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Sample records for allele-specific pcr as-pcr

  1. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  2. Allele-specific PCR typing and sequencing of the mitochondrial D-loop region in four layer breeds.

    PubMed

    Harumi, Takashi; Sano, Akiko; Minematsu, Takeo; Naito, Mitsuru

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the ability of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes in chicken mtDNA for presumption of the origins of chicken meat. We typed five SNPs of the D-loop region in mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) in 556 hens, that is 233 White Leghorn (WL), 50 Dekalb-TX35 (D-TX), 140 Barred Plymouth Rock (BPR) and 133 Rhode Island Red (RIR) kept in the National Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science (NILGS, Tsukuba, Japan). Five haplotypes were observed among those chickens by AS-PCR. WL, D-TX, BPR and RIR displayed three, two, one and four SNP haplotypes, respectively. By a combination of the haplotypes by AS-PCR and the breeds, these chickens were classified into 10 groups. After the D-loop was sequenced in two chickens from every group (20 individuals), 15 SNP sites (including one insertion) and eight sequence haplotypes were observed. In conclusion, haplotype variation was observed in and among the layer breeds of the NILGS. This study demonstrates that SNP haplotypes in mtDNA should be appropriate for the presumption of the origins of chicken meat.

  3. Simultaneous genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in alcoholism-related genes using duplex and triplex allele-specific PCR with two-step thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Naoto; Kuroki, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    We developed a time- and cost-effective multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) method based on the two-step PCR thermal cycles for genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms in three alcoholism-related genes: alcohol dehydrogenase 1B, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and μ-opioid receptor. Applying MightyAmp(®) DNA polymerase with optimized AS-primers and PCR conditions enabled us to achieve effective and selective amplification of the target alleles from alkaline lysates of a human hair root, and simultaneously to determine the genotypes within less than 1.5 h using minimal lab equipment.

  4. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  5. Determination of ABO genotypes by real-time PCR using allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Muro, Tomonori; Fujihara, Junko; Imamura, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Kimura-Kataoka, Kaori; Toga, Tomoko; Iida, Reiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Takeshita, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    ABO grouping of biological specimens is informative for identifying victims and narrowing down suspects. In Japan and elsewhere, ABO grouping as well as DNA profiling plays an essential role in crime investigations. In the present study, we developed a new method for ABO genotyping using allele-specific primers and real-time PCR. The method allows for the detection of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nucleotide positions 261, 796, and 803 in the ABO gene and the determination of six major ABO genotypes. This method required less than 2 h for accurate ABO genotyping using 2.0 ng of DNA. This method could be applicable for rapid and simple screening of forensic samples.

  6. Genotyping of benzimidazole resistant and susceptible isolates of Haemonchus contortus from sheep by allele specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Karthik; Subhadra, Subhra; Kalyanasundaram, Aravindan; Ilangopathy, Manikkavasagan; Raman, Muthusamy

    2017-03-01

    Extensive and indiscriminate use of the benzimidazole class of drugs has led to the onset of anthelmintic resistance. In tropical countries like India, Haemonchus contortus is the most pathogenic parasite infecting sheep and goats. The widespread presence of resistant helminths (especially H. contortus) threatens the livestock farming. The use of various drugs has led to single nucleotide polymorphism that causes specific amino acid substitutions in β-tubulin protein of H. contortus to confer resistance. This emphasizes the need for a survey on the present status of resistance in India. In this study, allele specific PCR was employed to screen the presence of a SNP, a thymine-to-adenine transversion which leads to substitution of amino acid in codon 200 of β-tubulin gene that is correlated specifically with BZ resistance. Third stage larvae (L3) from pooled faecal cultures of four organized sheep farms served as a source of genomic DNA for identification of H. contortus and further genotype analysis. A total of 1000 larvae was screened, out of which 673 larvae were identified as H. contortus. Among 673 H. contortus larvae, 539 larvae (80 %) were genotyped as homozygous resistant (rr) and remaining 134 (20 %) were heterozygous susceptible (Sr) by allele specific PCR. The concluded resistance status reasons out the failure of anthelmintic drug in treating ruminants. Immediate steps are needed to avoid further aggravation of the problem. Target selective treatment by reviewing the resistance status of individual drugs, appropriate use of anthelmintic drugs and other control strategies will provide a pragmatic option for delaying the further spread of anthelmintic resistance.

  7. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  8. Identification of self-incompatibility genotypes of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) by S-allele-specific PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Jie, Qi; Shupeng, Gai; Jixiang, Zhang; Manru, Gu; Huairui, Shu

    2005-08-01

    A cDNA of 417 bp encoding an S-RNase gene, named PA S3, was isolated from apricot, Prunus aremeniaca. Nine S-alleles, S1-S9, were recognized by S-allele-specific PCR and confirmed by Southern blot analysis using PA S3 as probe. The S-genotypes of the six cultivars were determined and the results of self- and cross-pollination tests among the six cultivars were consistent with the predicted S-haplotypes by PCR analysis.

  9. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  10. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  11. Allele specific-PCR and melting curve analysis showed relatively high frequency of β-casein gene A1 allele in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cows.

    PubMed

    Gholami, M; Hafezian, S H; Rahimi, G; Farhadi, A; Rahimi, Z; Kahrizi, D; Kiani, S; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Muhammadi, S; Veisi, F; Ghadiri, K; Shetabi, H; Zargooshi, J

    2016-10-31

    There are two allelic forms of A1 and A2 of β-casein gene in dairy cattle. Proteolytic digestion of bovine β-casein A1 type produces bioactive peptide of β-casomorphin-7 known as milk devil. β-casomorphin-7 causes many diseases, including type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease syndrome, sudden death and madness. The aim of the present study was to determine the different allelic forms of β-casein gene in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cattle in order to identify A1 and A2 variants. The blood samples were collected randomly and DNA was extracted using modified salting out method. An 854 bp fragment including part of exon 7 and part of intron 6 of β-casein gene was amplified by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). Also, the accuracy of AS-PCR genotyping has been confirmed by melting temperature curve analysis using Real-time PCR machinery. The comparison of observed allele and genotype frequency among the studied breeds was performed using the Fisher exact and Chi-squared test, respectively by SAS program. Obtained results showed the A1 allele frequencies of 50, 51.57, 54.5, 49.4 and 46.6% in Holstein, Simmental, Sistani, Taleshi and Mazandarani cattle populations, respectively. The chi-square test was shown that no any populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for studied marker locus. Comparison and analysis of the test results for allelic frequency showed no any significant differences between breeds (P>0.05). The frequency of observed genotypes only differs significantly between Holstein and Taleshi breeds but no any statistically significant differences were found for other breeds (P>0.05). A relatively high frequency of β-casein A1 allele was observed in Iranian native cattle. Therefore, determine the genotypes and preference alleles A2 in these native and commercial cattle is recommended.

  12. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [θ angle = tan−1 (y/x) and y′ = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis

  13. The allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay, a new real-time PCR method for fine quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pooled DNA.

    PubMed

    Billard, A; Laval, V; Fillinger, S; Leroux, P; Lachaise, H; Beffa, R; Debieu, D

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of fungicide resistance within populations of plant pathogens must be monitored to develop management strategies. Such monitoring often is based on microbiological tests, such as microtiter plate assays. Molecular monitoring methods can be considered if the mutations responsible for resistance have been identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR approaches, such as amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, are, despite their moderate efficacy, among the most precise methods for refining SNP quantification. We describe here a new real-time PCR method, the allele-specific probe and primer amplification assay (ASPPAA PCR). This method makes use of mixtures of allele-specific minor groove binder (MGB) TaqMan probes and allele-specific primers for the fine quantification of SNPs from a pool of DNA extracted from a mixture of conidia. It was developed for a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is responsible for resistance to the sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide fenhexamid, resulting in the replacement of the phenylalanine residue (encoded by the TTC codon) in position 412 of the enzymatic target (3-ketoreductase) by a serine (TCC), valine (GTC), or isoleucine (ATC) residue. The levels of nonspecific amplification with the ASPPAA PCR were reduced at least four times below the level of currently available allele-specific real-time PCR approaches due to strong allele specificity in amplification cycles, including two allele selectors. This new method can be used to quantify a complex quadriallelic SNP in a DNA pool with a false discovery rate of less than 1%.

  14. Authentication of official Da-huang by sequencing and multiplex allele-specific PCR of a short maturase K gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guojie; Wang, Xueyong; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Weidong; Wei, Shengli; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoli; Liu, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Rhubarb (official Da-huang) is an important medicinal herb in Asia. Many adulterants of official Da-huang have been discovered in Chinese markets in recent years, which has resulted in adverse effects in medicinal treatment. Here, novel molecular markers based on a short maturase K (matK) gene were developed for authenticating official Da-huang. This study showed that all the species from official Da-huang were clustered together in one clade in the polygenetic trees based on short matK. Two highly conserved single nucleotide polymorphisms of short matK were mined in the species from official Da-huang. Based on these polymophisms, four improved specific primers of official Da-huang were successfully developed that generated reproducible specific bands. These results suggest that the short matK sequence can be considered as a favorable candidate for distinguishing official Da-huang from its adulterants. The established multiplex allele-specific PCR was determined to be simple and accurate and may serve as a preferable tool for authentication of official Da-huang. In addition, we suggest that short-sized specific bands be developed to authenticate materials used in traditional Chinese medicine.

  15. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  16. Requisite analytic and diagnostic performance characteristics for the clinical detection of BRAF V600E in hairy cell leukemia: a comparison of 2 allele-specific PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Noah A; Weigelin, Helmut C; Bailey, Nathanael; Laliberte, Julie; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Lim, Megan S; Betz, Bryan L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of high-frequency BRAF V600E mutations in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) has important diagnostic utility. However, the requisite analytic performance for a clinical assay to routinely detect BRAF V600E mutations in HCL has not been clearly defined. In this study, we sought to determine the level of analytic sensitivity needed for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and frozen samples and to compare the performance of 2 allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Twenty-nine cases of classic HCL, including 22 FFPE bone marrow aspirates and 7 frozen specimens from blood or bone marrow were evaluated using a laboratory-developed allele-specific PCR assay and a commercially available allele-specific quantitative PCR assay-myT BRAF Ultra. Also included were 6 HCL variant and 40 non-HCL B-cell lymphomas. Two cases of classic HCL, 1 showing CD5 expression, were truly BRAF V600E-negative based on negative results by PCR and sequencing despite high-level leukemic involvement. Among the remaining 27 specimens, V600E mutations were detected in 88.9% (17/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen) and 81.5% (15/20 FFPE; 7/7 frozen), for the laboratory-developed and commercial assays, respectively. No mutations were detected among the 46 non-HCL lymphomas. Both assays showed an analytic sensitivity of 0.3% involvement in frozen specimens and 5% in FFPE tissue. On the basis of these results, an assay with high analytic sensitivity is required for the clinical detection of V600E mutations in HCL specimens. Two allele-specific PCR assays performed well in both frozen and FFPE bone marrow aspirates, although detection in FFPE tissue required 5% or more involvement.

  17. Capillary and microchip gel electrophoresis for simultaneous detection of Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum by rfbS allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seonsook; Eo, Seong Kug; Kim, Yongseong; Yoo, Dong Jin; Kang, Seong Ho

    2007-09-30

    We report the use of capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) based on a rfbS allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the analysis and simultaneous detection of Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum, which are the major bacterial pathogens in poultry. rfbS allele-specific PCR was used to concurrently amplify two specific 147- and 187-bp DNA fragments for the simultaneous detection of S. pullorum and S. gallinarum at an annealing temperature of 54+/-1 degrees C and an MgCl(2) concentration of 2.8-5.6mM. Under an electric field of 333.3V/cm and a sieving matrix of 1.0% poly(ethyleneoxide) (M(r) 600000), the amplified PCR products were analyzed within 6min by CGE separation. This CGE assay could be translated to microchip format using programmed field strength gradients (PFSG). In the microchip gel electrophoresis with PFSG, both of the Salmonella analyses were completed within 30s, without decreasing the resolution efficiency. rfbS allele-specific PCR-microchip gel electrophoresis with the PFSG technique might be a new tool for the simultaneous detection of both S. pullorum and S. gallinarum, due to its ultra-speed and high efficiency.

  18. Determination of cis/trans phase of variations in the MC1R gene with allele-specific PCR and single base extension.

    PubMed

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J; Eiberg, Hans; Morling, Niels

    2008-12-01

    The MC1R gene encodes a protein with key regulatory functions in the melanin synthesis. A multiplex PCR and a multiplex single base extension protocol were established for genotyping six exonic MC1R variations highly penetrant for red hair (R), four exonic MC1R variations weakly penetrant for red hair (r), two frameshift variations highly penetrant for red hair (R) and three variations in the promoter region. We genotyped 600 individuals from Denmark using either CE or MALDI-TOF MS as the detection platform. A total of 62 individuals were genotyped R/R and among the 62 individuals, 57 had red hair and five had blond hair colour. Two different R alleles may be located in cis (RR/-) position or trans (R/R) position, and the phenotype associated with RR/- and R/R may be different. Two allele-specific PCRs were established with primers targeting the -G445A variation in the MC1R promoter and the allele-specific PCR products were used in the multiplex single base extension assay. In all 62 individuals, the MC1R variants were situated in trans position. Another 18 individuals with red hair colour were either genotyped R/- or R/r, suggesting that other genes influence hair colour.

  19. Detection of EGFR mutations by TaqMan mutation detection assays powered by competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR technology.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Esposito, Claudia; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Iannaccone, Alessia; Chicchinelli, Nicoletta; Franco, Renato; Mancini, Rita; Pisconti, Salvatore; De Luca, Antonella; Botti, Gerardo; Morabito, Alessandro; Normanno, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are predictive of response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Competitive Allele-Specific TaqMan PCR (castPCR) is a highly sensitive and specific technology. EGFR mutations were assessed by TaqMan Mutation Detection Assays (TMDA) based on castPCR technology in 64 tumor samples: a training set of 30 NSCLC and 6 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) samples and a validation set of 28 NSCLC cases. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were compared with routine diagnostic techniques including direct sequencing and the EGFR Therascreen RGQ kit. Analysis of the training set allowed the identification of the threshold value for data analysis (0.2); the maximum cycle threshold (Ct = 37); and the cut-off ΔCt value (7) for the EGFR TMDA. By using these parameters, castPCR technology identified both training and validation set EGFR mutations with similar frequency as compared with the Therascreen kit. Sequencing detected rare mutations that are not identified by either castPCR or Therascreen, but in samples with low tumor cell content it failed to detect common mutations that were revealed by real-time PCR based methods. In conclusion, our data suggest that castPCR is highly sensitive and specific to detect EGFR mutations in NSCLC clinical samples.

  20. Fully automated sample preparation microsystem for genetic testing of hereditary hearing loss using two-color multiplex allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bin; Gan, Wupeng; Wang, Shuaiqin; Han, Junping; Xiang, Guangxin; Li, Cai-Xia; Sun, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-20

    A fully automated microsystem consisting of a disposable DNA extraction and PCR microchip, as well as a compact control instrument, has been successfully developed for genetic testing of hereditary hearing loss from human whole blood. DNA extraction and PCR were integrated into a single 15-μL reaction chamber, where a piece of filter paper was embedded for capturing genomic DNA, followed by in-situ PCR amplification without elution. Diaphragm microvalves actuated by external solenoids together with a "one-way" fluidic control strategy operated by a modular valve positioner and a syringe pump were employed to control the fluids and to seal the chamber during thermal cycling. Fully automated DNA extractions from as low as 0.3-μL human whole blood followed by amplifications of 59-bp β-actin fragments can be completed on the microsystem in about 100 min. Negative control tests that were performed between blood sample analyses proved the successful elimination of any contamination or carryover in the system. To more critically test the microsystem, a two-color multiplex allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assay for detecting c.176_191del16, c.235delC, and c.299_300delAT mutations in GJB2 gene that accounts for hereditary hearing loss was constructed. Two allele-specific primers, one labeled with TAMRA for wild type and the other with FAM for mutation, were designed for each locus. DNA extraction from blood and ASPCR were performed on the microsystem, followed by an electrophoretic analysis on a portable microchip capillary electrophoresis system. Blood samples from a healthy donor and five persons with genetic mutations were all accurately analyzed with only two steps in less than 2 h.

  1. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  2. Development of Nuclear Microsatellite Loci and Mitochondrial Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms for the Natterjack Toad, Bufo (Epidalea) calamita (Bufonidae), Using Next Generation Sequencing and Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar).

    PubMed

    Faucher, Leslie; Godé, Cécile; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are undergoing a major decline worldwide and the steady increase in the number of threatened species in this particular taxa highlights the need for conservation genetics studies using high-quality molecular markers. The natterjack toad, Bufo (Epidalea) calamita, is a vulnerable pioneering species confined to specialized habitats in Western Europe. To provide efficient and cost-effective genetic resources for conservation biologists, we developed and characterized 22 new nuclear microsatellite markers using next-generation sequencing. We also used sequence data acquired from Sanger sequencing to develop the first mitochondrial markers for KASPar assay genotyping. Genetic polymorphism was then analyzed for 95 toads sampled from 5 populations in France. For polymorphic microsatellite loci, number of alleles and expected heterozygosity ranged from 2 to 14 and from 0.035 to 0.720, respectively. No significant departures from panmixia were observed (mean multilocus F IS = -0.015) and population differentiation was substantial (mean multilocus F ST = 0.222, P < 0.001). From a set of 18 mitochondrial SNPs located in the 16S and D-loop region, we further developed a fast and cost-effective SNP genotyping method based on competitive allele-specific PCR amplification (KASPar). The combination of allelic states for these mitochondrial DNA SNP markers yielded 10 different haplotypes, ranging from 2 to 5 within populations. Populations were highly differentiated (G ST = 0.407, P < 0.001). These new genetic resources will facilitate future parentage, population genetics and phylogeographical studies and will be useful for both evolutionary and conservation concerns, especially for the set-up of management strategies and the definition of distinct evolutionary significant units.

  3. Detection of the V1016G mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) by allele-specific PCR assay, and its distribution and effect on deltamethrin resistance in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides is widespread among populations of Aedes aegypti, the main vector for the dengue virus. Several different point mutations within the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene contribute to such resistance. A mutation at position 1016 in domain II, segment 6 of the VGSC gene in Ae. aegypti leads to a valine to glycine substitution (V1016G) that confers resistance to deltamethrin. Methods This study developed and utilized an allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) assay that could be used to detect the V1016G mutation. The assay was validated against a number of sequenced DNA samples of known genotype and was determined to be in complete agreement. Larvae and pupae were collected from various localities throughout Thailand. Samples were reared to adulthood and their resistance status against deltamethrin was determined by standard WHO susceptibility bioassays. Deltamethrin-resistant and susceptible insects were then genotyped for the V1016G mutation. Additionally, some samples were genotyped for a second mutation at position 1534 in domain III (F1534C) which is also known to confer pyrethroid resistance. Results The bioassay results revealed an overall mortality of 77.6%. Homozygous 1016G individuals survived at higher rates than either heterozygous or wild-type (1016 V) mosquitoes. The 1016G mutation was significantly and positively associated with deltamethrin resistance and was widely distributed throughout Thailand. Interestingly, wild-type 1016 V mosquitoes tested were homozygous for the 1534C mutation, and all heterozygous mosquitoes were also heterozygous for 1534C. Mutant homozygous (G/G) mosquitoes expressed the wild-type (F/F) at position 1534. However, the presence of the 1534C mutation was not associated with deltamethrin resistance. Conclusions Our bioassay results indicate that all populations sampled display some degree of resistance to deltamethrin. Homozygous 1016G mosquitoes were far likelier to survive such

  4. An allele-specific PCR system for rapid detection and discrimination of the CYP2C19∗4A, ∗4B, and ∗17 alleles: implications for clopidogrel response testing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stuart A; Tan, Qian; Baber, Usman; Yang, Yao; Martis, Suparna; Bander, Jeffrey; Kornreich, Ruth; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Desnick, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    CYP2C19 is involved in the metabolism of clinically relevant drugs, including the antiplatelet prodrug clopidogrel, which has prompted interest in clinical CYP2C19 genotyping. The CYP2C19∗4B allele is defined by both gain-of-function [c.-806C>T (∗17)] and loss-of-function [c.1A>G (∗4)] variants on the same haplotype; however, current genotyping and sequencing assays are unable to determine the phase of these variants. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an assay that could rapidly detect and discriminate the related ∗4A, ∗4B, and ∗17 alleles. An allele-specific PCR assay, composed of four unique primer mixes that specifically interrogate the defining ∗17 and ∗4 variants, was developed by using samples (n = 20) with known genotypes, including the ∗4A, ∗4B, and/or ∗17 alleles. The assay was validated by testing 135 blinded samples, and the results were correlated with CYP2C19 genotyping and allele-specific cloning/sequencing. Importantly, among the six ∗4 carriers in the validation cohort, after allele-specific PCR testing both samples with a ∗1/∗4 genotype were reclassified to ∗1/∗4A, all three samples with a ∗4/∗17 genotype were reclassified to ∗1/∗4B, and a sample with a ∗4/∗17/∗17 genotype was reclassified to ∗4B/∗17. In conclusion, this rapid and robust allele-specific PCR assay can refine CYP2C19 genotyping and metabolizer phenotype classification by determining the phase of the defining ∗17 and ∗4 variants, which may have utility when testing CYP2C19 for clopidogrel response.

  5. Identification of new primer binding site mutations at TH01 and D13S317 loci and determination of their corresponding STR alleles by allele-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengrui; Xuan, Jinfeng; Xing, Jiaxin; Ding, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Pang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Several commercial multiplex PCR kits for the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci have been extensively applied in forensic genetics. Consequently, large numbers of samples have been genotyped, and the number of discordant genotypes observed has also increased. We observed allele dropout with two novel alleles at the STR loci TH01 and D13S317 during paternity testing using the AmpFℓSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit. The lost alleles reappeared when alternative PCR primer pairs were used. A sequence analysis revealed a G-to-A substitution 82 bases downstream of the last TCAT motif of the repeat region at the TH01 locus (GenBank accession: D00269) and a G-to-T substitution 90 bases upstream of the first TATC motif of the repeat region at the D13S317 locus (GenBank accession: G09017). The frequencies of these two point mutations were subsequently investigated in the Chinese population using sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR), but neither of these mutations was detected in any of the samples tested. In addition, the DNA samples in which the mutations were identified were amplified to type the point mutations by SSP-PCR to determine the corresponding STR alleles at the two loci. Subsequently, the amplified PCR products with different point mutations and STR repeat numbers were directly sequenced because this strategy overcomes the appearance overlapping peaks generated by different STR alleles and accurately characterizes genotypes. Thus, our findings not only provide useful information for DNA databases and forensic identification but also establish an effective strategy for typing STR alleles with primer binding site mutations.

  6. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques.

  7. [Detection of JAK2V617F mutation rate by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR using allele specific primer and TaqMan-MGB probe for dual inhibiting amplification of wild type alleles].

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo-Wei; Shao, Dong-Hua; He, Mei-Ling; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2012-12-01

    This study was purposed to develop a real-time PCR assay for sensitive quantification of JAK2V617F allele burden in peripheral blood and to evaluate the clinical value of this method. Both allele-specific mutant reverse primer and wild-type TaqMan-MGB probe were used for dual-inhibiting amplification of wild-type alleles in a real-time PCR, and then the JAK2V617F mutant alleles were amplified specially. The standard curve for quantification of JAK2V617F was established by percentages of JAK2V617F alleles with threshold cycle (Ct) values in a real-time PCR. Furthermore, 89 apparent healthy donors were tested by this method. The results showed that the quantitative lower limit of this method for JAK2V617F was 0.1%, and the intra- and inter-assay average variability for quantifying percentage of JAK2V617F in total DNA was 4.1% and 6.1%, respectively. Two JAK2V617F-positive individuals were identified (the percentage of JAK2V617F alleles were 0.64% and 0.98%, respectively) using this method in blood from 89 apparently healthy donors. It is concluded that the developed method with highly sensitive and reproducible quantification of JAK2V617F mutant burden can be used clinically for diagnosis and evaluation of disease prognosis and efficacy of therapy in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Moreover, this technique can be also used for quantitative detection of variety of single nucleotide mutation.

  8. Human Y-chromosome haplotyping by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Martinez, Laisel; Cadenas, Alicia M; Herrera, Rene J

    2008-06-01

    We describe the application of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) for screening biallelic markers, including SNPs, within the nonrecombining region of the human Y-chromosome (NRY). The AS-PCR method is based on the concept that the perfectly annealed primer-template complex is more stable, and therefore, more efficiently amplified under the appropriate annealing temperature than the complex with a mismatched 3'-residue. Furthermore, a mismatched nucleotide at the primer's 3'-OH end provides for a poor extension substrate for Taq DNA polymerase, allowing for discrimination between the two alleles. This method has the dual advantage of amplification and detection of alleles in a single expeditious and inexpensive procedure. The amplification conditions of over 50 binary markers, mostly SNPs, that define the major Y-haplogroups as well as their derived lineages were optimized and are provided for the first time. In addition, artificial restriction sites were designed for those markers that are not selectively amplified by AS-PCR. Our results are consistent with allele designations derived from other techniques such as RFLP and direct sequencing of PCR products.

  9. Ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR reveals rare preexisting drug-resistant variants and a large replicating virus population in macaques infected with a simian immunodeficiency virus containing human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Valerie F; Ambrose, Zandrea; Kearney, Mary F; Shao, Wei; Kewalramani, Vineet N; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Coffin, John M

    2012-12-01

    It has been proposed that most drug-resistant mutants, resulting from a single-nucleotide change, exist at low frequency in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) populations in vivo prior to the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To test this hypothesis and to investigate the emergence of resistant mutants with drug selection, we developed a new ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR (UsASP) assay, which can detect drug resistance mutations at a frequency of ≥0.001% of the virus population. We applied this assay to plasma samples obtained from macaques infected with an SIV variant containing HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) (RT-simian-human immunodeficiency [SHIV](mne)), before and after they were exposed to a short course of efavirenz (EFV) monotherapy. We detected RT inhibitor (RTI) resistance mutations K65R and M184I but not K103N in 2 of 2 RT-SHIV-infected macaques prior to EFV exposure. After three doses over 4 days of EFV monotherapy, 103N mutations (AAC and AAT) rapidly emerged and increased in the population to levels of ∼20%, indicating that they were present prior to EFV exposure. The rapid increase of 103N mutations from <0.001% to 20% of the viral population indicates that the replicating virus population size in RT-SHIV-infected macaques must be 10(6) or more infected cells per replication cycle.

  10. IGH and IGK gene rearrangements as PCR targets for pediatric Burkitt's lymphoma and mature B-ALL MRD analysis.

    PubMed

    Lovisa, Federica; Mussolin, Lara; Corral, Lilia; Pillon, Marta; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Rosolen, Angelo

    2009-10-01

    We recently reported that minimal residual disease (MRD) and minimal disseminated disease (MDD), assessed by long-distance PCR (LD-PCR) for t(8;14), are negative prognostic factors in mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). However, t(8;14) is detectable in only about 70% of patients, thus preventing MRD studies by this approach in the remaining patients. At present, no molecular assays have been reported for MRD and MDD analysis in t(8;14)-negative patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the characteristics of patient-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements as RQ-PCR targets for MRD analysis, in order to extend MRD studies to those patients who are not eligible for the LD-PCR assay. The study was performed according to the guidelines of the European Study Group on MRD detection in ALL (ESG-MRD-ALL). Overall, 36 B-ALL and 19 BL cases were analyzed. Multiple PCR reactions were performed for each sample to identify heavy and kappa light-chain rearrangements. A total of 97 RQ-PCR targets (62 for B-ALL, 35 for BL) were analyzed for sensitivity. The rearrangement pattern identified was similar to that reported for normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. In 88% of the targets, a sensitivity of at least 10(-4) was achieved. In 87% of patients (84% of B-ALLs, 95% of BLs) at least one sensitive target was available. All PCR targets identified at diagnosis were preserved at relapse. Our results suggest that MDD and MRD can be successfully studied using a single sensitive Ig target in the great majority of B-ALL and BL cases. The combination of LD-PCR and Ig-based assays will allow MRD analysis in virtually all of the patients.

  11. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction typing and sequencing of mitochondrial D-loop region in broiler chickens in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harumi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Naito, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to comprehend a feature of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mainly of general broiler chickens in Japan. We typed two SNP sites (199C/T and 792A/G) of the D-loop region in mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) in 359 broiler (182 chunky and 177 cobb) and 506 layer (233 White Leghorn, 140 Barred Plymouth Rock and 133 Rhode Island Red) chickens. The SNP of 199C or 792A by AS-PCR was observed in the chunky and cobb chickens, and not in the layers. The haplotype 199T/792G was observed in a part of cobb and all layers. By the result of AS-PCR haplotyping and the broiler brands, the D-loop region was sequenced in 44 broiler chickens (20 chunky and 24 cobb) and compared with the layers' sequence data. Among the broiler and layer chickens, 21 SNP sites (including one insertion) and 11 sequence haplotypes were observed. Haplotype variation or correspondence was observed in and between the broiler brands. This study provides important information to establish a chicken meat traceability system by SNP haplotyping of mtDNA in Japan.

  12. Allele-specific DNA methylation: beyond imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) and allele-specific gene expression (ASE) have long been studied in genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. But these types of allelic asymmetries, along with allele-specific transcription factor binding (ASTF), have turned out to be far more pervasive-affecting many non-imprinted autosomal genes in normal human tissues. ASM, ASE and ASTF have now been mapped genome-wide by microarray-based methods and NextGen sequencing. Multiple studies agree that all three types of allelic asymmetries, as well as the related phenomena of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci, are mostly accounted for by cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms. The precise mechanisms by which this occurs are not yet understood, but there are some testable hypotheses and already a few direct clues. Future challenges include achieving higher resolution maps to locate the epicenters of cis-regulated ASM, using this information to test mechanistic models, and applying genome-wide maps of ASE/ASM/ASTF to pinpoint functional regulatory polymorphisms influencing disease susceptibility.

  13. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of a mutation in the relax circular DNA and the covalently closed circular DNA of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wan-Long; Hu, Jie-Li; Fang, Yan; Luo, Qiang; Xu, Ge; Xu, Lei; Jing, Zhou-Hong; Shan, Xue-Feng; Zhu, Yan-Ling; Huang, Ai-Long

    2013-12-01

    The relax circle DNA (rcDNA) sequence and the covalently closed circle DNA (cccDNA) sequence in hepatitis B virus (HBV) are crucial regions for HBV infections. To analyze mutations in rcDNA and cccDNA, DNA sequencing is often used, although it is time-consuming and expensive. Herein, we report a simple, economic, albeit accurate allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) to detect mutations in these regions of HBV. This method can be extensively used to screen for mutations at specific positions of HBV genome.

  14. A novel technique for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms by analyzing consumed allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Sato, M; Sakabe, M; Naito, E; Yamanouchi, H; Suzuki, T

    2001-02-01

    We present a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique, termed consumed allele-specific primer analysis (CASPA), as a new strategy for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The method involves the use of labeled allele-specific primers, differing in length, with several noncomplementary nucleotides added in the 5'-terminal region. After PCR amplification, the amounts of the remaining primers not incorporated into the PCR products are determined. Thus, nucleotide substitutions are identified by measuring the consumption of primers. In this study, the CASPA method was successfully applied to ABO genotyping. In the present method, the allele-specific primer only anneals with the target polymorphic site on the DNA, so it is not necessary to analyze the PCR products. Therefore, this method is only little affected by modification of the PCR products. The CASPA method is expected to be a useful tool for typing of SNPs.

  15. SNP-Based Quantification of Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Patterns by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of allele-specific DNA methylation patterns has recently attracted much interest as loci of allele-specific DNA methylation overlap with known risk loci for complex diseases and the analysis might contribute to the fine-mapping and interpretation of non-coding genetic variants associated with complex diseases and improve the understanding between genotype and phenotype. In the presented protocol, we present a method for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns on both alleles separately using heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) as anchor for allele-specific PCR amplification followed by analysis of the allele-specific DNA methylation patterns by Pyrosequencing(®). Pyrosequencing is an easy-to-handle, quantitative real-time sequencing method that is frequently used for genotyping as well as for the analysis of DNA methylation patterns. The protocol consists of three major steps: (1) identification of individuals heterozygous for a SNP in a region of interest using Pyrosequencing; (2) analysis of the DNA methylation patterns surrounding the SNP on bisulfite-treated DNA to identify regions of potential allele-specific DNA methylation; and (3) the analysis of the DNA methylation patterns associated with each of the two alleles, which are individually amplified using allele-specific PCR. The enrichment of the targeted allele is re-enforced by modification of the allele-specific primers at the allele-discriminating base with Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA). For the proof-of-principle of the developed approach, we provide assay details for three imprinted genes (IGF2, IGF2R, and PEG3) within this chapter. The mean of the DNA methylation patterns derived from the individual alleles corresponds well to the overall DNA methylation patterns and the developed approach proved more reliable compared to other protocols for allele-specific DNA methylation analysis.

  16. High-Throughput Genotyping with TaqMan Allelic Discrimination and Allele-Specific Genotyping Assays.

    PubMed

    Heissl, Angelika; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Real-time PCR-based genotyping methods, such as TaqMan allelic discrimination assays and allele-specific genotyping, are particularly useful when screening a handful of single nucleotide polymorphisms in hundreds of samples; either derived from different individuals, tissues, or pre-amplified DNA. Although real-time PCR-based methods such as TaqMan are well-established, alternative methods, like allele-specific genotyping, are powerful alternatives, especially for genotyping short tandem repeat (STR) length polymorphisms. Here, we describe all relevant aspects when developing an assay for a new SNP or STR using either TaqMan or allele-specific genotyping, respectively, such as primer and probe design, optimization of reaction conditions, the experimental procedure for typing hundreds of samples, and finally the data evaluation. Our goal is to provide a guideline for developing genotyping assays using these two approaches that render reliable and reproducible genotype calls involving minimal optimization.

  17. RNA-FISH to analyze allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the analysis of imprinted gene expression is the need to distinguish RNA synthesis occurring at the maternal vs the paternally inherited copy of the gene. Most of the techniques used to examine allele-specific expression exploit naturally occurring polymorphisms and measure steady-state levels of RNA isolated from a pool of cells. Hence, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) an be exploited in a heterozygote, by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)- based procedure, to analyze maternal vs paternal gene expression. The human IGF2R gene was analyzed in this way. Smrzka et al. (1) were thus able to show that the IGF2R gene possesses a hemimethylated, intronic CpG island analogous to the mouse imprinting box. However, IGF2R mRNA was detected that possessed the RFLP from both the maternal and paternal alleles in all but one of the 70 lymphoblastoid samples. (The one monoallelic sample reactivated its paternal allele with continued cell culturing.) It was concluded that monoallelic expression of the human gene is a polymorphic trait occurring in a small minority of all tested samples (reviewed in refs. 2,3). Although this is a sound conclusion, the question remains: Is the human IGF2R gene imprinted?

  18. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  19. Allele-specific chemical genetics: concept, strategies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kabirul

    2015-02-20

    The relationship between DNA and protein sequences is well understood, yet because the members of a protein family/subfamily often carry out the same biochemical reaction, elucidating their individual role in cellular processes presents a challenge. Forward and reverse genetics have traditionally been employed to understand protein functions with considerable success. A fundamentally different approach that has gained widespread application is the use of small organic molecules, known as chemical genetics. However, the slow time-scale of genetics and inherent lack of specificity of small molecules used in chemical genetics have limited the applicability of these methods in deconvoluting the role of individual proteins involved in fast, dynamic biological events. Combining the advantages of both the techniques, the specificity achieved with genetics along with the reversibility and tunability of chemical genetics, has led to the development of a powerful approach to uncover protein functions in complex biological processes. This technique is known as allele-specific chemical genetics and is rapidly becoming an essential toolkit to shed light on proteins and their mechanism of action. The current review attempts to provide a comprehensive description of this approach by discussing the underlying principles, strategies, and successful case studies. Potential future implications of this technology in expanding the frontiers of modern biology are discussed.

  20. MYD88 L265P in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy, and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders using conventional and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lian; Hunter, Zachary R.; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xia; Morra, Enrica; Trojani, Alessandra; Greco, Antonino; Arcaini, Luca; Varettoni, Maria; Brown, Jennifer R.; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Manning, Robert J.; Tripsas, Christina K.; Lindeman, Neal I.

    2013-01-01

    By whole-genome and/or Sanger sequencing, we recently identified a somatic mutation (MYD88 L265P) that stimulates nuclear factor κB activity and is present in >90% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) patients. MYD88 L265P was absent in 90% of immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients. We therefore developed conventional and real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assays for more sensitive detection and quantification of MYD88 L265P. Using either assay, MYD88 L265P was detected in 97 of 104 (93%) WM and 13 of 24 (54%) IgM MGUS patients and was either absent or rarely expressed in samples from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (2/20; 10%), CLL (1/26; 4%), multiple myeloma (including IgM cases, 0/14), and immunoglobulin G MGUS (0/9) patients as well as healthy donors (0/40; P < 1.5 × 10−5 for WM vs other cohorts). Real-time AS-PCR identified IgM MGUS patients progressing to WM and showed a high rate of concordance between MYD88 L265P ΔCT and BM disease involvement (r = 0.89, P = .008) in WM patients undergoing treatment. These studies identify MYD88 L265P as a widely present mutation in WM and IgM MGUS patients using highly sensitive and specific AS-PCR assays with potential use in diagnostic discrimination and/or response assessment. The finding of this mutation in many IgM MGUS patients suggests that MYD88 L265P may be an early oncogenic event in WM pathogenesis. PMID:23321251

  1. Design of allele-specific primers and detection of the human ABO genotyping to avoid the pseudopositive problem.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Yukimasa, Tetsuo; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Oka, Hiroaki

    2008-11-01

    PCR experiments using DNA primers forming mismatch pairing with template lambda DNA at the 3' end were carried out in order to develop allele-specific primers capable of detecting SNP in genomes without generating pseudopositive amplification products, and thus avoiding the so-called pseudopositive problem. Detectable amounts of PCR products were obtained when primers forming a single or two mismatch pairings at the 3' end were used. In particular, 3' terminal A/C or T/C (primer/template) mismatches tended to allow PCR amplification to proceed, resulting in pseudopositive results in many cases. While less PCR product was observed for primers forming three terminal mismatch pairings, target DNA sequences were efficiently amplified by primers forming two mismatch pairings next to the terminal G/C base pairing. These results indicate that selecting a primer having a 3' terminal nucleotide that recognizes the SNP nucleotide and the next two nucleotides that form mismatch pairings with the template sequence can be used as an allele-specific primer that eliminates the pseudopositive problem. Trials with the human ABO genes demonstrated that this primer design is also useful for detecting a single base pair difference in gene sequences with a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 45.

  2. [Microchip electrophoresis coupled with multiplex allele-specific am-plification for typing multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Peng; Zhou, Guo-Hua

    2009-02-01

    A new method of DNA adapter ligation-mediated allele-specific amplification (ALM-ASA) was developed for typing multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the platform of microchip electrophoresis. Using seven SNPs of 794C>T, 1274C>T, 2143T>C, 2766T>del, 3298G>A, 5200G>A, and 5277C>T in the interleukin 1B (IL1B) gene as a target object, a long DNA fragment containing the seven SNPs of interest was pre-amplified to enhance the specificity. The pre-amplified DNA fragment was digested by a restriction endonuclease to form sticky ends; and then the adapter was ligated to either end of the digested fragment. Using the adapter-ligated fragments as templates, a 7-plex allele-specific amplification was performed by 7 allele-specific primers and a universal primer in one tube. The allele-specific products amplified were separated by chip electrophoresis and the types of SNPs were easily discriminated by the product sizes. The seven SNPs in IL1B gene in 48 healthy Chinese were successfully typed by microchip electrophoresis and the results coincided with those by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing method. The method established was accurate and can be used to type multiple SNPs simultaneously. In combination with microchip electrophoresis for readout, ALM-ASA assay can be used for fast SNP detection with a small amount of sample. Using self-prepared gel matrix and reused chips for analysis, the SNP can be typed at an ultra low cost.

  3. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population.

  4. Chromosome-wide analysis of parental allele-specific chromatin and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Wu, Xiwei; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Li, Arthur X; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Mann, Jeffrey R; Szabó, Piroska E

    2011-04-01

    To reveal the extent of domain-wide epigenetic features at imprinted gene clusters, we performed a high-resolution allele-specific chromatin analysis of over 100 megabases along the maternally or paternally duplicated distal chromosome 7 (Chr7) and Chr15 in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). We found that reciprocal allele-specific features are limited to imprinted genes and their differentially methylated regions (DMRs), whereas broad local enrichment of H3K27me3 (BLOC) is a domain-wide feature at imprinted clusters. We uncovered novel allele-specific features of BLOCs. A maternally biased BLOC was found along the H19-Igf2 domain. A paternal allele-specific gap was found along Kcnq1ot1, interrupting a biallelic BLOC in the Kcnq1-Cdkn1c domain. We report novel allele-specific chromatin marks at the Peg13 and Slc38a4 DMRs, Cdkn1c upstream region, and Inpp5f_v2 DMR and paternal allele-specific CTCF binding at the Peg13 DMR. Additionally, we derived an imprinted gene predictor algorithm based on our allele-specific chromatin mapping data. The binary predictor H3K9ac and CTCF or H3K4me3 in one allele and H3K9me3 in the reciprocal allele, using a sliding-window approach, recognized with precision the parental allele specificity of known imprinted genes, H19, Igf2, Igf2as, Cdkn1c, Kcnq1ot1, and Inpp5f_v2 on Chr7 and Peg13 and Slc38a4 on Chr15. Chromatin features, therefore, can unequivocally identify genes with imprinted expression.

  5. A majority of Huntington's disease patients may be treatable by individualized allele-specific RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Jaspers, Leonie; Spronkmans, Christine; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Di Maria, Emilio; Donato, Stefano Di; Kaemmerer, William F

    2009-06-01

    Use of RNA interference to reduce huntingtin protein (htt) expression in affected brain regions may provide an effective treatment for Huntington disease (HD), but it remains uncertain whether suppression of both wild-type and mutant alleles in a heterozygous patient will provide more benefit than harm. Previous research has shown suppression of just the mutant allele is achievable using siRNA targeted to regions of HD mRNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To determine whether more than a minority of patients may be eligible for an allele-specific therapy, we genotyped DNA from 327 unrelated European Caucasian HD patients at 26 SNP sites in the HD gene. Over 86% of the patients were found to be heterozygous for at least one SNP among those tested. Because the sites are genetically linked, one cannot use the heterozygosity rates of the individual SNPs to predict how many sites (and corresponding allele-specific siRNA) would be needed to provide at least one treatment possibility for this percentage of patients. By computing all combinations, we found that a repertoire of allele-specific siRNA corresponding to seven sites can provide at least one allele-specific siRNA treatment option for 85.6% of our sample. Moreover, we provide evidence that allele-specific siRNA targeting these sites are readily identifiable using a high throughput screening method, and that allele-specific siRNA identified using this method indeed show selective suppression of endogenous mutant htt protein in fibroblast cells from HD patients. Therefore, allele-specific siRNA are not so rare as to be impractical to find and use therapeutically.

  6. Rapid quantification of single-nucleotide mutations in mixed influenza A viral populations using allele-specific mixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cindy M; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Schupp, James; Kelley, Erin; Nguyen, Jack T; McSharry, James J; Weng, Qingmei; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring antiviral resistance in influenza is critical to public health epidemiology and pandemic preparedness activities. Effective monitoring requires methods to detect low-level resistance and to monitor the change in resistance as a function of time and drug treatment. Resistance-conferring single-nucleotide mutations in influenza virus are ideal targets for such methods. In the present study, fives sets of paired TaqMan allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays were developed and validated for quantitative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This novel method using Delta Ct is termed allele-specific mixture analysis (ASMA) or FluASMA. The FluASMA assays target L26F, V27A, A30T, and S31N mutations in the A/Albany/1/98 (H3N2) M2 gene and H275Y mutation in the A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) NA gene and have a limit of quantification of 0.25-0.50% mutant. The error for % mutant estimation was less than 10% in all FluASMA assays, with intra-run Delta Ct coefficient of variance (CoV) at

  7. Heritable Individual-Specific and Allele-Specific Chromatin Signatures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    McDaniell, Ryan; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Song, Lingyun; Liu, Zheng; Boyle, Alan P.; Erdos, Michael R.; Scott, Laura J.; Morken, Mario A.; Kucera, Katerina S.; Battenhouse, Anna; Keefe, Damian; Collins, Francis S.; Willard, Huntington F.; Lieb, Jason D.; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Birney, Ewan

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which variation in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding may influence gene expression, and thus underlie or contribute to variation in phenotype, is unknown. To address this question, we cataloged both individual-to-individual variation and differences between homologous chromosomes within the same individual (allele-specific variation) in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding in lymphoblastoid cells derived from individuals of geographically diverse ancestry. Ten percent of active chromatin sites were individual-specific; a similar proportion were allele-specific. Both individual-specific and allele-specific sites were commonly transmitted from parent to child, which suggests that they are heritable features of the human genome. Our study shows that heritable chromatin status and transcription factor binding differ as a result of genetic variation and may underlie phenotypic variation in humans. PMID:20299549

  8. A novel measurement of allele discrimination for assessment of allele-specific silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masaki; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2014-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing by RNA interference (ASP-RNAi) is an atypical RNAi that is capable of discriminating target alleles from non-target alleles, and may be therapeutically useful for specific inhibition of disease-causing alleles without affecting their corresponding normal alleles. However, it is difficult to design and select small interfering RNA (siRNAs) that confer ASP-RNAi. A major problem is that there are few appropriate measures in determining optimal allele-specific siRNAs. Here we show two novel formulas for calculating a new measure of allele-discrimination, named "ASP-score". The formulas and ASP-score allow for an unbiased determination of optimal siRNAs, and may contribute to characterizing such allele-specific siRNAs.

  9. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  10. Allele-specific copy number profiling by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bell, John M; Zavala, Nicolas A; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-02-27

    The progression and clonal development of tumors often involve amplifications and deletions of genomic DNA. Estimation of allele-specific copy number, which quantifies the number of copies of each allele at each variant loci rather than the total number of chromosome copies, is an important step in the characterization of tumor genomes and the inference of their clonal history. We describe a new method, falcon, for finding somatic allele-specific copy number changes by next generation sequencing of tumors with matched normals. falcon is based on a change-point model on a bivariate mixed Binomial process, which explicitly models the copy numbers of the two chromosome haplotypes and corrects for local allele-specific coverage biases. By using the Binomial distribution rather than a normal approximation, falcon more effectively pools evidence from sites with low coverage. A modified Bayesian information criterion is used to guide model selection for determining the number of copy number events. Falcon is evaluated on in silico spike-in data and applied to the analysis of a pre-malignant colon tumor sample and late-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma from the same individual. The allele-specific copy number estimates obtained by falcon allows us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the clonal history of the individual's colon cancer.

  11. Robust and accurate single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH): design criteria and assay validation.

    PubMed

    Prince, J A; Feuk, L; Howell, W M; Jobs, M; Emahazion, T; Blennow, K; Brookes, A J

    2001-01-01

    We recently introduced a generic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping method, termed DASH (dynamic allele-specific hybridization), which entails dynamic tracking of probe (oligonucleotide) to target (PCR product) hybridization as reaction temperature is steadily increased. The reliability of DASH and optimal design rules have not been previously reported. We have now evaluated crudely designed DASH assays (sequences unmodified from genomic DNA) for 89 randomly selected and confirmed SNPs. Accurate genotype assignment was achieved for 89% of these worst-case-scenario assays. Failures were determined to be caused by secondary structures in the target molecule, which could be reliably predicted from thermodynamic theory. Improved design rules were thereby established, and these were tested by redesigning six of the failed DASH assays. This involved reengineering PCR primers to eliminate amplified target sequence secondary structures. This sophisticated design strategy led to complete functional recovery of all six assays, implying that SNPs in most if not all sequence contexts can be effectively scored by DASH. Subsequent empirical support for this inference has been evidenced by approximately 30 failure-free DASH assay designs implemented across a range of ongoing genotyping programs. Structured follow-on studies employed standardized assay conditions, and revealed that assay reproducibility (733 duplicated genotypes, six different assays) was as high as 100%, with an assay accuracy (1200 genotypes, three different assays) that exceeded 99.9%. No post-PCR assay failures were encountered. These findings, along with intrinsic low cost and high flexibility, validate DASH as an effective procedure for SNP genotyping.

  12. Simple and sensitive method for identification of human DNA by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction of FOXP2.

    PubMed

    Hiroshige, Kenichi; Soejima, Mikiko; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kamimura, Shigeo; Koda, Yoshiro

    2009-07-01

    The forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) gene is specifically involved in speech and language development in humans. The sequence is well conserved among many vertebrate species but has accumulated amino acid changes in the human lineage. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to discriminate between human and nonhuman vertebrate DNA in forensic specimens by amplification of a human-specific genomic region. In the present study, we designed an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers to amplify smaller than 70-bp regions of FOXP2 to identify DNA as being of human or nonhuman, including ape, origin. PCR amplification was also successfully performed using fluorescence-labeled primers, and this method allows a single PCR reaction with a genomic DNA sample as small as 0.01 ng. This system also identified the presence of human DNA in two blood stains stored for 20 and 38 years. The results suggested the potential usefulness of FOXP2 as an identifier of human DNA in forensic samples.

  13. Allele-specific impairment of GJB2 expression by GJB6 deletion del(GJB6-D13S1854).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Tamayo, Marta L; Gelvez, Nancy; Schrijver, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene, which encodes connexin 26, are a frequent cause of congenital non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Two large deletions, del(GJB6-D13S1830) and del(GJB6-D13S1854), which truncate GJB6 (connexin 30), cause hearing loss in individuals homozygous, or compound heterozygous for these deletions or one such deletion and a mutation in GJB2. Recently, we have demonstrated that the del(GJB6-D13S1830) deletion contributes to hearing loss due to an allele-specific lack of GJB2 mRNA expression and not as a result of digenic inheritance, as was postulated earlier. In the current study we investigated the smaller del(GJB6-D13S1854) deletion, which disrupts the expression of GJB2 at the transcriptional level in a manner similar to the more common del(GJB6-D13S1830) deletion. Interestingly, in the presence of this deletion, GJB2 expression remains minimally but reproducibly present. The relative allele-specific expression of GJB2 was assessed by reverse-transcriptase PCR and restriction digestions in three probands who were compound heterozygous for a GJB2 mutation and del(GJB6-D13S1854). Each individual carried a different sequence variant in GJB2. All three individuals expressed the mutated GJB2 allele in trans with del(GJB6-D13S1854), but expression of the GJB2 allele in cis with the deletion was almost absent. Our study clearly corroborates the hypothesis that the del(GJB6-D13S1854), similar to the larger and more common del(GJB6-D13S1830), removes (a) putative cis-regulatory element(s) upstream of GJB6 and narrows down the region of location.

  14. Pmp22 mutant allele-specific siRNA alleviates demyelinating neuropathic phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Su; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Koo, Ok Jae; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Mo, Won Min; Kwak, Geon; Moon, Hyo Won; Park, Hwan Tae; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2017-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a genetic disorder that can be caused by aberrations in >80 genes. CMT has heterogeneous modes of inheritance, including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, and X-linked recessive. Over 95% of cases are dominantly inherited. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of a mutant allele by an allele-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) can alleviate the demyelinating neuropathic phenotype of CMT. We designed 19 different allele-specific siRNAs for Trembler J (Tr-J) mice harboring a naturally occurring mutation (Leu16Pro) in Pmp22. Using a luciferase assay, we identified an siRNA that specifically and selectively reduced the expression level of the mutant allele and reversed the low viability of Schwann cells caused by mutant Pmp22 over-expression in vitro. The in vivo efficacy of the allele-specific siRNA was assessed by its intraperitoneal injection to postnatal day 6 of Tr-J mice. Administration of the allele-specific siRNA to Tr-J mice significantly enhanced motor function and muscle volume, as assessed by the rotarod test and magnetic resonance imaging analysis, respectively. Increases in motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials were also observed in the treated mice. In addition, myelination, as evidenced by toluidine blue staining and electron microscopy, was augmented in the sciatic nerves of the mice after allele-specific siRNA treatment. After validating suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele at the mRNA level in the Schwann cells of Tr-J mice, we observed increased expression levels of myelinating proteins such as myelin basic protein and myelin protein zero. These data indicate that selective suppression of the Pmp22 mutant allele by non-viral delivery of siRNA alleviates the demyelinating neuropathic phenotypes of CMT in vivo, implicating allele-specific siRNA treatment as a potent therapeutic strategy for dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies.

  15. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  16. Correction of hair shaft defects through allele-specific silencing of mutant Krt75

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R.; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yan-Feng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A.; Roop, Dennis R.; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele specific siRNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific shRNA persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of the mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  17. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  18. Predictive long-range allele-specific mapping of regulatory variants and target transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibaick; Lee, Seulkee; Bang, Hyoeun; Choi, Jung Kyoon

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a large number of noncoding associations, calling for systematic mapping to causal regulatory variants and their distal target genes. A widely used method, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for chromatin or expression traits, suffers from sample-to-sample experimental variation and trans-acting or environmental effects. Instead, alleles at heterozygous loci can be compared within a sample, thereby controlling for those confounding factors. Here we introduce a method for chromatin structure-based allele-specific pairing of regulatory variants and target transcripts. With phased genotypes, much of allele-specific expression could be explained by paired allelic cis-regulation across a long range. This approach showed approximately two times greater sensitivity than QTL mapping. There are cases in which allele imbalance cannot be tested because heterozygotes are not available among reference samples. Therefore, we employed a machine learning method to predict missing positive cases based on various features shared by observed allele-specific pairs. We showed that only 10 reference samples are sufficient to achieve high prediction accuracy with a low sampling variation. In conclusion, our method enables highly sensitive fine mapping and target identification for trait-associated variants based on a small number of reference samples.

  19. AlleleSeq: analysis of allele-specific expression and binding in a network framework.

    PubMed

    Rozowsky, Joel; Abyzov, Alexej; Wang, Jing; Alves, Pedro; Raha, Debasish; Harmanci, Arif; Leng, Jing; Bjornson, Robert; Kong, Yong; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Rubin, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2011-08-02

    To study allele-specific expression (ASE) and binding (ASB), that is, differences between the maternally and paternally derived alleles, we have developed a computational pipeline (AlleleSeq). Our pipeline initially constructs a diploid personal genome sequence (and corresponding personalized gene annotation) using genomic sequence variants (SNPs, indels, and structural variants), and then identifies allele-specific events with significant differences in the number of mapped reads between maternal and paternal alleles. There are many technical challenges in the construction and alignment of reads to a personal diploid genome sequence that we address, for example, bias of reads mapping to the reference allele. We have applied AlleleSeq to variation data for NA12878 from the 1000 Genomes Project as well as matched, deeply sequenced RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq data sets generated for this purpose. In addition to observing fairly widespread allele-specific behavior within individual functional genomic data sets (including results consistent with X-chromosome inactivation), we can study the interaction between ASE and ASB. Furthermore, we investigate the coordination between ASE and ASB from multiple transcription factors events using a regulatory network framework. Correlation analyses and network motifs show mostly coordinated ASB and ASE.

  20. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes.

  1. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R.; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring ‘allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable ‘allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  2. Detection of cariogenic bacteria genes by a combination of allele-specific polymerase chain reactions and a novel bioluminescent pyrophosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Karasawa, Koji; Igarashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shigeya; Goto, Nobuichi; Maeda, Masako

    2004-10-15

    We developed a novel bioluminescent assay for detection of pyrophosphate in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product. The principle of this method is as follows: pyrophosphate released by PCR is converted to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by pyruvate phosphate dikinase in the presence of the substrate pyruvate phosphate and the coenzyme adenosine 5'-monophosphate; subsequently, ATP concentration is determined by firefly luciferase reaction. The detection limit of pyrophosphate is 1.56 x 10(-15)mol/assay. Additionally, luminescent intensity reached a maximum at approximately 100 s and remained elevated beyond 10 min. This approach is applicable to the detection of cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque. Thus, the allele-specific PCR products of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus developed in this study were measured via the proposed bioluminescent assay. This protocol, which does not require expensive equipment, can be utilized to rapidly monitor cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque.

  3. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  4. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  5. A two-step method for identification of the Chinese glutinous rice Suyunuo, based on ISSR-SCAR and allele-specific markers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y B; Zhang, Y M; Hang, Y Y; Li, M M; Zhou, G C; Shen, X L; Sun, X Q

    2016-10-05

    Suyunuo is a valuable glutinous rice variety cultivated mainly in the Lake Taihu area of China. Historically, Suyunuo was presented to emperors as a tribute, and, still today, enjoys a great reputation in China. This study aimed to develop a unique, specific molecular marker for the identification of Suyunuo rice. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers was performed on Suyunuo and 11 other glutinous rice varieties that are mainly cultivated in the Yangtze River Delta region. A Suyunuo-specific band was detected in the PCR products generated from primer ISSR-807. A sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) primer pair targeting a Suyunuo-specific band was subsequently designed. The SCAR primers amplified a target band in all individuals of Suyunuo and in four glutinous indica varieties, whereas no bands were found in the seven glutinous japonica varieties. Subsequently, sequences amplified by the SCAR primer pair were analyzed to facilitate the design of Suyunuo allele-specific primers. The allele-specific primer pair produced target bands in all individuals of Suyunuo rice but no bands in individuals of any of the other 11 rice varieties. This study provides a theoretical guideline for rice germplasm identification and innovation of other valuable rice landraces.

  6. Allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show genetic influence on chromatin state in human genome.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Mitsutaka; Yang, Howard H; Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Hu, Ying; Taylor, Philip R; Buetow, Kenneth H; Lee, Maxwell P

    2007-05-18

    Several recent studies have shown a genetic influence on gene expression variation, including variation between the two chromosomes within an individual and variation between individuals at the population level. We hypothesized that genetic inheritance may also affect variation in chromatin states. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed chromatin states in 12 lymphoblastoid cells derived from two Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families using an allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-chip) assay with Affymetrix 10K SNP chip. We performed the allele-specific ChIP-on-chip assays for the 12 lymphoblastoid cells using antibodies targeting at RNA polymerase II and five post-translation modified forms of the histone H3 protein. The use of multiple cell lines from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families allowed us to evaluate variation of chromatin states across pedigrees. These studies demonstrated that chromatin state clustered by family. Our results support the idea that genetic inheritance can determine the epigenetic state of the chromatin as shown previously in model organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration in humans that genetics may be an important factor that influences global chromatin state mediated by histone modification, the hallmark of the epigenetic phenomena.

  7. Microarrays for high-throughput genotyping of MICA alleles using allele-specific primer extension.

    PubMed

    Baek, I C; Jang, J-P; Choi, H-B; Choi, E-J; Ko, W-Y; Kim, T-G

    2013-10-01

    The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand of NKG2D, has been defined in human diseases by its allele associations with various autoimmune diseases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cancer. This study describes a practical system to develop MICA genotyping by allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. From the results of 20 control primers, strict and reliable cut-off values of more than 30,000 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) as positive and less than 3000 MFI as negative, were applied to select high-quality specific extension primers. Among 55 allele-specific primers, 44 primers could be initially selected as optimal primer. Through adjusting the length, six primers were improved. The other failed five primers were corrected by refractory modification. MICA genotypes by ASPE on microarrays showed the same results as those by nucleotide sequencing. On the basis of these results, ASPE on microarrays may provide high-throughput genotyping for MICA alleles for population studies, disease-gene associations and HSCT.

  8. Human leukocyte antigen haplotype phasing by allele-specific enrichment with peptide nucleic acid probes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Pouton, Colin W; Irving, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Targeted capture of large fragments of genomic DNA that enrich for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system haplotypes has utility in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current methods of HLA matching are based on inference or familial studies of inheritance; and each approach has its own inherent limitations. We have designed and tested a probe–target-extraction method for capturing specific HLA haplotypes by hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to alleles of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Short target fragments contained in plasmids were initially used to optimize the method followed by testing samples of genomic DNA from human subjects with preselected HLA haplotypes and obtained approximately 10% enrichment for the specific haplotype. When performed with high-molecular-weight genomic DNA, 99.0% versus 84.0% alignment match was obtained for the specific haplotype probed. The allele-specific target enrichment that we obtained can facilitate the elucidation of haplotypes between the 65 kb separating the HLA-DRB1 and the HLA-DQA1 genes, potentially spanning a total distance of at least 130 kb. Allele-specific target enrichment with PNA probes is a straightforward technique that has the capability to improve the resolution of DNA and whole genome sequencing technologies by allowing haplotyping of enriched DNA and crucially, retaining the DNA methylation profile. PMID:24936514

  9. Mutant allele specific imbalance in oncogenes with copy number alterations: Occurrence, mechanisms, and potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Chieh; Qiu, Wanglong; Juang, Caroline S; Mansukhani, Mahesh M; Halmos, Balazs; Su, Gloria H

    2017-01-01

    Mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI) was initially coined to describe copy number alterations associated with the mutant allele of an oncogene. The copy number gain (CNG) specific to the mutant allele can be readily observed in electropherograms. With the development of genome-wide analyses at base-pair resolution with copy number counts, we can now further differentiate MASI into those with CNG, with copy neutral alteration (also termed acquired uniparental disomy; UPD), or with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to the loss of the wild-type (WT) allele. Here we summarize the occurrence of MASI with CNG, aUPD, or MASI with LOH in some major oncogenes (such as EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF). We also discuss how these various classifications of MASI have been demonstrated to impact tumorigenesis, progression, metastasis, prognosis, and potentially therapeutic responses in cancer, notably in lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers.

  10. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  11. Allele-Specific Interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED Control Abscission in Arabidopsis Flowers.

    PubMed

    Groner, William D; Christy, Megan E; Kreiner, Catherine M; Liljegren, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV) gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST), which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  12. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John N; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  13. Allele-specific analysis of DNA replication origins in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Boris; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lajugie, Julien; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Bouhassira, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the location and timing of firing of replication origins are poorly understood. Using a novel functional genomic approach based on the analysis of SNPs and indels in phased human genomes, we observe that replication asynchrony is associated with small cumulative variations in the initiation efficiency of multiple origins between the chromosome homologues, rather than with the activation of dormant origins. Allele-specific measurements demonstrate that the presence of G-quadruplex-forming sequences does not correlate with the efficiency of initiation. Sequence analysis reveals that the origins are highly enriched in sequences with profoundly asymmetric G/C and A/T nucleotide distributions and are almost completely depleted of antiparallel triplex-forming sequences. We therefore propose that although G4-forming sequences are abundant in replication origins, an asymmetry in nucleotide distribution, which increases the propensity of origins to unwind and adopt non-B DNA structure, rather than the ability to form G4, is directly associated with origin activity. PMID:25987481

  14. Pseudoexons provide a mechanism for allele-specific expression of APC in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Taina T; Pavicic, Walter; Porkka, Noora; Kankainen, Matti; Järvinen, Heikki J; Lepistö, Anna; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-10-25

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene occurs in up to one-third of families with adenomatous polyposis (FAP) that have screened mutation-negative by conventional techniques. To advance our understanding of the genomic basis of this phenomenon, 54 APC mutation-negative families (21 with classical FAP and 33 with attenuated FAP, AFAP) were investigated. We focused on four families with validated ASE and scrutinized these families by sequencing of the blood transcriptomes (RNA-seq) and genomes (WGS). Three families, two with classical FAP and one with AFAP, revealed deep intronic mutations associated with pseudoexons. In all three families, intronic mutations (c.646-1806T>G in intron 6, c.1408+729A>G in intron 11, and c.1408+731C>T in intron 11) created new splice donor sites resulting in the insertion of intronic sequences (of 127 bp, 83 bp, and 83 bp, respectively) in the APC transcript. The respective intronic mutations were absent in the remaining polyposis families and the general population. Premature stop of translation as the predicted consequence as well as co-segregation with polyposis supported the pathogenicity of the pseudoexons. We conclude that next generation sequencing on RNA and genomic DNA is an effective strategy to reveal and validate pseudoexons that are regularly missed by traditional screening methods and is worth considering in apparent mutation-negative polyposis families.

  15. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene–childhood trauma interactions

    PubMed Central

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma–dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  16. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Capon, Samuel J.; Baillie, Gregory J.; Bower, Neil I.; da Silva, Jason A.; Paterson, Scott; Hogan, Benjamin M.; Simons, Cas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The advent of genome editing has significantly altered genetic research, including research using the zebrafish model. To better understand the selectivity of the commonly used CRISPR/Cas9 system, we investigated single base pair mismatches in target sites and examined how they affect genome editing in the zebrafish model. Using two different zebrafish strains that have been deep sequenced, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites containing polymorphisms between the two strains were identified. These strains were crossed (creating heterozygotes at polymorphic sites) and CRISPR/Cas9 complexes that perfectly complement one strain injected. Sequencing of targeted sites showed biased, allele-specific editing for the perfectly complementary sequence in the majority of cases (14/19). To test utility, we examined whether phenotypes generated by F0 injection could be internally controlled with such polymorphisms. Targeting of genes bmp7a and chordin showed reduction in the frequency of phenotypes in injected ‘heterozygotes’ compared with injecting the strain with perfect complementarity. Next, injecting CRISPR/Cas9 complexes targeting two separate sites created deletions, but deletions were biased to selected chromosomes when one CRISPR/Cas9 target contained a polymorphism. Finally, integration of loxP sequences occurred preferentially in alleles with perfect complementarity. These experiments demonstrate that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present throughout the genome can be utilised to increase the efficiency of in cis genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 in the zebrafish model. PMID:27895053

  17. Regulatory Divergence in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, a Genomewide Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Graze, Rita M.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Main, Bradley J.; Wayne, Marta L.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    Species-specific regulation of gene expression contributes to the development and maintenance of reproductive isolation and to species differences in ecologically important traits. A better understanding of the evolutionary forces that shape regulatory variation and divergence can be developed by comparing expression differences among species and interspecific hybrids. Once expression differences are identified, the underlying genetics of regulatory variation or divergence can be explored. With the goal of associating cis and/or trans components of regulatory divergence with differences in gene expression, overall and allele-specific expression levels were assayed genomewide in female adult heads of Drosophila melanogaster, D. simulans, and their F1 hybrids. A greater proportion of cis differences than trans differences were identified for genes expressed in heads and, in accordance with previous studies, cis differences also explained a larger number of species differences in overall expression level. Regulatory divergence was found to be prevalent among genes associated with defense, olfaction, and among genes downstream of the Drosophila sex determination hierarchy. In addition, two genes, with critical roles in sex determination and micro RNA processing, Sxl and loqs, were identified as misexpressed in hybrid female heads, potentially contributing to hybrid incompatibility. PMID:19667135

  18. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  19. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Capon, Samuel J; Baillie, Gregory J; Bower, Neil I; da Silva, Jason A; Paterson, Scott; Hogan, Benjamin M; Simons, Cas; Smith, Kelly A

    2017-01-15

    The advent of genome editing has significantly altered genetic research, including research using the zebrafish model. To better understand the selectivity of the commonly used CRISPR/Cas9 system, we investigated single base pair mismatches in target sites and examined how they affect genome editing in the zebrafish model. Using two different zebrafish strains that have been deep sequenced, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites containing polymorphisms between the two strains were identified. These strains were crossed (creating heterozygotes at polymorphic sites) and CRISPR/Cas9 complexes that perfectly complement one strain injected. Sequencing of targeted sites showed biased, allele-specific editing for the perfectly complementary sequence in the majority of cases (14/19). To test utility, we examined whether phenotypes generated by F0 injection could be internally controlled with such polymorphisms. Targeting of genes bmp7a and chordin showed reduction in the frequency of phenotypes in injected 'heterozygotes' compared with injecting the strain with perfect complementarity. Next, injecting CRISPR/Cas9 complexes targeting two separate sites created deletions, but deletions were biased to selected chromosomes when one CRISPR/Cas9 target contained a polymorphism. Finally, integration of loxP sequences occurred preferentially in alleles with perfect complementarity. These experiments demonstrate that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present throughout the genome can be utilised to increase the efficiency of in cis genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 in the zebrafish model.

  20. DASH-2: flexible, low-cost, and high-throughput SNP genotyping by dynamic allele-specific hybridization on membrane arrays.

    PubMed

    Jobs, Magnus; Howell, W Mathias; Stromqvist, Linda; Mayr, Torsten; Brookes, Anthony J

    2003-05-01

    Genotyping technologies need to be continually improved in terms of their flexibility, cost-efficiency, and throughput, to push forward genome variation analysis. To this end, we have leveraged the inherent simplicity of dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH) and coupled it to recent innovations of centrifugal arrays and iFRET. We have thereby created a new genotyping platform we term DASH-2, which we demonstrate and evaluate in this report. The system is highly flexible in many ways (any plate format, PCR multiplexing, serial and parallel array processing, spectral-multiplexing of hybridization probes), thus supporting a wide range of application scales and objectives. Precision is demonstrated to be in the range 99.8-100%, and assay costs are 0.05 USD or less per genotype assignment. DASH-2 thus provides a powerful new alternative for genotyping practice, which can be used without the need for expensive robotics support.

  1. Molecular characterization and a multiplex allele-specific PCR method for detection of thiabendazole resistance in Penicillium expansum from apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is commonly used as a postharvest treatment for control of blue mold in apples caused by Penicillium expansum. Different point mutations in the ß-tubulin gene conferring benzimidazole resistance have been reported in plant pathogens, but molecular mechanisms of TBZ resistance in ...

  2. Molecular genetic mechanisms of allelic specific regulation of murine Comt expression

    PubMed Central

    Segall, Samantha K.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Meloto, Carolina B.; Wen, Xia; Cunningham, Danielle; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Wiltshire, Tim; Gauthier, Josée; Tohyama, Sarasa; Martin, Loren J.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A functional allele of the mouse catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) gene is defined by the insertion of a B2 short interspersed repeat element in its 3′-untranslated region (UTR). This allele has been associated with a number of phenotypes, such as pain and anxiety. In comparison with mice carrying the ancestral allele (Comt+), ComtB2i mice show higher Comt mRNA and enzymatic activity levels. Here, we investigated the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying this allelic specific regulation of Comt expression. Insertion of the B2 element introduces an early polyadenylation signal generating a shorter Comt transcript, in addition to the longer ancestral mRNA. Comparative analysis and in silico prediction of Comt mRNA potential targets within the transcript 3′ to the B2 element was performed and allowed choosing microRNA (miRNA) candidates for experimental screening: mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667. Cell transfection with each miRNA downregulated the expression of the ancestral transcript and COMT enzymatic activity. Our in vivo experiments showed that mmu-miR-667-3p is strongly correlated with decreasing amounts of Comt mRNA in the brain, and lentiviral injections of mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667 increase hypersensitivity in the mouse formalin model, consistent with reduced COMT activity. In summary, our data demonstrate that the Comt+ transcript contains regulatory miRNA signals in its 3′-untranslated region leading to mRNA degradation; these signals, however, are absent in the shorter transcript, resulting in higher mRNA expression and activity levels. PMID:26067582

  3. High-throughput allele-specific expression across 250 environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Richards, Allison L.; Kurtz, Daniel; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Davis, Gordon O.; Harvey, Chris T.; Alazizi, Adnan; Watza, Donovan; Sorokin, Yoram; Hauff, Nancy; Zhou, Xiang; Wen, Xiaoquan; Pique-Regi, Roger; Luca, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions determine common disease risk factors and biomedically relevant complex traits. However, quantifying how the environment modulates genetic effects on human quantitative phenotypes presents unique challenges. Environmental covariates are complex and difficult to measure and control at the organismal level, as found in GWAS and epidemiological studies. An alternative approach focuses on the cellular environment using in vitro treatments as a proxy for the organismal environment. These cellular environments simplify the organism-level environmental exposures to provide a tractable influence on subcellular phenotypes, such as gene expression. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping studies identified GxE interactions in response to drug treatment and pathogen exposure. However, eQTL mapping approaches are infeasible for large-scale analysis of multiple cellular environments. Recently, allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis emerged as a powerful tool to identify GxE interactions in gene expression patterns by exploiting naturally occurring environmental exposures. Here we characterized genetic effects on the transcriptional response to 50 treatments in five cell types. We discovered 1455 genes with ASE (FDR < 10%) and 215 genes with GxE interactions. We demonstrated a major role for GxE interactions in complex traits. Genes with a transcriptional response to environmental perturbations showed sevenfold higher odds of being found in GWAS. Additionally, 105 genes that indicated GxE interactions (49%) were identified by GWAS as associated with complex traits. Examples include GIPR–caffeine interaction and obesity and include LAMP3–selenium interaction and Parkinson disease. Our results demonstrate that comprehensive catalogs of GxE interactions are indispensable to thoroughly annotate genes and bridge epidemiological and genome-wide association studies. PMID:27934696

  4. Characterization and machine learning prediction of allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    He, Jianlin; Sun, Ming-an; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Qianfei; Li, Qing; Xie, Hehuang

    2015-12-01

    A large collection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) has been identified in the human genome. Currently, the epigenetic influences of SNPs on their neighboring CpG sites remain elusive. A growing body of evidence suggests that locus-specific information, including genomic features and local epigenetic state, may play important roles in the epigenetic readout of SNPs. In this study, we made use of mouse methylomes with known SNPs to develop statistical models for the prediction of SNP associated allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). ASM has been classified into parent-of-origin dependent ASM (P-ASM) and sequence-dependent ASM (S-ASM), which comprises scattered-S-ASM (sS-ASM) and clustered-S-ASM (cS-ASM). We found that P-ASM and cS-ASM CpG sites are both enriched in CpG rich regions, promoters and exons, while sS-ASM CpG sites are enriched in simple repeat and regions with high frequent SNP occurrence. Using Lasso-grouped Logistic Regression (LGLR), we selected 21 out of 282 genomic and methylation related features that are powerful in distinguishing cS-ASM CpG sites and trained the classifiers with machine learning techniques. Based on 5-fold cross-validation, the logistic regression classifier was found to be the best for cS-ASM prediction with an ACC of 0.77, an AUC of 0.84 and an MCC of 0.54. Lastly, we applied the logistic regression classifier on human brain methylome and predicted 608 genes associated with cS-ASM. Gene ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that these cS-ASM associated genes are significantly enriched in the category coding for transcripts with alternative splicing forms. In summary, this study provided an analytical procedure for cS-ASM prediction and shed new light on the understanding of different types of ASM events.

  5. Efficient and Allele-Specific Genome Editing of Disease Loci in Human iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cory; Abalde-Atristain, Leire; He, Chaoxia; Brodsky, Brett R; Braunstein, Evan M; Chaudhari, Pooja; Jang, Yoon-Young; Cheng, Linzhao; Ye, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and precise genome editing is crucial for realizing the full research and therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Engineered nucleases including CRISPR/Cas9 and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) provide powerful tools for enhancing gene-targeting efficiency. In this study, we investigated the relative efficiencies of CRISPR/Cas9 and TALENs in human iPSC lines for inducing both homologous donor-based precise genome editing and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated gene disruption. Significantly higher frequencies of NHEJ-mediated insertions/deletions were detected at several endogenous loci using CRISPR/Cas9 than using TALENs, especially at nonexpressed targets in iPSCs. In contrast, comparable efficiencies of inducing homologous donor-based genome editing were observed at disease-associated loci in iPSCs. In addition, we investigated the specificity of guide RNAs used in the CRISPR/Cas9 system in targeting disease-associated point mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. Using myeloproliferative neoplasm patient-derived iPSCs that carry an acquired JAK2-V617F point mutation and α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency patient-derived iPSCs that carry an inherited Z-AAT point mutation, we demonstrate that Cas9 can specifically target either the mutant or the wild-type allele with little disruption at the other allele differing by a single nucleotide. Overall, our results demonstrate the advantages of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in allele-specific genome targeting and in NHEJ-mediated gene disruption. PMID:25418680

  6. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F.; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P.; Goland, Robin S.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G.; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M.; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A∗-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  7. Molecular basis of allele-specific efficacy of a blood-stage malaria vaccine: vaccine development implications.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Thera, Mahamadou A; Coulibaly, Drissa; Niangaly, Amadou; Saye, Renion; Tolo, Youssouf; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D Gray; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L; Vekemans, Johan; Cohen, Joe; Blackwelder, William C; Dube, Tina; Laurens, Matthew B; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V

    2013-02-01

    The disappointing efficacy of blood-stage malaria vaccines may be explained in part by allele-specific immune responses that are directed against polymorphic epitopes on blood-stage antigens. FMP2.1/AS02(A), a blood-stage candidate vaccine based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, had allele-specific efficacy against clinical malaria in a phase II trial in Malian children. We assessed the cross-protective efficacy of the malaria vaccine and inferred which polymorphic amino acid positions in AMA1 were the targets of protective allele-specific immune responses. FMP2.1/AS02(A) had the highest efficacy against AMA1 alleles that were identical to the 3D7 vaccine-type allele at 8 highly polymorphic amino acid positions in the cluster 1 loop (c1L) but differed from 3D7 elsewhere in the molecule. Comparison of the incidence of vaccine-type alleles before and after vaccination in the malaria vaccine and control groups and examination of the patterns of allele change at polymorphic positions in consecutive malaria episodes suggest that the highly polymorphic amino acid position 197 in c1L was the most critical determinant of allele-specific efficacy. These results indicate that a multivalent AMA1 vaccine with broad efficacy could include only a limited set of key alleles of this extremely polymorphic antigen.

  8. Allele-specific H3K79 Di- versus trimethylation distinguishes opposite parental alleles at imprinted regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Han, Li; Rivas, Guillermo E; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Nicholson, Thomas B; Larson, Garrett P; Chen, Taiping; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-06-01

    Imprinted gene expression corresponds to parental allele-specific DNA CpG methylation and chromatin composition. Histone tail covalent modifications have been extensively studied, but it is not known whether modifications in the histone globular domains can also discriminate between the parental alleles. Using multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation-single nucleotide primer extension (ChIP-SNuPE) assays, we measured the allele-specific enrichment of H3K79 methylation and H4K91 acetylation along the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. Whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac displayed a paternal-specific enrichment at the paternally expressed Igf2 locus, H3K79me3 was paternally biased at the maternally expressed H19 locus, including the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR). We found that these allele-specific differences depended on CTCF binding in the maternal ICR allele. We analyzed an additional 11 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and found that, in general, H3K79me3 was associated with the CpG-methylated alleles, whereas H3K79me1, H3K79me2, and H4K91ac enrichment was specific to the unmethylated alleles. Our data suggest that allele-specific differences in the globular histone domains may constitute a layer of the "histone code" at imprinted genes.

  9. Analysis of genomic imprinting by quantitative allele-specific expression by Pyrosequencing(®).

    PubMed

    McKeown, Peter C; Fort, Antoine; Spillane, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a parent-of-origin phenomenon whereby gene expression is restricted to the allele inherited from either the maternal or paternal parent. It has been described from flowering plants and eutherian mammals and may have evolved due to parental conflicts over resource allocation. In mammals, imprinted genes are responsible for ensuring correct rates of embryo development and for preventing parthenogenesis. The molecular basis of imprinting depends upon the presence of differential epigenetic marks on the alleles inherited from each parent, although in plants the exact mechanisms that control imprinting are still unclear in many cases. Recent studies have identified large numbers of candidate imprinted genes from Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants (see Chap. 7 by Köhler and colleagues elsewhere in this volume) providing the tools for more thorough investigation into how imprinted gene networks (IGNs) are regulated. Analysis of genomic imprinting in animals has revealed important information on how IGNs are regulated during development, which often involves intermediate levels of imprinting. In some instances, small but significant changes in the degree of parental bias in gene expression have been linked to developmental traits, livestock phenotypes, and human disease. As some of the imprinted genes recently reported from plants show differential rather than complete (binary) imprinting, there is a clear need for tools that can quantify the degree of allelic expression bias occurring at a transcribed locus. In this chapter, we describe the use of Quantification of Allele-Specific Expression by Pyrosequencing(®) (QUASEP) as a tool suitable for this challenge. We describe in detail the factors which ensure that a Pyrosequencing(®) assay will be suitable for giving robust QUASEP and the problems which may be encountered during the study of imprinted genes by Pyrosequencing(®), with particular reference to our work in A. thaliana and in cattle

  10. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with idiopathic achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Michela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Pesce, Marcella; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Annese, Vito; Petruzzelli, Raffaella; Izzo, Paola; Sepulveres, Rossana; Bruzzese, Dario; Esposito, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of genes involved in the regulation of the immune response are risk factors for achalasia, but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Nitric oxide is involved both in immune function and inhibitory neurotransmission. Objective The objective of this article is to assess the association and the functional relevance of the CCTTT-inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) gene promoter polymorphism in achalasia. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from 181 achalasia patients and 220 controls. Genotyping of the (CCTTT)n repeats was performed by PCR and capillary electrophoresis, and data analyzed by considering the frequency of the different alleles. HT29 cells were transfected with iNOS luciferase promoter-reporter plasmids containing different (CCTTT)n. Results The alleles’ distribution ranged from 7 to 18, with a peak frequency at 12 repeats. Analysis of the allele frequencies revealed that individuals carrying 10 and 13 CCTTT repeats were respectively less and more frequent in achalasia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.5 and OR 1.6, 95% CI 1–2.4, all p < 0.05). Long repeats were also significantly associated with an earlier onset of the disease (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.13–2.53, p = 0.01). Transfection experiments revealed a similar allele-specific iNOS transcriptional activity. Conclusion The functional polymorphism (CCTTT) of NOS2 promoter is associated with achalasia, likely by an allele-specific modulation of nitric oxide production. PMID:28344787

  11. Huntingtin Haplotypes Provide Prioritized Target Panels for Allele-specific Silencing in Huntington Disease Patients of European Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Warby, Simon C; Caron, Nicholas S; Doty, Crystal N; Nguyen, Betty; Griguoli, Annamaria; Ross, Colin J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Heterozygous polymorphisms in cis with the mutation allow for allele-specific suppression of the pathogenic HTT transcript as a therapeutic strategy. To prioritize target selection, precise heterozygosity estimates are needed across diverse HD patient populations. Here we present the first comprehensive investigation of all common target alleles across the HTT gene, using 738 reference haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and 2364 haplotypes from HD patients and relatives in Canada, Sweden, France, and Italy. The most common HD haplotypes (A1, A2, and A3a) define mutually exclusive sets of polymorphisms for allele-specific therapy in the greatest number of patients. Across all four populations, a maximum of 80% are treatable using these three target haplotypes. We identify a novel deletion found exclusively on the A1 haplotype, enabling potent and selective silencing of mutant HTT in approximately 40% of the patients. Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the deletion reduce mutant A1 HTT mRNA by 78% in patient cells while sparing wild-type HTT expression. By suppressing specific haplotypes on which expanded CAG occurs, we demonstrate a rational approach to the development of allele-specific therapy for a monogenic disorder.

  12. Huntingtin Haplotypes Provide Prioritized Target Panels for Allele-specific Silencing in Huntington Disease Patients of European Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Warby, Simon C; Caron, Nicholas S; Doty, Crystal N; Nguyen, Betty; Griguoli, Annamaria; Ross, Colin J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Heterozygous polymorphisms in cis with the mutation allow for allele-specific suppression of the pathogenic HTT transcript as a therapeutic strategy. To prioritize target selection, precise heterozygosity estimates are needed across diverse HD patient populations. Here we present the first comprehensive investigation of all common target alleles across the HTT gene, using 738 reference haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and 2364 haplotypes from HD patients and relatives in Canada, Sweden, France, and Italy. The most common HD haplotypes (A1, A2, and A3a) define mutually exclusive sets of polymorphisms for allele-specific therapy in the greatest number of patients. Across all four populations, a maximum of 80% are treatable using these three target haplotypes. We identify a novel deletion found exclusively on the A1 haplotype, enabling potent and selective silencing of mutant HTT in approximately 40% of the patients. Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the deletion reduce mutant A1 HTT mRNA by 78% in patient cells while sparing wild-type HTT expression. By suppressing specific haplotypes on which expanded CAG occurs, we demonstrate a rational approach to the development of allele-specific therapy for a monogenic disorder. PMID:26201449

  13. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  14. Allele-specific conventional reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction as a screening assay for discriminating influenza a H1N1 (H275Y) oseltamivir-resistant and wild-type viruses.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Karry L K; Lam, Wai-Yip; Lee, Nelson; Leung, Ting Fan; Hui, David S C; Chan, Paul K S

    2010-08-01

    In early 2008, a sudden increase in oseltamivir (Tamiflu)-resistant influenza A H1N1 viruses was reported from several European countries. This resistant virus has spread globally and accounted for more than 95% of H1N1 viruses isolated in the following influenza season. A continuous close monitoring on the prevalence of this resistant virus is necessary to rationalize the choice of antiviral agents. The resistance of this novel strain to oseltamivir is conferred by an amino acid substitution from histidine to tyrosine at position 275 (H275Y) of the neuraminidase protein. This study developed and evaluated allele-specific conventional reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) assays to provide a simple, rapid, and low-cost option for discriminating oseltamivir-resistant influenza A H1N1 (H275Y) mutant from wild-type viruses. The evaluation was based on 90 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens collected before, during the initial phase and at the peak of emergence of resistance. Thirty-six (40%) of these specimens were H275Y mutant, whereas the other 54 (60%) were wild-type viruses as confirmed by sequencing of the neuraminidase gene. When applied directly on the 90 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens, the allele-specific cRT-PCR assays achieved an unequivocal discrimination for 82 (91%) specimens. Further improvement in performance is expected when applied to cell culture isolates with a higher viral titer. These allele-specific cRT-PCR assays can be a simple, low-cost option for large-scale screening of influenza isolates.

  15. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Clark, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  16. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)’s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list. PMID:25621316

  17. Allele-specific RNA interference rescues the long-QT syndrome phenotype in human-induced pluripotency stem cell cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matsa, Elena; Dixon, James E.; Medway, Christopher; Georgiou, Orestis; Patel, Minal J.; Morgan, Kevin; Kemp, Paul J.; Staniforth, Andrew; Mellor, Ian; Denning, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aims Long-QT syndromes (LQTS) are mostly autosomal-dominant congenital disorders associated with a 1:1000 mutation frequency, cardiac arrest, and sudden death. We sought to use cardiomyocytes derived from human-induced pluripotency stem cells (hiPSCs) as an in vitro model to develop and evaluate gene-based therapeutics for the treatment of LQTS. Methods and results We produced LQTS-type 2 (LQT2) hiPSC cardiomyocytes carrying a KCNH2 c.G1681A mutation in a IKr ion-channel pore, which caused impaired glycosylation and channel transport to cell surface. Allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) directed towards the mutated KCNH2 mRNA caused knockdown, while leaving the wild-type mRNA unaffected. Electrophysiological analysis of patient-derived LQT2 hiPSC cardiomyocytes treated with mutation-specific siRNAs showed normalized action potential durations (APDs) and K+ currents with the concurrent rescue of spontaneous and drug-induced arrhythmias (presented as early-afterdepolarizations). Conclusions These findings provide in vitro evidence that allele-specific RNAi can rescue diseased phenotype in LQTS cardiomyocytes. This is a potentially novel route for the treatment of many autosomal-dominant-negative disorders, including those of the heart. PMID:23470493

  18. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  19. IDP-ASE: haplotyping and quantifying allele-specific expression at the gene and gene isoform level by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deonovic, Benjamin; Wang, Yunhao; Weirather, Jason; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Au, Kin Fai

    2016-11-28

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) is a fundamental problem in studying gene regulation and diploid transcriptome profiles, with two key challenges: (i) haplotyping and (ii) estimation of ASE at the gene isoform level. Existing ASE analysis methods are limited by a dependence on haplotyping from laborious experiments or extra genome/family trio data. In addition, there is a lack of methods for gene isoform level ASE analysis. We developed a tool, IDP-ASE, for full ASE analysis. By innovative integration of Third Generation Sequencing (TGS) long reads with Second Generation Sequencing (SGS) short reads, the accuracy of haplotyping and ASE quantification at the gene and gene isoform level was greatly improved as demonstrated by the gold standard data GM12878 data and semi-simulation data. In addition to methodology development, applications of IDP-ASE to human embryonic stem cells and breast cancer cells indicate that the imbalance of ASE and non-uniformity of gene isoform ASE is widespread, including tumorigenesis relevant genes and pluripotency markers. These results show that gene isoform expression and allele-specific expression cooperate to provide high diversity and complexity of gene regulation and expression, highlighting the importance of studying ASE at the gene isoform level. Our study provides a robust bioinformatics solution to understand ASE using RNA sequencing data only.

  20. Read-mapping using personalized diploid reference genome for RNA sequencing data reduced bias for detecting allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Zhaohui

    2012-10-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been applied extensively in many areas of genetics and genomics research. A fundamental problem when comes to analyzing NGS data is mapping short sequencing reads back to the reference genome. Most of existing software packages rely on a single uniform reference genome and do not automatically take into the consideration of genetic variants. On the other hand, large proportions of incorrectly mapped reads affect the correct interpretation of the NGS experimental results. As an example, Degner et al. showed that detecting allele-specific expression from RNA sequencing data was biased toward the reference allele. In this study, we developed a method that utilize DirectX 11 enabled graphics processing unit (GPU)'s parallel computing power to produces a personalized diploid reference genome based on all known genetic variants of that particular individual. We show that using such a personalized diploid reference genome can improve mapping accuracy and significantly reduce the bias toward reference allele in allele-specific expression analysis. Our method can be applied to any individual that has genotype information obtained either from array-based genotyping or resequencing. Besides the reference genome, no additional changes to alignment algorithm are needed for performing read mapping therefore one can utilize any of the existing read mapping tools and achieve the improved read mapping result. C++ and GPU compute shader source code of the software program is available at: http://code.google.com/p/diploid-mapping/downloads/list.

  1. [Rapid PCR authentication Lonicera japanica].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Hou, Jing-Yi; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan

    2014-10-01

    To simply and rapid authenticate Lonicera japanica. Rapid allele-specific PCR primer was designed base on trnL-trnF 625 G/T Single nucleotide polymorphism and the PCR reaction systems including annealing temperature was optimized; optimized results were performed to authenticate L. japanica and its 9 adulterants. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product of 87 degrees C initial denatured 1 min; 87 degrees C denatured 5 s, 68 degrees C annealing 5 s, 30 cycle; L. japanica visualize strong green fluorescence under 365 nm UV lamp whereas adulterants without. The results indicate rapid allele-specific PCR could authenticate L. japanica and its adulterants rapidly and simply.

  2. Powerful Identification of Cis-regulatory SNPs in Human Primary Monocytes Using Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Lundmark, Anders; Ge, Bing; Maouche, Seraya; Göring, Harald H. H.; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Enström, Camilla; Brocheton, Jessy; Proust, Carole; Godefroy, Tiphaine; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Jolley, Jennifer; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Foad, Nicola; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Stephens, Jonathan; Gwilliam, Rhian; Rice, Catherine M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Samani, Nilesh J.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Pastinen, Tomi; Deloukas, Panos; Goodall, Alison H.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Cambien, François; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed during the past five years to identify associations between SNPs and human complex diseases and traits. The assignment of a functional role for the identified disease-associated SNP is not straight-forward. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis is frequently used as the initial step to define a function while allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis has not yet gained a wide-spread use in disease mapping studies. We compared the power to identify cis-acting regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNPs) by genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis with that of traditional expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. Our study included 395 healthy blood donors for whom global gene expression profiles in circulating monocytes were determined by Illumina BeadArrays. ASE was assessed in a subset of these monocytes from 188 donors by quantitative genotyping of mRNA using a genome-wide panel of SNP markers. The performance of the two methods for detecting cis-rSNPs was evaluated by comparing associations between SNP genotypes and gene expression levels in sample sets of varying size. We found that up to 8-fold more samples are required for eQTL mapping to reach the same statistical power as that obtained by ASE analysis for the same rSNPs. The performance of ASE is insensitive to SNPs with low minor allele frequencies and detects a larger number of significantly associated rSNPs using the same sample size as eQTL mapping. An unequivocal conclusion from our comparison is that ASE analysis is more sensitive for detecting cis-rSNPs than standard eQTL mapping. Our study shows the potential of ASE mapping in tissue samples and primary cells which are difficult to obtain in large numbers. PMID:23300628

  3. Bivariate segmentation of SNP-array data for allele-specific copy number analysis in tumour samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SNP arrays output two signals that reflect the total genomic copy number (LRR) and the allelic ratio (BAF), which in combination allow the characterisation of allele-specific copy numbers (ASCNs). While methods based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extended from array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) to jointly handle the two signals, only one method based on change-point detection, ASCAT, performs bivariate segmentation. Results In the present work, we introduce a generic framework for bivariate segmentation of SNP array data for ASCN analysis. For the matter, we discuss the characteristics of the typically applied BAF transformation and how they affect segmentation, introduce concepts of multivariate time series analysis that are of concern in this field and discuss the appropriate formulation of the problem. The framework is implemented in a method named CnaStruct, the bivariate form of the structural change model (SCM), which has been successfully applied to transcriptome mapping and aCGH. Conclusions On a comprehensive synthetic dataset, we show that CnaStruct outperforms the segmentation of existing ASCN analysis methods. Furthermore, CnaStruct can be integrated into the workflows of several ASCN analysis tools in order to improve their performance, specially on tumour samples highly contaminated by normal cells. PMID:23497144

  4. Analysis of LMNB1 Duplications in Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy Provides Insights into Duplication Mechanisms and Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Kropp, Laura; Chakka, Anish Baswanth; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Gregorio, Eleonora Di; Lacerenza, Daniela; Vaula, Giovanna; Talarico, Flavia; Mandich, Paola; Toro, Camilo; Pierre, Eleonore Eymard; Labauge, Pierre; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Miguel, Diego; Stubbolo, Danielle; Marques, Lourenco Charles; Gahl, William; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Melberg, Atle; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Cohen, Oren S; Pjontek, Rastislav; Grau, Armin; Klopstock, Thomas; Fogel, Brent; Meijer, Inge; Rouleau, Guy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre L; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Vanderver, Adeline; Dahl, Niklas; Hobson, Grace; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro; Padiath, Quasar Saleem

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is an adult onset demyelinating disorder that is caused by duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene. However, as only a few cases have been analyzed in detail, the mechanisms underlying LMNB1 duplications are unclear. We report the detailed molecular analysis of the largest collection of ADLD families studied, to date. We have identified the minimal duplicated region necessary for the disease, defined all the duplication junctions at the nucleotide level and identified the first inverted LMNB1 duplication. We have demonstrated that the duplications are not recurrent; patients with identical duplications share the same haplotype, likely inherited from a common founder and that the duplications originated from intrachromosomal events. The duplication junction sequences indicated that nonhomologous end joining or replication-based mechanisms such fork stalling and template switching or microhomology-mediated break induced repair are likely to be involved. LMNB1 expression was increased in patients’ fibroblasts both at mRNA and protein levels and the three LMNB1 alleles in ADLD patients show equal expression, suggesting that regulatory regions are maintained within the rearranged segment. These results have allowed us to elucidate duplication mechanisms and provide insights into allele-specific LMNB1 expression levels. PMID:23649844

  5. Transcriptome analysis revealed chimeric RNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms and allele-specific expression in porcine prenatal skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yalan; Tang, Zhonglin; Fan, Xinhao; Xu, Kui; Mu, Yulian; Zhou, Rong; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal skeletal muscle development genetically determines postnatal muscle characteristics such as growth and meat quality in pigs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development remain unclear. Here, we performed the first genome-wide analysis of chimeric RNAs, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and allele-specific expression (ASE) in prenatal skeletal muscle in pigs. We identified 14,810 protein coding genes and 163 high-confidence chimeric RNAs expressed in prenatal skeletal muscle. More than 94.5% of the chimeric RNAs obeyed the canonical GT/AG splice rule and were trans-splicing events. Ten and two RNAs were aligned to human and mouse chimeric transcripts, respectively. We detected 106,457 high-quality SNPs (6,955 novel), which were mostly (89.09%) located within QTLs for production traits. The high proportion of non-exonic SNPs revealed the incomplete annotation status of the current swine reference genome. ASE analysis revealed that 11,300 heterozygous SNPs showed allelic imbalance, whereas 131 ASE variants were located in the chimeric RNAs. Moreover, 4 ASE variants were associated with various economically relevant traits of pigs. Taken together, our data provide a source for studies of chimeric RNAs and biomarkers for pig breeding, while illuminating the complex transcriptional events underlying prenatal skeletal muscle development in mammals. PMID:27352850

  6. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Østergaard, Michael E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, C Frank; Swayze, Eric E; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  7. Allele-Specific Suppression of Mutant Huntingtin Using Antisense Oligonucleotides: Providing a Therapeutic Option for All Huntington Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Skotte, Niels H.; Southwell, Amber L.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Warby, Simon C.; Doty, Crystal N.; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P.; Bennett, C. Frank; Swayze, Eric E.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder. PMID:25207939

  8. Allele-specific expression of mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene and alternative susceptibility to colorectal cancer in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Cao, Yanfei; Huang, Xiaoye; Yu, Tao; Wei, Zhiyun; McGrath, John; Xu, Fei; Bi, Yan; Li, Xingwang; Yang, Fengping; Li, Weidong; Zou, Xia; Peng, Zhihai; Xiao, Yanzeng; Zhang, Yan; He, Lin; He, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among schizophrenia is lower than normal. To explore this potential protective effect, we employed an innovative strategy combining association study with allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis in MCC gene. We first genotyped four polymorphisms within MCC in 312 CRC patients, 270 schizophrenia patients and 270 controls. Using the MassArray technique, we performed ASE measurements in a second sample series consisting of 50 sporadic CRC patients, 50 schizophrenia patients and 52 controls. Rs2227947 showed significant differences between schizophrenia cases and controls, and haplotype analysis reported some significant discrepancies among these three subject groups. ASE values of rs2227948 and rs2227947 presented consistently differences between CRC (or schizophrenia) patients and controls. Of the three groups, highest frequencies of ASE in MCC were concordantly found in CRC group, whereas lowest frequencies of ASE were observed in schizophrenia group. Similar trends were confirmed in both haplotype frequencies and ASE frequencies (i.e. CRC > control > schizophrenia). We provide a first indication that MCC might confer alterative genetic susceptibility to CRC in individuals with schizophrenia promising to shed more light on the relationship between schizophrenia and cancer progression. PMID:27226254

  9. TFIIB/SUA7(E202G) is an allele-specific suppressor of TBP1(E186D)

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon Shang; Lehming, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    The TBP (TATA-box-binding protein), Tbp1p, plays a vital role in all three classes of transcription by RNA polymerases I–III. A TBP1(E186D) mutation had been described that affected interaction of Tbp1p with TFIIB (transcription factor IIB) and that caused slow-growth, temperature-sensitivity, 3-aminotriazole-sensitivity as well as a gal− phenotype. We used the TBP1(E186D) mutant for suppressor screens, and we isolated TFIIB/SUA7(E202G) as an allele-specific suppressor of all phenotypes caused by the TBP1(E186D) mutation. Our results show that the SUA7(E202G) mutation restored binding of TFIIB to Tbp1(E186D)p. In addition, we observed that Tbp1(E186D)p was expressed at a lower level than wild-type Tbp1p, and that SUA7(E202G) restored the protein level of Tbp1(E186D)p. This suggested that the TBP1(E186D) mutation might have generated its phenotypes by making Tbp1p the limiting factor for activated transcription. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the TBP1(E186D) temperature-sensitivity and slow-growth phenotypes might have been caused by insufficient amounts of Tbp1p for efficient transcription of the rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I. PMID:17680779

  10. EGFR mutant allelic-specific imbalance assessment in routine samples of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Malapelle, Umberto; Vatrano, Simona; Russo, Stefania; Bellevicine, Claudio; de Luca, Caterina; Sgariglia, Roberta; Rocco, Danilo; de Pietro, Livia; Riccardi, Fernando; Gobbini, Elisa; Righi, Luisella; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene may undergo both mutations and copy number gains. EGFR mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) occurs when the ratio of mutant-to-wild-type alleles increases significantly. In this study, by using a previously validated microfluidic-chip-based technology, EGFR-MASI occurred in 25/67 mutant cases (37%), being more frequently associated with EGFR exon 19 deletions (p=0.033). In a subset of 49 treated patients, we assessed whether MASI is a modifier of anti-EGFR treatment benefit. The difference in progression-free survival and overall survival between EGFR-MASI-positive and EGFR-MASI-negative groups of patients did not show a statistical significance. In conclusion, EGFR-MASI is a significant event in NSCLC, specifically associated with EGFR exon 19 deletions. However, EGFR-MASI does not seem to play a role in predicting the response to first-generation EGFR small molecules inhibitors.

  11. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish.

  12. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Tzintzuni I; Matos, Isa; Shen, Yingjia; Pabuwal, Vagmita; Coelho, Maria Manuela; Wakamatsu, Yuko; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B

    2014-01-01

    Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE) on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types) and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues). In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82%) shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18%) displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78%) displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  13. Molecular structure of three mutations at the maize sugary1 locus and their allele-specific phenotypic effects.

    PubMed

    Dinges, J R; Colleoni, C; Myers, A M; James, M G

    2001-03-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required.

  14. Molecular Structure of Three Mutations at the Maize sugary1 Locus and Their Allele-Specific Phenotypic Effects1

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Jason R.; Colleoni, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2001-01-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required. PMID:11244120

  15. Comprehensively Evaluating cis-Regulatory Variation in the Human Prostate Transcriptome by Using Gene-Level Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nicholas B.; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J.; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A.; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E−5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate. PMID:25983244

  16. Comprehensively evaluating cis-regulatory variation in the human prostate transcriptome by using gene-level allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicholas B; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2015-06-04

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E-5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate.

  17. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

    SciTech Connect

    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M.

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  18. Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 3 by single-base extension method and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed allele specific (AS) SNP primers for rapid detection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) race 3. FOV_BT_SNP_R3 and FOV_BT_AS_R3 primers were designed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial sequence alignment of the ß-tubulin (BT) gene from several FOV races. These ...

  19. Absolute quantification of the alleles in somatic point mutations by bioluminometric methods based on competitive polymerase chain reaction in the presence of a locked nucleic acid blocker or an allele-specific primer.

    PubMed

    Iliadi, Alexandra; Petropoulou, Margarita; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos I; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan

    2011-09-01

    In somatic (acquired) point mutations, the challenge is to quantify minute amounts of the mutant allele in the presence of a large excess of the normal allele that differs only in a single base pair. We report two bioluminometric methods that enable absolute quantification of the alleles. The first method exploits the ability of a locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotide to bind to and inhibit effectively the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the normal allele while the amplification of the mutant allele remains unaffected. The second method employs allele-specific PCR primers, thereby allowing the amplification of the corresponding allele only. DNA internal standards (competitors) are added to the PCR mixture to compensate for any sample-to-sample variation in the amplification efficiency. The amplification products from the two alleles and the internal standards are quantified by a microtiter well-based bioluminometric hybridization assay using the photoprotein aequorin as a reporter. The methods allow absolute quantification of less than 300 copies of the mutant allele even in samples containing less than 1% of the mutant allele.

  20. Allele-specific effects of ecSOD on asbestos-induced fibroproliferative lung disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sujung; Fattman, Cheryl L; Kim, Byung-Jin; Jones, Harlan; Dory, Ladislav

    2011-05-15

    resistance to asbestos-induced lung injury reported for the 129/J strain of mice. The data further suggest allele-specific differences in the regulation of ecSOD expression. These congenic mice therefore represent a very useful model to study the role of this enzyme in all inflammatory diseases. Polymorphisms in human ecSOD have also been reported and it appears logical to assume that such variations may have a profound effect on disease susceptibility.

  1. Development of three allele-specific co-Dominant PCR markers suitable for marker-assisted selection of amylose class and paste viscosity of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most rice is consumed as whole kernel cooked rice, and the consumer preferences for cooked rice texture and other sensory properties differ among regions of the world. Rice is also used as an ingredient in a multitude of foods by food-processing companies across the globe. These sensory and function...

  2. Development of three allele-specific codominant rice Waxy gene PCR markers suitable for marker assisted selection of amylose content and paste viscosity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four Waxy haplotypes, which were identified previously as having different combinations of these three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the Waxy gene, were highly correlated to the apparent amylose content and pasting properties, the important grain quality traits for predicting cooked rice...

  3. Transcriptomes and shRNA Suppressors in a TP53 Allele-specific Model of Early-onset Colon Cancer in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Weige, Charles C.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Mallick, Himel; Yi, Nengjun; Berrong, Zuzana; Cloessner, Emily; Duff, Keely; Tidwell, Josephine; Clendenning, Megan; Wilkerson, Brent; Farrell, Christopher; Bunz, Fred; Ji, Hao; Shtutman, Michael; Creek, Kim E.; Banister, Carolyn E.; Buckhaults, Phillip J.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by early-onset, high-grade malignancies. A fraction of this cancer health disparity can be explained by genetic differences between individuals of African or European descent. Here the wild-type Pro/Pro genotype at the TP53Pro72Arg (P72R) polymorphism (SNP: rs1042522) is more frequent in African Americans with cancer than in African Americans without cancer (51% vs 37%), and is associated with a significant increase in the rates of cancer diagnosis in African Americans. To test the hypothesis that p53 allele-specific gene expression may contribute to African American cancer disparities, p53 hemizygous knockout variants were generated and characterized in the RKO colon carcinoma cell line, which is wild-type for p53 and heterozygous at the TP53Pro72Arg locus. Transcriptome profiling, using RNAseq, in response to the DNA-damaging agent etoposide revealed a large number of p53-regulated transcripts, but also a subset of transcripts that were TP53Pro72Arg allele specific. In addition, a shRNA-library suppressor screen for p53 allele-specific escape from p53-induced arrest was performed. Several novel RNAi suppressors of p53 were identified, one of which, PRDM1β (BLIMP-1), was confirmed to be an Arg-specific transcript. PRDM1β silences target genes by recruiting H3K9 trimethyl (H3K9me3) repressive chromatin marks, and is necessary for stem cell differentiation. These results reveal a novel model for African American cancer disparity, in which the TP53 codon 72 allele influences lifetime cancer risk by driving damaged cells to differentiation through an epigenetic mechanism involving gene silencing. Implications TP53 P72R polymorphism significantly contributes to increased African American cancer disparity. PMID:24743655

  4. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starska, Katarzyna; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina; Aleksandrowicz, Paweł; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  5. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-10-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction.

  6. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bryś, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  7. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5'-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method.

    PubMed

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3'-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one "counter-primer", which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3'-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5'-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5'-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method.

  8. Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression in Mouse Liver by RNA-Seq: A Comparison With Cis-eQTL Identified Using Genetic Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Martin, Lisa; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Roux, Pierre-François; Pan, Calvin; van Nas, Atila; Demeure, Olivier; Cantor, Rita; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Eskin, Eleazar; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) and parent-of-origin expression in adult mouse liver using next generation sequencing (RNA-Seq) of reciprocal crosses of heterozygous F1 mice from the parental strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. We found a 60% overlap between genes exhibiting ASE and putative cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) identified in an intercross between the same strains. We discuss the various biological and technical factors that contribute to the differences. We also identify genes exhibiting parental imprinting and complex expression patterns. Our study demonstrates the importance of biological replicates to limit the number of false positives with RNA-Seq data. PMID:24026101

  9. CalMaTe: a method and software to improve allele-specific copy number of SNP arrays for downstream segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Aramburu, Ander; Bengtsson, Henrik; Neuvial, Pierre; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: CalMaTe calibrates preprocessed allele-specific copy number estimates (ASCNs) from DNA microarrays by controlling for single-nucleotide polymorphism-specific allelic crosstalk. The resulting ASCNs are on average more accurate, which increases the power of segmentation methods for detecting changes between copy number states in tumor studies including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity. CalMaTe applies to any ASCNs regardless of preprocessing method and microarray technology, e.g. Affymetrix and Illumina. Availability: The method is available on CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/) in the open-source R package calmate, which also includes an add-on to the Aroma Project framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22576175

  10. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas: a pilot case-control analysis.

    PubMed

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso; Magrin, José; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rainho, Cláudia Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2006-02-01

    Aberrant methylation of seven potential binding sites of the CTCF factor in the differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene (H19-DMR) has been suggested as critical for the regulation of IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes. In this study, we analyzed the allele-specific methylation pattern of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic methylation pattern was maintained in CTCF binding site 5 in 22 heterozygous out of 91 samples analyzed. Nevertheless, a biallelic methylation pattern was detected in CTCF binding site 6 in a subgroup of HNSCC patients as a somatic acquired feature of tumor cells. An atypical biallelic methylation was also observed in both tumor and lymphocyte DNA from two patients, and at a high frequency in the control group (29 out of 64 informative controls). Additionally, we found that the C/T transition detected by HhaI RFLP suppressed one dinucleotide CpG in critical CTCF binding site 6, of a mutation showing polymorphic frequencies. Although a heterogeneous methylation pattern was observed after DNA sequencing modified by sodium bisulfite, the biallelic methylation pattern was confirmed in 9 out of 10 HNSCCs. These findings are likely to be relevant in the epigenetic regulation of the DMR, especially in pathological conditions in which the imprinting of IGF2 and H19 genes is disrupted.

  11. Allele-specific suppression of a defective trans-Golgi network (TGN) localization signal in Kex2p identifies three genes involved in localization of TGN transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, K; Brickner, J H; Marschall, L G; Nichols, J W; Fuller, R S

    1996-01-01

    Kex2 protease (Kex2p) and Ste13 dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (Ste13p) are required in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for maturation of the alpha-mating factor in a late Golgi compartment, most likely the yeast trans-Golgi network (TGN). Previous studies identified a TGN localization signal (TLS) in the C-terminal cytosolic tail of Kex2p consisting of Tyr-713 and contextual sequences. Further analysis of the Kex2p TLS revealed similarity to the Ste13p TLS. Mutation of the Kex2p TLS results in transport of Kex2p to the vacuole by default. When expression of a GAL1 promoter-driven KEX2 gene is shut off in MAT(alpha) cells, the TGN becomes depleted of Kex2p, resulting in a gradual decline in mating competence which is greatly accelerated by TLS mutations. To identify the genes involved in localization of Kex2p, we isolated second-site suppressors of the rapid loss of mating competence observed upon shutting off expression of a TLS mutant form of Kex2p (Y713A). Seven of 58 suppressors were allele specific, suppressing point mutations at Tyr-713 but not deletions of the TLS or entire C-terminal cytosolic tail. By linkage analysis, the allele-specific suppressors defined three genetic loci, SOI1, S0I2, and S0I3. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that these suppressors increased net TGN retention of both Y713A Kex2p and a Ste13p-Pho8p fusion protein containing a point mutation in the Ste13p TLS. SOI1 suppressor alleles reduced the efficiency of localization of wild-type Kex2p to the TGN, implying an impaired ability to discriminate between the normal TLS and a mutant TLS. soi1 mutants also exhibited a recessive defect in vacuolar protein sorting. Suppressor alleles of S0I2 were dominant. These results suggest that the SOI1 and S0I2 genes encode regulators or components of the TLS recognition machinery. PMID:8887651

  12. Quantifying RNA allelic ratios by microfluidic multiplex PCR and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Xin; Ramaswami, Gokul; Smith, Kevin S; Turecki, Gustavo; Montgomery, Stephen B; Li, Jin Billy

    2014-01-01

    We developed a targeted RNA sequencing method that couples microfluidics-based multiplex PCR and deep sequencing (mmPCR-seq) to uniformly and simultaneously amplify up to 960 loci in 48 samples independently of their gene expression levels and to accurately and cost-effectively measure allelic ratios even for low-quantity or low-quality RNA samples. We applied mmPCR-seq to RNA editing and allele-specific expression studies. mmPCR-seq complements RNA-seq for studying allelic variations in the transcriptome.

  13. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; ...

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of bindingmore » at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.« less

  14. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; Shi, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Zhou, Tongqing

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of binding at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.

  15. Molecular genetic survey of European mistletoe (Viscum album) subspecies with allele-specific and dCAPS type markers specific for chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Stefanowicz, Justyna; ŁUczkiewicz, Maria

    2003-10-01

    The qualitative and quantitative content of mistletoe metabolites, and bioactivity of extracts is related to the subspecies of Viscum album L. These were indicated to be genetically distinct and host specific. We aimed to check (i) whether the specificity is strict and (ii) how frequently hybridization occurs among the subspecies. We designed two sets of allele-specific and dCAPS molecular genetic markers that would facilitate identification of Viscum album L. subspecies and their hybrid derivatives on the basis of chloroplast trnH(GUG)- trnK(UUU) and nuclear rDNA ITS1&2 sequences. Out of 118 plants surveyed, 103 displayed characteristics that confirmed strict host specificity of the subspecies, in addition, the results were compliant between nuclear and chloroplast markers showing no indication of hybridization among subspecies. From 15 samples that showed deviations from this model 13 came from the Mediterranean Sea basin, and only two originated from Central and Western Europe. Abbreviations. dCAPS:derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence ITS1&2:Internal Transcribed Spacers 1&2 MAMA:Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay

  16. Use of an interspecific hybrid in identifying a new allelic specificity generated at the self-incompatibility locus after inbreeding in Lycopersicon peruvianum.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, G; Perryman, T; Williams, E G

    1986-12-01

    An interspecific hybrid between Lycopersicon esculentum (♀) and L. peruvianum has been raised by embryo rescue in vitro and used to confirm the presence of a new S-allelic specificity in its inbred L. peruvianum parent, a plant derived by enforced bud self-pollination of a self-incompatible clone with the genotype S 1 S 2. The inbred plant showed breeding behavior characteristic of both S 2 and a second specificity which was not S 1, S 2, S 3 or S f. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of stylar proteins, however, showed only a single typical S-associated component with the Mr and pI characteristic of S2. The alteration in specificity, therefore, was not associated with a detectable change in an S-associated protein. The F1 interspecific hybrid showed intermediacy of vegetative and reproductive characters, relatively high fertility and full self-incompatibility. Backcrossing to L. esculentum produced only abortive seeds requiring embryo culture. Backcrosses to L. peruvianum produced a very low proportion of filled germinable seeds. Pollen of the hybrid showed superior viability and tube growth rate compared with pollen of the two parent plants.

  17. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats in 5' region of the DRD4 gene is stimulus specific in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Paredes, U M; Quinn, J P; D'Souza, U M

    2013-03-01

    The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene includes several variable number of tandem repeat loci that have been suggested to modulate DRD4 gene expression patterns. Previous studies showed differential basal activity of the two most common variants of a tandem repeat (120 bp per repeat unit) located in the 5' region adjacent to the DRD4 promoter in human cell lines. In this communication, we further characterized the ability of this polymorphic repeat to elicit tissue-, allele- and stimuli-specific transcriptional activity in vitro. The short and long variants of the DRD4 5' tandem repeat were cloned into a luciferase reporter gene construct containing the SV40 promoter. The luciferase constructs were cotransfected with expression vectors of two ubiquitously expressed human transcription factors (TFs), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), into human cell lines and primary cultures of neonate rat cortex and luciferase activity measured. Overexpression with these TFs resulted in differential cell- and allele-specific transcriptional activities of the luciferase constructs. The results of our experiments show that variants of this tandem repeat in the 5' promoter of the DRD4 gene will direct differential reporter gene transcriptional activity in a cell-type-specific manner dependent on the signal pathways activated.

  18. A and MdMYB1 allele-specific markers controlling apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) skin color and suitability for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X J; Wang, L X; Chen, X X; Liu, Y L; Meng, R; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Z Y

    2014-10-31

    Pre-selection for fruit skin color at the seedling stage would be highly advantageous, with marker-assisted selection offering a potential method for apple pre-selection. A and MdMYB1 alleles are allele-specific DNA markers that are potentially associated with apple skin color, and co-segregate with the Rf and Rni loci, respectively. Here, we assessed the potential application of these 2 alleles for marker-assisted breeding across 30 diverse cultivars and 2 apple seedling progenies. The red skin color phenotype was usually associated with the MdMYB1-1 allele and A(1) allele, respectively, while the 2 molecular markers provided approximately 91% predictability in the 'Fuji' x 'Cripps Pink' and 'Fuji' x 'Gala' progenies. The results obtained from the 30 cultivars and 2 progenies were consistent for the 2 molecular markers. Hence, the results supported that Rf and Rni could be located in a gene cluster, or even correspond to alleles of the same gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that red/yellow dimorphism is controlled by a monogenic system, with the presence of the red anthocyanin pigmentation being dominant. In addition, our results supported that the practical utilization of the 2 function markers to efficiently and accurately select red-skinned apple cultivars in apple scion breeding programs.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by mini-primer allele-specific amplification with universal reporter primers for identification of degraded DNA.

    PubMed

    Asari, Masaru; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Shiono, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Keiko

    2009-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is informative for human identification, and much shorter regions are targeted in analysis of biallelic SNP compared with highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR). Therefore, SNP genotyping is expected to be more sensitive than STR genotyping of degraded human DNA. To achieve simple, economical, and sensitive SNP genotyping for identification of degraded human DNA, we developed 18 loci for a SNP genotyping technique based on the mini-primer allele-specific amplification (ASA) combined with universal reporter primers (URP). The URP/ASA-based genotyping consisted of two amplifications followed by detection using capillary electrophoresis. The sizes of the target genome fragments ranged from 40 to 67bp in length. In the Japanese population, the frequencies of minor alleles of 18 SNPs ranged from 0.36 to 0.50, and these SNPs are informative for identification. The success rate of SNP genotyping was much higher than that of STR genotyping of artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, we applied this genotyping method to case samples and showed successful SNP genotyping of severely degraded DNA from a 4-year buffered formalin-fixed tissue sample for human identification.

  20. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  1. MHC allele-specific binding of a malaria peptide makes it become promiscuous on fitting a glycine residue into pocket 6.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Parra, Carlos Alberto; Salazar, Luz Mary; Guzmán, Fanny; Pinto, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-18

    Peptide 1585 (EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKKQLE) has a highly conserved amino-acid sequence located in the Plasmodium falciparum main merozoite surface protein (MSP-1) C-terminal region, required for merozoite entry into human erythrocytes and therefore represents a vaccine candidate for P. falciparum malaria. Original sequence-specific binding to five HLA DRB1* alleles (0101, 0102, 0401, 0701, and 1101) revealed this peptide's specific HLA DRB1*0102 allele binding. This peptide's allele-specific binding to HLA DRB1*0102 took on broader specificity for the DRB1*0101, -0401, and -1101 alleles when lysine was replaced by glycine in position 17 (peptide 5198: EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKG(17)QLE). Binding of the identified G(10)VYRSLKGQLE(20) C-terminal register to these alleles suggests that peptide promiscuous binding relied on fitting Y(12), L(15), and G(17) into P-1, P-4, and P-6, respectively. The implications of the findings and the future of this synthetic vaccine candidate are discussed.

  2. Allele-specific expression at the RET locus in blood and gut tissue of individuals carrying risk alleles for Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Matera, Ivana; Musso, Marco; Griseri, Paola; Rusmini, Marta; Di Duca, Marco; So, Man-Ting; Mavilio, Domenico; Miao, Xiaoping; Tam, Paul Hk; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Ceccherini, Isabella; Garcia-Barcelo, Merce

    2013-05-01

    RET common variants are associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; colon aganglionosis), a congenital defect of the enteric nervous system. We analyzed a well-known HSCR-associated RET haplotype that encompasses linked alleles in coding and noncoding/regulatory sequences. This risk haplotype correlates with reduced level of RET expression when compared with the wild-type counterpart. As allele-specific expression (ASE) contributes to phenotypic variability in health and disease, we investigated whether RET ASE could contribute to the overall reduction of RET mRNA detected in carriers. We tested heterozygous neuroblastoma cell lines, ganglionic gut tissues (18 HSCR and 14 non-HSCR individuals) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs; 16 HSCR and 14 non-HSCR individuals). Analysis of the data generated by SNaPshot and Pyrosequencing revealed that the RET risk haplotype is significantly more expressed in gut than in PBMCs (P = 0.0045). No ASE difference was detected between patients and controls, irrespective of the sample type. Comparison of total RET expression levels between gut samples with and without ASE, correlated reduced RET expression with preferential transcription from the RET risk haplotype. Nonrandom RET ASE occurs in ganglionic gut regardless of the disease status. RET ASE should not be excluded as a disease mechanism acting during development.

  3. Inactive allele-specific methylation and chromatin structure of the imprinted gene U2af1-rs1 on mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Hideo; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kamiya, Mamoru

    1996-07-01

    The imprinted U2Af1-rs1 gene that maps to mouse chromosome 11 is predominately expressed from the paternal allele. We examined the methylation of genomic sequences in and around the U2af1-rs1 locus to establish the extent of sequence modifications that accompanied the silencing of the maternal allele. The analysis of HapII or HhaI sites showed that the silent maternal allele was hypermethylated in a block of CpG sequences that covered more than 10 kb. By comparison, the expressed paternal allele was unmethylated from a CpG island upstream of the transcribed region through 2 kb. An analysis of DNaseI hypersensitivity of a putative promoter of U2af1-rs1 showed an open chromatin conformation only on the unmethylated, expressed paternal allele. These results suggest that allele-specific hypermethylation covering the gene and its upstream CpG island plays a role in maternal allele repression of U2af1-rs1, which is reflected in altered chromatin conformation of DNaseI hypersensitive sites. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Allele-specific gene expression patterns in primary leukemic cells reveal regulation of gene expression by CpG site methylation

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica; Kiialainen, Anna; Flaegstad, Trond; Jonmundsson, Gudmundur; Kanerva, Jukka; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2009-01-01

    To identify genes that are regulated by cis-acting functional elements in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we determined the allele-specific expression (ASE) levels of 2529 genes by genotyping a genome-wide panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms in RNA and DNA from bone marrow and blood samples of 197 children with ALL. Using a reproducible, quantitative genotyping method and stringent criteria for scoring ASE, we found that 16% of the analyzed genes display ASE in multiple ALL cell samples. For most of the genes, the level of ASE varied largely between the samples, from 1.4-fold overexpression of one allele to apparent monoallelic expression. For genes exhibiting ASE, 55% displayed bidirectional ASE in which overexpression of either of the two SNP alleles occurred. For bidirectional ASE we also observed overall higher levels of ASE and correlation with the methylation level of these sites. Our results demonstrate that CpG site methylation is one of the factors that regulates gene expression in ALL cells. PMID:18997001

  5. Natural variation in male-induced ‘cost-of-mating’ and allele-specific association with male reproductive genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Anthony C; Dumont, Bethany L; Clark, Andrew G

    2006-01-01

    One of the most sharply defined sexual conflicts arises when the act of mating is accompanied by an inflated risk of death. Several reports have documented an increased death rate of female Drosophila as a result of recurrent mating. Transgenic and mutation experiments have further identified components of seminal fluid that are at least in part responsible for this toxicity. Variation among males in their tendency for matings to be toxic to their partners has also been documented, but here for the first time we identify polymorphism within particular genes conferring differential post-mating female mortality. Such polymorphism is important, as it raises the challenge of whether sexual conflict models can provide means for maintenance of polymorphism. Using a set of second chromosome extraction lines, we scored differences in post-mating female fecundity and longevity subsequent to mating, and identified significant among-line differences. Seventy polymorphisms in ten male reproductive genes were scored and permutation tests were used to identify significant associations between genotype and phenotype. One polymorphism upstream of PEBII and an amino acid substitution in CG17331 were both associated with male-induced female mortality. The same allele of CG17331 that is toxic to females also induces greater refractoriness to remating in the females, providing an example of an allele-specific sexual conflict. Postcopulatory sexual selection could lead to sexual conflict by favouring males that prevent their mates from mating, even when there is a viability cost to those females. PMID:16612893

  6. SAAS-CNV: A Joint Segmentation Approach on Aggregated and Allele Specific Signals for the Identification of Somatic Copy Number Alterations with Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes exhibit profound somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs). Studying tumor SCNAs using massively parallel sequencing provides unprecedented resolution and meanwhile gives rise to new challenges in data analysis, complicated by tumor aneuploidy and heterogeneity as well as normal cell contamination. While the majority of read depth based methods utilize total sequencing depth alone for SCNA inference, the allele specific signals are undervalued. We proposed a joint segmentation and inference approach using both signals to meet some of the challenges. Our method consists of four major steps: 1) extracting read depth supporting reference and alternative alleles at each SNP/Indel locus and comparing the total read depth and alternative allele proportion between tumor and matched normal sample; 2) performing joint segmentation on the two signal dimensions; 3) correcting the copy number baseline from which the SCNA state is determined; 4) calling SCNA state for each segment based on both signal dimensions. The method is applicable to whole exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) as well as SNP array data in a tumor-control study. We applied the method to a dataset containing no SCNAs to test the specificity, created by pairing sequencing replicates of a single HapMap sample as normal/tumor pairs, as well as a large-scale WGS dataset consisting of 88 liver tumors along with adjacent normal tissues. Compared with representative methods, our method demonstrated improved accuracy, scalability to large cancer studies, capability in handling both sequencing and SNP array data, and the potential to improve the estimation of tumor ploidy and purity. PMID:26583378

  7. KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance is associated with worse prognosis in pancreatic cancer and progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Moser, A James; Saka, Burcu; Adsay, N Volkan; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-10-01

    KRAS codon 12 mutations are present in about 90% of ductal adenocarcinomas and in undifferentiated carcinomas of the pancreas. The role of KRAS copy number changes and resulting KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) in ductal adenocarcinoma (n=94), and its progression into undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas (n=25) was studied by direct sequencing and KRAS fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Semi-quantitative evaluation of sequencing electropherograms showed KRAS MASI (ie, mutant allele peak higher than or equal to the wild-type allele peak) in 22 (18.4%) cases. KRAS FISH (performed on 45 cases) revealed a trend for more frequent KRAS amplification among cases with KRAS MASI (7/20, 35% vs 3/25, 12%, P=0.08). KRAS amplification by FISH was seen only in undifferentiated carcinomas (10/24, 42% vs 0/21 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 0%, P=0.0007). In 6 of 11 cases with both undifferentiated and well-differentiated components, transition to undifferentiated carcinoma was associated with an increase in KRAS copy number, due to amplification and/or chromosome 12 hyperploidy. Pancreatic carcinomas with KRAS MASI (compared to those without MASI) were predominantly undifferentiated (16/22, 73% vs 9/97, 9%, P<0.001), more likely to present at clinical stage IV (5/22, 23% vs 7/97, 7%, P=0.009), and were associated with shorter overall survival (9 months, 95% confidence interval, 5-13, vs 22 months, 95% confidence interval, 17-27; P=0.015) and shorter disease-free survival (5 months, 95% confidence interval, 2-8 vs 13 months, 95% confidence interval, 10-16; P=0.02). Our findings suggest that in a subset of ductal adenocarcinomas, KRAS MASI correlates with the progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

  8. RNA-Seq Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression, Hybrid Effects, and Regulatory Divergence in Hybrids Compared with Their Parents from Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graeme D.M.; Kane, Nolan C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Adams, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization is a prominent process among natural plant populations that can result in phenotypic novelty, heterosis, and changes in gene expression. The effects of intraspecific hybridization on F1 hybrid gene expression were investigated using parents from divergent, natural populations of Cirsium arvense, an invasive Compositae weed. Using an RNA-seq approach, the expression of 68,746 unigenes was quantified in parents and hybrids. The expression levels of 51% of transcripts differed between parents, a majority of which had less than 1.25× fold-changes. More unigenes had higher expression in the invasive parent (P1) than the noninvasive parent (P2). Of those that were divergently expressed between parents, 10% showed additive and 81% showed nonadditive (transgressive or dominant) modes of gene action in the hybrids. A majority of the dominant cases had P2-like expression patterns in the hybrids. Comparisons of allele-specific expression also enabled a survey of cis- and trans-regulatory effects. Cis- and trans-regulatory divergence was found at 70% and 68% of 62,281 informative single-nucleotide polymorphism sites, respectively. Of the 17% of sites exhibiting both cis- and trans-effects, a majority (70%) had antagonistic regulatory interactions (cis x trans); trans-divergence tended to drive higher expression of the P1 allele, whereas cis-divergence tended to increase P2 transcript abundance. Trans-effects correlated more highly than cis with parental expression divergence and accounted for a greater proportion of the regulatory divergence at sites with additive compared with nonadditive inheritance patterns. This study explores the nature of, and types of mechanisms underlying, expression changes that occur in upon intraspecific hybridization in natural populations. PMID:23677938

  9. Regulatory hierarchy of photomorphogenic loci: allele-specific and light-dependent interaction between the HY5 and COP1 loci.

    PubMed Central

    Ang, L H; Deng, X W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) gene product represses photomorphogenic development in darkness and that light signals reverse this action. In this report, we used genetic analysis to investigate the regulatory hierarchical relationship of COP1 and the loci encoding the photoreceptors and other signaling components. Our results showed that cop1 mutations are epistatic to the long hypocotyl mutations hy1, hy2, hy3, and hy4, suggesting that COP1 acts downstream of the phytochromes and a blue light receptor. Although epistasis of a putative null cop1-5 mutation over a hy5 mutation implied that COP1 acts downstream of HY5, the same hy5 mutation can suppress the dark photomorphogenic phenotypes (including hypocotyl elongation and cotyledon cellular differentiation) of the weak cop1-6 mutation. This, and other allele-specific interactions between COP1 and HY5, may suggest direct physical contact of their gene products. In addition, the synthetic lethality of the weak deetiolated1 (det1) and cop1 mutations and the fact that the cop1-6 mutation is epistatic to the det1-1 mutation with respect to light control of seed germination and dark-adaptative gene expression suggested that DET1 and COP1 may act in the same pathway, with COP1 being downstream. These results, together with previous epistasis studies, support models in which light signals, once perceived by different photoreceptors, converge downstream and act through a common cascade(s) of regulatory steps, as defined by DET1, HY5, COP1, and likely others, to derepress photomorphogenic development. PMID:8038602

  10. Fine mapping of QTL and genomic prediction using allele-specific expression SNPs demonstrates that the complex trait of genetic resistance to Marek’s disease is predominantly determined by transcriptional regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis that polymorphisms associated with transcriptional regulation are critical for viral disease resistance was tested by selecting birds using SNPs exhibiting allele-specific expression (ASE) in response to viral challenge. Analysis indicates ASE markers account for 83% of the disease re...

  11. A new PCR method: one primer amplification of PCR-CTPP products.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guang; Mitsuda, Yoko; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP) is a convenient method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms, saving time, and costs. It uses four primers for PCR; F1 and R1 for one allele, and F2 and R2 for the other allele, by which three different sizes of DNA are amplified; between F1 and R1, between F2 and R2, and between F1 and R2. To date, we have applied PCR-CTPP successfully for genotyping more than 60 polymorphisms. However, it is not rare that PCR does not produce balanced amplification of allele specific bands. Accordingly, the method was modified by attaching a common sequence at the 5' end of two-pair primers and adding another primer with the common sequence in PCR, in total five different primers in a tube for PCR. The modification allowed one primer amplification for the products of initial PCR with confronting two-pair primers, named as one primer amplification of PCR-CTPP products (OPA-CTPP). This article demonstrates an example for an A/G polymorphism of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Gln192Arg (rs662). PCR-CTPP failed clear genotyping for the polymorphism, while OPA-CTPP successfully produced PCR products corresponding to the allele. The present example indicated that the OPA-CTPP would be useful in the case that PCR-CTPP failed to produce balanced PCR products specific to each allele.

  12. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  13. Allele-specific germ cell epimutation in the spacer promoter of the 45S ribosomal RNA gene after Cr(III) exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, Y.-H. . E-mail: shiao@mail.ncifrcf.gov; Crawford, Erik B.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Patel, Pritesh; Ko, Kinarm

    2005-06-15

    Paternal exposure of mice to Cr(III) causes increased tumor risk in offspring; an epigenetic mechanism has been hypothesized. Representational difference analysis of gene methylation in sperm revealed hypomethylation in the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene after Cr(III) exposure, compared with controls. The most striking effects were seen in the rRNA spacer promoter, a region in the intergenic region of rRNA gene clusters that can influence transcription. Methylation of the rRNA spacer promoter has not been studied heretofore. Sperm DNAs from Cr(III)-treated and control mice were modified by the bisulfite method followed by PCR amplification of the spacer promoter, including 27 CpG sites. Cloning and dideoxy sequencing identified sequence variants (T or G at base -2214) in the spacer promoter. The T allele had less DNA methylation than the G allele in control mice (17 of 17 clones vs. 42 of 72 clones, P = 0.0004). In spite of diversity of sperm DNA methylation patterns, the DNA clones from Cr(III)-exposed mice had fewer methylated CpG sites, by an average of 19% (P < 0.0001). This difference was limited to the G allele. The pyrosequencing technique was applied to quantify the percentage of methylation directly from amplified PCR products. Strikingly, for nine CpG sites including the spacer promoter core region, hypomethylation was highly significant in the Cr(III)-treated group (paired T test, P < 0.0001). Thus, one allele of the 45S rRNA spacer promoter is hypomethylated in sperm germ cells after Cr(III) exposure. This epimutation may lead to increase of tumor risk in the offspring.

  14. Genome-wide and parental allele-specific analysis of CTCF and cohesin DNA binding in mouse brain reveals a tissue-specific binding pattern and an association with imprinted differentially methylated regions.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Adam R; Barkas, Nikolaos; McCole, Ruth B; Hughes, Siobhan; Amante, Samuele M; Schulz, Reiner; Oakey, Rebecca J

    2013-10-01

    DNA binding factors are essential for regulating gene expression. CTCF and cohesin are DNA binding factors with central roles in chromatin organization and gene expression. We determined the sites of CTCF and cohesin binding to DNA in mouse brain, genome wide and in an allele-specific manner with high read-depth ChIP-seq. By comparing our results with existing data for mouse liver and embryonic stem (ES) cells, we investigated the tissue specificity of CTCF binding sites. ES cells have fewer unique CTCF binding sites occupied than liver and brain, consistent with a ground-state pattern of CTCF binding that is elaborated during differentiation. CTCF binding sites without the canonical consensus motif were highly tissue specific. In brain, a third of CTCF and cohesin binding sites coincide, consistent with the potential for many interactions between cohesin and CTCF but also many instances of independent action. In the context of genomic imprinting, CTCF and/or cohesin bind to a majority but not all differentially methylated regions, with preferential binding to the unmethylated parental allele. Whether the parental allele-specific methylation was established in the parental germlines or post-fertilization in the embryo is not a determinant in CTCF or cohesin binding. These findings link CTCF and cohesin with the control regions of a subset of imprinted genes, supporting the notion that imprinting control is mechanistically diverse.

  15. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by amplification. Conclusions Our data suggest that directional loss and amplification exist in breast cancer. These are highly associated with grade, which may indicate that they are enforced with increasing number of cell divisions. Whether there is selective pressure for some loci to be preferentially amplified or deleted remains to be confirmed. PMID:22188678

  16. Multi-primer target PCR for rapid identification of bovine DRB3 alleles.

    PubMed

    Ledwidge, S A; Mallard, B A; Gibson, J P; Jansen, G B; Jiang, Z H

    2001-08-01

    Multi-primer target polymerase chain reaction (MPT-PCR) is a rapid method for the identification of specific BoLA-DRB3 alleles. In a single PCR reaction, the presence of two alleles associated with increased risk, DRB3.2*23 (DRB3*2701-2703, 2705-2707) and decreased risk, DRB3.2*16 (DRB3*1501, 1502), of mastitis in Canadian Holstein can be detected. Two outer primers amplify exon 2 of DRB3. Simultaneously, two inner, allele-specific primers amplify individual alleles. Initially, 40 cows previously typed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were genotyped using the multi-primer approach. An additional 30 cows were first genotyped by multi-primer target PCR, then by PCR-RFLP. All animals were correctly identified and there were no false positives. This technique can readily be modified to identify other BoLA alleles of interest.

  17. RNase H-dependent PCR (rhPCR): improved specificity and single nucleotide polymorphism detection using blocked cleavable primers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly used to detect the presence of nucleic acid sequences both in research and diagnostic settings. While high specificity is often achieved, biological requirements sometimes necessitate that primers are placed in suboptimal locations which lead to problems with the formation of primer dimers and/or misamplification of homologous sequences. Results Pyrococcus abyssi (P.a.) RNase H2 was used to enable PCR to be performed using blocked primers containing a single ribonucleotide residue which are activated via cleavage by the enzyme (rhPCR). Cleavage occurs 5'-to the RNA base following primer hybridization to the target DNA. The requirement of the primer to first hybridize with the target sequence to gain activity eliminates the formation of primer-dimers and greatly reduces misamplification of closely related sequences. Mismatches near the scissile linkage decrease the efficiency of cleavage by RNase H2, further increasing the specificity of the assay. When applied to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rhPCR was found to be far more sensitive than standard allele-specific PCR. In general, the best discrimination occurs when the mismatch is placed at the RNA:DNA base pair. Conclusion rhPCR eliminates the formation of primer dimers and markedly improves the specificity of PCR with respect to off-target amplification. These advantages of the assay should find utility in challenging qPCR applications such as genotyping, high level multiplex assays and rare allele detection. PMID:21831278

  18. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  19. SNP genotyping using single-tube fluorescent bidirectional PCR.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-07-01

    SNP genotyping is a well-populatedfield with a large number of assay formats offering accurate allelic discrimination. However, there remains a discord between the ultimate goal of rapid, inexpensive assays that do not require complex design considerations and involved optimization strategies. We describe the first integration of bidirectional allele-specific amplification, SYBR Green I, and rapid-cycle PCR to provide a homogeneous SNP-typing assay. Wild-type, mutant, and heterozygous alleles were easily discriminated in a single tube using melt curve profiling of PCR products alone. We demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of this assay with a blinded trial using clinical samples from individuals with sickle cell anemia, sickle cell trait, or unaffected individuals. The tests were completed in less than 30 min without expensive fluorogenic probes, prohibiting design rules, or lengthy downstream processing for product analysis.

  20. High frequency of SLC22A12 variants causing renal hypouricemia 1 in the Czech and Slovak Roma population; simple and rapid detection method by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gabrikova, Dana; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Sokolova, Jitka; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2015-10-01

    Renal hypouricemia is a rare heterogeneous inherited disorder characterized by impaired tubular uric acid transport with severe complications, such as acute kidney injury. Type 1 and 2 are caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 gene, respectively. A cohort of 881 randomly chosen ethnic Roma from two regions in Eastern Slovakia and two regions in the Czech Republic participated. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs and/or from blood samples. The c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction with allele-specific primers in a multiplex arrangement and/or direct sequencing of exon 7 and 9. Allele frequencies and genotypes were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium using the Chi-square test. 25 subjects were heterozygous and three were homozygous for the c.1245_1253del, while 92 subjects were heterozygous and two were homozygous for the c.1400C>T. Moreover, two participants were compound heterozygotes. Frequencies of the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were 1.87 and 5.56 %, respectively. Our finding confirms an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of SLC22A12 mutant variants. We found that the c.1245_1253del and c.1400C>T variants were present in the Czech and Slovak Roma population at unexpectedly high frequencies. Renal hypouricemia should be kept in mind during differential diagnostic on Roma patients with low serum uric acid concentrations.

  1. A semi-nested real-time PCR method to detect low chimerism percentage in small quantity of hematopoietic stem cell transplant DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Aloisio, Michelangelo; Bortot, Barbara; Gandin, Ilaria; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Athanasakis, Emmanouil

    2017-02-01

    Chimerism status evaluation of post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation samples is essential to predict post-transplant relapse. The most commonly used technique capable of detecting small increments of chimerism is quantitative real-time PCR. Although this method is already used in several laboratories, previously described protocols often lack sensitivity and the amount of the DNA required for each chimerism analysis is too high. In the present study, we compared a novel semi-nested allele-specific real-time PCR (sNAS-qPCR) protocol with our in-house standard allele-specific real-time PCR (gAS-qPCR) protocol. We selected two genetic markers and analyzed technical parameters (slope, y-intercept, R2, and standard deviation) useful to determine the performances of the two protocols. The sNAS-qPCR protocol showed better sensitivity and precision. Moreover, the sNAS-qPCR protocol requires, as input, only 10 ng of DNA, which is at least 10-fold less than the gAS-qPCR protocols described in the literature. Finally, the proposed sNAS-qPCR protocol could prove very useful for performing chimerism analysis with a small amount of DNA, as in the case of blood cell subsets.

  2. Rapid direct PCR for ABO blood typing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Many different molecular typing methods have been reported to complement routine serological ABO blood typing in forensics. However, these ABO genotyping methods are often time-consuming and call for an initial DNA isolation step that requires the use of expensive kits or reagents. We report here a rapid direct ABO genotyping method that eliminates the need for DNA extraction from fresh blood, hair, and body fluid stains before PCR. Using a fast PCR instrument and an optimized polymerase, the genotyping method-which employs a multiplex allele-specific primer set for the simultaneous detection of three single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites (nucleotides 261, 526, and 803)-identifies A, B, O01/O02, O03, and cis-AB01 alleles in around 70 min from sample collection to electropherogram. Not only will this ABO genotyping method be efficiently used in forensic practice for rapid screening of samples before full-blown multilocus short tandem repeat profiling, but it will also demonstrate an example of rapid direct genotyping of SNPs that offers the advantages of time- and cost-efficiency, convenience, and reduced contamination during DNA analysis.

  3. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-02-08

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction.

  4. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction. PMID:26853558

  5. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  6. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2005-05-17

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  7. PCR Techniques in Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Rashmi S

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation sequencing and its prolific use in the clinical realm, it would appear that techniques such as PCR would not be in high demand. This is not the case however, as PCR techniques play an important role in the success of NGS technology. Although NGS has rapidly become an important part of clinical molecular diagnostics, whole genome sequencing is still difficult to implement in a clinical laboratory due to high costs of sequencing, as well as issues surrounding data processing, analysis, and data storage, which can reduce efficiency and increase turnaround times. As a result, targeted sequencing is often used in clinical diagnostics, due to its increased efficiency. PCR techniques play an integral role in targeted NGS sequencing, allowing for the generation of multiple NGS libraries and the sequencing of multiple targeted regions simultaneously. We will outline the methods we employ in PCR amplification of targeted genomic regions for cancer mutation hotspots using the Ampliseq Cancer Hotspot v2 panel (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA).

  8. Establishment of a nested-ASP-PCR method to determine the clarithromycin resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Feng; Jiao, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Yue; Pu, Han-Ming; Qu, Bao-Jin; Yang, Bing-Ya; Hou, Min; Ji, Min-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate clarithromycin resistance positions 2142, 2143 and 2144 of the 23SrRNA gene in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by nested-allele specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (nested-ASP-PCR). METHODS: The gastric tissue and saliva samples from 99 patients with positive results of the rapid urease test (RUT) were collected. The nested-ASP-PCR method was carried out with the external primers and inner allele-specific primers corresponding to the reference strain and clinical strains. Thirty gastric tissue and saliva samples were tested to determine the sensitivity of nested-ASP-PCR and ASP-PCR methods. Then, clarithromycin resistance was detected for 99 clinical samples by using different methods, including nested-ASP-PCR, bacterial culture and disk diffusion. RESULTS: The nested-ASP-PCR method was successfully established to test the resistance mutation points 2142, 2143 and 2144 of the 23SrRNA gene of H. pylori. Among 30 samples of gastric tissue and saliva, the H. pylori detection rate of nested-ASP-PCR was 90% and 83.33%, while the detection rate of ASP-PCR was just 63% and 56.67%. Especially in the saliva samples, nested-ASP-PCR showed much higher sensitivity in H. pylori detection and resistance mutation rates than ASP-PCR. In the 99 RUT-positive gastric tissue and saliva samples, the H. pylori-positive detection rate by nested-ASP-PCR was 87 (87.88%) and 67 (67.68%), in which there were 30 wild-type and 57 mutated strains in gastric tissue and 22 wild-type and 45 mutated strains in saliva. Genotype analysis showed that three-points mixed mutations were quite common, but different resistant strains were present in gastric mucosa and saliva. Compared to the high sensitivity shown by nested-ASP-PCR, the positive detection of bacterial culture with gastric tissue samples was 50 cases, in which only 26 drug-resistant strains were found through analyzing minimum inhibitory zone of clarithromycin. CONCLUSION: The nested-ASP-PCR assay showed higher

  9. Forensic implications of PCR inhibition--A review.

    PubMed

    Alaeddini, Reza

    2012-05-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is currently the method of choice for the identification of human remains in forensic coursework. DNA samples from crime scenes often contain co-purified impurities which inhibit PCR. PCR inhibition is the most common cause of PCR failure when adequate copies of DNA are present. Inhibitors have been routinely reported in forensic investigations of DNA extracted from a variety of templates. Humic compounds, a series of substances produced during decay process have been considered as the materials contaminating DNA in soil, natural waters and recent sediments. Those compounds have been frequently assigned as PCR inhibitors. The current report reviews the characteristics of PCR inhibition, including the proposed mechanisms of inhibition, detection methods and the available technologies to remove or overcome the inhibitory activities.

  10. Blood grouping based on PCR methods and agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2015-01-01

    The study of erythrocyte antigens continues to be an intense field of research, particularly after the development of molecular testing methods. More than 300 specificities have been described by the International Society for Blood Transfusion as belonging to 33 blood group systems. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a central tool for red blood cells (RBC) genotyping. PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis are low cost, easy, and versatile in vitro methods for amplifying defined target DNA (RBC polymorphic region). Multiplex-PCR, AS-PCR (Specific Allele Polymerase Chain Reaction), and RFLP-PCR (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism-Polymerase Chain Reaction) techniques are usually to identify RBC polymorphisms. Furthermore, it is an easy methodology to implement. This chapter describes the PCR methodology and agarose gel electrophoresis to identify the polymorphisms of the Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and MNS blood group systems.

  11. Sporulation properties and antimicrobial susceptibility in endemic and rare Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes.

    PubMed

    Zidaric, Valerija; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-06-01

    Increased sporulation and antibiotic resistance have been proposed to be associated with certain Clostridium difficile epidemic strains such as PCR ribotype 027. In this study we examined these properties in another widespread PCR ribotype, 014/020, in comparison to prevalent PCR ribotype 002 and a group of rarely represented PCR ribotypes. Highest sporulation was observed in 014/020 strains at 24 h, while after 72 h PCR ribotype 002 and rare PCR ribotypes formed higher total number of spores. PCR ribotype 014/020 strains exhibited slightly higher resistance to tested antimicrobials, followed by group of rare PCR ribotypes and less common PCR ribotype 002. Neither sporulation properties nor antibiotic resistance clearly differed in endemic and rare strains.

  12. Sex Determination Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kima, Peter E.; Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized many aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology research. In the following exercise, students learn PCR by isolating their own DNA, amplifying specific segments of the X and Y chromosomes, and estimating the sizes of the PCR products using agarose gel electrophoresis. Based on the pattern of PCR products, students can…

  13. Cryptococcus gattii sero-mating type allelic pattern determined by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, M; D'Amicis, R; Tortorano, A M

    2015-02-01

    Molecular methods to differentiate serotypes, mating types and molecular types of Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii are important tools to understand epidemiology and pathogenesis of these pathogens. In this study, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was applied to sero-mating typing of C. gattii strains. Four pairs of primers were designed to target 4 allele-specific genes located in the mating-type locus. Twenty-three C. gattii strains, presenting different mating types and serotypes, were tested to validate the method. The method was able to identify all sero-mating allelic patterns including hybrid combinations, and therefore, it represents a simple one-step PCR for sero-mating typing of C. gattii strains.

  14. PCR und Real-Time PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Regina; Busch, Ulrich

    Die vielfältigen Anwendungsmöglichkeiten der Polymerasekettenreaktion (polymerase chain reaction, PCR) machen sie zu einer der wichtigsten und am häufigsten eingesetzten Methoden in der molekularbiologischen Forschung und Diagnostik. Für diese Technologie wurde der Erfinder der Methode, Kary Mullis, 1993 mit dem Nobelpreis ausgezeichnet. Die PCR erlaubt einen hochsensitiven und spezifischen in-vitro-Nachweis von Desoxyribonukleinsäuren (DNA), da im Zuge der Reaktion Sequenzabschnitte gezielt vermehrt werden. Innerhalb weniger Stunden können aus einem einzigen Zielmolekül 1012 identische Moleküle entstehen [1].

  15. Two-temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, J Aquiles; Abramowitz, Jessica D; Salk, Jesse J; Reis, Arthur H; Rice, John E; Pierce, Kenneth E; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2006-01-01

    Background In conventional PCR, total amplicon yield becomes independent of starting template number as amplification reaches plateau and varies significantly among replicate reactions. This paper describes a strategy for reconfiguring PCR so that the signal intensity of a single fluorescent detection probe after PCR thermal cycling reflects genomic composition. The resulting method corrects for product yield variations among replicate amplification reactions, permits resolution of homozygous and heterozygous genotypes based on endpoint fluorescence signal intensities, and readily identifies imbalanced allele ratios equivalent to those arising from gene/chromosomal duplications. Furthermore, the use of only a single colored probe for genotyping enhances the multiplex detection capacity of the assay. Results Two-Temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping combines Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR (an advanced form of asymmetric PCR that efficiently generates single-stranded DNA) and mismatch-tolerant probes capable of detecting allele-specific targets at high temperature and total single-stranded amplicons at a lower temperature in the same reaction. The method is demonstrated here for genotyping single-nucleotide alleles of the human HEXA gene responsible for Tay-Sachs disease and for genotyping SNP alleles near the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In each case, the final probe signals were normalized against total single-stranded DNA generated in the same reaction. Normalization reduces the coefficient of variation among replicates from 17.22% to as little as 2.78% and permits endpoint genotyping with >99.7% accuracy. These assays are robust because they are consistent over a wide range of input DNA concentrations and give the same results regardless of how many cycles of linear amplification have elapsed. The method is also sufficiently powerful to distinguish between samples with a 1:1 ratio of two alleles from samples comprised of 2:1 and 1:2 ratios of the

  16. The applicability of TaqMan-based quantitative real-time PCR assays for detecting and enumeratIng Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in the environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular detection methods such as PCR have been extensively used to type Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in the environment. More recently, studies have developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of microbial contaminants in water as well as ...

  17. Application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1).

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Singh, B K; Yadav, M P

    1996-11-01

    Fifty aborted foetus samples were diagnosed for the presence of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Specific primer pair for amplification of a particular segment of EHV-1 DNA in gc region having 3 Hae III restriction endonuclease sites was used. A 409 base pair segment obtained as PCR amplification product in 9 samples was digested with Hae III to confirm the presence of EHV-1 as the infectious agent in aborted tissues. It was observed that PCR technique was more sensitive, specific and rapid than the conventional virological diagnostic methods.

  18. A simple real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for authentication of the Chinese Panax ginseng cultivar Damaya from a local ginseng population.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J; Li, G

    2016-06-27

    Panax ginseng is one of the most important medicinal plants in the Orient. Owing to its increasing demand in the world market, cultivated ginseng has become the main source of medicinal material. Among the Chinese ginseng cultivars, Damaya commands higher prices and is grown in significant proportions among the local ginseng population. Due to the lack of rapid and accurate authentication methods, Damaya is distributed among different cultivars in the local ginseng population in China. Here, we identified a unique, Damaya-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site present in the second intron of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2). Based on this SNP, a Damaya cultivar-specific primer was designed and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized for the effective molecular authentication of Damaya. We designed a method by combining a simple DNA isolation method with real-time allele-specific PCR using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye, and proved its efficacy in clearly discriminated Damaya cultivar from other Chinese ginseng cultivars according to the allelic discrimination analysis. Hence, this study provides a simple and rapid assay for the differentiation and conservation of Damaya from the local Chinese ginseng population.

  19. SYBR green dye-based probe-free SNP genotyping: introduction of T-Plex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Baris, Ibrahim; Etlik, Ozdal; Koksal, Vedat; Ocak, Zeynep; Baris, Saniye Tugba

    2013-10-15

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is widely used in genetic association studies to characterize genetic factors underlying inherited traits. Despite many recent advances in high-throughput SNP genotyping, inexpensive and flexible methods with reasonable throughput levels are still needed. Real-time PCR methods for discovering and genotyping SNPs are becoming increasingly important in various fields of biology. In this study, we introduce a new, single-tube strategy that combines the tetra-primer ARMS PCR assay, SYBR Green I-based real-time PCR, and melting-point analysis with primer design strategies to detect the SNP of interest. This assay, T-Plex real-time PCR, is based on the T(m) discrimination of the amplified allele-specific amplicons in a single tube. The specificity, sensitivity, and robustness of the assay were evaluated for common mutations in the FV, PII, MTHFR, and FGFR3 genes. We believe that T-Plex real-time PCR would be a useful alternative for either individual genotyping requests or large epidemiological studies.

  20. Direct micro-haplotyping by multiple double PCR amplifications of specific alleles (MD-PASA)

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Yuval; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of haplotypes is an important tool in population genetics, familial heredity and gene mapping. Determination of haplotypes of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or other simple mutations is time consuming and expensive when analyzing large populations, and often requires the help of computational and statistical procedures. Based on double PCR amplification of specific alleles, described previously, we have developed a simple, rapid and low-cost method for direct haplotyping of multiple SNPs and simple mutations found within relatively short specific regions or genes (micro-haplotypes). Using this method, it is possible to directly determine the physical linkage of multiple heterozygous alleles, by conducting a series of double allele-specific PCR amplification sets with simple analysis by gel electrophoresis. Application of the method requires prior information as to the sequence of the segment to be haplotyped, including the polymorphic sites. We applied the method to haplotyping of nine sites in the chicken HSP108 gene. One of the haplotypes in the population apparently arose by recombination between two existing haplotypes, and we were able to locate the point of recombination within a segment of 19 bp. We anticipate rapidly growing needs for SNP haplotyping in human (medical and pharmacogenetics), animal and plant genetics; in this context, the multiple double PCR amplifications of specific alleles (MD-PASA) method offers a useful haplotyping tool. PMID:12060700

  1. High-specificity single-tube multiplex genotyping using Ribo-PAP PCR, tag primers, alkali cleavage of RNA/DNA chimeras and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Florence; Gelfand, David H; Gupta, Amar; Bodepudi, Veeraiah; Will, Stephen G; Bauer, Keith; Myers, Thomas W; Gut, Ivo G

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe a high-throughput, single-tube, allele-specific ribonucleotide analog pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization (ribo-PAP) PCR multiplex genotyping and resequencing method. An RNA/DNA chimeric PCR product is generated using genomic DNA as starting template, a panel of allele-selective 5'-tagged primers, a reverse primer, one nucleotide in the ribo-form (90-100%), the other nucleotides in the deoxy-form, a DNA polymerase capable of incorporating ribonucleotides, a suitable buffer and thermal cycling. The RNA/DNA chimeric PCR products are fragmented by treatment with alkali and analyzed by mass spectrometry. All allele-selective primers have a 5' repetitive motif where each repeat unit has a unique, distinct mass upon reverse copying and alkali fragmentation. The mass of the complement repeat fragment or flag identifies the primer or primers that were recruited in the ribo-PAP PCR. The method readily identifies homozygous and heterozygous positions in simplex or duplex ribo-PAP PCR. Many different tags can be analyzed simultaneously. The assay can genotype several SNPs in a single tube. It thus constitutes the simplest genotyping protocol with multiplex analysis. This novel genotyping and resequencing protocol was applied to different genomic loci: NOS1 and H19 in 30 individuals in simplex ribo-PAP PCR and at two SLCO1B1 loci in 95 individuals in duplex ribo-PAP PCR.

  2. Analysis of PIK3CA exon 9 and 20 mutations in breast cancers using PCR-HRM and PCR-ARMS: correlation with clinicopathological criteria.

    PubMed

    Harlé, Alexandre; Lion, Maëva; Lozano, Nicolas; Husson, Marie; Harter, Valentin; Genin, Pascal; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3K) are essential for cell signaling, proliferation, differentiation and survival. The catalytic subunit of PI3K, encoded by the PIK3CA oncogene, is mutated in 18-45% of breast carcinomas. These mutations, involved in tumorigenic processes, activate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Resistance to anti‑human epidermal growth factor receptor, hormonal or anti-PI3K therapies have been described in breast carcinomas bearing activation of the PI3K signaling pathway. The present study reports the evaluation of PIK3CA exon 9 and 20 mutations in 149 invasive breast cancer cases using a validated PCR-high resolution melting assay (PCR-HRM). An amplification refractory mutation system (PCR-ARMS) using allele-specific scorpion primers was used to detect hotspot mutations in exons 9 (c.1624G→A and c.1633G→A) and 20 (c.3140A→G and c.3140A→T) in 118 tumor specimens. No correlation was observed with age at diagnosis, histological type, hormone receptor and HER2 status. PIK3CA exon 9 and 20 mutations were found to be related to Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade with a lower rate of mutations and a higher frequency of exon 9 mutations in SBRI and exon 20 mutations in SBRII/III tumors. No difference was observed in the incidence rates of the two different mutations screened for each exon in any subcategory. A statistically significant correlation was found between PCR-HRM and PCR-ARMS (κ=0.845; P<0.001). PCR-ARMS was found to be more sensitive than PCR-HRM (sensitivity 0.5 and 5-10% of mutated DNA, respectively). We propose that PCR-HRM and PCR-ARMS can be combined for the cost-effective routine clinical identification of PIK3CA mutations for the purpose of personalizing therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  3. Integration of nanoparticle cell lysis and microchip PCR for one-step rapid detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weijie; Yeow, John T W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes an integrated microchip system as an efficient and cost-effective solution involving Nanotechnology and Lab-on-a-Chip technology for the rapid detection of bacteria. The system is based on using surface-modified gold nanoparticles for efficient cell lysis followed by microchip PCR without having to remove the nanoparticles from the PCR solution. Poly(quaternary ammonium) modified gold nanoparticles are used to provide a novel and efficient cell lysis method without the need to go through time-consuming, expensive and complicated microfabrication processes as most of current cell lysis methods for Lab-on-a-Chip applications do. It also facilitates the integration of cell lysis and PCR by sharing the same reaction chamber as PCR uses. It is integrated with a prototype microchip PCR system consisting of a physical microchip PCR device and an automated temperature control mechanism. The research work explores solutions for the problem of PCR inhibition caused by gold nanoparticles as well as for the problem of non-specific PCR amplification in the integrated microchip system. It also explores the possibility of greatly reducing PCR cycling time to achieve the same result compared to the protocol for a regular PCR machine. The simplicity of the setup makes it easy to be integrated with other Lab-on-a-Chip functional modules to create customized solutions for target applications.

  4. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a workshop in January 2003 on the detection of viruses in water using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Speakers were asked to address a series of specific questions, including whether a single standard method coul...

  5. QUALITY CONTROLS FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to present an overview of the quality control (QC) sections of a draft EPA document entitled, "Quality Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Laboratories Performing PCR Analyses on Environmental Samples." This document has been prepared by th...

  6. Superior Multiplexing Capacity of PlexPrimers Enables Sensitive and Specific Detection of SNPs and Clustered Mutations in qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lit Yeen; Walker, Samantha Michelle; Lonergan, Tina; Lima, Nicole Elizabeth; Todd, Alison Velyian

    2017-01-01

    Background Whilst qPCR provides an extremely powerful tool for genetic analysis, some applications such as multiplexing variant alleles (eg SNPs, point mutations or deletions), remain challenging using current primer/probe systems. The novel design features of PlexPrimers allow sensitive, multiplexed analysis of variant alleles even when these are tightly clustered. Method PlexPrimers were combined with PlexZymes in qPCR assays for the detection of SNPs in human absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) genes; clustered mutations in the 23S rRNA gene which confer antibiotic resistance to Mycoplasma genitalium; and deletions within the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Results The combination of PlexPrimers and PlexZymes allowed robust multiplexing of targets which resulted in 100% concordance with results obtained using hydrolysis probe kits for 14 SNPs in the ADME genes. A 7-plex qPCR assay targeting M. genitalium, 5 clustered mutations associated with macrolide resistance and an internal control, allowed efficient amplification of all targets, with all 5 mutations detected in a single channel. Finally, the strategy was employed to analyse common EGFR mutants with high sensitivity, detecting deletions present at only 0.01%. Conclusion PlexPrime is a novel technology for the detection of genetic variants. Unlike previous strategies, the combination of PlexPrimers with PlexZymes enables both allele-specific detection and allele-specific amplification in qPCR. The study demonstrated highly sensitive and specific detection of mutations and SNPs, and superior multiplexing capacity. The ability to multiplex clustered genetic variants reduces the time to result providing more actionable information. PMID:28114309

  7. Pcr by Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) allows for highly sensitive and specific amplification of DNA. It is the backbone of many genetic experiments and tests. Recently, three labs independently uncovered a novel and simple way to perform a PCR reaction. Instead of repetitive heating and cooling, a temperature gradient across the reaction vessel drives thermal convection. By convection, the reaction liquid circulates between hot and cold regions of the chamber. The convection triggers DNA amplification as the DNA melts into two single strands in the hot region and replicates into twice the amount in the cold region. The amplification progresses exponentially as the convection moves on. We review the characteristics of the different approaches and show the benefits and prospects of the method.

  8. PCR in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Morling, Niels

    2009-04-01

    Since the introduction in the mid-1980s of analyses of minisatellites for DNA analyses, a revolution has taken place in forensic genetics. The subsequent invention of the PCR made it possible to develop forensic genetics tools that allow both very informative routine investigations and still more and more advanced, special investigations in cases concerning crime, paternity, relationship, disaster victim identification etc. The present review gives an update on the use of DNA investigations in forensic genetics.

  9. DNA Sequence Signatures for Rapid Detection of Six Target Bacterial Pathogens Using PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Kenjiro; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Using Streptococcus pyogenes as a model, we previously established a stepwise computational workflow to effectively identify species-specific DNA signatures that could be used as PCR primer sets to detect target bacteria with high specificity and sensitivity. In this study, we extended the workflow for the rapid development of PCR assays targeting Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Staphylococcus aureus, which are of safety concern for human tissue intended for transplantation. Twenty-one primer sets that had sensitivity of detecting 5–50 fg DNA from target bacteria with high specificity were selected. These selected primer sets can be used in a PCR array for detecting target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity. The workflow could be widely applicable for the rapid development of PCR-based assays for a wide range of target bacteria, including those of biothreat agents. PMID:26279626

  10. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  11. Fluorescent detection of Southern blots and PCR-based genetic typing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, E.S.; Worley, J.M.; Zimmerman, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Southern blot is used to study gene organization, to identify disease-causing genomic rearrangements, or for typing RFLP markers in forensic, paternity, or prenatal diagnostic testing. Fluorescence offers a much greater dynamic range and a more linear response than film used in radioactive or chemiluminescent detection of RFLPs. We therefore investigated using the Fluorimager{trademark} 575 (Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) for analyzing Southern blots. Using a single-locus probe to D2S44 (YNH24) (Promega Corp.), we detect as little as 100 ng (0.05 attomole) genomic DNA. The alkaline phosphatase-labeled probe is detected using AttoPhos (JBL Scientific), and the developed membrane is scanned with the Fluorimager. Biotinylated hybridization probes can also be developed using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and AttoPhos. The instrument scan parameters can be adjusted to prevent overexposure and accompanying loss of resolution in images of blots, gels, or 96-well microplates. We have used these other sample formats in PCR-based genetic typing assays. We use FluorKit DQS (Molecular Dynamics) to accurately quantify PCR template DNA (1-500 ng) in 96-well microplates scanned using the same instrument. Mutation detection assays run include heteroduplex gels (5% polyacrylamide, 2.7 M urea), short tandem repeat (STR) markers, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AmpFLP), competitive priming PCR, and allele-specific oligotyping. These assays are run using either 1- or 2-color labeling. We detect unlabeled PCR products, such as the AmpFLP marker D1S80 (Perkin-Elmer) by post-staining gels for 10 minutes with SYBR Green 1 (Molecular Probes) and scanning the wet gel. The Fluorimager scans a 20 x 25 cm sample within three minutes, allowing rapid optimization of fluorescent protocols and high sample throughput.

  12. Evaluation of various real-time reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays for norovirus detection.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ju Eun; Lee, Cheonghoon; Park, SungJun; Ko, GwangPyo

    2017-02-01

    Human noroviruses are widespread and contagious viruses causing nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Real-time reverse transcription quantitative PCR (real-time RT-qPCR) is currently the gold standard for sensitive and accurate detection for these pathogens and serves as a critical tool in outbreak prevention and control. Different surveillance teams, however, may use different assays and variability in specimen conditions may lead to disagreement in results. Furthermore, the norovirus genome is highly variable and continuously evolving. These issues necessitate the re-examination of the real-time RT-qPCR's robustness in the context of accurate detection as well as the investigation of practical strategies to enhance assay performance. Four widely referenced real-time RT-qPCR assays (Assay A-D) were simultaneously performed to evaluate characteristics such as PCR efficiency, detection limit, as well as sensitivity and specificity with RT-PCR, and to assess the most accurate method for detecting norovirus genogroups I and II. Overall, Assay D was evaluated to be the most precise and accurate assay in this study. A Zen internal quencher, which decreases nonspecific fluorescence during the PCR reaction, was added to Assay D's probe which further improved assay performance. This study compared several detection assays for noroviruses and an improvement strategy based on such comparisons provided useful characterizations of a highly optimized real-time RT-qPCR assay for norovirus detection.

  13. Improved detection of episomal Banana streak viruses by multiplex immunocapture PCR.

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Grégoire; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Acina, Isabelle; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Banana streak viruses (BSV) are currently the main viral constraint to Musa germplasm movement, genetic improvement and mass propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and implement BSV detection strategies that are both reliable and sensitive, such as PCR-based techniques. Unfortunately, BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs) are present in the genome of Musa balbisiana. They interfere with PCR-based detection of episomal BSV in infected banana and plantain, such as immunocapture PCR. Therefore, a multiplex, immunocapture PCR (M-IC-PCR) was developed for the detection of BSV. Musa sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) primers were selected and used in combination with BSV species-specific primers in order to monitor possible contamination by Musa genomic DNA, using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, immunocapture conditions were optimized in order to prevent Musa DNA from interfering with episomal BSV DNA during the PCR step. This improved detection method successfully allowed the accurate, specific and sensitive detection of episomal DNA only from distinct BSV species. Its implementation should benefit PCR-based detection of viruses for which homologous sequences are present in the genome of their hosts, including transgenic plants expressing viral sequences.

  14. A suitable duplex PCR for ovine embryo sex and genotype of PrnP gene determination for MOET-based selection programmes.

    PubMed

    Dervishi, E; Sánchez, P; Alabart, J L; Cocero, M J; Folch, J; Calvo, J H

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to test the suitability of a duplex PCR assay for sex and scrapie resistance genotype determination in fresh embryos. Duplex PCR amplified a repetitive and specific fragment of Y chromosome, used for sex diagnosis, and a PrnP fragment. PrnP codons 134 and 156, and codon 171 were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphisms and allele-specific PCR, respectively, after re-amplification of PrnP fragment. The specificity of the method was first assessed by testing 359 blood samples from Rasa Aragonesa sheep breed (161 males and 198 females). No amplification failures and total agreement between genotypic and phenotypic sex were found. In the same way, PrnP genotype determination by duplex PCR assay was in agreement with the PrnP animal's genotype established by sequencing. Finally, 73 samples of 1-10 cells from compact morulae were aspirated through the zona pellucida and genotyped for sex and PrnP. The efficiency was 96% when three or more cells were sampled. These results confirm that the duplex PCR assay reported in this work can be used for rapid sex determination in ovine embryos, with a high efficiency and accuracy (96%) when three or more cells are sampled, allowing sexed fresh embryos of known PrnP genotype to be transferred in multiple ovulation and embryo transfer programmes.

  15. Rapid real-time PCR and high resolution melt analysis in a self-filling thermoplastic chip.

    PubMed

    Sposito, A; Hoang, V; DeVoe, D L

    2016-09-21

    A microfluidic platform designed for point-of-care PCR-based nucleic acid diagnostics is described. Compared to established microfluidic PCR technologies, the system is unique in its ability to achieve exceptionally rapid PCR amplification in a low cost thermoplastic format, together with high temperature accuracy enabling effective validation of reaction product by high resolution melt analysis performed in the same chamber as PCR. In addition, the system employs capillary pumping for automated loading of sample into the reaction chamber, combined with an integrated hydrophilic valve for precise self-metering of sample volumes into the device. Using the microfluidic system to target a mutation in the G6PC gene, efficient PCR from human genomic DNA template is achieved with cycle times as low as 14 s, full amplification in 8.5 min, and final melt analysis accurately identifying the desired amplicon.

  16. Real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis for rapid detection of Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance mutations and strain types.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Kai, Masanori; Thapa, Pratibha; Khadge, Saraswoti; Hagge, Deanna A; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2012-03-01

    Drug resistance surveillance and strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae are necessary to investigate ongoing transmission of leprosy in regions of endemicity. To enable wider implementation of these molecular analyses, novel real-time PCR-high-resolution melt (RT-PCR-HRM) assays without allele-specific primers or probes and post-PCR sample handling were developed. For the detection of mutations within drug resistance-determining regions (DRDRs) of folP1, rpoB, and gyrA, targets for dapsone, rifampin, and fluoroquinolones, real-time PCR-HRM assays were developed. Wild-type and drug-resistant mouse footpad-derived strains that included three folP1, two rpoB, and one gyrA mutation types in a reference panel were tested. RT-PCR-HRM correctly distinguished the wild type from the mutant strains. In addition, RT-PCR-HRM analyses aided in recognizing samples with mixed or minor alleles and also a mislabeled sample. When tested in 121 sequence-characterized clinical strains, HRM identified all the folP1 mutants representing two mutation types, including one not within the reference panel. The false positives (<5%) could be attributed to low DNA concentration or PCR inhibition. A second set of RT-PCR-HRM assays for identification of three previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been used for strain typing were developed and validated in 22 reference and 25 clinical strains. Real-time PCR-HRM is a sensitive, simple, rapid, and high-throughput tool for routine screening known DRDR mutants in new and relapsed cases, SNP typing, and detection of minor mutant alleles in the wild-type background at lower costs than current methods and with the potential for quality control in leprosy investigations.

  17. Rapid Detection of Rifampicin- and Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Sahebi, Leyla; Ansarin, Khalil; Monfaredan, Amir; Farajnia, Safar; Nili, Seiran; Khalili, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate and rapid detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is fundamental for the successful treatment of tuberculosis (TB). Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of common mutations leading to isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RMP) resistance. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study carried out in 2014, 90 patients with M. tuberculosis from five border provinces of Iran were selected. After a full clinical history and physical evaluation, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was performed for the detection of mutations in the patients’ katG and rpoB genes. The results were compared with results of a standard proportion method as well as a multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR). Results A total of 23 mutations were found in isolates among which, codon katG 315, rpoB P1 (511 - 519 sequence) and rpoB P2 (524-533 sequence) were responsible for seven, nine and seven cases, respectively. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) of melting temperature (Tm) in katG 315 codon, rpoB P1 and P2 sequences in susceptible and mutant isolates was as follows: katG 85.4°C (0.18) and 87.54°C (0.62); rpoΒ P1 84.6°C (0.61) and 82.9°C (0.38); rpoΒ P2 83.4°C (0.18) and 85.3°C (0.19), respectively. In comparison to the standard proportion test, the sensitivity of real-time PCR in detecting INH- and RMP-resistant mutations was 75% and 83.3%, respectively. In comparison to the MAS-PCR test, 100% of katG 315 mutations and 80% of rpoB mutations were determined. Overall, 10% of the patients were diagnosed with a recurrence of TB. Age and previous history of TB treatment increased mutation odds in rpoB sequences (P = 0.046, P = 0.036, respectively). Conclusions Detection of drug resistance associated with mutations through real-time PCR by melting analysis technique showed a high differentiating power. This technique had high concordance with the standard proportion test and MAS-PCR results. PMID:27942356

  18. Performance of Bordetella pertussis IS481 real-time PCR in a vaccine trial setting.

    PubMed

    Gullsby, Karolina; Hallander, Hans O; Bondeson, Kåre

    2007-12-01

    A real-time PCR method targeting the Bordetella pertussis IS481 gene fragment was evaluated in a vaccine trial setting in which real-time PCR results could be validated against culture and serology results. Two commonly used DNA extraction methods, Amplicor Respiratory Preparation kit and the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, were compared. An approximately 50-fold higher sensitivity was achieved using the Amplicor kit. 89 of 276 aspirates analysed with the IS481 real-time PCR were positive. Interestingly, six of these were culture negative and came from serology-negative patients. Defining true positive cases either as culture-positive or as PCR-positive cases that had been confirmed with a serology-positive result or verified with a newly constructed recA PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of the IS481 real-time PCR were 89% and 98%, respectively. This study confirms the specificity and high diagnostic sensitivity of IS481-based PCR methods for diagnosis of B. pertussis.

  19. High-Throughput SNP Allele-Frequency Determination in Pooled DNA Samples by Kinetic PCR

    PubMed Central

    Germer, Søren; Holland, Michael J.; Higuchi, Russell

    2000-01-01

    We have developed an accurate, yet inexpensive and high-throughput, method for determining the allele frequency of biallelic polymorphisms in pools of DNA samples. The assay combines kinetic (real-time quantitative) PCR with allele-specific amplification and requires no post-PCR processing. The relative amounts of each allele in a sample are quantified. This is performed by dividing equal aliquots of the pooled DNA between two separate PCR reactions, each of which contains a primer pair specific to one or the other allelic SNP variant. For pools with equal amounts of the two alleles, the two amplifications should reach a detectable level of fluorescence at the same cycle number. For pools that contain unequal ratios of the two alleles, the difference in cycle number between the two amplification reactions can be used to calculate the relative allele amounts. We demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the assay on samples with known predetermined SNP allele frequencies from 5% to 95%, including pools of both human and mouse DNAs using eight different SNPs altogether. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and known frequencies having an r2 = 0.997. The loss of sensitivity as a result of measurement error is typically minimal, compared with that due to sampling error alone, for population samples up to 1000. We believe that by providing a means for SNP genotyping up to thousands of samples simultaneously, inexpensively, and reproducibly, this method is a powerful strategy for detecting meaningful polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans. PMID:10673283

  20. Development of a simple PCR-based assay for the identification of triazine resistance in the noxious plant common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and its applicability in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Mátyás, Kinga Klára; Taller, János; Cseh, András; Poczai, Péter; Cernák, István

    2011-12-01

    Bidirectional allele-specific PCR (Bi-PASA) was used to detect a point mutation causing triazine resistance in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). The external primers amplified a 278 bp standard DNA fragment in all genotypes. In the susceptible S264S genotypes, a 208 bp fragment was expected while in resistant S264G common ragweed genotypes a 109 bp band was expected. In resistant plants, both the wild and mutant type fragments were detected, indicating that the original triazine sensitive cpDNA is maintained in a heteroplasmic state in the resistant S264G genotypes. Additionally, in silico analysis confirmed the potential applicability of our diagnostic assay for other plant species. In 24 out of 74 taxa (32%), the assay could be used without any change, while in the others some of the primers should be redesigned before use.

  1. Raising the shields: PCR in the presence of metallic surfaces protected by tailor-made coatings.

    PubMed

    Scherag, Frank D; Brandstetter, Thomas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The implementation of PCR reactions in the presence of metallic surfaces is interesting for the generation of novel bioanalytical devices, because metals exhibit high mechanical stability, good thermal conductivity, and flexibility during deformation. However, metallic substrates are usually non-compatible with enzymatic reactions such as PCR due to poisoning of the active center of the enzyme or nonspecific adsorption of the enzymeto the metal surface, which could result in protein denaturation. We present a method for the generation of polymer coatings on metallic surfaces which are designed to minimize protein adsorption and also prevent the release of metal ions. These coatings consist of three layers covalently linked to each other; a self-assembled monolayer to promote adhesion, a photochemically generated barrier layer and a photochemically generated hydrogel. The coatings can be deposited onto aluminum, stainless steel, gold and copper surfaces. We compare PCR efficiencies in the presence of bare metallic surfaces with those of surfaces treated with the novel coating system.

  2. Blood Group Determination using DNA extracted from Exfoliated Primary Teeth at Various Time Durations and Temperatures: A PCR Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sham S; Salman, Afreen; Hegde, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based blood group on tooth pulp obtained from teeth stored for 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year following extraction and to evaluate the stability of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in primary tooth subjected to a temperature of 200°C ± 5°C for 15 minutes. Materials and methods Dental pulp tissue was collected from 40 exfoliated primary teeth stored for various time durations and temperature and preserved at 4°C till DNA extraction was carried out. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted using silica membrane-based spin-column procedure of QIAamp DNA minikit from BioRad. Deoxyribonucleic acid was subjected to PCR amplification and monoplex allele-specific PCR primers for ABO genotyping. Statistical analysis used The data were analyzed by comparison (based on percentage). Results In our study, overall, 85% samples showed a DNA yield. Cent percent results were obtained for samples studied at the end of 1 month followed by 90 and 80% for samples studied for 6 months and 1 year respectively. Heated samples showed 70% result. Conclusion Polymerase chain reaction was found to be an effective method for blood group determination for teeth stored at various time durations and temperatures. However, as the time interval increased, the number of positive results obtained decreased. How to cite this article Pai RK, Bhat SS, Salman A, Hegde S. Blood Group Determination using DNA extracted from Exfoliated Primary Teeth at Various Time Durations and Temperatures: A PCR Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):308-312. PMID:28127161

  3. [Allele polymorphism analysis in coagulation factors F2, F5 and folate metabolism gene MTHFR by using microchip-based multiplex real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, K V; Nikitin, M M; Slyadnev, M N

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping methods are widely used for the detection of hereditary thrombophilias caused by genetic defects in the coagulation system. The hereditary thrombophilias are frequently associated with higher incidences of point mutations in hemostasis (F2 20210G>A, F5 1691G>A) and folate metabolism (MTHFR 677C>Т, MTHFR 1298A>C) genes. Moreover, the combination of gene abnormalities in F2 or/and MTHFR with F5 Leiden mutation leads to increased risk of developing thrombosis. Thus, simultaneous detection of the multiple gene mutations in a sample has important clinical relevance. The microchip-based multiplex real time PCR for estimation of allele specific polymorphism in hemostatic and folate metabolism genes presented here has a high efficiency and may be used for laboratory diagnosis. The optimized protocol for estimation of 4 different types of genetic polymorphisms allowed PCR to be performed with minimal quantity of DNA template and PCR reagents including Taq polymerase and a short-term thermocycling.

  4. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in bovine and bubaline tissues through nested-PCR.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cristina P; Osório, Ana Luiza A R; Jorge, Klaudia S G; Ramos, Carlos A N; Souza Filho, Antonio F; Vidal, Carlos E S; Vargas, Agueda P C; Roxo, Eliana; Rocha, Adalgiza S; Suffys, Philip N; Fonseca, Antônio A; Silva, Marcio R; Barbosa Neto, José D; Cerqueira, Valíria D; Araújo, Flábio R

    2014-01-01

    Post-mortem bacterial culture and specific biochemical tests are currently performed to characterize the etiologic agent of bovine tuberculosis. Cultures take up to 90 days to develop. A diagnosis by molecular tests such as PCR can provide fast and reliable results while significantly decreasing the time of confirmation. In the present study, a nested-PCR system, targeting rv2807, with conventional PCR followed by real-time PCR, was developed to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) organisms directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. The sensitivity and specificity of the reactions were assessed with DNA samples extracted from tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, as well as other Actinomycetales species and DNA samples extracted directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. Regarding the analytical sensitivity, DNA of the M. bovis AN5 strain was detected up to 1.5 pg by nested-PCR, whereas DNA of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain was detected up to 6.1 pg. The nested-PCR system showed 100% analytical specificity for MTC when tested with DNA of reference strains of non-tuberculous mycobacteria and closely-related Actinomycetales. A clinical sensitivity level of 76.7% was detected with tissues samples positive for MTC by means of the culture and conventional PCR. A clinical specificity of 100% was detected with DNA from tissue samples of cattle with negative results in the comparative intradermal tuberculin test. These cattle exhibited no visible lesions and were negative in the culture for MTC. The use of the nested-PCR assay to detect M. tuberculosis complex in tissue homogenates provided a rapid diagnosis of bovine and bubaline tuberculosis.

  5. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in bovine and bubaline tissues through nested-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Cristina P.; Osório, Ana Luiza A.R.; Jorge, Klaudia S.G.; Ramos, Carlos A.N.; Souza Filho, Antonio F.; Vidal, Carlos E.S.; Vargas, Agueda P.C.; Roxo, Eliana; Rocha, Adalgiza S.; Suffys, Philip N.; Fonseca, Antônio A.; Silva, Marcio R.; Barbosa Neto, José D.; Cerqueira, Valíria D.; Araújo, Flábio R.

    2014-01-01

    Post-mortem bacterial culture and specific biochemical tests are currently performed to characterize the etiologic agent of bovine tuberculosis. Cultures take up to 90 days to develop. A diagnosis by molecular tests such as PCR can provide fast and reliable results while significantly decreasing the time of confirmation. In the present study, a nested-PCR system, targeting rv2807, with conventional PCR followed by real-time PCR, was developed to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) organisms directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. The sensitivity and specificity of the reactions were assessed with DNA samples extracted from tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, as well as other Actinomycetales species and DNA samples extracted directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. Regarding the analytical sensitivity, DNA of the M. bovis AN5 strain was detected up to 1.5 pg by nested-PCR, whereas DNA of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain was detected up to 6.1 pg. The nested-PCR system showed 100% analytical specificity for MTC when tested with DNA of reference strains of non-tuberculous mycobacteria and closely-related Actinomycetales. A clinical sensitivity level of 76.7% was detected with tissues samples positive for MTC by means of the culture and conventional PCR. A clinical specificity of 100% was detected with DNA from tissue samples of cattle with negative results in the comparative intradermal tuberculin test. These cattle exhibited no visible lesions and were negative in the culture for MTC. The use of the nested-PCR assay to detect M. tuberculosis complex in tissue homogenates provided a rapid diagnosis of bovine and bubaline tuberculosis. PMID:25242951

  6. Detecting bunyaviruses of the Bunyamwera and California serogroups by a PCR technique.

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, G; Mitchell, C J; Chang, G J; Smith, G C

    1996-01-01

    Many bunyaviruses of the Bunyamwera and California serogroups are medically important human pathogens. The development of an effective technique to detect the viruses by using molecular biologic tools, such as PCR, improves not only clinical diagnosis but also virologic surveillance of mosquito vectors in the field. In this study, we evaluated eight pairs of primers for reactivity with 44 viruses of the genus Bunyavirus, using a reverse transcriptase PCR technique. With a pair of serogroup-specific primers we designed, all viruses of the serogroups tested could be detected. Further, virus-specific primer pairs were identified for California encephalitis virus, Jamestown Canyon virus, La Crosse virus, and snowshoe hare virus for use in North America. Using this technique, we could detect one La Crosse virus-infected mosquito in a pool of 100 mosquitoes with undetectable plaque titers. PMID:8727900

  7. Applications of Digital PCR for Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Jane; Jerome, Keith R

    2017-03-15

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is an important new tool for use in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Its advantages over quantitative PCR (qPCR), including absolute quantification without a standard curve, improved precision, improved accuracy in the presence of inhibitors, and more accurate quantitation when amplification efficiency is low, make dPCR the assay of choice for several specimen testing applications. This mini-review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of dPCR compared to qPCR, its applications in clinical microbiology and the considerations for implementation of the method in a clinical laboratory.

  8. Detection of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant Clostridium spp. in chilled fresh vacuum-packed meat using different PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Bonke, R; Drees, N; Gareis, M

    2016-01-01

    Since 1989, blown pack spoilage has been recognized as a special form of spoilage in vacuum-packed raw and cooked beef. However, only limited information concerning the occurrences of bacteria causing blown pack spoilage on chilled fresh meat is available. In this study, a total of 63 beef and 33 lamb commercially available samples from different countries and without any signs of spoilage were examined for contamination with psychrophilic and psychrotolerant Clostridium spp. using different PCR systems. In total, 34.4% of the chilled fresh vacuum-packed meats were PCR positive. A higher number of lamb samples were identified as PCR positive compared with beef. A geographical relationship between positive results and the origin of the samples could not be determined. PCR system described by Brightwell and Clemens (Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay specific for Clostridium estertheticum and C. estertheticum-like psychrotolerant bacteria. Meat Sci 2012;92:697-703) gave the highest number of positive detections compared with the Broda, Boerema and Bell PCR system (PCR detection of psychrophilic Clostridium spp. causing 'blown pack' spoilage of vacuum-packed chilled meats. J Appl Microbiol 2003;94:515-22). Eight clostridia isolates from two German beef and four Welsh lamb samples were isolated overall. Three of these clostridia isolates were identified as Clostridium estertheticum whereas five clostridia isolates remain unidentified. The study shows that psychrophilic and psychrotolerant Clostridium spp. are more prevalent in retail samples than previously suspected.

  9. A real-time PCR assay for the quantification of residual malignant cells in B cell chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, T; Engert, A; Wittor, H; Schinköthe, T; Oberhäuser, F; Schulz, H; Diehl, V; Barth, S

    2000-04-01

    Several new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of monoclonal B cell lymphomas are currently being investigated. In parallel with new therapeutic modalities, more sensitive diagnostic methods are needed. These methods should be highly sensitive in detecting very low amounts of malignant cells and should be specific for the malignant clone. In addition, these methods should allow the quantification of residual tumor cells. In this study a new real-time polymerase chain reaction (LightCycler) was evaluated to quantify residual tumor cells in monoclonal B cell malignancies. This technology combines the advantages of rapid cycling PCR with the online detection of PCR products using fluorescent dyes. Our assay is based on immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgVH)-specific PCR with allele-specific primers complementary to hypervariable CDRII and CDRIII regions. A set of framework region III (FRIII)-specific hybridization probes was used for detection of the specific amplification product, and IgVH copy number was quantified with the cloned IgVH sequence as an external standard. The approach was evaluated with the Hodgkin lymphoma cell line L428 in order to quantify L428 dilutions. L428 cells mixed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were detected and quantified with a sensitivity of one cell within 1 x 10(5) PBMNCs. Sample DNA from the peripheral blood and from the bone marrow of two patients with B-CLL was analyzed in the new set up at different time points before and after therapy. Statistically significant changes in IgVH copy numbers were documented in both patients. We conclude that this technology offers an additional opportunity to detect and quantify residual tumor cells in B-CLL over several log steps with a high sensitivity. The kinetics of residual tumor cell counts in B-CLL can be analyzed by this method.

  10. A real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Fergus; O’Dwyer, Veronica; Neylan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 95% of patients who are diagnosed with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have one of three mitochondrial point mutations responsible for the disease, G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel multiplex real-time amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR combined with high-resolution melt curves to identify the individual mutations involved. The study aimed to provide a more robust, cost- and time-effective mutation detection strategy than that offered with currently available methods. The assay reported in this study will allow diagnostic laboratories to avoid costly next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays for most patients with LHON and to focus resources on patients with unknown mutations that require further analysis. Methods The test uses a combination of multiplex allele-specific PCR (ARMS PCR) in combination with a high-resolution melt curve analysis to detect the presence of the mutations in G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. PCR primer sets were designed to produce a control PCR product and PCR products only in the presence of the mutations in 3460A, 11778A, and 14484C in a multiplex single tube format. Products produce discrete well-separated melt curves to clearly detect the mutations. Results This novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay accurately detected 95% of the mutations that cause LHON. The test has proved to be robust, cost- and time-effective with the real-time closed tube system taking approximately 1 h to complete. Conclusions A novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay is described for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in LHON. This test provides a simple, robust, easy-to-read output that is cost- and time-effective, thus providing an alternative method to individual endpoint PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCR followed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing, and next-generation sequencing

  11. A novel Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR based assay for genotyping SNP rs12303764(G/T) of human Unc-51 like kinase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Rohit; Duseja, Ajay; Changotra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    Various case-control studies have shown association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) in ULK1 with crohn's disease. The techniques used in these studies were time consuming, complicated and require sophisticated/expensive instruments. Therefore, in order to overcome these problems, we have developed a new, rapid and cost effective Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR assay to genotype single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) of ULK1 gene. We manually designed allele specific primers. DNA fragment amplified using outer primers was sequenced to obtain samples with known genotypes (GG, GT and TT) for further use in the development of T-ARMS-PCR assay. Amplification conditions were optimized for parameters; annealing temperature, Taq DNA polymerase and primers. The developed T-ARMS-PCR assay was applied to genotype one hundred samples from healthy individuals. Genotyping results of 10 DNA samples from healthy individuals for rs12303764(G/T) by T-ARMS-PCR assay and sequencing were concordant. The newly developed assay was further applied to genotype samples from 100 healthy individuals of North Indian origin. Genotype frequencies were 9, 34 and 57 % for GG, GT and TT, respectively. Allele frequencies were 0.26 and 0.74 for G and T, respectively. The allele frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium (p = 0.2443). T-ARMS-PCR assay developed in our laboratory for genotyping rs12303764 (G/T) of ULK1 gene is time saving and cost-effective as compared to the available methods. Furthermore, this is the first study reporting allelic and genotype frequencies of ULK1 rs12303764 (G/T) variants in North Indian population.

  12. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  13. A molecular mechanism of azoxystrobin resistance in Penicillium digitatum UV mutants and a PCR-based assay for detection of azoxystrobin-resistant strains in packing- or store-house isolates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Zhu, Zengrong; Ma, Zhonghua; Li, Hongye

    2009-05-31

    Sixty-five isolates of Pencillium digitatum (Pers.:Fr) Sacc., a causative agent of green mold of postharvest citrus, were collected from various locations in Zhejiang province in 2000, 2005 and 2006, and assayed for their sensitivity to the quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicide azoxystrobin. The results showed that azoxystrobin is highly effective against P. digitatum, in vitro, and that the effective concentrations resulting in reduction of conidial germination and mycelial growth by 50% (EC(50)) averaged 0.0426 microg/ml and 0.0250 microg/ml, respectively. Twenty-eight azoxystrobin-resistant mutants were obtained by UV mutagenesis and subsequent selection on medium amended with azoxystrobin (12 microg/ml) and salicylhydroxamic acid. All obtained mutants were highly resistant to azoxystrobin and their resistance was genetically stable. Analysis of the cytochrome b gene structure of P. digitatum (Pdcyt b) showed the absence of type I intron in the first hot spot region of mutation. These results indicate that P. digitatum is likely to evolve high levels of resistance to azoxystrobin after its application. Analysis of partial sequences of Pdcyt b from both the azoxystrobin-sensitive parental isolate and the 28 azoxystrobin-resistant mutants revealed that a point mutation, which leads to the substitution at code 143 of alanine for glycine (G143A), is responsible for the observed azoxystrobin resistance in the laboratory mutants. Based on this point mutation, two allele-specific PCR primers were designed and optimized for allele-specific PCR detection of azoxystrobin-resistant isolates of P. digitatum.

  14. Rapid PCR real-time genotyping of M-Malton alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency alleles by molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Germano; Faa, Gavino; Pillai, Sara; Pilloni, Luca; Montaldo, Caterina; Pusceddu, Gesuina; Piras, Vincenzo; Coni, Pierpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Alpha1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant inherited disorder, with increased risk of developing lung and liver disease. The large majority of subjects affected by alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency carry the PIZZ or PISZ genotypes, which can be easily detected using several molecular methods. Another pathologic allele, the M-Malton variant (also known as Mnichinan and Mcagliari), can mimic the Pi Z clinical phenotype, but this alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variant is not easily recognizable and, therefore, seems to be more under-recognized than the Z or S alleles. We report the development of a rapid qualitative fluorescent real-time PCR assay designed for the detection of the M-Malton alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency alleles using 2 specific molecular beacons. The assay is able to detect in a single tube the homozygous as well the heterozygous genotypes. The procedure combines the great sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction, the specificity provided by allele-specific molecular beacons, and the throughput of a multi-color fluorescence detection procedure. This technique will be useful for research and molecular diagnostic laboratories involved in the study of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency-related diseases.

  15. PCR hot-start using duplex primers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deming; Shen, Hanxi; Huang, Yanping; Mi, Huaifeng

    2004-02-01

    A new technique of PCR hot-start using duplex primers has been developed which can decrease the undesirable products arising throughout PCR amplification thereby giving better results than a manual hot-start method.

  16. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  17. Real-time PCR in Food Science: PCR Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Cook, Nigel; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control.

  18. Comparison of next-generation droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) with quantitative PCR (qPCR) for enumeration of Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Paparini, Andrea; Monis, Paul; Ryan, Una

    2014-12-01

    Clinical microbiology laboratories rely on quantitative PCR for its speed, sensitivity, specificity and ease-of-use. However, quantitative PCR quantitation requires the use of a standard curve or normalisation to reference genes. Droplet digital PCR provides absolute quantitation without the need for calibration curves. A comparison between droplet digital PCR and quantitative PCR-based analyses was conducted for the enteric parasite Cryptosporidium, which is an important cause of gastritis in both humans and animals. Two loci were analysed (18S rRNA and actin) using a range of Cryptosporidium DNA templates, including recombinant plasmids, purified haemocytometer-counted oocysts, commercial flow cytometry-counted oocysts and faecal DNA samples from sheep, cattle and humans. Each method was evaluated for linearity, precision, limit of detection and cost. Across the same range of detection, both methods showed a high degree of linearity and positive correlation for standards (R(2)⩾0.999) and faecal samples (R(2)⩾0.9750). The precision of droplet digital PCR, as measured by mean Relative Standard Deviation (RSD;%), was consistently better compared with quantitative PCR, particularly for the 18S rRNA locus, but was poorer as DNA concentration decreased. The quantitative detection of quantitative PCR was unaffected by DNA concentration, but droplet digital PCR quantitative PCR was less affected by the presence of inhibitors, compared with quantitative PCR. For most templates analysed including Cryptosporidium-positive faecal DNA, the template copy numbers, as determined by droplet digital PCR, were consistently lower than by quantitative PCR. However, the quantitations obtained by quantitative PCR are dependent on the accuracy of the standard curve and when the quantitative PCR data were corrected for pipetting and DNA losses (as determined by droplet digital PCR), then the sensitivity of both methods was comparable. A cost analysis based on 96 samples revealed that

  19. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  20. Direct in situ rt-PCR.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Gambino, Graziana; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2011-01-01

    In situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a histological technique that exploits the advantages of PCR for detection of mRNA directly in tissue sections. It somehow conjugates together PCR and in situ hybridization that is more traditionally employed for mRNA localization in cell organelles, intact cells, or tissue sections. This chapter describes the application of in situ PCR for neuropeptide mRNA localization. We provide here a detailed protocol for direct in situ reverse transcription (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) with nonradioactive probes after fixation and paraffin embedding or cryosectioning. Digoxigenin-labeled nucleotides (digoxigenin-11-dUTP) are incorporated in the PCR product after RT and subsequently detected with an anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase. The procedure can be modified for use with fluorescent probes and employed in combination with enzyme/fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling.

  1. Multiplexed Primer Prediction for PCR

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-23

    MPP predicts sets of multiplex-compatible primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), finding a near minimal set of primers such that at least one amplicon will be generated from every target sequence in the input file. The code finds highly conserved oligos that are suitable as primers, according to user-specified desired primer characteristics such as length, melting temperature, and amplicon length. The primers are predicted not to form unwanted dimer or hairpin structures. The target sequences used as input can be diverse, since no multiple sequence alighment is required. The code is scalable, taking up to tens of thousands of sequences as input, and works, for example, to find a "universal primer set" for all viral genomes provided as a single input file. The code generates a periodic check-point file, thus in the event of premature execution termination, the application can be restarted from the last check-point file.

  2. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  3. Allele-Specific Suppression by Formation of New Protein-Protein Interactions in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, T. M.; O'Dell, J. L.; Adams, AEM.

    1997-01-01

    Yeast fimbrin is encoded by the SAC6 gene, mutations of which suppress temperature-sensitive mutations in the actin gene (ACT1). To examine the mechanism of suppression, we have conducted a biochemical analysis of the interaction between various combinations of wild-type and mutant actin and Sac6 proteins. Previously, we showed that actin mutations that are suppressed by sac6 mutations encode proteins with a reduced affinity for wild-type Sac6p. In the present study, we have found that mutant Sac6 proteins bind more tightly to mutant actin than does wild-type Sac6p, and thus compensate for weakened interactions caused by the mutant actin. Remarkably, we have also found that mutant Sac6 proteins bind more tightly to wild-type actin than does wild-type Sac6p. This result indicates that suppression does not occur through the restoration of the original contact site, but rather through the formation of a novel contact site. This finding argues against suppression occurring through a ``lock-and-key'' mechanism and suggests a mechanism involving more global increases in affinity between the two proteins. We propose that the most common kind of suppressors involving interacting proteins will likely occur through this less specific mechanism. PMID:9409826

  4. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Cenchao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ji, Qiaoli; Maki, Hisaji; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.

  5. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cenchao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ji, Qiaoli; Maki, Hisaji; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2009-11-11

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.

  6. Study of the bacterial diversity of foods: PCR-DGGE versus LH-PCR.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Cristiana; Bancalari, Elena; Milanović, Vesna; Cardinali, Federica; Osimani, Andrea; Sardaro, Maria Luisa Savo; Bottari, Benedetta; Bernini, Valentina; Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2017-02-02

    The present study compared two culture-independent methods, polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and length-heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR), for their ability to reveal food bacterial microbiota. Total microbial DNA and RNA were extracted directly from fourteen fermented and unfermented foods, and domain A of the variable regions V1 and V2 of the 16S rRNA gene was analyzed through LH-PCR and PCR-DGGE. Finally, the outline of these analyses was compared with bacterial viable counts obtained after bacterial growth on suitable selective media. For the majority of the samples, RNA-based PCR-DGGE revealed species that the DNA-based PCR-DGGE was not able to highlight. When analyzing either DNA or RNA, LH-PCR identified several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and coagulase negative cocci (CCN) species that were not identified by PCR-DGGE. This phenomenon was particularly evident in food samples with viable loads<5.0 Logcfug(-1). Furthermore, LH-PCR was able to detect a higher number of peaks in the analyzed food matrices relative to species identified by PCR-DGGE. In light of these findings, it may be suggested that LH-PCR shows greater sensitivity than PCR-DGGE. However, PCR-DGGE detected some other species (LAB included) that were not detected by LH-PCR. Therefore, certain LH-PCR peaks not attributed to known species within the LH-PCR database could be solved by comparing them with species identified by PCR-DGGE. Overall, this study also showed that LH-PCR is a promising method for use in the food microbiology field, indicating the necessity to expand the LH-PCR database, which is based, up to now, mainly on LAB isolates from dairy products.

  7. Single cell PCR from archival stained bone marrow slides: a method for molecular diagnosis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of isolated single cells is a powerful tool for clarifying issues of cell origin and clonality. Previous reports have described PCR amplifications from total DNA and RNA extracted from archival bone marrow and peripheral blood smears and have also shown the feasibility of amplifications from single cells, microdissected from stained histological sections. In this study, a method is described for performing PCR from morphologically defined single cells isolated from archival May-Gruenwald-Giemsa-stained bone-marrow and blood smears. Using three DNA extraction procedures, the organic lysis showed reproducible high efficiencies of amplifications. With this method, we were able to amplify long range amplicons up to 14.5 kb from mitochondrial DNA as well as PCR products of conventional length. The usability of such products for molecular diagnosis is demonstrated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)characterization of a mitochondrial disorder. In conclusion, this method has the power to perform molecular diagnosis and characterization of diseases on the single cell level, and should provide valuable information to aid disease treatment and prognosis of hematological disorders.

  8. Diagnosis of neonatal group B Streptococcus sepsis by nested-PCR of residual urine samples

    PubMed Central

    Cezarino, Bruno Nicolino; Yamamoto, Lidia; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Rocha, Daisy; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2008-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) remains the most common cause of early-onset sepsis in newborns. Laboratory gold-standard, broth culture methods are highly specific, but lack sensitivity. The aim of this study was to validate a nested-PCR and to determine whether residue volumes of urine samples obtained by non invasive, non sterile methods could be used to confirm neonatal GBS sepsis. The nested-PCR was performed with primers of the major GBS surface antigen. Unavailability of biological samples to perform life supporting exams, as well as others to elucidate the etiology of infections is a frequent problem concerning newborn patients. Nevertheless, we decided to include cases according to strict criteria: newborns had to present with signs and symptoms compatible with GBS infection; at least one of the following biological samples had to be sent for culture: blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid; availability of residue volumes of the samples sent for cultures, or of others collected on the day of hospitalization, prior to antibiotic therapy prescription, to be analyzed by PCR; favorable outcome after GBS empiric treatment. In only one newborn GBS infection was confirmed by cultures, while infection was only presumptive in the other three patients (they fulfilled inclusion criteria but were GBS-culture negative). From a total of 12 biological samples (5 blood, 3 CSF and 4 urine specimen), eight were tested by culture methods (2/8 were positive), and 8 were tested by PCR (7/8 were positive), and only 4 samples were simultaneously tested by both methods (1 positive by culture and 3 by PCR). In conclusion, although based on a restricted number of neonates and samples, our results suggest that the proposed nested-PCR might be used to diagnose GBS sepsis as it has successfully amplified the three types of biological samples analyzed (blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid), and was more sensitive than culture methods as PCR in urine confirmed diagnosis in all four patients

  9. Pitfalls in PCR troubleshooting: Expect the unexpected?

    PubMed Central

    Schrick, Livia; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    PCR is a well-understood and established laboratory technique often used in molecular diagnostics. Huge experience has been accumulated over the last years regarding the design of PCR assays and their set-up, including in-depth troubleshooting to obtain the optimal PCR assay for each purpose. Here we report a PCR troubleshooting that came up with a surprising result never observed before. With this report we hope to sensitize the reader to this peculiar problem and to save troubleshooting efforts in similar situations, especially in time-critical and ambitious diagnostic settings. PMID:27077041

  10. Real-time PCR in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Hansen-Hagge, Thomas; Gärtner, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    A central method in a standard biochemical laboratory is represented by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), therefore many attempts have been performed so far to implement this technique in lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. PCR is an ideal candidate for miniaturization because of a reduction of assay time and decreased costs for expensive bio-chemicals. In case of the "classical" PCR, detection is done by identification of DNA fragments electrophoretically separated in agarose gels. This method is meanwhile frequently replaced by the so-called Real-Time-PCR because here the exponential increase of amplificates can be observed directly by measurement of DNA interacting fluorescent dyes. Two main methods for on-chip PCRs are available: traditional "batch" PCR in chambers on a chip using thermal cycling, requiring about 30 minutes for a typical PCR protocol and continuous-flow PCR, where the liquid is guided over stationary temperature zones. In the latter case, the PCR protocol can be as fast as 5 minutes. In the presented work, a proof of concept is demonstrated for a real-time-detection of PCR products in microfluidic systems.

  11. Absolute quantification by droplet digital PCR versus analog real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Hindson, Christopher M; Chevillet, John R; Briggs, Hilary A; Gallichotte, Emily N; Ruf, Ingrid K; Hindson, Benjamin J; Vessella, Robert L; Tewari, Muneesh

    2014-01-01

    Nanoliter-sized droplet technology paired with digital PCR (ddPCR) holds promise for highly precise, absolute nucleic acid quantification. Our comparison of microRNA quantification by ddPCR and real-time PCR revealed greater precision (coefficients of variation decreased by 37–86%) and improved day-to-day reproducibility (by a factor of seven) of ddPCR but with comparable sensitivity. When we applied ddPCR to serum microRNA biomarker analysis, this translated to superior diagnostic performance for identifying individuals with cancer. PMID:23995387

  12. Single-tube, non-isotopic, multiplex PCR/OLA assay and sequence-coded separation for simultaneous screening of 31 cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Brinson, E.C.; Adriano, T.; Bloch, W.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a rapid, single-tube, non-isotopic assay that screens a patient sample for the presence of 31 cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations. This assay can identify these mutations in a single reaction tube and a single electrophoresis run. Sample preparation is a simple, boil-and-go procedure, completed in less than an hour. The assay is composed of a 15-plex PCR, followed by a 61-plex oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA), and incorporates a novel detection scheme, Sequence Coded Separation. Initially, the multiplex PCR amplifies 15 relevant segments of the CFTR gene, simultaneously. These PCR amplicons serve as templates for the multiplex OLA, which detects the normal or mutant allele at all loci, simultaneously. Each polymorphic site is interrogated by three oligonucleotide probes, a common probe and two allele-specific probes. Each common probe is tagged with a fluorescent dye, and the competing normal and mutant allelic probes incorporate different, non-nucleotide, mobility modifiers. These modifiers are composed of hexaethylene oxide (HEO) units, incorporated as HEO phosphoramidite monomers during automated DNA synthesis. The OLA is based on both probe hybridization and the ability of DNA ligase to discriminate single base mismatches at the junction between paired probes. Each single tube assay is electrophoresed in a single gel lane of a 4-color fluorescent DNA sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Model 373A). Each of the ligation products is identified by its unique combination of electrophoretic mobility and one of three colors. The fourth color is reserved for the in-lane size standard, used by GENESCAN{sup TM} software (Applied Biosystems) to size the OLA electrophoresis products. The Genotyper{sub TM} software (Applied Biosystems) decodes these Sequence-Coded-Separation data to create a patient summary report for all loci tested.

  13. Evaluation of AMPLICOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR using cppB nested PCR and 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Farrell, D J

    1999-02-01

    Certain strains of Neisseria subflava and Neisseria cinerea are known to produce false-positive results with the AMPLICOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Branchburg, N.J.). The analytical sensitivity and analytical specificity of three PCR tests were assessed with 3 geographically diverse N. gonorrhoeae strains and 30 non-N. gonorrhoeae Neisseria spp. The sensitivities of the in-house nested cppB gene and the 16S rRNA PCR methods were greater than that of the AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR with purified DNA from all 3 N. gonorrhoeae strains. Six of 14 clinical strains of N. subflava (1 from a vaginal swab, 5 from respiratory sites) produced false-positive AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR results and were negative by the two other PCR methods. When applied to 207 clinical specimens selected from a population with a high prevalence ( approximately 9%) of infection, the results for 15 of 96 (15.6%) AMPLICOR-positive specimens and 14 of 17 (82.3%) AMPLICOR-equivocal specimens were not confirmed by the more sensitive nested cppB PCR method. Only 2 of 94 (2.1%) of AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR-negative specimens from the same population tested positive by the nested cppB method. These results suggest that for this population the AMPLICOR N. gonorrhoeae PCR test is suitable as a screening test only and all positive results should be confirmed by a PCR method that is more specific and at least as sensitive. This study also illustrates that caution should be used when introducing commercially available nucleic acid amplification-based diagnostic tests into the regimens of tests used for populations not previously tested with these products.

  14. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  15. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  16. Real-time PCR and PCR-tandem Mass Spectrometry for Biodetection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Real - time PCR and PCR- tandem mass spectrometry for biodetection Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina, School of Medicine Report Documentation...TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real - time PCR and PCRtandem mass spectrometry for biodetection 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...interspace region Bacillus subtilis W23 standard Blank Barn dust House dust Cycle Real - time PCR (16s rRNA) - environmental samples Real - time

  17. Pre-PCR processing: strategies to generate PCR-compatible samples.

    PubMed

    Rådström, Peter; Knutsson, Rickard; Wolffs, Petra; Lövenklev, Maria; Löfström, Charlotta

    2004-02-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is recognized as a rapid, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic tool for the analysis of nucleic acids. However, the sensitivity and kinetics of diagnostic PCR may be dramatically reduced when applied directly to biological samples, such as blood and feces, owing to PCR-inhibitory components. As a result, pre-PCR processing procedures have been developed to remove or reduce the effects of PCR inhibitors. Pre-PCR processing comprises all steps prior to the detection of PCR products, that is, sampling, sample preparation, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) amplification. The aim of pre-PCR processing is to convert a complex biological sample with its target nucleic acids/cells into PCR-amplifiable samples by combining sample preparation and amplification conditions. Several different pre-PCR processing strategies are used: (1) optimization of the DNA amplification conditions by the use of alternative DNA polymerases and/or amplification facilitators, (2) optimization of the sample preparation method, (3) optimization of the sampling method, and (4) combinations of the different strategies. This review describes different pre-PCR processing strategies to circumvent PCR inhibition to allow accurate and precise DNA amplification.

  18. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    1 Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Vipin K. Rastogi1, Tu-chen Cheng1, Lisa Collins1 and Jennifer Bagley2 1...A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B.pseudomallei 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...risk. There is currently no real - time PCR assay for detection of both of these pathogens. Primers and probes corresponding to specific genomic regions

  19. Quantitative real-time PCR eliminates false-positives in colony screening PCR.

    PubMed

    Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We report an alternative approach to colony screening using real-time PCR (qPCR) which can be used instead of the traditional end-point PCR to eliminate false-positives and reduce processing times. False-positive transformants can easily be distinguished from true-positives by comparing Ct values derived from qPCR amplification curves. In addition, the use of qPCR allows for more efficient processing since a gel electrophoresis step is not required and the screening process is no longer limited by the capacity of the gel apparatus.

  20. PCR for capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Falla, T J; Crook, D W; Brophy, L N; Maskell, D; Kroll, J S; Moxon, E R

    1994-01-01

    A PCR method for the unequivocal assignment of Haemophilus influenzae capsular type (types a to f) was developed. PCR primers were designed from capsule type-specific DNA sequences cloned from the capsular gene cluster of each of the six capsular types. PCR product was amplified only from the capsular type for which the primers were designed. Product was confirmed by using either an internal oligonucleotide or restriction endonuclease digestion. A total of 172 H. influenzae strains of known capsular type (determined genetically) comprising all capsular types and noncapsulate strains were tested by PCR capsular typing. In all cases the PCR capsular type corresponded to the capsular genotype determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the cap region. When used in conjunction with PCR primers derived from the capsular gene bexA, capsulate, noncapsulate, and capsule-deficient type b mutant strains could be differentiated. PCR capsular typing overcomes the problems of cross-reaction and autoagglutination associated with the serotyping of H. influenzae strains. The rapid and unequivocal capsular typing method that is described will be particularly important for typing invasive H. influenzae strains isolated from recipients of H. influenzae type b vaccine. Images PMID:7814470

  1. Quantitative DNA Analysis Using Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Rolf H A M; White, Stefan J

    2017-01-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is based on the isolated amplification of thousands of individual DNA molecules simultaneously, with each molecule compartmentalized in a droplet. The presence of amplified product in each droplet is indicated by a fluorescent signal, and the proportion of positive droplets allows the precise quantification of a given sequence. In this chapter we briefly outline the basis of ddPCR, and describe two different applications using the Bio-Rad QX200 system: genotyping copy number variation and quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries.

  2. The potential advantages of digital PCR for clinical virology diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth; Jerome, Keith R

    2014-05-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR), a new nucleic acid amplification technology, offers several potential advantages over real-time or quantitative PCR (qPCR), the current workhorse of clinical molecular virology diagnostics. Several studies have demonstrated dPCR assays for human cytomegalovirus or HIV, which give more precise and reproducible results than qPCR assays without sacrificing sensitivity. Here we review the literature comparing dPCR and qPCR performance in viral molecular diagnostic assays and offer perspective on the future of dPCR in clinical virology diagnostics.

  3. Predominance of PCR-ribotypes, 018 (smz) and 369 (trf) of Clostridium difficile in Japan: a potential relationship with other global circulating strains?

    PubMed

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Haru; Fukuda, Tadashi; Niikawa, Akiko; Hori, Yoshiko; Hagiya, Hideharu; Ito, Yoichiro; Miki, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoshifumi; Furuta, Kiyoshi; Takeuchi, Hideki; Tajima, Hirokazu; Tominaga, Harumi; Satomura, Hideyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Morita, Sayuri; Tanada, Ai; Hara, Toshinori; Kawada, Miki; Sato, Yuka; Takahashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Akiko; Nakajima, Tomoko; Wakamatsu, Yukiko; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Akiko; Roberts, Paul; Miyajima, Fabio; Shibayama, Keigo

    2015-10-01

    Global spread and evolutionary links of an epidemic Clostridium difficile strain (PCR-ribotype 027) have been noted in recent decades. However, in Japan, no outbreaks caused by type 027 have been reported to date. A total of 120 C. difficile isolates from patients at 15 hospitals during non-outbreak seasons between 2011 and 2013 as well as 18 and 21 isolates collected from two hospitals in 2010 and 2009, respectively, in outbreak periods in Japan, were examined. Among these 120 isolates, Japan-ribotypes smz and ysmz (subtype variant of smz) were the most predominant (39.2 %) followed by Japan-ribotype trf (15.8 %). Types smz/ysmz and trf were also concurrently predominant at two hospitals in the outbreak settings. Out of the five binary toxin-positive isolates observed, only one was PCR-ribotype 027 and another PCR-ribotype 078. Type smz was later found to correspond to PCR-ribotype 018. High rates of resistance against gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, erythromycin and clindamycin were observed in the PCR-ribotype 018 isolates. Interestingly, all trf isolates were toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive, but they did not correspond to PCR-ribotype 017, thus being assigned a new ribotype (PCR-ribotype 369). In conclusion, PCR-ribotypes 018 (smz) and 369 (trf) were identified as major circulating strains in both outbreak and non-outbreak settings in Japan. Given their epidemiological relevance, molecular investigations are warranted to clarify potential evolutionary links with related strains found elsewhere, such as PCR-ribotypes 018 and 017 from Europe and North America.

  4. Recent advances in quantitative PCR (qPCR) applications in food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Postollec, Florence; Falentin, Hélène; Pavan, Sonia; Combrisson, Jérôme; Sohier, Danièle

    2011-08-01

    Molecular methods are being increasingly applied to detect, quantify and study microbial populations in food or during food processes. Among these methods, PCR-based techniques have been the subject of considerable focus and ISO guidelines have been established for the detection of food-borne pathogens. More particularly, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is considered as a method of choice for the detection and quantification of microorganisms. One of its major advantages is to be faster than conventional culture-based methods. It is also highly sensitive, specific and enables simultaneous detection of different microorganisms. Application of reverse-transcription-qPCR (RT-qPCR) to study population dynamics and activities through quantification of gene expression in food, by contrast with the use of qPCR, is just beginning. Provided that appropriate controls are included in the analyses, qPCR and RT-qPCR appear to be highly accurate and reliable for quantification of genes and gene expression. This review addresses some important technical aspects to be considered when using these techniques. Recent applications of qPCR and RT-qPCR in food microbiology are given. Some interesting applications such as risk analysis or studying the influence of industrial processes on gene expression and microbial activity are reported.

  5. Sensitive and accurate quantification of human malaria parasites using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR)

    PubMed Central

    Koepfli, Cristian; Nguitragool, Wang; Hofmann, Natalie E.; Robinson, Leanne J.; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Felger, Ingrid; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate quantification of parasite density in the human host is essential for understanding the biology and pathology of malaria. Semi-quantitative molecular methods are widely applied, but the need for an external standard curve makes it difficult to compare parasite density estimates across studies. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) allows direct quantification without the need for a standard curve. ddPCR was used to diagnose and quantify P. falciparum and P. vivax in clinical patients as well as in asymptomatic samples. ddPCR yielded highly reproducible measurements across the range of parasite densities observed in humans, and showed higher sensitivity than qPCR to diagnose P. falciparum, and equal sensitivity for P. vivax. Correspondence in quantification was very high (>0.95) between qPCR and ddPCR. Quantification between technical replicates by ddPCR differed 1.5–1.7-fold, compared to 2.4–6.2-fold by qPCR. ddPCR facilitates parasite quantification for studies where absolute densities are required, and will increase comparability of results reported from different laboratories. PMID:27982132

  6. Transgene detection by digital droplet PCR.

    PubMed

    Moser, Dirk A; Braga, Luca; Raso, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro; Simon, Perikles

    2014-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of severe diseases. Because of its abuse potential for performance enhancement in sports, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) included the term 'gene doping' in the official list of banned substances and methods in 2004. Several nested PCR or qPCR-based strategies have been proposed that aim at detecting long-term presence of transgene in blood, but these strategies are hampered by technical limitations. We developed a digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) protocol for Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) detection and demonstrated its applicability monitoring 6 mice injected into skeletal muscle with AAV9-IGF1 elements and 2 controls over a 33-day period. A duplex ddPCR protocol for simultaneous detection of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) and Erythropoietin (EPO) transgenic elements was created. A new DNA extraction procedure with target-orientated usage of restriction enzymes including on-column DNA-digestion was established. In vivo data revealed that IGF1 transgenic elements could be reliably detected for a 33-day period in DNA extracted from whole blood. In vitro data indicated feasibility of IGF1 and EPO detection by duplex ddPCR with high reliability and sensitivity. On-column DNA-digestion allowed for significantly improved target detection in downstream PCR-based approaches. As ddPCR provides absolute quantification, it ensures excellent day-to-day reproducibility. Therefore, we expect this technique to be used in diagnosing and monitoring of viral and bacterial infection, in detecting mutated DNA sequences as well as profiling for the presence of foreign genetic material in elite athletes in the future.

  7. A naked-eye colorimetric "PCR developer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Despite several advances in molecular biology and diagnostics, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is currently the gold standard for nucleic acids amplification and detection, due to its versatility, low-cost and universality, with estimated <10 billion reactions per year and a worldwide market of several billion dollars/year. Nevertheless, PCR still relies on the laborious, time-consuming, and multi-step gel electrophoresis-based detection, which includes gel casting, electrophoretic run, gel staining, and gel visualization. In this work, we propose a "PCR developer", namely a universal one-step, one-tube method, based on controlled aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), to detect PCR products by naked eye in few minutes, with no need for any instrumentation. We demonstrated the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR developer on different model targets, suitable for a qualitative detection in real-world diagnostics (i.e., gene rearrangements, genetically modified organisms, and pathogens). The PCR developer proved to be highly specific and ultra-sensitive, discriminating down to few copies of HIV viral DNA, diluted in an excess of interfering human genomic DNA, which is a clinically relevant viral load. Hence, it could be a valuable tool for both academic research and clinical applications.

  8. A method for amplification of unknown flanking sequences based on touchdown PCR and suppression-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; He, Dan; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Lv, Huiying; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    Thermal asymmetric staggered PCR is the most widely used technique to obtain the flanking sequences. However, it has some limitations, including a low rate of positivity, and complex operation. In this study, a improved method of it was made based on suppression-PCR and touchdown PCR. The PCR fragment obtained by the amplification was used directly for sequencing after gel purification. Using this improved method, the positive rate of amplified flanking sequences of the ATMT mutants reached 99%. In addition, the time from DNA extraction to flanking sequence analysis was shortened to 2 days with about 6 dollars each sample.

  9. Evaluation of Altona Diagnostics RealStar Zika Virus RT-PCR Test Kit for Zika virus PCR testing.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Lombos, Ernesto; Tang, Elaine; Perusini, Stephen; Eshaghi, Alireza; Nagra, Sandeep; Frantz, Christine; Olsha, Romy; Kristjanson, Erik; Dimitrova, Kristina; Safronetz, David; Drebot, Mike; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2017-03-15

    Background: With the emerging ZIKA virus (ZIKV) epidemic, accessible real-time reverse-transcription PCR (rRT-PCR) assays are needed to streamline testing. The commercial Altona Diagnostics RealStar ZIKV rRT-PCR Test Kit has been approved for Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA. Our aim was to verify Altona-PCR, by comparing it to the CDC-designed dual target ZIKV virus rRT-PCR reference assay (Reference-PCR), and describe demographics of patients tested for ZIKV by rRT-PCR in Ontario, Canada.Methods: A large set of clinical specimens were tested for ZIKV by Altona-PCR and Reference-PCR. Positive or equivocal specimens underwent PCR and Sanger sequencing targeting ZIKV NS5 gene.Results: 671 serum specimens were tested by Reference-PCR: 58 (8.6%) were positive, 193 (28.8%) equivocal and 420 (62.6%) negative. Ninety percent of Reference-PCR positive patients were tested in the first 5 days after symptom onset. Altona-PCR was performed on 284/671 tested specimens by Reference-PCR. Altona-PCR was positive in 53/58 (91%) Reference-PCR positive and 16/193 (8%) Reference-PCR equivocal specimens; ZIKV NS5 PCR was positive in all 68 Altona-PCR positive specimens, and negative in all 181 Altona-PCR negative specimens that underwent NS5 PCR.Conclusion: Most ZIKV PCR positive cases are detected in the first five days of illness. Altona-PCR has very good sensitivity (91%) and specificity (97%) compared to Reference-PCR. Altona-PCR can be used for ZIKV diagnostic testing, with less extensive verification requirements compared to a laboratory developed test.

  10. PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, H.T.

    2002-04-15

    In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

  11. Real-time PCR array chip with capillary-driven sample loading and reactor sealing for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Liu, Hao-Bing; Dai, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinghui; M Hui, Kam; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2009-10-01

    A major challenge for the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) community is to develop point-of-care diagnostic chips that do not use instruments. Such instruments include pumping or liquid handling devices for distribution of patient's nucleic-acid test sample among an array of reactors and microvalves or mechanical parts to seal these reactors. In this paper, we report the development of a primer pair pre-loaded PCR array chip, in which the loading of the PCR mixture into an array of reactors and subsequent sealing of the reactors were realized by a novel capillary-based microfluidics with a manual two-step pipetting operations. The chip is capable of performing simultaneous (parallel) analyses of multiple gene targets and its performance was tested by amplifying twelve different gene targets against cDNA template from human hepatocellular carcinoma using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye. The versatility and reproducibility of the PCR-array chip are demonstrated by real-time PCR amplification of the BNI-1 fragment of SARS cDNA cloned in a plasmid vector. The reactor-to-reactor diffusion of the pre-loaded primer pairs in the chip is investigated to eliminate the possibility of primer cross-contamination. Key technical issues such as PCR mixture loss in gas-permeable PDMS chip layer and bubble generation due to different PDMS-glass bonding methods are investigated.

  12. pcrEfficiency: a Web tool for PCR amplification efficiency prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Relative calculation of differential gene expression in quantitative PCR reactions requires comparison between amplification experiments that include reference genes and genes under study. Ignoring the differences between their efficiencies may lead to miscalculation of gene expression even with the same starting amount of template. Although there are several tools performing PCR primer design, there is no tool available that predicts PCR efficiency for a given amplicon and primer pair. Results We have used a statistical approach based on 90 primer pair combinations amplifying templates from bacteria, yeast, plants and humans, ranging in size between 74 and 907 bp to identify the parameters that affect PCR efficiency. We developed a generalized additive model fitting the data and constructed an open source Web interface that allows the obtention of oligonucleotides optimized for PCR with predicted amplification efficiencies starting from a given sequence. Conclusions pcrEfficiency provides an easy-to-use web interface allowing the prediction of PCR efficiencies prior to web lab experiments thus easing quantitative real-time PCR set-up. A web-based service as well the source code are provided freely at http://srvgen.upct.es/efficiency.html under the GPL v2 license. PMID:22014212

  13. Detection of Leishmania infantum in animals and their ectoparasites by conventional PCR and real time PCR.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Rayana Carla Silva; Gonçalves, Suênia da Cunha; Costa, Pietra Lemos; da Silva, Kamila Gaudêncio; da Silva, Fernando José; Silva, Rômulo Pessoa E; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; de Paiva-Cavalcanti, Milena

    2013-04-01

    Visceral leishmaniosis (VL) is a parasitic disease caused by Leishmania infantum, which is primarily transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies. However, there has been much speculation on the role of other arthropods in the transmission of VL. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the presence of L. infantum in cats, dogs and their ectoparasites in a VL-endemic area in northeastern Brazil. DNA was extracted from blood samples and ectoparasites, tested by conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) targeting the L. infantum kinetoplast DNA. A total of 280 blood samples (from five cats and 275 dogs) and 117 ectoparasites from dogs were collected. Animals were apparently healthy and not previously tested by serological or molecular diagnostic methods. Overall, 213 (76.1 %) animals and 51 (43.6 %) ectoparasites were positive to L. infantum, with mean parasite loads of 795.2, 31.9 and 9.1 fg in dogs, cats and ectoparasites, respectively. Concerning the positivity between dogs and their ectoparasites, 32 (15.3 %) positive dogs were parasitized by positive ectoparasites. The overall concordance between the PCR protocols used was 59.2 %, with qPCR being more efficient than cPCR; 34.1 % of all positive samples were exclusively positive by qPCR. The high number of positive animals and ectoparasites also indicates that they could serve as sentinels or indicators of the circulation of L. infantum in risk areas.

  14. Propidium monoazide reverse transcription PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the publ...

  15. [Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A detection using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its correlation with coagulase and thermonuclease tests].

    PubMed

    Suarez, María José; Arias, María Laura; del Mar Gamboa, María

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium, widely distributed on nature and associated to general infection and food borne outbreaks. The relationship between this bacterium and food borne outbreaks has been done, historically, using several tests, including coagulase, thermonuclease and actually, PCR for the genes codifying for the enterotoxin responsible of clinical symptoms. The objective of this work is to detect enterotoxin A codifying gene through PCR in a group of S. aureus strains isolated from food samples, and also to correlate the presence of this gene with the production of coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes. A total of 69 staphylococcal strains were analyzed, 58 obtained from non pasteurized milk samples from the Estación Experimental Alfredo Volio Mata and 11 from the Food and Water Microbiology Laboratory collection, Universidad de Costa Rica. Coagulase, thermonuclease and enterotoxin A were analyzed in all the strains, and a statistical correlation was performed in order to verify possible associations. Results show that there is no correlation between the three variables, nevertheless, all coagulase positive strains were thermonuclease positive, and all enterotoxin positive strains were coagulase and thermonuclease positive, but not inversely. These results show that the use of presumptive or indirect tests for establishing entorotoxigenity of S. aureus strains is not truthful, more sensible and specific analysis, as PCR, shall be performed.

  16. A new general model for predicting melting thermodynamics of complementary and mismatched B-form duplexes containing locked nucleic acids: application to probe design for digital PCR detection of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis; Fakhfakh, Kareem; Bidshahri, Roza; Lund, H Louise; Haynes, Charles

    2015-02-17

    quantitative PCR or dPCR assay. This potential is demonstrated by using the model to design allele-specific probes that completely discriminate and quantify clinically relevant mutant alleles (BRAF V600E and KIT D816V) in a dPCR assay.

  17. Molecular analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in multiple nodules of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dimmler, Arno; Geddert, Helene; Werner, Martin; Faller, Gerhard

    2017-02-20

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare, smoking-related histiocytic disorder with variable clinical symptoms. Like in other non-pulmonary Langerhans cell proliferations, PLCH has recently been shown to harbour BRAF V600E mutations in a significant subset of cases, thus challenging the concept of PLCH being a reactive disorder. Here, we analysed 38 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded PLCH nodules of nine patients for BRAF mutation using two different molecular methods. Using pyrosequencing and allele-specific quantitative PCR (AS-PCR), BRAF V600E mutations were found in 16/38 (42%) and 31/37 (84%) nodules, respectively. Analysing different nodules of the same patients with pyrosequencing 3/6 patients showed a concordant BRAF mutation status. When allele-specific quantitative PCR was used, condordant results were found in 5/6 patients. Our findings clearly indicate that (a) the sensitivity of the method used is crucial in analysing BRAF mutation status, (b) AS-PCR is more sensitive in detecting BRAF V600E mutations than pyrosequencing,

  18. Real-time PCR: Advanced technologies and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book brings together contributions from 20 experts in the field of PCR, providing a broad perspective of the applications of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The editors state in the preface that the aim is to provide detailed insight into underlying principles and methods of qPCR to provide ...

  19. Manufacturing DNA microarrays from unpurified PCR products

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Frank; Beckmann, Boris; Kellner, Nadine; Hauser, Nicole C.; Diehl, Susanne; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2002-01-01

    For the production of DNA microarrays from PCR products, purification of the the DNA fragments prior to spotting is a major expense in cost and time. Also, a considerable amount of material is lost during this process and contamination might occur. Here, a protocol is presented that permits the manufacture of microarrays from unpurified PCR products on aminated surfaces such as glass slides coated with the widely used poly(l-lysine) or aminosilane. The presence of primer molecules in the PCR sample does not increase the non-specific signal upon hybridisation. Overall, signal intensity on arrays made of unpurified PCR products is 94% of the intensity obtained with the respective purified molecules. This slight loss in signal, however, is offset by a reduced variation in the amount of DNA present at the individual spot positions across an array, apart from the considerable savings in time and cost. In addition, a larger number of arrays can be made from one batch of amplification products. PMID:12177307

  20. Miniaturized technology for DNA typing: cassette PCR.

    PubMed

    Manage, Dammika P; Pilarski, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    With the smaller size, low cost, and rapid testing capabilities, miniaturized lab-on-a-chip devices can change the way medical diagnostics are currently performed in the health-care system. We have demonstrated such a device that is self-contained, simple, disposable, and inexpensive. It is capable of performing DNA amplification on an inexpensive instrument suitable for near point of care settings. This technology will enable on the spot evaluation of patients in the clinic for faster medical decision-making and more informed therapeutic choices. Our device, a gel capillary cassette, termed cassette PCR, contains capillary reaction units each holding a defined primer set, with arrays of capillary reaction units for simultaneously detecting multiple targets. With the exception of the sample to be tested, each capillary reaction unit holds all the reagents needed for PCR in a desiccated form that can be stored at room temperature for up to 3 months and even longer in colder conditions. It relies on capillary forces for sample delivery of microliter volumes through capillaries, hence avoiding the need for pumps or valves. In the assembled cassette, the wax architecture supporting the capillaries melts during the PCR and acts as a vapor barrier as well as segregating capillaries with different primer sets. No other chip sealing techniques are required. Cassette PCR accepts raw samples such as urine, genital swabs, and blood. The cassette is made with off-the-shelf components and contains integrated positive and negative controls.

  1. The Power of Real-Time PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valasek, Mark A.; Repa, Joyce J.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as a robust and widely used methodology for biological investigation because it can detect and quantify very small amounts of specific nucleic acid sequences. As a research tool, a major application of this technology is the rapid and accurate assessment of changes in gene…

  2. New PCR systems to confirm real-time PCR detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herthnek, David; Bölske, Göran

    2006-01-01

    Background Johne's disease, a serious chronic form of enteritis in ruminants, is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). As the organism is very slow-growing and fastidious, several PCR-based methods for detection have been developed, based mainly on the MAP-specific gene IS900. However, because this gene is similar to genes in other mycobacteria, there is a need for sensitive and reliable methods to confirm the presence of MAP. As described here, two new real-time PCR systems on the IS900 gene and one on the F57 gene were developed and carefully validated on 267 strains and 56 positive clinical faecal samples. Results Our confirmatory PCR systems on IS900 were found sensitive and specific, only yielding weak false positive reactions in one strain for each system. The PCR system on F57 did not elicit any false positives and was only slightly less sensitive than our primary IS900-system. DNA from both naturally infected and spiked faeces that tested positive with our primary system could be confirmed with all new systems, except one low-level infected sample that tested negative with the F57 system. Conclusion We recommend using the newly constructed DH3 PCR system on the F57 gene as the primary confirmatory test for PCR positives, but should it fail due to its lower sensitivity, the DH1 and DH2 PCR systems should be used. PMID:17020599

  3. Quantitative PCR and Digital PCR for Detection of Ascaris lumbricoides Eggs in Reclaimed Water

    PubMed Central

    Santísima-Trinidad, Ana Belén; Bornay-Llinares, Fernando Jorge; Martín González, Marcos; Pascual Valero, José Antonio; Ros Muñoz, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    The reuse of reclaimed water from wastewater depuration is a widespread and necessary practice in many areas around the world and must be accompanied by adequate and continuous quality control. Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the soil-transmitted helminths (STH) with risk for humans due to its high infectivity and an important determinant of transmission is the inadequacy of water supplies and sanitation. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a limit equal to or lower than one parasitic helminth egg per liter, to reuse reclaimed water for unrestricted irrigation. We present two new protocols of DNA extraction from large volumes of reclaimed water. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) were able to detect low amounts of A. lumbricoides eggs. By using the first extraction protocol, which processes 500 mL of reclaimed water, qPCR can detect DNA concentrations as low as one A. lumbricoides egg equivalent, while dPCR can detect DNA concentrations as low as five A. lumbricoides egg equivalents. By using the second protocol, which processes 10 L of reclaimed water, qPCR was able to detect DNA concentrations equivalent to 20 A. lumbricoides eggs. This fact indicated the importance of developing new methodologies to detect helminth eggs with higher sensitivity and precision avoiding possible human infection risks. PMID:28377928

  4. Quantitative PCR and Digital PCR for Detection of Ascaris lumbricoides Eggs in Reclaimed Water.

    PubMed

    Acosta Soto, Lucrecia; Santísima-Trinidad, Ana Belén; Bornay-Llinares, Fernando Jorge; Martín González, Marcos; Pascual Valero, José Antonio; Ros Muñoz, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    The reuse of reclaimed water from wastewater depuration is a widespread and necessary practice in many areas around the world and must be accompanied by adequate and continuous quality control. Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the soil-transmitted helminths (STH) with risk for humans due to its high infectivity and an important determinant of transmission is the inadequacy of water supplies and sanitation. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a limit equal to or lower than one parasitic helminth egg per liter, to reuse reclaimed water for unrestricted irrigation. We present two new protocols of DNA extraction from large volumes of reclaimed water. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) were able to detect low amounts of A. lumbricoides eggs. By using the first extraction protocol, which processes 500 mL of reclaimed water, qPCR can detect DNA concentrations as low as one A. lumbricoides egg equivalent, while dPCR can detect DNA concentrations as low as five A. lumbricoides egg equivalents. By using the second protocol, which processes 10 L of reclaimed water, qPCR was able to detect DNA concentrations equivalent to 20 A. lumbricoides eggs. This fact indicated the importance of developing new methodologies to detect helminth eggs with higher sensitivity and precision avoiding possible human infection risks.

  5. Digital PCR to assess gene-editing frequencies (GEF-dPCR) mediated by designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Hauber, Ilona; Fehse, Boris

    2016-03-01

    Genome editing using designer nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases is an emerging technology in basic and applied research. Whereas the application of editing tools, namely CRISPR-Cas9, has recently become very straightforward, quantification of resulting gene knockout rates still remains a bottleneck. This is particularly true if the product of a targeted gene is not easily detectable. To address this problem, we devised a novel gene-editing frequency digital PCR (GEF-dPCR) technique. GEF-dPCR exploits two differently labeled probes that are placed within one amplicon at the gene-editing target site to simultaneously detect wild-type and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-affected alleles. Taking advantage of the principle of dPCR, this enables concurrent quantification of edited and wild-type alleles in a given sample. We propose that our method is optimal for the monitoring of gene-edited cells in vivo, e.g., in clinical settings. Here we describe preparation, design of primers and probes, and setup and analysis of GEF-dPCR. The setup of GEF-dPCR requires up to 2 weeks (depending on the starting point); once the dPCR has been established, the protocol for sample analysis takes <1 d.

  6. Real-time PCR (qPCR) primer design using free online software.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most commonly used fluorescent chemistries are SYBR® Green dyes and TaqMan®, Molecular Beacon or Scorpion probes. SYBR® Green is very simple to use and cost efficient. As SYBR® Green dye binds to any double-stranded DNA product, its success depends greatly on proper primer design. Many types of online primer design software are available, which can be used free of charge to design desirable SYBR® Green-based qPCR primers. This laboratory exercise is intended for those who have a fundamental background in PCR. It addresses the basic fluorescent chemistries of real-time PCR, the basic rules and pitfalls of primer design, and provides a step-by-step protocol for designing SYBR® Green-based primers with free, online software.

  7. How Many Microorganisms Are Present? Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andy; Álvarez, Laura Acuña; Whitby, Corinne; Larsen, Jan

    Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a variation of conventional quantitative or real-time PCR, whereby mRNA is first converted into the complementary DNA (cDNA) by reverse transcription, the cDNA is then subsequently quantified by qPCR. The use of mRNA as the initial template allows the quantification of gene transcripts, rather than gene copy numbers. mRNA is only produced by actively metabolising cells and is produced by its corresponding gene to provide a 'blueprint' in order for a cell to manufacture a specific protein. Conventional qPCR detects not only DNA present in actively metabolising cells but also inactive and dead cells. qRT-PCR has the advantage that only actively metabolising cells are detected, hence provides a more reliable measure of microbial activity in oilfield samples. When qRT-PCR is combined with primers and probes for specific genes, the activity of microbial processes important in the oilfield, such as sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and nitrate reduction can be monitored.

  8. A survey of tools for the analysis of quantitative PCR (qPCR) data.

    PubMed

    Pabinger, Stephan; Rödiger, Stefan; Kriegner, Albert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Weinhäusel, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Real-time quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (qPCR) is a standard technique in most laboratories used for various applications in basic research. Analysis of qPCR data is a crucial part of the entire experiment, which has led to the development of a plethora of methods. The released tools either cover specific parts of the workflow or provide complete analysis solutions. Here, we surveyed 27 open-access software packages and tools for the analysis of qPCR data. The survey includes 8 Microsoft Windows, 5 web-based, 9 R-based and 5 tools from other platforms. Reviewed packages and tools support the analysis of different qPCR applications, such as RNA quantification, DNA methylation, genotyping, identification of copy number variations, and digital PCR. We report an overview of the functionality, features and specific requirements of the individual software tools, such as data exchange formats, availability of a graphical user interface, included procedures for graphical data presentation, and offered statistical methods. In addition, we provide an overview about quantification strategies, and report various applications of qPCR. Our comprehensive survey showed that most tools use their own file format and only a fraction of the currently existing tools support the standardized data exchange format RDML. To allow a more streamlined and comparable analysis of qPCR data, more vendors and tools need to adapt the standardized format to encourage the exchange of data between instrument software, analysis tools, and researchers.

  9. Identification of bacterial plant pathogens using multilocus PCR and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, previously known as “TIGER”) utilizes PCR with broad range primers to amplify products from wide array of organisms within a taxonomic group, followed by analysis of PCR amplicons using mass spectrometry. Computer analysis of precise masses ...

  10. Rapid simultaneous detection of enterovirus and parechovirus RNAs in clinical samples by one-step real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Susan; Harvala, Heli; Witteveldt, Jeroen; McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; McLeish, Nigel; Templeton, Kate; Gunson, Rory; Carman, William F; Simmonds, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are recognized as the major etiological agent in meningitis in children and young adults. The use of molecular techniques, such as PCR, has substantially improved the sensitivity of enterovirus detection compared to that of virus culture methods. PCR-based methods also can detect a much wider range of EV variants, including those within species A, as well as human parechoviruses (HPeVs) that often grow poorly in vitro and which previously have been underdiagnosed by traditional methods. To exploit these developments, we developed a real-time one-step reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the rapid and sensitive detection of EV and HPeV in clinical specimens. Two commercially available RT-PCR kits were used (method I, Platinum one-step kit; method II, Express qPCR one-step kit) with primers and probes targeting the EV and HPeV 5'-untranslated regions (5'UTR). Amplification dynamics (threshold cycle [C(T)]values and efficiencies) of absolutely quantified full-length RNA transcripts representative of EV species A to D and HPeV were similar, demonstrating the effectiveness of both assays across the range of currently described human EV and HPeV variants. Probit analysis of multiple endpoint replicates demonstrated comparable sensitivities of the assays for EV and HPeV (method I, approximately 10 copies per reaction for both targets; method II, 20 copies per reaction). C(T) values were highly reproducible on repeat testing of positive controls within assays and between assay runs. Considering the sample turnaround time of less than 3 h, the multiplexed one-step RT-PCR method provides rapid diagnostic testing for EV and HPeV in cases of suspected central nervous system infections in a clinically relevant time frame.

  11. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-03-05

    Many molecular biology assays depend in some way on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an initially dilute target DNA sample to a detectable concentration level. But the design of conventional PCR thermocycling hardware, predominantly based on massive metal heating blocks whose temperature is regulated by thermoelectric heaters, severely limits the achievable reaction speed(1). Considerable electrical power is also required to repeatedly heat and cool the reagent mixture, limiting the ability to deploy these instruments in a portable format. Thermal convection has emerged as a promising alternative thermocycling approach that has the potential to overcome these limitations(2-9). Convective flows are an everyday occurrence in a diverse array of settings ranging from the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and interior, to decorative and colorful lava lamps. Fluid motion is initiated in the same way in each case: a buoyancy driven instability arises when a confined volume of fluid is subjected to a spatial temperature gradient. These same phenomena offer an attractive way to perform PCR thermocycling. By applying a static temperature gradient across an appropriately designed reactor geometry, a continuous circulatory flow can be established that will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction (Figure 1). Thermocycling can therefore be actuated in a pseudo-isothermal manner by simply holding two opposing surfaces at fixed temperatures, completely eliminating the need to repeatedly heat and cool the instrument. One of the main challenges facing design of convective thermocyclers is the need to precisely control the spatial velocity and temperature distributions within the reactor to ensure that the reagents sequentially occupy the correct temperature zones for a sufficient period of time(10,11). Here we describe results of our efforts to probe the full 3-D velocity and

  12. A quadruplex PCR (qxPCR) assay for adulteration in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Agrimonti, Caterina; Pirondini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Marta; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-11-15

    This study describes the development of a quadruplex quantitative Real Time PCR (qxPCR) based on SYBR®GreenER chemistry, for rapid identification of DNA of cow, goat, sheep and buffalo in dairy products, and for quantification of cow DNA in these products. The platform was applied to: (i) mixes of milks at fixed percentages; (ii) cheeses prepared with the same mixes; (iii) commercial dairy products. The methodology enabled the detection of DNA from cow in mixes of milk and cheeses with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1%. When applied to commercial dairy products the qxPCR gave results comparable with each single-plex Real Time PCR. A good correlation (R(2)>0.9) between peaks' area of derivative of melting curves of amplicons and percentages of cow milk in milk mixes and cheeses, allows for an estimation of cow DNA in a dynamic range varying from 0.1-5% to 1-25%.

  13. Replaceable Microfluidic Cartridges for a PCR Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin; Sullivan, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a replaceable microfluidic cartridge that is a component of a miniature biosensor that detects target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. The biosensor utilizes (1) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to multiply the amount of DNA to be detected, (2) fluorogenic polynucleotide probe chemicals for labeling the target DNA sequences, and (3) a high-sensitivity epifluorescence-detection optoelectronic subsystem. Microfluidics is a relatively new field of device development in which one applies techniques for fabricating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to miniature systems for containing and/or moving fluids. Typically, microfluidic devices are microfabricated, variously, from silicon or polymers. The development of microfluidic devices for applications that involve PCR and fluorescence-based detection of PCR products poses special challenges

  14. A nanofluidic system for massively parallel PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin; Morrison, Tom; Roberts, Douglas; Hurley, James

    2008-02-01

    Massively parallel nanofluidic systems are lab-on-a-chip devices where solution phase biochemical and biological analyses are implemented in high density arrays of nanoliter holes micro-machined in a thin platen. Polymer coatings make the interior surfaces of the holes hydrophilic and the exterior surface of the platen hydrophobic for precise and accurate self-metered loading of liquids into each hole without cross-contamination. We have created a "nanoplate" based on this concept, equivalent in performance to standard microtiter plates, having 3072 thirty-three nanoliter holes in a stainless steel platen the dimensions of a microscope slide. We report on the performance of this device for PCR-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping or quantitative measurement of gene expression by real-time PCR in applications ranging from plant and animal diagnostics, agricultural genetics and human disease research.

  15. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) Testing for Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-20

    reactions. Prior to temperature cycling, this moderately heat stable enzyme selectively excises uracil residues which have been incorporated into DNA... temperature . Despite these precautions, some non-specific annealing of PCR primers does occur, even with single copy gene detection, and more so with...Mallinckrodt) in slightly hypotonic saline and allowed to remain at ambient temperature for 5 minutes, during which time RBC’s are lysed. Centrifugation

  16. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date.

  17. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  18. The effects of metal ion PCR inhibitors on results obtained with the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit.

    PubMed

    Combs, Laura Gaydosh; Warren, Joseph E; Huynh, Vivian; Castaneda, Joanna; Golden, Teresa D; Roby, Rhonda K

    2015-11-01

    Forensic DNA samples may include the presence of PCR inhibitors, even after extraction and purification. Studies have demonstrated that metal ions, co-purified at specific concentrations, inhibit DNA amplifications. Metal ions are endogenous to sample types, such as bone, and can be introduced from environmental sources. In order to examine the effect of metal ions as PCR inhibitors during quantitative real-time PCR, 2800 M DNA was treated with 0.0025-18.750 mM concentrations of aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, nickel, and lead. DNA samples, both untreated and metal-treated, were quantified using the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit. Quantification cycle (Cq) values for the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA and internal PCR control (IPC) assays were measured and the estimated concentrations of human DNA were obtained. Comparisons were conducted between metal-treated and control DNA samples to determine the accuracy of the quantification estimates and to test the efficacy of the IPC inhibition detection. This kit is most resistant to the presence of calcium as compared to all metals tested; the maximum concentration tested does not affect the amplification of the IPC or quantification of the sample. This kit is most sensitive to the presence of aluminum; concentrations greater than 0.0750 mM negatively affected the quantification, although the IPC assay accurately assessed the presence of PCR inhibition. The Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit accurately quantifies human DNA in the presence of 0.5000 mM copper, iron, nickel, and lead; however, the IPC does not indicate the presence of PCR inhibition at this concentration of these metals. Unexpectedly, estimates of DNA quantity in samples treated with 18.750 mM copper yielded values in excess of the actual concentration of DNA in the samples; fluorescence spectroscopy experiments indicated this increase was not a direct interaction between the copper metal and 6-FAM dye used to label the probe that

  19. Analysis of one-step and two-step real-time RT-PCR using SuperScript III.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Michael J; Godard, Michael P

    2005-09-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a commonly used technique to analyze gene expression. There has been little research conducted to test if SuperScript III quantitative one-step (reverse transcription carried out in the same tube as PCR) and two-step (reverse transcription carried out in a separate reaction) RT-PCR systems provide similar real-time results. In this study, real-time reactions were set up using the housekeeping genes glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), beta2-microglobulin (B2M), and RNA polymerase 2 subunit A (PolR2A). Reaction efficiencies were determined by generating standard curves using total RNA isolated from human skeletal muscle and brain. Reaction efficiencies ranged from 97.7+/-0.9% to 99.4+/-1.8% for one-step and 98.0+/-0.2% to 102.6+/-1.3% for two-step RT-PCR (R2 values for all reactions>or=0.995). The sensitivities of one-step and two-step methods, as measured by cycle threshold values, were similar for GAPDH and B2M. However, for the lesser expressed PolR2A mRNA there was a 5 cycle lower threshold for one-step. In summary, both SuperScript III one-step and two-step methods yield reaction efficiencies close to 100% and produce similar, accurate, linear standard curves. However, using the one-step method with gene-specific priming may be more sensitive for quantification of certain genes such as PolR2A.

  20. Aspergillus Collagen-Like Genes (acl): Identification, Sequence Polymorphism, and Assessment for PCR-Based Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tuntevski, Kiril; Durney, Brandon C.; Snyder, Anna K.; LaSala, P. Rocco; Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Holland, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus is a burden to public health due to its ubiquitous presence in the environment, its production of allergens, and wide demographic susceptibility among cystic fibrosis, asthmatic, and immunosuppressed patients. Current methods of detection of Aspergillus colonization and infection rely on lengthy morphological characterization or nonstandardized serological assays that are restricted to identifying a fungal etiology. Collagen-like genes have been shown to exhibit species-specific conservation across the noncollagenous regions as well as strain-specific polymorphism in the collagen-like regions. Here we assess the conserved region of the Aspergillus collagen-like (acl) genes and explore the application of PCR amplicon size-based discrimination among the five most common etiologic species of the Aspergillus genus, including Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. terreus. Genetic polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis of the aclF1 gene were additionally examined among the available strains. Furthermore, the applicability of the PCR-based assay to identification of these five species in cultures derived from sputum and bronchoalveolar fluid from 19 clinical samples was explored. Application of capillary electrophoresis on nanogels was additionally demonstrated to improve the discrimination between Aspergillus species. Overall, this study demonstrated that Aspergillus acl genes could be used as PCR targets to discriminate between clinically relevant Aspergillus species. Future studies aim to utilize the detection of Aspergillus acl genes in PCR and microfluidic applications to determine the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Aspergillus colonization and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised subjects. PMID:24123732

  1. Treatment of PCR products with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase improves the visibility of combined bisulfite restriction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kousuke; Emoto, Noriko; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Masanori; Kage, Hidenori; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Incubating PCR products at a high temperature causes smears in gel electrophoresis. {yields} Smears interfere with the interpretation of methylation analysis using COBRA. {yields} Treatment with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase eliminates smears. {yields} The elimination of smears improves the visibility of COBRA. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays a vital role in the regulation of gene expression. Abnormal promoter hypermethylation is an important mechanism of inactivating tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) is a widely used method for identifying the DNA methylation of specific CpG sites. Here, we report that exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase can be used for PCR purification for COBRA, improving the visibility of gel electrophoresis after restriction digestion. This improvement is observed when restriction digestion is performed at a high temperature, such as 60 {sup o}C or 65 {sup o}C, with BstUI and TaqI, respectively. This simple method can be applied instead of DNA purification using spin columns or phenol/chloroform extraction. It can also be applied to other situations when PCR products are digested by thermophile-derived restriction enzymes, such as PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  2. Detection of new HLA-DPB1 alleles generated by interallelic gene conversion using PCR amplification of DPB1 second exon sequences from sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, H.; Zangenberg, G.; Bugawan, T.

    1994-09-01

    The rate at which allelic diversity at the HLA class I and class II loci evolves has been the subject of considerable controversy as have the mechanisms which generate new alleles. The patchwork pattern of polymorphism, particularly within the second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus where the polymorphic sequence motifs are localized to 6 discrete regions, is consistent with the hypothesis that much of the allelic sequence variation may have been generated by segmental exchange (gene conversion). To measure the rate of new DPB1 variant generation, we have developed a strategy in which DPB1 second exon sequences are amplified from pools of FACS-sorted sperm (n=50) from a heterozygous sperm donor. Pools of sperm from these heterozygous individuals are amplified with an allele-specific primer for one allele and analyzed with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) complementary to the other allele. This screening procedure, which is capable of detecting a single variant molecule in a pool of parental alleles, allows the identification of new variants that have been generated by recombination and/or gene conversion between the two parental alleles. To control for potential PCR artifacts, the same screening procedure was carried out with mixtures of sperm from DPB1 *0301/*0301 and DPB1 *0401/ 0401 individuals. Pools containing putative new variants DPB1 alleles were analyzed further by cloning into M13 and sequencing the M13 clones. Our current estimate is that about 1/10,000 sperm from these heterozygous individuals represents a new DPB1 allele generated by micro-gene conversion within the second exon.

  3. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii)

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management. PMID:24964150

  4. Microfluidic gradient PCR (MG-PCR): a new method for microfluidic DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2010-02-01

    This study develops a new microfluidic DNA amplification strategy for executing parallel DNA amplification in the microfluidic gradient polymerase chain reaction (MG-PCR) device. The developed temperature gradient microfluidic system is generated by using an innovative fin design. The device mainly consists of modular thermally conductive copper flake which is attached onto a finned aluminum heat sink with a small fan. In our microfluidic temperature gradient prototype, a non-linear temperature gradient is produced along the gradient direction. On the copper flake of length 45 mm, width 40 mm and thickness 4 mm, the temperature gradient easily spans the range from 97 to 52 degrees Celsius. By making full use of the hot (90-97 degrees Celsius) and cold (60-70 degrees Celsius) regions on the temperature gradient device, the parallel, two-temperature MG-PCR amplification is feasible. As a demonstration, the MG-PCR from three parallel reactions of 112-bp Escherichia coli DNA fragment is performed in a continuous-flow format, in which the flow of the PCR reagent in the closed loop is induced by the buoyancy-driven nature convection. Although the prototype is not optimized, the MG-PCR amplification can be completed in less than 45 min. However, the MG-PCR thermocycler presented herein can be further scaled-down, and thus the amplification times and reagent consumption can be further reduced. In addition, the currently developed temperature gradient technology can be applied onto other continuous-flow MG-PCR systems or used for other analytical purposes such as parallel and combination measurements, and fluorescent melting curve analysis.

  5. Overcoming inhibition in real-time diagnostic PCR.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Rådström, Peter

    2013-01-01

    PCR is an important and powerful tool in several fields, including clinical diagnostics, food analysis, and forensic analysis. In theory, PCR enables the detection of one single cell or DNA molecule. However, the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample affects the amplification efficiency of PCR, thus lowering the detection limit, as well as the precision of sequence-specific nucleic acid quantification in real-time PCR. In order to overcome the problems caused by PCR inhibitors, all the steps leading up to DNA amplification must be optimized for the sample type in question. Sampling and sample treatment are key steps, but most of the methods currently in use were developed for conventional diagnostic methods and not for PCR. Therefore, there is a need for fast, simple, and robust sample preparation methods that take advantage of the accuracy of PCR. In addition, the thermostable DNA polymerases and buffer systems used in PCR are affected differently by inhibitors. During recent years, real-time PCR has developed considerably and is now widely used as a diagnostic tool. This technique has greatly improved the degree of automation and reduced the analysis time, but has also introduced a new set of PCR inhibitors, namely those affecting the fluorescence signal. The purpose of this chapter is to view the complexity of PCR inhibition from different angles, presenting both molecular explanations and practical ways of dealing with the problem. Although diagnostic PCR brings together scientists from different diagnostic fields, end-users have not fully exploited the potential of learning from each other. Here, we have collected knowledge from archeological analysis, clinical diagnostics, environmental analysis, food analysis, and forensic analysis. The concept of integrating sampling, sample treatment, and the chemistry of PCR, i.e., pre-PCR processing, will be addressed as a general approach to overcoming real-time PCR inhibition and producing samples optimal for PCR

  6. TqPCR: A Touchdown qPCR Assay with Significantly Improved Detection Sensitivity and Amplification Efficiency of SYBR Green qPCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fang; Yan, Zhengjian; Xia, Yinglin; Wang, Zhongliang; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya K; Wei, Qiang; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Wang, Xin; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; He, Tong-Chuan; Jiang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The advent of fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has revolutionized the quantification of gene expression analysis in many fields, including life sciences, agriculture, forensic science, molecular diagnostics, and medicine. While SYBR Green-based qPCR is the most commonly-used platform due to its inexpensive nature and robust chemistry, quantifying the expression of genes with low abundance or RNA samples extracted from highly restricted or limited sources can be challenging because the detection sensitivity of SYBR Green-based qPCR is limited. Here, we develop a novel and effective touchdown qPCR (TqPCR) protocol by incorporating a 4-cycle touchdown stage prior to the quantification amplification stage. Using the same cDNA templates, we find that TqPCR can reduce the average Cq values for Gapdh, Rps13, and Hprt1 reference genes by 4.45, 5.47, and 4.94 cycles, respectively, when compared with conventional qPCR; the overall average Cq value reduction for the three reference genes together is 4.95. We further find that TqPCR can improve PCR amplification efficiency and thus increase detection sensitivity. When the quantification of Wnt3A-induced target gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is analyzed, we find that, while both conventional qPCR and TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the relatively abundant target Axin2, only TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the lowly-expressed targets Oct4 and Gbx2. Finally, we demonstrate that the MRQ2 and MRQ3 primer pairs derived from mouse reference gene Tbp can be used to validate the RNA/cDNA integrity of qPCR samples. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that TqPCR may increase detection sensitivity and PCR amplification efficiency. Overall, TqPCR should be advantageous over conventional qPCR in expression quantification, especially when the transcripts of interest are lowly expressed, and/or the availability of total RNA is highly restricted or limited.

  7. TqPCR: A Touchdown qPCR Assay with Significantly Improved Detection Sensitivity and Amplification Efficiency of SYBR Green qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fang; Yan, Zhengjian; Xia, Yinglin; Wang, Zhongliang; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya K.; Wei, Qiang; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Wang, Xin; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Jiang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The advent of fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has revolutionized the quantification of gene expression analysis in many fields, including life sciences, agriculture, forensic science, molecular diagnostics, and medicine. While SYBR Green-based qPCR is the most commonly-used platform due to its inexpensive nature and robust chemistry, quantifying the expression of genes with low abundance or RNA samples extracted from highly restricted or limited sources can be challenging because the detection sensitivity of SYBR Green-based qPCR is limited. Here, we develop a novel and effective touchdown qPCR (TqPCR) protocol by incorporating a 4-cycle touchdown stage prior to the quantification amplification stage. Using the same cDNA templates, we find that TqPCR can reduce the average Cq values for Gapdh, Rps13, and Hprt1 reference genes by 4.45, 5.47, and 4.94 cycles, respectively, when compared with conventional qPCR; the overall average Cq value reduction for the three reference genes together is 4.95. We further find that TqPCR can improve PCR amplification efficiency and thus increase detection sensitivity. When the quantification of Wnt3A-induced target gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is analyzed, we find that, while both conventional qPCR and TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the relatively abundant target Axin2, only TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the lowly-expressed targets Oct4 and Gbx2. Finally, we demonstrate that the MRQ2 and MRQ3 primer pairs derived from mouse reference gene Tbp can be used to validate the RNA/cDNA integrity of qPCR samples. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that TqPCR may increase detection sensitivity and PCR amplification efficiency. Overall, TqPCR should be advantageous over conventional qPCR in expression quantification, especially when the transcripts of interest are lowly expressed, and/or the availability of total RNA is highly restricted or limited. PMID:26172450

  8. Viral diagnostics in the era of digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Jerome, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike quantitative PCR (qPCR), digital PCR (dPCR) achieves sensitive and accurate absolute quantitation of a DNA sample without the need for a standard curve. A single PCR reaction is divided into many separate reactions that each have a positive or negative signal. By applying Poisson statistics, the number of DNA molecules in the original sample is directly calculated from the number of positive and negative reactions. The recent availability of multiple commercial dPCR platforms has led to increased interest in clinical diagnostic applications, such as low viral load detection and low abundance mutant detection, where dPCR could be superior to traditional qPCR.Here we review current literature that demonstrates dPCR’s potential utility in viral diagnostics, particularly through absolute quantification of target DNA sequences and rare mutant allele detection. PMID:23182074

  9. Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System PCR (ARMS-PCR) provides sequencing independent typing of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Chakravarti, Soumendu; Gupta, Vikas; Nandi, Sukdeb; Singh, Mithilesh; Badasara, Surendra Kumar; Sharma, Chhavi; Mittal, Mitesh; Dandapat, S; Gupta, V K

    2016-10-29

    Canine parvovirus-2 antigenic variants (CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c) ubiquitously distributed worldwide in canine population causes severe fatal gastroenteritis. Antigenic typing of CPV-2 remains a prime focus of research groups worldwide in understanding the disease epidemiology and virus evolution. The present study was thus envisioned to provide a simple sequencing independent, rapid, robust, specific, user-friendly technique for detecting and typing of presently circulating CPV-2 antigenic variants. ARMS-PCR strategy was employed using specific primers for CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c to differentiate these antigenic types. ARMS-PCR was initially optimized with reference positive controls in two steps; where first reaction was used to differentiate CPV-2a from CPV-2b/CPV-2c. The second reaction was carried out with CPV-2c specific primers to confirm the presence of CPV-2c. Initial validation of the ARMS-PCR was carried out with 24 sequenced samples and the results were matched with the sequencing results. ARMS-PCR technique was further used to screen and type 90 suspected clinical samples. Randomly selected 15 suspected clinical samples that were typed with this technique were sequenced. The results of ARMS-PCR and the sequencing matched exactly with each other. The developed technique has a potential to become a sequencing independent method for simultaneous detection and typing of CPV-2 antigenic variants in veterinary disease diagnostic laboratories globally.

  10. Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System PCR (ARMS-PCR) provides sequencing independent typing of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Chakravarti, Soumendu; Gupta, Vikas; Nandi, Sukdeb; Singh, Mithilesh; Badasara, Surendra Kumar; Sharma, Chhavi; Mittal, Mitesh; Dandapat, S; Gupta, V K

    2016-12-01

    Canine parvovirus-2 antigenic variants (CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c) ubiquitously distributed worldwide in canine population causes severe fatal gastroenteritis. Antigenic typing of CPV-2 remains a prime focus of research groups worldwide in understanding the disease epidemiology and virus evolution. The present study was thus envisioned to provide a simple sequencing independent, rapid, robust, specific, user-friendly technique for detecting and typing of presently circulating CPV-2 antigenic variants. ARMS-PCR strategy was employed using specific primers for CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c to differentiate these antigenic types. ARMS-PCR was initially optimized with reference positive controls in two steps; where first reaction was used to differentiate CPV-2a from CPV-2b/CPV-2c. The second reaction was carried out with CPV-2c specific primers to confirm the presence of CPV-2c. Initial validation of the ARMS-PCR was carried out with 24 sequenced samples and the results were matched with the sequencing results. ARMS-PCR technique was further used to screen and type 90 suspected clinical samples. Randomly selected 15 suspected clinical samples that were typed with this technique were sequenced. The results of ARMS-PCR and the sequencing matched exactly with each other. The developed technique has a potential to become a sequencing independent method for simultaneous detection and typing of CPV-2 antigenic variants in veterinary disease diagnostic laboratories globally.

  11. Lab-on-a-chip PCR: real time PCR in miniaturized format for HLA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Sewart, René; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In case of transplantation or the identification of special metabolic diseases like coeliac disease, HLA typing has to be done fast and reliably with easy-to-handle devices by using limited amount of sample. Against this background a lab-on-a-chip device was realized enabling a fast HLA typing via miniaturized Real-time PCR. Hereby, two main process steps were combined, namely the extraction of DNA from whole blood and the amplification of the target DNA by Real-time PCR giving rise-to a semi-quantitative analysis. For the implementation of both processes on chip, a sample preparation and a real-time module were used. Sample preparation was carried out by using magnetic beads that were stored directly on chip as dry powder, together with all lysis reagents. After purification of the DNA by applying a special buffer regime, the sample DNA was transferred into the PCR module for amplification and detection. Coping with a massively increased surface-to-volume ratio, which results in a higher amount of unspecific binding on the chip surface, special additives needed to be integrated to compensate for this effect. Finally the overall procedure showed a sensitivity comparable to standard Real-time PCR but reduced the duration of analysis to significantly less than one hour. The presented work demonstrates that the combination of lab-on-a-chip PCR with direct optical read-out in a real-time fashion is an extremely promising tool for molecular diagnostics.

  12. Rapid identification of Brucella isolates to the species level by real time PCR based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gopaul, Krishna K; Koylass, Mark S; Smith, Catherine J; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2008-01-01

    Background Brucellosis, caused by members of the genus Brucella, remains one of the world's major zoonotic diseases. Six species have classically been recognised within the family Brucella largely based on a combination of classical microbiology and host specificity, although more recently additional isolations of novel Brucella have been reported from various marine mammals and voles. Classical identification to species level is based on a biotyping approach that is lengthy, requires extensive and hazardous culturing and can be difficult to interpret. Here we describe a simple and rapid approach to identification of Brucella isolates to the species level based on real-time PCR analysis of species-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were identified following a robust and extensive phylogenetic analysis of the genus. Results Seven pairs of short sequence Minor Groove Binding (MGB) probes were designed corresponding to SNPs shown to possess an allele specific for each of the six classical Brucella spp and the marine mammal Brucella. Assays were optimised to identical reaction parameters in order to give a multiple outcome assay that can differentiate all the classical species and Brucella isolated from marine mammals. The scope of the assay was confirmed by testing of over 300 isolates of Brucella, all of which typed as predicted when compared to other phenotypic and genotypic approaches. The assay is sensitive being capable of detecting and differentiating down to 15 genome equivalents. We further describe the design and testing of assays based on three additional SNPs located within the 16S rRNA gene that ensure positive discrimination of Brucella from close phylogenetic relatives on the same platform. Conclusion The multiple-outcome assay described represents a new tool for the rapid, simple and unambiguous characterisation of Brucella to the species level. Furthermore, being based on a robust phylogenetic framework, the assay provides a platform

  13. Application of a new PCR-RFLP panel suggests a restricted population structure for Eimeria tenella in UK and Irish chickens.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Elaine; Doyle, Kate; Clark, Emily L; Jatau, Isa D; Tomley, Fiona M; Blake, Damer P

    2016-10-15

    Eimeria species cause coccidiosis, most notably in chickens where the global cost exceeds US$3 billion every year. Understanding variation in Eimeria population structure and genetic diversity contributes valuable information that can be used to minimise the impact of drug resistance and develop new, cost-effective anticoccidial vaccines. Little knowledge is currently available on the epidemiology of Eimeria species and strains in different regions, or under different chicken production systems. Recently, 244 Eimeria tenella isolates collected from countries in Africa and Asia were genotyped using a Sequenom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) tool, revealing significant variation in haplotype diversity and population structure, with a marked North/South regional divide. To expand studies on genetic polymorphism to larger numbers of E. tenella populations in other geographic regions a cheaper and more accessible technique, such as polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), is desirable. We have converted a subset of SNP markers for use as PCR-RFLPs and re-analysed the original 244 isolates with the PCR-RFLPs to assess their utility. In addition, application of the PCR-RFLP to E. tenella samples collected from UK and Irish broiler chickens revealed a tightly restricted haplotype diversity. Just two of the PCR-RFLPs accounted for all of the polymorphism detected in the UK and Irish parasite populations, but analysis of the full dataset revealed different informative markers in different regions, supporting validity of the PCR-RFLP panel. The tools described here provide an accessible and cost-effective method that can be used to enhance understanding of E. tenella genetic diversity and population structure.

  14. Miniaturized detection system for handheld PCR assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, James B.; Benett, William J.; Stratton, Paul; Hadley, Dean R.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    2000-12-01

    We have developed and delivered a four chamber, battery powered, handheld instrument referred to as the HANAA which monitors the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using a TaqMan based fluorescence assay. The detection system differs form standard configurations in two essential ways. First, the size is miniaturized, with a combined cycling and optics plug-in module for a duplex assay begin about the size of a small box of matches. Second, the detection/analysis system is designed to call a positive sample in real time.

  15. Determining Fungi rRNA Copy Number by PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project is to improve the quantification of indoor fungal pollutants via the specific application of quantitative PCR (qPCR). Improvement will be made in the controls used in current qPCR applications. This work focuses on the use of two separate controls within ...

  16. Automated PCR setup for forensic casework samples using the Normalization Wizard and PCR Setup robotic methods.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, S A; Sykes, K L V; Ban, J D; Pollard, A; Baisden, M; Farr, M; Graham, N; Collins, B L; Green, M M; Christenson, C C

    2006-12-20

    Human genome, pharmaceutical and research laboratories have long enjoyed the application of robotics to performing repetitive laboratory tasks. However, the utilization of robotics in forensic laboratories for processing casework samples is relatively new and poses particular challenges. Since the quantity and quality (a mixture versus a single source sample, the level of degradation, the presence of PCR inhibitors) of the DNA contained within a casework sample is unknown, particular attention must be paid to procedural susceptibility to contamination, as well as DNA yield, especially as it pertains to samples with little biological material. The Virginia Department of Forensic Science (VDFS) has successfully automated forensic casework DNA extraction utilizing the DNA IQ(trade mark) System in conjunction with the Biomek 2000 Automation Workstation. Human DNA quantitation is also performed in a near complete automated fashion utilizing the AluQuant Human DNA Quantitation System and the Biomek 2000 Automation Workstation. Recently, the PCR setup for casework samples has been automated, employing the Biomek 2000 Automation Workstation and Normalization Wizard, Genetic Identity version, which utilizes the quantitation data, imported into the software, to create a customized automated method for DNA dilution, unique to that plate of DNA samples. The PCR Setup software method, used in conjunction with the Normalization Wizard method and written for the Biomek 2000, functions to mix the diluted DNA samples, transfer the PCR master mix, and transfer the diluted DNA samples to PCR amplification tubes. Once the process is complete, the DNA extracts, still on the deck of the robot in PCR amplification strip tubes, are transferred to pre-labeled 1.5 mL tubes for long-term storage using an automated method. The automation of these steps in the process of forensic DNA casework analysis has been accomplished by performing extensive optimization, validation and testing of the

  17. Design of electrochemical biosensor systems for the detection of specific DNA sequences in PCR-amplified nucleic acids related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val108/158Met polymorphism based on intrinsic guanine signal.

    PubMed

    Ozkan-Ariksoysal, Dilsat; Tezcanli, Burcin; Kosova, Buket; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2008-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common and complex diseases that show polygenic and multifactorial heredity. A single nucleotide polymorphism (Val108/158Met) in the catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene is related to many psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, alcoholism, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Schizophrenia is a complex disorder and a single nucleotide polymorphism (Val108/158Met) at the COMT gene is related to schizophrenia susceptibility. A novel hybridization-based disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of a common functional polymorphism in the COMT gene from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons has been described without using an external label. This developed technology combined with a disposable carbon graphite electrode and differential pulse voltammetry was performed by using short synthetic oligonucleotides and PCR amplicons in length 203 bp to measure the change of guanine oxidation signal obtained at approximately +1.0 V after DNA hybridization between probe and target (synthetic target or denatured PCR samples). COMT-specific oligonucleotides were immobilized onto the carbon surface with a simple adsorption method in two different modes: (a) Guanine-containing targets were attached or (b) inosine-substituted probes were attached onto an electrode. By controlling the surface coverage of the target DNA, the hybridization event between the probes and their synthetic targets or specific PCR products was optimized. The wild-type or polymorphic allele-specific probes/targets were also interacted with an equal amount of noncomplementary and one-base mismatch-containing DNAs in order to measure the sensor selectivity. The decrease or appearance in the intrinsic guanine signal simplified the detection procedure and shortened the assay time because protocol eliminates the label-binding step. The nonspecific binding effects were minimized by using sodium dodecyl sulfate with different washing methods

  18. A Guide to Using STITCHER for Overlapping Assembly PCR Applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping PCR is commonly used in many molecular applications that include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping assembly PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online.

  19. Accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA by digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lianhua; Yoo, Hee-Bong; Wang, Jing; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2016-04-11

    Digital PCR (dPCR) as an enumeration-based quantification method is capable of quantifying the DNA copy number without the help of standards. However, it can generate false results when the PCR conditions are not optimized. A recent international comparison (CCQM P154) showed that most laboratories significantly underestimated the concentration of supercoiled plasmid DNA by dPCR. Mostly, supercoiled DNAs are linearized before dPCR to avoid such underestimations. The present study was conducted to overcome this problem. In the bilateral comparison, the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) optimized and applied dPCR for supercoiled DNA determination, whereas Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) prepared the unknown samples and quantified them by flow cytometry. In this study, several factors like selection of the PCR master mix, the fluorescent label, and the position of the primers were evaluated for quantifying supercoiled DNA by dPCR. This work confirmed that a 16S PCR master mix avoided poor amplification of the supercoiled DNA, whereas HEX labels on dPCR probe resulted in robust amplification curves. Optimizing the dPCR assay based on these two observations resulted in accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA without preanalytical linearization. This result was validated in close agreement (101~113%) with the result from flow cytometry.

  20. Accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA by digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lianhua; Yoo, Hee-Bong; Wang, Jing; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) as an enumeration-based quantification method is capable of quantifying the DNA copy number without the help of standards. However, it can generate false results when the PCR conditions are not optimized. A recent international comparison (CCQM P154) showed that most laboratories significantly underestimated the concentration of supercoiled plasmid DNA by dPCR. Mostly, supercoiled DNAs are linearized before dPCR to avoid such underestimations. The present study was conducted to overcome this problem. In the bilateral comparison, the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM) optimized and applied dPCR for supercoiled DNA determination, whereas Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) prepared the unknown samples and quantified them by flow cytometry. In this study, several factors like selection of the PCR master mix, the fluorescent label, and the position of the primers were evaluated for quantifying supercoiled DNA by dPCR. This work confirmed that a 16S PCR master mix avoided poor amplification of the supercoiled DNA, whereas HEX labels on dPCR probe resulted in robust amplification curves. Optimizing the dPCR assay based on these two observations resulted in accurate quantification of supercoiled DNA without preanalytical linearization. This result was validated in close agreement (101~113%) with the result from flow cytometry. PMID:27063649

  1. Droplet digital PCR for absolute quantification of pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Rački, Nejc; Dreo, Tanja; Ravnikar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The recent advent of different digital PCR (dPCR) platforms is enabling the expansion of this technology for research and diagnostic applications worldwide. The main principle of dPCR, as in other PCR-based methods including quantitative PCR (qPCR), is the specific amplification of a nucleic acid target. The distinctive feature of dPCR is the separation of the reaction mixture into thousands to millions of partitions which is followed by a real time or end point detection of the amplification. The distribution of target sequences into partitions is described by the Poisson distribution, thus allowing accurate and absolute quantification of the target from the ratio of positive against all partitions at the end of the reaction. This omits the need to use reference materials with known target concentrations and increases the accuracy of quantification at low target concentrations compared to qPCR. dPCR has also shown higher resilience to inhibitors in a number of different types of samples. In this chapter we describe the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) workflow for the detection and quantification of pathogens using the droplet digital Bio-Rad platform QX100. We present as an example the quantification of the quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium, Erwinia amylovora.

  2. Application of real time PCR for diagnosis of Swine Dysentery.

    PubMed

    Akase, Satoru; Uchitani, Yumi; Sohmura, Yoshiko; Tatsuta, Keikichi; Sadamasu, Kenji; Adachi, Yoshikazu

    2009-03-01

    Evaluation of a genetic diagnostic technique using real time PCR of Swine Dysentery (SD) was performed using nox primers. Culture, ordinary PCR and real time PCR were compared in this experiment. Sixty-seven specimens from pigs with clinical signs of SD brought to a slaughterhouse in Shibaura, Tokyo, were used. B. hyodysenteriae was isolated from 49 of the pigs, was detected by ordinary PCR in 49 of the pigs and was detected by real time PCR in 54 of the pigs. Furthermore, we were able to determine the numbers of B. hyodysenteriae cells in all positive specimens by real time PCR. The rapid diagnostic technique established in this experiment was useful for detection of B. hyodysenteriae because it was more effective than ordinary PCR and culture.

  3. cDNA amplification by SMART-PCR and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Kenny, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The comparison of two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single-independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can identify differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population-dependent manner. There are a variety of methods for identifying differentially expressed genes, including microarray, SAGE, qRT-PCR, and DDGE. This protocol describes a potentially less sensitive yet relatively easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under investigation and is particularly applicable when minimal levels of starting material, RNA, are available. RNA input can often be a limiting factor when analyzing RNA from, for example, rigorously purified blood cells. This protocol describes the use of SMART-PCR to amplify cDNA from sub-microgram levels of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH-PCR), a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The final products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly over-represented transcripts in either of the two input RNA preparations. These cDNA populations may then be cloned to make subtracted cDNA libraries and/or used as probes to screen subtracted cDNA, global cDNA, or genomic DNA libraries.

  4. Simultaneous detection of ricin and abrin DNA by real-time PCR (qPCR).

    PubMed

    Felder, Eva; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Lange, Mirko; Wölfel, Roman

    2012-09-01

    Ricin and abrin are two of the most potent plant toxins known and may be easily obtained in high yield from the seeds using rather simple technology. As a result, both toxins are potent and available toxins for criminal or terrorist acts. However, as the production of highly purified ricin or abrin requires sophisticated equipment and knowledge, it may be more likely that crude extracts would be used by non-governmental perpetrators. Remaining plant-specific nucleic acids in these extracts allow the application of a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and identification of abrin or ricin genomic material. Therefore, we have developed a duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of ricin and abrin DNA based on the OmniMix HS bead PCR reagent mixture. Novel primers and hybridization probes were designed for detection on a SmartCycler instrument by using 5'-nuclease technology. The assay was thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity. Evaluation of the assay sensitivity by probit analysis demonstrated a 95% probability of detection at 3 genomes per reaction for ricin DNA and 1.2 genomes per reaction for abrin DNA. The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection of ricin and abrin contaminations in a food matrix.

  5. Rapid micro-PCR system for hepatitis C virus amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Young, Kung-Chia; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Wu, Ching-Yi

    2000-08-01

    A rapid micro-polymerase chain reaction ((mu) -PCR) system was integrated to amplify the complementary DNA (cDNA) molecules of hepatitis C virus (HCV). This system consists of a rapid thermal cycling system and a (mu) PCR chip fabricated by MEMS fabrication techniques. This rapid (mu) PCR system is verified by using serum samples from patients with chronic hepatitis C. The HCV amplicon of the rapid (mu) PCR system was analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis with separation of DNA marker in parallel. The (mu) PCR chip was fabricated on silicon wafer and Pyrex glass using photolithography, wet etching, and anodic bonding methods. Using silicon material to fabricate the raction well improves the temperature uniformity of sample and helps to reach the desired temperature faster. The rapid close loop thermal cycling system comprises power supplies, a thermal generator, a computer control PID controller, and a data acquisition subsystem. The thermoelectric (T.E.) cooler is used to work as the thermal generator and a heat sink by controlling the polarity of supplied power. The (mu) PCR system was verified with traditional PCR equipment by loading the same PCR mixture with HCV cDNA and running the same cycle numbers, then comparing both HCV amplicon slab gel electrophoresis. The HCV amplicon from the (mu) PCR system shows a DNA fragment with an expected size of 145 base pairs. The background is lower with the (mu) PCR system than that with the tradional PCR equipment. Comparing the traditional PCR equipment which spends 5.5 hours for 30 cycles to gain the detectable amount of HCV amplicon in slab gel separation, this (mu) PCR system takes 30 minutes to finish the 30 thermal cycles. This work has demonstrated that this rapid (mu) PCR system can provide rapid heat generation and dissipation, improved temperature uniformity in DNA amplification.

  6. Transcriptome and allele specificity associated with a 3BL locus for Fusarium crown rot resistance in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Stiller, Jiri; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Cavanagh, Colin; Wang, Penghao; Gardiner, Donald; Choulet, Frédéric; Feuillet, Catherine; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yuming; Yan, Guijun; Han, Bin; Manners, John M; Liu, Chunji

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens cause two major diseases in cereals, Fusarium crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB). A large-effect locus conferring resistance to FCR disease was previously located to chromosome arm 3BL (designated as Qcrs-3B) and several independent sets of near isogenic lines (NILs) have been developed for this locus. In this study, five sets of the NILs were used to examine transcriptional changes associated with the Qcrs-3B locus and to identify genes linked to the resistance locus as a step towards the isolation of the causative gene(s). Of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected between the NILs, 12.7% was located on the single chromosome 3B. Of the expressed genes containing SNP (SNP-EGs) detected, 23.5% was mapped to this chromosome. Several of the DEGs and SNP-EGs are known to be involved in host-pathogen interactions, and a large number of the DEGs were among those detected for FHB in previous studies. Of the DEGs detected, 22 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and they included eight which were detected in the resistant isolines only. The enrichment of DEG, and not necessarily those containing SNPs between the resistant and susceptible isolines, around the Qcrs-3B locus is suggestive of local regulation of this region by the resistance allele. Functions for 13 of these DEGs are known. Of the SNP-EGs, 28 were mapped in the Qcrs-3B interval and biological functions for 16 of them are known. These results provide insights into responses regulated by the 3BL locus and identify a tractable number of target genes for fine mapping and functional testing to identify the causative gene(s) at this QTL.

  7. Allele-Specific Phenotype Suggests a Possible Stimulatory Activity of RCAN-1 on Calcineurin in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixun; Choi, Tae-Woo; Ahnn, Joohong; Lee, Sun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) binds to calcineurin through the PxIxIT motif, which is evolutionarily conserved. SP repeat phosphorylation in RCAN1 is required for its complete function. The specific interaction between RCAN1 and calcineurin is critical for calcium/calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcineurin serine/threonine phosphatase activity. In this study, we investigated two available deletion rcan-1 mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans, which proceed differently for transcription and translation. We found that rcan-1 may be required for calcineurin activity and possess calcineurin-independent function in body growth and egg-laying behavior. In the genetic background of enhanced calcineurin activity, the rcan-1 mutant expressing a truncated RCAN-1 which retains the calcineurin-binding PxIxIT motif but misses SP repeats stimulated growth, while rcan-1 lack mutant resulted in hyperactive egg-laying suppression. These data suggest rcan-1 has unknown functions independent of calcineurin, and may be a stimulatory calcineurin regulator under certain circumstances. PMID:27871170

  8. Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Genotyping of a Normal Variation in Human Color Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Beth; Lubin, Ira M.; Grant, Kathryn B.

    2003-11-01

    This laboratory exercise offers undergraduate biochemistry students the opportunity to gain experience in a variety of techniques employed in modern molecular biology and biochemistry laboratories. Students utilize microcentrifugation and silica-gel column chromatography to extract DNA from their own buccal (cheek) epithelial cells. The polymerase chain reaction and agarose gel electrophoresis are then employed to identify a single nucleotide polymorphism that is responsible for a commonly encountered variation in human red color vision.

  9. Sequence variation at the rice blast resistance gene Pi-km locus: Implications for the development of allele specific markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recently cloned blast resistance (R) gene Pi-km protects rice crops against specific races of the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae in a gene-for-gene manner. The use of blast R genes remains the most cost-effective method for an integrated disease management strategy. To facilitate rice breed...

  10. Limited gene misregulation is exacerbated by allele-specific upregulation in lethal hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kevin H-C; Clark, Andrew G; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Misregulation of gene expression is often observed in interspecific hybrids and is generally attributed to regulatory incompatibilities caused by divergence between the two genomes. However, it has been challenging to distinguish effects of regulatory divergence from secondary effects including developmental and physiological defects common to hybrids. Here, we use RNA-Seq to profile gene expression in F1 hybrid male larvae from crosses of Drosophila melanogaster to its sibling species D. simulans. We analyze lethal and viable hybrid males, the latter produced using a mutation in the X-linked D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) gene and compare them with their parental species and to public data sets of gene expression across development. We find that Hmr has drastically different effects on the parental and hybrid genomes, demonstrating that hybrid incompatibility genes can exhibit novel properties in the hybrid genetic background. Additionally, we find that D. melanogaster alleles are preferentially affected between lethal and viable hybrids. We further determine that many of the differences between the hybrids result from developmental delay in the Hmr(+) hybrids. Finally, we find surprisingly modest expression differences in hybrids when compared with the parents, with only 9% and 4% of genes deviating from additivity or expressed outside of the parental range, respectively. Most of these differences can be attributed to developmental delay and differences in tissue types. Overall, our study suggests that hybrid gene misexpression is prone to overestimation and that even between species separated by approximately 2.5 Ma, regulatory incompatibilities are not widespread in hybrids.

  11. Analysis of allele-specific RNA transcription in FSHD by RNA-DNA FISH in single myonuclei.

    PubMed

    Masny, Peter S; Chan, On Ying A; de Greef, Jessica C; Bengtsson, Ulla; Ehrlich, Melanie; Tawil, Rabi; Lock, Leslie F; Hewitt, Jane E; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Martin, Jorge H; van der Maarel, Silvere M; Winokur, Sara T

    2010-04-01

    Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is likely caused by epigenetic alterations in chromatin involving contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array near the telomere of chromosome 4q. The precise mechanism by which deletions of D4Z4 influence gene expression in FSHD is not yet resolved. Regulatory models include a cis effect on proximal gene transcription (position effect), DNA looping, non-coding RNA, nuclear localization and trans-effects. To directly test whether deletions of D4Z4 affect gene expression in cis, nascent RNA was examined in single myonuclei so that transcription from each allele could be measured independently. FSHD and control myotubes (differentiated myoblasts) were subjected to sequential RNA-DNA FISH. A total of 16 genes in the FSHD region (FRG2, TUBB4Q, FRG1, FAT1, F11, KLKB1, CYP4V2, TLR3, SORBS2, PDLIM3 (ALP), LRP2BP, ING2, SNX25, SLC25A4 (ANT1), HELT and IRF2) were examined for interallelic variation in RNA expression within individual myonuclei. Sequential DNA hybridization with a unique 4q35 chromosome probe was then applied to confirm the localization of nascent RNA to 4q. A D4Z4 probe, labeled with a third fluorochrome, distinguished between the deleted and normal allele in FSHD nuclei. Our data do not support an FSHD model in which contracted D4Z4 arrays induce altered transcription in cis from 4q35 genes, even for those genes (FRG1, FRG2 and SLC25A4 (ANT1)) for which such an effect has been proposed.

  12. Diverse Non-genetic, Allele-Specific Expression Effects Shape Genetic Architecture at the Cellular Level in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chao; Ferris, Elliott; Cheng, Tong; Hörndli, Cornelia Stacher; Gleason, Kelly; Tamminga, Carol; Wagner, Janice D; Boucher, Kenneth M; Christian, Jan L; Gregg, Christopher

    2017-03-08

    Interactions between genetic and epigenetic effects shape brain function, behavior, and the risk for mental illness. Random X inactivation and genomic imprinting are epigenetic allelic effects that are well known to influence genetic architecture and disease risk. Less is known about the nature, prevalence, and conservation of other potential epigenetic allelic effects in vivo in the mouse and primate brain. Here we devise genomics, in situ hybridization, and mouse genetics strategies to uncover diverse allelic effects in the brain that are not caused by imprinting or genetic variation. We found allelic effects that are developmental stage and cell type specific, that are prevalent in the neonatal brain, and that cause mosaics of monoallelic brain cells that differentially express wild-type and mutant alleles for heterozygous mutations. Finally, we show that diverse non-genetic allelic effects that impact mental illness risk genes exist in the macaque and human brain. Our findings have potential implications for mammalian brain genetics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Intronless WNT10B-short variant underlies new recurrent allele-specific rearrangement in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaroni, Francesca; Del Giacco, Luca; Biasci, Daniele; Turrini, Mauro; Prosperi, Laura; Brusamolino, Roberto; Cairoli, Roberto; Beghini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Defects in the control of Wnt signaling have emerged as a recurrent mechanism involved in cancer pathogenesis and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), including the hematopoietic regeneration-associated WNT10B in AC133bright leukaemia cells, although the existence of a specific mechanism remains unproven. We have obtained evidences for a recurrent rearrangement, which involved the WNT10B locus (WNT10BR) within intron 1 (IVS1) and flanked at the 5′ by non-human sequences whose origin remains to be elucidated; it also expressed a transcript variant (WNT10BIVS1) which was mainly detected in a cohort of patients with intermediate/unfavorable risk AML. We also identified in two separate cases, affected by AML and breast cancer respectively, a genomic transposable short form of human WNT10B (ht-WNT10B). The intronless ht-WNT10B resembles a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), which suggests its involvement in a non-random microhomology-mediated recombination generating the rearranged WNT10BR. Furthermore, our studies supports an autocrine activation primed by the formation of WNT10B-FZD4/5 complexes in the breast cancer MCF7 cells that express the WNT10BIVS1. Chemical interference of WNT-ligands production by the porcupine inhibitor IWP-2 achieved a dose-dependent suppression of the WNT10B-FZD4/5 interactions. These results present the first evidence for a recurrent rearrangement promoted by a mobile ht-WNT10B oncogene, as a relevant mechanism for Wnt involvement in human cancer. PMID:27853307

  14. SNP-based large-scale identification of allele-specific gene expression in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Young; Kim, Hye-Eun; Kim, Sun; Choi, Ick-Hwa; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2012-02-10

    Polymorphism and variations in gene expression provide the genetic basis for human variation. Allelic variation of gene expression, in particular, may play a crucial role in phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. To identify genes with allelic expression in human cells, we genotyped genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from 31 immortalized B cell lines from three Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) families using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips containing 13,900 exonic SNPs. We identified seven SNPs in five genes with monoallelic expression, 146 SNPs in 125 genes with allelic imbalance in expression with preferentially higher expression of one allele in a heterozygous individual. The monoallelically expressed genes (ERAP2, MDGA1, LOC644422, SDCCAG3P1 and CLTCL1) were regulated by cis-acting, non-imprinted differential allelic control. In addition, all monoallelic gene expression patterns and allelic imbalances in gene expression in B cells were transmitted from parents to offspring in the pedigree, indicating genetic transmission of allelic gene expression. Furthermore, frequent allele substitution, probably due to RNA editing, was also observed in 21 genes in 23 SNPs as well as in 48 SNPs located in regions containing no known genes. In this study, we demonstrated that allelic gene expression is frequently observed in human B cells, and SNP chips are very useful tools for detecting allelic gene expression. Overall, our data provide a valuable framework for better understanding allelic gene expression in human B cells.

  15. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo moves into PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the payload changeout room on the Rotating Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, workers move the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo out of the payload canister. From the PCR Leonardo then will be transferred into Space Shuttle Discovery'''s payload bay. One of Italy'''s major contributions to the International Space Station program, Leonardo is a reusable logistics carrier. It is the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the primary payload on mission STS-102 and will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:45 a.m. EST.

  16. Comparison of droplet digital PCR to real-time PCR for quantification of hepatitis B virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hui; Cai, Qingchun; Li, Hu; Hu, Peng

    2016-06-16

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been widely implemented for clinical hepatitis B viral load testing, but a lack of standardization and relatively poor precision hinder its usefulness. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is a promising tool that offers high precision and direct quantification. In this study, we compared the ddPCR QX100 platform by Bio-Rad with the CFX384 Touch Real-Time PCR Detection System (Bio-Rad, USA) to detect serial plasmid DNA dilutions of known concentrations as well as HBV DNA extracted from patient serum samples. Both methods showed a high degree of linearity and quantitative correlation. However, ddPCR assays generated more reproducible results and detected lower copy numbers than qPCR assays. Patient sample quantifications by ddPCR and qPCR were highly agreeable based on the Bland-Altman analysis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that ddPCR offers improved analytical sensitivity and specificity for HBV measurements and is suitable for clinical HBV detection.

  17. Sensitivity of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Lima, Manoel Sebastião; Zorzenon, Denielly Christina Rodrigues; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Cavalheiros; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Cunha, Rodrigo; Andreotti, Renato; Matos, Maria de Fatima Cepa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood samples. Methods DNA extraction was performed using Promega Wizard® Genomic kits. PCR employing RV1/RV2 primers yielded 145-bp amplicons. Real-time PCR was performed with the same primers and SYBR Green ROX Plus mix. These techniques were used to analyze 100 peripheral blood samples from patients with clinical signs of the disease. Results The sensitivity and specificity levels were 91,3%% and 29,6%, respectively, for real-time PCR and 97.78% and 61.82%, respectively, for PCR. Conclusions Real-time PCR proved to be a satisfactory method for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis.

  18. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics.

  19. COMPARISON OF 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP, LipL32-PCR AND OmpL1-PCR METHODS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF LEPTOSPIROSIS

    PubMed Central

    GÖKMEN, Tülin GÜVEN; SOYAL, Ayben; KALAYCI, Yıldız; ÖNLEN, Cansu; KÖKSAL, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Leptospirosis is still one of the most important health problems in developing countries located in humid tropical and subtropical regions. Human infections are generally caused by exposure to water, soil or food contaminated with the urine of infected wild and domestic animals such as rodents and dogs. The clinical course of leptospirosis is variable and may be difficult to distinguish from many other infectious diseases. The dark-field microscopy (DFM), serology and nucleic acid amplification techniques are used to diagnose leptospirosis, however, a distinctive standard reference method is still lacking. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine the presence of Leptospira spp., to differentiate the pathogenic L. interrogans and the non-pathogenic L. biflexa, and also to determine the sensitivity and specificity values of molecular methods as an alternative to conventional ones. A total of 133 serum samples, from 47 humans and 86 cattle were evaluated by two conventional tests: the Microagglutination Test (MAT) and the DFM, as well as three molecular methods, the 16S rRNA-PCR followed by Restriction Fragment Lenght Polymorphism (RFLP) of the amplification products 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP, LipL32-PCR and OmpL1-PCR. In this study, for L. interrogans, the specificity and sensitivity rates of the 16S rRNA-PCR and the LipL32-PCR were considered similar (100% versus 98.25% and 100% versus 98.68%, respectively). The OmpL1-PCR was able to classify L. interrogans into two intergroups, but this PCR was less sensitive (87.01%) than the other two PCR methods. The 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP could detect L. biflexa DNA, but LipL32-PCR and OmpL1-PCR could not. The 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP provided an early and accurate diagnosis and was able to distinguish pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira species, hence it may be used as an alternative method to the conventional gold standard techniques for the rapid disgnosis of leptospirosis. PMID:27680169

  20. Multiplex enrichment quantitative PCR (ME-qPCR): a high-throughput, highly sensitive detection method for GMO identification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Zhu, Pengyu; Wei, Shuang; Zhixin, Du; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Xiyang; Li, Feiwu; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-04-01

    Among all of the high-throughput detection methods, PCR-based methodologies are regarded as the most cost-efficient and feasible methodologies compared with the next-generation sequencing or ChIP-based methods. However, the PCR-based methods can only achieve multiplex detection up to 15-plex due to limitations imposed by the multiplex primer interactions. The detection throughput cannot meet the demands of high-throughput detection, such as SNP or gene expression analysis. Therefore, in our study, we have developed a new high-throughput PCR-based detection method, multiplex enrichment quantitative PCR (ME-qPCR), which is a combination of qPCR and nested PCR. The GMO content detection results in our study showed that ME-qPCR could achieve high-throughput detection up to 26-plex. Compared to the original qPCR, the Ct values of ME-qPCR were lower for the same group, which showed that ME-qPCR sensitivity is higher than the original qPCR. The absolute limit of detection for ME-qPCR could achieve levels as low as a single copy of the plant genome. Moreover, the specificity results showed that no cross-amplification occurred for irrelevant GMO events. After evaluation of all of the parameters, a practical evaluation was performed with different foods. The more stable amplification results, compared to qPCR, showed that ME-qPCR was suitable for GMO detection in foods. In conclusion, ME-qPCR achieved sensitive, high-throughput GMO detection in complex substrates, such as crops or food samples. In the future, ME-qPCR-based GMO content identification may positively impact SNP analysis or multiplex gene expression of food or agricultural samples. Graphical abstract For the first-step amplification, four primers (A, B, C, and D) have been added into the reaction volume. In this manner, four kinds of amplicons have been generated. All of these four amplicons could be regarded as the target of second-step PCR. For the second-step amplification, three parallels have been taken for

  1. Comparison of the immunofluorescence assay with RT-PCR and nested PCR in the diagnosis of canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Jóźwik, A; Frymus, T

    2005-05-01

    Two pairs of primers were prepared, both localized within the sequences of the nucleoprotein gene (NP) of canine distemper virus (CDV). A number of experiments were done to optimize the conditions of RT-PCR and nested PCR methods. The nucleic acids of the Onderstepoort, Rockborn, Snyder Hill and Lederle strains of CDV could be detected with these primers. However, they did not react with the sequences of the Edmonston strain of the measles virus. The detection limit for RT-PCR was 10 TCID50 and for nested PCR 0.1 TCID50 of CDV. The RT-PCR was able to demonstrate the nucleic acid of CDV in the blood of all seven puppies vaccinated with a modified live virus. Blood samples of 23 dogs clinically suspected of distemper were examined by RT-PCR combined with nested PCR, and the results were compared with the detection of the CDV antigen in the smears from the mucous membranes by the direct immunofluorescence (IF) test. Of the 23 dogs, 12 were positive in nested PCR, six in the IF assay, and only two in single RT-PCR. It is concluded that nested PCR seems to be the most sensitive method for ante-mortem diagnosis of canine distemper, especially in its subacute or chronic forms.

  2. Microfluidics-Based PCR for Fusion Transcript Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The microfluidic technology allows the production of network of submillimeter-size fluidic channels and reservoirs in a variety of material systems. The microfluidic-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows automated multiplexing of multiple samples and multiple assays simultaneously within a network of microfluidic channels and chambers that are co-ordinated in controlled fashion by the valves. The individual PCR reaction is performed in nanoliter volume, which allows testing on samples with limited DNA and RNA. The microfluidics devices are used in various types of PCR such as digital PCR and single molecular emulsion PCR for genotyping, gene expression, and miRNA expression. In this chapter, the use of a microfluidics-based PCR for simultaneous screening of 14 known fusion transcripts in patients with leukemia is described.

  3. Misuse of PCR assay for diagnosis of mollusc protistan infections.

    PubMed

    Burreson, Eugene M

    2008-06-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are useful tools for pathogen surveillance, but they are only proxy indications of pathogen presence in that they detect a DNA sequence. To be useful for detection of actual infections, PCR assays must be thoroughly tested for sensitivity and specificity, and ultimately validated against a technique, typically histology, which allows visualization of the parasite in host tissues. There is growing use of PCR assays for pathogen surveillance, but too often the assumption is made that a positive PCR result verifies an infection in a tested host. This assumption is valid only if the assay has been properly validated for the geographic area and for the hosts examined. Researchers should interpret unvalidated PCR assay results with caution, and editors and reviewers should insist that robust validations support all assertions that PCR results confirm infections.

  4. Combined Overlap Extension PCR Method for Improved Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Nikson Fatt-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The combined overlap extension PCR (COE-PCR) method developed in this work combines the strengths of the overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) method with the speed and ease of the asymmetrical overlap extension (AOE-PCR) method. This combined method allows up to 6 base pairs to be mutated at a time and requires a total of 40–45 PCR cycles. A total of eight mutagenesis experiments were successfully carried out, with each experiment mutating between two to six base pairs. Up to four adjacent codons were changed in a single experiment. This method is especially useful for codon optimization, where doublet or triplet rare codons can be changed using a single mutagenic primer set, in a single experiment. PMID:27995143

  5. Optimized MOL-PCR for Characterization of Microbial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Véronique; Roosens, Nancy H C; Bertrand, Sophie; Marchal, Kathleen; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2016-01-06

    Characterization of microbial pathogens is necessary for surveillance, outbreak detection, and tracing of outbreak sources. This unit describes a multiplex oligonucleotide ligation-PCR (MOL-PCR) optimized for characterization of microbial pathogens. With MOL-PCR, different types of markers, like unique sequences, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels, can be simultaneously analyzed in one assay. This assay consists of a multiplex ligation for detection of the markers, a singleplex PCR for signal amplification, and hybridization to MagPlex-TAG beads for readout on a Luminex platform after fluorescent staining. The current protocol describes the MOL-PCR, as well as methods for DNA isolation, probe design, and data interpretation and it is based on an optimized MOL-PCR assay for subtyping of Salmonella Typhimurium.

  6. Direct PCR Improves the Recovery of DNA from Various Substrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Taylor, Duncan; Handt, Oliva; Skuza, Pawel; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    This study reports on the comparison of a standard extraction process with the direct PCR approach of processing low-level DNA swabs typical in forensic investigations. Varying concentrations of control DNA were deposited onto three commonly encountered substrates, brass, plastic, and glass, left to dry, and swabbed using premoistened DNA-free nylon FLOQswabs(™) . Swabs (n = 90) were either processed using the DNA IQ(™) kit or, for direct PCR, swab fibers (~2 mm(2) ) were added directly to the PCR with no prior extraction. A significant increase in the height of the alleles (p < 0.005) was observed when using the direct PCR approach over the extraction methodology when controlling for surface type and mass of DNA deposited. The findings indicate the potential use of direct PCR for increasing the PCR product obtained from low-template DNA samples in addition to minimizing contamination and saving resources.

  7. Patho-Genes.org: a website dedicated to gene sequences of potential bioterror bacteria and PCR primers used to amplify them.

    PubMed

    Gardès, Julien; Bachar, Dipankar; Croce, Olivier; Christen, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic agents can be very hard to detect, and usually they do not cause illness for several hours or days. To improve the speed and the accuracy of detection tests and satisfy the needs of early diagnosis, molecular biology methods such as PCR are now used. However, selecting a proper target gene and designing good primers is often not easy. We present a dedicated website, http://patho-genes.org, where we provide every sequence, functional annotation, published primer and relevant article for every annotated gene of major pathogenic bacterial species listed as key agents to be used for a bioterrorism attack. Each published primer was analysed to determine its melting temperature, its specificity and its coverage (i.e. its sensitivity against every allele of its target gene). Data generated have been organized in the form of data sheet for each gene, which are available through multiple browser panels and query systems.

  8. Specific detection of chikungunya virus using a RT-PCR/nested PCR combination.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, M; Linssen, B; Parke, M D; Kinney, R M

    2002-02-01

    Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is enzootic in many countries in Asia and throughout tropical Africa. In Asia the virus is transmitted from primates to humans almost exclusively by Aedes aegypti, while various aedine mosquito species are responsible for human infections in Africa. The clinical picture is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, rash and severe pain in the joints which may persist in a small proportion of cases. Although not listed as a haemorrhagic fever virus, illness caused by CHIK virus can be confused with diseases such as dengue or yellow fever, based on the similarity of the symptoms. Thus, laboratory confirmation of suspected cases is required to launch control measures during an epidemic. CHIK virus diagnosis based on virus isolation is very sensitive, yet requires at least a week in conjunction with virus identification using monovalent sera. We developed a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay which amplifies a 427-bp fragment of the E2 gene. Specificity was confirmed by testing representative strains of all known alphavirus species. To verify further the viral origin of the amplicon and to enhance sensitivity, a nested PCR was performed subsequently. This RT-PCR/nested PCR combination was able to amplify a CHIK virus-specific 172-bp amplicon from a sample containing as few as 10 genome equivalents. This assay was successfully applied to four CHIK virus isolates from Asia and Africa as well as to a vaccine strain developed by USAMRIID. Our method can be completed in less than two working days and may serve as a sensitive alternative in CHIK virus diagnosis.

  9. A comparison of DNA methylation specific droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) and real time qPCR with flow cytometry in characterizing human T cells in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Bracci, Paige M; Hsuang, George; Zheng, Shichun; Hansen, Helen; Wrensch, Margaret R; Rice, Terri; Eliot, Melissa; Kelsey, Karl T

    2014-10-01

    Quantitating the copy number of demethylated CpG promoter sites of the CD3Z gene can be used to estimate the numbers and proportions of T cells in human blood and tissue. Quantitative methylation specific PCR (qPCR) is useful for studying T cells but requires extensive calibration and is imprecise at low copy numbers. Here we compared the performance of a new digital PCR platform (droplet digital PCR or ddPCR) to qPCR using bisulfite converted DNA from 157 blood specimens obtained from ambulatory care controls and patients with primary glioma. We compared both ddPCR and qPCR with conventional flow cytometry (FACS) evaluation of CD3 positive T cells. Repeated measures on the same blood sample revealed ddPCR to be less variable than qPCR. Both qPCR and ddPCR correlated significantly with FACS evaluation of peripheral blood CD3 counts and CD3/total leukocyte values. However, statistical measures of agreement showed that linear concordance was stronger for ddPCR than for qPCR and the absolute values were closer to FACS for ddPCR. Both qPCR and ddPCR could distinguish clinically significant differences in T cell proportions and performed similarly to FACS. Given the higher precision, greater accuracy, and technical simplicity of ddPCR, this approach appears to be a superior DNA methylation based method than conventional qPCR for the assessment of T cells.

  10. Loop-linker PCR: an advanced PCR technique for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Shi, Hui; Xu, Wentao; Hao, Junran; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-10-01

    In this article, we developed a novel PCR method, termed loop-linker PCR, to isolate flanking sequences in transgenic crops. The novelty of this approach is its use of a stem-loop structure to design a loop-linker adapter. The adapter is designed to form a nick site when ligated with restricted DNA. This modification not only can prevent the self-ligation of adapters but also promotes the elongation of the 3' end of the loop-linker adapter to generate a stem-loop structure in the ligation products. Moreover, the suppressive effect of the stem-loop structure decreases nonspecific amplification and increases the success rate of the approach; all extension products will suppress exponential amplification except from the ligation product that contains the specific primer binding site. Using this method, 442, 1830, 107, and 512 bp left border flanking sequences were obtained from the transgenic maizes LY038, DAS-59122-7, Event 3272, and the transgenic soybean MON89788, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that loop-linker PCR is an efficient, reliable, and cost-effective method for identifying flanking sequences in transgenic crops and could be applied for other genome walking applications.

  11. Reconstruction of the original mycoflora in pelleted feed by PCR-SSCP and qPCR.

    PubMed

    Dorn-In, Samart; Fahn, Carmen; Hölzel, Christina S; Wenz, Sebastian; Hartwig, Isabella; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2014-10-01

    Ground feeds for pigs were investigated for fungal contamination before and after pelleting (subsamples in total n = 24) by cultural and molecular biological methods. A fungal-specific primer pair ITS1/ITS5.8R was used to amplify fungal DNA; PCR products were processed for the PCR-SSCP method. In the resulting acrylamide gel, more than 85% of DNA bands of ground feeds were preserved after pelleting. Twenty-two DNA bands were sequenced; all represented fungal DNA. The level of fungal DNA in ground feed samples was equivalent to 4.77-5.69 log10  CFU g(-1) , calculated by qPCR using a standard curve of Aspergillus flavus. In pelleted feed, the level of fungal DNA was in average ± 0.07 log10 different from ground feed. Quantified by cultural methods, the fresh ground feeds contained up to 4.51 log10  CFU g(-1) culturable fungi, while there was < 2.83 log10  CFU g(-1) detected in pelleted feeds. This result shows that, while the process of pelleting reduced the amount of living fungi dramatically, it did not affect the total fungal DNA in feed. Thus, the described methodology was able to reconstruct the fungal microbiota in feeds and reflected a considerable fungal contamination of raw materials such as grains.

  12. The inhibitory effect of pentobarbitone on reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Changbaig; Filippich, Lucio John; Hughes, Ian

    2005-01-31

    Pentobarbitone sodium (Sodium 5-ethyl-5[1-methylbutyl]-pentobarbitone) is a short-acting barbiturate that is commonly used to euthanase animals. As part of our studies into the molecular genetics of copper toxicosis in Bedlington terrier dogs, reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR was noted to always fail on RNA samples collected from livers of dogs sacrificed by pentobarbitone injection. When samples were collected without pentobarbitone, however, RT-PCR was always successful. We suspected the possible inhibition by pentobarbitone sodium of either reverse transcriptase or Taq polymerase. In vitro studies showed that pentobarbitone interference of PCR occurred at >4 microg/microl. To identify if pentobarbitone produced competitive inhibition, each components (Taq polymerase, MgCl(2), dNTP, etc.) of the PCR was individually altered. However, inhibition still persisted, suggesting that multiple PCR components may be affected. Also it was shown that pentobarbitone interference was not dependent on the PCR product size. Simple dilution of pentobarbitone contaminated DNA solutions, and the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the PCR mix overcame pentobarbitone interference. In vivo, PCR by pentobarbitone was found to be compounded by high DNA concentration and pentobarbitone contamination. In addition, both high DNA concentration and pentobarbitone contamination could be overcome through dilution and the addition of BSA. Further work is required to quantify pentobarbitone concentration in the liver-extracted DNA and RNA samples before this inhibition effect on PCR can be fully elucidated.

  13. Buoyancy-Driven Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, K D; Wheeler, E K; Benett, W; Stratton, P; Christian, A; Chen, A; Ortega, J; Weisgraber, T H; Goodson, K E

    2004-09-28

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) facilitates DNA detection by significantly increasing the concentration of specific DNA segments. A new class of PCR instruments uses a buoyancy-driven re-circulating flow to thermally cycle the DNA sample and benefits from reduced cycle times, low sample volumes, a miniaturized format, and low power consumption. This paper analyzes a specific buoyancy PCR device in a micro-channel ''race-track'' geometry to determine key parameters about PCR cycle times and other figures of merit as functions of device dimensions. The 1-D model balances the buoyancy driving force with frictional losses. A hydrostatic pressure imbalance concept is used between the left and right sides of the fluid loop to calculate the buoyancy driving force. Velocity and temperature distributions within the channels are determined from two-dimensional analysis of the channel section, with developing region effects included empirically through scaled values of the local Nusselt number. Good agreement between four independent verification steps validate the 1-D simulation approach: (1) analytical expressions for the thermal entrance length are compared against, (2) comparison with a full 3-D finite element simulation, (3) comparison with an experimental flow field characterization, and (4) calculation of the minimum PCR runtime required to get a positive PCR signal from the buoyancy-driven PCR device. The 1-D approach closely models an actual buoyancy-driven PCR device and can further be used as a rapid design tool to simulate buoyancy PCR flows and perform detailed design optimizations studies.

  14. Variation in copy number of the 28S rDNA of Aspergillus fumigatus measured by droplet digital PCR and analog quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Benabou, Marion; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) after DNA digestion yielded a 28S rDNA copy number of 61 to 86 copies/genome when testing 10 unrelated Aspergillus fumigatus isolates, higher than with quantitative PCR. Unfortunately, ddPCR after DNA digestion did not improve the sensitivity of our PCR assay when testing serum patients with invasive aspergillosis.

  15. Comparison of droplet digital PCR with quantitative real-time PCR for determination of zygosity in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Xiaofu; Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Junfeng

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the applicability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as a tool for maize zygosity determination using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) as a reference technology. Quantitative real-time PCR is commonly used to determine transgene copy number or GMO zygosity characterization. However, its effectiveness is based on identical reaction efficiencies for the transgene and the endogenous reference gene. Additionally, a calibrator sample should be utilized for accuracy. Droplet digital PCR is a DNA molecule counting technique that directly counts the absolute number of target and reference DNA molecules in a sample, independent of assay efficiency or external calibrators. The zygosity of the transgene can be easily determined using the ratio of the quantity of the target gene to the reference single copy endogenous gene. In this study, both the qPCR and ddPCR methods were used to determine insect-resistant transgenic maize IE034 zygosity. Both methods performed well, but the ddPCR method was more convenient because of its absolute quantification property.

  16. Hypervariable spacer regions are good sites for developing specific PCR-RFLP markers and PCR primers for screening actinorhizal symbionts.

    PubMed

    Varehese, Rajani; Chauhan, Vineeta S; Misra, Arvind K

    2003-06-01

    While the ribosomal RNA like highly conserved genes are good molecular chronometers for establishing phylogenetic relationships, they can also be useful in securing the amplification of adjoining hyper-variable regions. These regions can then be used for developing specific PCR primers or PCR-RFL profiles to be used as molecular markers. We report here the use of ITS region of rrn operon of Frankia for developing PCR-RFL profiles capable of discriminating between closely related frankiae. We have also made use of the ITS1 region of the nuclear rrn operon of Alnus nepalensis (D Don) for designing a PCR primer for specific amplification of nuclear DNA of this tree.

  17. Real-time PCR for the detection of Salmonella spp. in food: An alternative approach to a conventional PCR system suggested by the FOOD-PCR project.

    PubMed

    Hein, Ingeborg; Flekna, Gabriele; Krassnig, Martina; Wagner, Martin

    2006-09-01

    A real-time PCR assay using non-patented primers and a TaqMan probe for the detection and quantification of Salmonella spp. is presented. The assay is based on an internationally validated conventional PCR system, which was suggested as a standard method for the detection of Salmonella spp. in the FOOD-PCR project. The assay was sensitive and specific. Consistent detection of 9.5 genome equivalents per PCR reaction was achieved, whereas samples containing an average of 0.95 genome equivalents per reaction were inconsistently positive. The assay performed equally well as a commercially available real-time PCR assay and allowed sensitive detection of Salmonella spp. in artificially contaminated food. After enrichment for 16 h in buffered peptone water (BPW) or universal pre-enrichment broth (UPB) 2.5 CFU/25 g salmon and minced meat, and 5 CFU/25 g chicken meat and 25 ml raw milk were detected. Enrichment in BPW yielded higher numbers of CFU/ml than UPB for all matrices tested. However, the productivity of UPB was sufficient, as all samples were positive with both real-time PCR methods, including those containing less than 300 CFU/ml enrichment broth (enrichment of 5 CFU/25 ml raw milk in UPB).

  18. Quantitative PCR Method for Diagnosis of Citrus Bacterial Canker†

    PubMed Central

    Cubero, J.; Graham, J. H.; Gottwald, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    For diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker by PCR, an internal standard is employed to ensure the quality of the DNA extraction and that proper requisites exist for the amplification reaction. The ratio of PCR products from the internal standard and bacterial target is used to estimate the initial bacterial concentration in citrus tissues with lesions. PMID:11375206

  19. Applications of competitor RNA in diagnostic reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Kleiboeker, Steven B

    2003-05-01

    Detection of RNA viruses by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR has proven to be a useful approach for the diagnosis of infections caused by many viral pathogens. However, adequate controls are required for each step of the RT-PCR protocol to ensure the accuracies of diagnostic test results. Heterologous competitor RNA can be used as a control for a number of different aspects of diagnostic RT-PCR. Competitor RNA can be applied to assessments of the efficiency of RNA recovery during extraction procedures, detection of endogenous RT-PCR inhibitors that could lead to false-negative results, and quantification of viral template in samples used for diagnosis; competitor RNA can also be used as a positive control for the RT-PCR. In the present study, heterologous competitor RNA was synthesized by a method that uses two long oligonucleotide primers containing primer binding sites for RT-PCR amplification of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus or West Nile virus. Amplification of the competitor RNA by RT-PCR resulted in a product that was easily distinguished from the amplification product of viral RNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. Assessment of a variety of RNA samples prepared from routine submissions to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory found that either partial or complete inhibition of the RT-PCR could be demonstrated for approximately 20% of the samples. When inhibition was detected, either dilution of the sample or RNA extraction by an alternative protocol proved successful in eliminating the source of inhibition.

  20. ANIMAL DNA IN PCR REAGENTS PLAGUES ANCIENT DNA RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high-cycle PCR amplification targ...

  1. Detection of Salmonella spp. in oysters by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bej, A K; Mahbubani, M H; Boyce, M J; Atlas, R M

    1994-01-01

    PCR DNA amplification of a region of the himA gene of Salmonella typhimurium specifically detected Salmonella spp. In oysters, 1 to 10 cells of Salmonella spp. were rapidly detected by the PCR following a pre-enrichment step to increase sensitivity and to ensure that detection was based on the presence of viable Salmonella spp. Images PMID:8117091

  2. Interlaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Test Results for Dehalococcoides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques have been widely used to measure Dehalococcoides (Dhc) DNA in the groundwater at field sites for several years. Interpretation of these data may be complicated when different laboratories using alternate methods conduct the analysis. An...

  3. DNA probes and PCR for diagnosis of parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J B

    1995-01-01

    DNA probe and PCR-based assays to identify and detect parasites are technically complex; however, they have high sensitivity, directly detect parasites independent of the immunocompetence or previous clinical history of the patient, and can distinguish between organisms that are morphologically similar. Diagnosis of parasites is often based on direct detection by microscopy, which is insensitive and laborious and can lack specificity. Most PCR-based assays were more sensitive than DNA probe assays. The development of PCR-based diagnostic assays requires multiple steps following the initial selection of oligonucleotide primers and reporter probe. Generally, the ability to detect the DNA of one parasite was attained by PCR; however, advances in the preparation of samples for PCR (extraction of DNA while removing PCR inhibitors) will be required to achieve that sensitivity with human specimens. Preliminary PCR systems have been developed for many different parasites, yet few have been evaluated with a large number of clinical specimens and/or under field conditions. Those evaluations are essential for determination of clinical and field utility and performance and of the most appropriate application of the assay. Several situations in which PCR-based diagnosis will result in epidemiologic, medical, or public health advances have been identified. PMID:7704890

  4. Evaluation of Aspergillus PCR protocols for testing serum specimens.

    PubMed

    White, P Lewis; Mengoli, Carlo; Bretagne, Stéphane; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Finnstrom, Niklas; Klingspor, Lena; Melchers, Willem J G; McCulloch, Elaine; Barnes, Rosemary A; Donnelly, J Peter; Loeffler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    A panel of human serum samples spiked with various amounts of Aspergillus fumigatus genomic DNA was distributed to 23 centers within the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative to determine analytical performance of PCR. Information regarding specific methodological components and PCR performance was requested. The information provided was made anonymous, and meta-regression analysis was performed to determine any procedural factors that significantly altered PCR performance. Ninety-seven percent of protocols were able to detect a threshold of 10 genomes/ml on at least one occasion, with 83% of protocols reproducibly detecting this concentration. Sensitivity and specificity were 86.1% and 93.6%, respectively. Positive associations between sensitivity and the use of larger sample volumes, an internal control PCR, and PCR targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were shown. Negative associations between sensitivity and the use of larger elution volumes (≥100 μl) and PCR targeting the mitochondrial genes were demonstrated. Most Aspergillus PCR protocols used to test serum generate satisfactory analytical performance. Testing serum requires less standardization, and the specific recommendations shown in this article will only improve performance.

  5. Comparison between ICT and PCR for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Khan, E R; Hossain, M A; Paul, S K; Mahmud, C; Hasan, M M; Rahman, M M; Nahar, K; Kubayashi, N

    2012-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterium which is the most prevalent cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STI). The present study was carried to diagnose genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection among women of reproductive age, attending Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, during July 2009 to June 2010 by Immunochromatographic test (ICT) and Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 70 females were included in this study. Out of 70 cases 56 were symptomatic and 14 asymptomatic. Endocervical swabs were collected from each of the cases and examined by Immunochromatographic test (ICT) for antigen detection and Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of endogenous plasmid-based nucleic acid. A total 29(41.4%) of the cases were found positive for C. trachomatis either by ICT or PCR. Of the 56 symptomatic cases, 19(33.9%) were found ICT positive and 17(30.4%) were PCR positive. Among 14 asymptomatic females, 2(14.3%) were ICT positive and none were PCR positive. Though PCR is highly sensitive but a total of twelve cases were found ICT positive but PCR negative. It may be due to presence of plasmid deficient strain of C trachomatis which could be amplified by ompA based (Chromosomal gene) multiplex PCR.

  6. Comparison of two DNA extractions and nested PCR, real-time PCR, a new commercial PCR assay, and bacterial culture for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine feces.

    PubMed

    Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Dammen, Matthew A; Weeks, Shelleen R; Epperson, William B; Singh, Shri N; Steinlicht, Gina L; Fang, Ying; Skaare, Jessica L; Larsen, Jill L; Payeur, Janet B; Nelson, Eric A

    2003-03-01

    In this study, 5 combinations of 2 DNA extractions and 3 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were compared with culture for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis directly from bovine feces. These combinations included a new commercial extraction technique combined with a commercial PCR/Southern blot technique, nested PCR (nPCR), or real-time PCR, and a university-developed extraction combined with nPCR or real-time PCR. Four of the 5 combinations had statistically similar sensitivities between 93% and 100% and specificity between 95% and 100%, when compared with culture results from 63 bovine fecal samples. These results indicated that using a commercial extraction with a commercial PCR/Southern blot, nPCR, or real-time PCR, or a university-developed extraction with real-time PCR would result in similar sensitivities to culture for the identification of M. paratuberculosis from bovine feces and are valid alternatives to culture.

  7. Detection of episomal banana streak badnavirus by IC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Dahal, G; Thottappilly, G; Hull, R

    1999-04-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based strategy to detect episomal banana streak badnavirus (BSV) in banana and plantain plants that carry integrated BSV sequences was developed. Antisera used in immuno-capture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) are capable of binding a large number of BSV serotypes. The primers used for PCR are capable of annealing to and amplifying across the aspartic protease-reverse transcriptase domain boundaries of both episomal and integrated BSV sequences and result in similar or identical sequence size fragments from either template. However, we show that under the conditions selected for IC-PCR, nuclear, mitochondrial or chloroplast genomic sequences are not amplified and thus only captured episomal BSV is amplified. IC-PCR is suitable for the large-scale screening of Musa for episomal BSV which is necessary for germplasm movement.

  8. Engineered DNA polymerase improves PCR results for plastid DNA1

    PubMed Central

    Schori, Melanie; Appel, Maryke; Kitko, AlexaRae; Showalter, Allan M.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Secondary metabolites often inhibit PCR and sequencing reactions in extractions from plant material, especially from silica-dried and herbarium material. A DNA polymerase that is tolerant to inhibitors improves PCR results. • Methods and Results: A novel DNA amplification system, including a DNA polymerase engineered via directed evolution for improved tolerance to common plant-derived PCR inhibitors, was evaluated and PCR parameters optimized for three species. An additional 31 species were then tested with the engineered enzyme and optimized protocol, as well as with regular Taq polymerase. • Conclusions: PCR products and high-quality sequence data were obtained for 96% of samples for rbcL and 79% for matK, compared to 29% and 21% with regular Taq polymerase. PMID:25202519

  9. Rapid diagnosis of poliovirus infection by PCR amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Chezzi, C

    1996-01-01

    A single-tube, single-primer-set reverse transcription-PCR assay was developed for the rapid detection of polioviruses in infected tissue culture fluids and clinical materials. The poliovirus-specific PCR primers are located in the VP1-2A region of the poliovirus genome. They generate a 290-bp product and can be used in duplex reactions with general enterovirus primers. The primers span the region used for genotype determination, so that genotype analysis of wild-type polioviruses can be performed by direct sequencing of the PCR products. Of 125 virus isolates typed as polioviruses by neutralization assays, 125 (100%) were also positive by PCR, and of 38 isolates typed as non-polio enteroviruses by conventional techniques, 38 (100%) were also negative by PCR. The assay described here is rapid, highly sensitive, and specific and has clinical applicability in the diagnosis of poliovirus infections. PMID:8784577

  10. Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorighi, K. M.; Betancourt, J.; Sapp, J.; Quan, T. K.; Lee, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of PCR, as well as fundamental scientific process skills such as planning experiments, making predictions and interpreting data. In particular, the activity prompts students to use PCR to determine which gene has been deleted in a region of the Drosophila genome. During this activity, students also gained technical experience in common molecular biology techniques, learned about additional applications of PCR and used a hands-on approach to model each step of PCR.

  11. Transcript quantitation in total yeast cellular RNA using kinetic PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kang, John J.; Watson, Robert M.; Fisher, Mary E.; Higuchi, Russell; Gelfand, David H.; Holland, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetically monitored, reverse transcriptase-initiated PCR (kinetic RT–PCR, kRT–PCR) is a novel application of kinetic PCR for high throughput transcript quantitation in total cellular RNA. The assay offers the simplicity and flexibility of an enzyme assay with distinct advantages over DNA microarray hybridization and SAGE technologies for certain applications. The reproducibility, sensitivity and accuracy of the kRT–PCR were assessed for yeast transcripts previously quantitated by a variety of methods including SAGE analysis. Changes in transcript levels between different genetic or physiological cell states were reproducibly quantitated with an accuracy of ±20%. The assay was sufficiently sensitive to quantitate yeast transcripts over a range of more than five orders of magnitude, including low abundance transcripts encoding cell cycle and transcriptional regulators. PMID:10606670

  12. Multiplex PCR identification of Taenia spp. in rodents and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad N S; Kapel, Christian M O

    2011-11-01

    The genus Taenia includes several species of veterinary and public health importance, but diagnosis of the etiological agent in definitive and intermediate hosts often relies on labor intensive and few specific morphometric criteria, especially in immature worms and underdeveloped metacestodes. In the present study, a multiplex PCR, based on five primers targeting the 18S rDNA and ITS2 sequences, produced a species-specific banding patterns for a range of Taenia spp. Species typing by the multiplex PCR was compared to morphological identification and sequencing of cox1 and/or 12S rDNA genes. As compared to sequencing, the multiplex PCR identified 31 of 32 Taenia metacestodes from rodents, whereas only 14 cysts were specifically identified by morphology. Likewise, the multiplex PCR identified 108 of 130 adult worms, while only 57 were identified to species by morphology. The tested multiplex PCR system may potentially be used for studies of Taenia spp. transmitted between rodents and carnivores.

  13. PCR thermal management in an integrated Lab on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Janak; Ekaputri, Mayang

    2006-04-01

    Thermal management modelling and simulations of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device to be integrated on a lab on chip (LOC) have been carried out and presented. A typical MEMS PCR in symmetrical configuration is the base model for this study. When the PCR device is integrated on a fluidic chip with many other bio-analysis components such as DNA extraction, RNA extraction, electro-chemical sensor, flow through components and channels etc., thermal symmetry required for uniform temperature across the PCR chamber is normally lost. In this paper, ANSYS 8.0 simulations in varying conditions and corresponding physical basis have been investigated and presented. Model optimizations are carried out when PCR chamber is placed, one, in the centre (symmetry) and two, in the corner (asymmetry) of the integrated chip. In both cases, temperature uniformity within ±0.5 °C variation is obtained.

  14. [Detection of influenza virus (RT-PCR assay and others)].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2003-11-01

    Viral isolation is the conventional method for influenza virus diagnosis but it is less useful for immediate patient management. RT-PCR is the sensitive and rapid assay for the detection of respiratory viruses. Single step and multiplex RT-PCR is able to detect several viruses simultaneously in a single reaction. Real time PCR(TaqMan method) is able to detect the amplicon directly by release of a fluorescent reporter of the probe during the amplification reactions. This procedure can save time since it eliminates post-PCR processing steps. These RT-PCR methods should be useful for the accurate and rapid diagnosis of influenza virus infection, especially severe cases such as pneumonia and encephalopathy.

  15. PCR detection of Babesia ovata from questing ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Okubo, Kazuhiro; Suganuma, Keisuke; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Zakimi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-04-01

    Babesia ovata is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan parasite of cattle. In the present study, we analyzed tick DNA samples (n=1459) prepared from questing ticks collected from various cattle pastures in Hokkaido (Shibecha, Taiki, Otofuke, Memuro, and Shin-Hidaka districts) and Okinawa (Yonaguni Island) prefectures of Japan for B. ovata. When all the tick DNA samples were screened by a previously described B. ovata-specific apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, none of the DNA samples was positive. Therefore, we developed a PCR assay based on the protozoan beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) gene to detect B. ovata from ticks in Japan. In the specificity test, the PCR assay amplified the expected 444-bp target gene fragment from B. ovata DNA. No PCR products were amplified from DNA samples from other blood pathogens, bovine blood, or ticks. In addition, the PCR assay detected 100 fg of B. ovata-genomic DNA extracted from an in vitro culture of the parasites. Subsequently, when all the tick DNA samples were screened by this new PCR assay, 18 were positive for B. ovata. Positive samples were found only in the Yonaguni and Memuro areas. In Okinawa, where all the ticks were identified as Haemaphysalis longicornis, 9.7% of the samples were PCR-positive, while a single tick (Ixodes ovatus) from Memuro was infected with B. ovata. When the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons were phylogenetically analyzed, they formed a separate clade containing a previously described β-tubulin gene sequence from B. ovata (Miyake strain), confirming that the PCR assay had detected only B. ovata from the tick DNA samples. This is the first report that describes the PCR detection of B. ovata in ticks. The findings warrant transmission experiments to evaluate I. ovatus as a potential vector of B. ovata.

  16. An investigation of PCR inhibition using Plexor(®) -based quantitative PCR and short tandem repeat amplification.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robyn E; Duncan, George; McCord, Bruce R

    2014-11-01

    A common problem in forensic DNA typing is PCR inhibition resulting in allele dropout and peak imbalance. In this paper, we have utilized the Plexor(®) real-time PCR quantification kit to evaluate PCR inhibition. This is performed by adding increasing concentrations of various inhibitors and evaluating changes in melt curves and PCR amplification efficiencies. Inhibitors examined included calcium, humic acid, collagen, phenol, tannic acid, hematin, melanin, urea, bile salts, EDTA, and guanidinium thiocyanate. Results were plotted and modeled using mathematical simulations. In general, we found that PCR inhibitors that bind DNA affect melt curves and CT takeoff points while those that affect the Taq polymerase tend to affect the slope of the amplification curve. Mixed mode effects were also visible. Quantitative PCR results were then compared with subsequent STR amplification using the PowerPlex(®) 16 HS System. The overall results demonstrate that real-time PCR can be an effective method to evaluate PCR inhibition and predict its effects on subsequent STR amplifications.

  17. How good is a PCR efficiency estimate: Recommendations for precise and robust qPCR efficiency assessments.

    PubMed

    Svec, David; Tichopad, Ales; Novosadova, Vendula; Pfaffl, Michael W; Kubista, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the imprecision in the estimation of PCR efficiency by means of standard curves based on strategic experimental design with large number of technical replicates. In particular, how robust this estimation is in terms of a commonly varying factors: the instrument used, the number of technical replicates performed and the effect of the volume transferred throughout the dilution series. We used six different qPCR instruments, we performed 1-16 qPCR replicates per concentration and we tested 2-10 μl volume of analyte transferred, respectively. We find that the estimated PCR efficiency varies significantly across different instruments. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we find the uncertainty in the PCR efficiency estimation may be as large as 42.5% (95% CI) if standard curve with only one qPCR replicate is used in 16 different plates. Based on our investigation we propose recommendations for the precise estimation of PCR efficiency: (1) one robust standard curve with at least 3-4 qPCR replicates at each concentration shall be generated, (2) the efficiency is instrument dependent, but reproducibly stable on one platform, and (3) using a larger volume when constructing serial dilution series reduces sampling error and enables calibration across a wider dynamic range.

  18. Field effect sensors for PCR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taing, Meng-Houit; Sweatman, Denis R.

    2004-03-01

    The use of field effect sensors for biological and chemical sensing is widely employed due to its ability to make detections based on charge and surface potential. Because proteins and DNA almost always carry a charge [1], silicon can be used to micro fabricate such a sensor. The EIS structure (Electrolyte on Insulator on Silicon) provides a novel, label-free and simple to fabricate way to make a field effect DNA detection sensor. The sensor responds to fluctuating capacitance caused by a depletion layer thickness change at the surface of the silicon substrate through DNA adsorption onto the dielectric oxide/PLL (Poly-L-Lysine) surface. As DNA molecules diffuse to the sensor surface, they are bound to their complimentary capture probes deposited on the surface. The negative charge exhibited by the DNA forces negative charge carriers in the substrate to move away from the surface. This causes an n-type depletion layer substrate to thicken and a p-type to thin. The depletion layer thickness can be measured by its capacitance using an LCR meter. This experiment is conducted using the ConVolt (constant voltage) approach. Nucleic acids are amplified by an on chip PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) system and then fed into the sensor. The low ionic solution strength will ensure that counter-ions do not affect the sensor measurements. The sensor surface contains capture probes that bind to the pathogen. The types of pathogens we"ll be detecting include salmonella, campylobacter and E.Coli DNA. They are held onto the sensor surface by the positively charged Poly-L-Lysine layer. The electrolyte is biased through a pseudo-reference electrode. Pseudo reference electrodes are usually made from metals such as Platinum or Silver. The problem associated with "floating" biasing electrodes is they cannot provide stable biasing potentials [2]. They drift due to surface charging effects and trapped charges on the surface. To eliminate this, a differential system consisting of 2 sensors

  19. Real time PCR in childhood tuberculosis: a valuable diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Rajeshwar; Kashyap, Haripal; Pounikar, Gajanand; Kamal, Raj; Yadav, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Goyal, Ankur

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to detect and quantitate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from various body fluid specimens of cases of tuberculosis by real time PCR technique and compare results with conventional PCR technique and culture. One hundred fifteen children (<18 y) with tuberculosis (diagnosed as per IAP guidelines) and 32 disease matched controls from the Department of Pediatrics, S.N. Medical College, Agra, were included in the study. Different body fluids (CSF, gastric aspirate, pleural fluid, ascitic fluid and lymph node aspirate) were subjected to culture, conventional PCR targeting insertion sequence 1S6110 and Real time PCR targeting 16srRNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Real time PCR showed significantly better results than culture in all body fluids (p < 0.05). It was superior to conventional PCR in CSF (p < 0.05) but showed comparable results in gastric aspirate, pleural fluid, ascitic fluid and lymph node aspirate (p > 0.05). Hence, real time PCR is a promising diagnostic tool for childhood tuberculosis, particularly tubercular meningitis.

  20. A comparison of four methods for PCR inhibitor removal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingqing; Liu, Yuxuan; Yi, Shaohua; Huang, Daixin

    2015-05-01

    Biological samples collected from the crime scenes often contain some compounds that can inhibit the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The removal of PCR inhibitors from the extracts prior to the PCR amplification is vital for successful forensic DNA typing. This paper aimed to evaluate the ability of four different methods (PowerClean® DNA Clean-Up kit, DNA IQ™ System, Phenol-Chloroform extraction and Chelex®-100 methods) to remove eight commonly encountered PCR inhibitors including: melanin, humic acid, collagen, bile salt, hematin, calcium ions, indigo and urea. Each of these PCR inhibitors was effectively removed by the PowerClean® DNA Clean-Up kit and DNA IQ™ System as demonstrated by generating more complete short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from the cleaned up inhibitor samples than from the raw inhibitor samples. The Phenol-Chloroform extraction and Chelex®-100 methods, however, could only remove some of eight PCR inhibitors. Our results demonstrated that the PowerClean® DNA Clean-Up kit and DNA IQ™ System were very effective for the removal of known PCR inhibitors that are routinely found in DNA extracts from forensic samples.

  1. Multiplex PCR to detect four different tomato-infecting pathogens.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Vásquez, Gabriela Alejandra; Bazán-Tejeda, María Luisa; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Kameyama-Kawabe, Luis; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María

    2013-07-01

    This work was aimed to develop a multiplex PCR assay to detect infectious agents such as Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Fusarium sp, Leveillula taurica, and begomoviruses in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Specific primer sets of each pathogen were designed based on intergenic ribosomal RNA sequences for the first three, whereas for begomoviruses, primers were designed based on conserved regions. The design also considered that the length (200-800 bp) of the PCR products was resolvable by electrophoresis; thus 296, 380, 457, and 731 bp fragments for Clavibacter, Fusarium, Leveillula, and begomoviruses, respectively, were considered. PCR conditions were optimized to amplify all the products in a single tube from genomic DNA and circumvent PCR inhibitors from infected plants. Finally, when the multiplex PCR assay was tested with tomato plants infected with any of the four pathogens, specific PCR products confirmed the presence of the pathogens. Optimized PCR multiplex allowed for the accurate and simultaneous detection of Clavibacter, Fusarium, Leveillula, and begomoviruses in infected plants or seeds from tomato.

  2. Molecular characterization of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolates using ERIC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Alessandro de Sá; Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; Andrade, Giovanna Ivo; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Gouveia, Aurora Maria Guimarães; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2011-12-15

    Caseous lymphadenitis is an infectious sheep and goats disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and characterized by abscesses in superficial and visceral lymph nodes. C. pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from these hosts have been shown to be very difficult to type by the existing methods. The aim of this study is evaluating the potential of the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR) as a tool for molecular typing of C. pseudotuberculosis strains isolated in sheep. One hundred and twenty seven isolates of C. pseudotuberculosis were isolated from lesions suspected to have had caseous lymphadenitis collected from sheep at the slaughterhouse. Animals were from 24 flocks in 13 municipalities of the Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Species identification of the isolates was performed by routine biochemical tests and mPCR. Fingerprint was performed by RAPD using ERIC-1R, ERIC-2 and ERIC-1R+ERIC-2 primers. Seventeen different genotypes were generated by ERIC 1-PCR, 21 genotypes by ERIC 2-PCR and 21 genotypes by ERIC 1+2-PCR. Hunter-Gaston Discrimination Index (HGDI) found for ERIC 1, ERIC 2, ERIC 1+2 PCR were 0.69, 0.87, and 0.84, respectively. For most herds evaluated observed at most three different genotypes among isolates from animals of these property, in all ERIC-PCR assays. However a few flocks observed between four and nine genotypes per flock. The W Kendall value found for correlation among the three techniques of ERIC-PCR was 0.91 (P<5.0 x 10(-6)). The results show that ERIC-PCR has good discriminatory power and advantages over other DNA-based typing methods, making it a useful tool to discriminate C. pseudotuberculosis isolates.

  3. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-05

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors.

  4. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  5. PCR diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia: a bivariate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Ling, Guoya; Qiang, Chenyi; Ming, Qinshou; Wu, Cong; Wang, Ke; Ying, Zouxiao

    2011-12-01

    We undertook a bivariate meta-analysis to assess the overall accuracy of respiratory specimen PCR assays for diagnosing Pneumocystis pneumonia. The summary sensitivity and specificity were 0.99 (95% confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.00) and 0.90 (0.87 to 0.93). Subgroup analyses showed that quantitative PCR analysis and the major surface glycoprotein gene target had the highest specificity value (0.93). Respiratory specimen PCR results are sufficient to confirm or exclude the disease for at-risk patients suspected of having Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  6. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  7. Identification and quantification of ice nucleation active microorganisms by digital droplet PCR (ddPCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Martin; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Several bioaerosol types, including bacteria, fungi, pollen and lichen, have been identified as sources of biological ice nucleators (IN) which induce ice formation already at temperatures as high as -10 °C or above. Accordingly, they potentially contribute widely to environmental ice nucleation in the atmosphere and are of great interest in the study of natural heterogenous ice nucleation processes. Ice nucleation active microorganisms have been found and studied among bacteria (Proteobacteria) and fungi (phyla Basidiomycota and Ascomycota). The mechanisms enabling the microorganisms to ice nucleation are subject to ongoing research. While it has been demonstrated that whole cells can act as ice nucleators in the case of bacteria due to the presence of specific membrane proteins, cell-free ice nucleation active particles seem to be responsible for this phenomenon in fungi and lichen. The identification and quantification of these ice nucleation active microorganisms and their IN in atmospheric samples is crucial to understand their contribution to the pool of atmospheric IN. This is not a trivial task since the respective microorganisms are often prevalent in lowest concentrations and a variety of states, be it viable cells, spores or cell debris from dead cells. Molecular biology provides tools to identify and quantify ice nucleation active microorganisms independent of their state by detecting genetic markers specific for the organism of interest. Those methods are not without their drawbacks in terms of sample material concentration required or reliable standardization. Digital Droplet Polymerase Chain Reaction (ddPCR) was chosen for our demands as a more elegant, quick and specific method in the investigation of ice nucleation active microorganisms in atmospheric samples. The advantages of ddPCR lie in the simultaneous detection and quantification of genetic markers and their original copy numbers in a sample. This is facilitated by the fractionation of the

  8. Oligoribonucleotide (ORN) interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR): a simple method for suppressing PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences using ORNs.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Naoki; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of multiple templates using common primers is used in a wide variety of molecular biological techniques. However, abundant templates sometimes obscure the amplification of minor species containing the same primer sequences. To overcome this challenge, we used oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) to inhibit amplification of undesired template sequences without affecting amplification of control sequences lacking complementarity to the ORNs. ORNs were effective at very low concentrations, with IC50 values for ORN-mediated suppression on the order of 10 nM. DNA polymerases that retain 3'-5' exonuclease activity, such as KOD and Pfu polymerases, but not those that retain 5'-3' exonuclease activity, such as Taq polymerase, could be used for ORN-mediated suppression. ORN interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR) technology should be a useful tool for both molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis.

  9. COMplementary Primer ASymmetric PCR (COMPAS-PCR) Applied to the Identification of Salmo salar, Salmo trutta and Their Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Avoiding complementarity between primers when designing a PCR assay constitutes a central rule strongly anchored in the mind of the molecular scientist. 3’-complementarity will extend the primers during PCR elongation using one another as template, consequently disabling further possible involvement in traditional target amplification. However, a 5’-complementarity will leave the primers unchanged during PCR cycles, albeit sequestered to one another, therefore also suppressing target amplification. We show that 5’-complementarity between primers may be exploited in a new PCR method called COMplementary-Primer-Asymmetric (COMPAS)-PCR, using asymmetric primer concentrations to achieve target PCR amplification. Moreover, such a design may paradoxically reduce spurious non-target amplification by actively sequestering the limiting primer. The general principles were demonstrated using 5S rDNA direct repeats as target sequences to design a species-specific assay for identifying Salmo salar and Salmo trutta using almost fully complementary primers overlapping the same target sequence. Specificity was enhanced by using 3’-penultimate point mutations and the assay was further developed to enable identification of S. salar x S. trutta hybrids by High Resolution Melt analysis in a 35 min one-tube assay. This small paradigm shift, using highly complementary primers for PCR, should help develop robust assays that previously would not be considered. PMID:27783658

  10. Whole blood Nested PCR and Real-time PCR amplification of Talaromyces marneffei specific DNA for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sha; Li, Xiqing; Calderone, Richard; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jianchi; Cai, Wenying; Xi, Liyan

    2016-02-01

    Talaromyces marneffei is a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, which is a life-threatening invasive mycosis in the immunocompromised host. Prompt diagnosis of T. marneffei infection remains difficult although there has been progress in attempts to expedite the diagnosis of this infection. We previously demonstrated the value of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect T. marneffei in paraffin embedded tissue samples with high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, this assay was used to detect the DNA of T. marneffei in whole blood samples. Real-time PCR assay was also evaluated to identify T. marneffei in the same samples. Twenty out of 30 whole blood samples (67%) collected from 23 patients were found positive by using the nested PCR assay, while 23/30 (77%) samples were found positive by using the real-time PCR assay. In order to express accurately the fungal loads, we used a normalized linearized plasmid as an internal control for real-time PCR. The assay results were correlated as the initial quantity (copies/μl) with fungal burden. These data indicate that combination of nested PCR and real-time PCR assay provides an attractive alternative for identification of T. marneffei DNA in whole blood samples of HIV-infected patients.

  11. COMplementary Primer ASymmetric PCR (COMPAS-PCR) Applied to the Identification of Salmo salar, Salmo trutta and Their Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Anglès d'Auriac, Marc B

    2016-01-01

    Avoiding complementarity between primers when designing a PCR assay constitutes a central rule strongly anchored in the mind of the molecular scientist. 3'-complementarity will extend the primers during PCR elongation using one another as template, consequently disabling further possible involvement in traditional target amplification. However, a 5'-complementarity will leave the primers unchanged during PCR cycles, albeit sequestered to one another, therefore also suppressing target amplification. We show that 5'-complementarity between primers may be exploited in a new PCR method called COMplementary-Primer-Asymmetric (COMPAS)-PCR, using asymmetric primer concentrations to achieve target PCR amplification. Moreover, such a design may paradoxically reduce spurious non-target amplification by actively sequestering the limiting primer. The general principles were demonstrated using 5S rDNA direct repeats as target sequences to design a species-specific assay for identifying Salmo salar and Salmo trutta using almost fully complementary primers overlapping the same target sequence. Specificity was enhanced by using 3'-penultimate point mutations and the assay was further developed to enable identification of S. salar x S. trutta hybrids by High Resolution Melt analysis in a 35 min one-tube assay. This small paradigm shift, using highly complementary primers for PCR, should help develop robust assays that previously would not be considered.

  12. Specific detection of viable Legionella cells by combined use of photoactivated ethidium monoazide and PCR/real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bin; Sugiyama, Kanji; Taguri, Toshitsugu; Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Watanabe, Haruo

    2009-01-01

    Legionella organisms are prevalent in manmade water systems and cause legionellosis in humans. A rapid detection method for viable Legionella cells combining ethidium monoazide (EMA) and PCR/real-time PCR was assessed. EMA could specifically intercalate and cleave the genomic DNA of heat- and chlorine-treated dead Legionella cells. The EMA-PCR assay clearly showed an amplified fragment specific for Legionella DNA from viable cells, but it could not do so for DNA from dead cells. The number of EMA-treated dead Legionella cells estimated by real-time PCR exhibited a 10(4)- to 10(5)-fold decrease compared to the number of dead Legionella cells without EMA treatment. Conversely, no significant difference in the numbers of EMA-treated and untreated viable Legionella cells was detected by the real-time PCR assay. The combined assay was also confirmed to be useful for specific detection of culturable Legionella cells from water samples obtained from spas. Therefore, the combined use of EMA and PCR/real-time PCR detects viable Legionella cells rapidly and specifically and may be useful in environmental surveillance for Legionella.

  13. Sensitive simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in semen by multiplex-PCR and of HPV by single PCR.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, Fabrícia; Medina, Fabiana Soares; Abreu, André Luelsdorf Pimenta de; Irie, Mary Mayumi Taguti; Esquiçati, Isis Baroni; Malagutti, Natália; Vasconcellos, Vinícius Rodrigo Bulla; Discacciati, Michele Garcia; Bonini, Marcelo Gialluisi; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may impair sperm parameters and functions thereby promoting male infertility. To date limited molecular studies were conducted to evaluate the frequency and type of such infections in semen Thus, we aimed at conceiving and validating a multiplex PCR (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the following STD pathogens in semen: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes virus simplex (HSV) -1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum; We also investigated the potential usefulness of this M-PCR assay in screening programs for semen pathogens. In addition, we aimed: to detect human Papillomavirus (HPV) and genotypes by single PCR (sPCR) in the same semen samples; to determine the prevalence of the seven STDs, HPV and co-infections; to assess the possibility that these infections affect semen parameters and thus fertility. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR were extremely high including agreement (99.2%), sensitivity (100.00%), specificity (99.70%), positive (96.40%) and negative predictive values (100.00%) and accuracy (99.80%). The prevalence of STDs was very high (55.3%). Furthermore, associations were observed between STDs and changes in semen parameters, highlighting the importance of STD detection in semen. Thus, this M-PCR assay has great potential for application in semen screening programs for pathogens in infertility and STD clinics and in sperm banks.

  14. Sensitive Simultaneous Detection of Seven Sexually Transmitted Agents in Semen by Multiplex-PCR and of HPV by Single PCR

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, André Luelsdorf Pimenta; Irie, Mary Mayumi Taguti; Esquiçati, Isis Baroni; Malagutti, Natália; Vasconcellos, Vinícius Rodrigo Bulla; Discacciati, Michele Garcia; Bonini, Marcelo Gialluisi; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may impair sperm parameters and functions thereby promoting male infertility. To date limited molecular studies were conducted to evaluate the frequency and type of such infections in semen Thus, we aimed at conceiving and validating a multiplex PCR (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the following STD pathogens in semen: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes virus simplex (HSV) −1 and −2, and Treponema pallidum; We also investigated the potential usefulness of this M-PCR assay in screening programs for semen pathogens. In addition, we aimed: to detect human Papillomavirus (HPV) and genotypes by single PCR (sPCR) in the same semen samples; to determine the prevalence of the seven STDs, HPV and co-infections; to assess the possibility that these infections affect semen parameters and thus fertility. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR were extremely high including agreement (99.2%), sensitivity (100.00%), specificity (99.70%), positive (96.40%) and negative predictive values (100.00%) and accuracy (99.80%). The prevalence of STDs was very high (55.3%). Furthermore, associations were observed between STDs and changes in semen parameters, highlighting the importance of STD detection in semen. Thus, this M-PCR assay has great potential for application in semen screening programs for pathogens in infertility and STD clinics and in sperm banks. PMID:24921247

  15. A PCR assay and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism combination identifying the 3 primary Mycoplasma species causing mastitis.

    PubMed

    Boonyayatra, S; Fox, L K; Besser, T E; Sawant, A; Gay, J M; Raviv, Z

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the current research was to develop real-time PCR assays with improved sensitivity and the capacity to simultaneously speciate the 3 most common mycoplasma mastitis agents: Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma californicum, and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium. Real-time PCR was chosen because it provides rapid results. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used as the gold standard for evaluating candidate real-time PCR assays. To ascertain the real-time PCR assay specificity, reference strains of Mycoplasma species, Acholeplasma axanthum, and common gram-positive and gram-negative mastitis pathogens were tested. No cross-reactions were observed. Mycoplasma spp. isolated from bovine milk samples (n=228) and other organ sites (n=40) were tested by the real-time PCR assays and the partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing assay. Overall accuracy of this novel real-time PCR was 98.51%; 4 of 228 isolates identified as M. bovis by the partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing assay were identified as both M. bovis and M. californicum by real-time PCR. Subsequent amplicon sequencing suggested the presence of both M. bovis and M. californicum in these 4 samples. Using a cycle threshold of 37, the detection limits for real-time PCR were 10 copies of DNA template for both M. bovis and M. bovigenitalium, and 1 copy for M. californicum. This real-time PCR assay is a diagnostic technique that may be used as a screening tool or as a confirmation test for mycoplasma mastitis.

  16. Clinical Performance of Aspergillus PCR for Testing Serum and Plasma: a Study by the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative.

    PubMed

    White, P Lewis; Barnes, Rosemary A; Springer, Jan; Klingspor, Lena; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Morton, C Oliver; Lagrou, Katrien; Bretagne, Stéphane; Melchers, Willem J G; Mengoli, Carlo; Donnelly, J Peter; Heinz, Werner J; Loeffler, Juergen

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus PCR testing of serum provides technical simplicity but with potentially reduced sensitivity compared to whole-blood testing. With diseases for which screening to exclude disease represents an optimal strategy, sensitivity is paramount. The associated analytical study confirmed that DNA concentrations were greater in plasma than those in serum. The aim of the current investigation was to confirm analytical findings by comparing the performance of Aspergillus PCR testing of plasma and serum in the clinical setting. Standardized Aspergillus PCR was performed on plasma and serum samples concurrently obtained from hematology patients in a multicenter retrospective anonymous case-control study, with cases diagnosed according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) consensus definitions (19 proven/probable cases and 42 controls). Clinical performance and clinical utility (time to positivity) were calculated for both kinds of samples. The sensitivity and specificity for Aspergillus PCR when testing serum were 68.4% and 76.2%, respectively, and for plasma, they were 94.7% and 83.3%, respectively. Eighty-five percent of serum and plasma PCR results were concordant. On average, plasma PCR was positive 16.8 days before diagnosis and was the earliest indicator of infection in 13 cases, combined with other biomarkers in five cases. On average, serum PCR was positive 10.8 days before diagnosis and was the earliest indicator of infection in six cases, combined with other biomarkers in three cases. These results confirm the analytical finding that the sensitivity of Aspergillus PCR using plasma is superior to that using serum. PCR positivity occurs earlier when testing plasma and provides sufficient sensitivity for the screening of invasive aspergillosis while maintaining methodological simplicity.

  17. Quantitative PCR for genetic markers of human fecal pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantification approach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described hum...

  18. Quantitative PCR for Genetic Markers of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantificationapproach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for quantification of two recently described human-...

  19. Identification of Alocasia odora (Kuwazuimo in Japanese) Using PCR Method.

    PubMed

    Hagino, Kayo; Nakano, Hisako; Shimizu, Motomu; Terai, Akiko; Ogai, Mami; Aragane, Masako; Abe, Tomohiro; Sasamoto, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    Kuwazuimo (Alocasia odora) and shimakuwazuimo (Alocasia cucullata) are evergreen perennial plants that originated in East Asia. Although inedible, they are occasionally eaten by mistake because they resemble satoimo (Colocasia esculenta), and this has caused food poisoning in Japan. It is not easy to determine the cause of a food poisoning outbreak from the shape or chemical composition when the available sample is small. Therefore, we developed a new primer pair for PCR to identify kuwazuimo and shimakuwazuimo in small samples, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA. Using PCR with the developed primer pair, we detected all samples of kuwazuimo obtained from the market, while excluding 17 other kinds of crops. The samples were identified as shimakuwazuimo by DNA sequencing of the PCR products. The present PCR method showed high specificity and was confirmed to be applicable to the identification of kuwazuimo and shimakuwazuimo from various crops.

  20. Single-molecule emulsion PCR in microfluidic droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingxia; Guan, Zhichao; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-06-01

    The application of microfluidic droplet PCR for single-molecule amplification and analysis has recently been extensively studied. Microfluidic droplet technology has the advantages of compartmentalizing reactions into discrete volumes, performing highly parallel reactions in monodisperse droplets, reducing cross-contamination between droplets, eliminating PCR bias and nonspecific amplification, as well as enabling fast amplification with rapid thermocycling. Here, we have reviewed the important technical breakthroughs of microfluidic droplet PCR in the past five years and their applications to single-molecule amplification and analysis, such as high-throughput screening, next generation DNA sequencing, and quantitative detection of rare mutations. Although the utilization of microfluidic droplet single-molecule PCR is still in the early stages, its great potential has already been demonstrated and will provide novel solutions to today's biomedical engineering challenges in single-molecule amplification and analysis.

  1. Rapid PCR amplification of DNA utilizing Coriolis effects.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Gustaf; Skote, Martin; Malmqvist, Mats; Falk, Mats; Asp, Allan; Svanvik, Nicke; Johansson, Arne

    2006-08-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is presented that utilizes Coriolis and centrifugal effects, produced by rotation of the sample disc, in order to increase internal circulatory rates, and with them temperature homogenization and mixing speeds. A proof of concept has been presented by testing a rapid 45-cycle PCR DNA amplification protocol. During the repeated heating and cooling that constitutes a PCR process, the 100 microL samples were rotated at a speed equivalent to an effective acceleration of gravity of 7,000 g. A cycle time of 20.5 s gave a total process time of 15 min to complete the 45 cycles. A theoretical and numerical analysis of the resulting flow, which describes the increased mixing and temperature homogenization, is presented. The device gives excellent reaction speed efficiency, which is beneficial for rapid PCR.

  2. Introducing basic molecular biology to Turkish rural and urban primary school children via hands-on PCR and gel electrophoresis activities.

    PubMed

    Selli, Cigdem; Yıldırım, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

    2014-01-01

    This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gel electrophoresis. The participants were 13-year-old eighth-graders attending primary schools affiliated with Ministry of National Education in urban and rural areas of Izmir, Turkey. The purpose of this study was to introduce basic molecular biology concepts through individually performed experiments such as PCR and gel electrophoresis integrated with creative drama. The students were assessed at the beginning and the end of each project day via mini-tests, experimental and presentation skills evaluation forms. Data showed that students' knowledge about DNA structure and basic molecular biology techniques significantly increased. On the basis of experimental and presentational skills, there was no significant difference between kids from urban and rural schools or between public and boarding public schools, whereas the average score of girls was significantly higher than that of boys. In conclusion, individually performed experiments integrated with creative drama significantly increased students' perception of complex experimental procedures on basic molecular biology concepts. Data suggests that integration of these concepts into the science and technology curriculum of Turkish primary education may support the recruitment of future scientists who can handle rapidly developing genomic techniques that will affect our everyday life.

  3. DNA Microarray-Based PCR Ribotyping of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray. PMID:25411174

  4. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray.

  5. Quantification of HEV RNA by Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Florence; Cazabat, Michelle; Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Sauné, Karine; Chiabrando, Julie; Dubois, Martine; Kamar, Nassim; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of real-time PCR for hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA quantification differs greatly among techniques. Standardized tools that measure the real quantity of virus are needed. We assessed the performance of a reverse transcription droplet digital PCR (RT-ddPCR) assay that gives absolute quantities of HEV RNA. Analytical and clinical validation was done on HEV genotypes 1, 3 and 4, and was based on open reading frame (ORF)3 amplification. The within-run and between-run reproducibilities were very good, the analytical sensitivity was 80 HEV RNA international units (IU)/mL and linearities of HEV genotype 1, 3 and 4 were very similar. Clinical validation based on 45 samples of genotype 1, 3 or 4 gave results that correlated well with a validated reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay (Spearman rs = 0.89, p < 0.0001). The RT-ddPCR assay is a sensitive method and could be a promising tool for standardizing HEV RNA quantification in various sample types. PMID:27548205

  6. PCR test for detecting Taenia solium cysticercosis in pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    Sreedevi, Chennuru; Hafeez, Mohammad; Kumar, Putcha Anand; Rayulu, Vukka Chengalva; Subramanyam, Kothapalli Venkata; Sudhakar, Krovvidi

    2012-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was employed to detect Taenia solium DNA in muscle lesions for validation of the meat inspection results of slaughtered pigs. Two sets of oligonucleotide primers, one targeted against the large subunit rRNA gene (TBR primers) and the other targeted against cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (Cox1 primers) of T. solium were used in this study. On reactivity in PCR test, the TBR primers and the Cox1 primers yielded products of 286 and 984 bp, respectively, in cysticercosis positive cases. Both the sets of primers were found to be highly specific, since they did not yield any PCR product in negative controls. A total of 225 pig carcasses were screened for cysticercosis by meat inspection, out of which 25 carcasses with visible cysts (16 viable and 9 degenerated cysts) were also confirmed to be positive for cysticercosis in PCR test. However, out of the 35 carcasses with suspected lesions on meat inspection, only two were found to be positive for cysticercosis in PCR test. The detection limits for both the primer sets were analyzed. The TBR primer set could detect up to 10 pg of cysticercus DNA, whereas the Cox1 primer set could detect only up to 1 ng. It is evident from the study that PCR test is an efficient tool for validation of meat inspection results and also to rule out ambiguity in carcass judgment of suspected cases of porcine cysticercosis.

  7. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    PubMed

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  8. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  9. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  10. Rapid diagnosis of goose viral infections by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Li, Guoxin; Yu, Hai; Jiang, Yifeng; Yan, Liping; Meng, Chunchun; Zhou, Yanjun; Tong, Guangzhi; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-08-01

    Goose parvovirus (GPV), newcastle disease virus (NDV), goose herpesvirus (GHV) and goose adenovirus (GAV) are considered collectively to be four of the most important and widespread viruses of geese. Because all of these viruses cause similar pathological changes, histological differentiation among these viruses is difficult. A reliable, specific and sensitive multiplex PCR (mPCR) assay was developed for the combined detection of GPV, NDV, GHV and GAV in clinical samples of geese. Using the mPCR technique, single infections with GPV (28/76; 36.8%), NDV (9/76; 11.8%), GHV (3/76; 3.9%) and GAV (12/76; 15.8%) were identified in the samples; co-infections with GAV and either GPV or NDV (31.6%; 24/76) were also identified with this approach. The results for all of the samples tested were the same in both the uPCR and mPCR systems. The mPCR approach is considered to be useful for routine molecular diagnosis and epidemiological applications in geese.

  11. Specific PCR product primer design using memetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2009-01-01

    To provide feasible primer sets for performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiment, many primer design methods have been proposed. However, the majority of these methods require a relatively long time to obtain an optimal solution since large quantities of template DNA need to be analyzed. Furthermore, the designed primer sets usually do not provide a specific PCR product size. In recent years, evolutionary computation has been applied to PCR primer design and yielded promising results. In this article, a memetic algorithm (MA) is proposed to solve primer design problems associated with providing a specific product size for PCR experiments. The MA is compared with a genetic algorithm (GA) using an accuracy formula to estimate the quality of the primer design and test the running time. Overall, 50 accession nucleotide sequences were sampled for the comparison of the accuracy of the GA and MA for primer design. Five hundred runs of the GA and MA primer design were performed with PCR product lengths of 150-300 bps and 500-800 bps, and two different methods of calculating T(m) for each accession nucleotide sequence were tested. A comparison of the accuracy results for the GA and MA primer design showed that the MA primer design yielded better results than the GA primer design. The results further indicate that the proposed method finds optimal or near-optimal primer sets and effective PCR products in a dry dock experiment. Related materials are available online at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/ma-pd/.

  12. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and qPCR for the Quantification of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Bovine Feces.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Verstraete, Karen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-05-18

    Cattle are considered to be the main reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and are often the direct or indirect source of STEC outbreaks in humans. Accurate measurement of the concentration of shed STEC in cattle feces could be a key answer to questions concerning transmission of STEC, contamination sources and efficiency of treatments at farm level. Infected animals can be identified and the contamination level quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), which has its specific limitations. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been proposed as a method to overcome many of the drawbacks of qPCR. This end-point amplification PCR is capable of absolute quantification independent from any reference material and is less prone to PCR inhibition than qPCR. In this study, the qPCR-based protocol described by Verstraete et al. (2014) for Shiga toxin genes stx1 and stx2 and the intimin gene eae quantification was optimized for ddPCR analysis. The properties of ddPCR and qPCR using two different mastermixes (EMM: TaqMan(®) Environmental Master Mix 2.0; UMM: TaqMan(®) Universal PCR Master Mix) were evaluated, using standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples. In addition, the susceptibility of these assays to PCR-inhibitors was investigated. Evaluation of the standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples suggested a very good agreement between qPCR using EMM and ddPCR. Furthermore, similar sensitivities and no PCR inhibition were recorded for both assays. On the other hand, qPCR using UMM was clearly prone to PCR inhibition. In conclusion, the ddPCR technique shows potential for the accurate absolute quantification of STEC on the farms, without relying on standardized reference material.

  13. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and qPCR for the Quantification of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Bovine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Verstraete, Karen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are considered to be the main reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and are often the direct or indirect source of STEC outbreaks in humans. Accurate measurement of the concentration of shed STEC in cattle feces could be a key answer to questions concerning transmission of STEC, contamination sources and efficiency of treatments at farm level. Infected animals can be identified and the contamination level quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), which has its specific limitations. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been proposed as a method to overcome many of the drawbacks of qPCR. This end-point amplification PCR is capable of absolute quantification independent from any reference material and is less prone to PCR inhibition than qPCR. In this study, the qPCR-based protocol described by Verstraete et al. (2014) for Shiga toxin genes stx1 and stx2 and the intimin gene eae quantification was optimized for ddPCR analysis. The properties of ddPCR and qPCR using two different mastermixes (EMM: TaqMan® Environmental Master Mix 2.0; UMM: TaqMan® Universal PCR Master Mix) were evaluated, using standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples. In addition, the susceptibility of these assays to PCR-inhibitors was investigated. Evaluation of the standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples suggested a very good agreement between qPCR using EMM and ddPCR. Furthermore, similar sensitivities and no PCR inhibition were recorded for both assays. On the other hand, qPCR using UMM was clearly prone to PCR inhibition. In conclusion, the ddPCR technique shows potential for the accurate absolute quantification of STEC on the farms, without relying on standardized reference material. PMID:27213452

  14. Absolute quantification of olive oil DNA by droplet digital-PCR (ddPCR): Comparison of isolation and amplification methodologies.

    PubMed

    Scollo, Francesco; Egea, Leticia A; Gentile, Alessandra; La Malfa, Stefano; Dorado, Gabriel; Hernandez, Pilar

    2016-12-15

    Olive oil is considered a premium product for its nutritional value and health benefits, and the ability to define its origin and varietal composition is a key step towards ensuring the traceability of the product. However, isolating the DNA from such a matrix is a difficult task. In this study, the quality and quantity of olive oil DNA, isolated using four different DNA isolation protocols, was evaluated using the qRT-PCR and ddPCR techniques. The results indicate that CTAB-based extraction methods were the best for unfiltered oil, while Nucleo Spin-based extraction protocols showed greater overall reproducibility. The use of both qRT-PCR and ddPCR led to the absolute quantification of the DNA copy number. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the choice of DNA-isolation protocol, which should take into consideration the qualitative aspects of DNA and the evaluation of the amplified DNA copy number.

  15. Detection of Leishmania infantum in 4 different dog samples by real-time PCR and ITS-1 nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Ferreira, Aline Leandra; Carregal, Virgínia Mendes; de Almeida Ferreira, Sidney; Leite, Rodrigo Souza; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    The canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) diagnosis is an important step of visceral leishmaniasis control program in Brazil, which involves the elimination of infected dogs, the main animal reservoir host of the disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a sensitive real-time PCR method for Leishmania infantum detection in 4 different clinical samples of dogs, including the noninvasive conjunctival swab (CS) sample. The results of real-time PCR were compared with those obtained using internal transcribed spacer 1 nested PCR. Animals were divided into 2 groups based on the absence or presence of CVL clinical sings. The CS associated with real-time PCR, using primers addressed to kinetoplast DNA minicircles, was able to detect L. infantum infection in 96.7% of dogs without clinical signs and in 100% of the symptomatic animals, demonstrating the importance of these procedures for diagnosing CVL.

  16. Nuclease-mediated double-strand break (DSB) enhancement of small fragment homologous recombination (SFHR) gene modification in human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).

    PubMed

    Sargent, R Geoffrey; Suzuki, Shingo; Gruenert, Dieter C

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in methods to specifically modify genomic DNA using sequence-specific endonucleases and donor DNA have opened the door to a new therapeutic paradigm for cell and gene therapy of inherited diseases. Sequence-specific endonucleases, in particular transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs), have been coupled with polynucleotide small/short DNA fragments (SDFs) to correct the most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, a 3-base-pair deletion at codon 508 (delF508), in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The studies presented here describe the generation of candidate TALENs and their co-transfection with wild-type (wt) CFTR-SDFs into CF-iPS cells homozygous for the delF508 mutation. Using an allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR)-based cyclic enrichment protocol, clonal populations of corrected CF-iPS cells were isolated and expanded.

  17. Assessing UV Inactivation of Adenovirus 41 Using Integrated Cell Culture Real-Time qPCR/RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Craik, Stephen A; Pang, Xiaoli; Lee, Bonita; Neumann, Norman F

    2017-04-01

      Enteric adenoviruses are among most UV-resistant viruses in water. Cytopathic effects (CPE)-based cell culture TCID50 assay as a conventional virus assessment approach has major drawbacks for enteric adenovirus since it is selective on cell lines and takes longer time to show CPE. Integrated cell culture real-time quantitative PCR (ICC-qPCR) and reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR were applied in this study, in comparison with TCID50, to assess UV inactivation of adenovirus type 41 (Ad41) in water. Adenovirus type 41 was exposed to UV doses of 40, 80, 160, and 320 mJ/cm2 using a collimated beam apparatus. There was no significant difference of inactivation at conducted UV doses between measurements using TCID50 assay and ICC-RT-qPCR. Both assays fitted the Chick-Watson model at 95% confidence level. The inactivation measured by ICC-qPCR did not fit the Chick-Watson model. In summary, ICC-RT-qPCR is the most appropriate alternate to CPE-based assay for assessing UV inactivation of enteric adenoviruses.

  18. Inverse PCR for subtyping of Acinetobacter baumannii carrying ISAba1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shukho; Park, Yun-Ju; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has been prevalent in nosocomial infections, often causing outbreaks in intensive care units. ISAba1 is an insertion sequence that has been identified only in A. baumannii and its copy number varies among strains. It has been reported that ISAba1 provides a promoter for bla(OXA-51-like), bla(OXA-23-like), and bla(ampC), which are associated with the resistance of A. baumannii to carbapenems and cephalosporins. The main purpose of this study was to develop a novel inverse PCR method capable of typing A. baumannii strains. The method involves three major steps: cutting of genomic DNA with a restriction enzyme, ligation, and PCR. In the first step, bacterial genomic DNA was digested with DpnI. In the second step, the digested genomic DNAs were ligated to form intramolecular circular DNAs. In the last step, the ligated circular DNAs were amplified by PCR with primers specific for ISAba1 and the amplified PCR products were electrophoresed. Twenty-two clinical isolates of A. baumannii were used for the evaluation of the inverse PCR (iPCR) typing method. Dendrogram analysis revealed two major clusters, similar to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results. Three ISAba1-associated genes--bla(ampC), bla(OXA-66-like), and csuD--were amplified and detected in the clinical isolates. This novel iPCR typing method is comparable to PFGE in its ability to discriminate A. baumannii strains, and is a promising molecular epidemiological tool for investigating A. baumannii carrying ISAba1.

  19. Early diagnosis of Lassa fever by reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Demby, A H; Chamberlain, J; Brown, D W; Clegg, C S

    1994-12-01

    We developed a method based on a coupled reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the detection of Lassa virus using primers specific for regions of the S RNA segment which are well conserved between isolates from Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. The specificity of the assay was confirmed by Southern blotting with a chemiluminescent probe. The assay was able to detect 1 to 10 copies of a plasmid or an RNA transcript containing the target sequence. There was complete concordance between RT-PCR and virus culture for the detection of Lassa virus in a set of 29 positive and 32 negative serum samples obtained on admission to the hospital from patients suspected of having Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. Specificity was confirmed by the failure of amplification of specific products from serum samples collected from 129 healthy blood donors in Sierra Leone or from tissue culture supernatants from cells infected with related arenaviruses (Mopeia, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Tacaribe, and Pichinde viruses). Sequential serum samples from 29 hospitalized patients confirmed to have Lassa fever were tested by RT-PCR and for Lassa virus-specific antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IF). RT-PCR detected virus RNA in 79% of the patients at the time of admission, comparing favorably with IF, which detected antibodies in only 21% of the patients. Lassa virus RNA was detected by RT-PCR in all 29 patients by the third day of admission, whereas antibody was detectable by IF in only 52% of the patients. These results point to an important role for RT-PCR in the management of suspected cases of Lassa fever.

  20. Droplet-based micro oscillating-flow PCR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhi-Xin; Luo, Rong; Lü, Shu-Hai; Xu, Ai-Dong; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2005-08-01

    Polymerase chain reactions (PCR), thermally activated chemical reactions which are widely used for nucleic acid amplification, have recently received much attention in microelectromechanical systems and micro total analysis systems because a wide variety of DNA/RNA molecules can be enriched by PCR for further analyses. In the present work, a droplet-based micro oscillating-flow PCR chip was designed and fabricated by the silicon microfabrication technique. Three different temperature zones, which were stable at denaturation, extension and annealing temperatures and isolated from each other by a thin-wall linkage, were integrated with a single, simple and straight microchannel to form the chip's basic functional structure. The PCR mixture was injected into the chip as a single droplet and flowed through the three temperature zones in the main microchannel in an oscillating manner to achieve the temperature maintenance and transitions. The chip's thermal performance was theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated. The results indicated that the time needed for the temperature of the droplet to change to the target value is less than 1 s, and the root mean square error of temperature is less than 0.2 °C. A droplet of 1 µl PCR mixture with standard HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)-DNA sample inside was amplified by the present chip and the results were analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis with separation of DNA markers in parallel. The electrophoresis results demonstrated that the micro oscillating-flow PCR chip successfully amplified the HPV-DNA, with a processing time of about 15 min which is significantly reduced compared to that for the conventional PCR instrument.

  1. Pneumocystis sp. in bats evaluated by qPCR.

    PubMed

    Cavallini Sanches, E M; Ferreiro, L; Andrade, C P; Pacheco, S M; Almeida, L L; Spanamberg, A; Wissmann, G

    2013-03-01

    Molecular techniques have revealed a high prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization in wild mammals. Accurate quantification of Pneumocystis sp. is essential for the correct interpretation of many research experiments investigating this organism. The objectives of this study were to detect the presence of Pneumocystis sp. in bats by qPCR, and to distinguish colonization from infection. Probes and primers for real time PCR (qPCR) were designed based on the gene of major surface glycoprotein (MSG) of Pneumocystis sp., in order to analyze 195 lung tissue samples from bats captured (2007-2009). All samples were also analyzed by nested PCR, using oligonucleotide primers designed for the gene encoding the mitochondrial small subunit rRNA (mtSSU rRNA) to confirm the results. The qPCR assay was standardized using a standard curve made with the DNA extracted from bronchoalveolar lavage positive for Pneumocystis jirovecii. The average Ct was found to be between 13 and 14 (calibration curve) for the detection of infection with Pneumocystis sp. and above these values for colonization. It was considered as negative samples the ones that had Ct values equal to 50. Out of the total 195 samples, 47 (24.1%) bat lung DNA samples were positive for Pneumocystis sp. by qPCR. The most common bat species found were: Tadarida brasiliensis (23.4%), Histiotus velatus (17.0%), Desmodus rotundus (14.9%) and Molossus molossus (8.5%). The average cycle threshold of the positive samples (bats) was 25.8 and standard deviation was 1.7. The DNA samples with Ct values greater than 14 suggest that these animals might be colonized by Pneumocystis sp. Results obtained in this study demonstrated the usefulness of the qPCR procedure for identification of Pneumocystis sp. and for distinction between its colonizing or infectious status in bats.

  2. Development of internal controls for PCR detection of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, G; Pearce, M; Leslie, D

    1998-12-01

    This work describes the development and evaluation of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Bacillus anthracis strains harbouring plasmid pX02. The multiplex also incorporated an internal control (IC) to avoid false negative reactions. Internal controls consisted of plasmids containing modified PCR target sequences, corresponding to the capC and BA813 genes of B. anthracis, which were then co-amplified with the original target sequences using the same set of amplimers. The initial IC construct comprised of an internally deleted form of the genomic target sequence cloned into pUC19. A series of nested DNA fragments corresponding to the 23S rRNA sequences of Bacillus cereus were then subcloned into the point of deletion, producing a number of IC constructs with similar sequences but increasing product size on PCR amplification. Neither the presence of IC DNA template or IC PCR product size affected the specificity or non-specific cross-reactivity of the original PCR assay. The concentration of IC was critical, too much IC DNA template would out compete the genomic DNA template, thus giving a false negative result. However, when the concentration of IC was optimal assay sensitivity was not compromised.

  3. Optimizing methods for PCR-based analysis of predation

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Daniela; Raso, Lorna; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Molecular methods have become an important tool for studying feeding interactions under natural conditions. Despite their growing importance, many methodological aspects have not yet been evaluated but need to be considered to fully exploit the potential of this approach. Using feeding experiments with high alpine carabid beetles and lycosid spiders, we investigated how PCR annealing temperature affects prey DNA detection success and how post-PCR visualization methods differ in their sensitivity. Moreover, the replicability of prey DNA detection among individual PCR assays was tested using beetles and spiders that had digested their prey for extended times postfeeding. By screening all predators for three differently sized prey DNA fragments (range 116–612 bp), we found that only in the longest PCR product, a marked decrease in prey detection success occurred. Lowering maximum annealing temperatures by 4 °C resulted in significantly increased prey DNA detection rates in both predator taxa. Among the three post-PCR visualization methods, an eightfold difference in sensitivity was observed. Repeated screening of predators increased the total number of samples scoring positive, although the proportion of samples testing positive did not vary significantly between different PCRs. The present findings demonstrate that assay sensitivity, in combination with other methodological factors, plays a crucial role to obtain robust trophic interaction data. Future work employing molecular prey detection should thus consider and minimize the methodologically induced variation that would also allow for better cross-study comparisons. PMID:21507208

  4. High-throughput PCR in silicon based microchamber array.

    PubMed

    Nagai, H; Murakami, Y; Yokoyama, K; Tamiya, E

    2001-12-01

    Highly integrated hybridization assay and capillary electrophoresis have improved the throughput of DNA analysis. The shift to high throughput analysis requires a high speed DNA amplification system, and several rapid PCR systems have been developed. In these thermal cyclers, the temperature was controlled by effective methodology instead of a large heating/cooling block preventing rapid thermal cycling. In our research, high speed PCR was performed using a silicon-based microchamber array and three heat blocks. The highly integrated microchamber array was fabricated by semiconductor microfabrication techniques. The temperature of the PCR microchamber was controlled by alternating between three heat blocks of different temperature. In general, silicon has excellent thermal conductivity, and the heat capacity is small in the miniaturized sample volume. Hence, the heating/cooling rate was rapid, approximately 16 degrees C/s. The rapid PCR was therefore completed in 18 min for 40 cycles. The thermal cycle time was reduced to 1/10 of a commercial PCR instrument (Model 9600, PE Applied Biosystems-3 h).

  5. Digital PCR using micropatterned superporous absorbent array chips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhen; Southard, Kristopher M; Zeng, Yong

    2016-06-21

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is an emerging technology for genetic analysis and clinical diagnostics. To facilitate the widespread application of dPCR, here we developed a new micropatterned superporous absorbent array chip (μSAAC) which consists of an array of microwells packed with highly porous agarose microbeads. The packed beads construct a hierarchically porous microgel which confers superior water adsorption capacity to enable spontaneous filling of PDMS microwells for fluid compartmentalization without the need of sophisticated microfluidic equipment and operation expertise. Using large λ-DNA as the model template, we validated the μSAAC for stochastic partitioning and quantitative digital detection of DNA molecules. Furthermore, as a proof-of-concept, we conducted dPCR detection and single-molecule sequencing of a mutation prevalent in blood cancer, the chromosomal translocation t(14;18), demonstrating the feasibility of the μSAAC for analysis of disease-associated mutations. These experiments were carried out using the standard molecular biology techniques and instruments. Because of its low cost, ease of fabrication, and equipment-free liquid partitioning, the μSAAC is readily adaptable to general lab settings, which could significantly facilitate the widespread application of dPCR technology in basic research and clinical practice.

  6. Multiplex PCR Tests for Detection of Pathogens Associated with Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms including culture, biochemical identification, immunoassay and microscopic examination are time consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have as allowed its use as clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex PCR based testing has made its way to gastroenterology diagnostic arena in recent years. In this article we present a review of recent laboratory developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. We will focus on two FDA cleared commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG GPP and Biofire FimArray GI test. These multiplex tests can detect and identify multiple enteric pathogens in one test and provide results within hours. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens. The high negative predictive value of these multiplex tests has led to the suggestion that they be used as screening tools especially in outbreaks. Although the clinical utility and benefit of multiplex PCR test are to be further investigated, implementing these multiplex PCR tests in gastroenterology diagnostic algorithm has the potential to improve diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis. PMID:26004652

  7. Optimizing methods for PCR-based analysis of predation.

    PubMed

    Sint, Daniela; Raso, Lorna; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Molecular methods have become an important tool for studying feeding interactions under natural conditions. Despite their growing importance, many methodological aspects have not yet been evaluated but need to be considered to fully exploit the potential of this approach. Using feeding experiments with high alpine carabid beetles and lycosid spiders, we investigated how PCR annealing temperature affects prey DNA detection success and how post-PCR visualization methods differ in their sensitivity. Moreover, the replicability of prey DNA detection among individual PCR assays was tested using beetles and spiders that had digested their prey for extended times postfeeding. By screening all predators for three differently sized prey DNA fragments (range 116-612 bp), we found that only in the longest PCR product, a marked decrease in prey detection success occurred. Lowering maximum annealing temperatures by 4 °C resulted in significantly increased prey DNA detection rates in both predator taxa. Among the three post-PCR visualization methods, an eightfold difference in sensitivity was observed. Repeated screening of predators increased the total number of samples scoring positive, although the proportion of samples testing positive did not vary significantly between different PCRs. The present findings demonstrate that assay sensitivity, in combination with other methodological factors, plays a crucial role to obtain robust trophic interaction data. Future work employing molecular prey detection should thus consider and minimize the methodologically induced variation that would also allow for better cross-study comparisons.

  8. Electrochemistry-based real-time PCR on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Stephen S W; Lee, Thomas M H; Hsing, I-Ming

    2008-01-15

    The development of handheld instruments for point-of-care DNA analysis can potentially contribute to the medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring for decentralized applications. In this work, we demonstrate the implementation of a recently developed electrochemical real-time polymerase chain reaction (ERT-PCR) technique on a silicon-glass microchip for simultaneous DNA amplification and detection. This on-chip ERT-PCR process requires the extension of an oligonucleotide in both solution and at solid phases and intermittent electrochemical signal measurement in the presence of all the PCR reagents. Several important parameters, related to the surface passivation and electrochemical scanning of working electrodes, were investigated. It was found that the ERT-PCR's onset thermal cycle ( approximately 3-5), where the analytical signal begins to be distinguishable from the background, is much lower than that of the fluorescence-based counterparts for high template DNA situations (3 x 10(6) copies/microL). By carefully controlling the concentrations of the immobilized probe and the enzyme polymerase, improvements have been made in obtaining a meaningful electrochemical signal using a lower initial template concentration. This ERT-PCR technique on a microchip platform holds significant promise for rapid DNA detection for point-of-care testing applications.

  9. Application of PCR and real-time PCR for monitoring cyanobacteria, Microcystis spp. and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii in Macau freshwater reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiying; Lou, Inchio; Ung, Wai Kin; Kong, Yijun; Mok, Kai Meng

    2014-06-01

    Freshwater algal blooms have become a growing concern world-wide. They are caused by a high level of cyanobacteria, predominantly Microcystis spp. and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, which can produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin, respectively. Longtime exposure to these cyanotoxins may affect public health, thus reliable detection, quantification, and enumeration of these harmful algae species has become a priority in water quality management. Traditional manual enumeration of algal bloom cells primarily involves microscopic identification which limited by inaccuracy and time-consumption.With the development of molecular techniques and an increasing number of microbial sequences available in the Genbank database, the use of molecular methods can be used for more rapid, reliable, and accurate detection and quantification. In this study, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques were developed and applied for monitoring cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. and C. raciborskii in the Macau Storage Reservoir (MSR). The results showed that the techniques were successful for identifying and quantifying the species in pure cultures and mixed cultures, and proved to be a potential application for water sampling in MSR. When the target species were above 1 million cells/L, similar cell numbers estimated by microscopic enumeration and qPCR were obtained. Further quantification in water samples indicated that the ratio of the estimated number of cell by microscopy and qPCR was 0.4-12.9 for cyanobacteria and 0.2-3.9 for C. raciborskii. However, Microcystis spp. was not observed by manual enumeration, while it was detected at low levels by qPCR, suggesting that qPCR is more sensitive and accurate. Thus the molecular approaches provide an additional reliable monitoring option to traditional microscopic enumeration for the ecosystems monitoring program.

  10. Quantification of viable bacteria in wastewater treatment plants by using propidium monoazide combined with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR).

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Tong, Tiezheng; Zeng, Siyu; Lin, Yiwen; Wu, Shuxu; He, Miao

    2014-02-01

    The detection of viable bacteria in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is very important for public health, as WWTPs are a medium with a high potential for waterborne disease transmission. The aim of this study was to use propidium monoazide (PMA) combined with the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) to selectively detect and quantify viable bacteria cells in full-scale WWTPs in China. PMA was added to the concentrated WWTP samples at a final concentration of 100 micromol/L and the samples were incubated in the dark for 5 min, and then lighted for 4 min prior to DNA extraction and qPCR with specific primers for Escherichia coli and Enterococci, respectively. The results showed that PMA treatment removed more than 99% of DNA from non-viable cells in all the WWTP samples, while matrices in sludge samples markedly reduced the effectiveness of PMA treatment. Compared to qPCR, PMA-qPCR results were similar and highly linearly correlated to those obtained by culture assay, indicating that DNA from non-viable cells present in WWTP samples can be eliminated by PMA treatment, and that PMA-qPCR is a reliable method for detection of viable bacteria in environmental samples. This study demonstrated that PMA-qPCR is a rapid and selective detection method for viable bacteria in WWTP samples, and that WWTPs have an obvious function in removing both viable and non-viable bacteria. The results proved that PMA-qPCR is a promising detection method that has a high potential for application as a complementary method to the standard culture-based method in the future.

  11. [Use of nested PCR in detection of the plague pathogen].

    PubMed

    Glukhov, A I; Gordeev, S A; Al'tshuler, M L; Zykova, I E; Severin, S E

    2003-07-01

    Causative agents of plague, i.e. bacterium Yersina pestis (in the subcutaneous tissues of rodents) and their cutaneous parasites need to be isolated to enable plague prevention. A comparatively new method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) opens up new possibilities of determining Y. pestis just within several hours and without any cultivation. The article contains a description of the PCR-method, which makes it possible to distinguish the culture of Y. pestis from cultures of other microorganism, including speci of Yersina. The method is of the cluster-type, i.e. it is made up of subsequent PC reactions with the substrate for the second reaction being the product of the first one. The cluster nature of the method preconditions a higher sensitivity and specificity versus the ordinary PCR.

  12. Heat properties of an integrated micro PCR vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhan; Cui, Dafu; Yu, Zhongyao; Wang, Li; Xia, Shanhong; Cui, Zheng

    2001-09-01

    The PCR amplification is based on multiple temperature cycles of DNA synthesis; each includes denaturation of the template, annealing of the primers to complementary sites in the template and primer extension. The key technique of PCR amplification is the heating control in design and fabrication of its chip form. The specifications of the chip are heat properties. In this paper the heat properties of a micro PCR vessel integration heater and temperature sensor was introduced. The temperature distribution of the vessel was simulated with software tool IntelliSuite. The temperatures cycles were measured and the time response of the chip was discussed. It is found that the integrate micro vessel is a very useful tool not only for DNA synthesis but also as a biochemical reactor for many other biological and chemical analyses.

  13. Noninvasive genotyping of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) by fingernail PCR.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Shuji; Katoh, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate that is a useful model for medical studies. In this study, we report a convenient, reliable, and noninvasive procedure to genotype a living common marmoset by using fingernails. This method was used to successfully genotype DNA by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR without prior purification, by using the KOD FX PCR enzyme kit. Additionally, there is no sample contamination from hematopoietic chimera derived from fused placenta in utero. We compared chimeric levels between various tissues in females with male littermates using quantitative fluorescent (QF)-PCR to prepare a reliable DNA source for genetic analyses, such as genotyping, gene mapping, or genomic sequencing. The chimerism detected appeared to be restricted to lymphatic tissues, such as bone marrow, thymus, spleen, lymph nodes and blood cells. As a result, DNA from fingernails with the quick is the best DNA source for genetic research in living marmosets.

  14. Detection of alcohol-tolerant hiochi bacteria by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, T; Shimada, M; Mukai, H; Asada, K; Kato, I; Fujino, K; Sato, T

    1994-01-01

    We report a sensitive and rapid method for detection of hiochi bacteria by PCR. This method involves the electrophoresis of amplified DNA. Nucleotide sequences of the spacer region between 16S and 23S rRNA genes of 11 Lactobacillus strains were identified by analysis of PCR products. Five primers were designed by analysis of similarities among these sequences. A single cell of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei could be detected when purified genomic DNA was used as the template. When various cell concentrations of L. casei subsp. casei were added to 50 ml of pasteurized sake and the cells were recovered, the detection limit was about one cell. No discrete band was observed in electrophoresis after PCR when human, Escherichia coli, mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, yeast, or mold DNA was used as the template. Images PMID:7510942

  15. Multiplex PCR for identification of herpes virus infections in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Durzyńska, Julia; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Maria; Hanć, Tomasz; Durda, Magdalena; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a multiplex PCR (mPCR) for a rapid and simultaneous detection of herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in squamous oral cells obtained from adolescents. Accuracy of the method was tested in a group of 513 adolescents, almost 11% of subjects were positive for infection with herpes viruses. Correlations with gender, age, and place of residence were sought. A similar incidence of HSV-2 and HCMV was found (4.3% and 5.4%, respectively) and the incidence of HSV-1 was the lowest (1%) in the study group. Conversely to HSV-2, HCMV was detected mostly in the youngest individuals. The same occurrence of all viruses was observed in boys and girls. The mPCR method described is suggested as a useful tool for epidemiologic studies of active herpes infections.

  16. Identification of neotropical felid faeces using RCP-PCR.

    PubMed

    Roques, S; Adrados, B; Chavez, C; Keller, C; Magnusson, W E; Palomares, F; Godoy, J A

    2011-01-01

    Faeces similarity among sympatric felid species has generally hampered their use in distributional, demographic and dietary studies. Here, we present a new and simple approach based on a set of species-specific primers, for the unambiguous identification of faeces from sympatric neotropical felids (i.e. puma, jaguar, jaguarundi and ocelot/ margay). This method, referred to as rapid classificatory protocol-PCR (RCP-PCR), consists of a single-tube multiplex PCR yielding species-specific banding patterns on agarose gel. The method was optimized with samples of known origin (14 blood and 15 fresh faeces) and validated in faecal samples of unknown origin (n = 138), for some of which (n = 40) we also obtained species identification based on mtDNA sequencing. This approach proved reliable and provides high identification success rates from faeces. Its simplicity and cost effectiveness should facilitate its application for routine surveys of presence and abundance of these species.

  17. Design and evaluation of consensus PCR assays for henipaviruses.

    PubMed

    Feldman, K S; Foord, A; Heine, H G; Smith, I L; Boyd, V; Marsh, G A; Wood, J L N; Cunningham, A A; Wang, L-F

    2009-10-01

    Henipaviruses were first discovered in the 1990s, and their potential threat to public health is of increasing concern with increasing knowledge. Old-world fruit bats are the reservoir hosts for these viruses, and spill-over events cause lethal infections in a wide range of mammalian species, including humans. In anticipation of these spill-over events, and to investigate further the geographical range of these genetically diverse viruses, assays for detection of known and potentially novel strains of henipaviruses are required. The development of multiple consensus PCR assays for the detection of henipaviruses, including both SYBR Green and TaqMan real-time PCRs and a conventional heminested PCR is described. The assays are highly sensitive and have defined specificity. In addition to being useful tools for detection of known and novel henipaviruses, evaluation of assay efficiency and sensitivity across both biological and synthetic templates has provided valuable insight into consensus PCR design and use.

  18. [Application of rapid PCR to authenticate medicinal snakes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-Qi; Li, Man

    2014-10-01

    To obtained an accurate, rapid and efficient method for authenticate medicinal snakes listed in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (Zaocysd humnades, Bungarus multicinctus, Agkistrodon acutus), a rapid PCR method for authenticate snakes and its adulterants was established based on the classic molecular authentication methods. DNA was extracted by alkaline lysis and the specific primers were amplified by two-steps PCR amplification method. The denatured and annealing temperature and cycle numbers were optimized. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product, strong green fluorescence was visualized under 365 nm UV whereas adulterants without. The whole process can complete in 30-45 minutes. The established method provides the technical support for authentication of the snakes on field.

  19. Authentication of medicinal plants by SNP-based multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok Ran; Kim, Min-Kyeoung; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Highly variable intergenic spacer and intron regions from nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA have been used for species identification. Noncoding internal transcribed spacers (ITSs) located in 18S-5.8S-26S, and 5S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) represent suitable region for medicinal plant authentication. Noncoding regions from two cytoplasmic DNA, chloroplast DNA (trnT-F intergenic spacer region), and mitochondrial DNA (fourth intron region of nad7 gene) are also successfully applied for the proper identification of medicinal plants. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites obtained from the amplification of intergenic spacer and intron regions are properly utilized for the verification of medicinal plants in species level using multiplex PCR. Multiplex PCR as a variant of PCR technique used to amplify more than two loci simultaneously.

  20. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression †

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Leslie K.; Newman, Dina L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA) and gene expression (mRNA/protein) and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect) predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression. PMID:23858358

  1. Rapid PCR of STR markers: Applications to human identification.

    PubMed

    Romsos, Erica L; Vallone, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    Multiplex PCR with fluorescently labeled primers has been an essential method for the amplification of short tandem repeats used in human identify testing. Within the STR workflow of extraction, quantitation, amplification, separation, and detection, multiplex PCR is commonly identified as the bottleneck in the process. The time requirement of up to three hours to complete 28-30 cycles of multiplex PCR for STR genotyping is the greatest amount of time required for a single step within the process. The historical use of commercially available thermal cyclers and heat stable polymerases may have given the impression that large multiplex will always require long PCR cycling times to ensure that all of the varying sized targets (typically 100-400bp) can be amplified in a balanced manner throughout the multiplex. However, with the advent of improved polymerases and faster thermal cyclers the time required for the amplification of large STR multiplexes is no longer on the order of three hours, but as little as 14min. Faster amplification times can be performed while retaining the balance and integrity of large multiplex PCRs by implementation of alternate polymerases and thermal cyclers. With the reduction in PCR cycling times there has also been an impact on the development of integrated and microfluidics devices which employ the use of reduced or rapid thermal cycling protocols as part of their integration. Similarly, PCR inhibitor resistant polymerases can also reduce overall STR processing times for reference samples by eliminating the need for DNA extraction and purification that is additionally implemented within the development of integrated DNA typing devices.

  2. Monitoring of geosmin producing Anabaena circinalis using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsiang-Wei; Michinaka, Atsuko; Yen, Hung-Kai; Giglio, Steven; Hobson, Peter; Monis, Paul; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-02-01

    Geosmin is one of the most commonly detected off-flavor chemicals present in reservoirs and drinking water systems. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is useful for quantifying geosmin-producers by focusing on the gene encoding geosmin synthase, which is responsible for geosmin synthesis. In this study, several primers and probes were designed and evaluated to detect the geosmin synthase gene in cyanobacteria. The specificity of primer and probe sets was tested using 21 strains of laboratory cultured cyanobacteria isolated from surface waters in Australia (18) and Taiwan (2), including 6 strains with geosmin producing ability. The results showed that the primers designed in this study could successfully detect all geosmin producing strains tested. The selected primers were used in a qPCR assay, and the calibration curves were linear from 5 × 10(1) to 5 × 10(5) copies mL(-1), with a high correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.999). This method was then applied to analyze samples taken from Myponga Reservoir, South Australia, during a cyanobacterial bloom event. The results showed good correlations between qPCR techniques and traditional methods, including cell counts determined by microscopy and geosmin concentration measured using gas chromatography (GC) coupled with a mass selective detector (MSD). Results demonstrate that qPCR could be used for tracking geosmin-producing cyanobacteria in drinking water reservoirs. The qPCR assay may provide water utilities with the ability to properly characterize a taste and odor episode and choose appropriate management and treatment options.

  3. Revealing the Diversity and Quantity of Peritrich Ciliates in Environmental Samples Using Specific Primer-based PCR and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xihan; Gong, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Peritrichs are a diverse, ecologically important ciliate group usually with a complex life cycle. To date, the community of the peritrichs has been investigated by using morphology-based methods such as living observation and silver staining. Here we show a molecular approach for characterizing the diversity and quantity of free-living peritrichs in environmental samples. We newly designed four peritrich-specific primers targeting 18S rRNA genes that allow clone library construction, screening and analysis. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was developed to quantify peritrichs in environmental samples by using rDNA copy number as an indicator. DNA extracted from four water samples of contrasting environmental gradients was analysed. The results showed that the peritrich community was differentiated among these samples, and that the diversity decreased with the increase of water salinity. The qPCR results are consistent with the library sequence analysis in terms of quantity variations from sample to sample. The development of peritrich-specific primers, for the first time, for conventional PCR and qPCR assays, provides useful molecular tools for revealing the diversity and quantity of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples. Also, our study illustrates the potential of these molecular tools to ecological studies of other ciliate groups in diverse environments. PMID:23100023

  4. Detection and Quantification of Wallemia sebi in Aerosols by Real-Time PCR, Conventional PCR, and Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing-Yin; Westermark, Sven-Olof; Rasmuson-Lestander, Åsa; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2004-01-01

    Wallemia sebi is a deuteromycete fungus commonly found in agricultural environments in many parts of the world and is suspected to be a causative agent of farmer's lung disease. The fungus grows slowly on commonly used culture media and is often obscured by the fast-growing fungi. Thus, its occurrence in different environments has often been underestimated. In this study, we developed two sets of PCR primers specific to W. sebi that can be applied in either conventional PCR or real-time PCR for rapid detection and quantification of the fungus in environmental samples. Both PCR systems proved to be highly specific and sensitive for W. sebi detection even in a high background of other fungal DNAs. These methods were employed to investigate the presence of W. sebi in the aerosols of a farm. The results revealed a high concentration of W. sebi spores, 107 m−3 by real-time PCR and 106 m−3 by cultivation, which indicates the prevalence of W. sebi in farms handling hay and grain and in cow barns. The methods developed in this study could serve as rapid, specific, and sensitive means of detecting W. sebi in aerosol and surface samples and could thus facilitate investigations of its distribution, ecology, clinical diagnosis, and exposure risk assessment. PMID:15574929

  5. [Do Multiplex PCR techniques displace classical cultures in microbiology?].

    PubMed

    Auckenthaler, Raymond; Risch, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Multiplex PCR technologies progressively find their way in clinical microbiology. This technique allows the simultaneous amplification of multiple DNA targets in a single test run for the identification of pathogens up to the species level. Various pathogens of infectious diseases can be detected by a symptom-oriented approach clearly and quickly with high reliability. Essentially multiplex PCR panels are available for clarification of gastrointestinal, respiratory, sexually transmitted infections and meningitis. Today's offer from industry, university hospitals and large private laboratories of Switzerland is tabulated and commented.

  6. Novel PCR assay for determining the genetic sex of mice.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, L; Truong, V; Palmer, J S; Wilhelm, D

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies require the determination of the genetic sex of mouse embryos before sexual differentiation and/or of mutant mice that display partial or complete sex reversal. The majority of current methods for sexing by PCR involve multiplexing of 2 primer pairs. We have developed a novel sexing PCR using a single primer pair that amplifies fragments from the X and the Y chromosome with a clear size difference between the respective amplicons. This assay provides a rapid and reliable method to identify the genetic sex of mice across different mouse strains.

  7. Sheep poxvirus identification by PCR in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Mangana-Vougiouka, O; Markoulatos, P; Koptopoulos, G; Nomikou, K; Bakandritsos, N; Papadopoulos, O

    1999-01-01

    A simple, rapid and specific diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for sheep poxvirus identification. The primers used were from the sequenced genomes of the capripox viruses KS-1 and InS-1. Six different sheep pox isolates were tested against two orf (parapox) and three animal herpesviruses as controls. Material from uninfected cell cultures was also used as control. The sensitivity of the PCR was approximately equivalent with each of the two primers and for the six sheep pox isolates. All the negative control virus DNAs were negative and differed clearly from those of the sheep pox strains.

  8. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S. N.

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether there are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.

  9. Real-time PCR in Food Science: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Food safety and quality control programmes are increasingly applied throughout the production food chain in order to guarantee added value products as well as to minimize the risk of infection for the consumer. The development of real-time PCR has represented one of the most significant advances in food diagnostics as it provides rapid, reliable and quantitative results. These aspects become increasingly important for the agricultural and food industry. Different strategies for real-time PCR diagnostics have been developed including unspecific detection independent of the target sequence using fluorescent dyes such as SYBR Green, or by sequence-specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes such as TaqMan probes or molecular beacons.

  10. [Basics of PCR and related techniques applied in veterinary parasitology].

    PubMed

    Ben Abderrazak, S

    2004-01-01

    We attempte through the following overall review pertaining to the basics of PCR techniques (Polymerase Chain Reaction), to introduce the main applications used in veterinary parasitology. A major problem restricting the application possibilities of molecular biology techniques is of quantitative nature. Amplification techniques represent a real revolution, for it makes possible the production of tens, even hundreds of nanogrammes of sequences when starting from very small quantities. The PCR technique has dramatically transformed the strategies used so far in molecular biology and subsequently research and medical diagnosis.

  11. Microsatellite amplification in plants: optimization procedure of major PCR components.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Sana; Hasnaoui, Nejib

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are the most informative and popular class of molecular markers used for diverse purposes, particularly in plants: genetic diversity study, marker assisted selection, breeding, mapping, phylogenetics and phylogeography, systematics, etc. They have become a routine technique practically in each laboratory for studying molecular plant genetics. Despite their wide utilization, however, setup and optimization of various conditions involved in PCR amplification is a prerequisite for reliable inference of results. In this chapter, we describe optimization of SSR-PCR conditions and give ranges of concentrations for different parameters. The protocol provided here is inspired from bench work on the use of microsatellite to study diversity of Vitis vinifera germplasm.

  12. Multiplex PCR for Detection and Typing of Porcine Circoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ouardani, M.; Wilson, L.; Jetté, R.; Montpetit, C.; Dea, S.

    1999-01-01

    Sets of oligonucleotide primers were designed according to the sequences of the open reading frames (ORFs) ORF1 and ORF2 of the prototype nonpathogenic PK-15 strain of porcine circovirus (PCV) type 1 (PCV-1). By the PCR performed with the various primer sets, genomic DNA or RNA from other bacterial or viral pathogens of the respiratory tracts of pigs could not be amplified. A positive amplification reaction could be visualized with DNA extracted from a viral suspension containing as few as 10 viral particles per ml. No DNA fragment could be amplified from lysates of continuous porcine cell lines (PT, ST, and PFT cells) known to be negative for PCV. When tested with clinical samples from pigs, the results of the single PCR method showed nearly 93% (13 of 14 samples) correlation with histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. Interestingly, subclinical PCV infections could be detected by single PCR with clinical samples that have been submitted from animals with irrelevant cases of respiratory and/or enteric problems. On the basis of the nucleotide sequences of PCV strains (PCV-2) recently associated with outbreaks of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) in Quebec, Canada, pig farms, other primers were designed from the PCV-1 genome, and these primers failed to amplify genomic fragments specific to the ORF1 or ORF2 genes of clinical isolates associated with PWMS but amplified DNA from the PCV-1 strain. Two rapid multiplex PCR (mPCR) methods have been developed to distinguish between both genotypes of PCV. By those two mPCR methods, (i) species-specific primer pairs were used to amplify a DNA fragment of 488 bp specific for the ORF2 genes of both genotypes, whereas a 375-bp fragment was amplified from the ORF1 gene of the PCV-1 strain only, or (ii) species-specific primer pairs were used to amplify a DNA fragment of 646 bp specific for the ORF1 genes of both genotypes, whereas a 425-bp fragment was amplified from the ORF2 gene of the PCV-1 strain

  13. High-throughput quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Arany, Zoltan P

    2008-07-01

    Recent technical advances in quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) have allowed for extensive miniaturization, thereby rendering the technique amenable to high-throughput assays. Large numbers of different nucleic acids can now rapidly be measured quantitatively. Many investigations can benefit from this approach, including determination of gene expression in hundreds of samples, determination of hundreds of genes in a few samples, or even quantification of nucleic acids other than mRNA. A simple technique is described here to quantify 1880 transcripts of choice from any number of starting RNA samples.

  14. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  15. Critical appraisal of quantitative PCR results in colorectal cancer research: can we rely on published qPCR results?

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, J R; van Kempen, L C; Nagtegaal, I D; Bustin, S A

    2014-06-01

    The use of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in cancer research has become ubiquitous. The relative simplicity of qPCR experiments, which deliver fast and cost-effective results, means that each year an increasing number of papers utilizing this technique are being published. But how reliable are the published results? Since the validity of gene expression data is greatly dependent on appropriate normalisation to compensate for sample-to-sample and run-to-run variation, we have evaluated the adequacy of normalisation procedures in qPCR-based experiments. Consequently, we assessed all colorectal cancer publications that made use of qPCR from 2006 until August 2013 for the number of reference genes used and whether they had been validated. Using even these minimal evaluation criteria, the validity of only three percent (6/179) of the publications can be adequately assessed. We describe common errors, and conclude that the current state of reporting on qPCR in colorectal cancer research is disquieting. Extrapolated to the study of cancer in general, it is clear that the majority of studies using qPCR cannot be reliably assessed and that at best, the results of these studies may or may not be valid and at worst, pervasive incorrect normalisation is resulting in the wholesale publication of incorrect conclusions. This survey demonstrates that the existence of guidelines, such as MIQE, is necessary but not sufficient to address this problem and suggests that the scientific community should examine its responsibility and be aware of the implications of these findings for current and future research.

  16. Designing multiplex PCR system of Campylobacter jejuni for efficient typing by improving monoplex PCR binary typing method.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Ibata, Ami; Suzuki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the majority of Campylobacter infections. As the molecular epidemiological study of outbreaks, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is performed in general. But PFGE has several problems. PCR binary typing (P-BIT) method is a typing method for Campylobacter spp. that was recently developed, and was reported to have a similar discriminatory power and stability to those of PFGE. We modified the P-BIT method from 18 monoplex PCRs to two multiplex PCR systems (mP-BIT). The same results were obtained from monoplex PCRs using original primers and multiplex PCR in the representative isolates. The mP-BIT can analyze 48 strains at a time by using 96-well PCR systems and can identify C. jejuni because mP-BIT includes C. jejuni marker. The typing of the isolates by the mP-BIT and PFGE demonstrated generally concordant results and the mP-BIT method (D = 0.980) has a similar discriminatory power to that of PFGE with SmaI digest (D = 0.975) or KpnI digest (D = 0.987) as with original article. The mP-BIT method is quick, simple and easy, and comes to be able to perform it at low cost by having become a multiplex PCR system. Therefore, the mP-BIT method with two multiplex PCR systems has high potential for a rapid first-line surveillance typing assay of C. jejuni and can be used for routine surveillance and outbreak investigations of C. jejuni in the future.

  17. qPCR assays to quantify genes and gene expression associated with microbial perchlorate reduction.

    PubMed

    De Long, Susan K; Kinney, Kerry A; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting cld (developed in this work) and pcrA (previously described) were used to quantify these perchlorate-related genes in a perchlorate-reducing enrichment culture. Transcript copies were quantified in perchlorate-reducing Rhodocyclaceae strain JDS4. Oxygen and nitrate inhibited expression of cld and pcrA.

  18. Use of Droplet Digital PCR for Estimation of Fish Abundance and Biomass in Environmental DNA Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hideyuki; Uchii, Kimiko; Takahara, Teruhiko; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    An environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis method has been recently developed to estimate the distribution of aquatic animals by quantifying the number of target DNA copies with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A new quantitative PCR technology, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), partitions PCR reactions into thousands of droplets and detects the amplification in each droplet, thereby allowing direct quantification of target DNA. We evaluated the quantification accuracy of qPCR and ddPCR to estimate species abundance and biomass by using eDNA in mesocosm experiments involving different numbers of common carp. We found that ddPCR quantified the concentration of carp eDNA along with carp abundance and biomass more accurately than qPCR, especially at low eDNA concentrations. In addition, errors in the analysis were smaller in ddPCR than in qPCR. Thus, ddPCR is better suited to measure eDNA concentration in water, and it provides more accurate results for the abundance and biomass of the target species than qPCR. We also found that the relationship between carp abundance and eDNA concentration was stronger than that between biomass and eDNA by using both ddPCR and qPCR; this suggests that abundance can be better estimated by the analysis of eDNA for species with fewer variations in body mass. PMID:25799582

  19. Electrochemical genosensor based on peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR and asymmetric PCR techniques: Electrostatic interactions with a metal cation.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Nagatani, Naoki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2006-04-01

    The unique structure of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), linking the N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units that create a neutral backbone, and prevent it from acting as a primer for DNA polymerase, has been utilized in an electrochemical biosensor scheme for simple and sensitive detection of hybridization. When the PNA is targeted against a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or wild-type site on the gene, PNA-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method effectively blocks the formation of a PCR product. In our report, PNA probe for PCR clamping was targeted against the wild-type site of alcohol dehydrogenase. The electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged DNA and neutral PNA molecules with redox-active metal cation cobalt(III)hexamine ([Co(NH3)6]3+) were monitored using differential pulse voltammetry. The electrostatic binding of [Co(NH3)6]3+ to DNA provided the basis for the discrimination against PNA/PNA, PNA/DNA, and DNA/DNA hybrid molecules. We have optimized the experimental conditions, such as probe concentration, [Co(NH3)6]3+ concentration, accumulation time for [Co(NH3)6]3+, and target concentration. A new pretreatment method has also been employed to allow fast and simple detection of hybridization reaction between the PCR amplicon and the probe on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. This method was based on the application of a high-temperature treatment (95 degrees C, 5 min), followed by a 1-min incubation in the presence of DNA primers. The excess concentration of DNA primers prevented the rehybridization of the denatured strands, while enabling the target gene sequence to bind with the immobilized probe. Additionally, asymmetric PCR was employed to detect the presence of genetically modified organism in standard Roundup Ready soybean samples. The amplicons of asymmetric PCR, which were predominantly single-stranded DNA as a result of unequal primer concentration, hybridized with the DNA probe on the sensor surface efficiently. The

  20. Deletion-targeted multiplex PCR (DTM-PCR) for identification of Beijing/W genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Shen, Xin; Jiang, Xi; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian

    2007-09-01

    Beijing/W strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cause the vast majority of tuberculosis cases in Shanghai, China. Such highly prevalent strains are considered as hypervirulent and are often associated with multi-drug resistance, treatment failure and HIV status. We present a reliable and fast detection method to identify these Beijing/W strains, which can be applied to screening large numbers of samples at low cost. Using this Deletion-Targeted Multiplex PCR (DTM-PCR) method for detecting these strains, we obtained 100% sensitivity and specificity.

  1. A novel multiplex quantitative DNA array based PCR (MQDA-PCR) for quantification of transgenic maize in food and feed.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Rud, Ida; Holck, Askild

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a novel multiplex quantitative DNA array based PCR method (MQDA-PCR). The MQDA-PCR is general and may be used in all areas of biological science where simultaneous quantification of multiple gene targets is desired. We used quantification of transgenic maize in food and feed as a model system to show the applicability of the method. The method is based on a two-step PCR. In the first few cycles bipartite primers containing a universal 5' 'HEAD' region and a 3' region specific to each genetically modified (GM) construct are employed. The unused primers are then degraded with a single-strand DNA-specific exonuclease. The second step of the PCR is run containing only primers consisting of the universal HEAD region. The removal of the primers is essential to create a competitive, and thus quantitative PCR. Oligo nucleotides hybridising to internal segments of the PCR products are then sequence specifically labelled in a cyclic linear signal amplification reaction. This is done both to increase the sensitivity and the specificity of the assay. Hybridisation of the labelled oligonucleotides to their complementary sequences in a DNA array enables multiplex detection. Quantitative information was obtained in the range 0.1-2% for the different GM constructs tested. Seventeen different food and feed samples were screened using a twelve-plex system for simultaneous detection of seven different GM maize events (Bt176, Bt11, Mon810, T25, GA21, CBH351 and DBT418). Ten samples were GM positive containing mainly mixtures of Mon810, Bt11 and Bt176 DNA. One sample contained appreciable amounts of GA21. An eight-plex MQDA-PCR system for detection of Mon810, Bt11 and Bt176 was evaluated by comparison with simplex 5' nuclease PCRs. There were no significant differences in the quantifications using the two approaches. The samples could, by both methods, be quantified as containing >2%, between 1 and 2%, between 0.1 and 1%, or <0.1% in 43 out of 47 determinations. The

  2. Comparison of PCR/Electron spray Ionization-Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for active surveillance of organisms contaminating high-use surfaces in a burn intensive care unit, an orthopedic ward and healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding nosocomial pathogen transmission is restricted by culture limitations. Novel platforms, such as PCR-based electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), may be useful as investigational tools. Methods Traditional clinical microbiology (TCM) and PCR/ESI-TOF-MS were used to recover and detect microorganisms from the hands and personal protective equipment of 10 burn intensive care unit (ICU) healthcare workers providing clinical care at a tertiary care military referral hospital. High-use environmental surfaces were assessed in 9 burn ICU and 10 orthopedic patient rooms. Clinical cultures during the study period were reviewed for pathogen comparison with investigational molecular diagnostic methods. Results From 158 samples, 142 organisms were identified by TCM and 718 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. The molecular diagnostic method detected more organisms (4.5 ± 2.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.8, p < 0.01) from 99% vs. 67% of samples (p < 0.01). TCM detected S. aureus in 13 samples vs. 21 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. Gram-negative organisms were less commonly identified than gram-positive by both methods; especially by TCM. Among all detected bacterial species, similar percentages were typical nosocomial pathogens (18-19%) for TCM vs. PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. PCR/ESI-TOF-MS also detected mecA in 112 samples, vanA in 13, and KPC-3 in 2. MecA was associated (p < 0.01) with codetection of coagulase negative staphylococci but not S. aureus. No vanA was codetected with enterococci; one KPC-3 was detected without Klebsiella spp. Conclusions In this pilot study, PCR/ESI-TOF-MS detected more organisms, especially gram-negatives, compared to TCM, but the current assay format is limited by the number of antibiotic resistance determinants it covers. Further large-scale assessments of PCR/ESI-TOF-MS for hospital surveillance are warranted. PMID:23050585

  3. A comparative study of digital RT-PCR and RT-qPCR for quantification of Hepatitis A virus and Norovirus in lettuce and water samples.

    PubMed

    Coudray-Meunier, Coralie; Fraisse, Audrey; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Guillier, Laurent; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Perelle, Sylvie

    2015-05-18

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of foodborne enteric viruses is classically achieved by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Recently, digital PCR (dPCR) was described as a novel approach to genome quantification without need for a standard curve. The performance of microfluidic digital RT-PCR (RT-dPCR) was compared to RT-qPCR for detecting the main viruses responsible for foodborne outbreaks (human Noroviruses (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV)) in spiked lettuce and bottled water. Two process controls (Mengovirus and Murine Norovirus) were used and external amplification controls (EAC) were added to examine inhibition of RT-qPCR and RT-dPCR. For detecting viral RNA and cDNA, the sensitivity of the RT-dPCR assays was either comparable to that of RT-qPCR (RNA of HAV, NoV GI, Mengovirus) or slightly (around 1 log10) decreased (NoV GII and MNV-1 RNA and of HAV, NoV GI, NoV GII cDNA). The number of genomic copies determined by dPCR was always from 0.4 to 1.7 log10 lower than the expected numbers of copies calculated by using the standard qPCR curve. Viral recoveries calculated by RT-dPCR were found to be significantly higher than by RT-qPCR for NoV GI, HAV and Mengovirus in water, and for NoV GII and HAV in lettuce samples. The RT-dPCR assay proved to be more tolerant to inhibitory substances present in lettuce samples. This absolute quantitation approach may be useful to standardize quantification of enteric viruses in bottled water and lettuce samples and may be extended to quantifying other human pathogens in food samples.

  4. Using qPCR for Water Microbial Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial risk assessment (MRA) has traditionally utilized microbiological data that was obtained by culture-based techniques that are expensive and time consuming. With the advent of PCR methods there is a realistic opportunity to conduct MRA studies economically, in less time,...

  5. Enumeration of Mycobacterium leprae Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Andrews, P. Kyle; Robbins, Naoko Y.; Adams, Linda B.; Krahenbuhl, James L.; Gillis, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is not cultivable in axenic media, and direct microscopic enumeration of the bacilli is complex, labor intensive, and suffers from limited sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a real-time PCR assay for quantifying M. leprae DNA in biological samples. Primers were identified to amplify a shared region of the multicopy repeat sequence (RLEP) specific to M. leprae and tested for sensitivity and specificity in the TaqMan format. The assay was specific for M. leprae and able to detect 10 fg of purified M. leprae DNA, or approximately 300 bacteria in infected tissues. We used the RLEP TaqMan PCR to assess the short and long-term growth results of M. leprae in foot pad tissues obtained from conventional mice, a gene knock-out mouse strain, athymic nude mice, as well as from reticuloendothelial tissues of M. leprae–infected nine-banded armadillos. We found excellent correlative results between estimates from RLEP TaqMan PCR and direct microscopic counting (combined r = 0.98). The RLEP TaqMan PCR permitted rapid analysis of batch samples with high reproducibility and is especially valuable for detection of low numbers of bacilli. Molecular enumeration is a rapid, objective and highly reproducible means to estimate the numbers of M. leprae in tissues, and application of the technique can facilitate work with this agent in many laboratories. PMID:18982056

  6. Qualitative PCR method for Roundup Ready soybean: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kasahara, Masaki; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Futo, Satoshi; Sawada, Chihiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative methods based on PCR have been developed for genetically modified organisms (GMO). Interlaboratory studies were previously conducted for GMO quantitative methods; in this study, an interlaboratory study was conducted for a qualitative method for a GM soybean, Roundup Ready soy (RR soy), with primer pairs designed for the quantitative method of RR soy studied previously. Fourteen laboratories in Japan participated. Each participant extracted DNA from 1.0 g each of the soy samples containing 0, 0.05, and 0.10% of RR soy, and performed PCR with primer pairs for an internal control gene (Le1) and RR soy followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR product amplified in this PCR system for Le1 was detected from all samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative and false-positive rates of the method were obtained from the results of RR soy detection. False-negative rates at the level of 0.05 and 0.10% of the RR soy samples were 6.0 and 2.3%, respectively, revealing that the LOD of the method was somewhat below 0.10%. The current study demonstrated that the qualitative method would be practical for monitoring the labeling system of GM soy in kernel lots.

  7. Citrus stubborn disease incidence determined by quantitative real time PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative real-time (q) PCR was developed for detection of Spiroplasma citri, the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease (CSD), using the DNA binding fluorophore SYBR Green I. The primer pair, P58-3f/4r, developed based on sequences from the P58 putative adhesin multigene of the pathogen result...

  8. QUANTITATIVE PCR OF SELECTED ASPERGILLUS, PENICILLIUM AND PAECILOMYCES SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 65 quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays, incorporating fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan®) chemistry and directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon, internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2) was developed and tested for the detection of Aspergillus, Penicillium and ...

  9. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Methanobrevibacter oralis in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bringuier, Amélie; Khelaifia, Saber; Richet, Hervé; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay developed to quantify Methanobrevibacter oralis indicated that its inoculum significantly correlated with periodontitis severity (P = 0.003), despite a nonsignificant difference in prevalence between controls (3/10) and patients (12/22) (P = 0.2, Fisher test). The M. oralis load can be used as a biomarker for periodontitis. PMID:23254133

  10. Fuel utilization in a progressive conversion reactor (PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Leyse, C.F.; Judd, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that for once-through fuel cycles, the PCR offers potential improvements over current LWRs in the following major areas: improved uranium utilization (reduced uranium demand), degraded plutonium product in spent fuel, reduced plutonium content of spent fuel, reduced amount of spent fuel, reduced fissile content of spent fuel, and reduced separative work.

  11. Identification of Staphylococcus spp. using (GTG)₅-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Svec, Pavel; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Sedláček, Ivo; Nováková, Dana

    2010-12-01

    A group of 212 type and reference strains deposited in the Czech Collection of Microorganisms (Brno, Czech Republic) and covering 41 Staphylococcus species comprising 21 subspecies was characterised using rep-PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)₅ primer in order to evaluate this method for identification of staphylococci. All strains were typeable using the (GTG)₅ primer and generated PCR products ranging from 200 to 4500 bp. Numerical analysis of the obtained fingerprints revealed (sub)species-specific clustering corresponding with the taxonomic position of analysed strains. Taxonomic position of selected strains representing the (sub)species that were distributed over multiple rep-PCR clusters was verified and confirmed by the partial rpoB gene sequencing. Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus equorum, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus piscifermentans, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus revealed heterogeneous fingerprints and each (sub)species was distributed over several clusters. However, representatives of the remaining Staphylococcus spp. were clearly separated in single (sub)species-specific clusters. These results showed rep-PCR with the (GTG)₅ primer as a fast and reliable method applicable for differentiation and straightforward identification of majority of Staphylococcus spp.

  12. Real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis-associated meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nadir, Eyal; Grossman, Tamar; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Attali, Malka; Barkan, Daniel; Bardenstein, Rita; Zimhony, Oren

    2016-03-01

    Four immunocompromised patients, immigrants from Ethiopia, presented with diverse clinical manifestations of meningitis associated with Strongyloides stercoralis dissemination as determined by identification of intestinal larvae. The cerebrospinal fluid of 3 patients was tested by a validated (for stool) real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and was found positive, establishing this association.

  13. PCR Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rimbara, Emiko; Sasatsu, Masanori; Graham, David Y.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen whose primary niche is the human stomach. H. pylori is etio-logically associated with gastric inflammation (gastritis), peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Both noninvasive (e.g., urea breath and stool antigen tests) and invasive (gastric biopsy for histology, culture, or PCR) tests are used for diagnosis. PCR detection of H. pylori has been reported using a variety of clinical samples including gastric biopsy, gastric juice, saliva, dental plaque, and stools as well as environmental samples. Whenever possibly, noninvasive tests are preferred over invasive tests. H. pylori are excreted in the stool. Culture from stool is variable whereas stool antigen testing is widely used. Stool consists of a complicated mixture of commensal bacteria and chemicals and often includes inhibitors of PCR. Nevertheless, simple extraction methods are available to efficiently extract DNA from human stools and nested-PCR targeting the 23S rRNA gene have proven to be highly sensitive for the detection of H. pylori. Detection of clarithromycin susceptibility/resistance is important clinically and the mutation of the 23S rRNA gene responsible for resistance can also be detected using stool. This described method can be modified for other clinical samples such as gastric juice or biopsy material. PMID:23104297

  14. Halal authenticity of gelatin using species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Hessam; Mehdizadeh, Mehrangiz; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad; Dezfouli, Ehsan Ansari; Solgi, Tara; Khodaverdi, Mahdi; Rabiei, Maryam; Rastegar, Hossein; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of food products derived from porcine sources is strictly prohibited in Islam. Gelatin, mostly derived from bovine and porcine sources, has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. To ensure that food products comply with halal regulations, development of valid and reliable analytical methods is very much required. In this study, a species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using conserved regions of mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome b gene) was performed to evaluate the halal authenticity of gelatin. After isolation of DNA from gelatin powders with known origin, conventional PCR using species-specific primers was carried out on the extracted DNA. The amplified expected PCR products of 212 and 271 bp were observed for porcine and bovine gelatin, respectively. The sensitivity of the method was tested on binary gelatin mixtures containing 0.1%, 1%, 10%, and 100% (w/w) of porcine gelatin within bovine gelatin and vice versa. Although most of the DNA is degraded due to the severe processing steps of gelatin production, the minimum level of 0.1% w/w of both porcine and bovine gelatin was detected. Moreover, eight food products labeled as containing bovine gelatin and eight capsule shells were subjected to PCR examination. The results showed that all samples contained bovine gelatin, and the absence of porcine gelatin was verified. This method of species authenticity is very useful to verify whether gelatin and gelatin-containing food products are derived from halal ingredients.

  15. Introducing Undergraduate Students to Real-Time PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Funnell, Alister; Jack, Briony; Johnston, Jill

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is conducted, which in four 3 h laboratory sessions, introduces third year undergraduate Biochemistry students to the technique of real-time PCR in a biological context. The model used is a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL cells). These continuously cycling, immature red blood cells, arrested at an early stage in erythropoiesis,…

  16. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  17. Novel real-time PCR detection assay for Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Hänsel, C.; Mertens, K.; Elschner, M. C.; Melzer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brucella suis is the causative agent of brucellosis in suidae and is differentiated into five biovars (bv). Biovars 1 and 3 possess zoonotic potential and can infect humans, whereas biovar 2 represents the main source of brucellosis in feral and domestic pigs in Europe. Both aspects, the zoonotic threat and the economic loss, emphasize the necessity to monitor feral and domestic pig populations. Available serological or PCR based methods lack sensitivity and specificity. Results Here a bioinformatics approach was used to identify a B. suis specific 17 bp repeat on chromosome II (BS1330_II0657 locus). This repeat is common for B. suis bv 1 to 4 and was used to develop a TaqMan probe assay. The average PCR efficiency was determined as 95% and the limit of detection as 12,5 fg/µl of DNA, equally to 3.7 bacterial genomes. This assay has the highest sensitivity of all previously described B. suis specific PCR assays, making it possible to detect 3-4 bacterial genomes per 1 µl of sample. The assay was tested 100% specific for B. suis and negative for other Brucella spp. and closely related non-Brucella species. Conclusions This novel qPCR assay could become a rapid, inexpensive and reliable screening method for large sample pools of B. suis 1 to 4. This method will be applicable for field samples after validation. PMID:26392898

  18. Application of nested PCR for diagnosis of histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hideaki; Tanabe, Koichi; Umeyama, Takashi; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2013-10-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection that, although not endemic in Japan, has seen a rise in the number of Japanese cases since the mid-1980s. Diagnosis of the disease is not straightforward, and the main method of detection, fungal culture (which has biosafety-related issues), is of low sensitivity in general. Alternative methods that depend on antibody or antigen detection have had limited use. We have developed a histoplasmosis detection method based on PCR amplification of the Histoplasma capsulatum M antigen gene. We compared this method with fungal culture and serological diagnostic techniques. Among five cases that were finally diagnosed as histoplasmosis, the fungal culture method was only successful in identifying one such case. Although the presence of anti-H. capsulatum antibodies was confirmed in three cases, our PCR method identified four of five cases of histoplasmosis. The performance of our PCR method could not be compared with the antigen detection method, which is used in the United States but is not routinely used in Japan. However, the PCR method was shown to have high sensitivity and specificity for H. capsulatum. Although the number of histoplasmosis cases examined in this study was small, our data suggest that the molecular diagnosis technique has potential for increasing the reliability of histoplasmosis diagnosis when used in combination with established methods.

  19. Screening ancient tuberculosis with qPCR: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Kelly M.; Buikstra, Jane E.; Campbell, Tessa; Bos, Kirsten I.; Johnson, Eric D.; Krause, Johannes; Stone, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    The field of ancient DNA (aDNA) has rapidly accelerated in recent years as a result of new methods in next-generation sequencing, library preparation and targeted enrichment. Such research is restricted, however, by the highly variable DNA preservation within different tissues, especially when isolating ancient pathogens from human remains. Identifying positive candidate samples via quantitative PCR (qPCR) for downstream procedures can reduce reagent costs, increase capture efficiency and maximize the number of sequencing reads of the target. This study uses four qPCR assays designed to target regions within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) to examine 133 human skeletal samples from a wide geographical and temporal range, identified by the presence of skeletal lesions typical of chronic disseminated tuberculosis. Given the inherent challenges working with ancient mycobacteria, strict criteria must be used and primer/probe design continually re-evaluated as new data from bacteria become available. Seven samples tested positive for multiple MTBC loci, supporting them as strong candidates for downstream analyses. Using strict and conservative criteria, qPCR remains a fast and effective screening tool when compared with screening by more expensive sequencing and enrichment technologies. PMID:25487341

  20. DNA extraction protocol for rapid PCR detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually all current assays for foodborne pathogens, including PCR assays, are conducted after lengthy cultural enrichment of the sample to increase the concentration of the target organism. This delays detection by many hours, prevents quantitation, and limits the ability to detect multiple organ...

  1. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  2. DETECTION OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI USING A REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of their importance in public health, the detection of fecal enterococci is performed via culturing methods that are time consuming and that are subject to inaccuracies that relate to their culturable status. In order to address these problems, a real time PCR (TaqMan) ...

  3. Genus identification of toxic plant by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Shuji; Nishi, Katsuji

    2011-03-01

    Some plants have toxicities that are dangerous for humans. In the case of poisoning by toxic plants, a rapid and easy screening test is required for accurate medical treatment or forensic investigation. In this study, we designed specific primer pairs for identification of toxic plants, such as subgenus Aconitum, genus Ricinus, genus Illicium, and genus Scopolia, by internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. Allied species of target plants, foods, and human DNA were not detected, but each primer pair provided a specific PCR product from the target plant using real-time PCR. This method can detect the subgenus Aconitum, genus Ricinus, and genus Scopolia with template DNA of 10 pg, respectively, and genus Illicium with 1 pg. Furthermore, each primer pair provided the exact PCR product from digested target plants in artificial gastric fluid. When a trace unknown plant sample in forensic investigation is collected from stomach contents, this PCR assay may be useful for screening toxic plants.

  4. Primer design for PCR reactions in forensic biology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a popular method to copy DNA in vitro. Its invention revolutionized fields ranging from clinical medicine to anthropology, molecular biology, and forensic biology. The method employs one of many available heat-stable DNA polymerases in a reaction that is repeated many times in situ. The DNA polymerase reads a template DNA strand and using the components of the reaction mix, catalyzes the addition of free 2'-deoxynucleotide triphosphate nitrogenous bases to short segment of DNA that forms a complement with the template via Watson-Crick base pairing. This short segment of DNA is referred to as a PCR primer and it is essential to the success of the reaction. The most widely used application of PCR in forensic labs is the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci used in DNA typing. The STRs are routinely evaluated in concert with 16 or more reactions, a multiplex, run in one test tube simultaneously. In a multiplex, it is essential that the primers work specifically and accurately on the intended reactions without hindering the other reactions. The primers, which are very specific, also can be used to probe single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a DNA sequence of interest by single base extension. Primers are often designed using one of many available automated software packages. Here the process of manually designing PCR primers for forensic biology using no-cost software is described.

  5. A PCR test for avian malaria in Hawaiian birds.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R A; Freed, L A; Cann, R L

    1995-12-01

    The decline of native Hawaiian forest birds since European contact is attributed to factors ranging from habitat destruction to interactions with introduced species. Remaining populations of Hawaiian honeycreepers (Fringillidae: Drepanidinae) are most abundant and diverse in high elevation refuges above the normal range of disease-carrying mosquitoes. Challenge experiments suggest that honeycreepers are highly susceptible to avian malaria (Plasmodium sp.) but resistance exists in some species. In order to detect low levels of malarial infection and quantify prevalence of Plasmodium in high elevation natural populations of Hawaiian birds, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based diagnostic test was developed that identifies rRNA genes of Plasmodium in avian blood samples. Quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR) experiments indicate that the detection limit of our test is an order of magnitude greater than that reported for human malaria DNA blot tests. Compared with standard histological methods, the PCR test detected a higher prevalence of diseased birds at mid-elevations. Malaria was detected in three species of native birds living in a high elevation wildlife refuge on the island of Hawaii and in four species from Maui. Our results show that avian malaria is more widespread in Hawaiian forests than previously thought, a finding that has important conservation implications for these threatened species.

  6. A novel nested PCR for the diagnosis of calicivirus infections in the cat.

    PubMed

    Marsilio, Fulvio; Di Martino, Barbara; Decaro, Nicola; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2005-01-05

    A novel nested PCR (nPCR) assay is reported on the diagnosis of the feline calicivirus (FCV) infection. The test was performed on 47 ocular and 40 pharyngeal swabs collected from 47 cats with respiratory syndrome; among the 87 samples examined, 18 ocular and 23 pharyngeal swabs were positive in nPCR. The nPCR sensitivity was compared to other diagnostic techniques such as virus isolation on cell culture and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The nPCR was more sensitive than the virus isolation and RT-PCR; therefore, it can be used for calicivirosis diagnosis in cats.

  7. Advances in digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) and its emerging biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Cui, Xingye; Hu, Jie; Li, Zedong; Choi, Jane Ru; Yang, Qingzhen; Lin, Min; Ying Hui, Li; Xu, Feng

    2017-04-15

    Since the invention of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 1985, PCR has played a significant role in molecular diagnostics for genetic diseases, pathogens, oncogenes and forensic identification. In the past three decades, PCR has evolved from end-point PCR, through real-time PCR, to its current version, which is the absolute quantitive digital PCR (dPCR). In this review, we first discuss the principles of all key steps of dPCR, i.e., sample dispersion, amplification, and quantification, covering commercialized apparatuses and other devices still under lab development. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of different technologies based on these steps, and discuss the emerging biomedical applications of dPCR. Finally, we provide a glimpse of the existing challenges and future perspectives for dPCR.

  8. A Basic Guide to Real Time PCR in Microbial Diagnostics: Definitions, Parameters, and Everything

    PubMed Central

    Kralik, Petr; Ricchi, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Real time PCR (quantitative PCR, qPCR) is now a well-established method for the detection, quantification, and typing of different microbial agents in the areas of clinical and veterinary diagnostics and food safety. Although the concept of PCR is relatively simple, there are specific issues in qPCR that developers and users of this technology must bear in mind. These include the use of correct terminology and definitions, understanding of the principle of PCR, difficulties with interpretation and presentation of data, the limitations of qPCR in different areas of microbial diagnostics and parameters important for the description of qPCR performance. It is not our intention in this review to describe every single aspect of qPCR design, optimization, and validation; however, it is our hope that this basic guide will help to orient beginners and users of qPCR in the use of this powerful technique. PMID:28210243

  9. Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

  10. STITCHER: A web resource for high-throughput design of primers for overlapping PCR applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2015-06-01

    Overlapping PCR is routinely used in a wide number of molecular applications. These include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping by traditional PCR techniques and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online (http://ohalloranlab.net/STITCHER.html). STITCHER can handle both single sequence and multi-sequence input, and specific features facilitate numerous other PCR applications, including assembly PCR, adapter PCR, and primer walking. Field PCR, and in particular, LAMP, offers promise as an on site tool for pathogen detection in underdeveloped areas, and STITCHER includes off-target detection features for pathogens commonly targeted using LAMP technology.

  11. Use of multiplex PCR and PCR restriction enzyme analysis for detection and exploration of the variability in the free-living amoeba Naegleria in the environment.

    PubMed

    Pélandakis, Michel; Pernin, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed to simultaneously detect Naegleria fowleri and other Naegleria species in the environment. Multiplex PCR was also capable of identifying N. fowleri isolates with internal transcribed spacers of different sizes. In addition, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the PCR product distinguished the main thermophilic Naegleria species from the sampling sites.

  12. Use of Multiplex PCR and PCR Restriction Enzyme Analysis for Detection and Exploration of the Variability in the Free-Living Amoeba Naegleria in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pélandakis, Michel; Pernin, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed to simultaneously detect Naegleria fowleri and other Naegleria species in the environment. Multiplex PCR was also capable of identifying N. fowleri isolates with internal transcribed spacers of different sizes. In addition, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the PCR product distinguished the main thermophilic Naegleria species from the sampling sites. PMID:11916734

  13. Detection of glycopeptide resistance genes in enterococci by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Puneet; Sahni, A.K.; Praharaj, A.K.; Grover, Naveen; Kumar, Mahadevan; Chaudhari, C.N.; Khajuria, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) are a major cause of nosocomial infections. There are various phenotypic and genotypic methods of detection of glycopeptide resistance in enterococci. This study utilizes multiplex PCR for reliable detection of various glycopeptides resistance genes in VRE. Method This study was conducted to detect and to assess the prevalence of vancomycin resistance among enterococci isolates. From October 2011 to June 2013, a total of 96 non-repetitive isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. VRE were identified by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all isolates for vancomycin and teicoplanin was determined by E-test. Multiplex PCR was carried out for all enterococci isolates using six sets of primers. Results Out of 96 isolates, 14 (14.6%) were found to be resistant to vancomycin by vancomycin E-test method (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Out of these 14 isolates, 13 were also resistant to teicoplanin (MIC ≥16 μg/ml). VanA gene was detected in all the 14 isolates by Multiplex PCR. One of the PCR amplicons was sent for sequencing and the sequence received was submitted in the GenBank (GenBank accession no. KF181100). Conclusion Prevalence of VRE in this study was 14.6%. Multiplex PCR is a robust, sensitive and specific technique, which can be used for rapid detection of various glycopeptide resistance genes. Rapid identification of patients infected or colonized with VRE is essential for implementation of appropriate control measures to prevent their spread. PMID:25609863

  14. A Ribeiroia spp. (Class: Trematoda) - Specific PCR-based diagnostic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, D.M.; Yoshino, T.P.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased reporting of amphibian malformations in North America has been noted with concern in light of reports that amphibian numbers and species are declining worldwide. Ribeiroia ondatrae has been shown to cause a variety of types of malformations in amphibians. However, little is known about the prevalence of R. ondatrae in North America. To aid in conducting field studies of Ribeiroia spp., we have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic. Herein, we describe the development of an accurate, rapid, simple, and cost-effective diagnostic for detection of Ribeiroia spp. infection in snails (Planorbella trivolvis). Candidate oligonucleotide primers for PCR were designed via DNA sequence analyses of multiple ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 regions from Ribeiroia spp. and Echinostoma spp. Comparison of consensus sequences determined from both genera identified areas of sequence potentially unique to Ribeiroia spp. The PCR reliably produced a diagnostic 290-base pair (bp) product in the presence of a wide concentration range of snail or frog DNA. Sensitivity was examined with DNA extracted from single R. ondatrae cercaria. The single-tube PCR could routinely detect less than 1 cercariae equivalent, because DNA isolated from a single cercaria could be diluted at least 1:50 and still yield a positive result via gel electrophoresis. An even more sensitive nested PCR also was developed that routinely detected 100 fg of the 290-bp fragment. The assay did not detect furcocercous cercariae of certain Schistosomatidae, Echinostoma sp., or Sphaeridiotrema globulus nor adults of Clinostomum sp. or Cyathocotyle bushiensis. Field testing of 137 P. trivolvis identified 3 positives with no overt environmental cross-reactivity, and results concurred with microscopic examinations in all cases. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  15. Status of benzimidazole resistance in Haemonchus contortus of goats from different geographic regions of Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Prasad, A; Yadav, N; Latchumikanthan, A; Rakesh, R L; Praveen, K; Khobra, V; Subramani, K V; Misri, J; Sankar, M

    2015-03-15

    Present study was designed to survey the status of benzimidazole (BZ) resistance in goat flocks of different agro climatic regions of Uttar Pradesh (U.P.), India by faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) and allele specific PCR (AS-PCR). Faecal egg counts and larval culture were made from representative samples of all regions. The results of the faecal culture and PCR-RFLP on beta tubulin isotype-1 gene showed Haemonchus contortus was predominant species. FECRT results showed BZ resistance prevalent in all regions. However, six farms of twenty screened, harboured susceptible populations of strongyles. Three hundred H. contortus infective larvae from all regions of the state were genotyped for BZ resistance. AS-PCR results revealed 55-85% of H. contortus homozygous resistant (rr), 10-21% homozygous susceptible (SS) and 5-24% heterozygous (rS) among different regions of U.P. The allele frequencies were 67-87.5% for resistant (TTC) and 12.5-33% for susceptible (TAC). The survey indicated that the status of BZ resistance is in alarming conditions in all the parts of the state.

  16. Discrimination between Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum using PCR-RFLP and PCR.

    PubMed

    Cillara, Grazia; Manca, Maria Giovanna; Longheu, Carla; Tola, Sebastiana

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (lpdA) gene was used to distinguish Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) from Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc), two of four Mycoplasma species that cause contagious agalactia in sheep and goats. After alignment of nucleotide sequences of both species, specific primer sets were designed from unchanging and variable gene segments. The first primer set LPD-C1-F/LPD-C1-R was used to amplify a 911 bp fragment that was subsequently co-digested with FastDigest PstI, SspI, EcoRI and ClaI enzymes. The PCR-RFLP profiles differentiated the two mycoplasma species. The second primer set was used to distinguish Mmc from Mcc by single tube PCR. Both methods were further applied to identify 54 isolates collected from dairy herds from different provinces in Sardinia. The results of this study showed that PCR-RFLP and PCR could be used in routine diagnosis for rapid and specific simultaneous discrimination of Mmc and Mcc.

  17. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk.

  18. [Primers design and optimization of PCR and nested-PCR assays for the specific detection of Tritrichomonas foetus].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Paula Rogério; Da Silva, Andréa Caetano; Gambarini, Maria Lúcia; Linhares, Guido Fontgalland C

    2008-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a pathogenic protozoan that causes a venereal disease in cattle known as bovine genital tricomonosis. In spite of the efficacy to recognize the target genomic DNA, the protocols so far developed for the diagnosis of this organism by PCR promote some inespecific amplifications or they are unable to discriminate T. foetus against other species within the genus. The objective of this study was to assess and optimize PCR and nested-PCR assays for the specific diagnosis of T. foetus, using novel primers selected from the alignment of sequences of the genes 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 28S rRNA and of the internal transcribed spacers of the rDNA (ITS1 and ITS2). A pair of primers was constructed for the genus-specific amplification of a 648 bp fragment and two others to amplify T. foetus species-specific fragments of 343 and 429 bp. No cross amplification was observed against Bos taurus genomic DNA neither against the DNA of usual bovine genital pathogens. Both, single and nested-PCR assays, presented analytical sensitivity to detect at least two T. foetus organisms.

  19. Application of multiplex PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and BOX-PCR for molecular analysis of enterococci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to use band-based molecular methods including BOX-PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to determine if genetically related enterococci were found among different stores, food types, or years. Enterococci were also characterized f...

  20. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for Eimeria tenella replication--Implications for experimental refinement and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Matthew J; Tomley, Fiona M; Kaiser, Pete; Blake, Damer P

    2015-10-01

    The Eimeria species are highly pathogenic parasites of chickens. Research aimed at reducing their impact is hindered by a lack of non-subjective, quantitative, tools to measure parasite replication in the host. The time-consuming, and often time-sensitive, nature of existing approaches precludes their use in large-scale genetic, epidemiological, and evolutionary analyses. We have used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to accurately quantify Eimeria tenella in chicken tissue and shown this to be more efficient and sensitive than traditional methodologies. We tested four chicken-specific reference qPCR assays and found beta-actin (actb) to be optimal for sample normalisation. In an experimental setting, chickens were inoculated with 500, 1500, or 4500 E. tenella oocysts and parasite replication and the impact of infection measured by i) qPCR analysis of DNA extracted from caecal tissues collected at five and eight days post-infection (dpi), ii) faecal oocyst counts (FOCs) on samples taken from six to eight dpi, and iii) lesion scoring on caeca collected post-mortem at five and eight dpi. Quantitative real-time PCR test results indicated a significant dose-dependent increase in parasite numbers among study groups for samples collected five dpi (i.e., prior to gametogony) (R(2)=0.994) (p<0.002) but not in those from day eight (after most oocyst shedding) (R(2)=0.006) (p>0.379). A strong dose-dependent increase in parasite replication and severity of infection was also revealed by FOC (R(2)=0.997) and lesion scoring. Importantly, qPCR offers substantial improvements for animal welfare via improved statistical power and reduced group sizes in experimental studies. The described qPCR method overcomes subjective limitations of coproscopic quantification, allows reproducible medium- to high-throughput examination of tissues, faeces, and oocysts, and is a valuable tool for determining the impact of Eimeria infections in both experimental and field settings.