amplification of specific KRAS mutations in the presence of more than 10,000 fold excess of wild type DNA without false positive signals. PMID:25082368

  13. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    PubMed

    Canello, Tamar; Ovadia, Haim; Refael, Miri; Zrihan, Daniel; Siegal, Tali; Lavon, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1) within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA) modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN). Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  14. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-05-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours.

  15. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Mallory A.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA–RNA base-pairing or protein–RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipulate protein production from a gene. Splicing modulation is particularly valuable in cases of disease caused by mutations that lead to disruption of normal splicing or when interfering with the normal splicing process of a gene transcript may be therapeutic. SSOs offer an effective and specific way to target and alter splicing in a therapeutic manner. Here, we discuss the different approaches used to target and alter pre-mRNA splicing with SSOs. We detail the modifications to the nucleic acids that make them promising therapeutics and discuss the challenges to creating effective SSO drugs. We highlight the development of SSOs designed to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:27288447

  16. The development of bioactive triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Michael M; Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Alam, Rowshon

    2005-11-01

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-conjugated TFOs containing 2'-O-methyl (2'OMe) and 2'-O-aminoethoxy (AE) ribose substitutions. TFOs with a cluster of 3-4 AE residues, with all other sugars as 2'OMe, were bioactive in a gene knockout assay in mammalian cells. In contrast, TFOs with one or two clustered, or three dispersed, AE residues were inactive. Thermal stability analysis of the triplexes indicated that there were only incremental differences between the active and inactive TFOs. However the active and inactive TFOs could be distinguished by their association kinetics. The bioactive TFOs showed markedly greater on-rates than the inactive TFOs. It appears that the on-rate is a better predictor of TFO bioactivity than thermal stability. Our data are consistent with a model in which a cluster of 3-4 AE residues stabilizes the nucleation event that precedes formation of a complete triplex. It is likely that triplexes in cells are much less stable than triplexes in vitro probably as a result of elution by chromatin-associated translocases and helicases. Consequently the biologic assay will favor TFOs that can bind and rebind genomic targets quickly.

  17. Skipping multiple exons of dystrophin transcripts using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, with 20,000 children per year born with DMD globally. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense-mediated exon skipping therapy is a promising therapeutic approach that uses short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip over/splice out the mutated part of the gene to produce a shortened but functional dystrophin protein. One major challenge has been its limited applicability. Multiple exon skipping has recently emerged as a potential solution. Indeed, many DMD patients need exon skipping of multiple exons in order to restore the reading frame, depending on how many base pairs the mutated exon(s) and adjacent exons have. Theoretically, multiple exon skipping could be used to treat approximately 90%, 80%, and 98% of DMD patients with deletion, duplication, and nonsense mutations, respectively. In addition, multiple exon skipping could be used to select deletions that optimize the functionality of the truncated dystrophin protein. The proof of concept of systemic multiple exon skipping using a cocktail of AOs has been demonstrated in dystrophic dog and mouse models. Remaining challenges include the insufficient efficacy of systemic treatment, especially for therapies that target the heart, and limited long-term safety data. Here we review recent preclinical developments in AO-mediated multiple exon skipping and discuss the remaining challenges.

  18. Template-directed synthesis of oligonucleotides under eutectic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stribling, R.; Miller, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important sets of model prebiotic experiments consists of reactions that synthesize complementary oligonucleotides from preformed templates under nonenzymatic conditions. Most of these experiments are conducted at 4 degrees C using 0.01-0.1 M concentrations of activated nucleotide monomer and template (monomer equivalent). In an attempt to extend the conditions under which this type of reaction can occur, we have concentrated the reactants by freezing at -18 degrees C, which is close to the NaCl-H2O eutectic at -21 degrees C. The results from this set of experiments suggest that successful syntheses can occur with poly(C) concentrations as low at 5 x 10(-4) M and 2MeImpG concentrations at 10(-3) M. It was also anticipated that this mechanism might allow the previously unsuccessful poly(A)-directed synthesis of oligo(U)s to occur. However, no template effect was seen with the poly(A) and ImpU system. The failure of these conditions to allow template-directed synthesis of oligo(U)s supports the previously proposed idea that pyrimidines may not have been part of the earliest genetic material. Because of the low concentrations of monomer and template that would be expected from prebiotic syntheses, this lower temperature could be considered a more plausible geologic setting for template-directed synthesis than the standard reaction conditions.

  19. In vitro characterization of two novel biodegradable vectors for the delivery of radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Koslowsky, Ingrid; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Murray, David; Mercer, John

    2010-12-01

    The development of antisense oligonucleotides suitable for tumor targeting applications is hindered by low stability and bioavailability of oligonucleotides in vivo and by the absence of efficient and safe vectors for oligonucleotide delivery. Stabilization in vivo has been achieved through chemical modification of oligonucleotides by various means, but effective approaches to enhance their intracellular delivery are lacking. This study reports on the characterization in vitro of a fully phosphorothioated 20-mer oligonucleotide, complementary to p21 mRNA, radiolabeled with fluorine-18 using a thiol reactive prosthetic group. The potential of two novel synthetic block copolymers containing grafted polyamines on their hydrophobic blocks for vector-assisted cell delivery was studied in vitro. Extensive cellular uptake studies were performed in human colon carcinoma cell lines with enhanced or deficient p21 expression to evaluate and compare the uptake mechanism of naked and vectorized radiolabeled formulations. Uptake studies with the two novel biodegradable vectors showed a moderate increase in cell uptake of the radiofluorinated antisense oligonucleotide. The two vectors show, however, promising advantages over conventional lipidic vectors regarding their biocompatibility and subcellular distribution.

  20. Simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintela, Irwin A.; de Los Reyes, Benildo G.; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Wu, Vivian C. H.

    2015-01-01

    A simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC; ``Big Six'' - O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as well as O157 strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Initially, conserved regions of stx genes were amplified by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (asPCR). Pairs of single stranded thiol-modified oligonucleotides (30-mer) were immobilized onto AuNPs and used as probes to capture regions of stx1 (119-bp) and/or stx2 (104-bp) genes from STEC strains. DNA samples from pure cultures and food samples were sandwich hybridized with AuNP-oligo probes at optimal conditions (50 °C, 30 min). A complex was formed from the hybridization of AuNP-probes and target DNA fragments that retained the initial red color of the reaction solutions. For non-target DNA, a color change from red to purplish-blue was observed following an increase in salt concentration, thus providing the basis of simultaneous direct colorimetric detection of target DNA in the samples. Enrichment and pooling systems were incorporated to efficiently process a large number of food samples (ground beef and blueberries) and detection of live targets. The detection limit was <1 log CFU g-1, requiring less than 1 h to complete after DNA sample preparation with 100% specificity. Gel electrophoresis verified AuNP-DNA hybridization while spectrophotometric data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images supported color discrimination based on the occurrence of molecular aggregation. In conclusion, the significant features of this approach took advantage of the unique colorimetric properties of AuNPs as a low-cost and simple approach yet with high specificity for simultaneous detection of STEC strains.A simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC; ``Big Six'' - O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as well as O157 strains by optical biosensing with oligonucleotide

  1. Imaging of multiple mRNA targets using quantum dot based in situ hybridization and spectral deconvolution in clinical biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; Hoyland, Judith A.; Di Vizio, Dolores; O'Connell, Fionnuala; MacDermott, Sarah A.; Twomey, David; Levenson, Richard; Yin, John A. Liu; Golub, Todd R.; Loda, Massimo; Byers, Richard . E-mail: r.byers@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-09-22

    Gene expression mapping using microarray analysis has identified useful gene signatures for predicting outcome. However, little of this has been translated into clinically effective diagnostic tools as microa